Sample records for helium pressurization system

  1. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  2. Cold Helium Gas Pressurization For Spacecraft Cryogenic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell. Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the dry mass of a spacecraft pressurization system, helium pressurant may be stored at low temperature and high pressure to increase mass in a given tank volume. Warming this gas through an engine heat exchanger prior to tank pressurization both increases the system efficiency and simplifies the designs of intermediate hardware such as regulators, valves, etc. since the gas is no longer cryogenic. If this type of cold helium pressurization system is used in conjunction with a cryogenic propellant, though, a loss in overall system efficiency can be expected due to heat transfer from the warm ullage gas to the cryogenic propellant which results in a specific volume loss for the pressurant, interpreted as the Collapse Factor. Future spacecraft with cryogenic propellants will likely have a cold helium system, with increasing collapse factor effects as vehicle sizes decrease. To determine the collapse factor effects and overall implementation strategies for a representative design point, a cold helium system was hotfire tested on the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA) in a thermal vacuum environment at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station. The ICPTA vehicle is a small lander-sized spacecraft prototype built at NASA Johnson Space Center utilizing cryogenic liquid oxygen/liquid methane propellants and cryogenic helium gas as a pressurant to operate one 2,800lbf 5:1 throttling main engine, two 28lbf Reaction Control Engines (RCE), and two 7lbf RCEs (Figure 1). This vehicle was hotfire tested at a variety of environmental conditions at NASA Plum Brook, ranging from ambient temperature/simulated high altitude, deep thermal/high altitude, and deep thermal/high vacuum conditions. A detailed summary of the vehicle design and testing campaign may be found in Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Testing, AIAA JPC 2017.

  3. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hot-fire test demonstrations were successfully conducted using a cold helium pressurization system fully integrated into a liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion system (Figure 1). Cold helium pressurant storage at near liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures (-275 F and colder) and used as a heated tank pressurant provides a substantial density advantage compared to ambient temperature storage. The increased storage density reduces helium pressurant tank size and mass, creating payload increases of 35% for small lunar-lander sized applications. This degree of mass reduction also enables pressure-fed propulsion systems for human-rated Mars ascent vehicle designs. Hot-fire test results from the highly-instrumented test bed will be used to demonstrate system performance and validate integrated models of the helium and propulsion systems. A pressurization performance metric will also be developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes.

  4. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  5. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Initial Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype cold helium active pressurization system was incorporated into an existing liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) prototype planetary lander and hot-fire tested to collect vehicle-level performance data. Results from this hot-fire test series were used to validate integrated models of the vehicle helium and propulsion systems and demonstrate system effectiveness for a throttling lander. Pressurization systems vary greatly in complexity and efficiency between vehicles, so a pressurization performance metric was also developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes. This implementation of an active repress system is an initial sizing draft. Refined implementations will be tested in the future, improving the general knowledge base for a cryogenic lander-based cold helium system.

  6. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  7. Testing the Effects of Helium Pressurant on Thermodynamic Vent System Performance with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.; Tucker, S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the development of a zero gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of helium pressurant on the performance of a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). Fourteen days of testing was performed in August - September 2005, with an ambient heat leak of about 70-80 watts and tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. The TVS successfully controlled the tank pressure within a +/- 3.45 kPa (+/- 0.5 psi) band with various helium concentration levels in the ullage. Relative to pressure control with an "all hydrogen" ullage, the helium presence resulted in 10 to 30 per cent longer pressure reduction durations, depending on the fill level, during the mixing/venting phase of the control cycle. Additionally, the automated control cycle was based on mixing alone for pressure reduction until the pressure versus time slope became positive, at which time the Joule-Thomson vent was opened. Testing was also conducted to evaluate thermodynamic venting without the mixer operating, first with liquid then with vapor at the recirculation line inlet. Although ullage stratification was present, the ullage pressure was successfully controlled without the mixer operating. Thus, if vapor surrounded the pump inlet in a reduced gravity situation, the ullage pressure can still be controlled by venting through the TVS Joule Thomson valve and heat exchanger. It was evident that the spray bar configuration, which extends almost the entire length of the tank, enabled significant thermal energy removal from the ullage even without the mixer operating. Details regarding the test setup and procedures are presented in the paper. 1

  8. Speech intelligibility at high helium-oxygen pressures.

    PubMed

    Rothman, H B; Gelfand, R; Hollien, H; Lambertsen, C J

    1980-12-01

    Word-list intelligibility scores of unprocessed speech (mean of 4 subjects) were recorded in helium-oxygen atmospheres at stable pressures equivalent to 1600, 1400, 1200, 1000, 860, 690, 560, 392, and 200 fsw daring Predictive Studies IV-1975 by wide-bandwidth condenser microphones (frequency responses not degraded by increased gas density). Intelligibility scores were substantially lower in helium-oxygen a 200 fsw than in air at l ATA, but there was little difference between 200 fsw and 1600 fsw. A previously documented prominent decrease in intelligibility of speech between 200 or 600 fsw because of helium and pressure was probably due to degradation of microphone frequency response by high gas density.

  9. Design and Test of a Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Thruster with Cold Helium Pressurization Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    A liquid oxygen / liquid methane 2,000 lbf thruster was designed and tested in conjuction with a nozzle heat exchanger for cold helium pressurization. Cold helium pressurization systems offer significant spacecraft vehicle dry mass savings since the pressurant tank size can be reduced as the pressurant density is increased. A heat exchanger can be incorporated into the main engine design to provide expansion of the pressurant supply to the propellant tanks. In order to study the systems integration of a cold-helium pressurization system, a 2,000 lbf thruster with a nozzle heat exchanger was designed for integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle at NASA Johnson Space Center. The testing goals were to demonstrate helium loading and initial conditioning to low temperatures, high-pressure/low temperature storage, expansion through the main engine heat exchanger, and propellant tank injection/pressurization. The helium pressurant tank was an existing 19 inch diameter composite-overwrap tank, and the targert conditions were 4500 psi and -250 F, providing a 2:1 density advantage compared to room tempatrue storage. The thruster design uses like-on-like doublets in the injector pattern largely based on Project Morpheus main engine hertiage data, and the combustion chamber was designed for an ablative chamber. The heat exchanger was installed at the ablative nozzle exit plane. Stand-alone engine testing was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center, including copper heat-sink chambers and highly-instrumented spoolpieces in order to study engine performance, stability, and wall heat flux. A one-dimensional thermal model of the integrated system was completed. System integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle is complete, and systems demonstrations will follow.

  10. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  11. Experimental investigation on pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during high-temperature helium pressurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Yonghua, Jin; Yuan, Ma

    2015-03-01

    Sufficient knowledge of thermal performance and pressurization behaviors in cryogenic tanks during rocket launching period is of importance to the design and optimization of a pressurization system. In this paper, ground experiments with liquid oxygen (LO2) as the cryogenic propellant, high-temperature helium exceeding 600 K as the pressurant gas, and radial diffuser and anti-cone diffuser respectively at the tank inlet were performed. The pressurant gas requirements, axial and radial temperature distributions, and energy distributions inside the propellant tank were obtained and analyzed to evaluate the comprehensive performance of the pressurization system. It was found that the pressurization system with high-temperature helium as the pressurant gas could work well that the tank pressure was controlled within a specified range and a stable discharging liquid rate was achieved. For the radial diffuser case, the injected gas had a direct impact on the tank inner wall. The severe gas-wall heat transfer resulted in about 59% of the total input energy absorbed by the tank wall. For the pressurization case with anti-cone diffuser, the direct impact of high-temperature gas flowing toward the liquid surface resulted in a greater deal of energy transferred to the liquid propellant, and the percentage even reached up to 38%. Moreover, both of the two cases showed that the proportion of energy left in ullage to the total input energy was quite small, and the percentage was only about 22-24%. This may indicate that a more efficient diffuser should be developed to improve the pressurization effect. Generally, the present experimental results are beneficial to the design and optimization of the pressurization system with high-temperature gas supplying the pressurization effect.

  12. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas at two pressures

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming, cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes the fluid from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium gas in an expander so as to be at different temperature ranges and pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a cool gas at a temperature range T.sub.2 to T.sub.3 in the go leg, then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a cooler gas at a reduced pressure and at a reduced temperature T.sub.4 and finally by circulating the cooler gas back again to the refrigerator in a return leg at a temperature range T.sub.4 to T.sub.5, while in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg, and in the same enclosure therewith for compression into a higher pressure gas at T.sub.2 in a closed cycle, where T.sub.2 >T.sub.3 and T.sub.5 >T.sub.4, the fluid leaves the enclosure in the go leg as a gas at its coldest point in the go leg, and the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature decreases along its length from the refrigerator due to the cooling from the gas in the return leg.

  13. Modelling and Experimental Verification of Pressure Wave Following Gaseous Helium Storage Tank Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jędrusyna, A.; Wach, J.

    Helium inventory in high energy accelerators, tokamaks and free electron lasers may exceed tens of tons. The gaseous helium is stored in steel tanks under a pressure of about 20 bar and at environment temperature. Accidental rupture of any of the tanks filled with the gaseous helium will create a rapid energy release in form of physical blast. An estimation of pressure wave distribution following the tank rupture and potential consequences to the adjacent research infrastructure and buildings is a very important task, critical in the safety aspect of the whole cryogenic system. According to the present regulations the TNT equivalent approach is to be applied to evaluate the pressure wave following a potential gas storage tank rupture. A special test stand was designed and built in order to verify experimentally the blast effects in controlled conditions. In order to obtain such a shock wave a pressurized plastic tank was used. The tank was ruptured and the resulting pressure wave was recorded using a spatially-distributed array of pressure sensors connected to a high-speed data acquisition device. The results of the experiments and the comparison with theoretical values obtained from thermodynamic model of the blast are presented. A good agreement between the simulated and measured data was obtained. Recommendations regarding the applicability of thermodynamic model of physical blast versus TNT approach, to estimate consequences of gas storage tank rupture are formulated. The laboratory scale experimental results have been scaled to ITER pressurized helium storage tanks.

  14. Effects of helium and nitrogen as pressurants in nitrogen tetroxide transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizjak, F.; Simkin, D. J.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates effects of helium and nitrogen as pressurants in nitrogen tetroxide transfer from one vessel to another at a higher elevation. Results may contribute to creation of new environmental systems and improved oxygen solubility in water to promote fish life.

  15. High-resolution thermal expansion measurements under helium-gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Rudra Sekhar; Wolf, Bernd; de Souza, Mariano; Lang, Michael

    2012-08-01

    We report on the realization of a capacitive dilatometer, designed for high-resolution measurements of length changes of a material for temperatures 1.4 K ⩽ T ⩽ 300 K and hydrostatic pressure P ⩽ 250 MPa. Helium (4He) is used as a pressure-transmitting medium, ensuring hydrostatic-pressure conditions. Special emphasis has been given to guarantee, to a good approximation, constant-pressure conditions during temperature sweeps. The performance of the dilatometer is demonstrated by measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion at pressures P ≃ 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) and 104 MPa on a single crystal of azurite, Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2, a quasi-one-dimensional spin S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The results indicate a strong effect of pressure on the magnetic interactions in this system.

  16. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Measurement of quasi-isentropic compressibility of helium and deuterium at pressures of 1500-2000 GPa

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mochalov, M. A., E-mail: postmaster@ifv.vniief.ru; Il'kaev, R. I.; Fortov, V. E.

    2012-10-15

    The quasi-isentropic compressibility of helium and deuterium plasmas at pressures of up to 1500-2000 GPa has been measured using devices with spherical geometry and an X-ray diagnostic complex comprising three betatrons and a multichannel imaging system with electro-optic gamma detectors. A deuterium density of 4.5 g/cm{sup 3} and a helium density of 3.8 g/cm{sup 3} have been obtained at pressures of 2210 and 1580 GPa, respectively. The internal energy of a deuterium plasma at the indicated pressure is about 1 MJ/cm{sup 3}, which is about 100 times greater than the specific energy of condensed chemical explosives. Analysis of the obtainedmore » data shows that the degree of helium ionization under the achieved plasma compression parameters is about 0.9.« less

  18. Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts to Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee-Yon Lee; Hee-Soo Yoo; Jong Sook Park; Kwang-Jin Hwang; Jin Seog Kim

    2005-01-01

    The spontaneous mixing of helium and air in a helium-inflated balloon is described in an experiment in which the partial pressure of the gases in the balloon are determined from the mole factions and the total pressure measured in the balloon. The results described provide a model for teaching concepts of partial pressure, chemical potential, and…

  19. Influence of the helium-pressure on diode-pumped alkali-vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Chen, Fei; Xie, Ji-jiang; Zhang, Lai-ming; Li, Dian-jun; Yang, Gui-long; Guo, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Diode-pumped alkali-vapor laser (DPAL) is a kind of laser attracted much attention for its merits, such as high quantum efficiency, excellent beam quality, favorable thermal management, and potential scalability to high power and so on. Based on the rate-equation theory of end-pumped DPAL, the performances of DPAL using Cs-vapor collisionally broadened by helium are simulated and studied. With the increase of helium pressure, the numerical results show that: 1) the absorption line-width increases and the stimulated absorption cross-section decreases contrarily; 2) the threshold pumping power decreases to minimum and then rolls over to increase linearly; 3) the absorption efficiency rises to maximum initially due to enough large stimulated absorption cross-section in the far wings of collisionally broadened D2 transition (absorption transition), and then begins to reduce; 4) an optimal value of helium pressure exists to obtain the highest output power, leading to an optimal optical-optical efficiency. Furthermore, to generate the self-oscillation of laser, a critical value of helium pressure occurs when small-signal gain equals to the threshold gain.

  20. An Assessment of Helium Evolution from Helium-Saturated Propellant Depressurization in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Bich N.; Best, Frederick; Wong, Tony; Kurwitz, Cable; McConnaughey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Helium evolution from the transfer of helium-saturated propellant in space is quantified to assess its impacts from creating two-phase gas/liquid flow from the supply tank, gas injection into the receiving tank, and liquid discharge from the receiving tank. Propellant transfer takes place between two similar tanks whose maximum storage capacity is approximately 2.55 cubic meters each. The maximum on-orbit propellants transfer capability is 9000 lbm (fuel and oxidizer). The transfer line is approximately 1.27 cm in diameter and 6096 cm in length and comprised of the fluid interconnect system (FICS), the orbiter propellant transfer system (OPTS), and the International Space Station (ISS) propulsion module (ISSPM). The propellant transfer rate begins at approximately 11 liter per minute (lpm) and subsequently drops to approximately 0.5 lpm. The tank nominal operating pressure is approximately 1827 kPa (absolute). The line pressure drops for Monomethy1hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) at 11.3 lpm are approximately 202 kPa and 302 kPa, respectively. The pressure-drop results are based on a single-phase flow. The receiving tank is required to vent from approximately 1827 kPa to a lower pressure to affect propellant transfer. These pressure-drop scenarios cause the helium-saturated propellants to release excess helium. For tank ullage venting, the maximum volumes of helium evolved at tank pressure are approximately 0.5 ft3 for MMH and 2 ft3 for NTO. In microgravity environment, due to lack of body force, the helium evolution from a liquid body acts to propel it, which influences its fluid dynamics. For propellant transfer, the volume fractions of helium evolved at line pressure are 0.1% by volume for MMH and 0.6 % by volume for NTO at 11.3 lpm. The void fraction of helium evolved varies as an approximate second order power function of flow rate.

  1. Growth of a Bacterium Under a High-Pressure Oxy-Helium Atmosphere †

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Craig D.

    1979-01-01

    Growth of a barotolerant marine organism, EP-4, in a glutamate medium equilibrated with an oxy-helium atmosphere at 500 atmospheres (atm; total pressure) (20°C) was compared with control cultures incubated at hydrostatic pressures of 1 and 500 atm. Relative to the 1-atm control culture, incubation of EP-4 at 500 atm in the absence of an atmosphere resulted in an approximately fivefold reduction in the growth rate and a significant but time variant reduction in the rate constants for the incorporation of substrate into cell material and respiration. Distinct from the pressurized control and separate from potential effects of dissolution of helium upon decompression of subsamples, exposure of the organism to high-pressure oxy-helium resulted in either a loss of viability of a large fraction of the cells or the arrest of growth for one-third of the experimental period. After these initial effects, however, the culture grew exponentially at a rate which was three times greater than the 500-atm control culture. The rate constant for the incorporation of substrate into cell material was also enhanced twofold in the presence of high-pressure oxy-helium. Dissolved oxygen was well controlled in all of the cultures, minimizing any potential toxic effects of this gas. PMID:16345337

  2. Thermodynamic Vent System Performance Testing with Subcooled Liquid Methane and Gaseous Helium Pressurant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Tucker, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its high specific impulse and favorable thermal properties for storage, liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered as a candidate propellant for exploration architectures. In order to gain an -understanding of any unique considerations involving micro-gravity pressure control with LCH4, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the performance of a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with subcooled LCH4 and gaseous helium (GHe) pressurant. Thirteen days of testing were performed in November 2006, with total tank heat leak conditions of about 715 W and 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. The TVS system was used to subcool the LCH4 to a liquid saturation pressure of approximately 55.2 kPa before the tank was pressurized with GHe to a total pressure of 165.5 kPa. A total of 23 TVS cycles were completed. The TVS successfully controlled the ullage pressure within a prescribed control band but did not maintain a stable liquid saturation pressure. This was likely. due to a TVS design not optimized for this particular propellant and test conditions, and possibly due to a large artificially induced heat input directly into the liquid. The capability to reduce liquid saturation pressure as well as maintain it within a prescribed control band, demonstrated that the TVS could be used to seek and maintain a desired liquid inlet temperature for an engine (at a cost of propellant lost through the TVS vent). One special test was conducted at the conclusion of the planned test activities. Reduction of the tank ullage pressure by opening the Joule-Thomson valve (JT) without operating the pump was attempted. The JT remained open for over 9300 seconds, resulting in an ullage pressure reduction of 30 kPa. The special test demonstrated the feasibility of using the JT valve for limited ullage pressure reduction in the event of a pump failure.

  3. 75 FR 53353 - Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 “Pressure and Helium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Guidance Document No. 25 ``Pressure and Helium Leakage Testing of the Confinement Boundary of Spent Fuel...: The Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) of the Office of Nuclear Materials Safety... Helium Leakage Testing of the Confinement Boundary of Spent Fuel Dry Storage Systems.'' This ISG...

  4. Exergy analysis of helium liquefaction systems based on modified Claude cycle with two-expanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rijo Jacob; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2011-06-01

    Large-scale helium liquefaction systems, being energy-intensive, demand judicious selection of process parameters. An effective tool for design and analysis of thermodynamic cycles for these systems is exergy analysis, which is used to study the behavior of a helium liquefaction system based on modified Claude cycle. Parametric evaluation using process simulator Aspen HYSYS® helps to identify the effects of cycle pressure ratio and expander flow fraction on the exergetic efficiency of the liquefaction cycle. The study computes the distribution of losses at different refrigeration stages of the cycle and helps in selecting optimum cycle pressures, operating temperature levels of expanders and mass flow rates through them. Results from the analysis may help evolving guidelines for designing appropriate thermodynamic cycles for practical helium liquefaction systems.

  5. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  6. Equation of State and Electrical Conductivity of Helium at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, R. S.; Eggert, J. H.; Loubeyre, P.; Brygoo, S.; Collins, G.; Jeanloz, R.

    2004-12-01

    Helium, the second-most abundant element in the universe and giant planets, is expected to metallize at much higher pressures and temperatures than the most abundant element, hydrogen. The difference in chemical-bonding character, between insulator and metal, is expected to make hydrogen-helium mixtures immiscible throughout large fractions of planetary interiors, and therefore subject to gravitational separation contributing significantly to the internal dynamics of giant planets. Using laser-driven shock waves on samples pre-compressed in high-pressure cells, we have obtained the first measurements of optical reflectivity from the shock front in helium to pressures of 146 GPa. The reflectivity exceeds 5% above \\ensuremath{\\sim} 100 GPa, indicating high electrical conductivity. By varying the initial pressure (hence density) of the sample, we can access a much wider range of final pressure-temperature conditions than is possible in conventional Hugoniot experiments. Our work increases by nine-fold the pressure range of single-shock measurements, in comparison with gas-gun experiments, and yields results in agreement with the Saumon, Chabrier and Van Horn (1994) equation of state for helium. This changes the internal structures inferred for Jupiter-size planets, relative to models based on earlier equations of state (e. g., SESAME).

  7. The Observed Properties of Liquid Helium at the Saturated Vapor Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    1998-11-01

    The equilibrium and transport properties of liquid 4He are deduced from experimental observations at the saturated vapor pressure. In each case, the bibliography lists all known measurements. Quantities reported here include density, thermal expansion coefficient, dielectric constant, superfluid and normal fluid densities, first, second, third, and fourth sound velocities, specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, surface tension, ion mobilities, mutual friction, viscosity and kinematic viscosity, dispersion curve, structure factor, thermal conductivity, latent heat, saturated vapor pressure, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number of helium I, and displacement length and vortex core parameter in helium II.

  8. Use of a torsional pendulum as a high-pressure gage and determination of viscosity of helium gas at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, J. E.; Webeler, R. W. H.; Grimes, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Three torsional crystal parameters were examined for suitability in sensing pressure in gases up to 131 million newtons per square meter. The best parameters were found to be the change in crystal decrement at resonance and the change in crystal electrical resistance at resonance. The change in crystal resonant frequency did not appear to be a reliable pressure measuring parameter. Pure argon and pure helium gases were studied for use as working fluids. Helium functioned better over a wider pressure range. Calibration of the gage also provided a measure of the viscosity-density product of the gas as a function of pressure. These data, together with known extrapolated density data, permitted the determination of the viscosity of helium to 131 million N/square meter.

  9. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  10. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  11. Thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at high pressure and finite temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is reviewed for calculating thermodynamic quantities for mixtures of light elements at high pressure, in the metallic state. Ensemble averages are calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and periodic boundary conditions. Interparticle potentials are assumed to be coulombic, screened by the electrons in dielectric function theory. This method is quantitatively accurate for alloys at pressures above about 10 Mbar. An alloy of equal parts hydrogen and helium by mass appears to remain liquid and mixed for temperatures above about 3000 K, at pressures of about 15 Mbar. The additive volume law is satisfied to within about 10%, but the Gruneisen equation of state gives poor results. A calculation at 1300 K shows evidence of a hydrogen-helium phase separation.

  12. Anomalous behavior of cristobalite in helium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomoko; Takada, Hiroto; Yagi, Takehiko; Gotou, Hirotada; Okada, Taku; Wakabayashi, Daisuke; Funamori, Nobumasa

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the high-pressure behavior of cristobalite in helium by powder X-ray diffraction. Cristobalite transformed to a new phase at about 8 GPa. This phase is supposed to have a molar volume of about 30 % larger than cristobalite, suggesting the dissolution of helium atoms in its interstitial voids. On further compression, the new phase transformed to a different phase which showed an X-ray diffraction pattern similar to cristobalite X-I at about 21 GPa. On the other hand, when the new phase was decompressed, it transformed to another new phase at about 7 GPa, which is also supposed to have a molar volume of about 25 % larger than cristobalite. On further decompression, the second new phase transformed to cristobalite II at about 2 GPa. In contrast to cristobalite, quartz did not show anomalous behavior in helium. The behavior of cristobalite in helium was also consistent with that in other mediums up to about 8 GPa, where the volume of cristobalite became close to that of quartz. These results suggest that dissolution of helium may be controlled not only by the density (amount of voids) but also by the network structure of SiO4 tetrahedra (topology of voids).

  13. A stable compound of helium and sodium at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Xiao; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; ...

    2017-02-06

    Helium is generally understood to be chemically inert and this is due to its extremely stable closed-shell electronic configuration, zero electron affinity and an unsurpassed ionization potential. It is not known to form thermodynamically stable compounds, except a few inclusion compounds. Here, using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm USPEX and subsequent high-pressure synthesis in a diamond anvil cell, we report the discovery of a thermodynamically stable compound of helium and sodium, Na 2He, which has a fluorite-type structure and is stable at pressures >113 GPa. We show that the presence of He atoms causes strong electron localization and makes thismore » material insulating. This phase is an electride, with electron pairs localized in interstices, forming eight-centre two-electron bonds within empty Na 8 cubes. As a result, we also predict the existence of Na 2HeO with a similar structure at pressures above 15 GPa.« less

  14. A stable compound of helium and sodium at high pressure

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dong, Xiao; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    Helium is generally understood to be chemically inert and this is due to its extremely stable closed-shell electronic configuration, zero electron affinity and an unsurpassed ionization potential. It is not known to form thermodynamically stable compounds, except a few inclusion compounds. Here, using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm USPEX and subsequent high-pressure synthesis in a diamond anvil cell, we report the discovery of a thermodynamically stable compound of helium and sodium, Na 2He, which has a fluorite-type structure and is stable at pressures >113 GPa. We show that the presence of He atoms causes strong electron localization and makes thismore » material insulating. This phase is an electride, with electron pairs localized in interstices, forming eight-centre two-electron bonds within empty Na 8 cubes. We also predict the existence of Na 2HeO with a similar structure at pressures above 15 GPa.« less

  15. A stable compound of helium and sodium at high pressure

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dong, Xiao; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    Helium is generally understood to be chemically inert and this is due to its extremely stable closed-shell electronic configuration, zero electron affinity and an unsurpassed ionization potential. It is not known to form thermodynamically stable compounds, except a few inclusion compounds. Here, using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm USPEX and subsequent high-pressure synthesis in a diamond anvil cell, we report the discovery of a thermodynamically stable compound of helium and sodium, Na 2He, which has a fluorite-type structure and is stable at pressures >113 GPa. We show that the presence of He atoms causes strong electron localization and makes thismore » material insulating. This phase is an electride, with electron pairs localized in interstices, forming eight-centre two-electron bonds within empty Na 8 cubes. As a result, we also predict the existence of Na 2HeO with a similar structure at pressures above 15 GPa.« less

  16. Quality improvement of environmental secondary electron detector signal using helium gas in variable pressure scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Yamazaki, Sadao

    2007-01-01

    The quality of the image signal obtained from the environmental secondary electron detector (ESED) employed in a variable pressure (VP) SEM can be dramatically improved by using helium gas. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases gradually in the range of the pressures that can be used in our modified SEM. This method is especially useful in low-voltage VP SEM as well as in a variety of SEM operating conditions, because helium gas can more or less maintain the amount of unscattered primary electrons. In order to measure the SNR precisely, a digital scan generator system for obtaining two images with identical views is employed as a precondition.

  17. Helium recovery and purification at CHMFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Meng, Q.; Ouyang, Z.; Shi, L.; Ai, X.; Chen, X.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, rising demand and declining reserves of helium have led to dramatic increases in the helium price. The High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL) has made efforts since its foundation to increase the percentage of helium recovered. The piping network connects all the helium experimental facilities to the recovery system, and even exhaust ports of pressure relief valves and vacuum pumps are also connected. In each year, about 30,000 cubic meters helium gas is recovered. The recovery gas is purified, liquefied and supplied to the users again. This paper will provide details about the helium recovery and purification system at CHMFL, including system flowchart, components, problems and solutions.

  18. Closed-loop helium circulation system for actuation of a continuously operating heart catheter pump.

    PubMed

    Karabegovic, Alen; Hinteregger, Markus; Janeczek, Christoph; Mohl, Werner; Gföhler, Margit

    2017-06-09

    Currently available, pneumatic-based medical devices are operated using closed-loop pulsatile or open continuous systems. Medical devices utilizing gases with a low atomic number in a continuous closed loop stream have not been documented to date. This work presents the construction of a portable helium circulation addressing the need for actuating a novel, pneumatically operated catheter pump. The design of its control system puts emphasis on the performance, safety and low running cost of the catheter pump. Static and dynamic characteristics of individual elements in the circulation are analyzed to ensure a proper operation of the system. The pneumatic circulation maximizes the working range of the drive unit inside the catheter pump while reducing the total size and noise production.Separate flow and pressure controllers position the turbine's working point into the stable region of the pressure creation element. A subsystem for rapid gas evacuation significantly decreases the duration of helium removal after a leak, reaching subatmospheric pressure in the intracorporeal catheter within several milliseconds. The system presented in the study offers an easy control of helium mass flow while ensuring stable behavior of its internal components.

  19. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  20. The Role of Helium Metastable States in Radio-Frequency Helium-Oxygen Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Measurement and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Kari; Waskoenig, Jochen; Sadeghi, Nader; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He atoms were measured line-of sight integrated along the plasma channel of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in helium oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. Dependencies of the He metastable density with oxygen admixtures up to 1 percent were investigated. Results are compared to a 1-d numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (20 species, 184 reactions), and very good agreement is found. The main formation mechanisms for the helium metastables are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  1. Excited helium under high pressures in the bulk and in nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyper, N. C.; Naginey, T. C.; Nellist, P. D.; Whelan, Colm T.

    2017-08-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of intense pressures on the excitation energies of helium trapped in bubbles in order to deepen our understanding of the fundamental physics of atoms in extreme conditions. The ? excitation energy of a confined helium atom is known to differ from that of a free atom being greater in both the bulk liquid or solid or a bubble confined in a metallic matrix state. We compare calculations for the energy shift with both laboratory experiments for bulk systems and results derived from scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) studies of helium nanobubbles embedded in different matrices. We find excellent agreement between our calculations and the latest extensive measurements in the bulk. However, we find significant discrepancies when we compare with results deduced using the 'standard' approach for analysing STEM data. Here, we show the scattering matrix element determining the intensity of this excitation in a STEM experiment is significantly affected by the same environmental factors that shift the excitation energy. Consequently, there is a serious theoretical inconsistency in the way the STEM results are calculated, in that the 'standard' approach depends on a supposedly known ? scattering cross section, whereas we show here that this cross section is itself dependent on the environment. Correcting for this inconsistency does not, in itself, improve agreement.

  2. Pressurization, Pneumatic, and Vent Subsystems of the X-34 Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Steadman, T. E.; Brown, T. M.; Knight, K. C.; White, C. E., Jr.; Champion, R. H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    In pressurization systems, regulators and orifices are use to control the flow of the pressurant. For the X-34 Main Propulsion System, three pressurization subsystem design configuration options were considered. In the first option, regulators were used while in the other options, orifices were considered. In each design option, the vent/relief system must be capable of relieving the pressurant flow without allowing the tank pressure to rise above proof, therefore, impacts on the propellant tank vent system were investigated and a trade study of the pressurization system was conducted. The analysis indicated that design option using regulators poses least risk. Then, a detailed transient thermal/fluid analysis of the recommended pressurization system was performed. Helium usage, thermodynamic conditions, and overpressurization of each propellant tank were evaluated. The pneumatic and purge subsystem is used for pneumatic valve actuation, Inter-Propellant Seal purges, Engine Spin Start, and engine purges at the required interface pressures, A transient analysis of the pneumatic and purge subsystem provided helium usage and flow rates to Inter-Propellant Seal and engine interfaces. Fill analysis of the helium bottles of pressurization and pneumatic subsystems during ground operation was performed. The required fill time and the stored

  3. 80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM STORAGE AND TRANSFER CONTROL SKIDS ON NORTH END OF SLC-3W FUEL APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Aerial Deployment and Inflation System for Mars Helium Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachenmeler, Tim; Fairbrother, Debora; Shreves, Chris; Hall, Jeffery, L.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Pauken, Michael T.; Walsh, Gerald J.; White, Christopher V.

    2009-01-01

    A method is examined for safely deploying and inflating helium balloons for missions at Mars. The key for making it possible to deploy balloons that are light enough to be buoyant in the thin, Martian atmosphere is to mitigate the transient forces on the balloon that might tear it. A fully inflated Mars balloon has a diameter of 10 m, so it must be folded up for the trip to Mars, unfolded upon arrival, and then inflated with helium gas in the atmosphere. Safe entry into the Martian atmosphere requires the use of an aeroshell vehicle, which protects against severe heating and pressure loads associated with the hypersonic entry flight. Drag decelerates the aeroshell to supersonic speeds, then two parachutes deploy to slow the vehicle down to the needed safe speed of 25 to 35 m/s for balloon deployment. The parachute system descent dynamic pressure must be approximately 5 Pa or lower at an altitude of 4 km or more above the surface.

  5. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  6. Helium Evolution from the Transfer of Helium Saturated Propellant in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Bich N.

    2000-01-01

    Helium evolution from the transfer of helium saturated propellant in space is quantified to determine its impact from creating a two-phase mixture in the transfer line. The transfer line is approximately 1/2 inch in diameter and 2400 inches in length comprised of the Fluid Interconnect System (FICS), the Orbiter Propellant Transfer System (OPTS) and the International Space Station (ISS) Propulsion Module (ISSPM). The propellant transfer rate is approximately two to three gallons per minute, and the supply tank pressure is maintained at approximately 250 psig.

  7. Room temperature thermal conductivity measurements of neat MOF-5 compacts with high pressure hydrogen and helium

    DOE PAGES

    Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Veenstra, Mike; Dixon, Craig

    2016-02-09

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a highly porous crystalline material with potential in various applications including on-board vehicle hydrogen storage for fuel cell vehicles. The thermal conductivity of MOFs is an important parameter in the design and ultimate performance of an on-board hydrogen storage system. However, in-situ thermal conductivity measurements have not been previously reported. The present study reports room temperature thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity measurements performed on neat MOF-5 cylindrical compacts (ρ = 0.4 g/mL) as a function of pressure (0.27–90 bar) and gas type (hydrogen and helium). The transient plane source technique was used to measure both themore » non-directional thermal properties (isotropic method) and the directional thermal properties (anisotropic method). High pressure measurements were made using our in-house built low-temperature, high pressure thermal conductivity sample cell. The intrinsic thermal properties of neat MOF-5 measured under vacuum were—Isotropic: k isotropic = 0.1319 W/m K, α isotropic = 0.4165 mm 2/s; Anisotropic: k axial = 0.1477 W/m K, k radial = 0.1218 W/m K, α axial = 0.5096 mm 2/s, and α radial = 0.4232 mm 2/s. The apparent thermal properties of neat MOF-5 increased with increasing hydrogen and helium pressure, with the largest increase occurring in the narrow pressure range of 0–10 bar and then monotonically asymptoting with increasing pressures up to around 90 bar. On average, a greater than two-fold enhancement in the apparent thermal properties was observed with neat MOF-5 in the presence of helium and hydrogen compared to the intrinsic values of neat MOF-5 measured under vacuum. The apparent thermal properties of neat MOF-5 measured with hydrogen were higher than those measured with helium, which were directly related to the gas-specific thermal properties of helium and hydrogen. Neat MOF-5 exhibited a small degree of anisotropy under all conditions measured with

  8. Room temperature thermal conductivity measurements of neat MOF-5 compacts with high pressure hydrogen and helium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Veenstra, Mike; Dixon, Craig

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a highly porous crystalline material with potential in various applications including on-board vehicle hydrogen storage for fuel cell vehicles. The thermal conductivity of MOFs is an important parameter in the design and ultimate performance of an on-board hydrogen storage system. However, in-situ thermal conductivity measurements have not been previously reported. The present study reports room temperature thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity measurements performed on neat MOF-5 cylindrical compacts (ρ = 0.4 g/mL) as a function of pressure (0.27–90 bar) and gas type (hydrogen and helium). The transient plane source technique was used to measure both themore » non-directional thermal properties (isotropic method) and the directional thermal properties (anisotropic method). High pressure measurements were made using our in-house built low-temperature, high pressure thermal conductivity sample cell. The intrinsic thermal properties of neat MOF-5 measured under vacuum were—Isotropic: k isotropic = 0.1319 W/m K, α isotropic = 0.4165 mm 2/s; Anisotropic: k axial = 0.1477 W/m K, k radial = 0.1218 W/m K, α axial = 0.5096 mm 2/s, and α radial = 0.4232 mm 2/s. The apparent thermal properties of neat MOF-5 increased with increasing hydrogen and helium pressure, with the largest increase occurring in the narrow pressure range of 0–10 bar and then monotonically asymptoting with increasing pressures up to around 90 bar. On average, a greater than two-fold enhancement in the apparent thermal properties was observed with neat MOF-5 in the presence of helium and hydrogen compared to the intrinsic values of neat MOF-5 measured under vacuum. The apparent thermal properties of neat MOF-5 measured with hydrogen were higher than those measured with helium, which were directly related to the gas-specific thermal properties of helium and hydrogen. Neat MOF-5 exhibited a small degree of anisotropy under all conditions measured with

  9. A superfluid helium system for an LST IR experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. W., Jr.; Moore, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a study program directed toward evaluating the problems associated with cooling an LST instrument to 2 K for a year by using superfluid helium as the cooling means. The results include the parametric analysis of systems using helium only, and systems using helium plus a shield cryogen. A baseline system, using helium only is described. The baseline system is sized for an instrument heat leak of 50 mw. It contains 71 Kg of superfluid helium and has a total, filled weight of 217 Kg. A brief assessment of the technical problems associated with a long life, spaceborne superfluid helium storage system is also made. It is concluded that a one year life, superfluid helium cooling system is feasible, pending experimental verification of a suitable low g vent system.

  10. Innovative Method for Developing a Helium Pressurant Tank Suitable for the Upper Stage Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom K.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The AFRL USFE project is an experimental test bed for new propulsion technologies. It will utilize ambient temperature fuel and oxidizers (Kerosene and Hydrogen peroxide). The system is pressure fed, not pump fed, and will utilize a helium pressurant tank to drive the system. Mr. DeLay has developed a method for cost effectively producing a unique, large pressurant tank that is not commercially available. The pressure vessel is a layered composite structure with an electroformed metallic permeation barrier. The design/process is scalable and easily adaptable to different configurations with minimal cost in tooling development 1/3 scale tanks have already been fabricated and are scheduled for testing. The full-scale pressure vessel (50" diameter) design will be refined based on the performance of the sub-scale tank. The pressure vessels have been designed to operate at 6,000 psi. a PV/W of 1.92 million is anticipated.

  11. Personnel safety with pressurized gas systems

    DOE PAGES

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; Zhao, Haihua

    2016-09-08

    In this study, selected accident case histories are described that illustrate the potential modes of injury from gas jets, pressure-driven missiles, and asphyxiants. Gas combustion hazards are also briefly mentioned. Using high-pressure helium and nitrogen, estimates of safe exclusion distances are calculated for differing pressures, temperatures, and breach sizes. Some sources for gas system reliability values are also cited.

  12. Effects of particle size, helium gas pressure and microparticle dose on the plasma concentration of indomethacin after bombardment of indomethacin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid microspheres using a Helios gun system.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaki; Natsume, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Morimoto, Yasunori

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the particle size of indomethacin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid microspheres (IDM-loaded PLA MS), the helium pressure used to accelerate the particles, and the bombardment dose of PLA MS on the plasma concentration of IDM after bombarding with IDM-loaded PLA MS of different particle size ranges, 20-38, 44-53 and 75-100 microm, the abdomen of hairless rats using the Helios gene gun system (Helios gun system). Using larger particles and a higher helium pressure, produced an increase in the plasma IDM concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and resultant F (relative bioavailability with respect to intracutaneous injection) of IDM increased by an amount depending on the particle size and helium pressure. Although a reduction in the bombardment dose led to a decrease in C(max) and AUC, F increased on decreasing the bombardment dose. In addition, a more efficient F was obtained after bombarding with IDM-loaded PLA MS of 75-100 microm in diameter at each low dose in different sites of the abdomen compared with that after bolus bombardment with a high dose (dose equivalent). These results suggest that the bombardment injection of drug-loaded microspheres by the Helios gun system is a very useful tool for delivering a variety of drugs in powder form into the skin and systemic circulation.

  13. A study of helium atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for potential biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeli, K.; Noël, C.; Clément, F.; Daugé, C.; Svarnas, P.; Belmonte, T.

    2013-04-01

    The origin of differences in the rotational temperatures of various molecules and ions ( N_{2}^{+} (B), OH(A) and N2(C)) is studied in helium atmospheric-pressure guided streamers. The rotational temperature of N_{2}^{+} (B) is room temperature. It is estimated from the emission band of the first negative system at 391.4 nm, and it is governed by the temperature of N2(X) in the surrounding air. N2(X) is ionized by direct electron impact in the outer part of the plasma. N_{2}^{+} (B) is deactivated by collisions with N2 and O2. The rotational temperature of OH(A), estimated from the OH band at 306.4 nm, is slightly higher than that of N_{2}^{+} (B). OH(A) is excited by electron impact with H2O during the first 100 ns of the applied voltage pulse. Next, OH(A) is produced by electron impact with OH(X) created by the quenching of OH(A) by N2 and O2. H2O diffuses deeper than N2 into the plasma ring and the rotational temperature of OH(A) is slightly higher than that of N_{2}^{+} (B). The rotational temperature of N2(C), estimated from the emission of the second positive system at 315.9 nm, is governed by its collisions with helium. The gas temperature of helium at the beginning of the pulse is predicted to be several hundred kelvin higher than room temperature.

  14. Cryogenic filter method produces super-pure helium and helium isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1964-01-01

    Helium is purified when cooled in a low pressure environment until it becomes superfluid. The liquid helium is then filtered through iron oxide particles. Heating, cooling and filtering processes continue until the purified liquid helium is heated to a gas.

  15. Solubility of oxygen in a seawater medium in equilibrium with a high-pressure oxy-helium atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C D

    1979-06-01

    The molar oxygen concentration in a seawater medium in equilibrium with a high-pressure oxygen-helium atmosphere was measured directly in pressurized subsamples, using a modified version of the Winkler oxygen analysis. At a partial pressure of oxygen of 1 atm or less, its concentration in the aqueous phase was adequately described by Henry's Law at total pressures up to 600 atm. This phenomenon, which permits a straightforward determination of dissolved oxygen within hyperbaric systems, resulted from pressure-induced compensatory alterations in the Henry's Law variables rather than from a true obedience to the Ideal Gas Law. If the partial pressure of a gas contributes significantly to the hydrostatic pressure, Henry's Law is no longer adequate for determining its solubility within the compressed medium.

  16. Analyzing the Use of Gaseous Helium as a Pressurant with Cryogenic Propellants with Thermodynamic Venting System Modelling and Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.L.; Hastings, L.J.; Flachbart, R.H.; Vermillion, D.J.; Tucker, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogens are viable candidate propellants for NASA's Lunar and Mars exploration programs. To provide adequate mass flow to the system's engines and/or to prevent feed system cavitation, gaseous helium (GHe) is frequently considered as a pressurant. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) is designed to maintain tank pressure during low gravity operations without propellant resettling. Therefore, a series of tests were conducted in the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in order to evaluate the effects of GHe pressurant on pressure control performance of a TVS with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and nitrogen (LN2) as the test liquids. The TVS used in these test series consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted from the tank recirculation line, passing it through the J-T valve, and then through the heat exchanger, thermal energy is extracted from the bulk liquid and ullage thereby enabling pressure control. The LH2/GHe tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% and LN2/GHe tests were conducted at fill levels of 50% and 25%. Moreover, each test was conducted with a specified tank ullage pressure control band. A one-dimensional TVS performance program was used to analyze and correlate the test data. Predictions and comparisons with test data of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  17. The role of helium metastable states in radio-frequency driven helium-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jets: measurement and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, K.; Waskoenig, J.; Sadeghi, N.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He(23S1) atoms were measured line-of-sight integrated along the discharge channel of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in technologically relevant helium-oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. The dependences of the He(23S1) density in the homogeneous-glow-like α-mode plasma with oxygen admixtures up to 1% were investigated. The results are compared with a one-dimensional numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the pronounced electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (in total 20 species and 184 reactions). Very good agreement between measurement and simulation is found. The main formation mechanisms for metastable helium atoms are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  18. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure - A case for a classical theory of dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1989-06-01

    When subject to high pressure, H2 and He-3 are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin, calculations of phase transition and metallization pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallization occurs at p(M) = (3.0 + or - 0.2) Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is (106 + or - 1) Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at p(tr) = (10.0 + or - 0.4) Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed.

  19. CFD Modeling of Helium Pressurant Effects on Cryogenic Tank Pressure Rise Rates in Normal Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, Gary; Lopez, Alfredo; Chandler, Frank; Hastings, Leon; Hedayat, Ali; Brethour, James

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed computational fluid dynamics modeling capability for cryogenic tanks is used to simulate both self-pressurization from external heating and also depressurization from thermodynamic vent operation. Axisymmetric models using a modified version of the commercially available FLOW-3D software are used to simulate actual physical tests. The models assume an incompressible liquid phase with density that is a function of temperature only. A fully compressible formulation is used for the ullage gas mixture that contains both condensable vapor and a noncondensable gas component. The tests, conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, include both liquid hydrogen and nitrogen in tanks with ullage gas mixtures of each liquid's vapor and helium. Pressure and temperature predictions from the model are compared to sensor measurements from the tests and a good agreement is achieved. This further establishes the accuracy of the developed FLOW-3D based modeling approach for cryogenic systems.

  20. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  1. The control system of a 2kW@20K helium refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, W.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Qing; Liu, L. Q.; Li, Qiang

    2017-12-01

    The automatic control of a helium refrigerator includes three aspects, that is, one-button start and stop control, safety protection control, and cooling capacity control. The 2kW@20K helium refrigerator’s control system uses the SIEMENS PLC S7-300 and its related programming and configuration software Step7 and the industrial monitoring software WinCC, to realize the dynamic control of its process, the real-time monitoring of its data, the safety interlock control, and the optimal control of its cooling capacity. At first, this paper describes the control architecture of the whole system in detail, including communication configuration and equipment introduction; and then introduces the sequence control strategy of the dynamic processes, including the start and stop control mode of the machine and the safety interlock control strategy of the machine; finally tells the precise control strategy of the machine’s cooling capacity. Eventually, the whole system achieves the target of one-button starting and stopping, automatic fault protection and stable running to the target cooling capacity, and help finished the cold helium pressurization test of aerospace products.

  2. Impact of helium pressure in arc plasma synthesis on crystallinity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Atsushi; Takeda, Keigo; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Ando, Yoshinori; Hori, Masaru

    2018-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized with a high growth rate by an arc plasma method employing the electrodes made from a Ni–Y mixture catalyst. In a previous study, it was reported that the monitoring of high-crystallinity SWNT growth enabled the evaluation of the results of the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) of C2, Ni, and Y. Here, the impact of helium pressure of arc plasma on the high crystallinity of SWNTs was determined by considering the high intensity ratios of catalytic metals over C2 emissions at low helium pressures in the arc plasma.

  3. Atomic fluorescence emitted from a corona discharge in helium above and below saturated vapour pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltagh, Nagham M.; Mendoza Luna, Luis G.; Watkins, Mark J.; Thornton, Stuart C.; von Haeften, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    A new apparatus was constructed to investigate the visible and near infrared fluorescence spectroscopy of electronically excited helium over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, covering both the gaseous and liquid phases. To achieve sufficient throughput, increased sensitivity was established by employing a micro-discharge cell and a high performance lens system that allows for a large collection solid angle. With this set-up, several thousand spectra were recorded. The atomic 3 s 1 S → 2 p 1 P and 3 s 3 S → 2 p 3 P atomic transitions showed line shifts, spectral broadening and intensity changes that were dependent in magnitude on pressure, temperature and thermodynamic phase. While in the gas phase the lines showed little dependency on the discharge cell temperature, the opposite was observed for the liquid phase, suggesting that a significant number of atoms were solvated. Triplet lines were up to a factor of 50 times stronger in intensity than the singlet lines, depending on pressure. When taking the particle density into account, this effect was stronger in the gas phase than in the liquid phase of helium. This was attributed to the recombination of He2 +, He3 + and He4 + with electrons, which is facilitated in the gas phase because of the significantly higher mobility.

  4. Helium Transfer System for the Superconducting Devices at NSRRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. C.; Hsiao, F. Z.; Chang, S. H.; Chiou, W. S.

    2006-04-01

    A helium cryogenic plant with a maximum cooling power of 450 W at 4.5K was installed at the end of the year 2003. This plant has provide the cooling power for the test of one superconducting cavity and the commission of one superconducting magnet for nine months. In November 2004, we installed one helium transfer system in NSRRC's storage ring to fulfill the cooling requirement for the operation of one superconducting cavity and two superconducting magnets. This helium transfer system consists of a switch valve box and the nitrogen-shielding multi-channel transfer lines. The averaged heat leak to the helium process line (including the straight section, the joint, the elbow, the coupling) at liquid helium temperature is specified to be less than 0.1 W/m at 4.2K; the total heat leak of the switching valve box to helium process lines is less than 16 W at 4.2K. In this paper we present the function, design parameters and test result of the helium transfer system. Commissioning results of both the cavity and the magnets using this helium transfer system will be shown as well.

  5. Compression of helium to high pressures and temperatures using a ballistic piston apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, B. P.; Rovel, G. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Some preliminary experiments are described which were carried out in a high enthalpy laboratory to investigate the compression of helium, a typical shock-tube driver gas, to very high pressures and temperatures by means of a ballistic piston. The purpose of these measurements was to identify any problem areas in the compression process, to determine the importance of real gas effects duDC 47355s process, and to establish the feasibility of using a ballistic piston apparatus to achieve temperatures in helium in excess of 10,000 K.

  6. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D-2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. In order to study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. There are three different anode geometries that we have studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least onemore » order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.« less

  7. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Flesch, K., E-mail: kbflesch@wisc.edu; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D{sub 2} molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude abovemore » the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.« less

  8. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D-2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. In order to study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. There are three different anode geometries that we have studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least onemore » order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.« less

  9. CALCULATED REGENERATOR PERFORMANCE AT 4 K WITH HELIUM-4 AND HELIUM-3

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Radebaugh, Ray; Huang Yonghua; O'Gallagher, Agnes

    2008-03-16

    The helium-4 working fluid in regenerative cryocoolers operating with the cold end near 4 K deviates considerably from an ideal gas. As a result, losses in the regenerator, given by the time-averaged enthalpy flux, are increased and are strong functions of the operating pressure and temperature. Helium-3, with its lower boiling point, behaves somewhat closer to an ideal gas in this low temperature range and can reduce the losses in 4 K regenerators. An analytical model is used to find the fluid properties that strongly influence the regenerator losses as well as the gross refrigeration power. The thermodynamic and transportmore » properties of helium-3 were incorporated into the latest NIST regenerator numerical model, known as REGEN3.3, which was used to model regenerator performance with either helium-4 or helium-3. With this model we show how the use of helium-3 in place of helium-4 can improve the performance of 4 K regenerative cryocoolers. The effects of operating pressure, warm-end temperature, and frequency on regenerators with helium-4 and helium-3 are investigated and compared. The results are used to find optimum operating conditions. The frequency range investigated varies from 1 Hz to 30 Hz, with particular emphasis on higher frequencies.« less

  10. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    In free piston Stirling engine research the integrity of both amplitude and phase of the dynamic pressure measurements is critical to the characterization of cycle dynamics and thermodynamics. It is therefore necessary to appreciate all possible sources of signal distortion when designing pressure measurement systems for this type of research. The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving helium-charged free piston Stirling engines. The scope and limitations of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  11. Propagation of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet into ambient air at laminar gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, M.; Stepanova, O.; Kurakina, N.; Spodobin, V.

    2017-05-01

    The formation of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in a gas flow passing through the discharge gap depends on both gas-dynamic properties and electrophysical parameters of the plasma jet generator. The paper presents the results of experimental and numerical study of the propagation of the APPJ in a laminar flow of helium. A dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) generated inside a quartz tube equipped with a coaxial electrode system, which provided gas passing through it, served as a plasma source. The transition of the laminar regime of gas flow into turbulent one was controlled by the photography of a formed plasma jet. The corresponding gas outlet velocity and Reynolds numbers were revealed experimentally and were used to simulate gas dynamics with OpenFOAM software. The data of the numerical simulation suggest that the length of plasma jet at the unvarying electrophysical parameters of DBD strongly depends on the mole fraction of ambient air in a helium flow, which is established along the direction of gas flow.

  12. Centaur space vehicle pressurized propellant feed system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Engine firing tests, using a full-scale flight-weight vehicle, were performed to evaluate a pressurized propellant feed system for the Centaur. The pressurant gases used were helium and hydrogen. The system was designed to replace the boost pumps currently used on Centaur. Two liquid oxygen tank pressurization modes were studied: (1) directly into the ullage and (2) below the propellant surface. Test results showed the two Centaur RL10 engines could be started and run over the range of expected flight variables. No system instabilities were encountered. Measured pressurization gas quantities agreed well with analytically predicted values.

  13. Metastable Ar(1 s5) density dependence on pressure and argon-helium mixture in a high pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmons, D. J.; Weeks, D. E.; Eshel, B.; Perram, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Simulations of an α-mode radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge are performed for varying mixtures of argon and helium at pressures ranging from 200 to 500 Torr using both zero and one-dimensional models. Metastable densities are analyzed as a function of argon-helium mixture and pressure to determine the optimal conditions, maximizing metastable density for use in an optically pumped rare gas laser. Argon fractions corresponding to the peak metastable densities are found to be pressure dependent, shifting from approximately 15% Ar in He at 200 Torr to 10% at 500 Torr. A decrease in metastable density is observed as pressure is increased due to a diminution in the reduced electric field and a quadratic increase in metastable loss rates through A r2* formation. A zero-dimensional effective direct current model of the dielectric barrier discharge is implemented, showing agreement with the trends predicted by the one-dimensional fluid model in the bulk plasma.

  14. Use of Heated Helium to Simulate Surface Pressure Fluctuations on the Launch Abort Vehicle During Abort Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; James, George H.; Burnside, Nathan J.; Fong, Robert; Fogt, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    The solid-rocket plumes from the Abort motor of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV, also know as Orion) were simulated using hot, high pressure, Helium gas to determine the surface pressure fluctuations on the vehicle in the event of an abort. About 80 different abort situations over a wide Mach number range, (0.3< or =M< or =1.2) and vehicle attitudes (+/-15deg) were simulated inside the NASA Ames Unitary Plan, 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. For each abort case, typically two different Helium plume and wind tunnel conditions were used to bracket different flow matching critera. This unique, yet cost-effective test used a custom-built hot Helium delivery system, and a 6% scale model of a part of the MPCV, known as the Launch Abort Vehicle. The test confirmed the very high level of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the vehicle expected during an abort. In general, the fluctuations were found to be dominated by the very near-field hydrodynamic fluctuations present in the plume shear-layer. The plumes were found to grow in size for aborts occurring at higher flight Mach number and altitude conditions. This led to an increase in the extent of impingement on the vehicle surfaces; however, unlike some initial expectations, the general trend was a decrease in the level of pressure fluctuations with increasing impingement. In general, the highest levels of fluctuations were found when the outer edges of the plume shear layers grazed the vehicle surface. At non-zero vehicle attitudes the surface pressure distributions were found to become very asymmetric. The data from these wind-tunnel simulations were compared against data collected from the recent Pad Abort 1 flight test. In spite of various differences between the transient flight situation and the steady-state wind tunnel simulations, the hot-Helium data were found to replicate the PA1 data fairly reasonably. The data gathered from this one-of-a-kind wind-tunnel test fills a gap in the manned-space programs

  15. Helium refrigeration considerations for cryomodule design

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, packaged in cryo-modules (CM), which depend on helium refrigeration at sub-atmospheric pressures, nominally 2 K. These specialized helium refrigeration systems are quite cost intensive to produce and operate. Particularly as there is typically no work extraction below the 4.5-K supply, it is important that the exergy loss between this temperature level and the CM load temperature(s) be minimized by the process configuration choices. This paper will present, compare and discuss several possible helium distribution process arrangements to support the CM loads.

  16. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Dixon, Kelly d.

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields withmore » liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.« less

  17. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  18. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  19. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  20. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  1. Design and Manufacturing of the Kstar Tokamak Helium Refrigeration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauguet, P.; Briend, P.; Abe, I.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Andrieu, F.; Beauvisage, J.

    2008-03-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) project makes intensive use of superconducting (SC) magnets operated at 4.4 K. The cold components of KSTAR require a forced flow of supercritical helium for magnets and structure, boiling liquid helium for current leads, and gaseous helium for thermal shields. A helium refrigeration system has been custom-designed for this project. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of the proposed cryogenic system. The specified thermal loads for the different operating modes are presented. This specification results in the definition of a design mode for the refrigerator. The design and construction of the resulting 9 kW at 4.5-K Helium Refrigeration System (HSR) are presented.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of low pressure helium microwave driven discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinho, Susana; Felizardo, Edgar; Tatarova, Elena; Alves, Luis Lemos

    2016-09-01

    Surface wave driven discharges are reliable plasma sources that can produce high levels of vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation (VUV and EUV). The richness of the emission spectrum makes this type of discharge a possible alternative source in EUV/VUV radiation assisted applications. However, due to challenging experimental requirements, publications concerning EUV radiation emitted by microwave plasmas are scarce and a deeper understanding of the main mechanisms governing the emission of radiation in this spectral range is required. To this end, the EUV radiation emitted by helium microwave driven plasmas operating at 2.45 GHz has been studied for low pressure conditions. Spectral lines from excited helium atoms and ions were detected via emission spectroscopy in the EUV/VUV regions. Novel data concerning the spectral lines observed in the 23 - 33 nm wavelength range and their intensity behaviour with variation of the discharge operational conditions are presented. The intensity of all the spectral emissions strongly increases with the microwave power delivered to the plasma up to 400 W. Furthermore, the intensity of all the ion spectral emissions in the EUV range decreases by nearly one order of magnitude as the pressure was raised from 0.2 to 0.5 mbar. Work funded by FCT - Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia, under Project UID/FIS/50010/2013 and grant SFRH/BD/52412/2013 (PD-F APPLAuSE).

  3. Helium refrigeration systems for super-conducting accelerators

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ganni, V.

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting technology which requires 4.5-K or 2-K helium refrigeration systems. These systems utilize superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and/or superconducting magnets which are packaged into vacuum vessels known as cryo-modules (CM’s). Many of the present day accelerators are optimized to operate primarily at around 2-K, requiring specialized helium refrigeration systems which are cost intensive to produce and to operate. Some of the cryogenic refrigeration system design considerations for these challenging applications are discussed.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Laser Ablative Shock Waves From Aluminum in Presence of Helium Gas At Different Ambient Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Durvasula, P. S. L. Kameswari; S, Sai Shiva; Acrhem, University Of Hyderabad Team

    2017-06-01

    A two dimensional comparative study of Laser Ablative Shock Wave into the Aluminum target in the presence of Helium gas at different ambient pressures over a range of 690 - 105 Pa performed using FLASH hydrodynamic codes will be presented. The irradiation of Aluminum target (thickness 2 mm and radius 3 mm) with a 7 ns laser pulse of energy 175 mJ, spot size of 150 µm on the target surface at a wavelength of 532 nm at normal incidence is simulated. Helium gas enclosed in a chamber of height 3 mm and width 3 mm. The electron-ion inverse bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient is considered in the laser energy deposition process. The simulation was performed over a duration of 1 μs. It was observed that an ablative shock is launched into the Helium gas for the pressures of 0.5 atm and above. However, for pressure less than the 0.5 atm the plasma expanded into the He gas upto 12ns and after which due to pressure equilibration with the surroundings and plume splitting shock wave is launched in to Al. Authors acknowledge funding from DRDO, India.

  5. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  6. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  7. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  8. Synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of hydrogen and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Hoffmann, William H.; van Spronsen, Matthijs A.; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal

    2018-02-01

    Contrary to popular belief, it is possible to obtain X-ray photoelectron spectra for elements lighter than lithium, namely hydrogen and helium. The literature is plagued with claims of this impossibility, which holds true for lab-based X-ray sources. However, this limitation is merely technical and is related mostly to the low X-ray photoionization cross-sections of the 1s orbitals of hydrogen and helium. In this letter, we show that, using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a bright-enough X-ray source allows the study of these elusive elements. This has important implications in the understanding of the limitations of one of the most useful techniques in materials science, and moreover, it potentially opens the possibility of using XPS to directly study the most abundant element in the universe.

  9. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chakravarty, Anindya; Rane, Tejas; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2017-07-06

    The PIP-II cryogenic system consists of a Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and a Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP to the Superconducting (SC) Linac consisting of 25 cryomodules. The dynamic heat load of the SC cavities for continuous wave (CW) as well as pulsed mode of operation has been listed out. The static heat loads of the cavities along with the CDS have also been discussed. Simulation study has been carried out to compute the supercritical helium (SHe) flow requirements for each cryomodule. Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes ofmore » operation have also been made. From the total computed heat load and pressure drop values in the CDS, the basic specifications for the SHCP, required for cooling the SC Linac, have evolved.« less

  10. Use of Interrupted Helium Flow in the Analysis of Vapor Samples with Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Andrew P.; Zeiri, Offer M.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2017-02-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was used for the mass-spectrometric analysis of vapor samples introduced between the source and mass spectrometer inlet. Through interrupted operation of the plasma-supporting helium flow, helium consumption is greatly reduced and dynamic gas behavior occurs that was characterized by schlieren imaging. Moreover, mass spectra acquired immediately after the onset of helium flow exhibit a signal spike before declining and ultimately reaching a steady level. This initial signal appears to be due to greater interaction of sample vapor with the afterglow of the source when helium flow resumes. In part, the initial spike in signal can be attributed to a pooling of analyte vapor in the absence of helium flow from the source. Time-resolved schlieren imaging of the helium flow during on and off cycles provided insight into gas-flow patterns between the FAPA source and the MS inlet that were correlated with mass-spectral data.

  11. Use of Interrupted Helium Flow in the Analysis of Vapor Samples with Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Storey, Andrew P; Zeiri, Offer M; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2017-02-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was used for the mass-spectrometric analysis of vapor samples introduced between the source and mass spectrometer inlet. Through interrupted operation of the plasma-supporting helium flow, helium consumption is greatly reduced and dynamic gas behavior occurs that was characterized by schlieren imaging. Moreover, mass spectra acquired immediately after the onset of helium flow exhibit a signal spike before declining and ultimately reaching a steady level. This initial signal appears to be due to greater interaction of sample vapor with the afterglow of the source when helium flow resumes. In part, the initial spike in signal can be attributed to a pooling of analyte vapor in the absence of helium flow from the source. Time-resolved schlieren imaging of the helium flow during on and off cycles provided insight into gas-flow patterns between the FAPA source and the MS inlet that were correlated with mass-spectral data. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Helium refrigeration system for hydrogen liquefaction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, J. Kumar, Sr.; Menon, RS; Goyal, M.; Ansari, NA; Chakravarty, A.; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid hydrogen around 20 K is used as cold moderator for generating “cold neutron beam” in nuclear research reactors. A cryogenic helium refrigeration system is the core upon which such hydrogen liquefaction applications are built. A thermodynamic process based on reversed Brayton cycle with two stage expansion using high speed cryogenic turboexpanders (TEX) along with a pair of compact high effectiveness process heat exchangers (HX), is well suited for such applications. An existing helium refrigeration system, which had earlier demonstrated a refrigeration capacity of 470 W at around 20 K, is modified based on past operational experiences and newer application requirements. Modifications include addition of a new heat exchanger to simulate cryogenic process load and two other heat exchangers for controlling the temperatures of helium streams leading out to the application system. To incorporate these changes, cryogenic piping inside the cold box is suitably modified. This paper presents process simulation, sizing of new heat exchangers as well as fabrication aspects of the modified cryogenic process piping.

  13. Acquisition system testing with superfluid helium. [cryopumping for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John E.; Fester, Dale A.; Dipirro, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Minus one-g outflow tests were conducted with superfluid helium in conjunction with a thermomechanical pump setup in order to study the use of capillary acquisition systems for NASA's Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment. Results show that both fine mesh screen and porous sponge systems are capable of supplying superfluid helium to the thermomechanical pump inlet against a one-g head up to 4 cm, fulfilling the SHOOT requirements. Sponge results were found to be reproducible, while the screen results were not.

  14. PIP-II Cryogenic System and the Evolution of Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant Specifications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chakravarty, Anindya; Rane, Tejas; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2017-01-01

    PIP-II cryogenic system: Superfluid Helium Cryogenic Plant (SHCP) and Cryogenic Distribution System (CDS) connecting the SHCP and the SC Linac (25 cryomodules) PIP-II Cryogenic System Static and dynamic heat loads for the SC Linac and static load of CDS listed out Simulation study carried out to compute SHe flow requirements for each cryomodule Comparison between the flow requirements of the cryomodules for the CW and pulsed modes of operation presented From computed heat load and pressure drop values, SHCP basic specifications evolved.

  15. Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1997-01-01

    An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10.sup.-13 atm cc s.sup.-1. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces backstreaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium.

  16. Ultra high vacuum pumping system and high sensitivity helium leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1997-12-30

    An improved helium leak detection method and apparatus are disclosed which increase the leak detection sensitivity to 10{sup {minus}13} atm cc/s. The leak detection sensitivity is improved over conventional leak detectors by completely eliminating the use of o-rings, equipping the system with oil-free pumping systems, and by introducing measured flows of nitrogen at the entrances of both the turbo pump and backing pump to keep the system free of helium background. The addition of dry nitrogen flows to the system reduces back streaming of atmospheric helium through the pumping system as a result of the limited compression ratios of the pumps for helium. 2 figs.

  17. Study of the high-pressure helium phase diagram using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, L.; Ahuja, R.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Johansson, B.

    2007-01-01

    The rich occurrence of helium and hydrogen in space makes their properties highly interesting. By means of molecular dynamics (MD), we have examined two interatomic potentials for 4He. Both potentials are demonstrated to reproduce high-pressure solid and liquid equation of state (EOS) data. The EOS, solid-solid transitions and melting at high pressures (P) were studied using a two-phase method. The Buckingham potential shows a good agreement with theoretical and experimental EOS, but does not reproduce experimental melting data. The Aziz potential shows a perfect match with theoretical melting data. We conclude that there is a stable body-centred-cubic (bcc) phase for 4He at temperatures (T) above 340 K and pressures above 22 GPa for the Buckingham potential, whereas no bcc phase is found for the Aziz potential in the applied PT range.

  18. Synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of hydrogen and helium

    DOE PAGES

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Hoffmann, William H.; ...

    2018-03-01

    Contrary to popular belief, it is possible to obtain X-ray photoelectron spectra for elements lighter than lithium, namely hydrogen and helium. The literature is plagued with claims of this impossibility, which holds true for lab-based X-ray sources. However, this limitation is merely technical and is related mostly to the low X-ray photoionization cross-sections of the 1s orbitals of hydrogen and helium. Here, we show that, using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a bright-enough X-ray source allows the study of these elusive elements. This has important implications in the understanding of the limitations of one of the most useful techniquesmore » in materials science, and moreover, it potentially opens the possibility of using XPS to directly study the most abundant element in the universe.« less

  19. Synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of hydrogen and helium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Hoffmann, William H.

    Contrary to popular belief, it is possible to obtain X-ray photoelectron spectra for elements lighter than lithium, namely hydrogen and helium. The literature is plagued with claims of this impossibility, which holds true for lab-based X-ray sources. However, this limitation is merely technical and is related mostly to the low X-ray photoionization cross-sections of the 1s orbitals of hydrogen and helium. Here, we show that, using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a bright-enough X-ray source allows the study of these elusive elements. This has important implications in the understanding of the limitations of one of the most useful techniquesmore » in materials science, and moreover, it potentially opens the possibility of using XPS to directly study the most abundant element in the universe.« less

  20. Disruption mitigation with high-pressure helium gas injection on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. L.; Shen, B.; Granetz, R. S.; Qian, J. P.; Zhuang, H. D.; Zeng, L.; Duan, Y.; Shi, T.; Wang, H.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, B. J.

    2018-03-01

    High pressure noble gas injection is a promising technique to mitigate the effect of disruptions in tokamaks. In this paper, results of mitigation experiments with low-Z massive gas injection (helium) on the EAST tokamak are reported. A fast valve has been developed and successfully implemented on EAST, with valve response time  ⩽150 μs, capable of injecting up to 7 × 1022 particles, corresponding to 300 times the plasma inventory. Different amounts of helium gas were injected into stable plasmas in the preliminary experiments. It is seen that a small amount of helium gas (N_He≃ N_plasma ) can not terminate a discharge, but can trigger MHD activity. Injection of 40 times the plasma inventory impurity (N_He≃ 40× N_plasma ) can effectively radiate away part of the thermal energy and make the electron density increase rapidly. The mitigation result is that the current quench time and vertical displacement can both be reduced significantly, without resulting in significantly higher loop voltage. This also reduces the risk of runaway electron generation. As the amount of injected impurity gas increases, the gas penetration time decreases slowly and asymptotes to (˜7 ms). In addition, the impurity gas jet has also been injected into VDEs, which are more challenging to mitigate that stable plasmas.

  1. Performance of an efficient Helium Circulation System on a MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Okamoto, M.; Atsuda, K.; Katagiri, K.

    2009-02-01

    We report a Helium Circulation System (HCS) that re-liquefies all the evaporating helium gas, consumes far less power and has extremely lower magnetic noise compared with conventional systems. It collects warm helium gas about 300 K, cools it to about 40K and returns it to the neck tube of the Dewar to keep it cold. It also collects helium gas just above the liquid helium surface while it is still cold, re-liquefies and returns it to the Dewar. A special transfer tube (TT) about 2 m length with 7 multi-concentric pipes was developed to allow the dual helium streams. It separates the HCS with a MEG to reduce magnetic noise. A refiner to collect the contaminating gases such as oxygen and nitrogen effectively by freezing the gases is developed. It has an electric heater to remove the frozen contamination in the form of gases into the air. A gas flow controller is also developed, which automatically control the heater to cleanup the contamination. The developed TT has very low heat inflow less than 0.1W/m to the liquid helium ensuring the efficient operation. The HCS can re-liquefy up to 35.5 1/D of liquid helium from the evaporated helium gas using two 1.5W@4.2K GM cryocoolers (SRDK-415D, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd.). It has been confirmed that the HCS could be used with the real MEG system without any noise problem for over one year. The maintenance cost (electricity charges and cryocoolers maintenance fee) of the MEG has reduced to be less than 1/10 of the previous cost.

  2. Commissioning of helium refrigeration system at JLab for 12 GeV upgrade

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Knudsen, Peter N.

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system added to the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) for the 12 GeV upgrade will double its previous capacity. It includes a 4.5 K cold box system and compressor system with associated oil removal and gas management systems. At its maximum capacity condition, this new system supports an additional 238 g/s 30 K 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW 35–55 K shield load. Five more design conditions, ranging from liquefaction to refrigeration and a stand-by/reduced load state, were specified for the sizingmore » and selection of its components. The cold box system is comprised of a 300–60 K vertical cold box that incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and a 60–4.5 K horizontal cold box housing seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review the salient 4.5 K system design features and discuss the recent commissioning results.« less

  3. Thermophysical properties of Helium-4 from 0.8 to 1500 K with pressures to 2000 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, Vincent D.; Mccarty, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Tabular summary data of the thermophysical properties of fluid helium are given for temperatures from 0.8 to 1500 K, with pressures to 2000 MPa between 75 and 300 K, or to 100 MPa outside of this temperature band. Properties include density, specific heats, enthalpy, entropy, internal energy, sound velocity, expansivity, compressibility, thermal conductivity, and viscosity. The data are calculated from a computer program which is available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The computer program is based on carefully fitted state equations for both normal and superfluid helium.

  4. Molecular dynamics modeling of helium bubbles in austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelea, A.

    2018-06-01

    The austenitic steel devices from pressurized water reactors are continuously subjected to neutron irradiation that produces crystalline point defects and helium atoms in the steel matrix. These species evolve into large defects such as dislocation loops and helium filled bubbles. This paper analyzes, through molecular dynamics simulations with recently developed interatomic potentials, the impact of the helium/steel interface on the helium behavior in nanosize bubbles trapped in an austenitic steel matrix. It is shown that the repulsive helium-steel interactions induce higher pressures in the bubble compared to bulk helium at the same temperature and average density. A new equation of state for helium is proposed in order to take into account these interface effects.

  5. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though DFT based rst principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational e ciency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quanti cation of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures atmore » thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC based force estimators and use them to gain insights into how well the local liquid structure is captured by di erent density functionals. We nd that TPSS, BLYP and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative di erences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and estimate the magnitudes of these e ects when possible.« less

  6. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    DOE PAGES

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; ...

    2016-01-19

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though DFT based rst principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational e ciency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quanti cation of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures atmore » thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC based force estimators and use them to gain insights into how well the local liquid structure is captured by di erent density functionals. We nd that TPSS, BLYP and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative di erences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and estimate the magnitudes of these e ects when possible.« less

  7. Thermophysicochemical Reaction of ZrCo-Hydrogen-Helium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangjin; Kang, Hee-Seok; Yun, Sei-Hun; Chung, Hongsuk

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear fusion energy, which is clean and infinite, has been studied for more than half a century. Efforts are in progress worldwide for the demonstration and validation of nuclear fusion energy. Korea has been developing hydrogen isotope storage and delivery system (SDS) technologies including a basic scientific study on a hydrogen storage medium. An SDS bed, which is a key component of the SDS, is used for storing hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride form and supplying them to a tokamak. Thermophysicochemical properties of the ZrCo-H2-He system are investigated for the practical utilization of a hydriding alloy system. The hydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx is composed as ZrCo absorbing hydrogen, is exothermic. The dehydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx decomposes into ZrCo and hydrogen, is endothermic. The heat generated through the hydriding reaction interrupts the hydriding progress. The heat loss by a dehydriding reaction impedes the dehydriding progress. The tritium decay product, helium-3, covers the ZrCo and keeps the hydrogen from contact with ZrCo in the SDS bed. In this study, we designed and fabricated a ZrCo bed and its performance test rig. The helium blanketing effect on a ZrCo hydrogen reaction with 0 % to 20 % helium content in a gaseous phase and a helium blanket removal method were studied experimentally. In addition, the volumetric flow rates and temperature at the beginning of a ZrCo hydrogen reaction in a hydrogen or helium atmosphere, and the cooling of the SDS bed by radiation only and by both radiation and natural convection related to the reuse cycle, were obtained.

  8. Sonic Helium Detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  9. Investigation of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge between flat cathode and needle anode in helium and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafiev, Alexander; Belyaev, Vladimir; Zamchii, Roman; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Stepanova, Olga; Chen, Zhaoquan

    2016-09-01

    DC atmospheric-pressure glow microdischarge was generated between a flat cathode and needle anode with a diameter of 100 μm in a special chamber with helium or argon. Dependences of discharge parameters on an interelectrode gap was investigated with an original experimental setup based on a movable arm on the hinge joint which allowed changing the gap with a step of 5 μm. The gap was varied from 5 to 700 μm. Discharge current was 1-21 mA. Such discharge cell has a very low interelectrode capacitance and provides increasing the stability of the discharge against arc formation (transition to RC oscillations mode) at low currents of 1 mA. A weak dependence of discharge voltage across the gap was revealed in helium at 100-250 μm between the electrodes (normal discharge). In contrast to this, glow microdischarge in argon has a descending current-voltage characteristic and unstable nature. The discharge voltage depending on the gap changes significantly slower than in helium. According to our estimations, the strength of electrical field of positive glow in argon is 5 times lower than in helium. Saint Petersburg State University (Grant No. 0.37.218.2016).

  10. Pressure relaxation and diffusion of vacancies in rapidly grown helium crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenko, A. P.; Mikhin, N. P.; Rudavskii, E. Ya.; Smirnov, S. N.; Fysun, Ya. Yu.

    2018-04-01

    An experimental study of the features of pressure relaxation in rapidly grown crystals of a diluted solid solution 3He-4He, at temperatures above 1.3 K, was performed. A cylindrical cell with capacitive pressure sensors at the ends was used for measurements. It was found that, when the helium crystals were grown at cooling rates ≳4 mK/s, the difference in pressure ΔP registered by the sensors at 1.3 K reached 2.4 bars. The ΔP value decreased with subsequent stepwise increase in temperature, but reached zero only after thorough annealing at the premelting temperatures. The kinetics of pressure changes at the sample ends at different temperatures was recorded. The results obtained were interpreted within the framework of the structural relaxation model based on the monovacancy diffusion mechanism. The proposed model made it possible to explain the dependence of ΔP on the time and temperature recorded in the experiment, as well as to determine the activation energy of the structural relaxation process and the diffusion coefficient of vacancies. The details of the vacancy model are described in the Appendix.

  11. Thermophysical properties of helium-4 from 4 to 3000 R with pressures to 15000 psia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Data on many of the properties of helium commonly used in engineering calculations are compiled over as wide a temperature and pressure range as is practical. These properties are presented in a form which is convenient to the engineer. All of these properties have been critically evaluated and represent the best values for that property at this time.

  12. Performance Testing of Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Helium Screw Compressors

    DOE PAGES

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; ...

    2015-08-10

    Oil injected screw compressors have essentially superseded all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, reliability, minimal vibration, and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression. At the present state of compressor system designs for helium refrigeration systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. It is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design the compression system to match the refrigeration process. It is also important to identify those primary compressor skid exergetic loss mechanisms which maymore » be reduced, thereby offering the possibility of significantly reducing the input power to helium refrigeration processes which are extremely energy intensive. This paper summarizes the results collected during the commissioning of the new compressor system for Jefferson Lab's (JLab's) 12 GeV upgrade. The compressor skid packages were designed by JLab and built to print by industry. They incorporate a number of modifications not typical of helium screw compressor packages and most importantly allow a very wide range of operation so that JLab's patented Floating Pressure Process can be fully utilized. This paper also summarizes key features of the skid design that allow this process and facilitate the maintenance and reliability of these helium compressor systems.« less

  13. Performance Testing of Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Helium Screw Compressors

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.

    Oil injected screw compressors have essentially superseded all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, reliability, minimal vibration, and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression. At the present state of compressor system designs for helium refrigeration systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. It is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design the compression system to match the refrigeration process. It is also important to identify those primary compressor skid exergetic loss mechanisms which maymore » be reduced, thereby offering the possibility of significantly reducing the input power to helium refrigeration processes which are extremely energy intensive. This paper summarizes the results collected during the commissioning of the new compressor system for Jefferson Lab's (JLab's) 12 GeV upgrade. The compressor skid packages were designed by JLab and built to print by industry. They incorporate a number of modifications not typical of helium screw compressor packages and most importantly allow a very wide range of operation so that JLab's patented Floating Pressure Process can be fully utilized. This paper also summarizes key features of the skid design that allow this process and facilitate the maintenance and reliability of these helium compressor systems.« less

  14. The compressibility and the capacitance coefficient of helium-oxygen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Imbert, G; Dejours, P; Hildwein, G

    1982-12-01

    The capacitance coefficient beta of an ideal gas mixture depends only on its temperature T, and its value is derived from the ideal gas law (i.e., beta = 1/RT, R being the ideal gas constant). But real gases behave as ideal gases only at low pressures, and this would not be the case in deep diving. High pressures of helium-oxygen are used in human and animal experimental dives (up to 7 or 12 MPa or more, respectively). At such pressures deviations from the ideal gas law cannot be neglected in hyperbaric atmospheres with respect to current accuracy of measuring instruments. As shown both theoretically and experimentally by this study, the non-ideal nature of helium-oxygen has a significant effect on the capacitance coefficient of hyperbaric atmospheres. The theoretical study is based on interaction energy in either homogeneous (He-He and O2-O2) or heterogeneous (He-O2) molecular pairs, and on the virial equation of state for gas mixtures. The experimental study is based on weight determination of samples of known volume of binary helium-oxygen mixtures, which are prepared in well-controlled pressure and temperature conditions. Our experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. 1) The helium compressibility factor ZHe increases linearly with pressure [ZHe = 1 + 0.0045 P (in MPa) at 30 degrees C]; and 2) in same temperature and pressure conditions (T = 303 K and P = 0.1 to 15 MPa), the same value for Z is valid for a helium-oxygen binary mixture and for pure helium. As derived from the equation of state of real gases, the capacitance coefficient is inversely related to Z (beta = 1/ZRT); therefore, for helium-oxygen mixtures, this coefficient would decrease with increasing pressure. A table is given for theoretical values of helium-oxygen capacitance coefficient, at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 15.0 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 25 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  15. Diagnosis of a short-pulse dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure in helium with hydrogen-methane admixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastuta, A. V.; Pohoata, V.; Mihaila, I.; Topala, I.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, we present results from electrical, optical, and spectroscopic diagnosis of a short-pulse (250 ns) high-power impulse (up to 11 kW) dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure running in a helium/helium-hydrogen/helium-hydrogen-methane gas mixture. This plasma source is able to generate up to 20 cm3 of plasma volume, pulsed in kilohertz range. The plasma spatio-temporal dynamics are found to be developed in three distinct phases. All the experimental observations reveal a similar dynamic to medium power microsecond barrier discharges, although the power per pulse and current density are up to two orders of magnitude higher than the case of microsecond barrier discharges. This might open the possibility for new applications in the field of gas or surface processing, and even life science. These devices can be used in laboratory experiments relevant for molecular astrophysics.

  16. Transient Analysis of Pressurization and Pneumatic Subsystems of the X-34 Main Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Knight, K. C.; Chamption, R. H., Jr.; Kennedy, Jim W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Transient models for the pressurization, vent/relief, and pneumatic subsystems of the X-34 Main Propulsion System are presented and simulation of their operation within prescribed requirements are provided. First, using ROCket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) program, pressurization subsystem operation was simulated and helium requirements and the ullage thermodynamic condition within each propellant tank were calculated. Then, Overpressurization scenarios of propellant tanks and the response of vent/relief valves were evaluated using ROCETS simulation of simultaneous operation of the pressurization and vent/relief subsystems by incorporating the valves data into the model. Finally, the ROCETS simulation of in-flight operation of pneumatic subsystem predicted the overall helium consumption, Inter-Propellant Seal (IPS) purge flowrate and thermodynamic conditions, and Spin Start power.

  17. Persistent Currents in a Rotating Superleak Partially Filled with Superfluid Helium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    the difference in pressure of the helium bath Po and the reduced vapor pressure in the cell P. In the region from 1.0 to 0.1 the log Po-P has been seen...easily measurable quantities of temperature, T, the helium bath pressure, Po, and the cell pressure P to the film thickness d. Alpha is a measure of the...rotation is controlled by a motor and power supply. The temperature is controlled by the pumping rate and a feedback heater in the helium bath and -maybe

  18. Online helium inventory monitoring of JLab cryogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, N.; Knudsen, P.; Wright, M.

    2017-12-01

    There are five cryogenic plants at Jefferson Lab which support the LINAC, experiment hall end-stations and test facility. The majority of JLab’s helium inventory, which is around 15 tons, is allocated in the LINAC cryo-modules, with the majority of the balance of helium distributed at the cryogenic-plant level mainly as stored gas and liquid for stable operation. Due to the organic evolution of the five plants and independent actions within the experiment halls, the traditional inventory management strategy suffers from rapid identification of potential leaks. This can easily result in losses many times higher than the normally accepted (average) loss rate. A real-time program to quickly identify potential excessive leakage was developed and tested. This program was written in MATLAB© for portability, easy diagnostics and modification. It interfaces directly with EPICS to access the cryogenic system state, and with and NIST REFPROP© for real fluid properties. This program was validated against the actual helium offloaded into the system. The present paper outlines the details of the inventory monitoring program, its validation and a sample of the achieved results.

  19. Design considerations for a micro-g superfluid helium fluid acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The general description, the operation, and the design of a superfluid helium (SFHe) fluid acquisition system (FAS) for use under microgravity conditions is presented. For the type of FAS considered here, where fine-mesh woven screens are used to retain flowing SFHe within a gallery arm (flow) channel, those forces which determine the flow dynamics are the micro-g accelerations, liquid surface tension, and tensile strength and cumulative pressure drops along a flow path that begins at the bulk liquid and ends at the entrance to a pump. For this case, the dimensionless number, N(T) is written as the ratio between the pressure drop across the screen and the surface tension forces at the screen for low fluid velocities. Static Bond number measurements have bene taken for SFHe using 325 x 2300 twilled Dutch screen and have indicated a screen pore hydraulic radius of 0.00031 cm.

  20. How to make Raman-inactive helium visible in Raman spectra of tritium-helium gas mixtures

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schloesser, M.; Pakari, O.; Rupp, S.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy, a powerful method for the quantitative compositional analysis of molecular gases, e.g. mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues, is not able to detect monoatomic species like helium. This deficit can be overcome by using radioluminescence emission from helium atoms induced by β-electrons from tritium decay. We present theoretical considerations and combined Raman/radioluminescence spectra. Furthermore, we discuss the linearity of the method together with validation measurements for determining the pressure dependence. Finally, we conclude how this technique can be used for samples of helium with traces of tritium, and vice versa. (authors)

  1. Measurement of ion beam angular distribution at different helium gas pressures in a plasma focus device by large-area polycarbonate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M.; Ramezani, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents an experimental study and analysis of full helium ion density angular distributions in a 4-kJ plasma focus device (PFD) at pressures of 10, 15, 25, and 30 mbar using large-area polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) (15-cm etchable diameter) processed by 50-Hz-HV electrochemical etching (ECE). Helium ion track distributions at different pressures, in particular, at the main axis of the PFD are presented. Maximum ion track density of 4.4 × 104 tracks/cm2 was obtained in the PCTD placed 6 cm from the anode. The ion distributions for all pressures applied are ring-shaped, which is possibly due to the hollow cylindrical copper anode used. The large-area PCTD processed by ECE proves, at the present state-of-theart, a superior method for direct observation and analysis of ion distributions at a glance with minimum efforts and time. Some observations of the ion density distributions at different pressures are reported and discussed.

  2. Helium in inert matrix dispersion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veen, A.; Konings, R. J. M.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2003-07-01

    The behaviour of helium, an important decay product in the transmutation chains of actinides, in dispersion-type inert matrix fuels is discussed. A phenomenological description of its accumulation and release in CERCER and CERMET fuel is given. A summary of recent He-implantation studies with inert matrix metal oxides (ZrO 2, MgAl 2O 4, MgO and Al 2O 3) is presented. A general picture is that for high helium concentrations helium and vacancy defects form helium clusters which convert into over-pressurized bubbles. At elevated temperature helium is released from the bubbles. On some occasions thermal stable nano-cavities or nano-pores remain. On the basis of these results the consequences for helium induced swelling and helium storage in oxide matrices kept at 800-1000 °C will be discussed. In addition, results of He-implantation studies for metal matrices (W, Mo, Nb and V alloys) will be presented. Introduction of helium in metals at elevated temperatures leads to clustering of helium to bubbles. When operational temperatures are higher than 0.5 melting temperature, swelling and helium embrittlement might occur.

  3. Theoretical analysis of start-up power in helium pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Monan; Huang, Rongjin; Xu, Dong; Li, Laifeng

    2017-02-01

    An analytical model for one-turn helium pulsating heat pipes (PHPs) with single liquid slug and vapor plug is established in present study. When an additional heat power takes place in the evaporating section, temperature and pressure will increase. The pressure wave travels through vapor and liquid phases at different speed, producing a pressure difference in the system, which acts as an exciting force to start up the oscillating motion. Results show that the start-up power of helium PHP is related to the filling ratio. The start-up power increases with the filling ration. However, there exist an upper limit. Furthermore, the start-up power also depends on the inclination angle of PHP. When the inclination angle increases, the heat input needed to start up the oscillating motion decreases. But for one-turn helium PHP, it can not be started up when the inclination angle is up to 90°, equalling to horizontal position,. While the inclination angle ranges between 0° (vertical position) and 75°, it can operate successfully.

  4. Process optimization of helium cryo plant operation for SST-1 superconducting magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Patel, R.; Mahesuriya, G.; Sonara, D.; Srikanth G, L. N.; Garg, A.; Christian, D.; Bairagi, N.; Sharma, R.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Purwar, G.; Patel, J.; Tanna, V.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Several plasma discharge campaigns have been carried out in steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1). SST-1 has toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) superconducting magnet system (SCMS). The TF coils system is cooled to 4.5 - 4.8 K at 1.5 - 1.7 bar(a) under two phase flow condition using 1.3 kW helium cryo plant. Experience revealed that the PF coils demand higher pressure heads even at lower temperatures in comparison to TF coils because of its longer hydraulic path lengths. Thermal run away are observed within PF coils because of single common control valve for all PF coils in distribution system having non-uniform lengths. Thus it is routine practice to stop the cooling of PF path and continue only TF cooling at SCMS inlet temperature of ˜ 14 K. In order to achieve uniform cool down, different control logic is adopted to make cryo stable system. In adopted control logic, the SCMS are cooled down to 80 K at constant inlet pressure of 9 bar(a). After authorization of turbine A/B, the SCMS inlet pressure is gradually controlled by refrigeration J-T valve to achieve stable operation window for cryo system. This paper presents process optimization for cryo plant operation for SST-1 SCMS.

  5. Helium liquefaction plant

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Toscano, W.M.

    1981-05-19

    In a helium liquefaction plant, a compressor includes first, second and third stages and a precooling section includes first, second and third turboexpanders in series between high and low pressure lines of a heat exchanger. A portion of the medium pressure gas at the output of the second turboexpander is directed back through the heat exchanger and mixed with the output of the first compressor stage. The third turboexpander is positioned between the medium and low pressure lines.

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Modelling of streamer propagation in atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidis, G. V.

    2010-10-01

    The results of a two-dimensional numerical simulation of positive streamer propagation in atmospheric-pressure helium jets injected into ambient air are presented. It is shown that depending on the jet width and the initial radial distribution of electron number density streamer structures of two types can be formed: one with maxima of electric field and electron density at the jet axis and another with maxima of these parameters near the boundary between the jet and surrounding air. The latter structure is similar to the observed ring-shaped structures of plasma bullets.

  7. Detecting continuous gravitational waves with superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; de Lorenzo, Laura; Pikovski, Igor; Schwab, Keith

    2017-04-01

    We study the sensitivity to continuous-wave strain fields of a kg-scale optomechanical system formed by the acoustic motion of superfluid helium-4 parametrically coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity. This narrowband detection scheme can operate at very high Q-factors, while the resonant frequency is tunable through pressurization of the helium in the 0.1-1.5 kHz range. The detector can therefore be tuned to a variety of astrophysical sources and can remain sensitive to a particular source over a long period of time. For reasonable experimental parameters, we find that strain fields on the order of h 10-23 /√{ Hz} are detectable. We show that the proposed system can significantly improve the limits on gravitational wave strain from nearby pulsars within a few months of integration time.

  8. Thermal vacancies and phase separation in bcc mixtures of helium-3 and helium-4

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Fraass, Benedick Andrew

    1980-01-01

    Thermal vacancy concentrations in crystals of 3He- 4He mixtures have been determined. A new x-ray diffractometer-position sensitive detector system is used to make measurements of the absolute lattice parameter of the helium crystals with an accuracy of 300 ppM, and measurements of changes in lattice parameters to better than 60 ppM. The phase separation of the concentrated 3He- 4He mixtures has been studied in detail with the x-ray measurements. Vacancy concentrations in crystals with 99%, 51%, 28%, 12%, and 0% 3He have been determined. Phase separation has been studied in mixed crystals with concentrations of 51%, 28%, and 12% 3Hemore » and melting pressures between 3.0 and 6.1 MPa. The phase separation temperatures determined in this work are in general agreement with previous work. The pressure dependence of T c, the phase separation temperature for a 50% mixture, is found to be linear: dT c/dP = -34 mdeg/MPa. The x-ray measurements are used to make several comments on the low temperature phase diagram of the helium mixtures.« less

  9. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  10. Helium tables.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havill, Clinton H

    1928-01-01

    These tables are intended to provide a standard method and to facilitate the calculation of the quantity of "Standard Helium" in high pressure containers. The research data and the formulas used in the preparation of the tables were furnished by the Research Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  11. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Sunil P.; Ratcliff, Tyree D.; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M.; Shelley, Jacob T.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O2 +·, NO+, etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O2-FAPA, a unique (M + 3)+ ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3)+ ions correspond to (M - CH + O)+, with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3)+ ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O3 +·), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO2 · radical. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines in free-piston Stirling engine research is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving the helium-charged free-piston Stirling engines. The underdamped flow regime is described, the primary resonance frequency is derived, and the pressure phase and amplitude distortion are discussed. The scope and limitation of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  13. Equation of state of fluid helium at high temperatures and densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lingcang; Chen, Qifeng; Gu, Yunjun; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Xianming; Jing, Fuqian

    2005-03-01

    Hugoniot curves and shock temperatures of gas helium with initial temperature 293 K and three initial pressures 0.6, 1.2, and 5.0 MPa were measured up to 15000 K using a two-stage light-gas gun and transient radiation pyrometer. It was found that the calculated Hugoniot EOS of gas helium at the same initial pressure using Saha equation with Debye-Hückel correction was in good agreement with the experimental data. The curve of the calculated shock wave velocity with the particle velocity of gas helium which is shocked from the initial pressure 5 MPa and temperature 293 K, i.e., the D ≈ u relation, D= C 0+λ u ( u<10 km/s, λ=1.32) in a low pressure region, is approximately parallel with the fitted D ≈ u (λ=1.36) of liquid helium from the experimental data of Nellis et al. Our calculations show that the Hugoniot parameter λ is independent of the initial density p{in0}. The D≈ u curves of gas helium will transfer to another one and approach a limiting value of compression when their temperature elevates to about 18000 K and the ionization degree of the shocked gas helium reaches 10-3.

  14. Stability of the Helium-Antiproton System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of their Born-Oppenheimer calculations of this system Todd and Armour noted that the lowest-lying state closely resembles the hydrogen negative ion, since the antiproton lies very close to the helium nucleus and shields one unit of nuclear charge. In the present paper this observation will be taken seriously to produce a variationally correct estimate of the total energy of this system, along with a similar estimate of the energy of the once-ionized system. The nonadiabatic effect of exactly treating the reduced masses improves the results.

  15. Measurement of ion beam angular distribution at different helium gas pressures in a plasma focus device by large-area polycarbonate detectors

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M., E-mail: mortezahabibi@gmail.com; Ramezani, V.

    2017-02-15

    The paper presents an experimental study and analysis of full helium ion density angular distributions in a 4-kJ plasma focus device (PFD) at pressures of 10, 15, 25, and 30 mbar using large-area polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) (15-cm etchable diameter) processed by 50-Hz-HV electrochemical etching (ECE). Helium ion track distributions at different pressures, in particular, at the main axis of the PFD are presented. Maximum ion track density of ~4.4 × 10{sup 4} tracks/cm{sup 2} was obtained in the PCTD placed 6 cm from the anode. The ion distributions for all pressures applied are ring-shaped, which is possibly due tomore » the hollow cylindrical copper anode used. The large-area PCTD processed by ECE proves, at the present state-of-theart, a superior method for direct observation and analysis of ion distributions at a glance with minimum efforts and time. Some observations of the ion density distributions at different pressures are reported and discussed.« less

  16. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher [Allentown, PA; Farris, Thomas Stephen [Bethlehem, PA

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  17. Thermodynamic design of hydrogen liquefaction systems with helium or neon Brayton refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Ryu, Ki Nam; Baik, Jong Hoon

    2018-04-01

    A thermodynamic study is carried out for the design of hydrogen liquefaction systems with helium (He) or neon (Ne) Brayton refrigerator. This effort is motivated by our immediate goal to develop a small-capacity (100 L/h) liquefier for domestic use in Korea. Eight different cycles are proposed and their thermodynamic performance is investigated in comparison with the existing liquefaction systems. The proposed cycles include the standard and modified versions of He Brayton refrigerators whose lowest temperature is below 20 K. The Brayton refrigerator is in direct thermal contact with the hydrogen flow at atmospheric pressure from ambient-temperature gas to cryogenic liquid. The Linde-Hampson system pre-cooled by a Ne Brayton refrigerator is also considered. Full cycle analysis is performed with the real properties of fluids to estimate the figure of merit (FOM) under an optimized operation condition. It is concluded that He Brayton refrigerators are feasible for this small-scale liquefaction, because a reasonably high efficiency can be achieved with simple and safe (low-pressure) operation. The complete cycles with He Brayton refrigerator are presented for the development of a prototype, including the ortho-to-para conversion.

  18. Helium in the eroding atmosphere of an exoplanet.

    PubMed

    Spake, J J; Sing, D K; Evans, T M; Oklopčić, A; Bourrier, V; Kreidberg, L; Rackham, B V; Irwin, J; Ehrenreich, D; Wyttenbach, A; Wakeford, H R; Zhou, Y; Chubb, K L; Nikolov, N; Goyal, J M; Henry, G W; Williamson, M H; Blumenthal, S; Anderson, D R; Hellier, C; Charbonneau, D; Udry, S; Madhusudhan, N

    2018-05-01

    Helium is the second-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and is one of the main constituents of gas-giant planets in our Solar System. Early theoretical models predicted helium to be among the most readily detectable species in the atmospheres of exoplanets, especially in extended and escaping atmospheres 1 . Searches for helium, however, have hitherto been unsuccessful 2 . Here we report observations of helium on an exoplanet, at a confidence level of 4.5 standard deviations. We measured the near-infrared transmission spectrum of the warm gas giant 3 WASP-107b and identified the narrow absorption feature of excited metastable helium at 10,833 angstroms. The amplitude of the feature, in transit depth, is 0.049 ± 0.011 per cent in a bandpass of 98 angstroms, which is more than five times greater than what could be caused by nominal stellar chromospheric activity. This large absorption signal suggests that WASP-107b has an extended atmosphere that is eroding at a total rate of 10 10 to 3 × 10 11 grams per second (0.1-4 per cent of its total mass per billion years), and may have a comet-like tail of gas shaped by radiation pressure.

  19. Helium in the eroding atmosphere of an exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spake, J. J.; Sing, D. K.; Evans, T. M.; Oklopčić, A.; Bourrier, V.; Kreidberg, L.; Rackham, B. V.; Irwin, J.; Ehrenreich, D.; Wyttenbach, A.; Wakeford, H. R.; Zhou, Y.; Chubb, K. L.; Nikolov, N.; Goyal, J. M.; Henry, G. W.; Williamson, M. H.; Blumenthal, S.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Charbonneau, D.; Udry, S.; Madhusudhan, N.

    2018-05-01

    Helium is the second-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and is one of the main constituents of gas-giant planets in our Solar System. Early theoretical models predicted helium to be among the most readily detectable species in the atmospheres of exoplanets, especially in extended and escaping atmospheres1. Searches for helium, however, have hitherto been unsuccessful2. Here we report observations of helium on an exoplanet, at a confidence level of 4.5 standard deviations. We measured the near-infrared transmission spectrum of the warm gas giant3 WASP-107b and identified the narrow absorption feature of excited metastable helium at 10,833 angstroms. The amplitude of the feature, in transit depth, is 0.049 ± 0.011 per cent in a bandpass of 98 angstroms, which is more than five times greater than what could be caused by nominal stellar chromospheric activity. This large absorption signal suggests that WASP-107b has an extended atmosphere that is eroding at a total rate of 1010 to 3 × 1011 grams per second (0.1-4 per cent of its total mass per billion years), and may have a comet-like tail of gas shaped by radiation pressure.

  20. The Redundant Compressor System for the Helium Cryogenic Plant at TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. C.; Tsai, H. H.; Lin, T. F.; Chiou, W. S.; Chang, S. H.; Hsiao, F. Z.; Liao, W. R.; Chuang, P. S. D.

    2017-02-01

    Recommissioning the 700-W helium cryogenic system was completed in 2014 and it entered service in 2015. The main target of this system is a stable supply of liquid helium to the superconducting RF cavities at Taiwan Photo Source. The annual maintenance of the compressor of the plant causes operation of the system to be suspended at least two weeks. To avoid such a long suspension for the cryogenic plant, we installed a redundant compressor system for the cryogenic plant in 2015. We can switch to this redundant compressor system and restart the cryogenic system in a few minutes. In this paper we present the configuration, local testing and long-term operation of this redundant compressor system.

  1. Process Options for Nominal 2-K Helium Refrigeration System Designs

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni

    Nominal 2-K helium refrigeration systems are frequently used for superconducting radio frequency and magnet string technologies used in accelerators. This paper examines the trade-offs and approximate performance of four basic types of processes used for the refrigeration of these technologies; direct vacuum pumping on a helium bath, direct vacuum pumping using full or partial refrigeration recovery, cold compression, and hybrid compression (i.e., a blend of cold and warm sub-atmospheric compression).

  2. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source.

    PubMed

    Badal, Sunil P; Ratcliff, Tyree D; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M; Shelley, Jacob T

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O 2 +· , NO + , etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O 2 -FAPA, a unique (M + 3) + ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3) + ions correspond to (M - CH + O) + , with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3) + ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O 3 +· ), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO 2 · radical. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Effect of anode material on the breakdown in low-pressure helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Miles, J. A.; Tolson, B. A.

    2017-10-01

    The electric breakdown of gases is one of the fundamental phenomena of gas discharge physics. It has been studied for a long time but still attracts incessant interest of researchers. Besides the interesting physics, breakdown is important for many applications including development of reliable electric insulation in electric grids and the study of different aspects of gas discharge physics. In this work an experimental study of the electric breakdown in helium gas for the plane-parallel electrode configuration has been conducted using a copper cathode and a variety of anode materials: copper, aluminum, stainless steel, graphite, platinum-plated aluminum and gold-plated aluminum. According to the Paschen law for studied electrode configuration, the breakdown voltage is a function of the product of gas pressure and inter-electrode gap. The breakdown processes on the left, lower pressure side of the Paschen curve have been the subject of this investigation. For those pressures, the Paschen curve may become multi-valued, where any given pressure corresponds to three breakdown voltage values. It was experimentally demonstrated that the form of the Paschen curve might strongly depend on the material of the anode and the cleanness of the anode surface. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that electrons streaming from the cathode are reflected by the surface of the anode.

  4. Performance of the Helium Circulation System on a Commercialized MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Takeda; M, Okamoto; T, Miyazaki; K, Katagiri

    2012-12-01

    We report the performance of a helium circulation system (HCS) mounted on a MEG (Magnetoencephalography) at Nagoya University, Japan. This instrument is the first commercialized version of an HCS. The HCS collects warm helium gas at approximately 300 K and then cools it to approximately 40 K. The gas is returned to the neck tube of a Dewar of the MEG to keep it cold. It also collects helium gas in the region just above the liquid helium surface while it is still cold, re-liquefies the gas and returns it to the Dewar. A special transfer tube (TT) of approximately 3 m length was developed to allow for dual helium streams. This tube separates the HCS using a MEG to reduce magnetic noise. A refiner was incorporated to effectively collect contaminating gases by freezing them. The refiner was equipped with an electric heater to remove the frozen contaminants as gases into the air. A gas flow controller was also developed, which automatically controlled the heater and electric valves to clean up contamination. The developed TT exhibited a very low heat inflow of less than 0.1 W/m to the liquid helium, ensuring efficient operation. The insert tube diameter, which was 1.5 in. was reduced to a standard 0.5 in. size. This dimensional change enabled the HCS to mount onto any commercialized MEG without any modifications to the MEG. The HCS can increase liquid helium in the Dewar by at least 3 liters/Day using two GM cryocoolers (SRDK-415D, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd.). The noise levels were virtually the same as before this installation.

  5. Simplified Helium Refrigerator Cycle Analysis Using the `Carnot Step'

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    P. Knudsen; V. Ganni

    2006-05-01

    An analysis of the Claude form of an idealized helium liquefier for the minimum input work reveals the ''Carnot Step'' for helium refrigerator cycles. As the ''Carnot Step'' for a multi-stage polytropic compression process consists of equal pressure ratio stages; similarly for an idealized helium liquefier the ''Carnot Step'' consists of equal temperature ratio stages for a given number of expansion stages. This paper presents the analytical basis and some useful equations for the preliminary examination of existing and new Claude helium refrigeration cycles.

  6. Crystal structure and density of helium to 232 kbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Wu, Y.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bassett, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of helium and hydrogen at high pressure are topics of great interest to the understanding of planetary interiors. These materials constitute 95 percent of the entire solar system. A technique was presented for the measurement of X-ray diffraction from single-crystals of low-Z condenses gases in a diamond-anvil cell at high pressure. The first such single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on solid hydrogen to 26.5 GPa were presented. The application of this technique to the problem of the crystal structure, equation of state, and phase diagram of solid helium is reported. Crucial for X-ray diffraction studies of these materials is the use of a synchrotron radiation source which provides high brillance, narrow collimation of the incident and diffracted X-ray beams to reduce the background noise, and energy-dispersive diffraction techniques with polychromatic (white) radiation, which provides high detection efficiency.

  7. Effects of metastable species in helium and argon atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) on inactivation of periodontopathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kim, Su-Jeong; Bae, Byeongjun; Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The helium and argon have been widely used as discharge gases in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) for bacteria inactivation. The APPJs show apparent different in bullet propagation speed and bacteria inactivation rate apparently vary with discharge gas species. This work shows that these two distinctive features of APPJs can be linked through one factor, the metastable energy level. The effects of helium and argon metastable species on APPJ discharge mechanism for reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) generation in APPJs are investigated by experiments and numerical estimation. The discharge mechanism is investigated by using the bullet velocity from the electric field which is obtained with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement. The measured electric field also applied on the estimation of RONS generation, as electron energy source term in numerical particle reaction. The estimated RONS number is verified by comparing NO and OH densities to the inactivation rate of periodontitis bacteria. The characteristic time for bacteria inactivation of the helium-APPJ was found to be 1.63 min., which is significantly less than that of the argon-APPJ, 12.1 min. In argon-APPJ, the argon metastable preserve the energy due to the lack of the Penning ionization. Thus the surface temperature increase is significantly higher than helium-APPJ case. It implies that the metastable energy plays important role in both of APPJ bullet propagation and bacteria inactivation mechanism.

  8. Cooling-capacity characteristics of Helium-4 JT cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, D. L.; Gan, Z. H.; Guo, Y. X.; Shen, Y. W.; Chen, S. F.

    2017-12-01

    Cooling capacity of a Helium-4 JT cryocooler may be achieved at a temperature higher than liquid helium temperature. The latent cooling capacity, which should be obtained at liquid helium temperature, is defined as a special part of cooling capacity. With the thermodynamic analysis on steady working conditions of a Helium-4 JT cryocooler, its cooling capacity and temperature characteristics are presented systematically. The effects of precooling temperature and high pressure on the cooling capacity and latent cooling capacity are illustrated. Furthermore, the JT cryocoolers using hydrogen and neon as the working fluids are also discussed. It is shown that helium JT cryocooler has a special cooling capacity characteristic which does not exist in JT cryocoolers using other pure working fluids.

  9. Experimental study of the density of the helium-nitrogen gas system at low temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyutin, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    At the Department of TOT, an experimental setup was created to measure the density of a binary gas system from 100 to 300 K and pressures up to 16 MPa and with any mixture compositions. Experimental density for the helium-nitrogen system were determined by the piezometer of constant volume method. The amount of substance in the piezometer was measured by volumetric method. In this setup, the mixture of He - N2 was prepared in a special mixer for a series of p-v-T experiments, the concentration was determined by calculation using the equations of state of pure components. In the experiment, mixtures were prepared with molar concentrations, lying close to the range: 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8.

  10. Helium-Based Soundwave Chiller: Trillium: A Helium-Based Sonic Chiller- Tons of Freezing with 0 GWP Refrigerants

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    None

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Penn State is designing a freezer that substitutes the use of sound waves and environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional freezers. Called a thermoacoustic chiller, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the chiller is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. Penn State’s chiller uses helium gas to replace synthetic refrigerants. Becausemore » helium does not burn, explode or combine with other chemicals, it is an environmentally-friendly alternative to other polluting refrigerants. Penn State is working to apply this technology on a large scale.« less

  11. Helium transfer from water into quartz crystals: A new approach for porewater dating [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhin, I.; Gannibal, M.; Tarakanov, S.; Pevzner, B.; Lehmann, B.; Ihly, B.; Waber, H. N.

    2005-09-01

    Several important fundamental and applied problems require a quantification of slow rates of groundwater flow. To resolve these problems helium appears to be a promising tracer. In this contribution we discuss a new approach, which gives the helium inventory in a rock - pore water system by using the relevant mineral record, i.e., without extraction and investigation of the porewater samples. Some U- and Th-poor minerals such as quartz (quartz separates from Permo-Carboniferous Formation, sandstone-shale interlayering, Molasses Basin, Northern Switzerland, hereafter PCF, are used in this study) contain excessive helium having migrated into their internal helium-accessible volume (HAV) from the surrounding porewater [I.N. Tolstikhin, B.E. Lehmann, H.H. Loosli, A. Gautschi, Helium and argon isotopes in rocks, minerals and related groundwaters: a case study in Northern Switzerland, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60 (1996) 1497-1514]. These volumes are estimated by using helium as a nano-size penetrating tool, i.e., by saturation of the minerals with helium under controlled pressure-temperature conditions and subsequent measurements of the helium-saturated concentrations. In the quartz separates HAV/total volume ratios vary from 0.017% to 0.16%; along with the measured initial (unsaturated) He concentration the HAV gives the internal helium pressure, the mean value obtained for 7 samples (25 sample aliquots) is P = 0.45 ± 0.15 atm (1 σ). The product of helium pressure and solubility (7.35 × 10 - 3 cc STP He/cc H 2O for the temperature and salinity of PCF aquifers reported in [F.J. Pearson, W. Balderer, H.H. Loosli, B.E. Lehmann, A. Matter, T. Peters, H. Schmassmann, A. Gautschi, Applied Isotope Hydrogeology-A Case Study in Northern Switzerland, Elsevier Amsterdam, 1991, 439 pp.]) is the mineral-derived He concentration in the respective porewater, CPW = 0.0035 ± 0.0017 cc He/cc H 2O. This value is in full accord with measured He concentrations in PCF aquifers, CPCF

  12. Automated recognition of helium speech. Phase I: Investigation of microprocessor based analysis/synthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    This is the Final Report of Electronic Design Associates on its Phase I SBIR project. The purpose of this project is to develop a method for correcting helium speech, as experienced in diver-surface communication. The goal of the Phase I study was to design, prototype, and evaluate a real time helium speech corrector system based upon digital signal processing techniques. The general approach was to develop hardware (an IBM PC board) to digitize helium speech and software (a LAMBDA computer based simulation) to translate the speech. As planned in the study proposal, this initial prototype may now be used to assess expected performance from a self contained real time system which uses an identical algorithm. The Final Report details the work carried out to produce the prototype system. Four major project tasks were: a signal processing scheme for converting helium speech to normal sounding speech was generated. The signal processing scheme was simulated on a general purpose (LAMDA) computer. Actual helium speech was supplied to the simulation and the converted speech was generated. An IBM-PC based 14 bit data Input/Output board was designed and built. A bibliography of references on speech processing was generated.

  13. Plasma action on helium flow in cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darny, T.; Pouvesle, J.-M.; Fontane, J.; Joly, L.; Dozias, S.; Robert, E.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, helium flow modifications, visualized by schlieren imaging, induced by the plasma generated in a plasma jet have been studied in conditions used for biomedical treatments (jet being directed downwards with a low helium flow rate). It has been shown that the plasma action can shift up to few centimeters downstream the effects of buoyancy, which allows to the helium flow to reach a target below in conditions for which it is not the case when the plasma is off. This study reveals the critical role of large and long lifetime negative ions during repetitive operations in the kHz regime, inducing strong modifications in the gas propagation. The cumulative added streamwise momentum transferred to ambient air surrounding molecules resulting from a series of applied voltage pulses induces a gradual built up of a helium channel on tens of millisecond timescale. In some conditions, a remarkable stable cylindrical helium channel can be generated to the target with plasma supplied by negative polarity voltage pulses whereas a disturbed flow results from positive polarity operation. This has a direct effect on air penetration in the helium channel and then on the reactive species production over the target which is of great importance for biomedical applications. It has also been shown that with an appropriate combination of negative and positive polarity pulses, it is possible to benefit from both polarity features in order to optimize the plasma plume propagation and plasma delivery to a target.

  14. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant, revision A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: 'Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10(exp 8) Pa', Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923-1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: 'Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres', Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  15. Development of monitoring system of helium leakage from canister

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Toriu, D.; Ushijima, S.; Takeda, H.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a computational method for the helium leakage from a canister. The governing equations for compressible fluids consist of mass conservation equation in Eulerian description, momentum equations and energy equation. The numerical procedures are divided into three phases, advection, diffusion and acoustic phases, and the equations of compressible fluids are discretized with a finite volume method. Thus, the mass conservation law is sufficiently satisfied in the calculation region. In particular, our computational method enables us to predict the change of the temperature distributions around the canister boundaries by calculating the governing equations for the compressible gas flows, whichmore » are leaked out from a slight crack on the canister boundary. In order to confirm the validity of our method, it was applied to the basic problem, 2-dimensional natural convection flows in a rectangular cavity. As a result, it was shown that the naturally convected flows can be reasonably simulated by our method. Furthermore, numerical experiments were conducted for the helium leakage from canister and we derived a close relationship between the inner pressure and the boundary temperature distributions.« less

  16. DC-driven plasma gun: self-oscillatory operation mode of atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet comprised of repetitive streamer breakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingxing; Shashurin, Alexey

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents and studies helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet comprised of a series of repetitive streamer breakdowns, which is driven by pure DC high voltage (self-oscillatory behavior). The repetition frequency of the breakdowns is governed by the geometry of discharge electrodes/surroundings and gas flow rate. Each next streamer is initiated when the electric field on the anode tip recovers after the previous breakdown and reaches the breakdown threshold value of about 2.5 kV cm-1. One type of the helium plasma gun designed using this operational principle is demonstrated. The gun operates on about 3 kV DC high voltage and is comprised of the series of the repetitive streamer breakdowns at a frequency of about 13 kHz.

  17. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, participants cut the lines to helium-filled balloons. From left, they are Center Director Roy Bridges; Michael Butchko, president, SGS; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pamela Gillespie, executive administrator, office of Congressman Dave Weldon; and Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS), and Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO.

  18. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, participants watch as helium-filled balloons take to the sky after their lines were cut. From left, they are Center Director Roy Bridges; Michael Butchko, president, SGS; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pamela Gillespie, executive administrator, office of Congressman Dave Weldon; and Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS), and Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO.

  19. Extending helium partial pressure measurement technology to JET DTE2 and ITER.

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Biewer, T M; Kruezi, U; Vartanian, S; Douai, D; Hillis, D L; Marcus, C

    2016-11-01

    The detection limit for helium (He) partial pressure monitoring via the Penning discharge optical emission diagnostic, mainly used for tokamak divertor effluent gas analysis, is shown here to be possible for He concentrations down to 0.1% in predominantly deuterium effluents. This result from a dedicated laboratory study means that the technique can now be extended to intrinsically (non-injected) He produced as fusion reaction ash in deuterium-tritium experiments. The paper also examines threshold ionization mass spectroscopy as a potential backup to the optical technique, but finds that further development is needed to attain with plasma pulse-relevant response times. Both these studies are presented in the context of continuing development of plasma pulse-resolving, residual gas analysis for the upcoming JET deuterium-tritium campaign (DTE2) and for ITER.

  20. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  1. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges addresses the audience at the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center that will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile- long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS.

  2. Diffuse Helium Emission as a Precursory Sign of Volcanic Unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron, E.; Perez, N.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Sumino, H.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Barrancos, J.; Nolasco, D.; Padilla, G.; Dionis, S.; Rodriguez, F.; Hernandez, I.; Calvo, D.; Peraza, M.; Nagao, K.

    2012-12-01

    /d on November 6, several days before the occurrence of the submarine eruption. A significant decrease to 13 kg/d was estimated almost 10 days after the beginning of the eruption, followed by a sudden increase to 38 kg/d several days before the largest seismic event of the volcanic crisis (M = 4.6) occurred on November 11. High volcanic-gas pressure in a magma surrounded by a less deformed and fractured crust could be responsible for the high magmatic-helium emission rate and eventual submarine eruption during the first segment of activity, whereas the second segment causing extensive crustal deformation and fracturing resulted in a low gas pressure on the magma and relatively low magmatic-helium diffuse emission rates. The energy loss in the system from the release of volcanic gases might be responsible for the observed decrease in the seismic energy released and the absence of a second volcanic eruption. The system continued to degas for one month, producing a gradual decrease in the helium emission rate. Helium emission data shown in this report demonstrate that diffuse helium surveys is a powerful tool for volcano monitoring. The geochemical parameters presented here are extremely important for forecasting the onset of volcanic unrest and subsequent volcanic eruptions, mainly when magma migrates aseismically, i.e., silently, toward the surface.

  3. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng, E-mail: hujs@ipp.ac.cn; Wan, Zhao

    2016-03-15

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10{sup −6}–5.0 × 10{sup −2} Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eVmore » and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (P{sub D{sub 2}}) and helium partial pressure (P{sub He}) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if P{sub D{sub 2}} > 10{sup −6} Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if P{sub He}/P{sub D{sub 2}} > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.« less

  4. A high-resolution superconducting pressure control system for use at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Z. K.; Swanson, D. R.; Nissen, J. A.; Lipa, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a high resolution superconducting pressure gauge and controller system capable of stabilizing pressure to within +/-10-8 bar in the range 0-30 bars at temperatures below about 6K. The system consists of two parts: a transducer and a pressure actuator. The transducer is based on the inductive sensing of the position of a diaphragm using superconducting techniques. A rod attached to the center of the diaphragm supports a superconducting plate which is in close proximity to a flat, spiral superconducting coil. A persistent current of about 1 A is trapped in the coil and is coupled to a dc SQUID magnetometer. The magnetometer produces a partially digitized dc output proportional to the change of pressure applied to the diaphragm. Because of the ability of the magnetometer to count magnetic flux quanta, an extremely wide dynamic range can be achieved with high sensitivity and repeatability. The transducer was used to control the pressure of a sample of liquid helium at temperatures near 2 K and pressures from 1-25 bars. The actuator consisted of two parts: a thermally isolated chamber filled with 3He that could be heated and cooled as desired over the range 1.5 to 10 K, and a beryllium-copper diaphragm assembly. This diaphragm had the 3He on one side and the sample helium on the other. A simple servomechanism was used to convert the output signal from the magnetometer to heat applied to the 3He chamber. The system has been operated routinely over the full range of pressures and so far no significant drift has been detected. It is somewhat sensitive to vibration and EMI, but otherwise appears quite robust. Plans have been made to improve the shielding to reduce the EMI susceptibility. The vibration sensitivity can be reduced by making use of a pair of pressure sensing diaphragms acting in opposite directions. .

  5. Surge Pressure Mitigation in the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Core Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scroggins, Ashley R.; Fiebig, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership between NASA and JAXA whose Core spacecraft performs cutting-edge measurements of rainfall and snowfall worldwide and unifies data gathered by a network of precipitation measurement satellites. The Core spacecraft's propulsion system is a blowdown monopropellant system with an initial hydrazine load of 545 kg in a single composite overwrapped propellant tank. At launch, the propulsion system contained propellant in the tank and manifold tubes upstream of the latch valves, with low-pressure helium gas in the manifold tubes downstream of the latch valves. The system had a relatively high beginning-of- life pressure and long downstream manifold lines; these factors created conditions that were conducive to high surge pressures. This paper discusses the GPM project's approach to surge mitigation in the propulsion system design. The paper describes the surge testing program and results, with discussions of specific difficulties encountered. Based on the results of surge testing and pressure drop analyses, a unique configuration of cavitating venturis was chosen to mitigate surge while minimizing pressure losses during thruster maneuvers. This paper concludes with a discussion of overall lessons learned with surge pressure testing for NASA Goddard spacecraft programs.

  6. 3He NMR studies on helium-pyrrole, helium-indole, and helium-carbazole systems: a new tool for following chemistry of heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald

    2015-02-01

    The (3)He nuclear magnetic shieldings were calculated for free helium atom and He-pyrrole, He-indole, and He-carbazole complexes. Several levels of theory, including Hartree-Fock (HF), Second-order Møller-Plesset Perturbation Theory (MP2), and Density Functional Theory (DFT) (VSXC, M062X, APFD, BHandHLYP, and mPW1PW91), combined with polarization-consistent pcS-2 and aug-pcS-2 basis sets were employed. Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) calculated (3)He nuclear magnetic shieldings reproduced accurately previously reported theoretical values for helium gas. (3)He nuclear magnetic shieldings and energy changes as result of single helium atom approaching to the five-membered ring of pyrrole, indole, and carbazole were tested. It was observed that (3)He NMR parameters of single helium atom, calculated at various levels of theory (HF, MP2, and DFT) are sensitive to the presence of heteroatomic rings. The helium atom was insensitive to the studied molecules at distances above 5 Å. Our results, obtained with BHandHLYP method, predicted fairly accurately the He-pyrrole plane separation of 3.15 Å (close to 3.24 Å, calculated by MP2) and yielded a sizable (3)He NMR chemical shift (about -1.5 ppm). The changes of calculated nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) with the distance above the rings showed a very similar pattern to helium-3 NMR chemical shift. The ring currents above the five-membered rings were seen by helium magnetic probe to about 5 Å above the ring planes verified by the calculated NICS index. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved barrier discharge produced in trapped helium gas at atmospheric pressure

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Popa, Gheorghe

    2013-06-07

    Experimental study was made on induced effects by trapped helium gas in the pulsed positive dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in symmetrical electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. Using fast photography technique and electrical measurements, the differences in the discharge regimes between the stationary and the flowing helium are investigated. It was shown experimentally that the trapped gas atmosphere (TGA) has notable impact on the barrier discharge regime compared with the influence of the flowing gas atmosphere. According to our experimental results, the DBD discharge produced in trapped helium gas can be categorized as a multi-glow (pseudo-glow) discharge, each discharge workingmore » in the sub-normal glow regime. This conclusion is made by considering the duration of current pulse (few {mu}s), their maximum values (tens of mA), the presence of negative slope on the voltage-current characteristic, and the spatio-temporal evolution of the most representative excited species in the discharge gap. The paper focuses on the space-time distribution of the active species with a view to better understand the pseudo-glow discharge mechanism. The physical basis for these effects was suggested. A transition to filamentary discharge is suppressed in TGA mode due to the formation of supplementary source of seed electrons by surface processes (by desorption of electrons due to vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, originated from barriers surfaces) rather than volume processes (by enhanced Penning ionisation). Finally, we show that the pseudo-glow discharge can be generated by working gas trapping only; maintaining unchanged all the electrical and constructive parameters.« less

  8. Effect of two types of helium circulators on the performance of a subsonic nuclear powered airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Two types of helium circulators are analytically compared on the bases of their influence on airplane payload and on propulsion system variables. One type of circulator is driven by the turbofan engines with power takeoff shafting while the other, a turbocirculator, is powered by a turbine placed in the helium loop between the nuclear reactor and the helium-to-air heat exchangers inside the engines. Typical results show that the turbocirculator yields more payload for circulator efficiencies greater than 0.82. Optimum engine and heat exchanger temperatures and pressures are significantly lower in the turbocirculator case compared to the engine-driven circulator scheme.

  9. 3D magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a dc low-current plasma arc batch reactor at very high pressure in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouvier, A.; Iwarere, S. A.; Ramjugernath, D.; Fulcheri, L.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with a three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model under peculiar conditions of very high pressures (from 2 MPa up to 10 MPa) and low currents (<1 A). Studies on plasma arc working under these unusual conditions remain almost unexplored because of the technical and technological challenges to develop a reactor able to sustain a plasma at very high pressures. The combined effect of plasma reactivity and high pressure would probably open the way towards new promising applications in various fields: chemistry, lightning, materials or nanomaterial synthesis. A MHD model helps one to understand the complex and coupled phenomena surrounding the plasma which cannot be understood by simply experimentation. The model also provides data which are difficult to directly determine experimentally. The model simulates an experimental-based batch reactor working with helium. The particular reactor in question was used to investigate the Fischer-Tropsch application, fluorocarbon production and CO2 retro-conversion. However, as a first approach in terms of MHD, the model considers the case for helium as a non-reactive working gas. After a detailed presentation of the model, a reference case has been fully analysed (P = 8 MPa, I = 0.35 A) in terms of physical properties. The results show a bending of the arc and displacement of the anodic arc root towards the top of the reactor, due to the combined effects of convection, gravity and electromagnetic forces. A parametric study on the pressure (2-10 MPa) and current (0.25-0.4 A) was then investigated. The operating pressure does not show an influence on the contraction of the arc but higher pressures involve a higher natural convection in the reactor, driven by the density gradients between the cold and hot gas.

  10. SWCX Emission from the Helium Focusing Cone - Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Collier, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results from an XMM-Newton campaign to study solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the heliospheric focusing cone of interstellar helium are presented. The detections of enhanced O VII and O VIII emission from the cone are at the 2(sigma) and 4(sigma) levels. The solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission in the heliosphere not associated with distinct objects (e.g., comets and planets including exospheric material in and near Earth s magnetosheath) is proportional to the flux of the solar wind and the space density of neutral material. The neutral material originates in the interstellar medium (ISM) and passes through the solar system due to the relative motion of the Sun and the ISM. The flow of the neutral material through the solar system is strongly perturbed by the Sun both by gravity and by radiation pressure. Because of the relative radiative scattering cross sections and the effect of solar gravitation the density of interstellar hydrogen near the Sun is reduced while interstellar helium is gravitationally focused. This creates a helium focusing cone downstream of the Sun [e.g., 1, and references therein].

  11. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.; Dominick, Sam M.; Anderson, John E.; Gille, John P.; Martin, Tim A.; Marino, John S.; Paynter, Howard L.; Traill, R. Eric; Herzl, Alfred; Gotlib, Sam

    1988-01-01

    Replenishment of superfluid helium (SFHe) offers the potential of extending the on-orbit life of observatories, satellite instruments, sensors and laboratories which operate in the 2 K temperature regime. A reference set of resupply customers was identified as representing realistic helium servicing requirements and interfaces for the first 10 years of superfluid helium tanker (SFHT) operations. These included the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag), and the Microgravity and Materials Processing Sciences Facility (MMPS)/Critical Point Phenomena Facility (CPPF). A mixed-fleet approach to SFHT utilization was considered. The tanker permits servicing from the Shuttle cargo bay, in situ when attached to the OMV and carried to the user spacecraft, and as a depot at the Space Station. A SFHT Dewar ground servicing concept was developed which uses a dedicated ground cooling heat exchanger to convert all the liquid, after initial fill as normal fluid, to superfluid for launch. This concept permits the tanker to be filled to a near full condition, and then cooled without any loss of fluid. The final load condition can be saturated superfluid with any desired ullage volume, or the tank can be totally filed and pressurized. The SFHT Dewar and helium plumbing system design has sufficient component redundancy to meet fail-operational, fail-safe requirements, and is designed structurally to meet a 50 mission life usage requirement. Technology development recommendations were made for the selected SFHT concept, and a Program Plan and cost estimate prepared for a phase C/D program spanning 72 months from initiation through first launch in 1997.

  12. Development of Helium-Mass-Spectrometry-Permeameter for the Measurement of Permeability of Near-Impermeable Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moo Y.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2016-12-01

    A helium leakage detection system was modified to measure gas permeability on extracted cores of nearly impermeable rock. The Helium-Mass-Spectrometry-Permeameter (HMSP) is duplicating the classic Darcy's experiment with a constant pressure differential and steady-state flow through a sample using helium gas. Under triaxial stress condition, the newly developed HMSP can measure hydraulic permeability of rocks and geomaterials down to the nanoDarcy scale (10-21 m2). The extension of measuring the lower end of the permeability scale may help answer important questions regarding the permeability of rock at great depth where fractures may close completely under high lithostatic stress.

  13. Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A2Σ+(ν=0,1)→X2Π(Δν =0) at 308 nm and A2Σ+(ν=0,1)→X2Π(Δν =1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p5P→3s5S0 at 777.41 nm, and 3p3P→3s3S0 at 844.6 nm, N2(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C3Πu→B3Πg in the range of 300-450 nm and N2+(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B2Σu+→X2Σg+(Δν =0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p3P0→2s3S at 388.8 nm, 3p1P0→ 2s1S at 501.6 nm, 3d3D→2p3P0 at 587.6 nm, 3d1D→2p1P0 at 667.8 nm, 3s3S1→2p3P0 at 706.5 nm, 3s1S0→2p1P0 at 728.1 nm, and Hα transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that, in the entire active plasma region, the gas temperature remains at 310 ± 25 K and 340 ± 25 K and it increases to 320 ± 25 K and 360 ± 25 K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture

  14. Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina

    In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity propertymore » of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 308 nm and A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p{sup 5}P{yields}3s{sup 5}S{sup 0} at 777.41 nm, and 3p{sup 3}P{yields}3s{sup 3}S{sup 0} at 844.6 nm, N{sub 2}(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{sup {yields}}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}'' in the range of 300-450 nm and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p{sup 3}P{sup 0}{yields}2s{sup 3}S at 388.8 nm, 3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}{yields} 2s{sup 1}S at 501.6 nm, 3d{sup 3}D{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 587.6 nm, 3d{sup 1}D{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 667.8 nm, 3s{sup 3}S{sup 1}{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 706.5 nm, 3s{sup 1}S{sup 0}{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 728.1 nm, and H{sub {alpha}} transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational

  15. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO , presents a plaque to Center Director Roy Bridges. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad.

  16. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS) presents an award of appreciation to H.T. Everett, KSC Propellants manager, at the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Center Director Roy Bridges;); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS.

  17. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jerry Jorgensen welcomes the audience to the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center. Jorgensen, with Space Gateway Support (SGS), is the pipeline project manager. To the right is Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO. Others at the ceremony were Center Director Roy Bridges; Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad.

  18. Bench experiments comparing simulated inspiratory effort when breathing helium-oxygen mixtures to that during positive pressure support with air

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhalation of helium-oxygen (He/O2) mixtures has been explored as a means to lower the work of breathing of patients with obstructive lung disease. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) with positive pressure support is also used for this purpose. The bench experiments presented herein were conducted in order to compare simulated patient inspiratory effort breathing He/O2 with that breathing medical air, with or without pressure support, across a range of adult, obstructive disease patterns. Methods Patient breathing was simulated using a dual-chamber mechanical test lung, with the breathing compartment connected to an ICU ventilator operated in NIV mode with medical air or He/O2 (78/22 or 65/35%). Parabolic or linear resistances were inserted at the inlet to the breathing chamber. Breathing chamber compliance was also varied. The inspiratory effort was assessed for the different gas mixtures, for three breathing patterns, with zero pressure support (simulating unassisted spontaneous breathing), and with varying levels of pressure support. Results Inspiratory effort increased with increasing resistance and decreasing compliance. At a fixed resistance and compliance, inspiratory effort increased with increasing minute ventilation, and decreased with increasing pressure support. For parabolic resistors, inspiratory effort was lower for He/O2 mixtures than for air, whereas little difference was measured for nominally linear resistance. Relatively small differences in inspiratory effort were measured between the two He/O2 mixtures. Used in combination, reductions in inspiratory effort provided by He/O2 and pressure support were additive. Conclusions The reduction in inspiratory effort afforded by breathing He/O2 is strongly dependent on the severity and type of airway obstruction. Varying helium concentration between 78% and 65% has small impact on inspiratory effort, while combining He/O2 with pressure support provides an additive reduction in inspiratory effort

  19. Bench experiments comparing simulated inspiratory effort when breathing helium-oxygen mixtures to that during positive pressure support with air.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew R; Katz, Ira M; Jenöfi, Katharina; Caillibotte, Georges; Brochard, Laurent; Texereau, Joëlle

    2012-10-03

    Inhalation of helium-oxygen (He/O2) mixtures has been explored as a means to lower the work of breathing of patients with obstructive lung disease. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) with positive pressure support is also used for this purpose. The bench experiments presented herein were conducted in order to compare simulated patient inspiratory effort breathing He/O2 with that breathing medical air, with or without pressure support, across a range of adult, obstructive disease patterns. Patient breathing was simulated using a dual-chamber mechanical test lung, with the breathing compartment connected to an ICU ventilator operated in NIV mode with medical air or He/O2 (78/22 or 65/35%). Parabolic or linear resistances were inserted at the inlet to the breathing chamber. Breathing chamber compliance was also varied. The inspiratory effort was assessed for the different gas mixtures, for three breathing patterns, with zero pressure support (simulating unassisted spontaneous breathing), and with varying levels of pressure support. Inspiratory effort increased with increasing resistance and decreasing compliance. At a fixed resistance and compliance, inspiratory effort increased with increasing minute ventilation, and decreased with increasing pressure support. For parabolic resistors, inspiratory effort was lower for He/O2 mixtures than for air, whereas little difference was measured for nominally linear resistance. Relatively small differences in inspiratory effort were measured between the two He/O2 mixtures. Used in combination, reductions in inspiratory effort provided by He/O2 and pressure support were additive. The reduction in inspiratory effort afforded by breathing He/O2 is strongly dependent on the severity and type of airway obstruction. Varying helium concentration between 78% and 65% has small impact on inspiratory effort, while combining He/O2 with pressure support provides an additive reduction in inspiratory effort. In addition, breathing He/O2 alone may

  20. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This workmore » also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.« less

  1. Determining the Pressure Shift of Helium I Lines Using White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarota, Lawrence

    This dissertation explores the non-Doppler shifting of Helium lines in the high pressure conditions of a white dwarf photosphere. In particular, this dissertation seeks to mathematically quantify the shift in a way that is simple to reproduce and account for in future studies without requiring prior knowledge of the star's bulk properties (mass, radius, temperature, etc.). Two main methods will be used in this analysis. First, the spectral line will be quantified with a continuous wavelet transformation, and the components will be used in a chi2 minimizing linear regression to predict the shift. Second, the position of the lines will be calculated using a best-fit Levy-alpha line function. These techniques stand in contrast to traditional methods of quantifying the center of often broad spectral lines, which usually assume symmetry on the parts of the lines.

  2. Helium-3 and helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.

    The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions (heavier than protons). This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes thismore » species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (magnetic vortex acceleration and hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration) of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He3 ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He4 with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.« less

  3. Helium-3 and helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    DOE PAGES

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; ...

    2015-06-24

    The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions (heavier than protons). This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes thismore » species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (magnetic vortex acceleration and hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration) of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He3 ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He4 with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.« less

  4. Theoretical research of helium pulsating heat pipe under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Liu, H. M.; Li, L. F.; Huang, R. J.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    As a new-type heat pipe, pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has several outstanding features, such as great heat transport ability, strong adjustability, small size and simple construction. PHP is a complex two-phase flow system associated with many physical subjects and parameters, which utilizes the pressure and temperature changes in volume expansion and contraction during phase changes to excite the pulsation motion of liquid plugs and vapor bubbles in the capillary tube between the evaporator and the condenser. At present time, some experimental investigation of helium PHP have been done. However, theoretical research of helium PHP is rare. In this paper, the physical and mathematical models of operating mechanism for helium PHP under steady state are established based on the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Several important parameters are correlated and solved, including the liquid filling ratio, flow velocity, heat power, temperature, etc. Based on the results, the operational driving force and flow resistances of helium PHP are analysed, and the flow and heat transfer is further studied.

  5. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Nils B.; Smolarek, Szymon; Loginov, Evgeniy; Mateo, David; Hernando, Alberto; Pi, Marti; Barranco, Manuel; Buma, Wybren J.; Drabbels, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitations of the helium atoms in the liquid. In the present work we determine to what extent this concept can still be applied to nanometer-scale, finite size helium systems. To this end, atoms and molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets of various sizes are accelerated out of the droplets by means of optical excitation, and the speed distributions of the ejected particles are determined. The measurements reveal the existence of a critical velocity in these systems, even for nanodroplets consisting of only a thousand helium atoms. Accompanying theoretical simulations based on a time-dependent density functional description of the helium confirm and further elucidate this experimental finding.

  6. Liquid helium free cryogenic mechanical property test system with optical windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. C.; Huang, C. J.; Huang, R. J.; Li, L. F.

    2017-12-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a non-contact optical method for the in-plane displacement and strain measurement, which has been widely accepted and applied in mechanical property analysis owing to its simple experimental steps, high accuracy and large range of measurement. However, it has been rarely used in cryogenic mechanical test since the opaque design of cryostats and the interaction of optics with liquid coolants (liquid nitrogen or liquid helium). In the present work, a liquid helium free cryogenic mechanical property test system cooled by G-M cryocoolers, with a continuous, tunable environmental temperature from room temperature down to around 20 K, was developed and tested. Quartz optical windows, which are compatible with 2D DIC technology, were designed and manufactured on both inner and outer vacuum chambers. The cryogenic test system with optical windows satisfies well for mechanical tests of materials and takes advantage of both being compatible with DIC technology and getting rid of the use of expensive liquid helium. Surface displacement and strain field of Ti6Al4V under uniaxial tension were studied at 20 K by using this system. The results obtained by DIC method agree well with those obtained by extensometers at cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  8. Pressurization System Modeling for a Generic Bimese Two- Stage-to-Orbit Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurkivich, Pete; Chandler, Frank; Nguyen, Han

    2005-01-01

    A pressurization system model was developed for a generic bimese Two-Stage-to-orbit Reusable Launch Vehicle using a cross-feed system and operating with densified propellants. The model was based on the pressurization system model for a crossfeed subscale water test article and was validated with test data obtained from the test article. The model consists of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen pressurization models, each made up of two submodels, Booster and Orbiter tank pressurization models. The tanks are controlled within a 0.2-psi band and pressurized on the ground with ambient helium and autogenously in flight with gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. A 15-psi pressure difference is maintained between the Booster and Orbiter tanks to ensure crossfeed check valve closure before Booster separation. The analysis uses an ascent trajectory generated for a generic bimese vehicle and a tank configuration based on the Space Shuttle External Tank. It determines the flow rates required to pressurize the tanks on the ground and in flight, and demonstrates the model's capability to analyze the pressurization system performance of a full-scale bimese vehicle with densified propellants.

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  10. Emergency relief venting of the infrared telescope liquid helium dewar, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    An updated analysis is made of the emergency relief venting of the liquid helium dewar of the Spacelab 2 Infrared Telescope experiment in the event of a massive failure of the dewar guard vacuum. Such a failure, resulting from a major accident, could cause rapid heating and pressurization of the liquid helium in the dewar and lead to relief venting through the emergency relief system. The heat input from an accident is estimated for various fluid conditions in the dewar and the relief process considered as it takes place through one or both of the emergency relief paths. It was previously assumed that the burst diaphragms in the dewar relief paths would rupture at a pressure of 65 psi differential or 4.4 atmospheres. In fact, it has proved necessary to use burst diaphragms in the dewar which rupture at 115 psid or 7.8 atmospheres. An analysis of this case was carried out and shows that when the high pressure diaphragm rupture occurs, the dewar pressure falls within 8 s to below the 4.4 atmospheres for which the original analysis was performed, and thereafter it remains below that level.

  11. Helium cluster isolation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, John Paul

    Clusters of helium, each containing ~103- 104 atoms, are produced in a molecular beam and are doped with alkali metal atoms (Li, Na, and K) and large organic molecules. Electronic spectroscopy in the visible and UV regions of the spectrum is carried out on the dopant species. Since large helium clusters are liquid and attain an equilibrium internal temperature of 0.4 K, they interact weakly with atoms or molecules absorbed on their surface or resident inside the cluster. The spectra that are obtained are characterized by small frequency shifts from the positions of the gas phase transitions, narrow lines, and cold vibrational temperatures. Alkali atoms aggregate on the helium cluster surface to form dimers and trimers. The spectra of singlet alkali dimers exhibit the presence of elementary excitations in the superfluid helium cluster matrix. It is found that preparation of the alkali molecules on the surface of helium clusters leads to the preferential formation of high-spin, van der Waals bound, triplet dimers and quartet trimers. Four bound-bound and two bound-free transitions are observed in the triplet manifold of the alkali dimers. The quartet trimers serve as an ideal system for the study of a simple unimolecular reaction in the cold helium cluster environment. Analysis of the lowest quartet state provides valuable insight into three-body forces in a van der Waals trimer. The wide range of atomic and molecular systems studied in this thesis constitutes a preliminary step in the development of helium cluster isolation spectroscopy, a hybrid technique combining the advantages of high resolution spectroscopy with the synthetic, low temperature environment of matrices.

  12. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of the problems associated with reliably containing gaseous helium pressurized to 1530 bars (22 500 psi) between 4.2 K and 150 K led to the following conclusions: (1) common seal designs used in existing elevated-temperature pressure vessels are unsuitable for high-pressure cryogenic operation, (2) extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not good seal materials for cryogenic high-pressure operation; and (3) several high-pressure cryogenic seal systems suitable for large-pressure vessel applications were developed; two seals required prepressurization, and one seal functioned repeatedly without any prepressurization. These designs used indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless-steel anvil rings, and two O-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F.

  13. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  14. The effect of supercritical helium natural convection on the temperature stabilityin a cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Zhou, G.; Li, K. R.; Li, Q.; Pan, W.

    2017-12-01

    With high specific heat and density, supercritical helium can be used to reduce the temperature oscillationand improve temperature stabilityin the low temperature conditions. However, the natural convection ofthe supercritical helium has a complex influence on the suppression of the temperature oscillation. In this paper,a transient three-dimensional numerical simulation is carried out for the natural convection in the cylinder to analyze the effect of natural convection on transferring of temperature oscillation.According to the results of numerical calculation, a cryogenic system cooled by GM cryocooler is designed tostudy the influence of natural convection of supercritical helium on temperature oscillation suppression.

  15. Three-dimensional simulation of microwave-induced helium plasma under atmospheric pressure

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhao, G. L.; Hua, W., E-mail: huaw@scu.edu.cn; Guo, S. Y.

    2016-07-15

    A three-dimensional model is presented to investigate helium plasma generated by microwave under atmospheric pressure in this paper, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron and heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The model is based on the fluid approximation calculation and local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The simulation results demonstrate that the maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.79 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and 1667 K, respectively, for the operating conditions with microwave power of 500 W, gas flow rate of 20 l/min, and initial gas temperature of 500 K. The electromagnetic field distribution in the plasma sourcemore » is obtained by solving Helmholtz equation. Electric field strength of 2.97 × 10{sup 4 }V/m is obtained. There is a broad variation on microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial gas temperature to obtain deeper information about the changes of the electron density and gas temperature.« less

  16. Superfluid helium on orbit transfer (SHOOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of space flight experiments and entire facilities require superfluid helium as a coolant. Among these are the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (PAMF or Astromag), and perhaps even a future Hubble Space Telescope (HST) instrument. Because these systems are required to have long operational lifetimes, a means to replenish the liquid helium, which is exhausted in the cooling process, is required. The most efficient method of replenishment is to refill the helium dewars on orbit with superfluid helium (liquid helium below 2.17 Kelvin). To develop and prove the technology required for this liquid helium refill, a program of ground and flight testing was begun. The flight demonstration is baselined as a two flight program. The first, described in this paper, will prove the concepts involved at both the component and system level. The second flight will demonstrate active astronaut involvement and semi-automated operation. The current target date for the first launch is early 1991.

  17. Measurements of emission-propagation phenomena in low-energy atmospheric-pressure helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kato, Susumu; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kiyama, Satoru; Kim, Jaeho; Ikehara, Sanae; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Hayao; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Sakakita, Hajime

    2018-05-01

    In a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet using helium gas, emission-propagation phenomena, such as streamers and striations were measured using a high-speed intensified charge-coupled device camera. A particular focus was placed on the study of the dependence of the phenomena on the distance between the nozzle of the plasma device and a target plate. When the distance decreased, a transition from the positive streamer to a spatially continuous emission resulted. A further distance reduction resulted in a new propagation mode in which the positive and negative streamers appeared alternately with different current waveforms over two cycles of applied voltage. This phenomenon may be related to residual charges of the preceding cycle when streamer propagation begins. Striation structures were observed in the tail of the positive streamer head and in the successive spatially continuous-emission region. These structures can be measured only within a shorter period than one voltage cycle.

  18. Test program, helium II orbital resupply coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, William S.

    1991-01-01

    The full scope of this program was to have included development tests, design and production of custom test equipment and acceptance and qualification testing of prototype and protoflight coupling hardware. This program was performed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado until its premature termination in May 1991. Development tests were performed on cryogenic face seals and flow control devices at superfluid helium (He II) conditions. Special equipment was developed to allow quantified leak detection at large leak rates up to 8.4 x 10(exp -4) SCCS. Two major fixtures were developed and characterized: The Cryogenic Test Fixture (CTF) and the Thermal Mismatch Fixture (Glovebox). The CTF allows the coupling hardware to be filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid helium (LHe) or sub-cooled liquid helium when hardware flow control valves are either open or closed. Heat leak measurements, internal and external helium leakage measurements, cryogenic proof pressure tests and external load applications are performed in this fixture. Special reusable MLI closures were developed to provide repeatable installations in the CTF. The Thermal Mismatch Fixture allows all design configurations of coupling hardware to be engaged and disengaged while measuring applied forces and torques. Any two hardware components may be individually thermally preconditioned within the range of 117 deg K to 350 deg K prior to engage/disengage cycling. This verifies dimensional compatibility and operation when thermally mismatched. A clean, dry GN2 atmosphere is maintained in the fixture at all times. The first shipset of hardware was received, inspected and cycled at room temperature just prior to program termination.

  19. Fluid helium at conditions of giant planetary interiors

    PubMed Central

    Stixrude, Lars; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    As the second most-abundant chemical element in the universe, helium makes up a large fraction of giant gaseous planets, including Jupiter, Saturn, and most extrasolar planets discovered to date. Using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we find that fluid helium undergoes temperature-induced metallization at high pressures. The electronic energy gap (band gap) closes at 20,000 K at a density half that of zero-temperature metallization, resulting in electrical conductivities greater than the minimum metallic value. Gap closure is achieved by a broadening of the valence band via increased s–p hydridization with increasing temperature, and this influences the equation of state: The Grüneisen parameter, which determines the adiabatic temperature–depth gradient inside a planet, changes only modestly, decreasing with compression up to the high-temperature metallization and then increasing upon further compression. The change in electronic structure of He at elevated pressures and temperatures has important implications for the miscibility of helium in hydrogen and for understanding the thermal histories of giant planets.

  20. Development of a Measurement and Control System for a 40l/h Helium Liquefier based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, L. Q.; Xu, X. D.; Liu, T.; Li, Q.; Hu, Z. J.; Wang, B. M.; Xiong, L. Y.; Dong, B.; Yan, T.

    A 40l/h Helium Liquefier has been commissioned by the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this Helium Liquefier is developed. Proper sensors are selected, for example, three types of transmitters are adopted respectively according to detailed temperature measurement requirements. Siemens S7-300 PLC CPU315-2PN/DP operates as a master station and three sets of ET200 M DP remote expand I/O operate asslave stations. Profibus-DP field communication is used between the master station and the slave stations. The upper computer HMI(Human Machine Interface) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V7.0. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. A specific control logic for this Helium Liquefier is developed. The control of the suction and discharge pressures of the compressor and the control of the turbo-expanders loop are being discussed in this paper. Following the commissioning phase, the outlet temperature of the second stage turbine has reached 8.6K and the temperature before the throttle valve has reached 13.1K.

  1. Analysis and Design of the NASA Langley Cryogenic Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Stevens, Jonathan C.; Vause, R. Frank; Winn, Peter M.; Maguire, James F.; Driscoll, Glenn C.; Blackburn, Charles L.; Mason, Brian H.

    1999-01-01

    A cryogenic pressure box was designed and fabricated for use at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to subject 72 in. x 60 in. curved panels to cryogenic temperatures and biaxial tensile loads. The cryogenic pressure box is capable of testing curved panels down to -423 F (20K) with 54 psig maximum pressure on the concave side, and elevated temperatures and atmospheric pressure on the convex surface. The internal surface of the panel is cooled by high pressure helium as that is cooled to -423 F by liquid helium heat exchangers. An array of twelve independently controlled fans circulate the high pressure gaseous helium to provide uniform cooling on the panel surface. The load introduction structure, consisting of four stainless steel load plates and numerous fingers attaching the load plates to the test panel, is designed to introduce loads into the test panel that represent stresses that will he observed in the actual tank structure. The load plates are trace cooled with liquid nitrogen to reduce thermal gradients that may result in bending the load plates, and thus additional stresses in the test panel. The design of the cryogenic systems, load introduction structure, and control system are discussed in this report.

  2. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  3. Theoretical model of the helium zone plate microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, Adrià; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    Neutral helium microscopy is a new technique currently under development. Its advantages are the low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms, a potential large depth of field, and the fact that at thermal energies the helium atoms do not penetrate into any solid material. This opens the possibility, among others, for the creation of an instrument that can measure surface topology on the nanoscale, even on surfaces with high aspect ratios. One of the most promising designs for helium microscopy is the zone plate microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by an aperture (skimmer) focused by a Fresnel zone plate onto a sample. The resolution is determined by the focal spot size, which depends on the size of the skimmer, the optics of the system, and the velocity spread of the beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate. An important factor for the optics of the zone plate is the width of the outermost zone, corresponding to the smallest opening in the zone plate. The width of the outermost zone is fabrication limited to around 10 nm with present-day state-of-the-art technology. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and width of the outermost zone. Here we present an optimization model for the helium zone plate microscope. Assuming constant resolution and width of the outermost zone, we are able to reduce the problem to a two-variable problem (zone plate radius and object distance) and we show that for a given beam temperature and pressure, there is always a single intensity maximum. We compare our model with the highest-resolution zone plate focusing images published and show that the intensity can be increased seven times. Reducing the width of the outermost zone to 10 nm leads to an increase in intensity of more than 8000

  4. Effects of helium concentration and radiation temperature on interaction of helium atoms with displacement cascades in bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chan; Tian, Dongfeng; Li, Maosheng; Qian, Dazhi

    2018-03-01

    In fusion applications, helium, implanted or created by transmutation, plays an important role in the response of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels to neutron radiation damage. The effects of helium concentration and radiation temperature on interaction of interstitial helium atoms with displacement cascades have been studied in Fe-He system using molecular dynamics with recently developed Fe-He potential. Results indicate that interstitial helium atoms produce no additional defects at peak time and promote recombination of Frenkel pairs at lower helium concentrations, but suppress recombination of Frenkel pairs at larger helium concentrations. Moreover, large helium concentrations promote the production of defects at the end of cascades. The number of substitutional helium atoms increases with helium concentration at peak time and the end of cascades, but the number of substitutional helium atoms at peak time is smaller than that at the end of displacement cascades. High radiation temperatures promote the production at peak time and the recombination of defects at the end of cascades. The number of substitutional helium atoms increases with radiation temperature, but that at peak time is smaller than that at the end of cascades.

  5. Commissioning and operational results of helium refrigeration system at JLab for the 12GeV upgrade

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system at the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL-2) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in late spring of 2013, following the commissioning of the new compressor system, and has been supporting 12 GeV LINAC commissioning since that time. Six design modes were tested during commissioning, consisting of a maximum capacity, nominal capacity, maximum liquefaction, maximum refrigeration, maximum fill and a stand-by/reduced load condition. The maximum capacity was designed to support a 238 g/s, 30 K and 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s, 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6more » kW, 35-55 K shield load. The other modes were selected to ensure proper component sizing and selection to allow the cold box to operate over a wide range of conditions and capacities. The cold box system is comprised of two physically independent cold boxes with interconnecting transfer-lines. The outside (upper) 300-60 K vertical cold box has no turbines and incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and 80-K beds. The inside (lower) 60-4.5 K horizontal cold box houses seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander and a 20-K bed. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will summarize the analysis of the test data obtained over the wide range of operating conditions and capacities which were tested.« less

  6. Flux of OH and O radicals onto a surface by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    The atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is of emerging interest as a cutting-edge biomedical device for cancer treatment, wound healing and sterilization. Reactive oxygen species such as OH and O radicals are considered to be major factors in the application of biological plasma. In this study, density distribution, temporal behaviour and flux of OH and O radicals on a surface are measured using laser-induced fluorescence. A helium plasma jet is generated by applying pulsed high voltage of 8 kV with 10 kHz using a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 4 mm. To evaluate the relation between the surface condition and active species production, three surfaces are used: dry, wet and rat skin. When the helium flow rate is 1.5 l min-1, radial distribution of OH density on the rat skin surface shows a maximum density of 1.2 × 1013 cm-3 at the centre of the plasma-mediated area, while O atom density shows a maximum of 1.0 × 1015 cm-3 at 2.0 mm radius from the centre of the plasma-mediated area. Their densities in the effluent of the plasma jet are almost constant during the intervals of the discharge pulses because their lifetimes are longer than the pulse interval. Their density distribution depends on the helium flow rate and the surface humidity. With these results, OH and O production mechanisms in the plasma jet and their flux onto the surface are discussed.

  7. Special treatment reduces helium permeation of glass in vacuum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, P. J.; Gosselin, C. M.

    1966-01-01

    Internal surfaces of the glass component of a vacuum system are exposed to cesium in gaseous form to reduce helium permeation. The cesium gas is derived from decomposition of cesium nitrate through heating. Several minutes of exposure of the internal surfaces of the glass vessel are sufficient to complete the treatment.

  8. Mechanical pumps for superfluid helium transfer in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, M. G.; Swift, W. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two alternate mechanical pump concepts have been identified for the transfer of superfluid helium in space. Both pumps provide flow at sufficient head and have operating characteristics suitable for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) refill mission. One pump operates at a relatively low speed and utilizes mechanical roller bearings, while the other operates at a higher rotational speed using either electromagnetic or tilting pad gas-dynamic bearings. The use of gas bearings requires transfer of normal helium so that the gas pressure within the pump casing is high enough to operate the bearings. The operating characteristics of both pumps are predicted, the dimensions are estimated and major technology issues are identified. The major issues for each pump design are cavitation performance and bearing development. Roller bearings require quantified reliability for operation in space while electromagnetic bearings require basic development as well as a complex control system. The low speed pump has significantly poorer hydraulic efficiency than the high speed pump.

  9. Analysis of helium purification system capability during water ingress accident in RDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriyono; Kusmastuti, Rahayu; Bakhri, Syaiful; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    The water ingress accident caused by steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) in RDE (Experimental Power Reactor) must be anticipated. During the accident, steam from secondary system diffused and mixed with helium gas in the primary coolant. To avoid graphite corrosion in the core, steam will be removed by Helium purification system (HPS). There are two trains in HPS, first train for normal operation and the second for the regeneration and accident. The second train is responsible to clean the coolant during accident condition. The second train is equipped with additional component, i.e. water cooler, post accident blower, and water separator to remove this mixture gas. During water ingress, the water release from rupture tube is mixed with helium gas. The water cooler acts as a steam condenser, where the steam will be separated by water separator from the helium gas. This paper analyses capability of HPS during water ingress accident. The goal of the research is to determine the time consumed by HPS to remove the total amount of water ingress. The method used is modelling and simulation of the HPS by using ChemCAD software. The BDBA and DBA scenarios will be simulated. In BDBA scenario, up to 110 kg of water is assumed to infiltrate to primary coolant while DBA is up to 35 kg. By using ChemCAD simulation, the second train will purify steam ingress maximum in 0.5 hours. The HPS of RDE has a capability to anticipate the water ingress accident.

  10. Real-Gas Correction Factors for Hypersonic Flow Parameters in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Wayne D.

    1960-01-01

    The real-gas hypersonic flow parameters for helium have been calculated for stagnation temperatures from 0 F to 600 F and stagnation pressures up to 6,000 pounds per square inch absolute. The results of these calculations are presented in the form of simple correction factors which must be applied to the tabulated ideal-gas parameters. It has been shown that the deviations from the ideal-gas law which exist at high pressures may cause a corresponding significant error in the hypersonic flow parameters when calculated as an ideal gas. For example the ratio of the free-stream static to stagnation pressure as calculated from the thermodynamic properties of helium for a stagnation temperature of 80 F and pressure of 4,000 pounds per square inch absolute was found to be approximately 13 percent greater than that determined from the ideal-gas tabulation with a specific heat ratio of 5/3.

  11. Helium interactions with alumina formed by atomic layer deposition show potential for mitigating problems with excess helium in spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenli; Yu, Erick; Gates, Sean; Cassata, William S.; Makel, James; Thron, Andrew M.; Bartel, Christopher; Weimer, Alan W.; Faller, Roland; Stroeve, Pieter; Tringe, Joseph W.

    2018-02-01

    Helium gas accumulation from alpha decay during extended storage of spent fuel has potential to compromise the structural integrity the fuel. Here we report results obtained with surrogate nickel particles which suggest that alumina formed by atomic layer deposition can serve as a low volume-fraction, uniformly-distributed phase for retention of helium generated in fuel particles such as uranium oxide. Thin alumina layers may also form transport paths for helium in the fuel rod, which would otherwise be impermeable. Micron-scale nickel particles, representative of uranium oxide particles in their low helium solubility and compatibility with the alumina synthesis process, were homogeneously coated with alumina approximately 3-20 nm by particle atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a fluidized bed reactor. Particles were then loaded with helium at 800 °C in a tube furnace. Subsequent helium spectroscopy measurements showed that the alumina phase, or more likely a related nickel/alumina interface structure, retains helium at a density of at least 1017 atoms/cm3. High resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the thermal treatment increased the alumina thickness and generated additional porosity. Results from Monte Carlo simulations on amorphous alumina predict the helium retention concentration at room temperature could reach 1021 atoms/cm3 at 400 MPa, a pressure predicted by others to be developed in uranium oxide without an alumina secondary phase. This concentration is sufficient to eliminate bubble formation in the nuclear fuel for long-term storage scenarios, for example. Measurements by others of the diffusion coefficient in polycrystalline alumina indicate values several orders of magnitude higher than in uranium oxide, which then can also allow for helium transport out of the spent fuel.

  12. Preliminary Optical Diagnostics of an Helium Plasma Formed with Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch (ICP-T64) and a Non Transferred Arc Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, D.; Menecier, S.; Dudeck, M.; Katsonis, K.; Berenguer, C.

    2012-12-01

    Gazeous planets of solar system are mainly composed of helium and hydrogen (respectively about 14 and 86%), with traces of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, argon, xenon, neon, methane, ammonia and water. The sun itself is composed mainly of hydrogen and helium. In the future purpose of exploring those kind of atmosphere with probes (Juice project or solar orbiter for instance), current authors propose to study such plasma composition, especially to investigate on their radiative properties. For preliminary study, only helium plasma has been producted at atmospheric pressure using two facilities available at LAEPT: an ICP torch and a non-transferred arc plasma torch (NTAPT). Helium spectra obtained are characterized and compared.

  13. High precision Hugoniot measurements on statically pre-compressed fluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, Christopher T.; Reinhart, William D.; Lopez, Andrew J.; Hickman, Randy J.; Thornhill, Tom F.

    2016-09-01

    The capability for statically pre-compressing fluid targets for Hugoniot measurements utilizing gas gun driven flyer plates has been developed. Pre-compression expands the capability for initial condition control, allowing access to thermodynamic states off the principal Hugoniot. Absolute Hugoniot measurements with an uncertainty less than 3% on density and pressure were obtained on statically pre-compressed fluid helium utilizing a two stage light gas gun. Helium is highly compressible; the locus of shock states resulting from dynamic loading of an initially compressed sample at room temperature is significantly denser than the cryogenic fluid Hugoniot even for relatively modest (0.27-0.38 GPa) initial pressures. The dynamic response of pre-compressed helium in the initial density range of 0.21-0.25 g/cm3 at ambient temperature may be described by a linear shock velocity (us) and particle velocity (up) relationship: us = C0 + sup, with C0 = 1.44 ± 0.14 km/s and s = 1.344 ± 0.025.

  14. 20 K Helium Refrigeration System for NASA-JSC Chamber-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, J.; Redman, R.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhelef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Norton, R.; Lauterbach, J.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.

    2013-01-01

    A new 20 K helium refrigerator installed at NASA Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) was successfully commissioned and tested in 2012. The refrigerator is used to create a deep space environment within SESL s Chamber A to perform ground testing of the James Webb Space Telescope. The chamber previously and currently still has helium cryopumping panels (CPP) and LN2 shrouds used to create Low Earth Orbit environments. Now with the new refrigerator and new helium shrouds (45 x 65 ) the chamber can create a deep space environment. The process design, system analysis, specification development, and commissioning oversight were performed by the cryogenics department at Jefferson Labs, while the contracts and system installation was performed by the ESC group at JSC. Commissioning data indicate a inverse coefficient of performance better than 70 W/W for a 18 KW load at 20 K (accounting for liquid nitrogen precooling power) that remains essentially constant down to 1/3 of this load. Even at 10 percent of the maximum capacity, the performance is better than 140 W/W at 20K. The refrigerator exceeded all design goals and demonstrated the ability to support a wide load range from 10kW at 15 K to 100 kW at 100K. The refrigerator is capable of operating at any load temperature from 15K to ambient with tight temperature stability. The new shroud (36 tons of aluminum) can be cooled from room temperature to 20 K in 24 hours. This paper will outline the process design and commissioning results.

  15. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wavemore » interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.« less

  16. Verification of International Space Station Component Leak Rates by Helium Accumulation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D.; Smith, Sherry L.

    2003-01-01

    Discovery of leakage on several International Space Station U.S. Laboratory Module ammonia system quick disconnects (QDs) led to the need for a process to quantify total leakage without removing the QDs from the system. An innovative solution was proposed allowing quantitative leak rate measurement at ambient external pressure without QD removal. The method utilizes a helium mass spectrometer configured in the detector probe mode to determine helium leak rates inside a containment hood installed on the test component. The method was validated through extensive developmental testing. Test results showed the method was viable, accurate and repeatable for a wide range of leak rates. The accumulation method has been accepted by NASA and is currently being used by Boeing Huntsville, Boeing Kennedy Space Center and Boeing Johnson Space Center to test welds and valves and will be used by Alenia to test the Cupola. The method has been used in place of more expensive vacuum chamber testing which requires removing the test component from the system.

  17. Measurement of Electron Density and Ion Collision Frequency with Dual Assisted Grounded Electrode DBD in Atmospheric Pressure Helium Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiujiao; Qi, Bing; Huang, Jianjun; Pan, Lizhu; Liu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    The properties of a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are diagnosed with a dual assisted grounded electrode dielectric barrier discharge device. In the glow discharge, we captured the current waveforms at the positions of the three grounded rings. From the current waveforms, the time delay between the adjacent positions of the rings is employed to calculate the plasma bullet velocity of the helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron density is deduced from a model combining with the time delay and current intensity, which is about 1011 cm-3. In addition, The ion-neutral particles collision frequency in the radial direction is calculated from the current phase difference between two rings, which is on the order of 107 Hz. The results are helpful for understanding the basic properties of APPJs. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11105093), the Technological Project of Shenzhen, China (No. JC201005280485A), and the Planned S&T Program of Shenzhen, China (No. JC201105170703A)

  18. Performance Characterization of the Production Facility Prototype Helium Flow System

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Dalmas, Dale Allen

    2015-12-16

    The roots blower in use at ANL for in-beam experiments and also at LANL for flow tests was sized for 12 mm diameter disks and significantly less beam heating. Currently, the disks are 29 mm in diameter, with a 12 mm FWHM Gaussian beam spot at 42 MeV and 2.86 μA on each side of the target, 5.72 μA total. The target design itself is reported elsewhere. With the increased beam heating, the helium flow requirement increased so that a larger blower was need for a mass flow rate of 400 g/s at 2.76 MPa (400 psig). An Aerzen GMmore » 12.4 blower was selected, and is currently being installed at the LANL facility for target and component flow testing. This report describes this blower/motor/pressure vessel package and the status of the facility preparations. Blower performance (mass flow rate as a function of loop pressure drop) was measured at 4 blower speeds. Results are reported below.« less

  19. Correlated wave functions for three-particle systems with Coulomb interaction - The muonic helium atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K.-N.

    1977-01-01

    A computational procedure for calculating correlated wave functions is proposed for three-particle systems interacting through Coulomb forces. Calculations are carried out for the muonic helium atom. Variational wave functions which explicitly contain interparticle coordinates are presented for the ground and excited states. General Hylleraas-type trial functions are used as the basis for the correlated wave functions. Excited-state energies of the muonic helium atom computed from 1- and 35-term wave functions are listed for four states.

  20. Optomechanics in a Levitated Droplet of Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Charles; Harris, Glen; Harris, Jack

    2017-04-01

    A critical issue common to all optomechanical systems is dissipative coupling to the environment, which limits the system's quantum coherence. Superfluid helium's extremely low optical and mechanical dissipation, as well as its high thermal conductivity and its ability cool itself via evaporation, makes the mostly uncharted territory of superfluid optomechanics an exciting avenue for exploring quantum effects in macroscopic objects. I will describe ongoing work that aims to exploit the unique properties of superfluid helium by constructing an optomechanical system consisting of a magnetically levitated droplet of superfluid helium., The optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the droplet, as well as the mechanical oscillations of its surface, should offer exceptionally low dissipation, and should couple to each other via the usual optomechanical interactions. I will present recent progress towards this goal, and also discuss the background for this work, which includes prior demonstrations of magnetic levitation of superfluid helium, high finesse WGMs in liquid drops, and the self-cooling of helium drops in vacuum.

  1. Description and operating performance of a parallel-rail electric-arc system with helium driver gas for the Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A parallel-rail arc-discharge system to heat and pressurize the initial helium driver gas of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube is described. This system was designed for a 2.44-m-long driver vessel rated at 138 MPa, with a distance between rails of 20.3 cm. Electric energy was obtained from a capacitor storage system rated at 12,000 V with a maximum energy of 5 MJ. Tests were performed over a range of energy from 1.74 MJ to the maximum value. The operating experience and system performance are discussed, along with results from a limited number of expansion-tube tests with air and carbon dioxide as test gases.

  2. Pressure drop and He II flow through fine mesh screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; van Sciver, S. W.

    1989-05-01

    Fluid acquisition systems for He II transfer devices will utilize gallery arms to ensure that the fluid encounters the pump inlet. In near term experiments such as Superfluid Helium on Orbit Transfer (SHOOT), the preferred configuration consists of several rectangular channels which have one side made from a Dutch weave stainless steel screen having 325 x 2300 wires per inch. The effective pore diameter for this screen is about 5 microns. The present paper reports on measurements of pressure drop across a screen when it is subjected to a flow of liquid helium. The experiment measures the time rate of change of the level in two different helium reservoirs connected by a screen-blocked channel. Results with normal helium are compared with predictions based on the Armour-Cannon (1968) equations. The He II data show considerable deviation from the classical result. A discussion of the He II pressure drop results in terms of two fluid hydrodynamics is included.

  3. Pressure drop and He II flow through fine mesh screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    Fluid acquisition systems for He II transfer devices will utilize gallery arms to ensure that the fluid encounters the pump inlet. In near term experiments such as Superfluid Helium on Orbit Transfer (SHOOT), the preferred configuration consists of several rectangular channels which have one side made from a Dutch weave stainless steel screen having 325 x 2300 wires per inch. The effective pore diameter for this screen is about 5 microns. The present paper reports on measurements of pressure drop across a screen when it is subjected to a flow of liquid helium. The experiment measures the time rate of change of the level in two different helium reservoirs connected by a screen-blocked channel. Results with normal helium are compared with predictions based on the Armour-Cannon (1968) equations. The He II data show considerable deviation from the classical result. A discussion of the He II pressure drop results in terms of two fluid hydrodynamics is included.

  4. Cardiopulmonary changes during laparoscopy and vessel injury: comparison of CO2 and helium in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, C A; Junghans, T; Peter, F; Naundorf, D; Ordemann, J; Müller, J M

    2000-11-01

    Injury of venous vessels during elevated intraperitoneal pressure is thought to cause possible fatal gas embolism, and helium may be dangerous because of its low solubility. Twenty pigs underwent laparoscopy with either CO2 (n=10) or helium (n=10) with a pressure of 15 mm Hg and standardized laceration (1 cm) of the vena cava inferior. After 30 s, the vena cava was clamped, closed endoscopically by a running suture and unclamped again. During the procedure changes of cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP), end tidal CO2 pressure (PETCO2), and arterial blood gas analyses (pH, pO2 and pCO2) were investigated. No animal died during the experimental course (mean blood loss during laceration: CO2, 157+/-50 ml; helium, 173+/-83 ml). MAP and CO values showed a decrease after laceration of the vena cava in both groups that had already been completely compensated for before suturing. PETCO2 increased significantly after CO2 insufflation (P<0.01), while helium showed no effect. Laceration of the vena cava caused no significant changes in PETCO2 values in either group. Significant acidosis and an increase of pCO2 were only found in the CO2 group. The incidence of gas embolism during laparoscopy and accidental vessel injury seems to be very low. With the exception of acidosis and an increase of PETCO2 in the CO2 group, there were no differences in cardiopulmonary function between insufflation of CO2 and helium.

  5. Influence of the excitation frequency on the density of helium metastable atoms in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Sadeghi, N.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric-pressure helium can be sustained over a wide range of excitation frequencies (from, but not restricted, 25 kHz to 15 MHz). The aim of the present paper is to identify the specific characteristics of the discharge modes that can be sustained in this frequency range, namely, the atmospheric-pressure Townsend-like discharge (APTD-L) mode, the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) mode, the Ω mode, the hybrid mode, and the RF-α mode. This is achieved experimentally, by measuring the density of helium metastable atoms, which are known to play a driving role on the discharge kinetics. This density is measured by means of two absorption spectroscopy methods, one using a spectral lamp and the other one using a diode laser as a light source. The first one provides the time-averaged atom densities in the singlet He(21S) and triplet He(23S) metastable states, while with the second one we access the time-resolved density of He(23S) atoms. Time-averaged measurements indicate that the He(23S) density is relatively low in the APTD-L, the Ω and the RF-α modes ( <4 ×1016 m-3 ) slightly higher in the APGD mode ( 2 -7 ×1016 m-3 ), and still higher ( >1 ×1017 m-3 ) in the hybrid mode. The hybrid mode is exclusively observed for frequencies from 0.2 to 3 MHz. However, time-resolved density measurement shows that at 1 MHz and below, the hybrid mode is not continuously sustained. Instead, the discharge oscillates between the Ω and the hybrid mode with a switching frequency about the kilohertz. This explains the significantly lower power required to sustain the plasma as compared to above 1 MHz.

  6. Preliminary performance of a 4.97-inch radial turbine operating in a Brayton power system with a helium-xenon gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, M. J., Jr.; Ream, L. W.; Curreri, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the Brayton-rotating-unit's 4.97-inch radial turbine were investigated with the turbine part of a power conversion system. The following system parameters were varied: turbine inlet temperature from 1200 to 1600 F, compressor inlet temperature from 60 to 120 F, compressor outlet pressure from 20 to 45 psia, and shaft speed from 90-110 percent of rated speed (36000 rpm). The working fluid of the system was a gas mixture of helium-xenon with a nominal molecular weight of 83.8. Test results indicate that changes in system conditions have little effect on the turbine efficiency. At the design turbine inlet temperature of 1600 F and compressor inlet temperature of 80 F, an average turbine efficiency of 91 percent was obtained.

  7. Capacity enhancement of indigenous expansion engine based helium liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, R. S.; Kush, P. K.; Maheshwari, G.

    2017-02-01

    Development of technology and understanding for large capacity helium refrigeration and liquefaction at helium temperature is indispensable for coming-up projects. A new version of helium liquefier designed and built to provide approximately 35 liters of liquid helium per hour. The refrigeration capacity of this reciprocating type expansion engine machine has been increased from its predecessor version with continuous improvement and deficiency debugging. The helium liquefier has been built using components by local industries including cryogenic Aluminum plate fin heat exchangers. Two compressors with nearly identical capacity have been deployed for the operation of system. Together they consume about 110 kW of electric power. The system employs liquid Nitrogen precooling to enhance liquid Helium yield. This paper describes details of the cryogenic expander design improvements, reconfiguration of heat exchangers, performance simulation and their experimental validation.

  8. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  9. A new helium gas bearing turboexpander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L. Y.; Chen, C. Z.; Liu, L. Q.; Hou, Y.; Wang, J.; Lin, M. F.

    2002-05-01

    A new helium gas bearing turboexpander of a helium refrigeration system used for space environment simulation experiments is described in this paper. The main design parameters and construction type of some key parts are presented. An improved calculation of thermodynamic efficiency and instability speed of this turboexpander has been obtained by a multiple objects optimization program. Experiments of examining mechanical and thermodynamic performance have been repeatedly conducted in the laboratory by using air at ambient and liquid nitrogen temperature, respectively. In order to predict the helium turboexpander performance, a similarity principles study has been developed. According to the laboratory and on-the-spot experiments, the mechanical and thermodynamic performances of this helium turboexpander are excellent.

  10. Helium recovery at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M.; Kynoch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Helium conservation is becoming increasingly important as helium availability is on the decline and prices are on the rise. The Florida State University National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has taken several steps over the past five years to increase the percentage of helium recovered. These include the installation of a standalone purifier, recovery flow meters, contamination meters, and a new piping system. The improvements to the recovery system have reduced the amount of helium purchased by the Mag Lab by 60% while helium usage has increased by roughly 40%. This article will provide details about the recovery system as a whole and describe some of the main components. There will also be some examples of the problems we've had to overcome, and some that we are still working on. Finally, there will be an update on the current status of the recovery system and a description of our plans for the future.

  11. High precision Hugoniot measurements on statically pre-compressed fluid helium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Seagle, Christopher T.; Reinhart, William D.; Lopez, Andrew J.

    Here we describe how the capability for statically pre-compressing fluid targets for Hugoniot measurements utilizing gas gun driven flyer plates has been developed. Pre-compression expands the capability for initial condition control, allowing access to thermodynamic states off the principal Hugoniot. Absolute Hugoniot measurements with an uncertainty less than 3% on density and pressure were obtained on statically pre-compressed fluid helium utilizing a two stage light gas gun. Helium is highly compressible; the locus of shock states resulting from dynamic loading of an initially compressed sample at room temperature is significantly denser than the cryogenic fluid Hugoniot even for relatively modestmore » (0.27–0.38 GPa) initial pressures. Lastly, the dynamic response of pre-compressed helium in the initial density range of 0.21–0.25 g/cm3 at ambient temperature may be described by a linear shock velocity (us) and particle velocity (u p) relationship: u s = C 0 + su p, with C 0 = 1.44 ± 0.14 km/s and s = 1.344 ± 0.025.« less

  12. High precision Hugoniot measurements on statically pre-compressed fluid helium

    DOE PAGES

    Seagle, Christopher T.; Reinhart, William D.; Lopez, Andrew J.; ...

    2016-09-27

    Here we describe how the capability for statically pre-compressing fluid targets for Hugoniot measurements utilizing gas gun driven flyer plates has been developed. Pre-compression expands the capability for initial condition control, allowing access to thermodynamic states off the principal Hugoniot. Absolute Hugoniot measurements with an uncertainty less than 3% on density and pressure were obtained on statically pre-compressed fluid helium utilizing a two stage light gas gun. Helium is highly compressible; the locus of shock states resulting from dynamic loading of an initially compressed sample at room temperature is significantly denser than the cryogenic fluid Hugoniot even for relatively modestmore » (0.27–0.38 GPa) initial pressures. Lastly, the dynamic response of pre-compressed helium in the initial density range of 0.21–0.25 g/cm3 at ambient temperature may be described by a linear shock velocity (us) and particle velocity (u p) relationship: u s = C 0 + su p, with C 0 = 1.44 ± 0.14 km/s and s = 1.344 ± 0.025.« less

  13. The use of Vacutainer tubes for collection of soil samples for helium analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Margaret E.; Kilburn, James E.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the helium concentration of soil samples collected and stored in Vacutainer-brand evacuated glass tubes show that Vacutainers are reliable containers for soil collection. Within the limits of reproducibility, helium content of soils appears to be independent of variations in soil temperature, barometric pressure, and quantity of soil moisture present in the sample.

  14. Performance test results of 80 K centrifugal compressor for helium refrigerator

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Asakura, H.; Kato, D.; Saji, N.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have developed a completely oil-free compressor used for the highly reliable helium refrigeration system for a superconducting generator and carried out performance tests under actual condition. The compressor is designed to achieve a pressure ratio of 8 with only 4 stages by cooling the compressor inlet at 80 K with liquid nitrogen, thus acquiring high reliability of long-term maintenance-free operation together with the use of magnetic bearings for oil-free operation. The compressor at each stage is independently driven by a 25 kW built-in motor at the speed of 100,000 rpm, with the power supplied by a variable frequencymore » inverter. The performance test was carried out at each stage, by incorporating the compressor in the closed loop test equipment using helium gas. It was recognized from the test results that the specified pressure ratio of each stage was achieved at the speed below the rated one of 100,000 rpm. It was found that each stage of the compressor has a flat characteristics of adiabatic efficiency over the wide flow range. The mechanical rotation characteristics at low temperatures was also confirmed to be sufficiently stable.« less

  15. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tatkowski, G.; Cheban, S.; Dhanaraj, N.

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantagesmore » which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids« less

  16. Exergy Analysis of the Cryogenic Helium Distribution System for the Large Hadron Collider (lhc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudet, S.; Lebrun, Ph.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.

    2010-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the world's largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility.

  17. Simulation of Oxygen Disintegration and Mixing With Hydrogen or Helium at Supercritical Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Taskinoglu, Ezgi

    2012-01-01

    The simulation of high-pressure turbulent flows, where the pressure, p, is larger than the critical value, p(sub c), for the species under consideration, is relevant to a wide array of propulsion systems, e.g. gas turbine, diesel, and liquid rocket engines. Most turbulence models, however, have been developed for atmospheric-p turbulent flows. The difference between atmospheric-p and supercritical-p turbulence is that, in the former situation, the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamics is moderate to negligible, but for the latter it is very significant, and can dominate the flow characteristics. The reason for this stems from the mathematical form of the equation of state (EOS), which is the perfect-gas EOS in the former case, and the real-gas EOS in the latter case. For flows at supercritical pressure, p, the large eddy simulation (LES) equations consist of the differential conservation equations coupled with a real-gas EOS. The equations use transport properties that depend on the thermodynamic variables. Compared to previous LES models, the differential equations contain not only the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, but also new SGS terms, each denoted as a correction. These additional terms, typically assumed null for atmospheric pressure flows, stem from filtering the differential governing equations, and represent differences between a filtered term and the same term computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In particular, the energy equation contains a heat-flux correction (q-correction) that is the difference between the filtered divergence of the heat flux and the divergence of the heat flux computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In a previous study, there was only partial success in modeling the q-correction term, but in this innovation, success has been achieved by using a different modeling approach. This analysis, based on a temporal mixing layer Direct Numerical Simulation database, shows that the focus in modeling the q

  18. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Wang, P.; Liu, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  19. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.

    2014-01-29

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemensmore » S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.« less

  20. An Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Regulator for Robotic Lunar Landing Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Christopher; Trinh, Huu; Pedersen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Robotic Lunar Lander Development (RLLD) Project Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has studied several lunar surface science mission concepts. These missions focus on spacecraft carrying multiple science instruments and power systems that will allow extended operations on the lunar surface. Initial trade studies of launch vehicle options for these mission concepts indicate that the spacecraft design will be significantly mass-constrained. To minimize mass and facilitate efficient packaging, the notional propulsion system for these landers has a baseline of an ultra-high pressure (10,000 psig) helium pressurization system that has been used on Defense missiles. The qualified regulator is capable of short duration use; however, the hardware has not been previously tested at NASA spacecraft requirements with longer duration. Hence, technical risks exist in using this missile-based propulsion component for spacecraft applications. A 10,000-psig helium pressure regulator test activity is being carried out as part of risk reduction testing for MSFC RLLD project. The goal of the test activity is to assess the feasibility of commercial off-the-shelf ultra-high pressure regulator by testing with a representative flight mission profile. Slam-start, gas blowdown, water expulsion, lock-up, and leak tests are also performed on the regulator to assess performance under various operating conditions. The preliminary test results indicated that the regulator can regulate helium to a stable outlet pressure of 740 psig within the +/- 5% tolerance band and maintain a lock-up pressure less than +5% for all tests conducted. Numerous leak tests demonstrated leakage less than 10-3 standard cubic centimeters per second (SCCS) for internal seat leakage at lock-up and less than10-5 SCCS for external leakage through the regulator ambient reference cavity. The successful tests have shown the potential for 10,000 psig helium systems in NASA spacecraft and have reduced risk

  1. Study of Injection of Helium into Supersonic Air Flow Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaholtz, Richard G.; Buggele, Alvin E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the transverse injection of helium into a Mach 3 crossflow is presented. Filtered Rayleigh scattering is used to measure penetration and helium mole fraction in the mixing region. The method is based on planar molecular Rayleigh scattering using an injection-seeded, frequency-doubled ND:YAG pulsed laser and a cooled CCD camera. The scattered light is filtered with an iodine absorption cell to suppress stray laser light. Preliminary data are presented for helium mole fraction and penetration. Flow visualization images obtained with a shadowgraph and wall static pressure data in the vicinity of the injection are also presented.

  2. Space shuttle OMS helium regulator design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Kelly, T. L.; Lynch, R.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis, design, fabrication and design verification testing was conducted on the technological feasiblity of the helium pressurization regulator for the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system application. A prototype regulator was fabricated which was a single-stage design featuring the most reliable and lowest cost concept. A tradeoff study on regulator concepts indicated that a single-stage regulator with a lever arm between the valve and the actuator section would offer significant weight savings. Damping concepts were tested to determine the amount of damping required to restrict actuator travel during vibration. Component design parameters such as spring rates, effective area, contamination cutting, and damping were determined by test prior to regulator final assembly. The unit was subjected to performance testing at widely ranging flow rates, temperatures, inlet pressures, and random vibration levels. A test plan for propellant compatibility and extended life tests is included.

  3. Effects of Oxygen Concentration on Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Helium-Oxygen Mixture at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Tan, Zhenyu; Pan, Jie; Chen, Xinxian

    2016-08-01

    In this work the effects of O2 concentration on the pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in helium-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure have been numerically researched by using a one-dimensional fluid model in conjunction with the chosen key species and chemical reactions. The reliability of the used model has been examined by comparing the calculated discharge current with the reported experiments. The present work presents the following significant results. The dominative positive and negative particles are He2+ and O2-, respectively, the densities of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) get their maxima nearly at the central position of the gap, and the density of the ground state O is highest in the ROS. The increase of O2 concentration results in increasingly weak discharge and the time lag of the ignition. For O2 concentrations below 1.1%, the density of O is much higher than other species, the averaged dissipated power density presents an evident increase for small O2 concentration and then the increase becomes weak. In particular, the total density of the reactive oxygen species reaches its maximums at the O2 concentration of about 0.5%. This characteristic further convinces the experimental observation that the O2 concentration of 0.5% is an optimal O2/He ratio in the inactivation of bacteria and biomolecules when radiated by using the plasmas produced in a helium oxygen mixture. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds of Shandong University, China (No. 2016JC016)

  4. Applicability of ASST-A helium refrigeration system for JLab End Station Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, N.; Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.

    2017-12-01

    The MØLLER experiment at Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a high power (5 kW) liquid hydrogen target scheduled to be operational in the 12 GeV-era. At present, cryogenic loads and targets at three of JLab’s four experimental halls are supported by the End Station Refrigerator (ESR) - a CTI/Helix 1.5 kW 4.5 K refrigerator. It is not capable of supporting the high power target load and a capacity upgrade of the ESR cryogenic system is essential. The ASST-A helium refrigeration system is a 4 kW 4.5 K refrigerator. It was designed and used for the Superconducting Super Collider Lab (SSCL) magnet string test and later obtained by JLab after the cancellation of that project. The modified ASST-A refrigeration system, which will be called ESR-II along with a support flow from JLab’s Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) is considered as an option for the End Station Refrigerator capacity upgrade. The applicability of this system for ESR-II under varying load conditions is investigated. The present paper outlines the findings of this process study.

  5. Approximating the Helium Wavefunction in Positronium-Helium Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    In the Kohn variational treatment of the positronium- hydrogen scattering problem the scattering wave function is approximated by an expansion in some appropriate basis set, but the target and projectile wave functions are known exactly. In the positronium-helium case, however, a difficulty immediately arises in that the wave function of the helium target atom is not known exactly, and there are several ways to deal with the associated eigenvalue in formulating the variational scattering equations to be solved. In this work we will use the Kohn variational principle in the static exchange approximation to d e t e e the zero-energy scattering length for the Ps-He system, using a suite of approximate target functions. The results we obtain will be compared with each other and with corresponding values found by other approximation techniques.

  6. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-01

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s-1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi below the thermocline than is seen in theoretical

  7. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s-1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.

  8. A compact membrane-driven diamond anvil cell and cryostat system for nuclear resonant scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, J. Y.; Bi, W.; Sinogeikin, S.; ...

    2017-12-13

    In order to study the vibrational and thermal dynamic properties of materials using the nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) and the hyperfine interactions and magnetic properties using the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) at simultaneously high pressure (multi-Mbar) and low temperature (T< 10 K), a new miniature panoramic diamond anvil cell (mini-pDAC) as well as a special gas membrane driven mechanism have been developed and implemented at 3ID, Advanced Photon Source. The gas membrane system allows in situ pressure tuning of the mini- pDAC at low temperature. The mini-pDAC fits into a specially designed compact liquid helium flow cryostat systemmore » to achieve low temperature, where liquid helium flows through the holder of the mini-pDAC to cool the sample more efficiently. The sample temperature as low as 9 K has been achieved. Through the membrane, the sample pressure as high as 1.4 Mbar has been generated from this mini-pDAC. The instrument has been routinely used at 3ID for NRIXS and SMS studies. In this paper, technical details of the mini-pDAC, membrane engaging mechanism and the cryostat system are described, and some experimental results are discussed.« less

  9. A compact membrane-driven diamond anvil cell and cryostat system for nuclear resonant scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhao, J. Y.; Bi, W.; Sinogeikin, S.

    In order to study the vibrational and thermal dynamic properties of materials using the nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) and the hyperfine interactions and magnetic properties using the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) at simultaneously high pressure (multi-Mbar) and low temperature (T< 10 K), a new miniature panoramic diamond anvil cell (mini-pDAC) as well as a special gas membrane driven mechanism have been developed and implemented at 3ID, Advanced Photon Source. The gas membrane system allows in situ pressure tuning of the mini- pDAC at low temperature. The mini-pDAC fits into a specially designed compact liquid helium flow cryostat systemmore » to achieve low temperature, where liquid helium flows through the holder of the mini-pDAC to cool the sample more efficiently. The sample temperature as low as 9 K has been achieved. Through the membrane, the sample pressure as high as 1.4 Mbar has been generated from this mini-pDAC. The instrument has been routinely used at 3ID for NRIXS and SMS studies. In this paper, technical details of the mini-pDAC, membrane engaging mechanism and the cryostat system are described, and some experimental results are discussed.« less

  10. Free-piston driver performance characterisation using experimental shock speeds through helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildfind, D. E.; James, C. M.; Morgan, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Tuned free-piston driver operation involves configuring the driver to produce a relatively steady blast of driver gas over the critical time scales of the experiment. For the purposes of flow condition development and parametric studies, it is useful to establish some average working values of the driver pressure and temperature for a given driver operating condition. However, in practise, these averaged values need to produce sufficiently accurate estimates of performance. In this study, two tuned driver conditions in the X2 expansion tube have been used to generate shock waves through a helium test gas. The measured shock speeds have then been used to calculate the effective driver gas pressure and temperature after diaphragm rupture. Since the driver gas is typically helium, or a mixture of helium and argon, and the test gas is also helium, ideal gas assumptions can be made without significant loss of accuracy. The technique is applicable to tuned free-piston drivers with a simple area change, as well as those using orifice plates. It is shown that this technique can be quickly used to establish average working driver gas properties which produce very good estimates of actual driven shock speed, across a wide range of operating conditions. The use of orifice plates to control piston dynamics at high driver gas sound speeds is also discussed in the paper, and a simple technique for calculating the restriction required to modify an established safe condition for use with lighter gases, such as pure helium, is presented.

  11. The Effects of the Pauli Exclusion Principle in Determining the Ionization Energies of the Helium Atom and Helium-Like Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    For helium and helium-like ions, we have examined the differences between the values of the ionization energies as calculated from the Bohr theory and those measured in experiments. We find that these differences vary linearly with the atomic number of the system. Using this result, we show how the Bohr model for single-electron systems may be…

  12. Empirical Correlations for the Solubility of Pressurant Gases in Cryogenic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Asipauskas, Marius; VanDresar, Neil T.

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed data published by others reporting the solubility of helium in liquid hydrogen, oxygen, and methane, and of nitrogen in liquid oxygen, to develop empirical correlations for the mole fraction of these pressurant gases in the liquid phase as a function of temperature and pressure. The data, compiled and provided by NIST, are from a variety of sources and covers a large range of liquid temperatures and pressures. The correlations were developed to yield accurate estimates of the mole fraction of the pressurant gas in the cryogenic liquid at temperature and pressures of interest to the propulsion community, yet the correlations developed are applicable over a much wider range. The mole fraction solubility of helium in all these liquids is less than 0.3% at the temperatures and pressures used in propulsion systems. When nitrogen is used as a pressurant for liquid oxygen, substantial contamination can result, though the diffusion into the liquid is slow.

  13. The thermodynamic properties of normal liquid helium 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Moshfegh, H. R.

    2009-09-01

    The thermodynamic properties of normal liquid helium 3 are calculated by using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method. The Landau Fermi liquid model and Fermi-Dirac distribution function are considered as our statistical model for the uncorrelated quantum fluid picture and the Lennard-Jones and Aziz potentials are used in our truncated cluster expansion (LOCV) to calculate the correlated energy. The single particle energy is treated variationally through an effective mass. The free energy, pressure, entropy, chemical potential and liquid phase diagram as well as the helium 3 specific heat are evaluated, discussed and compared with the corresponding available experimental data. It is found that the critical temperature for the existence of the pure gas phase is about 4.90 K (4.45 K), which is higher than the experimental prediction of 3.3 K, and the helium 3 flashing temperature is around 0.61 K (0.50 K) for the Lennard-Jones (Aziz) potential.

  14. Hydrogen-Helium shock Radiation tests for Saturn Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of shock layer radiation in Hydrogen/Helium mixtures representative of that encountered by probes entering the Saturn atmosphere. Normal shock waves are measured in Hydrogen-Helium mixtures (89:11% by volume) at freestream pressures between 13-66 Pa (0.1-0.5 Torr) and velocities from 20-30 km/s. Radiance is quantified from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Near Infrared. An induction time of several centimeters is observed where electron density and radiance remain well below equilibrium. Radiance is observed in front of the shock layer, the characteristics of which match the expected diffusion length of Hydrogen.

  15. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons.

  16. Improvement of In-Flight Alumina Spheroidization Process Using a Small Power Argon DC-RF Hybrid Plasma Flow System by Helium Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takana, Hidemasa; Jang, Juyong; Igawa, Junji; Nakajima, Tomoki; Solonenko, Oleg P.; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2011-03-01

    For the further improvement of in-flight alumina spheroidization process with a low-power direct-current radiofrequency (DC-RF) hybrid plasma flow system, the effect of a small amount of helium gas mixture in argon main gas and also the effect of increasing DC nozzle diameter on powder spheroidization ratio have been experimentally clarified with correlating helium gas mixture percentage, plasma enthalpy, powder in-flight velocity, and temperature. The alumina spheroidization ratio increases by helium gas mixture as a result of enhancement of plasma enthalpy. The highest spheroidization ratio is obtained by 4% mixture of helium in central gas with enlarging nozzle diameter from 3 to 4 mm, even under the constant low input electric power given to a DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system.

  17. Internal Acoustics of a Pintle Valve with Supercritical Helium Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, Sean R.; Davis, R. Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Large amplitude flow unsteadiness is a common phenomenon within the high flow rate ducts and valves associated with propulsion systems. Boundary layer noise, shear layers and vortex shedding are a few of the many sources of flow oscillations. The presence of lightly damped acoustic modes can organize and amplify these sources of flow perturbation, causing undesirable loading of internal parts. The present study investigates the self-induced acoustic environment within a pintle valve subject to high Reynolds Number flow of helium gas. Experiments were conducted to measure the internal pressure oscillations of the Ares I Launch Abort System (LAS) Attitude Control Motor (ACM) valve. The AGM consists of a solid propellant gas generator with eight pintle valves attached to the aft end. The pintle valve is designed to deliver variable upstream conditions to an attache( converging diverging nozzle. In order to investigate the full range of operating conditions 28 separate tests were conducted with varying pintle position and upstream pressure. Helium gas was utilized in order to closely mimic the speed of sound of the gas generator exhaust, minimizing required scaling during data analysis. The recordec pressure measurements were interrogated to multiple ends. The development of root mean square (RMS) value! versus Reynolds Number and Pintle position are important to creating bounding unsteady load curves for valve internal parts. Spectral analysis was also performed, helping to identify power spectral densities (PSD) of acoustic natural frequencies and boundary layer noise. An interesting and unexpected result was the identification of an acoustic mode within the valve which does not respond until the valve was over 60% open. Further, the response amplitude around this mode can be as large or larger than those associated with lower frequency modes.

  18. Growth rate effects on the formation of dislocation loops around deep helium bubbles in Tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Uberuaga, Blas P.; ...

    2016-11-15

    Here, the growth process of spherical helium bubbles located 6 nm below a (100) surface is studied using molecular dynamics and parallel replica dynamics simulations, over growth rates from 10 6 to 10 12 helium atoms per second. Slower growth rates lead to a release of pressure and lower helium content as compared with fast growth cases. In addition, at slower growth rates, helium bubbles are not decorated by multiple dislocation loops, as these tend to merge or emit given sufficient time. At faster rates, dislocation loops nucleate faster than they can emit, leading to a more complicated dislocation structuremore » around the bubble.« less

  19. Helium-like magnesium embedded in strongly coupled plasma

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bhattacharyya, Sukhamoy

    2016-05-06

    In recent days, with the advent of the x-ray free electron laser (FEL) with Linac coherent light source (LCLS) and the Orion laser, experimental studies on atomic systems within strongly coupled plasma environment with remarkable improvement in accuracy as compared to earlier experiments have become possible. In these kinds of experiments, hydrogen-like and helium-like spectral lines are used for determination of plasma parameters such as temperature, density. Accurate theoretical calculations are, therefore, necessary for such kind of studies within a dense plasma environment. In this work, ab initio calculations are carried out in the framework of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principlemore » to estimate the ground state energy of helium-like magnesium within strongly coupled plasma environment. Explicitly correlated wave functions in Hylleraas coordinates have been used to incorporate the effect of electron correlation. The ion-sphere model potential that confines the central positive ion in a finite domain filled with plasma electrons has been adopted to mimic the strongly coupled plasma environment. Thermodynamic pressure ’felt’ by the ion in the ground states due to the confinement inside the ion spheres is also estimated.« less

  20. Analytical modeling of helium turbomachinery using FORTRAN 77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Purushotham

    Advanced Generation IV modular reactors, including Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs), utilize helium as the working fluid, with a potential for high efficiency power production utilizing helium turbomachinery. Helium is chemically inert and nonradioactive which makes the gas ideal for a nuclear power-plant environment where radioactive leaks are a high concern. These properties of helium gas helps to increase the safety features as well as to decrease the aging process of plant components. The lack of sufficient helium turbomachinery data has made it difficult to study the vital role played by the gas turbine components of these VHTR powered cycles. Therefore, this research work focuses on predicting the performance of helium compressors. A FORTRAN77 program is developed to simulate helium compressor operation, including surge line prediction. The resulting design point and off design performance data can be used to develop compressor map files readable by Numerical Propulsion Simulation Software (NPSS). This multi-physics simulation software that was developed for propulsion system analysis has found applications in simulating power-plant cycles.

  1. Normal injection of helium from swept struts into ducted supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclinton, C. R.; Torrence, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    Recent design studies have shown that airframe-integrated scramjets should include instream mounted, swept-back strut fuel injectors to obtain short combustors. Because there was no data in the literature on mixing characteristics of swept strut fuel injectors, the present investigation was undertaken to provide such data. This investigation was made with two swept struts in a closed duct at Mach number of 4.4 and nominal jet-to-air mass flow ratio of 0.029 with helium used to simulate hydrogen fuel. The data is compared with flat plate mounted normal injector data to obtain the effect of swept struts on mixing. Three injector patterns were evaluated representing the range of hole spacing and jet-to-freestream dynamic pressure ratio of interest. Measured helium concentration, pitot pressure, and static pressure in the downstream mixing region are used to generate contour plots necessary to define the mixing region flow field and the mixing parameters.

  2. Real gas flow parameters for NASA Langley 22-inch Mach 20 helium tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational procedure was developed which can be used to determine the flow properties in hypersonic helium wind tunnels in which real gas behavior is significant. In this procedure, a three-coefficient virial equation of state and the assumption of isentropic nozzle flow are employed to determine the tunnel reservoir, nozzle, throat, freestream, and post-normal shock conditions. This method was applied to a range of conditions which encompasses the operational capabilities of the LaRC 22-Inch Mach 20 Helium Tunnel. Results are presented graphically in the form of real gas correction factors which can be applied to perfect gas calculations. Important thermodynamic properties of helium are also plotted versus pressure and temperature. The computational scheme used to determine the real-helium flow parameters was incorporated into a FORTRAN code which is discussed.

  3. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  4. Helium bubbles aggravated defects production in self-irradiated copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, FengChao; Zhu, YinBo; Wu, Qiang; Li, XinZhu; Wang, Pei; Wu, HengAn

    2017-12-01

    Under the environment of high radiation, materials used in fission and fusion reactors will internally accumulate numerous lattice defects and bubbles. With extensive studies focused on bubble resolution under irradiation, the mutually effects between helium bubbles and displacement cascades in irradiated materials remain unaddressed. Therefore, the defects production and microstructure evolution under self-irradiation events in vicinity of helium bubbles are investigated by preforming large scale molecular dynamics simulations in single-crystal copper. When subjected to displacement cascades, distinguished bubble resolution categories dependent on bubble size are observed. With the existence of bubbles, radiation damage is aggravated with the increasing bubble size, represented as the promotion of point defects and dislocations. The atomic mechanisms of heterogeneous dislocation structures are attributed to different helium-vacancy cluster modes, transforming from the resolved gas trapped with vacancies to the biased absorption of vacancies by the over-pressured bubble. In both cases, helium impedes the recombination of point defects, leading to the accelerated formation of interstitial loops. The results and insight obtained here might contribute to understand the underlying mechanism of transmutant solute on the long-term evolution of irradiated materials.

  5. Laminar Heat-Transfer and Pressure-Distribution Studies on a Series of Reentry Nose Shapes at a Mach Number of 19.4 in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Richard D., Jr.; Pine, W. Clint; Henderson, Arthur, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted in the 2-inch helium tunnel at the Langley Research Center at a Mach number of 19.4 to determine the pressure distributions and heat-transfer characteristics of a family of reentry nose shapes. The pressure and heat-transfer-rate distributions on the nose shapes are compared with theoretical predictions to ascertain the limitations and validity of the theories at hypersonic speeds. The experimental results were found to be adequately predicted by existing theories. Two of the nose shapes were tested with variable-length flow-separation spikes. The results obtained by previous investigators of spike-nose bodies were found to prevail at the higher Mach number of the present investigation.

  6. Theory of Positron Annihilation in Helium-Filled Bubbles in Plutonium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sterne, P A; Pask, J E

    2003-02-13

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of vacancies and voids in materials. This non-destructive measurement technique can identify the presence of specific defects in materials at the part-per-million level. Recent experiments by Asoka-Kumar et al. have identified two lifetime components in aged plutonium samples--a dominant lifetime component of around 182 ps and a longer lifetime component of around 350-400ps. This second component appears to increase with the age of the sample, and accounts for only about 5 percent of the total intensity in 35 year-old plutonium samples. First-principles calculations of positron lifetimes are now used extensively to guidemore » the interpretation of positron lifetime data. At Livermore, we have developed a first-principles finite-element-based method for calculating positron lifetimes for defects in metals. This method is capable of treating system cell sizes of several thousand atoms, allowing us to model defects in plutonium ranging in size from a mono-vacancy to helium-filled bubbles of over 1 nm in diameter. In order to identify the defects that account for the observed lifetime values, we have performed positron lifetime calculations for a set of vacancies, vacancy clusters, and helium-filled vacancy clusters in delta-plutonium. The calculations produced values of 143ps for defect-free delta-Pu and 255ps for a mono-vacancy in Pu, both of which are inconsistent with the dominant experimental lifetime component of 182ps. Larger vacancy clusters have even longer lifetimes. The observed positron lifetime is significantly shorter than the calculated lifetimes for mono-vacancies and larger vacancy clusters, indicating that open vacancy clusters are not the dominant defect in the aged plutonium samples. When helium atoms are introduced into the vacancy cluster, the positron lifetime is reduced due to the increased density of electrons available for annihilation. For a mono-vacancy in Pu containing one

  7. Optical diagnostics with radiation trapping effect in low density and low temperature helium plasma

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lee, Wonwook, E-mail: wwlee@kaeri.re.kr; Kwon, Duck-Hee; Park, Kyungdeuk

    2016-06-15

    Low density (n{sub e} < 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3}) and low temperature (T{sub e} < 10 eV) helium plasma was generated by hot filament discharge. Electron temperature and density of neutral helium plasma were measured by Langmuir probe and were determined by line intensity ratio method using optical emission spectroscopy with population modelings. Simple corona model and collisional-radiative (CR) model without consideration for radiation trapping effect are applied. In addition, CR model taking into account the radiation trapping effect (RTE) is adopted. The change of single line intensity ratio as a function of electron temperature and density were investigated when the RTE is included and excluded.more » The changes of multi line intensity ratios as a function of electron temperature were scanned for various radiative-excitation rate coefficients from the ground state and the helium gas pressures related with the RTE. Our CR modeling with RTE results in fairly better agreement of the spectroscopic diagnostics for the plasma temperature or density with the Langmuir probe measurements for various helium gas pressures than corona modeling and CR modeling without RTE.« less

  8. Using second-sound shock waves to probe the intrinsic critical velocity of liquid helium II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. N.

    1983-01-01

    A critical velocity truly intrinsic to liquid helium II is experimentally sought in the bulk fluid far from the apparatus walls. Termed the 'fundamental critical velocity,' it necessarily is caused by mutual interactions which operate between the two fluid components and which are activated at large relative velocities. It is argued that flow induced by second-sound shock waves provides the ideal means by which to activate and isolate the fundamental critical velocity from other extraneous fluid-wall interactions. Experimentally it is found that large-amplitude second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium II, which is dramatically manifested as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. This breakdown is shown to be caused by a fundamental critical velocity. Secondary effects include boiling for ambient pressures near the saturated vapor pressure or the formation of helium I boundary layers at higher ambient pressures. When compared to the intrinsic critical velocity discovered in highly restricted geometries, the shock-induced critical velocity displays a similar temperature dependence and is the same order of magnitude.

  9. Limited Quantum Helium Transportation through Nano-channels by Quantum Fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Helium at low temperatures has unique quantum properties such as superfluidity, which causes it to behave differently from a classical fluid. Despite our deep understanding of quantum mechanics, there are many open questions concerning the properties of quantum fluids in nanoscale systems. Herein, the quantum behavior of helium transportation through one-dimensional nanopores was evaluated by measuring the adsorption of quantum helium in the nanopores of single-walled carbon nanohorns and AlPO4-5 at 2–5 K. Quantum helium was transported unimpeded through nanopores larger than 0.7 nm in diameter, whereas quantum helium transportation was significantly restricted through 0.4-nm and 0.6-nm nanopores. Conversely, nitrogen molecules diffused through the 0.4-nm nanopores at 77 K. Therefore, quantum helium behaved as a fluid comprising atoms larger than 0.4–0.6 nm. This phenomenon was remarkable, considering that helium is the smallest existing element with a (classical) size of approximately 0.27 nm. This finding revealed the presence of significant quantum fluctuations. Quantum fluctuation determined the behaviors of quantum flux and is essential to understanding unique quantum behaviors in nanoscale systems. PMID:27363671

  10. An investigation on the effects of air on electron energy in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yadi; Tan, Zhenyu; Chen, Xinxian; Li, Xiaotong; Zhang, Huimin; Pan, Jie; Wang, Xiaolong

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the effects of air on electron energy in the atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet produced by a needle-plane discharge system have been investigated by means of the numerical simulation based on a two-dimensional fluid model, and the air concentration dependences of the reactive species densities have also been calculated. In addition, the synergistic effects of the applied voltage and air concentration on electron energy have been explored. The present work gives the following significant results. For a fixed applied voltage, the averaged electron energy is basically a constant at air concentrations below about 0.5%, but it evidently decreases above the concentration of 0.5%. Furthermore, the averaged densities of four main reactive species O, O(1D), O2(1Δg), and N2(A3Σu+) increase with the increasing air concentration, but the increase becomes slow at air concentrations above 0.5%. The air concentration dependences of the averaged electron energy under different voltage amplitudes are similar, and for a given air concentration, the averaged electron energy increases with the increase in the voltage amplitude. For the four reactive species, the effects of the air concentration on their averaged densities are similar for a given voltage amplitude. In addition, the averaged densities of the four reactive species increase with increasing voltage amplitude for a fixed air concentration. The present work suggests that a combination of high voltage amplitude and the characteristic air concentration, 0.5% in the present discharge system, allows an expected electron energy and also generates abundant reactive species.

  11. Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haight, Harlan; Kegley, Jeff; Bourdreaux, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    While augmentation of heat transfer from a test article by helium gas at low pressures is well known, the method is rarely employed during space simulation testing because the test objectives usually involve simulation of an orbital thermal environment. Test objectives of cryogenic optical testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) have typically not been constrained by orbital environment parameters. As a result, several methods of helium injection have been utilized at the XRCF since 1999 to decrease thermal transition times. A brief synopsis of these injection (and removal) methods including will be presented.

  12. Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    While augmentation of heat transfer from a test article by helium gas at low pressures is well known, the method is rarely employed during space simulation testing because the test objectives are to simulate an orbital thermal environment. Test objectives of cryogenic optical testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) have typically not been constrained by orbital environment parameters. As a result, several methods of helium injection have been utilized at the XRCF since 1999 to decrease thermal transition times. A brief synopsis of these injection (and removal) methods including will be presented.

  13. Critical Temperature Differences of a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Prime Mover with Various Helium-Based Binary Mixture Working Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Nohtomi, Makoto; Katsuta, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    Thermoacoustic prime movers are energy conversion devices which convert thermal energy into acoustic work. The devices are environmentally friendly because they do not produce any exhaust gases. In addition, they can utilize clean energy such as solar-thermal energy or waste heat from internal combustion engines as the heat sources. The output mechanical work of thermoacoustic prime movers are usually used to drive a thermoacoustic refrigerator or to generate electricity. A thermoacoustic prime mover with low critical temperature difference is desired when we intend to utilize low quality of heat sources such as waste heat and sun light. The critical temperature difference can be significantly influenced by the kinds of working gases inside the resonator and stack's channels of the device. Generally, helium gas is preferred as the working gas due to its high sound speed which together with high mean pressure will yield high acoustic power per unit volume of the device. Moreover, adding a small amount of a heavy gas to helium gas may improve the efficiency of thermoacoustic devices. This paper presents numerical study and estimation of the critical temperature differences of a standing wave thermoacoustic prime mover with various helium-based binary-mixture working gases. It is found that mixing helium (He) gas with other common gases, namely argon (Ar), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2), at appropriate pressures and molar compositions, reduce the critical temperature differences to lower than those of the individual components of the gas mixtures. In addition, the optimum mole fractions of Hegas which give the minimum critical temperature differences are shifted to larger values as the pressure increases, and tends to be constant at around 0.7 when the pressure increases more than 2 MPa. However, the minimum critical temperature differences slightly increase as the pressure increases to higher than 1.5 MPa. Furthermore, we found that the lowest

  14. Chemical reactions studied at ultra-low temperature in liquid helium clusters

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Krasnokutski, Serge A.

    Low-temperature reaction rates are important ingredients for astrophysical reaction networks modeling the formation of interstellar matter in molecular clouds. Unfortunately, such data is difficult to obtain by experimental means. In an attempt to study low-temperature reactions of astrophysical interest, we have investigated relevant reactions at ultralow temperature in liquid helium droplets. Being prepared by supersonic expansion of helium gas at high pressure through a nozzle into a vacuum, large helium clusters in the form of liquid droplets constitute nano-sized reaction vessels for the study of chemical reactions at ultra-low temperature. If the normal isotope {sup 4}He is used, the heliummore » droplets are superfluid and characterized by a constant temperature of 0.37 K. Here we present results obtained for Mg, Al, and Si reacting with O{sub 2}. Mass spectrometry was employed to characterize the reaction products. As it may be difficult to distinguish between reactions occurring in the helium droplets before they are ionized and ion-molecule reactions taking place after the ionization, additional techniques were applied to ensure that the reactions actually occurred in the helium droplets. This information was provided by measuring the chemiluminescence light emitted by the products, the evaporation of helium atoms by the release of the reaction heat, or by laser-spectroscopic identification of the reactants and products.« less

  15. Determination of electron temperature in a penning discharge by the helium line ratio method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The helium line ratio technique was used to determine electron temperatures in a toroidal steady-state Penning discharge operating in helium. Due to the low background pressure, less than .0001 torr, and the low electron density, the corona model is expected to provide a good description of the excitation processes in this discharge. In addition, by varying the Penning discharge anode voltage and background pressure, it is possible to vary the electron temperature as measured by the line ratio technique over a wide range (10 to 100+ eV). These discharge characteristics allow a detailed comparison of electron temperatures measured from different possible line ratios over a wide range of temperatures and under reproducible steady-state conditions. Good agreement is found between temperatures determined from different neutral line ratios, but use of the helium ion line results in a temperature systematically 10 eV high compared to that from the neutral lines.

  16. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Static Bubble Point Pressure for Cryogenic LADs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John; Chato, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen and nitrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device (LAD). Three fine mesh screen samples (325x2300, 450x2750, 510x3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen using cold and warm non-condensable (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen or nitrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0K - 90K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over non-condensable pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  17. Liquid Hydrogen Regulated Low Pressure High Flow Pneumatic Panel AFT Arrow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    Project Definition: Design a high flow pneumatic regulation panel to be used with helium and hydrogen. The panel will have two circuits, one for gaseous helium (GHe) supplied from the GHe Movable Storage Units (MSUs) and one for gaseous hydrogen (GH2) supplied from an existing GH2 Fill Panel. The helium will supply three legs; to existing panels and on the higher pressure leg and Simulated Flight Tanks (SFTs) for the lower pressure legs. The hydrogen line will pressurize a 33,000 gallon vacuum jacketed vessel.

  18. Advanced helium magnetometer for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this effort was demonstration of the concepts for an advanced helium magnetometer which meets the demands of future NASA earth orbiting, interplanetary, solar, and interstellar missions. The technical effort focused on optical pumping of helium with tunable solid state lasers. We were able to demonstrate the concept of a laser pumped helium magnetometer with improved accuracy, low power, and sensitivity of the order of 1 pT. A number of technical approaches were investigated for building a solid state laser tunable to the helium absorption line at 1083 nm. The laser selected was an Nd-doped LNA crystal pumped by a diode laser. Two laboratory versions of the lanthanum neodymium hexa-aluminate (LNA) laser were fabricated and used to conduct optical pumping experiments in helium and demonstrate laser pumped magnetometer concepts for both the low field vector mode and the scalar mode of operation. A digital resonance spectrometer was designed and built in order to evaluate the helium resonance signals and observe scalar magnetometer operation. The results indicate that the laser pumped sensor in the VHM mode is 45 times more sensitive than a lamp pumped sensor for identical system noise levels. A study was made of typical laser pumped resonance signals in the conventional magnetic resonance mode. The laser pumped sensor was operated as a scalar magnetometer, and it is concluded that magnetometers with 1 pT sensitivity can be achieved with the use of laser pumping and stable laser pump sources.

  19. Transient heat transfer to a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloem, W. B.

    The transient heat transfer coefficient of supercritical helium flowing through a rectangular copper tube with a hydraulic diameter of 5 mm has been measured. The conditions of the flow were: inlet bulk temperature of the fluid was 4.2 K pressures from 3 to 10 bar and Reynolds numbers between 1.5 × 10 4 and 2 × 10 5. The tube was heated on four sides with heat fluxes up to 9800 W m -2. From the experiments it followed that during the first tens of milliseconds the heat transfer is determined by the heat conduction in the boundary layer of the supercritical helium flow. The heat transfer coefficient can be described by h = 0.5(Π λ p C p/t) 1/2. Although the helium properties λ p and Cp are a strong function of pressure and temperature, it was remarkable that the temperature increase during a heat pulse was almost the same at different flow pressures. After analysing the data an empirical relation, h =b ṁ0.75 (t t/t) case1/n, was derived, which predicts the heat transfer coefficient at a given mass flow, ṁ, to within 10% during 0.1 s. The constants b, n and tt are related to the mass flow, ṁ, and the pressure of the fluid.

  20. Safety Aspects of Big Cryogenic Systems Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Fydrych, J.; Poliński, J.

    2010-04-01

    Superconductivity and helium cryogenics are key technologies in the construction of large scientific instruments, like accelerators, fusion reactors or free electron lasers. Such cryogenic systems may contain more than hundred tons of helium, mostly in cold and high-density phases. In spite of the high reliability of the systems, accidental loss of the insulation vacuum, pipe rupture or rapid energy dissipation in the cold helium can not be overlooked. To avoid the danger of over-design pressure rise in the cryostats, they need to be equipped with a helium relief system. Such a system is comprised of safety valves, bursting disks and optionally cold or warm quench lines, collectors and storage tanks. Proper design of the helium safety relief system requires a good understanding of worst case scenarios. Such scenarios will be discussed, taking into account different possible failures of the cryogenic system. In any case it is necessary to estimate heat transfer through degraded vacuum superinsulation and mass flow through the valves and safety disks. Even if the design of the helium relief system does not foresee direct helium venting into the environment, an occasional emergency helium spill may happen. Helium propagation in the atmosphere and the origins of oxygen-deficiency hazards will be discussed.

  1. Development of a feed monitor system for a helium-cooled Michelson intererometer for the Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essenwanger, P.

    1980-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer feed monitor system developed for Spacelab is described. The device is helium cooled and is to be used to measure far infrared radiation sources in space. Performance data and development sequence are presented.

  2. Commissioning of a 20 K Helium Refrigeration System for NASA-JSC Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, J.; Redman, R.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Norton, R.; Lauterbach, J.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.

    2013-01-01

    A new 20 K helium refrigerator installed at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) was successfully commissioned and tested in 2012. The refrigerator is used to create a deep space environment within SESL s Chamber A to perform ground testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The chamber previously and currently still has helium cryo-pumping panels (CPP) and liquid nitrogen shrouds used to create low earth orbit environments. Now with the new refrigerator and new helium shrouds the chamber can create a deep space environment. The process design, system analysis, specification development, and commissioning oversight were performed by the cryogenics department at Jefferson Lab, while the contracts and system installation was performed by the ESC group at JSC. Commissioning data indicate an inverse coefficient of performance better than 70 W/W for a 18 kW load at 20 K (accounting for liquid nitrogen pre-cooling power) that remains essentially constant down to one third of this load. Even at 10 percent of the maximum capacity, the performance is better than 150 W/W at 20 K. The refrigerator exceeded all design goals and demonstrated the ability to support a wide load range from 10 kW at 15 K to 100 kW at 100 K. The refrigerator is capable of operating at any load temperature from 15 K to ambient with tight temperature stability. The new shroud (36 tons of aluminum) can be cooled from room temperature to 20 K in 24 hours. This paper will outline the process design and commissioning results.

  3. Commissioning of a 20 K helium refrigeration system for NASA-JSC Chamber-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, J.; Redman, R.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Norton, R.; Lauterbach, J.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.

    2014-01-01

    A new 20 K helium refrigerator installed at NASA Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) was successfully commissioned and tested in 2012. The refrigerator is used to create a deep space environment within SESL's Chamber A to perform ground testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The chamber previously and currently still has helium cryo-pumping panels (CPP) and liquid nitrogen shrouds used to create low earth orbit environments. Now with the new refrigerator and new helium shrouds the chamber can create a deep space environment. The process design, system analysis, specification development, and commissioning oversight were performed by the cryogenics department at Jefferson Lab, while the contracts and system installation was performed by the ESC group at JSC. Commissioning data indicate an inverse coefficient of performance better than 70 W/W for a 18 kW load at 20 K (accounting for liquid nitrogen pre-cooling power) that remains essentially constant down to one third of this load. Even at 10 percent of the maximum capacity, the performance is better than 150 W/W at 20 K. The refrigerator exceeded all design goals and demonstrated the ability to support a wide load range from 10 kW at 15 K to 100 kW at 100 K. The refrigerator is capable of operating at any load temperature from 15 K to ambient with tight temperature stability. The new shroud (23 metric tons of aluminum) can be cooled from room temperature to 20 K in 24 hours. This paper will outline the design, project execution and commissioning results.

  4. Shock-adiabatic to quasi-isentropic compression of warm dense helium up to 150 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, Q. F.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, J. T.; Li, Z. G.; Li, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Multiple reverberation compression can achieve higher pressure, higher temperature, but lower entropy. It is available to provide an important validation for the elaborate and wider planetary models and simulate the inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion process. In the work, we have developed the thermodynamic and optical properties of helium from shock-adiabatic to quasi-isentropic compression by means of a multiple reverberation technique. By this technique, the initial dense gaseous helium was compressed to high pressure and high temperature and entered the warm dense matter (WDM) region. The experimental equation of state (EOS) of WDM helium in the pressure-density-temperature (P-ρ -T) range of 1 -150 GPa , 0.1 -1.1 g c m-3 , and 4600-24 000 K were measured. The optical radiations emanating from the WDM helium were recorded, and the particle velocity profiles detecting from the sample/window interface were obtained successfully up to 10 times compression. The optical radiation results imply that dense He has become rather opaque after the 2nd compression with a density of about 0.3 g c m-3 and a temperature of about 1 eV. The opaque states of helium under multiple compression were analyzed by the particle velocity measurements. The multiple compression technique could efficiently enhanced the density and the compressibility, and our multiple compression ratios (ηi=ρi/ρ0,i =1 -10 ) of helium are greatly improved from 3.5 to 43 based on initial precompressed density (ρ0) . For the relative compression ratio (ηi'=ρi/ρi -1) , it increases with pressure in the lower density regime and reversely decreases in the higher density regime, and a turning point occurs at the 3rd and 4th compression states under the different loading conditions. This nonmonotonic evolution of the compression is controlled by two factors, where the excitation of internal degrees of freedom results in the increasing compressibility and the repulsive interactions between the

  5. Lamb shift of electronic states in neutral muonic helium, an electron-muon-nucleus system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.; Amusia, Miron

    2015-03-01

    Neutral muonic helium is an exotic atomic system consisting of an electron, a muon, and a nucleus. Being a three-body system, it possesses a clear hierarchy. This allows us to consider it as a hydrogenlike atom with a compound nucleus, which is, in turn, another hydrogenlike system. There are a number of corrections to the Bohr energy levels, all of which can be treated as contributions of generic hydrogenlike theory. While the form of those contributions is the same for all hydrogenlike atoms, their relative numerical importance differs from atom to atom. Here, the leading contribution to the (electronic) Lamb shift in neutral muonic helium is found in a closed analytic form together with the most important corrections. We believe that the Lamb shift in neutral muonic hydrogen is measurable, at least through a measurement of the (electronic) 1 s -2 s transition. We present a theoretical prediction for the 1 s -2 s transitions with an uncertainty of 3 ppm (9 GHz ), as well as for the 2 s -2 p Lamb shift with an uncertainty of 1.3 GHz .

  6. Helium extraction and nitrogen removal from LNG boil-off gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L.; Peng, N.; Liu, L.; Gong, L.

    2017-02-01

    The helium bearing boil off gas (BOG) from liquid natural gas (LNG) storage tank in LNG plant, which has a helium concentration of about 1%, has attracted the attention in China as a new helium source. As the BOG is usually reused by re-condensing to recover methane, it is likely to cause continuous accumulation of nitrogen in the unit, thus a nitrogen removal process must be integrated. This paper describes a conceptional cryogenic separation system aiming at recovering methane, helium and nitrogen from BOG based on cryogenic distillation and condensation process.

  7. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents1. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot2. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  8. Formation of Triplet Positron-helium Bound State by Stripping of Positronium Atoms in Collision with Ground State Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of triplet positron-helium bound state by stripping of positronium atoms in collision with ground state helium JOSEPH DI RlENZI, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, RICHARD J. DRACHMAN, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center - The system consisting of a positron and a helium atom in the triplet state e(+)He(S-3)(sup e) was conjectured long ago to be stable [1]. Its stability has recently been established rigorously [2], and the values of the energies of dissociation into the ground states of Ps and He(+) have also been reported [3] and [4]. We have evaluated the cross-section for this system formed by radiative attachment of a positron in triplet He state and found it to be small [5]. The mechanism of production suggested here should result in a larger cross-section (of atomic size) which we are determining using the Born approximation with simplified initial and final wave functions.

  9. The nanostructure of porous cobalt coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering in helium atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, B; Godinho, V; Fernández, A

    2018-05-01

    In this work, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the nanostructure of porous cobalt coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering using helium as process gas. This nanostructure consists of closed pores of different nanometric size (about 4-20 nm) that are distributed all over a nanocrystalline Co matrix and filled with the deposition gas. Spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis was applied to measure and map, with high lateral resolution, the relevant physical properties (density, pressure and He-K edge shift) of helium trapped inside these individual nanopores, in order to provide new insights about the growth mechanism involved in such systems. In particular, a coefficient of proportionality, C = 0.039 eV nm 3 , between the blue shift of the He K-edge and the He density has been found. In addition, very high He densities (10-100 at./nm 3 ) and pressures in the gigapascal range (0.05-5.0 GPa) have been measured. The linear dependence of these parameters as a function of the inverse radii obeying to the Laplace-Young law for most of the pores suggests that their formation during the coating's growth takes place in regime of elastic deformation of the Co matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  11. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  12. An Evaluation of a High Pressure Regulator for NASA's Robotic Lunar Lander Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Christopher G.; Trinh, Huu P.; Pedersen, Kevin W.

    2013-01-01

    The Robotic Lunar Lander (RLL) development project office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently studying several lunar surface science mission concepts. The focus is on spacecraft carrying multiple science instruments and power systems that will allow extended operations on the lunar surface or other air-less bodies in the solar system. Initial trade studies of launch vehicle options indicate the spacecraft will be significantly mass and volume constrained. Because of the investment by the DOD in low mass, highly volume efficient components, NASA has investigated the potential integration of some of these technologies in space science applications. A 10,000 psig helium pressure regulator test activity has been conducted as part of the overall risk reduction testing for the RLL spacecraft. The regulator was subjected to typical NASA acceptance testing to assess the regulator response to the expected RLL mission requirements. The test results show the regulator can supply helium at a stable outlet pressure of 740 psig within a +/- 5% tolerance band and maintain a lock-up pressure less than the +5% above nominal outlet pressure for all tests conducted. Numerous leak tests demonstrated leakage less than 10-3 standard cubic centimeters per second (SCCS) for the internal seat leakage at lock-up and less than 10-5 SCCS for external leakage through the regulator body. The successful test has shown the potential for 10,000 psig helium systems in NASA spacecraft and has reduced risk associated with hardware availability and hardware ability to meet RLL mission requirements.

  13. Hybrid Circuit QED with Electrons on Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ge

    Electrons on helium (eHe) is a 2-dimensional system that forms naturally at the interface between superfluid helium and vacuum. It has the highest measured electron mobility, and long predicted spin coherence time. In this talk, we will first review various quantum computer architecture proposals that take advantage of these exceptional properties. In particular, we describe how electrons on helium can be combined with superconducting microwave circuits to take advantage of the recent progress in the field of circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED). We will then demonstrate how to reliably trap electrons on these devices hours at a time, at millikelvin temperatures inside a dilution refrigerator. The coupling between the electrons and the microwave resonator exceeds 1 MHz, and can be reproduced from the design geometry using our numerical simulation. Finally, we will present our progress on isolating individual electrons in such circuits, to build single-electron quantum dots with electrons on helium.

  14. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Arpaia, P.; Technology Department, European Organization for Nuclear Research; Blanco, E.

    2015-07-15

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [ http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [ http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves—Part 2-1: Flow capacity—sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for differentmore » pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.« less

  15. Exergy analysis of large-scale helium liquefiers: Evaluating design trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rijo Jacob; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2014-01-01

    It is known that higher heat exchanger area, more number of expanders with higher efficiency and more involved configuration with multi-pressure compression system increase the plant efficiency of a helium liquefier. However, they involve higher capital investment and larger size. Using simulation software Aspen Hysys v 7.0 and exergy analysis as the tool of analysis, authors have attempted to identify various trade-offs while selecting the number of stages, the pressure levels in compressor, the cold-end configuration, the heat exchanger surface area, the maximum allowable pressure drop in heat exchangers, the efficiency of expanders, the parallel/series connection of expanders etc. Use of more efficient cold ends reduces the number of refrigeration stages and the size of the plant. For achieving reliability along with performance, a configuration with a combination of expander and Joule-Thomson valve is found to be a better choice for cold end. Use of multi-pressure system is relevant only when the number of refrigeration stages is more than 5. Arrangement of expanders in series reduces the number of expanders as well as the heat exchanger size with slight expense of plant efficiency. Superior heat exchanger (having less pressure drop per unit heat transfer area) results in only 5% increase of plant performance even when it has 100% higher heat exchanger surface area.

  16. On the basis set convergence of electron–electron entanglement measures: helium-like systems

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic investigation of three different electron–electron entanglement measures, namely the von Neumann, the linear and the occupation number entropy at full configuration interaction level has been performed for the four helium-like systems hydride, helium, Li+ and Be2+ using a large number of different basis sets. The convergence behavior of the resulting energies and entropies revealed that the latter do in general not show the expected strictly monotonic increase upon increase of the one–electron basis. Overall, the three different entanglement measures show good agreement among each other, the largest deviations being observed for small basis sets. The data clearly demonstrates that it is important to consider the nature of the chemical system when investigating entanglement phenomena in the framework of Gaussian type basis sets: while in case of hydride the use of augmentation functions is crucial, the application of core functions greatly improves the accuracy in case of cationic systems such as Li+ and Be2+. In addition, numerical derivatives of the entanglement measures with respect to the nucleic charge have been determined, which proved to be a very sensitive probe of the convergence leading to qualitatively wrong results (i.e., the wrong sign) if too small basis sets are used. PMID:24790952

  17. On the basis set convergence of electron-electron entanglement measures: helium-like systems.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    A systematic investigation of three different electron-electron entanglement measures, namely the von Neumann, the linear and the occupation number entropy at full configuration interaction level has been performed for the four helium-like systems hydride, helium, Li(+) and Be(2+) using a large number of different basis sets. The convergence behavior of the resulting energies and entropies revealed that the latter do in general not show the expected strictly monotonic increase upon increase of the one-electron basis. Overall, the three different entanglement measures show good agreement among each other, the largest deviations being observed for small basis sets. The data clearly demonstrates that it is important to consider the nature of the chemical system when investigating entanglement phenomena in the framework of Gaussian type basis sets: while in case of hydride the use of augmentation functions is crucial, the application of core functions greatly improves the accuracy in case of cationic systems such as Li(+) and Be(2+). In addition, numerical derivatives of the entanglement measures with respect to the nucleic charge have been determined, which proved to be a very sensitive probe of the convergence leading to qualitatively wrong results (i.e., the wrong sign) if too small basis sets are used.

  18. Development of a Pressure Box to Evaluate Reusable-Launch-Vehicle Cryogenic-Tank Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Sikora, Joseph; Maguire, James F.; Winn, Peter M.

    1996-01-01

    A cryogenic pressure-box test machine has been designed and is being developed to test full-scale reusable-launch-vehicle cryogenic-tank panels. This machine is equipped with an internal pressurization system, a cryogenic cooling system, and a heating system to simulate the mechanical and thermal loading conditions that are representative of a reusable-launch-vehicle mission profile. The cryogenic cooling system uses liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to simulate liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tank internal temperatures. A quartz lamp heating system is used for heating the external surface of the test panels to simulate cryogenic-tank external surface temperatures during re-entry of the launch vehicle. The pressurization system uses gaseous helium and is designed to be controlled independently of the cooling system. The tensile loads in the axial direction of the test panel are simulated by means of hydraulic actuators and a load control system. The hoop loads in the test panel are reacted by load-calibrated turnbuckles attached to the skin and frame elements of the test panel. The load distribution in the skin and frames can be adjusted to correspond to the tank structure by using these turnbuckles. The seal between the test panel and the cryogenic pressure box is made from a reinforced Teflon material which can withstand pressures greater than 52 psig at cryogenic temperatures. Analytical results and tests on prototype test components indicate that most of the cryogenic-tank loading conditions that occur in flight can be simulated in the cryogenic pressure-box test machine.

  19. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  20. Germanium resistance thermometer calibration at superfluid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid increase in resistance of high purity semi-conducting germanium with decreasing temperature in the superfluid helium range of temperatures makes this material highly adaptable as a very sensitive thermometer. Also, a germanium thermometer exhibits a highly reproducible resistance versus temperature characteristic curve upon cycling between liquid helium temperatures and room temperature. These two factors combine to make germanium thermometers ideally suited for measuring temperatures in many cryogenic studies at superfluid helium temperatures. One disadvantage, however, is the relatively high cost of calibrated germanium thermometers. In space helium cryogenic systems, many such thermometers are often required, leading to a high cost for calibrated thermometers. The construction of a thermometer calibration cryostat and probe which will allow for calibrating six germanium thermometers at one time, thus effecting substantial savings in the purchase of thermometers is considered.

  1. A portable helium sniffer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Irving; Denton, E.H.

    1976-01-01

    A portable helium sniffer has been developed for field use. The instrument is mounted in a four-wheel-drive pickup truck and can detect 50 parts per billion of helium in soil gas. The usefulness of helium sniffing in soil is being investigated as a prospecting tool in gas, oil, uranium, and geothermal prospecting as well as in earthquake prediction.

  2. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  3. Electronic Spectroscopy of Phthalocyanine and Porphyrin Derivatives in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Slenczka, Alkwin

    2017-07-25

    Phthalocyanine and porphyrin were among the first organic compounds investigated by means of electronic spectroscopy in superfluid helium nanodroplets. Superfluid helium nanodroplets serve as a very gentle host system for preparing cold and isolated molecules. The uniqueness of helium nanodroplets is with respect to the superfluid phase which warrants the vanishing viscosity and, thus, minimal perturbation of the dopant species at a temperature as low as 0.37 K. These are ideal conditions for the study of molecular spectra in order to analyze structures as well as dynamic processes. Besides the investigation of the dopant species itself, molecular spectroscopy in helium droplets provides information on the helium droplet and in particular on microsolvation. This article, as part of a special issue on phthalocyanines and porphyrins, reviews electronic spectroscopy of phthalocyanine and porphyrin compounds in superfluid helium nanodroplets. In addition to the wide variety of medical as well as technical and synthetical aspects, this article discusses electronic spectroscopy of phthalocyanines and porphyrins in helium droplets in order to learn about both the dopant and the helium environment.

  4. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  5. Reactivity of He with ionic compounds under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Botana, Jorge; Hermann, Andreas; Valdez, Steven; Zurek, Eva; Yan, Dadong; Lin, Hai-Qing; Miao, Mao-Sheng

    2018-03-05

    Until very recently, helium had remained the last naturally occurring element that was known not to form stable solid compounds. Here we propose and demonstrate that there is a general driving force for helium to react with ionic compounds that contain an unequal number of cations and anions. The corresponding reaction products are stabilized not by local chemical bonds but by long-range Coulomb interactions that are significantly modified by the insertion of helium atoms, especially under high pressure. This mechanism also explains the recently discovered reactivity of He and Na under pressure. Our work reveals that helium has the propensity to react with a broad range of ionic compounds at pressures as low as 30 GPa. Since most of the Earth's minerals contain unequal numbers of positively and negatively charged atoms, our work suggests that large quantities of He might be stored in the Earth's lower mantle.

  6. PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Esselman, W.H.; Kaplan, G.M.

    1961-06-20

    The control of pressure in pressurized liquid systems, especially a pressurized liquid reactor system, may be achieved by providing a bias circuit or loop across a closed loop having a flow restriction means in the form of an orifice, a storage tank, and a pump connected in series. The subject invention is advantageously utilized where control of a reactor can be achieved by response to the temperature and pressure of the primary cooling system.

  7. Effect of carbon and alloying solute atoms on helium behaviors in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yange; You, Yu-Wei; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C. S.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-02-01

    Helium bubbles could strongly degrade the mechanical properties of ferritic steels in fission and fusion systems. The formation of helium bubble is directly affected by the interactions between helium and the compositions in steels, such as solute atoms, carbon and irradiation defects. We thereby performed systematical first-principles calculations to investigate the interactions of solute-helium and carbon-solute-helium. It is found that substitutional helium is more attractive than interstitial helium to all the considered 3p, 4p, 5p and 6p solutes. The attraction between carbon and substitutional helium suggests the carbon-solute-helium complex can be formed stably. By examining the charge density difference and thermal stability, it is found that the ternary complex shows stronger attraction with He than that of solute-helium pair for some solutes (S, Se, In, Te, Pb and Bi) and the complex could existed in iron stably at 700 K. The present theoretical results may be helpful for exploring alloy additions to mitigate the formation of large helium bubbles.

  8. Neovascular glaucoma after helium ion irradiation for uveal melanoma

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kim, M.K.; Char, D.H.; Castro, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    Neovascular glaucoma developed in 22 of 169 uveal melanoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation. Most patients had large melanomas; no eyes containing small melanomas developed anterior segment neovascularization. The mean onset of glaucoma was 14.1 months (range, 7-31 months). The incidence of anterior segment neovascularization increased with radiation dosage; there was an approximately three-fold increase at 80 GyE versus 60 GyE of helium ion radiation (23% vs. 8.5%) (P less than 0.05). Neovascular glaucoma occurred more commonly in larger tumors; the incidence was not affected by tumor location, presence of subretinal fluid, nor rate of tumor regression. Fifty-three percentmore » of patients had some response with intraocular pressures of 21 mmHg or less to a combination of antiglaucoma treatments.« less

  9. Pressure Measurement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  10. Development of a transferline connecting a helium liquefier coldbox and a liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajendran S.; Rane, Tejas; Chakravarty, Anindya; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    A helium liquefier with demonstrated capacity of 32 1/hr has been developed by BARC. Mumbai. A transferline for two way flow of helium between the helium liquefier coldbox and receiver Dewar has been developed in-house at BARC. Further, a functionally similar, but structurally improved transferline has been developed through a local fabricator. This paper describes and discusses issues related to the development of these cryogenic transferlines. The developed transferlines have been tested with a flow of liquid nitrogen and successfully utilised later in the helium liquefier plant.

  11. Accurate Determination of the Volume of an Irregular Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Jack; Bradvica, Rafaela; Karl, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Zable described an experiment with a near-spherical balloon filled with impure helium. Measuring the temperature and the pressure inside and outside the balloon, the lift of the balloon, and the mass of the balloon materials, he described how to use the ideal gas laws and Archimedes' principal to compute the average molecular…

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence of Helium Ions in a Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, C. S.; Biloui, C.; Hardin, R. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R.

    2003-10-01

    The lack of a suitable Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) scheme for helium ions at visible wavelengths has prevented LIF from being employed in helium plasmas for measurements of ion temperature and bulk ion flow speeds. In this work, we will discuss our attempts to perform LIF of helium ions in a helicon source plasma using an infrared, tunable diode laser operating at 1012.36 nm. The infrared transition corresponds to excitation from the n = 4 level (4f ^2F) to the n = 5 (5g ^2G) level of singly ionized helium and therefore requires substantial electron temperatures (> 10 eV) to maintain an adequate ion population in the n = 4 state. Calculations using a steady state coronal model predict that the n = 4 state population will be 25% larger than the n = 5 population for our experimental conditions. The fluorescence decay from the n = 5 (5f ^2F) level of singly ionized helium level to the n = 3 (3d ^2D) level at 320.31 nm is monitored as the diode laser is swept through 10 GHz around the 1012.36 nm line. Note that the fluorescence emission requires a collisionally coupled transition between two different n = 5 quantum states. We will also present measurements of the emission intensities of both the 1012.36 nm and the 320.31 nm lines as a function of source neutral pressure, rf power, and plasma density. This work supported by the U.S. DoE EPSCoR Lab Partnership Program.

  13. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-04-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the phenomenon requires that we distinguish between the frequencies of sound produced by the larynx and the filtering of those frequencies by the vocal tract. We will describe here an experiment done by introductory physics students that uses helium speech as a context for learning about the human vocal system and as an application of the standing sound-wave concept. Modern acoustic analysis software easily obtained by instructors for student use allows data to be obtained and analyzed quickly.

  14. Pressures, forces, moments and shock shapes for a geometrically matched sphere-cone and hyperboloid at Mach 20.3 in helium. [22-inch aerodynamics leg of the Langley hypersonic helium tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare measured and predicted pressure distributions, forces and moments, and shock shapes on a geometrically matched sphere-cone and hyperboloid. A hyperboloid with a nose radius of 0.5276 in. and an asymptotic angle of 39.9871 deg was matched to a sphere-cone with a nose radius of 0.750 in. and a cone half-angle of 45 deg. Experimental results in helium at a free-stream Mach number of 20.3 and a free-stream unit Reynolds number of 6.83 x 10 to the 6th power per foot were combined with predicted results from a theoretical method to compare the two shapes. Comparisons of experimental results showed small differences in the two shapes, but the prediction method provided better results for the hyperboloid than for the sphere-cone.

  15. Multi-objective Optimization on Helium Liquefier Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Meng, Y. R.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Research on optimization of helium liquefier is limited at home and abroad, and most of the optimization is single-objective based on Collins cycle. In this paper, a multi-objective optimization is conducted using genetic algorithm (GA) on the 40 L/h helium liquefier developed by Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Science (TIPC, CAS), steady solutions are obtained in the end. In addition, the exergy loss of the optimized system is studied in the case of with and without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. The results have guiding significance for the future design of large helium liquefier.

  16. Exploding and Imaging of Electron Bubbles in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Neha; Vadakkumbatt, Vaisakh; Maris, Humphrey J.; Ghosh, Ambarish

    2017-06-01

    An electron bubble in liquid helium-4 under the saturated vapor pressure becomes unstable and explodes if the pressure becomes more negative than -1.9 bars. In this paper, we use focused ultrasound to explode electron bubbles. We then image at 30,000 frames per second the growth and subsequent collapse of the bubbles. We find that bubbles can grow to as large as 1 mm in diameter within 2 ms after the cavitation event. We examine the relation between the maximum size of the bubble and the lifetime and find good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; ...

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~10 21 m -3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 10 23 m -3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests thatmore » the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.« less

  18. External pressure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Jon K.; Fowler, Don P.

    Hydraulic systems comprise an important part of jet aircraft and their pressure needs must be checked constantly. Tests of the prototype external pressure measurement system show that it is possible to accurately convert the small expansion of tubing with pressure into a direct pressure reading without inserting a pressure gage into the piping system. The tool described in the paper is a clamp-on displacement transducer that can read pressure directly in PSI from 0 to 5000. Some limitations concerning temperature and accuracy should be remedied by additional design work. The system promises to streamline troubleshooting of all types of piping systems.

  19. Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Helium 4 Near the Lambda-Transition Using a Magnetostrictive Low Gravity Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Melora; Israelsson, Ulf E.

    1995-01-01

    There has been a recent increase in interest both experimentally and theoretically in the study of liquid helium very near the lambda-transition in the presence of a heat current. In traditional ground based experiments there are gravitationally induced pressure variations in any macroscopic helium sample that limit how closely the transition can be approached. We have taken advantage of the finite magnetic susceptibility of He 4 to build a magnetostrictive low gravity simulator. The simulator consists of a superconducting magnet with field profile shaped to counteract the force of gravity in a helium sample. When the magnet is operated with B x dB/dz = 21T(exp 2)/cm at the location of the cell, the gravitationally induced pressure variations will be canceled to within 1% over a volume of 0.5 cm in height and 0.5 cm in diameter. This technique for canceling the pressure variations in a long sample cell allows the lambda-transition to be studied much closer in reduced temperature and under a wider range of applied heat currents than is possible using other ground based techniques. Preliminary results using this low gravity simulator and the limitations of the magnetostrictive technique in comparison to doing space based experiments will be presented.

  20. Coupling of the coronal helium abundance to the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansteen, Viggo H.; Leer, Egil; Holzer, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    Models of the transition region-corona-solar wind system are investigated in order to find the coronal helium abundance and to study the role played by coronal helium in controlling the solar wind proton flux. The thermal force on alpha-particles in the transition region sets the flow of helium into the corona. The frictional coupling between alpha-particles and protons and/or the electric polarization field determines the proton flux in the solar wind as well as the fate of the coronal helium content. The models are constructed by solving the time-dependent population and momentum equations for all species of hydrogen and helium in an atmosphere with a given temperature profile. Several temperature profiles are considered in order to very the roles of frictional coupling and electric polarization field in the solar wind, and the thermal force in the transition region. Steady-state solutions are found for coronae with a hydrogen flux at 1 AU of 1.0 x 10(exp 9)/cm(exp 2)/sec or larger. For coronae with lower hydrogen fluxes, the helium flux into the corona is larger than the flux 'pulled out' by the solar wind protons, and solutions with increasing coronal helium content are found. The timescale for forming a helium-filled corona, that may allow for a steady outflow, is long compared to the mixing time for the corona.

  1. Compact, ultra-low vibration, closed-cycle helium recycler for uninterrupted operation of MEG with SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Sun, Limin; Lichtenwalter, Ben; Zerkle, Brent; Okada, Yoshio

    2016-06-01

    A closed-cycle helium recycler was developed for continuous uninterrupted operation for magnetometer-based whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems. The recycler consists of a two stage 4 K pulse-tube cryocooler and is mounted on the roof of a magnetically shielded room (MSR). A flexible liquid helium (LHe) return line on the recycler is inserted into the fill port of the MEG system in the MSR through a slotted opening in the ceiling. The helium vapor is captured through a line that returns the gas to the top of the recycler assembly. A high-purity helium gas cylinder connected to the recycler assembly supplies the gas, which, after it is liquefied, increases the level of LHe in the MEG system during the start-up phase. No storage tank for evaporated helium gas nor a helium gas purifier is used. The recycler is capable of liquefying helium with a rate of ∼17 L/d after precooling the MEG system. It has provided a fully maintenance-free operation under computer control for 7 months without refill of helium. Although the recycler is used for single-orientation operation at this initial testing site, it is designed to operate at ±20° orientations, allowing the MEG system to be tilted for supine and reclining positions. Vibration of the recycler is dampened to an ultra-low level by using several vibration isolation methods, which enables uninterrupted operation during MEG measurements. Recyclers similar to this system may be quite useful even for MEG systems with 100% magnetometers.

  2. Effect of pressure gradient and new phases for 1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine (RDX) under high pressures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chan; Zhang, Xueyong; Zhang, Chuanchao; Sui, Zhilei; Hou, Meng; Dai, Rucheng; Wang, Zhongping; Zheng, Xianxu; Zhang, Zengming

    2018-05-17

    Herein, pressure-induced phase transitions of RDX up to 50 GPa were systematically studied under different compression conditions. Precise phase transition points were obtained based on high-quality Raman spectra with small pressure intervals. This favors the correctness of the theoretical formula for detonation and the design of a precision weapon. The experimental results indicated that α-RDX immediately transformed to γ-RDX at 3.5 GPa due to hydrostatic conditions and possible interaction between the penetrating helium and RDX, with helium gas as the pressure-transmitting medium (PTM). Mapping of pressure distribution in samples demonstrates that the pressure gradient is generated in the chamber and independent of other PTMs. The gradient induced the first phase transition starts at 2.3 GPa and completed at 4.1 GPa. The larger pressure gradient promoted phase transition in advance under higher pressures. Experimental results supported that there existed two conformers of AAI and AAE for γ-RDX, as proposed by another group. δ-RDX was considered to only occur in a hydrostatic environment around 18 GPa using helium as the PTM. This study confirms that δ-RDX is independent of PTM and exists under non-hydrostatic conditions. Evidence for a new phase (ζ) was found at about 28 GPa. These 4 phases have also been verified via XRD under high pressures. In addition to this, another new phase (η) may exist above 38 GPa, and it needs to be further confirmed in the future. Moreover, all the phase transitions were reversible after the pressure was released, and original α-RDX was always obtained at ambient pressure.

  3. Steady-state temperature distribution within a Brayton rotating unit operating in a power conversion system using helium-xenon gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R. L.; Namkoong, D.; Edkin, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The Brayton rotating unit (BRU), consisting of a turbine, an alternator, and a compressor, was tested as part of a Brayton cycle power conversion system over a side range of steady state operating conditions. The working fluid in the system was a mixture of helium-xenon gases. Turbine inlet temperature was varied from 1200 to 1600 F, compressor inlet temperature from 60 to 120 F, compressor discharge pressure from 20 to 45 psia, rotative speed from 32 400 to 39 600 rpm, and alternator liquid-coolant flow rate from 0.01 to 0.27 pound per second. Test results indicated that the BRU internal temperatures were highly sensitive to alternator coolant flow below the design value of 0.12 pound per second but much less so at higher values. The armature winding temperature was not influenced significantly by turbine inlet temperature, but was sensitive, up to 20 F per kVA alternator output, to varying alternator output. When only the rotational speed was changed (+ or - 10% of rated value), the BRU internal temperatures varied directly with the speed.

  4. Propulsive jet simulation with air and helium in launcher wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2017-06-01

    The influence on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher model due to the presence of an under-expanded jet is investigated experimentally. Wake flow phenomena represent a significant source of uncertainties in the design of a space launcher. Especially critical are dynamic loads on the structure. The wake flow is investigated at supersonic (M=2.9) and hypersonic (M=5.9) flow regimes. The jet flow is simulated using air and helium as working gas. Due to the lower molar mass of helium, higher jet velocities are realized, and therefore, velocity ratios similar to space launchers can be simulated. The degree of under-expansion of the jet is moderate for the supersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 5) and high for the hypersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 90). The flow topology is described by Schlieren visualization and mean-pressure measurements. Unsteady pressure measurements are performed to describe the dynamic wake flow. The influences of the under-expanded jet and different jet velocities are reported. On the base fluctuations at a Strouhal number, around St_D ≈ 0.25 dominate for supersonic free-stream flows. With air jet, a fluctuation-level increase on the base is observed for Strouhal numbers above St_D ≈ 0.75 in hypersonic flow regime. With helium jet, distinct peaks at higher frequencies are found. This is attributed to the interactions of wake flow and jet.

  5. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the manner required by the United States to such plants or reduction works as the United States may provide. (c) The extraction of helium shall not cause a reduction in the value of the lessee's gas or any... necessary for the extraction of helium. The extraction of helium shall not cause substantial delays in the...

  6. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Delivery shall be made in the manner required by the United States to such plants or reduction works as the United States may provide. (c) The extraction of helium shall not cause a reduction in the value of the... and other equipment necessary for the extraction of helium. The extraction of helium shall not cause...

  7. Note: control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Pal, G

    2015-02-01

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.

  8. Note: Control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bhattacharyya, T. K., E-mail: tamal@vecc.gov.in; Pal, G.

    2015-02-15

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these threemore » cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.« less

  9. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part II: Thermohydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    In part one of this publication experimental results for a single-channel transfer line used at liquid helium (LHe) decant stations are presented. The transfer of LHe into mobile dewars is an unavoidable process since the places of storage and usage are generally located apart from each other. The experimental results have shown that reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus, generated helium cold gas has to be collected and reliquefied, demanding a huge amount of electrical energy. Although this transfer process is common in cryogenic laboratories, no existing code could be found to model it. Therefore, a thermohydraulic model has been developed to model the LHe flow at operating conditions using published heat transfer and pressure drop correlations. This paper covers the basic equations used to calculate heat transfer and pressure drop, as well as the validation of the thermohydraulic code, and its application within the optimisation process. The final transfer line design features reduced heat leak and pressure drop values based on a combined measurement and modelling campaign in the range of 0.112 < pin < 0.148 MPa, 190 < G < 450 kg/(m2 s), and 0.04 < xout < 0.12.

  10. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part I: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-04-01

    The transfer of liquid helium (LHe) into mobile dewars or transport vessels is a common and unavoidable process at LHe decant stations. During this transfer reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus generated helium gas needs to be collected and reliquefied which requires a huge amount of electrical energy. Therefore, the design of transfer lines used at LHe decant stations has been optimised to establish a LHe transfer with minor evaporation losses which increases the overall efficiency and capacity of LHe decant stations. This paper presents the experimental results achieved during the thermohydraulic optimisation of a flexible LHe transfer line. An extensive measurement campaign with a set of dedicated transfer lines equipped with pressure and temperature sensors led to unique experimental data of this specific transfer process. The experimental results cover the heat leak, the pressure drop, the transfer rate, the outlet quality, and the cool-down and warm-up behaviour of the examined transfer lines. Based on the obtained results the design of the considered flexible transfer line has been optimised, featuring reduced heat leak and pressure drop.

  11. Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kulsreshath, M. K.; Schwaederle, L.; Dufour, T.

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250 μm thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8 μm thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atomsmore » density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2 μs long current peak as high as 24 mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400 Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the extinction period at high pressure also appeared on the density of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms, but delayed by a few μs relative to the current oscillations. Metastable atoms thus cannot be at the origin of the generation of the observed instabilities.« less

  12. Laboratory testing of a supercritical helium pump for a magnetic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1988-01-01

    A supercritical helium testing system for a magnetic refrigerator has been built. Details of the supercritical helium pump, the test system, and the test instrumentation are given. Actual pump tests were not run during this ASEE term because of delivery problems associated with the required pump flow meter. Consequently, efforts were directed on preliminary design of the magnetic refrigeration system for the pump. The first concern with the magnetic refrigerator design was determining how to effectively make use of the pump. A method to incorporate the supercritical helium pump into a magnetic refrigerator was determined by using a computer model. An illustrated example of this procedure is given to provide a tool for sizing the magnetic refrigerator system as a function of the pump size. The function of the computer model and its operation are also outlined and discussed.

  13. Structure design and simulation research of active magnetic bearing for helium centrifugal cold compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhang, S.; Pan, W.; Wei, C. B.; Wu, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Helium centrifugal cold compressors are utilized to pump gaseous helium from saturated liquid helium tank to obtain super-fluid helium in cryogenic refrigeration system, which is now being developed at TIPC, CAS. Active magnetic bearing (AMB) is replacing traditional oil-fed bearing as the optimal supporting assembly for cold compressor because of its many advantages: free of contact, high rotation speed, no lubrication and so on. In this paper, five degrees of freedom for AMB are developed for the helium centrifugal cold compressor application. The structure parameters of the axial and radial magnetic bearings as well as hardware and software of the electronic control system is discussed in detail. Based on modal analysis and critical speeds calculation, a control strategy combining PID arithmetic with other phase compensators is proposed. Simulation results demonstrate that the control method not only stables AMB system but also guarantees good performance of closed-loop behaviour. The prior research work offers important base and experience for test and application of AMB experimental platform for system centrifugal cold compressor.

  14. Pulse Shape Analysis and Discrimination for Silicon-Photomultipliers in Helium-4 Gas Scintillation Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Cathleen; Zhu, Ting; Rolison, Lucas; Kiff, Scott; Jordan, Kelly; Enqvist, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Using natural helium (helium-4), the Arktis 180-bar pressurized gas scintillator is capable of detecting and distinguishing fast neutrons and gammas. The detector has a unique design of three optically separated segments in which 12 silicon-photomultiplier (SiPM) pairs are positioned equilaterally across the detector to allow for them to be fully immersed in the helium-4 gas volume; consequently, no additional optical interfaces are necessary. The SiPM signals were amplified, shaped, and readout by an analog board; a 250 MHz, 14-bit digitizer was used to examine the output pulses from each SiPMpair channel. The SiPM over-voltage had to be adjusted in order to reduce pulse clipping and negative overshoot, which was observed for events with high scintillation production. Pulse shaped discrimination (PSD) was conducted by evaluating three different parameters: time over threshold (TOT), pulse amplitude, and pulse integral. In order to differentiate high and low energy events, a 30ns gate window was implemented to group pulses from two SiPM channels or more for the calculation of TOT. It was demonstrated that pulses from a single SiPM channel within the 30ns window corresponded to low-energy gamma events while groups of pulses from two-channels or more were most likely neutron events. Due to gamma pulses having lower pulse amplitude, the percentage of measured gamma also depends on the threshold value in TOT calculations. Similarly, the threshold values were varied for the optimal PSD methods of using pulse amplitude and pulse area parameters. Helium-4 detectors equipped with SiPMs are excellent for in-the-field radiation measurement of nuclear spent fuel casks. With optimized PSD methods, the goal of developing a fuel cask content monitoring and inspection system based on these helium-4 detectors will be achieved.

  15. Study on the Dynamic Performance of the Helium Turboexpander for EAST Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuangtao; Yang, Shanju; Fu, Bao; Zhang, Qiyong; Hou, Yu

    2015-06-01

    An increase of the cooling capacities in the liquid helium temperature area is required by Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) due to the extension of its subsystems in the near future. Limited by the heat exchangers, cryogenic pipes, and cryogenic valves, it is difficult to enlarge the present EAST helium system. 102 W@4.5 K level helium cryogenic systems are needed in view of feasibility and economy. A turboexpander is the key component of a helium cryogenic system. In this article, a hydrostatic gas lubricated cryogenic helium turboexpander for a 900 W@4.5 K cryogenic helium system was developed for the EAST updated subsystem by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Cryogenic and Refrigeration of Xi'an Jiaotong University. The main components, such as gas bearings, expansion wheel, shaft, and brake wheel, were briefly presented. The dynamic performance of the journal and thrust gas bearings was investigated numerically. The rotordynamic performance of the developed turboexpander was studied experimentally. The results show that the axial and radial load capacities supplied by the journal gas bearing and thrust gas bearing are enough to balance the axial force and radial force of the rotor. A 43% overspeed operation was achieved, which validated the reasonable design of the turboexpander. supported by Joint Funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11176023), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51306135), and partially supported by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2013M532040) and Special Financial Grant of China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2014T70917)

  16. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures upmore » to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.« less

  17. Helium accumulation and bubble formation in FeCoNiCr alloy under high fluence He+ implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Tong, Y.; Li, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Y. L.; Hu, Alice; Kai, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Face-centered cubic (FCC) high-entropy alloys (HEA), as emerging alloys with equal-molar or near equal-molar constituents, show a promising radiation damage resistance under heavy ion bombardment, making them potential for structural material application in next-generation nuclear reactors, but the accumulation of light helium ions, a product of nuclear fission reaction, has not been studied. The present work experimentally studied the helium accumulation and bubble formation at implantation temperatures of 523 K, 573 K and 673 K in a homogenized FCC FeCoNiCr HEA, a HEA showing excellent radiation damage resistance under heavy ion irradiation. The size and population density of helium bubbles in FeCoNiCr samples were quantitatively analyzed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the helium content existing in bubbles were estimated from a high-pressure Equation of State (EOS). We found that the helium diffusion in such condition was dominated by the self-interstitial/He replacement mechanism, and the corresponding activation energy in FeCoNiCr is comparable with the vacancy migration energy in Ni and austenitic stainless steel but only 14.3%, 31.4% and 51.4% of the accumulated helium precipitated into helium bubbles at 523 K, 573 K and 673 K, respectively, smaller than the pure Ni case. Importantly, the small bubble size suggested that FeCoNiCr HEA has a high resistance of helium bubble formation compared with Ni and steels.

  18. Growth process of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced CVD using nitrogen and helium as a dilution gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takanori; Sakurai, Takachika; Sato, Taiki; Shirakura, Akira; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with various thicknesses were synthesized by dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma deposition under atmospheric pressure diluted with nitrogen (N2) and helium (He) at various pulse frequencies. The C2H2/N2 film showed cauliflower-like-particles that grew bigger with the increase in film’s thickness. At 5 kHz, the film with a thickness of 2.7 µm and smooth surface was synthesized. On the other hand, the films synthesized from C2H2/He had a smooth surface and was densely packed with domed particles. The domed particles extended with the increase in the film thickness, enabling it to grow successfully to 37 µm with a smooth surface.

  19. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  20. 3. SOUTHWEST REAR, WITH RAILROAD LINE AT RIGHT. HIGH PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTHWEST REAR, WITH RAILROAD LINE AT RIGHT. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Pure Niobium as a Pressure Vessel Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, T. J.; Carter, H. F.; Foley, M. H.; Klebaner, A. L.; Nicol, T. H.; Page, T. M.; Theilacker, J. C.; Wands, R. H.; Wong-Squires, M. L.; Wu, G.

    2010-04-01

    Physics laboratories around the world are developing niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for use in particle accelerators. These SRF cavities are typically cooled to low temperatures by direct contact with a liquid helium bath, resulting in at least part of the helium container being made from pure niobium. In the U.S., the Code of Federal Regulations allows national laboratories to follow national consensus pressure vessel rules or use of alternative rules which provide a level of safety greater than or equal to that afforded by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Thus, while used for its superconducting properties, niobium ends up also being treated as a material for pressure vessels. This report summarizes what we have learned about the use of niobium as a pressure vessel material, with a focus on issues for compliance with pressure vessel codes. We present results of a literature search for mechanical properties and tests results, as well as a review of ASME pressure vessel code requirements and issues.

  2. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  3. Phase order in superfluid helium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramwell, Steven T.; Faulkner, Michael F.; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.; Taroni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Classic experimental data on helium films are transformed to estimate a finite-size phase order parameter that measures the thermal degradation of the condensate fraction in the two-dimensional superfluid. The order parameter is found to evolve thermally with the exponent β = 3 π^2/128 , a characteristic, in analogous magnetic systems, of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition. Universal scaling near the BKT fixed point generates a collapse of experimental data on helium and ferromagnetic films, and implies new experiments and theoretical protocols to explore the phase order. These results give a striking example of experimental finite-size scaling in a critical system that is broadly relevant to two-dimensional Bose fluids. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our friend and colleague Maxime Clusel, with whom we enjoyed many stimulating discussions on related topics.

  4. Formation Mechanisms for Helium White Dwarfs in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandquist, E. L.; Taam, R. E.; Burkert, A.

    1999-05-01

    We discuss the constraints that can be placed on formation mechanisms for helium degenerate stars in binary systems, as well as the orbital parameters of the progenitor binaries, by using observed systems and numerical simulations of common envelope evolution. For pre-cataclysmic variable stars having a helium white dwarf, common envelope simulations covering the range of observed companion masses indicate that the initial mass of the red giant (parent of the white dwarf) can be constrained by the final period of the system. The formation mechanisms for double helium degenerate systems are also restricted. Using energy arguments, we find that there are almost no parameter combinations for which such a system can be formed using two successive common envelope phases. Observed short-period systems appear to favor an Algol-like phase of stable mass transfer followed by a common envelope phase. However, theory predicts that the brighter component is also the most massive, which is not observed in at least one system. This may require that nuclear burning must have occurred on the white dwarf that formed first, but after its formation. Systems which instead go through a common envelope episode, followed by a phase of nonconservative mass transfer from secondary to primary, would tend to form double degenerates with low mass ratios, which have not been observed to date. Finally, we discuss a new mechanism for producing subdwarf B stars in binaries. This work was supported by NSF grants AST-9415423 and AST-9727875.

  5. Pressure Systems Energy Release Protection (Gas Pressurized Systems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. J. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A survey of studies into hazards associated with closed or pressurized system rupture and preliminary guidelines for the performance design of primary, secondary, and protective receptors of these hazards are provided. The hazards discussed in the survey are: blast, fragments, ground motion, heat radiation, biological, and chemical. Performance guidelines for receptors are limited to pressurized systems that contain inert gas. The performance guidelines for protection against the remaining unaddressed degenerative hazards are to be covered in another study.

  6. r-process nucleosynthesis in dynamic helium-burning environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. J.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Truran, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an extended examination of r-process nucleosynthesis in helium-burning enviroments are presented. Using newly calculated nuclear rates, dynamical r-process calculations have been made of thermal runaways in helium cores typical of low-mass stars and in the helium zones of stars undergoing supernova explosions. These calculations show that, for a sufficient flux of neutrons produced by the C-13 neutron source, r-process nuclei in solar proportions can be produced. The conditions required for r-process production are found to be 10 to the 20th-10 to the 21st neutrons per cubic centimeter for times of 0.01-0.1 s and neutron number densities in excess of 10 to the 19th per cubic centimeter for times of about 1 s. The amount of C-13 required is found to be exceedingly high - larger than is found to occur in any current stellar evolutionary model. It is thus unlikely that these helium-burning environments are responsible for producing the bulk of the r-process elements seen in the solar system.

  7. Diffusion of radiogenic helium in natural uranium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudil, Danièle; Bonhoure, Jessica; Pik, Raphaël; Cuney, Michel; Jégou, Christophe; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    2008-08-01

    The issue of nuclear waste management - and especially spent fuel disposal - demands further research on the long-term behavior of helium and its impact on physical changes in UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 matrices subjected to self-irradiation. Helium produced by radioactive decay of the actinides concentrates in the grains or is trapped at the grain boundaries. Various scenarios can be considered, and can have a significant effect on the radionuclide source terms that will be accessible to water after the canisters have been breached. Helium production and matrix damage is generally simulated by external irradiation or with actinide-doped materials. A natural uranium oxide sample was studied to acquire data on the behavior of radiogenic helium and its diffusion under self-irradiation in spent fuel. The sample from the Pen Ar Ran deposit in the Vendée region of France dated at 320 ± 9 million of years was selected for its simple geological history, making it a suitable natural analog of spent fuel under repository conditions during the initial period in a closed system not subject to mass transfer with the surrounding environment. Helium outgassing measured by mass spectrometry to determine the He diffusion coefficients through the ore shows that: (i) a maximum of 5% (2.1% on average) of the helium produced during the last 320 Ma in this natural analog was conserved, (ii) about 33% of the residual helium is occluded in the matrix and vacancy defects (about 10 -5 mol g -1) and 67% in bubbles that were analyzed by HRTEM. A similar distribution has been observed in spent fuel and in (U 0.9,Pu 0.1)O 2. The results obtained for the natural Pen Ar Ran sample can be applied by analogy to spent fuel, especially in terms of the apparent solubility limit and the formation, characteristics and behavior of the helium bubbles.

  8. Selective fibronectin adsorption against albumin and enhanced stem cell attachment on helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge treated titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Inho; Vagaska, Barbora; Joo Park, Bong; Lee, Mi Hee; Jin Lee, Seung; Park, Jong-Chul

    2011-06-01

    Successful tissue integration of implanted medical devices depends on appropriate initial cellular response. In this study, the effect of helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge (He-APGD) treatment of titanium on selective protein adsorption and the initial attachment processes and focal adhesion formation of osteoprogenitor cells and stem cells were examined. Titanium disks were treated in a self-designed He-APGD system. Initial attachment of MC3T3-E1 mouse pre-osteoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was evaluated by MTT assay and plasma membrane staining followed by morphometric analysis. Fibronectin adsorption was investigated by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbant Assay. MSCs cell attachment to treated and non-treated titanium disks coated with different proteins was verified also in serum-free culture. Organization of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions was evaluated microscopically. He-APGD treatment effectively modified the titanium surfaces by creating a super-hydrophilic surface, which promoted selectively higher adsorption of fibronectin, a protein of critical importance for cell/biomaterial interaction. In two different types of cells, the He-APGD treatment enhanced the number of attaching cells as well as their attachment area. Moreover, cells had higher organization of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. Faster acceptance of the material by the progenitor cells in the early phases of tissue integration after the implantation may significantly reduce the overall healing time; therefore, titanium treatment with He-APGD seems to be an effective method of surface modification of titanium for improving its tissue inductive properties.

  9. Maximum Expected Wall Heat Flux and Maximum Pressure After Sudden Loss of Vacuum Insulation on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Liquid Helium (LHe) Dewars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared observation experiments. The experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium (LHe) temperatures. A question arose regarding the heat input and peak pressure that would result from a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation. Owing to concerns about the adequacy of dewar pressure relief in the event of a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation, the SOFIA Program engaged the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). This report summarizes and assesses the experiments that have been performed to measure the heat flux into LHe dewars following a sudden vacuum insulation failure, describes the physical limits of heat input to the dewar, and provides an NESC recommendation for the wall heat flux that should be used to assess the sudden loss of vacuum insulation case. This report also assesses the methodology used by the SOFIA Program to predict the maximum pressure that would occur following a loss of vacuum event.

  10. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Heath, Jason E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measuredmore » using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.« less

  11. High Pressure Cosmochemistry of Major Planetary Interiors: Laboratory Studies of the Water-rich Region of the System Ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of gas-ice mixtures in major planets at very high pressures was studied. Some relevant pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-X) regions of the hydrogen (H2)-helium (He)-water (H2O-ammonia (NH3)-methane (CH4) phase diagram were determined. The studies, and theoretical model, of the relevant phases, are needed to interpret the compositions of ice-gas systems at conditions of planetary interest. The compositions and structures of a multiphase, multicomponent system at very high pressures care characterized, and the goal is to characterize this system over a wide range of low and high temperatures. The NH3-H2O compositions that are relevant to planetary problems yet are easy to prepare were applied. The P-T surface of water was examined and the corresponding surface for NH3 was determined. The T-X diagram of ammonia-water at atmospheric pressure was studied and two water-rich phases were found, NH3-2H2O (ammonia dihydrate), which melts incongruently, and NH3.H2O (ammonia monohydrate), which is nonstoichiometric and melts at a higher temperature than the dihydrate. It is suggested that a P-T surface at approximately the monohydrate composition and the P-X surface at room temperature is determined.

  12. Nonmonotonic radial distribution of excited atoms in a positive column of pulsed direct currect discharges in helium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Barnat, E. V.; Kolobov, V. I.

    2013-01-21

    Nonmonotonic radial distributions of excited helium atoms have been experimentally observed in a positive column of pulsed helium discharges using planar laser induced fluorescence. Computational analysis of the discharge dynamics with a fluid plasma model confirms the experimental observations over a range of pressures and currents. The observed effect is attributed to the peculiarities of electron population-depopulation of the excited states during the 'dynamic discharge' conditions with strong modulations of the electric field maintaining the plasma.

  13. Integration of a Cryocooler into a SQUID Magnetospinography System for Reduction of Liquid Helium Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Ogata, Hisanao; Uehara, Gen

    We are currently developing a magnetospinography (MSG) system for noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord. The MSG system is a device for observing a weak magnetic field accompanied by the neural activity of the spinal cord by using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic flux sensors. As in the case of other biomagnetic measurement systems such as the magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, the running cost of the MSG system is mainly dependent on the liquid helium (LHe) consumption of a dewar vessel. We integrated a cryocooler into the MSG system to reduce LHe consumption. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cooling power of 0.5Wat 4 K was placed adjacent to a magnetically shielded room and was directly connected to the thermal radiation shield of the dewar by an electrically isolated transfer tube. Cold helium gas was circulated between the cryocooler and the radiation shield. Consequently, the temperature of the radiation shield decreased below 40 K. Previous studies have shown that the detection of a weak magnetic field is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, the band of the MSG signals is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. Therefore, the noise can be filtered out and has a less detrimental effect on MSG measurement than on other biomagnetic field measurements such as MEG measurement. As a result, LHe consumption was reduced by 46%, with no increase in the noise floor.

  14. A first-principles and experimental study of helium diffusion in periclase MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhewen; Wu, Henry; Shu, Shipeng; Krawczynski, Mike; Van Orman, James; Cherniak, Daniele J.; Bruce Watson, E.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Morgan, Dane

    2018-02-01

    The distribution of He isotopes is used to trace heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle, and is particularly useful for constraining the length scale of heterogeneity due to the generally rapid diffusivity of helium. However, such an analysis is challenging because He diffusivities are largely unknown in lower mantle phases, which can influence the He profiles in regions that cycle through the lower mantle. With this motivation, we have used first-principles simulations based on density functional theory to study He diffusion in MgO, an important lower mantle phase. We first studied the case of interstitial helium diffusion in perfect MgO and found a migration barrier of 0.73 eV at zero pressure. Then we used the kinetic Monte Carlo method to study the case of substitutional He diffusion in MgO, where we assumed that He diffuses on the cation sublattice through cation vacancies. We also performed experiments on He diffusion at atmospheric pressure using ion implantation and nuclear reaction analysis in both as-received and Ga-doped samples. A comparison between the experimental and simulation results are shown. This work provides a foundation for further studies at high-pressure.

  15. Helium-induced hardening effect in polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanhang; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Ailin; Peng, Shixiang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, helium induced hardening effect of tungsten was investigated. 50 keV He2+ ions at fluences vary from 5 × 1015 cm-2 to 5 × 1017 cm-2 were implanted into polycrystalline tungsten at RT to create helium bubble-rich layers near the surface. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the irradiated specimens were studied by TEM and nano-indentor. Helium bubble rich layers are formed in near surface region, and the layers become thicker with the rise of fluences. Helium bubbles in the area of helium concentration peak are found to grow up, while the bubble density is almost unchanged. Obvious hardening effect is induced by helium implantation in tungsten. Micro hardness increases rapidly with the fluence firstly, and more slowly when the fluence is above 5 × 1016 cm-2. The hardening effect of tungsten can be attributed to helium bubbles, which is found to be in agreement with the Bacon-Orowan stress formula. The growing diameter is the major factor rather than helium bubbles density (voids distance) in the process of helium implantation at fluences below 5 × 1017 cm-2.

  16. Low helium flux from the mantle inferred from simulations of oceanic helium isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Key, Robert M.; Schlosser, Peter; Newton, Robert

    2010-09-01

    The high 3He/ 4He isotopic ratio of oceanic helium relative to the atmosphere has long been recognized as the signature of mantle 3He outgassing from the Earth's interior. The outgassing flux of helium is frequently used to normalize estimates of chemical fluxes of elements from the solid Earth, and provides a strong constraint to models of mantle degassing. Here we use a suite of ocean general circulation models and helium isotope data obtained by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment to constrain the flux of helium from the mantle to the oceans. Our results suggest that the currently accepted flux is overestimated by a factor of 2. We show that a flux of 527 ± 102 mol year - 1 is required for ocean general circulation models that produce distributions of ocean ventilation tracers such as radiocarbon and chlorofluorocarbons that match observations. This new estimate calls for a reevaluation of the degassing fluxes of elements that are currently tied to the helium fluxes, including noble gases and carbon dioxide.

  17. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  19. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  20. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    With fossil fuels running out and global energy demand increasing, the need for alternative energy sources is apparent. Nuclear fusion using Helium-3 may be a solution. Helium-3 is a rare isotope on Earth, but it is abundant on the Moon. Throughout the space community lunar Helium-3 is often cited as a major reason to return to the Moon. Despite the potential of lunar Helium-3 mining, little research has been conducted on a full end-to-end mission. This abstract presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by students from Delft University of Technology. The goal of the study was to assess whether a continuous end-to-end mission to mine Helium-3 on the Moon and return it to Earth is a viable option for the future energy market. The set requirements for the representative end-to-end mission were to provide 10% of the global energy demand in the year 2040. The mission elements have been selected with multiple trade-offs among both conservative and novel concepts. A mission architecture with multiple decoupled elements for each transportation segment (LEO, transfer, lunar surface) was found to be the best option. It was found that the most critical element is the lunar mining operation itself. To supply 10% of the global energy demand in 2040, 200 tons of Helium-3 would be required per year. The resulting regolith mining rate would be 630 tons per second, based on an optimistic concentration of 20 ppb Helium-3 in lunar regolith. Between 1,700 to 2,000 Helium-3 mining vehicles would be required, if using University of Wisconsin’s Mark III miner. The required heating power, if mining both day and night, would add up to 39 GW. The resulting power system mass for the lunar operations would be in the order of 60,000 to 200,000 tons. A fleet of three lunar ascent/descent vehicles and 22 continuous-thrust vehicles for orbit transfer would be required. The costs of the mission elements have been spread out over expected lifetimes. The resulting profits from Helium

  1. Helium runaways in white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The long term evolution of an accreting carbon white dwarf was studied from the onset of accretion to the ignition of helium. The variations in the details of the helium shell flash examined with respect to variations in mass accretion rate. For intermediate rates the helium flash is potentially explosive whereas for high rates the shell flash is relatively weak. The results are discussed in the context of the long term evolution of novae.

  2. Applications of Groundwater Helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundance and isotope variations have widespread application in groundwater-related studies. This stems from the inert nature of this noble gas and the fact that its two isotopes ? helium-3 and helium-4 ? have distinct origins and vary widely in different terrestrial reservoirs. These attributes allow He concentrations and 3He/4He isotope ratios to be used to recognize and quantify the influence of a number of potential contributors to the total He budget of a groundwater sample. These are atmospheric components, such as air-equilibrated and air-entrained He, as well as terrigenic components, including in situ (aquifer) He, deep crustal and/or mantle He and tritiogenic 3He. Each of these components can be exploited to reveal information on a number of topics, from groundwater chronology, through degassing of the Earth?s crust to the role of faults in the transfer of mantle-derived volatiles to the surface. In this review, we present a guide to how groundwater He is collected from aquifer systems and quantitatively measured in the laboratory. We then illustrate the approach of resolving the measured He characteristics into its component structures using assumptions of endmember compositions. This is followed by a discussion of the application of groundwater He to the types of topics mentioned above using case studies from aquifers in California and Australia. Finally, we present possible future research directions involving dissolved He in groundwater.

  3. Cryogenic system for BERLinPro

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Anders, W.; Hellwig, A.; Knobloch, J.

    2014-01-29

    In 2010 Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) received funding to design and build the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project BERLinPro. The goal of this compact Energy recovery linac (ERL) is to develop the accelerator physics and technology required to generate and accelerate a 100-mA, 1-mm mrad emittance electron beam. The BERLinPro know-how can then be transferred to various ERL-based applications. All accelerating RF cavities including the electron source are based on superconducting technology operated at 1.8 K. A Linde L700 helium liquefier is supplying 4.5 K helium. The subatmospheric pressure of 16 mbar of the helium bath of the cavities will bemore » achieved by pumping with a set of cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps. While the L700 is already in operating, the 1.8 K system and the helium transfer system are in design phase.« less

  4. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  5. Expansion of high-temperature; high-pressure data set for coal gasification. Fifth quarterly report, September 28-December 28, 1985

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    During the fifth quarter, the gas mixing station for the high pressure reactor (HPR) system was completed. This station allows us to make reproducible binary mixtures of any two gases. It will be used for pyrolysis experiments in helium/nitrogen or oxygen/nitrogen and gasification experiments in helium/nitrogen or oxygen/nitrogen and gasification experiments in carbon dioxide/nitrogen. In addition, work began on modifications of the HPR system for high pressure (600 psig) operation. A limited amount of data was taken with the HPR system due to the modifications for the mixing station. However, the test plan experiments for pyrolysis in mixtures of heliummore » and nitrogen were completed. In general, there is a slightly higher yield of volatiles and lower yield of char as the helium content (heating rate) increases. A new technique for measuring char reactivity resulted from an Army SBIR program and was further developed under our other METC Contract. It has also been used to characterize chars generated under the current program. It was evident that the severity of the thermal treatment had a direct effect on char reactivity. In this regard, rapid heating to a relatively low temperature was most favorable while slow heating to a high temperature was least favorable. With regard to pressure effects on reactivity, our preliminary data indicated that higher pressures produce chars lower initial reactivity. A total of four experiments were done in the heated tube reactor (HTR) at 60 psig, 800/sup 0/C maximum tube temperature. The trends are the same as observed in the atmospheric pressure experiments for the same tube temperature and cold gas velocity. During the past quarter, a particle temperature (PT) model was under development for the high pressure entrained flow reactor (HPR). 5 refs., 5 figs.« less

  6. Helium self-trapping and diffusion behaviors in deformed 316L stainless steel exposed to high flux and low energy helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yihao; Jin, Shuoxue; Zhu, Te; Cheng, Long; Cao, Xingzhong; You, Li; Lu, Guanghong; Guo, Liping; Wang, Baoyi

    2018-04-01

    A large number of dislocation networks were introduced in to 316L stainless steel by cold rolling. Subsequently, low energy (40 eV) helium ions were implanted by exposing the steel to helium plasma. Thermal desorption and positron annihilation spectroscopy were used to study the behavior of helium in the presence of dislocations, with emphasis on helium self-trapping and migration behaviors. Helium desorption behaviour from different helium trapping states was measured by the thermal desorption spectroscopy. Most of the helium desorbed from the He m V n clusters, and the corresponding desorption peak is located at ~650 K. The desorption peak from helium-dislocation clusters (He m D) is at approximately 805 K. The effect of annealing on the defect evolution was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. For the specimen exposed to helium plasma without displacement damage, the increment of S parameter meant the existence of helium self-trapping behavior (He m V n ). Helium atoms could diffuse two to three orders of magnitude deeper than the implantation depth calculated by SRIM. The diffusing helium atoms were gradually trapped by dislocation lines and formed He m D. Elevated temperatures enhance the self-trapping behavior and cause helium atoms to dissociate/desorb from the He m V n clusters, increasing the S parameters at 473-673 K. The gradual recovery of vacancies in the He m V n clusters decreased the S parameter above 673 K.

  7. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  12. Performance of Upgraded Cooling System for Lhd Helical Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Obana, T.; Yanagi, N.; Moriuchi, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Oba, K.; Mito, T.; Motojima, O.; Okamura, T.; Semba, T.; Yoshinaga, S.; Wakisaka, H.

    2008-03-01

    Helical coils of the Large Helical Device (LHD) are large scale superconducting magnets for heliotron plasma experiments. The helical coils had been cooled by saturated helium at 4.4 K, 120 kPa until 2005. An upgrade of the cooling system was carried out in 2006 in order to improve the cryogenic stability of the helical coils and then it has been possible to supply the coils with subcooled helium at 3.2 K, 120 kPa. A designed mass flow of the supplied subcooled helium is 50 g/s. The subcooled helium is generated at a heat exchanger in a saturated helium bath. A series of two centrifugal cold compressors with gas foil bearing is utilized to lower the helium pressure in the bath. The supplied helium temperature is regulated by rotational speed of the cold compressors and power of a heater in the bath. The mass flow of the supplied helium is also controlled manually by a supply valve and its surplus is evaporated by ten heaters at the outlet above the coils. In the present study, the performance of the cooling system has been investigated and a stable operating method has also developed. As the result, it was confirmed that the performance of the upgraded cooling system satisfies the requirements.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Thermophysical Properties of Quantum Liquid Helium Using the Feynman-Hibbs Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Lu, W. Q.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the detailed MD simulation on the properties including the thermal conductivities and viscosities of the quantum fluid helium at different state points. The molecular interactions are represented by the Lennard-Jones pair potentials supplemented by quantum corrections following the Feynman-Hibbs approach and the properties are calculated using the Green-Kubo equations. A comparison is made among the numerical results using LJ and QFH potentials and the existing database and shows that the LJ model is not quantitatively correct for the supercritical liquid helium, thereby the quantum effect must be taken into account when the quantum fluid helium is studied. The comparison of the thermal conductivity is also made as a function of temperatures and pressure and the results show quantum effect correction is an efficient tool to get the thermal conductivities.

  14. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Z.

    2016-06-01

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  15. Final report on the Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC tunnel at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufay-Chanat, L.; Bremer, J.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Koettig, T.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.

    2015-12-01

    The 27 km circumference LHC underground tunnel is a space in which the helium cooled LHC magnets are installed. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting magnets are protected by over-pressure safety relief devices that open whenever cold helium escapes either from the magnet cold enclosure or from the helium supply headers, into this vacuum enclosure. A 3-m long no stay zone around these devices is defined based on scale model studies, protecting the personnel against cold burns or asphyxia caused by such a helium release event. Recently, several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the helium/air mixture, resulting from the opening of such a safety device, along the tunnel. The released helium flows vary in the range between 1 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. To validate these different simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed inside the LHC tunnel, releasing helium flow rates of 1 kg/s, 0.3 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. For each test, up to 1000 liters of liquid helium were released under standard operational tunnel conditions. The data recorded include oxygen concentration, temperature and flow speed measurements, and video footage used to assess qualitatively the visibility. These measurements have been made in the up- and downstream directions, with respect to the air ventilation flow, of the spill point. This paper presents the experimental set-up under which these release tests were made, the effects of these releases on the atmospheric tunnel condition as a function of the release flow rate. We discuss the modification to the personnel access conditions to the LHC tunnel that are presently implemented as a result of these tests.

  16. Analysis of plasmas generated by fission fragments. [nuclear pumped lasers and helium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deese, J. E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    A kinetic model is developed for a plasma generated by fission fragments and the results are employed to study helium plasma generated in a tube coated with fissionable material. Because both the heavy particles and electrons play important roles in creating the plasma, their effects are considered simultaneously. The calculations are carried out for a range of neutron fluxes and pressures. In general, the predictions of the theory are in good agreement with available intensity measurements. Moreover, the theory predicts the experimentally measured inversions. However, the calculated gain coefficients are such that lasing is not expected to take place in a helium plasma generated by fission fragments. The effects of an externally applied electric field are also considered.

  17. A high-pressure van der Waals compound in solid nitrogen-helium mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, W. L.; Finger, L. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Hu, J. Z.; Mao, H. K.; Schouten, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed diamond anvil-cell study using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and optical microscopy has been conducted for the He-N system, with a view to the weakly-bound van der Waals molecule interactions that can be formed in the gas phase. High pressure is found to stabilize the formation of a stoichiometric, solid van der Waals compound of He(N2)11 composition which may exemplify a novel class of compounds found at high pressures in the interiors of the outer planets and their satellites.

  18. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  19. Rydberg States of Alkali Metal Atoms on Superfluid Helium Droplets - Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Lackner, Florian; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-06-01

    The bound states of electrons on the surface of superfluid helium have been a research topic for several decades. One of the first systems treated was an electron bound to an ionized helium cluster. Here, a similar system is considered, which consists of a helium droplet with an ionized dopant inside and an orbiting electron on the outside. In our theoretical investigation we select alkali metal atoms (AK) as central ions, stimulated by recent experimental studies of Rydberg states for Na, Rb, and Cs attached to superfluid helium nanodroplets. Experimental spectra , obtained by electronic excitation and subsequent ionization, showed blueshifts for low lying electronic states and redshifts for Rydberg states. In our theoretical treatment the diatomic AK^+-He potential energy curves are first computed with ab initio methods. These potentials are then used to calculate the solvation energy of the ion in a helium droplet as a function of the number of atoms. Additional potential terms, derived from the obtained helium density distribution, are added to the undisturbed atomic pseudopotential in order to simulate a 'modified' potential felt by the outermost electron. This allows us to compute a new set of eigenstates and eigenenergies, which we compare to the experimentally observed energy shifts for highly excited alkali metal atoms on helium nanodroplets. A. Golov and S. Sekatskii, Physica B, 1994, 194, 555-556 E. Loginov, C. Callegari, F. Ancilotto, and M. Drabbels, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2011, 115, 6779-6788 F. Lackner, G. Krois, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2012, 3, 1404-1408 F. Lackner, G. Krois, M. Theisen, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 18781-18788

  20. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; ...

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  1. Backscattered helium spectroscopy in the helium ion microscope: Principles, resolution and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gastel, R.; Hlawacek, G.; Dutta, S.; Poelsema, B.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the possibilities and limitations for microstructure characterization using backscattered particles from a sharply focused helium ion beam. The interaction of helium ions with matter enables the imaging, spectroscopic characterization, as well as the nanometer scale modification of samples. The contrast that is seen in helium ion microscopy (HIM) images differs from that in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and is generally a result of the higher surface sensitivity of the method. It allows, for instance, a much better visualization of low-Z materials as a result of the small secondary electron escape depth. However, the same differences in beam interaction that give HIM an edge over other imaging techniques, also impose limitations for spectroscopic applications using backscattered particles. Here we quantify those limitations and discuss opportunities to further improve the technique.

  2. Feasibility study for long lifetime helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    A feasible concept for a launchable three year lifetime helium dewar was investigted. Current helium dewar designs were examined to see where the largest potential reductions in parasitic heat loads can be made. The study was also devoted to examining support concepts. The support concept chosen, a passive orbital disconnect strut (PODS), has an orbital support conductance that is lower by more than an order of magnitude over current tension band supports. This lower support conductance cuts the total dewar weight in half for the same three year life time requirements. Effort was also concentrated on efficient wire feed through designs and vapor cooling of the multilayer insulation, supports, wire feed throughs and plumbing penetrations. A single stage helium dewar vs. dual stage dewars with a guard cryogen of nitrogen or neon was examined. The single stage dewar concept was selected. Different support concepts were analyzed from which the PODS support concepts was chosen. A preliminary design of the dewar was thermally and structurally analyzed and laid out including system weights, thermal performance and performance sensitivities.

  3. Commercial helium reserves, continental rifting and volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Barry, P. H.; Hillegonds, D.; Fontijn, K.; Bluett, J.; Abraham-James, T.; Danabalan, D.; Gluyas, J.; Brennwald, M. S.; Pluess, B.; Seneshens, D.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2017-12-01

    Helium has many industrial applications, but notably provides the unique cooling medium for superconducting magnets in medical MRI scanners and high energy beam lines. In 2013 the global supply chainfailed to meet demand causing significant concern - the `Liquid Helium Crisis' [1]. The 2017 closure of Quatar borders, a major helium supplier, is likely to further disrupt helium supply, and accentuates the urgent need to diversify supply. Helium is found in very few natural gas reservoirs that have focused 4He produced by the dispersed decay (a-particle) of U and Th in the crust. We show here, using the example of the Rukwa section of the Tanzanian East African Rift, how continental rifting and local volcanism provides the combination of processes required to generate helium reserves. The ancient continental crust provides the source of 4He. Rifting and associated magmatism provides the tectonic and thermal mechanism to mobilise deep fluid circulation, focusing flow to the near surface along major basement faults. Helium-rich springs in the Tanzanian Great Rift Valley were first identified in the 1950's[2]. The isotopic compositions and major element chemistry of the gases from springs and seeps are consistent with their release from the crystalline basement during rifting [3]. Within the Rukwa Rift Valley, helium seeps occur in the vicinity of trapping structures that have the potential to store significant reserves of helium [3]. Soil gas surveys over 6 prospective trapping structures (1m depth, n=1486) show helium anomalies in 5 out of the 6 at levels similar to those observed over a known helium-rich gas reservoir at 1200m depth (7% He - Harley Dome, Utah). Detailed macroseep gas compositions collected over two days (n=17) at one site allows us to distinguish shallow gas contributions and shows the deep gas to contain between 8-10% helium, significantly increasing resource estimates based on uncorrected values (1.8-4.2%)[2,3]. The remainder of the deep gas is

  4. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat loadmore » from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.« less

  5. Development and Dissemination of a Nationwide Helium Database for a National Assessment of Helium Resources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, S. T.; East, J. A., II; Garrity, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, Congress passed the Helium Stewardship Act requiring the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to undertake a national helium gas resource assessment to determine the nation's helium resources. An important initial component necessary to complete this assessment was the development of a comprehensive database of Helium (He) concentrations from petroleum exploration wells. Because Helium is often used as the carrier gas for compositional analyses for commercial and exploratory oil and gas wells, this limits the available helium concentration data. A literature search in peer-reviewed publications, state geologic survey databases, USGS energy geochemical databases, and the Bureau of Land Management databases provided approximately 16,000 data points from wells that had measurable He concentrations in the gas composition analyses. The data from these wells includes, date of sample collection, American Petroleum Institute well number, formation name, field name, depth of sample collection, and location. The gas compositional analyses, some performed as far back as 1934, do not all have the same level of precision and accuracy, therefore the date of the analysis is critical to the assessment as it indicates the relative amount of uncertainty in the analytical results. Non-proprietary data was used to create a GIS based interactive web interface that allows users to visualize, inspect, interact, and download our most current He data. The user can click on individual locations to see the available data at that location, as well as zoom in and out on a data density map. Concentrations on the map range from .04 mol% (lowest concentration of economic value) to 12% (highest naturally occurring values). This visual interface will allow users to develop a rapid appreciation of the areas with the highest potential for high helium concentrations within oil and gas fields.

  6. Advantages of cryopumping with liquid hydrogen instead of helium refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. W.; Tueller, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Open loop hydrogen vaporizers and helium refrigerators are compared for operational complexity, installation and operating cost, and safety requirements. Data from two vacuum chambers using helium refrigerators are used to provide comparative data. In general, the use of hydrogen is attractive in the larger systems, even when extra safety precautions are taken. Emotional resistance to the use of hydrogen because of safety requirements is considered great. However, the experience gained in the handling of large quantities of cryogenics, particularly hydrogen and liquefied natural gases, should be considered in the design of open loop hydrogen cooling systems.

  7. Photo-electron emission directly in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, V. V.; Pyurbeeva, E. B.; Khaldeev, S. I.

    2018-03-01

    Despite the fact that electron transport in condensed helium has been studied for over half a century [1], observations of new intriguing effects still appear [2]. Alas, the traditional methods of injecting electrons into condensed helium (radioactive-sources, electrical discharge or field emission) lead to generation of helium ions, recombination of which is accompanied by emergence of a large number of excitations. As a result, interpretation of such experiments is not simple and sometimes may be questionable. In this respect, photoelectron emitters, which operate with energies substantially smaller than the ionization energy of helium, are preferable. However, immersion of the photocathode into condensed helium suppresses electron emission. Nevertheless, we managed to achieve electron currents (>20 fA) with the In photocathode immersed directly in liquid superfluid helium. The UV light (λ=254 nm) was guided to the photocathode through a two-meter long Al-covered quartz optical fiber.

  8. Transient boiling in two-phase helium natural circulation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase helium natural circulation loops are used for cooling large superconducting magnets, as CMS for LHC. During normal operation or in the case of incidents, transients are exerted on the cooling system. Here a cooling system of this type is studied experimentally. Sudden power changes are operated on a vertical-heated-section natural convection loop, simulating a fast increase of heat deposition on magnet cooling pipes. Mass flow rate, heated section wall temperature and pressure drop variations are measured as a function of time, to assess the time behavior concerning the boiling regime according to the values of power injected on the heated section. The boiling curves and critical heat flux (CHF) values have been obtained in steady state. Temperature evolution has been observed in order to explore the operating ranges where heat transfer is deteriorated. Premature film boiling has been observed during transients on the heated section in some power ranges, even at appreciably lower values than the CHF. A way of attenuating these undesired temperature excursions has been identified through the application of high enough initial heating power.

  9. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    DOE PAGES

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; ...

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determinemore » operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.« less

  10. Helium diffusion parameters of hematite from a single-diffusion-domain crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.

    2018-06-01

    This contribution reports new parameters for helium diffusion in hematite useful for interpretation of cosmogenic 3He and radiogenic 4He chronometry. Fragments of a coarse, euhedral single crystal of hematite from Minas Gerais, Brazil were subjected to bulk step-heating helium diffusion experiments after proton irradiation to make a uniform distribution of 3He. Aliquots of three different grain sizes ranging from ∼300 to ∼700 μm in equivalent-sphere radius yielded helium diffusion activation energies Ea ∼ 170 kJ/mol, very similar to previous estimates for Ea in hematite. Uniquely in this specimen, diffusivity varies with the dimensions of the analyzed fragments in precisely the fashion expected if the diffusion domain corresponds to the physical grain. This contrasts with previous studies that concluded that the analyzed hematites consist of polycrystalline aggregates in which helium migration is governed by the size distribution of the constituent crystallites. These new data permit a direct estimate of the helium diffusivity at infinite temperature for hematite of ln(Do) = -0.66 ± 0.35 in cm2/s. The major implication of the new diffusion parameters is that hematite is very retentive of helium even at very small crystal sizes. For example, a 20 nm radius hematite crystal, at the smallest end of the size range so far described in dated polycrystalline hematite specimens, will retain more than 99% of its ingrown He over 1 Myr at 30 °C, and more than 90% over 100 Myr. Under most conditions, hematite is close to quantitatively helium-retentive on the Earth's surface, simplifying radiogenic and cosmogenic helium dating of this phase. In a system cooling at 10 °C/Myr, the 20 nm hematite crystal has a He closure temperature of ∼70 °C, similar to a typical ∼100 μm apatite crystal. Helium is likely held tightly in hematite owing to its dense hexagonal closest packing structure and absence of migration-enhancing channels. The isostructural minerals corundum

  11. Volatile fluxes through the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault, California: helium and carbon-dioxide systematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.; Barry, Peter H.; Esser, Bradley K.; Hillegonds, Darren; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the source of volatiles and their relationship to the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS), 18 groundwater samples were collected from wells near the Big Bend section of the SAFS in southern California and analyzed for helium and carbon abundance and isotopes. Concentrations of 4He, corrected for air-bubble entrainment, vary from 4.15 to 62.7 (× 10− 8) cm3 STP g− 1 H2O. 3He/4He ratios vary from 0.09 to 3.52 RA (where RA = air 3He/4He), consistent with up to 44% mantle helium in samples. A subset of 10 samples was analyzed for the major volatile phase (CO2) — the hypothesized carrier phase of the helium in the mantle–crust system: CO2/3He ratios vary from 0.614 to 142 (× 1011), and δ13C (CO2) values vary from − 21.5 to − 11.9‰ (vs. PDB). 3He/4He ratios and CO2 concentrations are highest in the wells located in the Mil Potrero and Cuddy valleys adjacent to the SAFS. The elevated 3He/4He ratios are interpreted to be a consequence of a mantle volatile flux though the SAFS diluted by radiogenic He produced in the crust. Samples with the highest 3He/4He ratios also had the lowest CO2/3He ratios. The combined helium isotope, He–CO2 elemental relationships, and δ13C (CO2) values of the groundwater volatiles reveal a mixture of mantle and deep crustal (metamorphic) fluid origins. The flux of fluids into the seismogenic zone at high hydrostatic pressure may cause fault rupture, and transfer volatiles into the shallow crust. We calculate an upward fluid flow rate of 147 mm a− 1 along the SAFS, up to 37 times higher than previous estimates (Kennedy et al., 1997). However, using newly identified characteristics of the SAFS, we calculate a total flux of 3He along the SAFS of 7.4 × 103 cm3 STP a− 1 (0.33 mol 3He a− 1), and a CO2 flux of 1.5 × 1013 cm3STP a− 1 (6.6 × 108 mol a− 1), ~ 1% of previous estimates. Lower fluxes along the Big Bend section of the SAFS suggest that the flux of mantle volatiles alone is insufficient to cause the

  12. Global helium particle balance in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, G.; Masuzaki, S.; Tokitani, M.; Kasahara, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Morisaki, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Akiyama, T.; Ohno, N.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, H.; LHD Experiment Group

    2015-08-01

    Global helium particle balance in long-pulse discharges is analyzed for the first time in the Large Helical Device (LHD) with the plasma-facing components of the first wall and the divertor tiles composed of stainless steel and carbon, respectively. During the 2-min discharge sustained by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and electron cyclotron heating (ECH), helium is observed to be highly retained in the wall (regarded as both the first wall and the divertor tiles). Almost all (about 96%) puffed helium particles (1.3 × 1022 He) are absorbed in the wall near the end of the discharge. Even though a dynamic retention is eliminated, 56% is still absorbed. The analysis is also applied to longer pulse discharges over 40 min by ICRH and ECH, indicating that the helium wall retention is dynamically changed in time. At the initial phase of the discharge, a mechanism for adsorbing helium other than dynamical retention is invoked.

  13. Dynamic Simulation of a Helium Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, R.; Ooba, K.; Nobutoki, M.; Mito, T.

    2004-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of a helium liquefier has been studied in detail with a Cryogenic Process REal-time SimulaTor (C-PREST) at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The C-PREST is being developed to integrate large-scale helium cryogenic plant design, operation and maintenance for optimum process establishment. As a first step of simulations of cooldown to 4.5 K with the helium liquefier model is conducted, which provides a plant-process validation platform. The helium liquefier consists of seven heat exchangers, a liquid-nitrogen (LN2) precooler, two expansion turbines and a liquid-helium (LHe) reservoir. Process simulations are fulfilled with sequence programs, which were implemented with C-PREST based on an existing liquefier operation. The interactions of a JT valve, a JT-bypass valve and a reservoir-return valve have been dynamically simulated. The paper discusses various aspects of refrigeration process simulation, including its difficulties such as a balance between complexity of the adopted models and CPU time.

  14. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    PubMed Central

    Massiczek, O.; Friedreich, S.; Juhász, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-01-01

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser–microwave–laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium – an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland – are described. Similar experiments for 4He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised 3He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the 3He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD. PMID:22267883

  15. Helium as a Dynamical Tracer in the Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, J. P.; Liu, X.; Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Helium has been a missing constituent in current thermosphere general circulation models. Although typically a minor gas relative to the more abundant major gasses, its unique properties of being chemically inert and light make it an excellent tracer of thermosphere dynamics. Studying helium can help simplify understanding of transport effects. This understanding can then be projected to other gasses whose overall structure and behavior are complex but, by contrasting with helium, can be evaluated for its transport dependencies. The dynamical influences on composition impact estimates of thermosphere mass density, where helium during solar minima can have a direct contribution, as well as ionosphere electron density. Furthermore, helium estimates in the upper thermosphere during solar minima have not been observed since the 1976 minimum. Indirect estimates of helium in the upper thermosphere during the recent extreme solar minimum indicates winter-time helium concentrations exceeded NRL-MSISE00 estimates by 30%-70% during periods of quiet geomagnetic activity. For times of active geomagnetic conditions, helium concentrations near ~450 km altitude are estimated to decrease while oxygen concentrations increase. An investigation of the altitude structure in thermosphere mass density storm-time perturbations reveal the important effects of composition change with maximum perturbation occurring near the He/O transition region and a much weaker maximum occurring near the O/N2 transition region. However, evaluating helium behavior and its role as a dynamical tracer is not straightforward and model development is necessary to adequately establish the connection to specific dynamical processes. Fortunately recent efforts have led to the implementation of helium modules in the NCAR TIEGCM and TIME-GCM. In this invited talk, the simulated helium behavior and structure will be shown to reproduce observations (such as the wintertime helium bulge and storm-time response) and its

  16. Helium Diffusion in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusion of helium has been characterized in natural Fe-bearing olivine (~Fo90) and synthetic forsterite. Polished, oriented slabs of olivine were implanted with 3He, at 100 keV at a dose of 5x1015/cm2 or at 3.0 MeV at a dose of 1x1016/cm2. A set of experiments on the implanted olivine were run in 1-atm furnaces. In addition to the one-atm experiments, experiments on implanted samples were also run at higher pressures (2.6 and 2.7 GPa) to assess the potential effects of pressure on He diffusion and the applicability of the measured diffusivities in describing He transport in the mantle. The high-pressure experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus using an "ultra-soft" pressure cell, with the diffusion sample directly surrounded by AgCl. 3He distributions following experiments were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. This direct profiling method permits us to evaluate anisotropy of diffusion, which cannot be easily assessed using bulk-release methods. For diffusion in forsterite parallel to c we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperatures 250-950°C: D = 3.91x10-6exp(-159 ± 4 kJ mol-1/RT) m2/sec. The data define a single Arrhenius line spanning more than 7 orders of magnitude in D and 700°C in temperature. Diffusion parallel to a appears slightly slower, yielding an activation energy for diffusion of 135 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 3.73x10-8 m2/sec. Diffusion parallel to b is slower than diffusion parallel to a (by about two-thirds of a log unit); for this orientation an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 1.34x10-8 m2/sec are obtained. This anisotropy is broadly consistent with observations for diffusion of Ni and Fe-Mg in olivine. Diffusion in Fe-bearing olivine (transport parallel to b) agrees within uncertainty with findings for He diffusion in forsterite. The higher-pressure experiments yield diffusivities in agreement with those from the 1-atm

  17. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mahmood, S., E-mail: shahzadm100@gmail.com; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.

    2016-06-15

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found whichmore » depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.« less

  18. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  20. The A-B transition in superfluid helium-3 under confinement in a thin slab geometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, N.; Abhilash, T. S.; Smith, E. N.; Bennett, R. G.; Rojas, X.; Levitin, L.; Saunders, J.; Parpia, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of confinement on the phases of superfluid helium-3 is studied using the torsional pendulum method. We focus on the transition between the A and B phases, where the A phase is stabilized by confinement and a spatially modulated stripe phase is predicted at the A–B phase boundary. Here we discuss results from superfluid helium-3 contained in a single 1.08-μm-thick nanofluidic cavity incorporated into a high-precision torsion pendulum, and map the phase diagram between 0.1 and 5.6 bar. We observe only small supercooling of the A phase, in comparison to bulk or when confined in aerogel, with evidence for a non-monotonic pressure dependence. This suggests that an intrinsic B-phase nucleation mechanism operates under confinement. Both the phase diagram and the relative superfluid fraction of the A and B phases, show that strong coupling is present at all pressures, with implications for the stability of the stripe phase. PMID:28671184

  1. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A., E-mail: alkwin.slenczka@chemie.uni-regensburg.de

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broadmore » (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.« less

  2. Nanofabrication with a helium ion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Diederik; van Veldhoven, Emile; Chen, Ping; Sidorkin, Vadim; Salemink, Huub; van der Drift, Emile..; Alkemade, Paul

    2010-03-01

    The recently introduced helium ion microscope (HIM) is capable of imaging and fabrication of nanostructures thanks to its sub-nanometer sized ion probe. The unique interaction of the helium ions with the sample material provides very localized secondary electron emission, thus providing a valuable signal for high-resolution imaging as well as a mechanism for very precise nanofabrication. The low proximity effects, due to the low yield of backscattered ions and the confinement of the forward scattered ions into a narrow cone, enable patterning of ultra-dense sub-10 nm structures. This paper presents various nanofabrication results obtained with direct-write, with scanning helium ion beam lithography, and with helium ion beam induced deposition.

  3. A Report on Superfluid Helium Flow Through Porous Plugs for Space Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    As a background for the study of the nature of superfluid helium flow through porous plugs for other space science uses, preliminary tests on various plugs of a given material, diameter, height, and filtration grade have been performed. Two characteristics of the plugs, pore size and number of channels, have been determined by the bubble test and warm flow test of helium gas through the plugs, respectively. Tests on the flow of He II through the plugs have also been performed. An obvious feature of the results of these tests is that for isothermal measurements of pressure versus mass flow rate below approximately 2.10 K, the flow is separated into two different regimes, indicative of the occurrence of a critical phenomenon.

  4. Nutrition systems for pressure suits.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Nutrition systems were successfully developed in the Apollo Program for astronauts wearing pressure suits during emergency decompression situations and during lunar surface explorations. These nutrition systems consisted of unique dispensers, water, flavored beverages, nutrient-fortified beverages, and intermediate moisture food bars. The emergency decompression system dispensed the nutrition from outside the pressure suit by interfacing with a suit helmet penetration port. The lunar exploration system utilized dispensers stowed within the interior layers of the pressure suit. These systems could be adapted for provision of nutrients in other situations requiring the use of pressure suits.

  5. Effects of helium and air inhalation on the innate and early adaptive immune system in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Oei, Gezina T M L; Smit, Kirsten F; vd Vondervoort, Djai; Brevoord, Daniel; Hoogendijk, Arjan; Wieland, Catharina W; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C

    2012-09-24

    Helium inhalation protects myocardium, brain and endothelium against ischemia/reperfusion injury in animals and humans, when applied according to specific "conditioning" protocols. Before widespread use of this "conditioning" agent in clinical practice, negative side effects have to be ruled out. We investigated the effect of prolonged helium inhalation on the responsiveness of the human immune response in whole blood ex vivo. Male healthy volunteers inhaled 30 minutes heliox (79%He/21%O(2)) or air in a cross over design, with two weeks between measurements. Blood was withdrawn at T0 (baseline), T1 (25 min inhalation) and T2-T5 (1, 2, 6, 24 h after inhalation) and incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), T-cell stimuli anti-CD3/ anti-CD28 (TCS) or RPMI (as control) for 2, 4 and 24 hours or not incubated (0 h). An additional group of six volunteers inhaled 60 minutes of heliox or air, followed by blood incubation with LPS and RPMI. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) was analyzed by cytometric bead array. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test for matched samples. Incubation with LPS, LTA or TCS significantly increased TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-2 in comparison to incubation with RPMI alone. Thirty min of helium inhalation did not influence the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-2 in comparison to air. Sixty min of helium inhalation did not affect cytokine production after LPS stimulation. We conclude that 79% helium inhalation does not affect the responsiveness of the human immune system in healthy volunteers. Dutch Trial Register: http://www.trialregister.nl/ NTR2152.

  6. Precision measurement of the three 2(3)P(J) helium fine structure intervals.

    PubMed

    Zelevinsky, T; Farkas, D; Gabrielse, G

    2005-11-11

    The three 2(3)P fine structure intervals of 4H are measured at an improved accuracy that is sufficient to test two-electron QED theory and to determine the fine structure constant alpha to 14 parts in 10(9). The more accurate determination of alpha, to a precision higher than attained with the quantum Hall and Josephson effects, awaits the reconciliation of two inconsistent theoretical calculations now being compared term by term. A low pressure helium discharge presents experimental uncertainties quite different than for earlier measurements and allows direct measurements of light pressure shifts.

  7. Sources of groundwater based on Helium analyses in and near the freshwater/saline-water transition zone of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards Aquifer, South-Central Texas, 2002-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Lambert, Rebecca B.; Fahlquist, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    This report evaluates dissolved noble gas data, specifically helium-3 and helium-4, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, during 2002-03. Helium analyses are used to provide insight into the sources of groundwater in the freshwater/saline-water transition zone of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer. Sixty-nine dissolved gas samples were collected from 19 monitoring wells (categorized as fresh, transitional, or saline on the basis of dissolved solids concentration in samples from the wells or from fluid-profile logging of the boreholes) arranged in five transects, with one exception, across the freshwater/saline-water interface (the 1,000-milligrams-per-liter dissolved solids concentration threshold) of the Edwards aquifer. The concentration of helium-4 (the dominant isotope in atmospheric and terrigenic helium) in samples ranged from 63 microcubic centimeters per kilogram at standard temperature (20 degrees Celsius) and pressure (1 atmosphere) in a well in the East Uvalde transect to 160,587 microcubic centimeters per kilogram at standard temperature and pressure in a well in the Kyle transect. Helium-4 concentrations in the 10 saline wells generally increase from the western transects to the eastern transects. Increasing helium-4 concentrations from southwest to northeast in the transition zone, indicating increasing residence time of groundwater from southwest to northeast, is consistent with the longstanding conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer in which water recharges in the southwest, flows generally northeasterly (including in the transition zone, although more slowly than in the fresh-water zone), and discharges at major springs in the northeast. Excess helium-4 was greater than 1,000 percent for 60 of the 69 samples, indicating that terrigenic helium is largely present and that most of the excess helium-4 comes from sources other than the atmosphere. The helium data of this report cannot be

  8. Commissioning of the helium cryogenic system for the HIE- ISOLDE accelerator upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delruelle, N.; Inglese, V.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Williams, L.

    2015-12-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN. The most significant improvement will come from replacing the existing REX accelerating structure by a superconducting linear accelerator (SC linac) composed ultimately of six cryo-modules installed in series, each containing superconducting RF cavities and solenoids operated at 4.5 K. In order to provide the cooling capacity at all temperature levels between 300 K and 4.5 K for the six cryo-modules, an existing helium refrigerator, manufactured in 1986 and previously used to cool the ALEPH magnet during LEP operation from 1989 to 2000, has been refurbished, reinstalled and recommissioned in a dedicated building located next to the HIE-ISOLDE experimental hall. This helium refrigerator has been connected to a new cryogenic distribution line, consisting of a 30-meter long vacuum-insulated transfer line, a 2000-liter storage dewar and six interconnecting valve boxes, one for each cryo-module. This paper describes the whole cryogenic system and presents the commissioning results including the preliminary operation at 4.5 K of the first cryo- module in the experimental hall.

  9. Miniaturized pressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Swink, Don G.

    1991-01-01

    The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  10. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  11. Ten-year helium anomaly prior to the 2014 Mt Ontake eruption

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Yuji; Kagoshima, Takanori; Takahata, Naoto; Nishio, Yoshiro; Roulleau, Emilie; Pinti, Daniele L.; Fischer, Tobias P.

    2015-01-01

    Mt Ontake in central Japan suddenly erupted on 27th September 2014, killing 57 people with 6 still missing. It was a hydro-volcanic eruption and new magmatic material was not detected. There were no precursor signals such as seismicity and edifice inflation. It is difficult to predict hydro-volcanic eruptions because they are local phenomena that only affect a limited area surrounding the explosive vent. Here we report a long-term helium anomaly measured in hot springs close to the central cone. Helium-3 is the most sensitive tracer of magmatic volatiles. We have conducted spatial surveys around the volcano at once per few years since November 1981. The 3He/4He ratios of the closest site to the cone stayed constant until June 2000 and increased significantly from June 2003 to November 2014, while those of distant sites showed no valuable change. These observations suggest a recent re-activation of Mt Ontake and that helium-3 enhancement may have been a precursor of the 2014 eruption. We show that the eruption was ultimately caused by the increased input of magmatic volatiles over a ten-year period which resulted in the slow pressurization of the volcanic conduit leading to the hydro-volcanic event in September 2014. PMID:26286468

  12. Ten-year helium anomaly prior to the 2014 Mt Ontake eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Kagoshima, Takanori; Takahata, Naoto; Nishio, Yoshiro; Roulleau, Emilie; Pinti, Daniele L.; Fischer, Tobias P.

    2015-08-01

    Mt Ontake in central Japan suddenly erupted on 27th September 2014, killing 57 people with 6 still missing. It was a hydro-volcanic eruption and new magmatic material was not detected. There were no precursor signals such as seismicity and edifice inflation. It is difficult to predict hydro-volcanic eruptions because they are local phenomena that only affect a limited area surrounding the explosive vent. Here we report a long-term helium anomaly measured in hot springs close to the central cone. Helium-3 is the most sensitive tracer of magmatic volatiles. We have conducted spatial surveys around the volcano at once per few years since November 1981. The 3He/4He ratios of the closest site to the cone stayed constant until June 2000 and increased significantly from June 2003 to November 2014, while those of distant sites showed no valuable change. These observations suggest a recent re-activation of Mt Ontake and that helium-3 enhancement may have been a precursor of the 2014 eruption. We show that the eruption was ultimately caused by the increased input of magmatic volatiles over a ten-year period which resulted in the slow pressurization of the volcanic conduit leading to the hydro-volcanic event in September 2014.

  13. Ten-year helium anomaly prior to the 2014 Mt Ontake eruption.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yuji; Kagoshima, Takanori; Takahata, Naoto; Nishio, Yoshiro; Roulleau, Emilie; Pinti, Daniele L; Fischer, Tobias P

    2015-08-19

    Mt Ontake in central Japan suddenly erupted on 27(th) September 2014, killing 57 people with 6 still missing. It was a hydro-volcanic eruption and new magmatic material was not detected. There were no precursor signals such as seismicity and edifice inflation. It is difficult to predict hydro-volcanic eruptions because they are local phenomena that only affect a limited area surrounding the explosive vent. Here we report a long-term helium anomaly measured in hot springs close to the central cone. Helium-3 is the most sensitive tracer of magmatic volatiles. We have conducted spatial surveys around the volcano at once per few years since November 1981. The (3)He/(4)He ratios of the closest site to the cone stayed constant until June 2000 and increased significantly from June 2003 to November 2014, while those of distant sites showed no valuable change. These observations suggest a recent re-activation of Mt Ontake and that helium-3 enhancement may have been a precursor of the 2014 eruption. We show that the eruption was ultimately caused by the increased input of magmatic volatiles over a ten-year period which resulted in the slow pressurization of the volcanic conduit leading to the hydro-volcanic event in September 2014.

  14. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin

    2016-08-14

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities (“magic number” peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers canmore » be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.« less

  15. Helium sell-off risks future supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The US must stop selling off its helium reserves so that the country has enough of the gas to meet the needs of researchers and medical programmes, warns a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The report, entitled "Selling the Nation's Helium Reserve", says that failure to halt the sale of helium could lead to a drop in supply of the gas, which is vital for research into magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and low-temperature physics.

  16. Transparent Helium in Stripped Envelope Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  17. Collective Autoionization in Multiply-Excited Systems: A novel ionization process observed in Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    LaForge, A. C.; Drabbels, M.; Brauer, N. B.; Coreno, M.; Devetta, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Finetti, P.; Grazioli, C.; Katzy, R.; Lyamayev, V.; Mazza, T.; Mudrich, M.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Piseri, P.; Plekan, O.; Prince, K. C.; Richter, R.; Stranges, S.; Callegari, C.; Möller, T.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2014-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) offer the unprecedented capability to study reaction dynamics and image the structure of complex systems. When multiple photons are absorbed in complex systems, a plasma-like state is formed where many atoms are ionized on a femtosecond timescale. If multiphoton absorption is resonantly-enhanced, the system becomes electronically-excited prior to plasma formation, with subsequent decay paths which have been scarcely investigated to date. Here, we show using helium nanodroplets as an example that these systems can decay by a new type of process, named collective autoionization. In addition, we show that this process is surprisingly efficient, leading to ion abundances much greater than that of direct single-photon ionization. This novel collective ionization process is expected to be important in many other complex systems, e.g. macromolecules and nanoparticles, exposed to high intensity radiation fields. PMID:24406316

  18. Filling of orbital fluid management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merino, F.; Blatt, M. H.; Thies, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study was performed with three objectives: (1) analyze fluid management system fill under orbital conditions; (2) determine what experimentation is needed; and (3) develop an experimental program. The fluid management system was a 1.06m (41.7 in) diameter pressure vessel with screen channel device. Analyses were conducted using liquid hydrogen and N2O4. The influence of helium and autogenous pressurization systems was considered. Analyses showed that fluid management system fill will be more difficult with a cryogen than with an earth storable. The key to a successful fill with cryogens is in devising techniques for filling without vent liquid, and removing trapped vapor from the screen device at tank fill completion. This will be accomplished with prechill, fill, and vapor condensation processes. Refill will require a vent and purge process, to dilute the residual helium, prior to introducing liquid. Neither prechill, chill, nor purge processes will be required for earth storables.

  19. Gas Requirements in Pressurized Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluck, D. F.; Kline, J. F.

    1961-01-01

    Of late, liquid hydrogen has become a very popular fuel for space missions. It is being used in such programs as Centaur and Saturn. Furthermore, hydrogen is the ideal working fluid for nuclear powered space vehicles currently under development. In these applications, liquid hydrogen fuel is generally transferred to the combustion chamber by a combination of pumping and pressurization. The pump forces the liquid propellant from the fuel tank to the combustion chamber; gaseous pressurant holds tank pressure sufficiently high to prevent cavitation at the pump inlet and to maintain the structural rigidity of the tank. The pressurizing system, composed of pressurant, tankage, and associated hardware can be a large portion of the total vehicle weight. Pressurant weight can be reduced by introducing the pressurizing gas at temperatures substantially greater than those of liquid hydrogen. Heat and mass transfer processes thereby induced complicate gas requirements during discharge. These requirements must be known to insure proper design of the pressurizing system. The aim of this paper is to develop from basic mass and energy transfer processes a general method to predict helium and hydrogen gas usage for the pressurized transfer of liquid hydrogen. This required an analytical and experimental investigation, the results of which are described in this paper.

  20. System of cryogenic security of the superconducting accelerator of relativistic nuclei-nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, N. N.; Lipchenko, V. I.; Mazarskij, V. L.; Makarov, L. G.; Sukhanova, A. K.

    The system of cryogenic security of the Nuclotron (superconducting accelerator of relativistic nuclei) is described. The system consists of three helium liquefiers KGU-16004/5. Refrigeration in each liquefier is performed by three preliminary cool-down turboexpanders and a vapor-liquid turboexpander. In this case the refrigeration of the KGU-1600/4.5 liquefiers reaches 1700 W. The system of gas preparation is composed of driers operating at the surrounding temperature. Purification from the admixtures of oxygen, nitrogen, neon, hydrogen and other gases is carried out in low-temperature blocks built in the helium liquefiers KGU-1600/4.5. To store the helium, there are ten 20 cu m receivers under a pressure of 3MPA.

  1. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the orbiter main propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicoll, W. J.; Mcneely, M.; Holden, K. A.; Emmons, T. E.; Lowery, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) hardware are documented. The Orbiter MPS consists of two subsystems: the Propellant Management Subsystem (PMS) and the Helium Subsystem. The PMS is a system of manifolds, distribution lines and valves by which the liquid propellants pass from the External Tank (ET) to the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) and gaseous propellants pass from the SSMEs to the ET. The Helium Subsystem consists of a series of helium supply tanks and their associated regulators, check valves, distribution lines, and control valves. The Helium Subsystem supplies helium that is used within the SSMEs for inflight purges and provides pressure for actuation of SSME valves during emergency pneumatic shutdowns. The balance of the helium is used to provide pressure to operate the pneumatically actuated valves within the PMS. Each component was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticalities were assigned based on the worst possible effect of each failure mode. Of the 690 failure modes analyzed, 349 were determined to be PCIs.

  2. Helium-Shrouded Planets Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-11

    Planets having atmospheres rich in helium may be common in our galaxy, according to a new theory based on data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. These planets would be around the mass of Neptune, or lighter, and would orbit close to their stars, basking in their searing heat. According to the new theory, radiation from the stars would boil off hydrogen in the planets' atmospheres. Both hydrogen and helium are common ingredients of gas planets like these. Hydrogen is lighter than helium and thus more likely to escape. After billions of years of losing hydrogen, the planet's atmosphere would become enriched with helium. Scientists predict the planets would appear covered in white or gray clouds. This is in contrast to our own Neptune, which is blue due to the presence of methane. Methane absorbs the color red, leaving blue. Neptune is far from our sun and hasn't lost its hydrogen. The hydrogen bonds with carbon to form methane. This artist's concept depicts a proposed helium-atmosphere planet called GJ 436b, which was found by Spitzer to lack in methane -- a first clue about its lack of hydrogen. The planet orbits every 2.6 days around its star, which is cooler than our sun and thus appears more yellow-orange in color. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19344

  3. A temperature and pressure controlled calibration system for pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.; Kahng, Seun K.

    1989-01-01

    A data acquisition and experiment control system capable of simulating temperatures from -184 to +220 C and pressures either absolute or differential from 0 to 344.74 kPa is developed to characterize silicon pressure sensor response to temperature and pressure. System software is described that includes sensor data acquisition, algorithms for numerically derived thermal offset and sensitivity correction, and operation of the environmental chamber and pressure standard. This system is shown to be capable of computer interfaced cryogenic testing to within 1 C and 34.47 Pa of single channel or multiplexed arrays of silicon pressure sensors.

  4. Two discharge modes of a repetitive nanosecond pulsed helium glow discharge under sub-atmospheric pressure in the repetition frequency range of 20 to 600 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Maegawa, Takuya; Otsubo, Akira; Nishimura, Yoshimi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Yatsuzuka, Mitsuyasu

    2018-05-01

    Two discharge modes, α and γ, of a repetitive nanosecond pulsed helium glow discharge at a gas pressure of 10 kPa in the repetition frequency range from 20 to 600 kHz are reported for the first time. The pulsed glow discharge is produced in a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes without insertion of dielectrics. The α mode discharge is volumetrically produced in the electrode gap at a low-repetition frequency, whereas the γ mode discharge is localized at the cathode surface at a high-repetition frequency. At high-repetition frequency, the time interval between voltage pulses is shorter than the lifetime of the afterglow produced by the preceding discharge. Then, the γ mode discharge is maintained by a large number of secondary electrons emitted from the cathode exposed to high-density ions and metastable helium atoms in the afterglow. In the α mode discharge with a low-repetition frequency operation, primary electrons due to gas ionization dominate the ionization process. Thus, a large discharge voltage is needed for the excitation of the α mode discharge. It is established that the bifurcation of α-γ discharge mode, accompanied by a decrease in the discharge voltage, occurs at the high-repetition frequency of ∼120 kHz.

  5. Nucleation of Bubbles by Electrons in Liquid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sirisky, S.; Wei, W.; Seidel, G. M.; Maris, H. J.

    2018-02-01

    We report on experiments in which we study cavitation resulting from electrons in liquid helium. Electrons are introduced into the liquid by a radioactive source. After an electron comes to rest in the liquid, it forces open a small cavity referred to as an electron bubble. To study cavitation, a sound pulse is generated by means of a hemispherical piezoelectric transducer producing a large-amplitude pressure oscillation at the acoustic focus. If an electron is in the vicinity of the focus and the negative-going pressure swing exceeds a critical value, a cavitation bubble is produced which can be detected by light scattering. Two distinct critical pressures P_{el} and P_{rare} have been measured. The first corresponds to cavitation resulting from the application of a reduced pressure to liquid containing an electron which has already formed an electron bubble. The second is the critical pressure needed to lead to cavitation when an electron enters the liquid at a time and place where there is already a reduced pressure. We have measured these two pressures as a function of temperature and consider possible explanations for the difference between them. In addition to these clearly seen cavitation thresholds, there are some cavitation events that have been detected with a threshold that is at an even smaller negative pressure than P_{el} and P_{rare}.

  6. The Liquid Nitrogen System for Chamber A: A Change from Original Forced Flow Design to a Natural Flow (Thermo Siphon) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan; Montz, Michael; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Ganni, Venkatarao (Rao); Knudsen, Peter; Garcia, Sam; Linza, Robert; Meagher, Daniel; Lauterbauch, John

    2008-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston is currently supplementing its 20K helium refrigeration system to meet the new requirements for testing the James Web Space Telescope in the environmental control Chamber-A (65 dia x 120 high) in Building 32. The new system is required to meet the various operating modes which include a high 20K heat load, a required temperature stability at the load, rapid (but controlled) cool down and warm up and bake out of the chamber. This paper will present the proposed modifications to the existing helium system(s) to incorporate the new requirements and the integration of the new helium refrigerator with the existing two 3.5KW 20K helium refrigerators. In addition, the floating pressure process control philosophy to achieve high efficiency over the operating range (40% to 100% of the refrigeration system capacity), and the required temperature stability of +/- 0.25 K at the load will be discussed. The refrigeration systems ability to naturally seek the operating conditions under various loads and thus minimizing operator involvement and the over all improvements to the system operability and the reliability will be explained.

  7. Influence of wind-induced air pressure fluctuations on topsoil gas concentrations within a Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Manuel; Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schindler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    Commonly it is assumed that soil gas transport is dominated by molecular diffusion. Few recent studies indicate that the atmosphere above the soil triggers non-diffusive gas transport processes in the soil, which can enhance soil gas transport and therefore soil gas efflux significantly. During high wind speed conditions, the so called pressure pumping effect has been observed: the enhancement of soil gas transport through dynamic changes in the air pressure field above the soil. However, the amplitudes and frequencies of the air pressure fluctuations responsible for pressure pumping are still uncertain. Moreover, an in situ observation of the pressure pumping effect is still missing. To investigate the pressure pumping effect, airflow measurements above and below the canopy of a Scots pine forest and high-precision relative air pressure measurements were conducted in the below-canopy space and in the soil over a measurement period of 16 weeks. To monitor the soil gas transport, a newly developed gas measurement system was used. The gas measurement system continuously injects helium as a tracer gas into the soil until a diffusive steady state is reached. With the steady state concentration profile of the tracer gas, it is possible to inversely model the gas diffusion coefficient profile of the soil. If the gas diffusion coefficient profile differed from steady state, we deduced that the soil gas transport is not only diffusive, but also influenced by non-diffusive processes. Results show that the occurrence of small air pressure fluctuations is strongly dependent on the mean above-canopy wind speed. The wind-induced air pressure fluctuations have mean amplitudes up to 10 Pa and lie in the frequency range 0.01-0.1 Hz. To describe the pumping motion of the air pressure field, the pressure pumping coefficient (PPC) was defined as the mean change in pressure per second. The PPC shows a clear quadratic dependence on mean above-canopy wind speed. Empirical modelling of

  8. Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Pad Abort Test Vehicle (PATV) II Attitude Control System (ACS) Integration and Pressurization Subsystem Dynamic Random Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Cook, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate catastrophic failures on future generation space vehicles, engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have begun to integrate a novel crew abort systems that could pull a crew module away in case of an emergency at the launch pad or during ascent. The Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) is a recent test vehicle that was designed as an alternative to the baseline Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) to demonstrate the performance of a "tower-less" LAS configuration under abort conditions. The MLAS II test vehicle will execute a propulsive coast stabilization maneuver during abort to control the vehicles trajectory and thrust. To accomplish this, the spacecraft will integrate an Attitude Control System (ACS) with eight hypergolic monomethyl hydrazine liquid propulsion engines that are capable of operating in a quick pulsing mode. Two main elements of the ACS include a propellant distribution subsystem and a pressurization subsystem to regulate the flow of pressurized gas to the propellant tanks and the engines. The CAD assembly of the Attitude Control System (ACS) was configured and integrated into the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) design. A dynamic random vibration analysis was conducted on the Main Propulsion System (MPS) helium pressurization panels to assess the response of the panel and its components under increased gravitational acceleration loads during flight. The results indicated that the panels fundamental and natural frequencies were farther from the maximum Acceleration Spectral Density (ASD) vibrations which were in the range of 150-300 Hz. These values will direct how the components will be packaged in the vehicle to reduce the effects high gravitational loads.

  9. Electron density and temperature in an atmospheric-pressure helium diffuse dielectric barrier discharge from kHz to MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Stafford, L.; Naudé, N.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse dielectric barrier discharges are generated over a very wide range of frequencies. According to the targeted frequency, the glow, Townsend-like, hybrid, Ω and RF-α modes are sustained. In this paper, the electrical characterization of the discharge cell together with an electrical model are used to estimate the electron density from current and voltage measurements for excitation frequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 15 MHz. The electron density is found to vary from 1014 to 1017 m-3 over this frequency range. In addition, a collisional-radiative model coupled with optical emission spectroscopy is used to evaluate the electron temperature (assuming Maxwellian electron energy distribution function) in the same conditions. The time and space-averaged electron temperature is found to be about 0.3 eV in both the low-frequency and high-frequency ranges. However, in the medium-frequency range, it reaches almost twice this value as the discharge is in the hybrid mode. The hybrid mode is similar to the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge usually observed in helium DBDs at low frequency with the major difference being that the plasma is continuously sustained and is characterized by a higher power density.

  10. Influence of Au ions irradiation damage on helium implanted tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanhang; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha; Cao, Xingzhong; Peng, Shixiang; Zhang, Ailin; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Baoyi

    2017-10-01

    The damages of implanted helium ions together with energetic neutrons in tungsten is concerned under the background of nuclear fusion related materials research. Helium is lowly soluble in tungsten and has high binding energy with vacancy. In present work, noble metal Au ions were used to study the synergistic effect of radiation damage and helium implantation. Nano indenter and the Doppler broaden energy spectrum of positron annihilation analysis measurements were used to research the synergy of radiation damage and helium implantation in tungsten. In the helium fluence range of 4.8 × 1015 cm-2-4.8 × 1016 cm-2, vacancies played a role of trappers only at the very beginning of bubble nucleation. The size and density is not determined by vacancies, but the effective capture radius between helium bubbles and scattered helium atoms. Vacancies were occupied by helium bubbles even at the lowest helium fluence, leaving dislocations and helium bubbles co-exist in tungsten materials.

  11. Leak testing in parenteral packaging: establishment of direct correlation between helium leak rate measurements and microbial ingress for two different leak types.

    PubMed

    Morrical, Bradley D; Goverde, Marcel; Grausse, Jean; Gerwig, Tanja; Vorgrimler, Lothar; Morgen, Rachel; Büttiker, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    A direct test method using helium leak detection was developed to determine microbial ingress in parenteral vial/rubber closure systems. The purpose of this study was to establish a direct correlation between the helium leak rate and the presence of ingress when vials were submersed under pressure in a broth of bacteria. Results were obtained for two different types of leaks: microholes that have been laser-drilled into thin metal plates, and thin copper wire that was placed between the rubber closure and the glass vial's sealing surface. The results from the microholes showed that the helium leak rate was a function of the square of the hole diameter and fit well with theoretical calculations. The relationship with the wire gave a far more complex dependence and was not modeled theoretically. Comparison with the microbial challenge showed that for microholes a lower size limit was found to be 2 microm with a corresponding leak rate of 1.4 x 10(-3) mbarl/s. For the fine wire experiment the lower limit was 15-microm wire and a corresponding leak rate of 1.3 x 10(-5) mbarl/s. From these tests a safe, lower limit, leak rate was established.

  12. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure themore » average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.« less

  13. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; ...

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure themore » average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.« less

  14. Helium diffusion in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate improved standard solar models using the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity tables, an accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine which takes account of recent measurements and analyses, and the recent Anders-Grevesse determination of heavy element abundances. We also evaluate directly the effect of the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen on the calculated neutrino fluxes, on the primordial solar helium abundance, and on the depth of the convective zone. Helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11 percent of the total rate, in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment, by about 3.5 SNU, or 3 percent, in the gallium solar neutrino experiments, and by about 12 percent in the Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, and radiative opacity predicts a value of 8.0 SNU +/- 3.0 SNU for the C1-37 experiment and 132 +21/-17 SNU for the Ga - 71 experiment, where the uncertainties include 3 sigma errors for all measured input parameters.

  15. Hiding in Plain Sight: The Low Mass Helium Star Companion of EL CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Douglas

    2016-10-01

    Binary stars with orbital periods of a decade or less are destined to interact during their evolution. The mass donor star among intermediate binaries may be stripped of its envelope by mass transfer to reveal its helium core. In cases that avoid merger, the low mass helium star will remain in a binary orbit but be lost in the glare of the mass gainer star.Thanks to photometric time series from Kepler and WASP, we now know of 27 such systems that are oriented to produce mutual eclipses. Althoughthe helium star companions are too small and faint in the optical bandfor spectroscopic detection, they contribute a larger fraction of the total flux in the ultraviolet. HST/COS measurements of one long period system, KOI-81, successfully detected the helium star's spectrum in the far-ultraviolet, leading to estimates of its mass and temperature. Here we propose to obtain new HST/COS FUV spectra of the prototype of this class of evolved binaries, EL CVn, and to determine the mass and physical properties of a star that barely escaped a merger.

  16. Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov Websites

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory In the Energy Systems Integration Facility's High-Pressure Test Laboratory, researchers can safely test high-pressure hydrogen components. Photo of researchers running an experiment with a hydrogen fuel

  17. Thermal desorption behavior of helium in aged titanium tritide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G. J.; Shi, L. Q.; Zhou, X. S.; Liang, J. H.; Wang, W. D.; Long, X. G.; Yang, B. F.; Peng, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    The desorption behavior of helium in TiT(1.5∼1.8)-x3Hex film samples (x = 0.0022-0.22) was investigated by thermal desorption technique in vacuum condition in this paper. The thermal helium desorption spectrometry (THDS) of aging titanium tritide films prepared by electron beam evaporation revealed that, depending on the decayed 3He concentration in the samples, there are more than four states of helium existing in the films. The divided four zones in THDS based on helium states represent respectively: (1) the mobile single helium atoms with low activation energy in all aging samples resulted from the interstitial sites or dissociated from interstitial clusters, loops and dislocations, (2) helium bubbles inside the grain lattices, (3) helium bubbles in the grain boundaries and interconnected networks of dislocations in the helium concentration of 3Hegen/Ti > 0.0094, and (4) helium bubbles near or linked to the film surface by interconnected channel for later aging stage with 3Hegen/Ti > 0.18. The proportion of helium desorption in each zone was estimated, and dissociated energies of helium for different trapping states were given.

  18. SNS Central Helium Liquefier spare Carbon Bed installation and commissioning

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Degraff, Brian D.; Howell, Matthew P.; Kim, Sang-Ho

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been without major operations downtime since operations were started back in 2006. This system utilizes a vessel filled with activated carbon as the final major component to remove oil vapor from the compressed helium circuit prior to insertion into the system's cryogenic cold box. The need for a spare carbon bed at SNS due to the variability of carbon media lifetime calculation to adsorption efficiency will be discussed. The fabrication, installation and commissioning of this spare carbon vessel will be presented. The novel planmore » for connecting the spare carbon vessel piping to the existing infrastructure will be presented.« less

  19. Development of a gas-pressurized high-pressure μSR setup at the RIKEN-RAL Muon Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, I.; Ishii, Y.; Kawamata, T.; Suzuki, T.; Pratt, F. L.; Done, R.; Chowdhury, M.; Goodway, C.; Dreyer, J.; Smith, C.; Southern, M.

    2009-04-01

    The development and testing of a gas-pressurized μSR setup for the RIKEN-RAL Muon Facility is reported. In collaboration with the high-pressure group of the ISIS Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, a gas-pressurized setup for a pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN-RAL Muon Facility has been constructed in 2008. The sample is pressurized by helium gas and the designed maximum pressure is 6.4 kbar. The high-pressure cell can be cooled down to 2 K using an existing cryostat. Tests were made injecting the double-pulsed muon beam into a high-purity sample of Sn powder, which confirmed that the maximum pressure achieved at 2 K was close to the designed pressure.

  20. A model for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump shaft seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple static model is presented which solves for the flow properties of pressure, temperature, and mass flow in the Space Shuttle Main Engine pressure Oxidizer Turbopump Shaft Seal Systems. This system includes the primary and secondary turbine seals, the primary and secondary turbine drains, the helium purge seals and feed line, the primary oxygen drain, and the slinger/labyrinth oxygen seal pair. The model predicts the changes in flow variables that occur during and after failures of the various seals. Such information would be particularly useful in a post flight situation where processing of sensor information using this model could identify a particular seal that had experienced excessive wear. Most of the seals in the system are modeled using simple one dimensional equations which can be applied to almost any seal provided that the fluid is gaseous. A failure is modeled as an increase in the clearance between the shaft and the seal. Thus, the model does not attempt to predict how the failure process actually occurs (e.g., wear, seal crack initiation). The results presented were obtained using a FORTRAN implementation of the model running on a VAX computer. Solution for the seal system properties is obtained iteratively; however, a further simplified implementation (which does not include the slinger/labyrinth combination) was also developed which provides fast and reasonable results for most engine operating conditions. Results from the model compare favorably with the limited redline data available.

  1. LRO-LAMP Observations of Lunar Exospheric Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Retherford, Kurt D.; Hurley, Dana M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Gladstone, Randy; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Cook, Jason C.; Stern, Alan; Pryor, Wayne R.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Kaufmann, David E.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s (LRO) UV spectrograph LAMP (Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project) campaign to study the lunar atmosphere. Two kinds of off-nadir maneuvers (lateral rolls and pitches towards and opposite the direction of motion of LRO) were performed to search for resonantly scattering species, increasing the illuminated line-of-sight (and hence the signal from atoms resonantly scattering the solar photons) compared to previously reported LAMP “twilight observations” [Cook & Stern, 2014]. Helium was the only element distinguishable on a daily basis, and we present latitudinal profiles of its line-of-sight column density in December 2013. We compared the helium line-of-sight column densities with solar wind alpha particle fluxes measured from the ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, & Electrodynamics of Moon’s Interaction with the Sun) twin spacecraft. Our data show a correlation with the solar wind alpha particle flux, confirming that the solar wind is the main source of the lunar helium, but not with a 1:1 relationship. Assuming that the lunar soil is saturated with helium atoms, our results suggest that not all of the incident alpha particles are converted to thermalized helium, allowing for a non-negligible fraction (~50 %) to escape as suprathermal helium or simply backscattered from the lunar surface. We also support the finding by Benna et al. [2015] and Hurley et al. [2015], that a non-zero contribution from endogenic helium, coming from radioactive decay of 232Th and 238U within the mantle, is present, and is estimated to be (4.5±1.2) x 106 He atoms cm-2 s-1. Finally, we compare LAMP-derived helium surface density with the one recorded by the mass spectrometer LACE (Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment) deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo 17 mission, finding good agreement between the two measurements. These LRO off-nadir maneuvers allow LAMP to provide unique coverage of local solar time and

  2. Gas flow rate dependence of the discharge characteristics of a helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet interacting with a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Economou, Demetre J.

    2017-10-01

    A 2D (axisymmetric) computational study of the discharge characteristics of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet as a function of gas flow rate was performed. The helium jet emerged from a dielectric tube, with an average gas flow velocity in the range 2.5-20 m s-1 (1 atm, 300 K) in a nitrogen ambient, and impinged on a substrate a short distance dowstream. The effect of the substrate conductivity (conductror versus insulator) was also studied. Whenever possible, simulation predictions were compared with published experimental observations. Discharge ignition and propagation in the dielectric tube were hardly affected by the He gas flow velocity. Most properties of the plasma jet, however, depended sensitively on the He gas flow velocity, which determined the concentration distributions of helium and nitrogen in the mixing layer forming in the gap between the tube exit and the substrate. At low gas flow velocity, the plasma jet evolved from a hollow (donut-shaped) feature to one where the maximum of electron density was on axis. When the gas flow velocity was high, the plasma jet maintained its hollow structure until it struck the substrate. For a conductive substrate, the radial ion fluxes to the surface were relatively uniform over a radius of ~0.4-0.8 mm, and the dominant ion flux was that of He+. For a dielectric substrate, the radial ion fluxes to the surface peaked on the symmetry axis at low He gas flow velocity, but a hollow ion flux distribution was observed at high gas flow velocity. At the same time, the main ion flux switched from N2+ to He2+ as the He gas flow velocity increased from a low to a high value. The diameter of the plasma ‘footprint’ on the substrate first increased with increasing He gas flow velocity, and eventually saturated with further increases in velocity.

  3. Measurements of the principal Hugoniots of dense gaseous deuterium-helium mixtures: Combined multi-channel optical pyrometry, velocity interferometry, and streak optical pyrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Chen, Qi-Feng; Gu, Yun-Jun; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2016-10-01

    The accurate hydrodynamic description of an event or system that addresses the equations of state, phase transitions, dissociations, ionizations, and compressions, determines how materials respond to a wide range of physical environments. To understand dense matter behavior in extreme conditions requires the continual development of diagnostic methods for accurate measurements of the physical parameters. Here, we present a comprehensive diagnostic technique that comprises optical pyrometry, velocity interferometry, and time-resolved spectroscopy. This technique was applied to shock compression experiments of dense gaseous deuterium-helium mixtures driven via a two-stage light gas gun. The advantage of this approach lies in providing measurements of multiple physical parameters in a single experiment, such as light radiation histories, particle velocity profiles, and time-resolved spectra, which enables simultaneous measurements of shock velocity, particle velocity, pressure, density, and temperature and expands understanding of dense high pressure shock situations. The combination of multiple diagnostics also allows different experimental observables to be measured and cross-checked. Additionally, it implements an accurate measurement of the principal Hugoniots of deuterium-helium mixtures, which provides a benchmark for the impedance matching measurement technique.

  4. Crustal contamination processes traced by helium isotopes: Examples from the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparon, M.; Hilton, D. R.; Varne, R.

    1994-08-01

    Helium isotope data have been obtained on well-characterised olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts and xenocrysts from thirteen volcanic centres located between central Sumatra and Sumbawa in the Sunda arc of Indonesia. Olivine crystals in mantle xenoliths (Iherzolite) from Bukit Telor basalts are primitive (Mg# = 90), and their He-3/He-4 value (R/R(sub A) = 8.8) indicates that the Sumatran mantle wedge is MORB-like in helium isotope composition. All other samples have lower He-3/He-4 ratios ranging from 8.5R(sub A) to 4.5R(sub A), with most (thirteen out of eighteen) following a trend of more radiogenic He-3/He-4 values with decreasing Mg#. The only exceptions to this trend are phenocrysts from Batur, Agung and Kerinci, which have MORB-like He-3/He-4 values but relatively low Mg# (Mg# = 70-71), and two highly inclusion-rich clinopyroxenes which have He-3/He-4 values lower than other samples of similar Mg#. The results indicate that crustal contamination unrelated to subduction in the Sunda arc is clearly recorded in the He-3/He-4 characteristics of mafic phenocrysts of subaerial volcanics, and that addition of radiogenic helium is related to low-pressure differentiation processes affecting the melts prior to eruption. These conclusions may have widespread applicability and indicate that helium isotope variations can act as an extremely sensitive tracer of upper crustal contamination.

  5. Phase Diagram of Hydrogen and a Hydrogen-Helium Mixture at Planetary Conditions by Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Helled, Ravit; Sorella, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Understanding planetary interiors is directly linked to our ability of simulating exotic quantum mechanical systems such as hydrogen (H) and hydrogen-helium (H-He) mixtures at high pressures and temperatures. Equation of state (EOS) tables based on density functional theory are commonly used by planetary scientists, although this method allows only for a qualitative description of the phase diagram. Here we report quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) molecular dynamics simulations of pure H and H-He mixture. We calculate the first QMC EOS at 6000 K for a H-He mixture of a protosolar composition, and show the crucial influence of He on the H metallization pressure. Our results can be used to calibrate other EOS calculations and are very timely given the accurate determination of Jupiter's gravitational field from the NASA Juno mission and the effort to determine its structure.

  6. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Middleton, Bobby; Pasch, James Jay; Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO 2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO 2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related tomore » both Helium and to sCO 2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO 2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO 2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation« less

  7. Operation Results of the Kstar Helium Refrigeration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.-S.; Fauve, E.; Park, D.-S.; Joo, J.-J.; Moon, K.-M.; Cho, K.-W.; Na, H. K.; Kwon, M.; Yang, S.-H.; Gistau-Baguer, G.

    2010-04-01

    The "first plasma" (100 kA of controllable plasma current for 100 ms) of KSTAR has been successfully generated in July 2008. The major outstanding feature of KSTAR compared to most other Tokamaks is that all the magnet coils are superconducting (SC), which enables higher plasma current values for a longer time duration when the nominal operation status has been reached. However, to establish the operating condition for the SC coils, other cold components, such as thermal shields, coil-supporting structures, SC buslines, and current leads also must be maintained at proper cryogenic temperature levels. A helium refrigeration system (HRS) with an exergetic equivalent cooling power of 9 kW at 4.5 K has been installed for such purposes and successfully commissioned. In this proceeding, we will report on the operation results of the HRS during the first plasma campaign of KSTAR. Using the HRS, the 300-ton cold mass of KSTAR was cooled down from ambient to the operating temperature levels of each cold component. Stable and steady cryogenic conditions, proper for the generation of the "first plasma" have been maintained for three months, after which, all of the cold mass was warmed up again to ambient temperature.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gaveau, Marc-André; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accountingmore » for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S←{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup −1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.« less

  9. Numerical Aspects of Atomic Physics: Helium Basis Sets and Matrix Diagonalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich; Noble, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    We present a matrix diagonalization algorithm for complex symmetric matrices, which can be used in order to determine the resonance energies of auto-ionizing states of comparatively simple quantum many-body systems such as helium. The algorithm is based in multi-precision arithmetic and proceeds via a tridiagonalization of the complex symmetric (not necessarily Hermitian) input matrix using generalized Householder transformations. Example calculations involving so-called PT-symmetric quantum systems lead to reference values which pertain to the imaginary cubic perturbation (the imaginary cubic anharmonic oscillator). We then proceed to novel basis sets for the helium atom and present results for Bethe logarithms in hydrogen and helium, obtained using the enhanced numerical techniques. Some intricacies of ``canned'' algorithms such as those used in LAPACK will be discussed. Our algorithm, for complex symmetric matrices such as those describing cubic resonances after complex scaling, is faster than LAPACK's built-in routines, for specific classes of input matrices. It also offer flexibility in terms of the calculation of the so-called implicit shift, which is used in order to ``pivot'' the system toward the convergence to diagonal form. We conclude with a wider overview.

  10. First operational experience with the HIE-Isolde helium cryogenic system including several RF cryo-modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillotin, N.; Dupont, T.; Gayet, Ph; Pirotte, O.

    2017-12-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) upgrade project at CERN includes the deployment of new superconducting accelerating structures operated at 4.5 K (ultimately of six cryo-modules) installed in series, and the refurbishing of the helium cryo-plant previously used to cool the ALEPH magnet during the operation of the LEP accelerator from 1989 to 2000. The helium refrigerator is connected to a new cryogenic distribution line, supplying a 2000-liter storage dewar and six interconnecting valve boxes (i.e jumper boxes), one for each cryo-module. After a first operation period with one cryo-module during six months in 2015, a second cryo-module has been installed and operated during 2016. The operation of the cryo-plant with these two cryo-modules has required significant technical enhancements and tunings for the compressor station, the cold-box and the cryogenic distribution system in order to reach nominal and stable operational conditions. The present paper describes the commissioning results and the lessons learnt during the operation campaign of 2016 together with the preliminary experience acquired during the 2017 operation phase with a third cryo-module.

  11. Superfluid helium 2 liquid-vapor phase separation: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A literature survey of helium 2 liquid vapor phase separation is presented. Currently, two types of He 2 phase separators are being investigated: porous, sintered metal plugs and the active phase separator. The permeability K(P) shows consistency in porous plug geometric characterization. Both the heat and mass fluxes increase with K(P). Downstream pressure regulation to adjust for varying heat loads and both temperatures is possible. For large dynamic heat loads, the active phase separator shows a maximum heat rejection rate of up to 2 W and bath temperature stability of 0.1 mK. Porous plug phase separation performance should be investigated for application to SIRTF and, in particular, that plugs of from 10 to the minus ninth square centimeters to 10 to the minus eighth square centimeters in conjunction with downstream pressure regulation be studied.

  12. LOFA analysis in helium and Pb-Li circuits of LLCB TBM by FE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Ranjithkumar, S.; Sharma, Deepak; Danani, Chandan

    2017-04-01

    One of the main ITER objectives is to demonstrate the feasibility of the breeding blanket concepts that would lead to tritium self-sufficiency and the extraction of a high-grade heat for electricity production. India has developed the LLCB TBM to be tested in ITER for the validation of design concepts for tritium breeding blankets relevant DEMO and future power reactor. LLCB concept has the unique features of combination of both solid (lithium titanate as packed pebble bed) and liquid breeders (molten lead lithium). India specific IN-RAFMS is the structural material for TBM. The First Wall is actively cooled by high-pressure helium (He) gas [1]. It is important to validate the design of TBM to withstand various loads acting on it including accident analysis like LOCA, LOFA etc. Detailed thermal-hydraulic simulation studies including LOFA in helium and Pb-Li circuits of LLCB TBM have been performed using Finite Element using ANSYS. These analyses will provide important information about the temperature distribution in different materials used in TBM during steady state and transient condition. Thermal-hydraulic safety requirement has also been envisaged for the initiation the FPPS (Fusion Power Shutdown System) during LOFA. All these analysis will be presented in detail in this paper.

  13. Goulds Belt, Interstellar Clouds, and the Eocene Oligocene Helium-3 Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2015-01-01

    Drag from hydrogen in the interstellar cloud which formed Gould's Belt may have sent interplanetary dust particle (IDPs) and small meteoroids with embedded helium to the Earth, perhaps explaining part the helium-3 flux increase seen in the sedimentary record near the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Assuming the Solar System passed through part of the cloud, IDPs in the inner Solar System may have been dragged to Earth, while dust and small meteoroids in the asteroid belt up to centimeter size may have been dragged to the resonances, where their orbital eccentricities were pumped up into Earth-crossing orbits; however, this hypotheses does not explain the Popigai and Chesapeake Bay impacts.

  14. Computation of the properties of liquid neon, methane, and gas helium at low temperature by the Feynman-Hibbs approach.

    PubMed

    Tchouar, N; Ould-Kaddour, F; Levesque, D

    2004-10-15

    The properties of liquid methane, liquid neon, and gas helium are calculated at low temperatures over a large range of pressure from the classical molecular-dynamics simulations. The molecular interactions are represented by the Lennard-Jones pair potentials supplemented by quantum corrections following the Feynman-Hibbs approach. The equations of state, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients are determined for neon at 45 K, helium at 80 K, and methane at 110 K. A comparison is made with the existing experimental data and for thermodynamical quantities, with results computed from quantum numerical simulations when they are available. The theoretical variation of the viscosity coefficient with pressure is in good agreement with the experimental data when the quantum corrections are taken into account, thus reducing considerably the 60% discrepancy between the simulations and experiments in the absence of these corrections.

  15. Enhancement of helium exhaust by resonant magnetic perturbations at TEXTOR-DED and LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Kobayashi, M.; Bader, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Evans, T. E.; Funaba, H.; Goto, M.; Ida, K.; Mitarai, O.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Narushima, Y.; Nicolai, D.; Samm, U.; Tanaka, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Xu, Y.; Textor Experiment Team; Lhd Experiment Team

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate in this paper that resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields can be used to enhance helium exhaust. Results from TEXTOR-DED as example for a tokamak with a pumped limiter and from the Large Helical Device LHD with the closed helical divertor as example for a heliotron device are presented. In both devices RMP fields are applied to generate a magnetic island located in the very plasma edge. The effective helium confinement time is decreased by up to 30% at LHD and up to 45% at TEXTOR-DED when RMP fields are applied. The measurements from both devices support that this reduction is caused by combination of enhanced outward transport of helium, improved coupling to the pumping systems yielding improved exhaust of helium from the SOL and reduced fueling efficiencies for both, injected and recycled helium. Work supported in part by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25420893, start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and U.S. DOE Contract #: DE-SC0013911.

  16. Operational experience with the supercritical helium during the TF coils tests campaign of SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Rohitkumar Natvarlal; Patel, Rakesh; Tank, Jignesh; Mahesuria, Gaurang; Sonara, Dashrath; Tanna, Vipul; Patel, Jayant; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Singh, Manoj; Patel, Ketan; Christian, Dikens; Garg, Atul; Bairagi, Nitn; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Nimavat, Hiren; Shah, Pankil; Sharma, Rajiv; Pradhan, Subrata

    2012-06-01

    Under the 'SST-1 mission mandate' recently, all the sixteen Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) Toroidal Field (TF) magnets have been successfully tested at their nominal currents of 10000 A in cold under supercritical helium (SHe) flow conditions. The TF magnets test campaign have begun in an experimental cryostat since June 2010 with the SST-1 Helium cryogenics facility, which is a 1.3 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator-cum-liquefier (HRL) system. The HRL provides ~300 g-s-1supercritical helium (SHe) with cold circulator (CC) as well as ~ 60 g-s-1 without cold circulator to fulfill the forced flow cooling requirements of SST- 1 magnets. In case of single TF coil tests, we can adjust HRL process parameters such that an adequate amount of required supercritical helium is available without the cold circulator. In this paper, the complete process is describing the Process Flow Diagram (PFD) of 1.3 kW at 4.5 K HRL, techniques to generate supercritical helium without using the cold-circulator and the results of the cooldown, steady state characteristics and experience of supercritical helium operations during the TF coils test campaign have been discussed.

  17. Embedded programmable blood pressure monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Mahmud-Ul; Islam, Md. Kafiul; Shawon, Mehedi Azad; Nowrin, Tasnuva Faruk

    2010-02-01

    A more efficient newer algorithm of detecting systolic and diastolic pressure of human body along with a complete package of an effective user-friendly embedded programmable blood pressure monitoring system has been proposed in this paper to reduce the overall workload of medical personals as well as to monitor patient's condition more conveniently and accurately. Available devices for measuring blood pressure have some problems and limitations in case of both analog and digital devices. The sphygmomanometer, being analog device, is still being used widely because of its reliability and accuracy over digital ones. But it requires a skilled person to measure the blood pressure and obviously not being automated as well as time consuming. Our proposed system being a microcontroller based embedded system has the advantages of the available digital blood pressure machines along with a much improved form and has higher accuracy at the same time. This system can also be interfaced with computer through serial port/USB to publish the measured blood pressure data on the LAN or internet. The device can be programmed to determine the patient's blood pressure after each certain interval of time in a graphical form. To sense the pressure of human body, a pressure to voltage transducer is used along with a cuff in our system. During the blood pressure measurement cycle, the output voltage of the transducer is taken by the built-in ADC of microcontroller after an amplifier stage. The recorded data are then processed and analyzed using the effective software routine to determine the blood pressure of the person under test. Our proposed system is thus expected to certainly enhance the existing blood pressure monitoring system by providing accuracy, time efficiency, user-friendliness and at last but not the least the 'better way of monitoring patient's blood pressure under critical care' all together at the same time.

  18. How to Make a Helium Atmosphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-11

    This diagram illustrates how hypothetical helium atmospheres might form. These would be on planets about the mass of Neptune, or smaller, which orbit tightly to their stars, whipping around in just days. They are thought to have cores of water or rock, surrounded by thick atmospheres of gas. Radiation from their nearby stars would boil off hydrogen and helium, but because hydrogen is lighter, more hydrogen would escape. It's also possible that planetary bodies, such as asteroids, could impact the planet, sending hydrogen out into space. Over time, the atmospheres would become enriched in helium. With less hydrogen in the planets' atmospheres, the concentration of methane and water would go down. Both water and methane consist in part of hydrogen. Eventually, billions of years later (a "Gyr" equals one billion years), the abundances of the water and methane would be greatly reduced. Since hydrogen would not be abundant, the carbon would be forced to pair with oxygen, forming carbon monoxide. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a proposed helium planet, GJ 436b, with these traits: it lacks methane, and appears to contain carbon monoxide. Future observations are needed to detect helium itself in the atmospheres of these planets, and confirm this theory. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19345

  19. Description and initial operating performance of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube using heated helium driver gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube is presented along with discussion of the basic components, internal resistance heater, arc-discharge assemblies, instrumentation, and operating procedure. Preliminary results using unheated and resistance-heated helium as the driver gas are presented. The driver-gas pressure ranged from approximately 17 to 59 MPa and its temperature ranged from 300 to 510 K. Interface velocities of approximately 3.8 to 6.7 km/sec were generated between the test gas and the acceleration gas using air as the test gas and helium as the acceleration gas. Test flow quality and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  20. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  1. Development of a test rig for a helium twin-screw compressor

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, B. M.; Hu, Z. J.; Zhang, P.

    2014-01-29

    A large helium cryogenic system is being developed for use in great science projects, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Large Helical Device (LHD), and the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In this cryogenic system, a twin-screw compressor is a key component. Therefore, it is necessary to obtain the compressor performance. To obtain the performance characteristics, a test rig for the compressor has been built. All the important performance parameters, including adiabatic efficiency, volumetric efficiency, oil injection characteristic, and noise characteristic can be acquired with the rig when sensors are installed in the test system. With the testmore » performance, the helium twin-screw compressor can be evaluated. Using these results, the design of the compressor can be improved.« less

  2. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  3. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  4. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  5. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  6. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  7. Pressurant requirements for discharge of liquid methane from a 1.52-meter-(5-ft-) diameter spherical tank under both static and slosh conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, R. L.; Mcintire, T. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressurized expulsion tests were conducted to determine the effect of various physical parameters on the pressurant gas (methane, helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen) requirements during the expulsion of liquid methane from a 1.52-meter-(5-ft-) diameter spherical tank and to compare results with those predicted by an analytical program. Also studied were the effects on methane, helium, and hydrogen pressurant requirements of various slosh excitation frequencies and amplitudes, both with and without slosh suppressing baffles in the tank. The experimental results when using gaseous methane, helium, and hydrogen show that the predictions of the analytical program agreed well with the actual pressurant requirements for static tank expulsions. The analytical program could not be used for gaseous nitrogen expulsions because of the large quantities of nitrogen which can dissolve in liquid methane. Under slosh conditions, a pronounced increase in gaseous methane requirements was observed relative to results obtained for the static tank expulsions. Slight decreases in the helium and hydrogen requirements were noted under similar test conditions.

  8. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, David; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Skrbek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    When a hot body A is thermally connected to a cold body B, the textbook knowledge is that heat flows from A to B. Here, we describe the opposite case in which heat flows from a colder but constantly heated body B to a hotter but constantly cooled body A through a two-phase liquid–vapor system. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence that heat flows through liquid and vapor phases of cryogenic helium from the constantly heated, but cooler, bottom plate of a Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell to its hotter, but constantly cooled, top plate. The bottom plate is heated uniformly, and the top plate is cooled by heat exchange with liquid helium maintained at 4.2 K. Additionally, for certain experimental conditions, a rain of helium droplets is detected by small sensors placed in the cell at about one-half of its height. PMID:23576759

  9. Quantification of fatal helium exposure following self-administration.

    PubMed

    Malbranque, S; Mauillon, D; Turcant, A; Rouge-Maillart, C; Mangin, P; Varlet, V

    2016-11-01

    Helium is nontoxic at standard conditions, plays no biological role, and is found in trace amounts in human blood. Helium can be dangerous if inhaled to excess, since it is a simple tissue hypoxia and so displaces the oxygen needed for normal respiration. This report presents a fatal case of a middle-aged male victim who died from self-administered helium exposure. For the first time, the quantification of the helium levels in gastric and lung air and in blood samples was achieved using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after airtight sampling. The results of the toxicological investigation showed that death was caused directly by helium exposure. However, based on the pathomorphological changes detected during the forensic autopsy, we suppose that the fatal outcome was the result of the lack of oxygen after inhalation.

  10. Pressure reversal of the action of octanol on postsynaptic membranes from Torpedo.

    PubMed Central

    Braswell, L. M.; Miller, K. W.; Sauter, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Octanol increases the binding of [3H]-acetylcholine to the desensitized state of the nicotinic receptor in postsynaptic membranes prepared from Torpedo californica. This increase in binding results from an increase in the affinity of [3H]-acetylcholine for its receptor without any change in the number of sites or the shape of the acetylcholine binding curve. High pressures of helium (300 atm) decrease [3H]-acetylcholine binding by a mechanism that changes only the affinity of acetylcholine binding. Helium pressure reverses the effect of octanol on the affinity of [3H]-acetylcholine for its receptor. This pressure reversal of the action of octanol at a postsynaptic membrane is consistent either with pressure counteracting an octanol-induced membrane expansion or with independent mechanisms for the actions of octanol and pressure. The data do not conform with a mechanism in which pressure displaces octanol from a binding site on the receptor protein. PMID:6487895

  11. Ambient Pressure Test Rig Developed for Testing Oil-Free Bearings in Alternate Gases and Variable Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    The Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is conducting research to develop turbomachinery systems that utilize high-speed, high temperature foil (air) bearings that do not require an oil lubrication system. Such systems combine the most advanced foil bearings from industry with NASA-developed hightemperature solid-lubricant technology. New applications are being pursued, such as Oil- Free turbochargers, auxiliary power units, and turbine propulsion systems for aircraft. An Oil-Free business jet engine, for example, would be simpler, lighter, more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain than current engines. Another application is NASA's Prometheus mission, where gas bearings will be required for the closed-cycle turbine based power-conversion system of a nuclear power generator for deep space. To support these applications, Glenn's Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team developed the Ambient Pressure Test Rig. Using this facility, researchers can load and heat a bearing and evaluate its performance with reduced air pressure to simulate high altitude conditions. For the nuclear application, the test chamber can be purged with gases such as helium to study foil gas bearing operation in working fluids other than air.

  12. Detection of Charged Particles in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, Simon Richard

    1995-01-01

    At the present time the measurement of the flux of neutrinos from the sun remains a challenging experimental problem. The ideal detector would be able to detect neutrinos at high rate, in real time, with good energy resolution and would have a threshold which is low enough for investigation of the entire solar neutrino spectrum. A new detection scheme using superfluid helium as a target has been proposed which has the potential to meet most of the criteria of the ideal detector. In this scheme a neutrino would be detected when it elastically scatters off an atomic electron in superfluid helium. The electron loses energy via a number of processes eventually leading to the generation of phonons and rotons in the liquid. At low temperatures these excitations propagate ballistically through the superfluid helium. When the excitations reach the free surface some of them are able to evaporate helium atoms. These atoms can be detected by an array of calorimeters suspended above the liquid surface. In this thesis, results are presented for a small -scale prototype of this type of detector. Experiments have been performed using various radioactive sources to generate energy depositions in the liquid. The results reveal details about the processes of generation of rotons and phonons, the propagation of these excitations through the superfluid, the evaporation of helium atoms and the adsorption of helium atoms onto the wafer. Results are also presented on the detection of fluorescent photons generated in the liquid. One source of energy depositions was 241{rm Am} which produces monoenergetic 5.5 MeV alpha particles. It was found that the ratio of the energy deposited in a calorimeter to the energy deposited in liquid helium was 0.084 when alpha's are emitted parallel to the liquid surface, and 0.020 for alpha's emitted perpendicular. The difference is due to the anisotropic distribution of helium excitations generated. A 113{rm Sn} source of 360 keV electrons stopped in

  13. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dammers, Jürgen, E-mail: J.Dammers@fz-juelich.de; Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localizationmore » of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.« less

  14. System Would Regulate Low Gas Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    System intended to maintain gases in containers at pressures near atmospheric. Includes ballast volume in form of underinflated balloon that communicates with working volume. Balloon housed in rigid chamber not subjected to extremes of temperature of working volume. Pressure in chamber surrounding balloon regulated at ambient atmospheric pressure or at constant small differential pressure above or below ambient. Expansion and contraction of balloon accommodates expansion or contraction of gas during operational heating or cooling in working volume, maintaining pressure in working volume at ambient or constant differential above or below ambient. Gas lost from system due to leakage or diffusion, low-pressure sensor responds, signaling valve actuators to supply more gas to working volume. If pressure rises too high, overpressure relief valve opens before excessive pressure damages system.

  15. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  19. The application of laser Rayleigh scattering to gas density measurements in hypersonic helium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, J. C.; Honaker, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the mean static free-stream gas density have been made in two Langley Research Center helium facilities, the 3-inch leg of the high-Reynolds-number helium complex and the 22-inch hypersonic helium tunnel. Rayleigh scattering of a CW argon ion laser beam at 514.5 nm provided the basic physical mechanism. The behavior of the scattered signal was linear, confirmed by a preliminary laboratory study. That study also revealed the need to introduce baffles to reduce stray light. A relatively simple optical system and associated photon-counting electronics were utilized to obtain data for densities from 10 to the 23rd to 10 to the 25th per cu m. The major purpose, to confirm the applicability of this technique in the hypersonic helium flow, was accomplished.

  20. Breakdown in helium in high-voltage open discharge with subnanosecond current front rise

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schweigert, I. V., E-mail: ischweig@itam.nsc.ru; Alexandrov, A. L.; Bokhan, P. A.

    Investigations of high-voltage open discharge in helium have shown a possibility of generation of current pulses with subnanosecond front rise, due to ultra-fast breakdown development. The open discharge is ignited between two planar cathodes with mesh anode in the middle between them. For gas pressure 6 Torr and 20 kV applied voltage, the rate of current rise reaches 500 A/(cm{sup 2} ns) for current density 200 A/cm{sup 2} and more. The time of breakdown development was measured for different helium pressures and a kinetic model of breakdown in open discharge is presented, based on elementary reactions for electrons, ions andmore » fast atoms. The model also includes various cathode emission processes due to cathode bombardment by ions, fast atoms, electrons and photons of resonant radiation with Doppler shift of frequency. It is shown, that the dominating emission processes depend on the evolution of the discharge voltage during the breakdown. In the simulations, two cases of voltage behavior were considered: (i) the voltage is kept constant during the breakdown; (ii) the voltage is reduced with the growth of current. For the first case, the exponentially growing current is maintained due to photoemission by the resonant photons with Doppler-shifted frequency. For the second case, the dominating factor of current growth is the secondary electron emission. In both cases, the subnanosecond rise of discharge current was obtained. Also the effect of gas pressure on breakdown development was considered. It was found that for 20 Torr gas pressure the time of current rise decreases to 0.1 ns, which is in agreement with experimental data.« less

  1. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  2. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  3. Helium resources of the United States, 1993. Information circular/1995

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hamak, J.E.; Driskill, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    This report uses several criteria to determine reserves, marginal reserves, and subeconomic resources, including helium content, proximity to major gas transmission lines, and size of field. Refinements in evaluating other occurrences of helium and undiscovered resources also have been made for this report. As of this report, there is 33.7 Bcf of helium stored in Bush Dome at Cliffside Gasfield. The USBM owns 31.7 Bcf, and 2.0 Bcf is owned by private companies. There is also approximately 3.8 Bcf of helium contained in the natural gas in Bush Dome. This reserve of helium and the helium on Federal lands inmore » nondepleting fields will fulfill the USBM`s mission of supplying helium to meet all essential Government needs for several decades.« less

  4. Atmospheric structure and helium abundance on Saturn from Cassini/UVIS and CIRS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Guerlet, S.

    2018-06-01

    We combine measurements from stellar occultations observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and limb scans observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) to create empirical atmospheric structure models for Saturn corresponding to the locations probed by the occultations. The results cover multiple locations at low to mid-latitudes between the spring of 2005 and the fall of 2015. We connect the temperature-pressure (T-P) profiles retrieved from the CIRS limb scans in the stratosphere to the T-P profiles in the thermosphere retrieved from the UVIS occultations. We calculate the altitudes corresponding to the pressure levels in each case based on our best fit composition model that includes H2, He, CH4 and upper limits on H. We match the altitude structure to the density profile in the thermosphere that is retrieved from the occultations. Our models depend on the abundance of helium and we derive a volume mixing ratio of 11 ± 2% for helium in the lower atmosphere based on a statistical analysis of the values derived for 32 different occultation locations. We also derive the mean temperature and methane profiles in the upper atmosphere and constrain their variability. Our results are consistent with enhanced heating at the polar auroral region and a dynamically active upper atmosphere.

  5. Helium gas purity monitor based on low frequency acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Karthikeyan, A.

    1996-05-01

    Monitoring gas purity is an important aspect of gas recovery stations where air is usually one of the major impurities. Purity monitors of Katherometric type are commercially available for this purpose. Alternatively, we discuss here a helium gas purity monitor based on acoustic resonance of a cavity at audio frequencies. It measures the purity by monitoring the resonant frequency of a cylindrical cavity filled with the gas under test and excited by conventional telephone transducers fixed at the ends. The use of the latter simplifies the design considerably. The paper discusses the details of the resonant cavity and the electronic circuit along with temperature compensation. The unit has been calibrated with helium gas of known purities. The unit has a response time of the order of 10 minutes and measures the gas purity to an accuracy of 0.02%. The unit has been installed in our helium recovery system and is found to perform satisfactorily.

  6. Helium Tagging Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy of Reactive Ions.

    PubMed

    Roithová, Jana; Gray, Andrew; Andris, Erik; Jašík, Juraj; Gerlich, Dieter

    2016-02-16

    The interrogation of reaction intermediates is key for understanding chemical reactions; however their direct observation and study remains a considerable challenge. Mass spectrometry is one of the most sensitive analytical techniques, and its use to study reaction mixtures is now an established practice. However, the information that can be obtained is limited to elemental analysis and possibly to fragmentation behavior, which is often challenging to analyze. In order to extend the available experimental information, different types of spectroscopy in the infrared and visible region have been combined with mass spectrometry. Spectroscopy of mass selected ions usually utilizes the powerful sensitivity of mass spectrometers, and the absorption of photons is not detected as such but rather translated to mass changes. One approach to accomplish such spectroscopy involves loosely binding a tag to an ion that will be removed by absorption of one photon. We have constructed an ion trapping instrument capable of reaching temperatures that are sufficiently low to enable tagging by helium atoms in situ, thus permitting infrared photodissociation spectroscopy (IRPD) to be carried out. While tagging by larger rare gas atoms, such as neon or argon is also possible, these may cause significant structural changes to small and reactive species, making the use of helium highly beneficial. We discuss the "innocence" of helium as a tag in ion spectroscopy using several case studies. It is shown that helium tagging is effectively innocent when used with benzene dications, not interfering with their structure or IRPD spectrum. We have also provided a case study where we can see that despite its minimal size there are systems where He has a huge effect. A strong influence of the He tagging was shown in the IRPD spectra of HCCl(2+) where large spectral shifts were observed. While the presented systems are rather small, they involve the formation of mixtures of isomers. We have therefore

  7. The effect of helium-oxygen-assisted mechanical ventilation on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Shao, Chuan; Zhang, Liang; Tu, Jinjing; Xu, Hui; Lin, Zhihui; Xu, Shuguang; Yu, Biyun; Tang, Yaodong; Li, Shanqun

    2018-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often accompanied by acute exacerbations. Patients of COPD exacerbation suffering from respiratory failure often need the support of mechanical ventilation. Helium-oxygen can be used to reduce airway resistance during mechanical ventilation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of helium-oxygen-assisted mechanical ventilation on COPD exacerbation through a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search through databases of Pub Med (1966∼2016), Ovid MEDLINE (1965∼2016), Cochrane EBM (1991∼2016), EMBASE (1974∼2016) and Ovid MEDLINE was performed to identify associated studies. Randomized clinical trials met our inclusion criteria that focus on helium-oxygen-assisted mechanical ventilation on COPD exacerbation were included. The quality of the papers was evaluated after inclusion and information was extracted for meta-analysis. Six articles and 392 patients were included in total. Meta-analysis revealed that helium-oxygen-assisted mechanical ventilation reduced Borg dyspnea scale and increased arterial PH compared with air-oxygen. No statistically significant difference was observed between helium-oxygen and air-oxygen as regards to WOB, PaCO 2 , OI, tracheal intubation rates and mortality within hospital. Our study suggests helium-oxygen-assisted mechanical ventilation can help to reduce Borg dyspnea scale. In terms of the tiny change of PH, its clinical benefit is negligible. There is no conclusive evidence indicating the beneficial effect of helium-oxygen-assisted mechanical ventilation on clinical outcomes or prognosis of COPD exacerbation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Enhancement of helium exhaust by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at LHD and TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Bader, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Evans, T. E.; Funaba, H.; Goto, M.; Mitarai, O.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Narushima, Y.; Nicolai, D.; Samm, U.; Tanaka, H.; Yamada, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Xu, Y.; TEXTOR, the; LHD Experiment Groups

    2016-10-01

    The ability to exhaust helium as the fusion born plasma impurity is a critical requirement for burning plasmas. We demonstrate in this paper that resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields can be used to actively manipulate helium exhaust characteristics. We present results from puff/pump studies at TEXTOR as example for a tokamak with a pumped limiter and from the Large Helical Device (LHD) with the closed helical divertor as example for a heliotron/stellarator device. For LHD, the effective helium confinement time τ p,\\text{He}\\ast is a factor of 7-8 higher in the low and high density regimes explored when compared to TEXTOR discharges. This is attributed to ion root impurity transport which is one particular impurity transport regime assessed experimentally at LHD and which facilitates helium penetration to the plasma core. However, when an edge magnetic island is induced by externally applied RMP fields, τ p,\\text{He}\\ast is decreased by up to 30% and hence τ p,\\text{He}\\ast values closer to those of TEXTOR can be established. The combination of TEXTOR and LHD results suggest that a magnetic island induced by the RMP field in the plasma source region is an important ingredient for improving helium exhaust. The reduction in τ p,\\text{He}\\ast seen is caused by a combination of improved helium exhaust due to an enhanced coupling to the pumping systems, increased outward transport and a reduced fueling efficiency for the helium injected and recycling from the wall elements.

  9. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shimada, M.; Merrill, B. J.

    2016-06-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a Demonstration reactor (DEMO) and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to steady-state/transient heat fluxes and intense neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while at the same time minimizing in-vessel tritium inventories and permeation fluxes into the PFC’s coolant. Tritium will diffuse in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [1,2]. Tritium decay into helium-3 may also play a major role in microstructuralmore » evolution (e.g. helium embrittlement) in tungsten due to relatively low helium-4 production (e.g. He/dpa ratio of 0.4-0.7 appm [3]) in tungsten. Tritium-decay helium-3 effect on tungsten is hardly understood, and its database is very limited. Two tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) were exposed to high flux (ion flux of 1.0x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1.0x1026 m-2) 0.5%T2/D2 plasma at two different temperatures (200, and 500°C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. Tritium implanted samples were stored at ambient temperature in air for more than 3 years to investigate tritium decay helium-3 effect in tungsten. The tritium distributions on plasma-exposed was monitored by a tritium imaging plate technique during storage period [4]. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10°C/min up to 900°C to outgas residual deuterium and tritium but keep helium-3 in tungsten. These helium-3 implanted samples were exposed to deuterium plasma in TPE to investigate helium-3 effect on deuterium behavior in tungsten. The results show that tritium surface concentration in 200°C sample decreased to 30 %, but tritium surface concentration in 500°C sample did not alter over the 3 years storage period, indicating possible

  10. Atmospheric helium and geomagnetic field reversals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Kern, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the earth's helium budget is examined in the light of recent work on the interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic planets. It is proposed that the dominant mode of helium (He4) loss is ion pumping by the solar wind during geomagnetic field reversals, when the earth's magnetic field is very small. The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's upper atmosphere during such a period is found to involve the formation of a bow shock. The penetration altitude of the shock-heated solar plasma is calculated to be about 700 km, and ionization rates above this level are estimated for a cascade ionization (electron avalanche) process to average 10 to the 9th power ions/sq cm/sec. The calculated ionization rates and the capacity of the solar wind to remove ionized helium (He4) from the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic dipole reversals are sufficient to yield a secular equilibrium over geologic time scales. The upward transport of helium from the lower atmosphere under these conditions is found to be adequate to sustain the proposed loss rate.

  11. Quantum transition and decoherence of levitating polaron on helium film thickness under an electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenfack, S. C.; Fotue, A. J.; Fobasso, M. F. C.; Djomou, J.-R. D.; Tiotsop, M.; Ngouana, K. S. L.; Fai, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    We have studied the transition probability and decoherence time of levitating polaron in helium film thickness. By using a variational method of Pekar type, the ground and the first excited states of polaron are calculated above the liquid-helium film placed on the polar substrate. It is shown that the polaron transits from the ground to the excited state in the presence of an external electromagnetic field in the plane. We have seen that, in the helium film, the effects of the magnetic and electric fields on the polaron are opposite. It is also shown that the energy, transition probability and decoherence time of the polaron depend sensitively on the helium film thickness. We found that decoherence time decreases as a function of increasing electron-phonon coupling strength and the helium film thickness. It is seen that the film thickness can be considered as a new confinement in our system and can be adjusted in order to reduce decoherence.

  12. An efficient cooling loop for connecting cryocooler to a helium reservoir

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Taylor, C.E.; Abbott, C.S.R.; Leitner, D.

    2003-09-21

    The magnet system of the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL has two 1.5-watt cryocoolers suspended in the cryostat vacuum. Helium vapor from the liquid reservoir is admitted to a finned condenser bolted to the cryocooler 2nd stage and returns as liquid via gravity. Small-diameter flexible tubes allow the cryocoolers to be located remotely from the reservoir. With 3.1 watts load, the helium reservoir is maintained at 4.35 K, 0.05K above the cryocooler temperature. Design, analysis, and performance are presented.

  13. Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under a contract entitled 'Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low Gravity'. This project performed verification tests, over a wide range of accelerations of two Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes of which one incorporates the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (SFHe). Helium was first liquefied in 1908 and not until the 1930s were the properties of helium below 2.2 K observed sufficiently to realize that it did not obey the ordinary physical laws of physics as applied to ordinary liquids. The term superfluidity became associated with these unique observations. The low temperature of SFHe and it's temperature unifonrmity have made it a significant cryogenic coolant for use in space applications in astronomical observations with infrared sensors and in low temperature physics. Superfluid helium has been used in instruments such as the Shuttle Infrared Astronomy Telescope (IRT), the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Observatory (COBE), and the Infrared Satellite Observatory (ISO). It is also used in the Space Infrared Telescope (SIRTF), Relativity Mission Satellite formally called Gravity Probe-B (GP-B), and the Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) presently under development. For GP-B and STEP, the use of SFHE is used to cool Superconducting Quantum Interference Detectors (SQUIDS) among other parts of the instruments. The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment flown in the Shuttle studied the behavior of SFHE. This experiment attempted to get low-gravity slosh data, however, the main emphasis was to study the low-gravity transfer of SFHE from tank to tank. These instruments carried tanks of SFHE of a few hundred liters to 2500 liters. The capability of modeling the behavior of SFHE is important to spacecraft control engineers who must design systems that can overcome disturbances created by the movement of the fluid. In addition instruments such as GP-B and STEP are very

  14. Realization of mechanical rotation in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, E. B.; Kulish, M. I.; Karabulin, A. V.; Matyushenko, V. I.; Dyatlova, E. V.; Gordienko, A. S.; Stepanov, M. E.

    2017-09-01

    The possibility of using miniaturized low-power electric motors submerged in superfluid helium for organization of rotation inside a cryostat has been investigated. It has been revealed that many of commercial micromotors can operate in liquid helium consuming low power. Turret with 5 sample holders, assembled on the base of stepper motor, has been successfully tested in experiments on the nanowire production in quantized vortices of superfluid helium. Application of the stepper motor made it possible in a single experiment to study the effect of various experimental parameters on the yield and quality of the nanowires. The promises for continuous fast rotation of the bath filled by superfluid helium by using high-speed brushless micromotor were outlined and tested. Being realized, this approach will open new possibility to study the guest particles interaction with the array of parallel linear vortices in He II.

  15. AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

    1958-01-01

    An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

  16. Rotons, Superfluidity, and Helium Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balibar, Sébastien

    2006-09-01

    Fritz London understood that quantum mechanics could show up at the macroscopic level, and, in 1938, he proposed that superfluidity was a consequence of Bose-Einstein condensation. However, Lev Landau never believed in London's ideas; instead, he introduced quasiparticles to explain the thermodynamics of superfluid 4He and a possible mechanism for its critical velocity. One of these quasiparticles, a crucial one, was his famous "roton" which he considered as an elementary vortex. At the LT0 conference (Cambridge, 1946), London criticized Landau and his "theory based on the shaky grounds of imaginary rotons". Despite their rather strong disagreement, Landau was awarded the London prize in 1960, six years after London's death. Today, we know that London and Landau had both found part of the truth: BEC takes place in 4He, and rotons exist. In my early experiments on quantum evaporation, I found direct evidence for the existence of rotons and for evaporation processes in which they play the role of photons in the photoelectric effect. But rotons are now considered as particular phonons which are nearly soft, due to some local order in superfluid 4He. Later we studied helium crystals which are model systems for the general study of crystal surfaces, but also exceptional systems with unique quantum properties. In our recent studies of nucleation, rotons show their importance again: by using acoustic techniques, we have extended the study of liquid 4He up to very high pressures where the liquid state is metastable, and we wish to demonstrate that the vanishing of the roton gap may destroy superfluidity and trigger an instability towards the crystalline state.

  17. 14 CFR 25.979 - Pressure fueling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.979 Pressure fueling system. For pressure fueling systems, the following apply: (a) Each pressure fueling system fuel manifold connection must have means to prevent the escape of hazardous quantities of fuel from the system if the fuel...

  18. 14 CFR 25.979 - Pressure fueling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.979 Pressure fueling system. For pressure fueling systems, the following apply: (a) Each pressure fueling system fuel manifold connection must have means to prevent the escape of hazardous quantities of fuel from the system if the fuel...

  19. 14 CFR 25.979 - Pressure fueling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.979 Pressure fueling system. For pressure fueling systems, the following apply: (a) Each pressure fueling system fuel manifold connection must have means to prevent the escape of hazardous quantities of fuel from the system if the fuel...

  20. 14 CFR 25.979 - Pressure fueling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.979 Pressure fueling system. For pressure fueling systems, the following apply: (a) Each pressure fueling system fuel manifold connection must have means to prevent the escape of hazardous quantities of fuel from the system if the fuel...