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Sample records for helix-loop-helix protein-mediated regulation

  1. Thymocyte selection is regulated by the helix-loop-helix inhibitor protein, Id3.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R R; Johns, C P; Quan, J; Johnson, R S; Murre, C

    2000-01-01

    E2A, HEB, E2-2, and daughterless are basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that play key roles in multiple developmental pathways. The DNA binding activity of E2A, HEB, and E2-2 is regulated by a distinct class of inhibitor HLH proteins, the Id gene products. Here, we show that Id3 is required for major histocompatability (MHC) class I- and class II-restricted thymocyte positive selection. Additionally, H-Y TCR-mediated negative selection is severely perturbed in Id3 null mutant mice. Finally, we show that E2A and Id3 interact genetically to regulate thymocyte development. These observations identify the HLH inhibitory protein Id3 as an essential component required for proper thymocyte maturation.

  2. The HAND1 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor regulates trophoblast differentiation via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scott, I C; Anson-Cartwright, L; Riley, P; Reda, D; Cross, J C

    2000-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes Hand1 and Mash2 are essential for placental development in mice. Hand1 promotes differentiation of trophoblast giant cells, whereas Mash2 is required for the maintenance of giant cell precursors, and its overexpression prevents giant cell differentiation. We found that Hand1 expression and Mash2 expression overlap in the ectoplacental cone and spongiotrophoblast, layers of the placenta that contain the giant cell precursors, indicating that the antagonistic activities of Hand1 and Mash2 must be coordinated. MASH2 and HAND1 both heterodimerize with E factors, bHLH proteins that are the DNA-binding partners for most class B bHLH factors and which are also expressed in the ectoplacental cone and spongiotrophoblast. In vitro, HAND1 could antagonize MASH2 function by competing for E-factor binding. However, the Hand1 mutant phenotype cannot be solely explained by ectopic activity of MASH2, as the Hand1 mutant phenotype was not altered by further mutation of Mash2. Interestingly, expression of E-factor genes (ITF2 and ALF1) was down-regulated in the trophoblast lineage prior to giant cell differentiation. Therefore, suppression of MASH2 function, required to allow giant cell differentiation, may occur in vivo by loss of its E-factor partner due to loss of its expression and/or competition from HAND1. In giant cells, where E-factor expression was not detected, HAND1 presumably associates with a different bHLH partner. This may account for the distinct functions of HAND1 in giant cells and their precursors. We conclude that development of the trophoblast lineage is regulated by the interacting functions of HAND1, MASH2, and their cofactors.

  3. Regulation of Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid Signaling by Atypical Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhu, Yongyou; Fujioka, Shozo; Asami, Tadao; Li, Jiayang; Li, Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved transcription factors critical for cell proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies have implicated bHLH proteins in many plant signaling processes, including brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Here, we report identification of two families of atypical bHLH proteins capable of modulating BR signaling. We found that activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1-Dominant (atbs1-D), previously identified as a dominant suppressor of a weak BR receptor mutant bri1-301, was caused by overexpression of a 93–amino acid atypical bHLH protein lacking amino acids critical for DNA binding. Interestingly, atbs1-D only suppresses weak BR mutants, while overexpression of a truncated ATBS1 lacking the basic motif also rescues bri1-301, suggesting that ATBS1 likely stimulates BR signaling by sequestering negative BR signaling components. A yeast two-hybrid screen using ATBS1 as bait discovered four ATBS1-Interacting Factors (AIFs) that are members of another atypical bHLH protein subfamily. AIF1 exhibits an overlapping expression pattern with ATBS1 and its homologs and interacts with ATBS1 in vitro and in vivo. AIF1 overexpression nullifies the suppressive effect of atbs1-D on bri1-301 and results in dwarf transgenic plants resembling BR mutants. By contrast, silencing of AIF1 partially suppressed the bri1-301 phenotype. Our results suggested that plants use these atypical bHLH proteins to regulate BR signaling. PMID:20023194

  4. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1 regulates mouse development as a homodimer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong; Scott, Ian C; Snider, Fran; Geary-Joo, Colleen; Zhao, Xiang; Simmons, David G; Cross, James C

    2013-10-15

    Hand1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is essential for development of the placenta, yolk sac and heart during mouse development. While Hand1 is essential for trophoblast giant cell (TGC) differentiation, its potential heterodimer partners are not co-expressed in TGCs. To test the hypothesis that Hand1 functions as homodimer, we generated knock-in mice in which the Hand1 gene was altered to encode a tethered homodimer (TH). Some Hand1(TH/-) conceptuses in which the only form of Hand1 is Hand1(TH) are viable and fertile, indicating that homodimer Hand1 is sufficient for mouse survival. ~2/3 of Hand1(TH/-) and all Hand1(TH/TH) mice died in utero and displayed severe placental defects and variable cardial and cranial-facial abnormalities, indicating a dosage-dependent effect of Hand1(TH). Meanwhile, expression of the Hand1(TH) protein did not have negative effects on viability or fertility in all Hand1(TH/+) mice. These data imply that Hand1 homodimer plays a dominant role during development and its expression dosage is critical for survival, whereas Hand1 heterodimers can be either dispensable or play a regulatory role to modulate the activity of Hand1 homodimer in vivo.

  5. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  6. Genome-wide features of neuroendocrine regulation in Drosophila by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DIMMED

    PubMed Central

    Hadžić, Tarik; Park, Dongkook; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Yang, Lin; Trigg, Jennifer S.; Rohs, Remo; Rosbash, Michael; Taghert, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) cells use large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) to traffic, process, store and secrete neuropeptide hormones through the regulated secretory pathway. The dimmed (DIMM) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor of Drosophila controls the level of regulated secretory activity in NE cells. To pursue its mechanisms, we have performed two independent genome-wide analyses of DIMM's activities: (i) in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to define genomic sites of DIMM occupancy and (ii) deep sequencing of purified DIMM neurons to characterize their transcriptional profile. By this combined approach, we showed that DIMM binds to conserved E-boxes in enhancers of 212 genes whose expression is enriched in DIMM-expressing NE cells. DIMM binds preferentially to certain E-boxes within first introns of specific gene isoforms. Statistical machine learning revealed that flanking regions of putative DIMM binding sites contribute to its DNA binding specificity. DIMM's transcriptional repertoire features at least 20 LDCV constituents. In addition, DIMM notably targets the pro-secretory transcription factor, creb-A, but significantly, DIMM does not target any neuropeptide genes. DIMM therefore prescribes the scale of secretory activity in NE neurons, by a systematic control of both proximal and distal points in the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:25634895

  7. Akt regulates basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor-coactivator complex formation and activity during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, Anne B; Taylor, Jennifer; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Figueroa, Claudia; Kwok, Roland P S; Turner, David L

    2003-07-01

    Neural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulate neurogenesis in vertebrates. Signaling by peptide growth factors also plays critical roles in regulating neuronal differentiation and survival. Many peptide growth factors activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and subsequently the Akt kinases, raising the possibility that Akt may impact bHLH protein function during neurogenesis. Here we demonstrate that reducing expression of endogenous Akt1 and Akt2 by RNA interference (RNAi) reduces neuron generation in P19 cells transfected with a neural bHLH expression vector. The reduction in neuron generation from decreased Akt expression is not solely due to decreased cell survival, since addition of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK rescues cell death associated with loss of Akt function but does not restore neuron formation. This result indicates that Akt1 and Akt2 have additional functions during neuronal differentiation that are separable from neuronal survival. We show that activated Akt1 enhances complex formation between bHLH proteins and the transcriptional coactivator p300. Activated Akt1 also significantly augments the transcriptional activity of the bHLH protein neurogenin 3 in complex with the coactivators p300 or CBP. In addition, inhibition of endogenous Akt activity by the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 abolishes transcriptional cooperativity between the bHLH proteins and p300. We propose that Akt regulates the assembly and activity of bHLH-coactivator complexes to promote neuronal differentiation.

  8. A novel initiator regulates expression of the nontissue-specific helix-loop-helix gene ME1.

    PubMed Central

    Shain, D H; Neuman, T; Zuber, M X

    1995-01-01

    The mouse ME1 gene (HEB, REB and GE1, homologues in human, rat and chick, respectively) is a member of the nontissue-specific helix-loop-helix (HLH) gene family that includes E2A, E2-2 and Drosophila daughterless. We have examined the factors that control ME1 gene expression. ME1 is a single copy gene that spans > or = 150 kb of DNA and contains > 10 exons. Transcription was directed by an unusual initiator element that contained a 13 bp poly d(A) tract flanked by palindromic and inverted repeat sequences. Both RNase protection and primer extension analyses mapped the ME1 transcriptional start site to the center of the 13 bp poly d(A) tract. The ME1 initiator and its proximal sequences were required for promoter activity, supported basal levels of transcription, and contributed to cell type-specific gene expression. Other cis-elements utilized by the TATA-less ME1 promoter included a cluster of Sp1 response elements, E-boxes and a strong repressor. Collectively, our results suggest that the ME1 initiator and other cis-elements in the proximal promoter play an important role in regulating ME1 gene expression. Images PMID:7784173

  9. Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 regulate glucosinolate biosynthesis, insect performance, and feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Fabian; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Zander, Mark; Diez-Diaz, Monica; Fonseca, Sandra; Glauser, Gaétan; Lewsey, Mathew G; Ecker, Joseph R; Solano, Roberto; Reymond, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants fend off insect attack by constitutive and inducible production of toxic metabolites, such as glucosinolates (GSs). A triple mutant lacking MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are known to additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, was shown to have a highly reduced expression of GS biosynthesis genes. The myc2 myc3 myc4 (myc234) triple mutant was almost completely devoid of GS and was extremely susceptible to the generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. On the contrary, the specialist Pieris brassicae was unaffected by the presence of GS and preferred to feed on wild-type plants. In addition, lack of GS in myc234 drastically modified S. littoralis feeding behavior. Surprisingly, the expression of MYB factors known to regulate GS biosynthesis genes was not altered in myc234, suggesting that MYC2/MYC3/MYC4 are necessary for direct transcriptional activation of GS biosynthesis genes. To support this, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that MYC2 binds directly to the promoter of several GS biosynthesis genes in vivo. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and pull-down experiments indicated that MYC2/MYC3/MYC4 interact directly with GS-related MYBs. This specific MYC-MYB interaction plays a crucial role in the regulation of defense secondary metabolite production and underlines the importance of GS in shaping plant interactions with adapted and nonadapted herbivores. PMID:23943862

  10. PIL5, a Phytochrome-Interacting Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Protein, Is a Key Negative Regulator of Seed Germination in Arabidopsis thalianaW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Kim, Jonghyun; Park, Eunae; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kang, Changwon; Choi, Giltsu

    2004-01-01

    The first decision made by an angiosperm seed, whether to germinate or not, is based on integration of various environmental signals such as water and light. The phytochromes (Phys) act as red and far-red light (Pfr) photoreceptors to mediate light signaling through yet uncharacterized pathways. We report here that the PIF3-like 5 (PIL5) protein, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is a key negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated seed germination. PIL5 preferentially interacts with the Pfr forms of Phytochrome A (PhyA) and Phytochrome B (PhyB). Analyses of a pil5 mutant in conjunction with phyA and phyB mutants, a pif3 pil5 double mutant, and PIL5 overexpression lines indicate that PIL5 is a negative factor in Phy-mediated promotion of seed germination, inhibition of hypocotyl negative gravitropism, and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Our data identify PIL5 as the first Phy-interacting protein that regulates seed germination. PMID:15486102

  11. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DEC1 regulates the cisplatin-induced apoptotic pathway of human esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seino, Hiroko; Wu, Yunyan; Morohashi, Satoko; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Katsumi; Kato, Yukio; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    DEC1 [basic helix-loop-helix (BHLH) E40/Stra13/Sharp2] and DEC2 (BHLHE41/Sharp1) are BHLH transcription factors that are associated with the regulation of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and circadian rhythms, as well as malignancy in various cancers. However, the roles of DEC1 and DEC2 expression in esophageal cancer are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the roles of DEC1 and DEC2 in human esophageal cancer TE 5 and TE 10 cells that had been treated with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin: CDDP). Expression of DEC1 and DEC2 was decreased with CDDP treatment in TE 5 cells; however, knockdown or overexpression of DEC1/DEC2 had little effects on CDDP-induced apoptosis in TE 5 cells. DEC1 expression was up-regulated in CDDP-treated TE 10 cells, whereas DEC2 expression was unchanged. DEC1 knockdown by siRNA in TE 10 decreased the amount of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) after treatment with CDDP, whereas DEC2 knockdown had no effects on the amount of cleaved PARP in both the presence and absence of CDDP. We also demonstrated that DEC1 overexpression promoted cleaved PARP expression, whereas DEC2 overexpression had no effects on the amount of cleaved PARP in TE 10 cells. These results suggested that DEC1 has pro-apoptotic effects on human esophageal cancer TE 10 cells of well-differentiated type.

  12. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BcbHLHpol functions as a positive regulator of pollen development in non-heading Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Changwei; Duan, Weike; Huang, Feiyi; Hou, Xilin

    2014-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a common trait in higher plants, and several transcription factors regulate pollen development. Previously, we obtained a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, BcbHLHpol, via suppression subtractive hybridization in non-heading Chinese cabbage. However, the regulatory function of BcbHLHpol during anther and pollen development remains unclear. In this study, BcbHLHpol was cloned, and its tissue-specific expression profile was analyzed. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that BcbHLHpol was highly expressed in maintainer buds and that the transcripts of BcbHLHpol significantly decreased in the buds of pol CMS. A virus-induced gene silencing vector that targets BcbHLHpol was constructed and transformed into Brassica campestris plants to further explore the function of BcbHLHpol. Male sterility and short stature were observed in BcbHLHpol-silenced plants. The degradation of tapetal cells was inhibited in BcbHLHpol-silenced plants, and nutrients were insufficiently supplied to the microspore. These phenomena resulted in pollen abortion. This result indicates that BcbHLHpol functions as a positive regulator in pollen development. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed that BcbHLHpol interacted with BcSKP1 in the nucleus. This finding suggests that BcbHLHpol and BcSKP1 are positive coordinating regulators of pollen development. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that BcbHLHpol and BcSKP1 can be induced at low temperatures. Thus, we propose that BcbHLHpol is necessary for meiosis. This study provides insights into the regulatory functions of the BcbHLHpol network during anther development. PMID:25147023

  13. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jing; Chang, Xiaoxiao; Kasuga, Takao; Bui, Mai; Reid, Michael S; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during flower senescence. Transcription of PhFBH4 is induced by plant hormones and abiotic stress treatments. Silencing of PhFBH4 using virus-induced gene silencing or an antisense approach extended flower longevity, while transgenic petunia flowers with an overexpression construct showed a reduction in flower lifespan. Abundance of transcripts of senescence-related genes (SAG12, SAG29) was significantly changed in petunia PhFBH4 transgenic flowers. Furthermore, silencing or overexpression of PhFBH4 reduced or increased, respectively, transcript abundances of important ethylene biosynthesis-related genes, ACS1 and ACO1, thereby influencing ethylene production. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that the PhFBH4 protein physically interacted with the G-box cis-element in the promoter of ACS1, suggesting that ACS1 was a direct target of the PhFBH4 protein. In addition, ectopic expression of this gene altered plant development including plant height, internode length, and size of leaves and flowers, accompanied by alteration of transcript abundance of the gibberellin biosynthesis-related gene GA2OX3. Our results indicate that PhFBH4 plays an important role in regulating plant growth and development through modulating the ethylene biosynthesis pathway. PMID:26715989

  14. SclR, a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor, Regulates Hyphal Morphology and Promotes Sclerotial Formation in Aspergillus oryzae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Feng Jie; Takahashi, Tadashi; Matsushima, Ken-ichiro; Hara, Seiichi; Shinohara, Yasutomo; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Koyama, Yasuji

    2011-01-01

    Most known basic-region helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins belong to a superfamily of transcription factors often involved in the control of growth and differentiation. Therefore, inappropriate expression of genes encoding bHLH proteins is frequently associated with developmental dysfunction. In our previously reported study, a novel bHLH protein-encoding gene (AO090011000215) of Aspergillus oryzae was identified. The gene-disrupted strain was found to produce dense conidia, but sparse sclerotia, relative to the parent strain. Here, to further analyze its function, we generated an overexpressing strain using the A. oryzae amyB gene promoter. Genetic overexpression led to a large number of initial hyphal aggregations and then the formation of mature sclerotia; it was therefore designated sclR (sclerotium regulator). At the same time, the sclR-overexpressing strain also displayed both delayed and decreased conidiation. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the aerial hyphae of the sclR-overexpressing strain were extremely branched and intertwined with each other. In the generation of the SclR-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression strain, the SclR-EGFP protein fusion was conditionally detected in the nuclei. In addition, the loss of sclR function led to rapid protein degradation and cell lysis in dextrin-polypeptone-yeast extract liquid medium. Taken together, these observations indicate that SclR plays an important role in hyphal morphology, asexual conidiospore formation, and the promotion of sclerotial production, even retaining normal cell function, at least in submerged liquid culture. PMID:21551246

  15. Receptor editing and marginal zone B cell development are regulated by the helix-loop-helix protein, E2A.

    PubMed

    Quong, Melanie W; Martensson, Annica; Langerak, Anton W; Rivera, Richard R; Nemazee, David; Murre, Cornelis

    2004-04-19

    Previous studies have indicated that the E2A gene products are required to initiate B lineage development. Here, we demonstrate that E2A(+/-) B cells that express an autoreactive B cell receptor fail to mature due in part to an inability to activate secondary immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain gene rearrangement. Both RAG1/2 gene expression and RS deletion are severely defective in E2A(+/-) mice. Additionally, we demonstrate that E2A(+/-) mice show an increase in the proportion of marginal zone B cells with a concomitant decrease in the proportion of follicular B cells. In contrast, Id3-deficient splenocytes show a decline in the proportion of marginal zone B cells. Based on these observations, we propose that E-protein activity regulates secondary Ig gene rearrangement at the immature B cell stage and contributes to cell fate determination of marginal zone B cells. Additionally, we propose a model in which E-proteins enforce the developmental checkpoint at the immature B cell stage.

  16. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors dHAND and eHAND exhibit dimerization characteristics that suggest complex regulation of function.

    PubMed

    Firulli, B A; Hadzic, D B; McDaid, J R; Firulli, A B

    2000-10-27

    dHAND and eHAND are basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors expressed during embryogenesis and are required for the proper development of cardiac and extraembryonic tissues. HAND genes, like the myogenic bHLH genes, are classified as class B bHLH genes, which are expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern and function by forming heterodimers with class A bHLH proteins. Myogenic bHLH genes are shown not to form homodimers efficiently, suggesting that their activity is dependent on their E-protein partners. To identify HIPs (HAND-interacting proteins) that regulate the activity of the HAND genes, we screened an 9.5-10.5-day-old mouse embryonic yeast two-hybrid library with eHAND. Several HIPs held high sequence identity to eHAND, indicating that eHAND could form and function as a homodimer. Based on the high degree of amino acid identity between eHAND and dHAND, it is possible that dHAND could also form homodimers and heterodimers with eHAND. We show using yeast and mammalian two-hybrid assays as well as biochemical pull-down assays that eHAND and dHAND are capable of forming both HAND homo- and heterodimers in vivo. To investigate whether HAND genes form heterodimers with other biologically relevant bHLH proteins, we tested and show HAND heterodimerization with the recently identified Hairy-related transcription factors, HRT1-3. This finding is exciting, because both HRT and HAND genes are coexpressed in the developing heart and limb and both have been implicated in establishing tissue boundaries and pattern formation. Moreover, competition gel shift analysis demonstrates that dHAND and eHAND can negatively regulate the DNA binding of MyoD/E12 heterodimers in a manner similar to MISTI and Id proteins, suggesting a possible transcriptional inhibitory role for HAND genes. Taken together, these results show that dHAND and eHAND can form homo- and heterodimer combinations with multiple bHLH partners and that this broad dimerization profile reflects the

  17. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors JASMONATE-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), JAM2, and JAM3 are negative regulators of jasmonate responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Obayashi, Takeshi; Saito, Hikaru; Masuda, Shinji; Kamiya, Yuji; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Shirasu, Ken

    2013-09-01

    Jasmonates regulate transcriptional reprogramming during growth, development, and defense responses. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine, an amino acid conjugate of jasmonic acid (JA), is perceived by the protein complex composed of the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) and JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins, leading to the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of JAZ proteins. This activates basic helix-loop-helix-type MYC transcription factors to regulate JA-responsive genes. Here, we show that the expression of genes encoding other basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), JAM2, and JAM3, is positively regulated in a COI1- and MYC2-dependent manner in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, contrary to myc2, the jam1jam2jam3 triple mutant exhibited shorter roots when treated with methyl jasmonate (MJ), indicating enhanced responsiveness to JA. Our genome-wide expression analyses revealed that key jasmonate metabolic genes as well as a set of genes encoding transcription factors that regulate the JA-responsive metabolic genes are negatively regulated by JAMs after MJ treatment. Consistently, loss of JAM genes resulted in higher accumulation of anthocyanin in MJ-treated plants as well as higher accumulation of JA and 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid in wounded plants. These results show that JAMs negatively regulate the JA responses in a manner that is mostly antagonistic to MYC2.

  18. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors JASMONATE-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), JAM2, and JAM3 Are Negative Regulators of Jasmonate Responses in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Obayashi, Takeshi; Saito, Hikaru; Masuda, Shinji; Kamiya, Yuji; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Shirasu, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonates regulate transcriptional reprogramming during growth, development, and defense responses. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine, an amino acid conjugate of jasmonic acid (JA), is perceived by the protein complex composed of the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) and JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins, leading to the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of JAZ proteins. This activates basic helix-loop-helix-type MYC transcription factors to regulate JA-responsive genes. Here, we show that the expression of genes encoding other basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), JAM2, and JAM3, is positively regulated in a COI1- and MYC2-dependent manner in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, contrary to myc2, the jam1jam2jam3 triple mutant exhibited shorter roots when treated with methyl jasmonate (MJ), indicating enhanced responsiveness to JA. Our genome-wide expression analyses revealed that key jasmonate metabolic genes as well as a set of genes encoding transcription factors that regulate the JA-responsive metabolic genes are negatively regulated by JAMs after MJ treatment. Consistently, loss of JAM genes resulted in higher accumulation of anthocyanin in MJ-treated plants as well as higher accumulation of JA and 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid in wounded plants. These results show that JAMs negatively regulate the JA responses in a manner that is mostly antagonistic to MYC2. PMID:23852442

  19. B-lymphocyte development is regulated by the combined dosage of three basic helix-loop-helix genes, E2A, E2-2, and HEB.

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Y; Cheng, P; Weintraub, H

    1996-01-01

    B-lymphocyte development requires the basic helix-loop-helix proteins encoded by the E2A gene. In this study, the control mechanism of E2A was further explored by disruption of the E2A-related genes, E2-2 and HEB. In contrast to E2A, E2-2 and HEB are not essential for the establishment of the B-cell lineage. However, both E2-2 and HEB are required for the generation of the normal numbers of pro-B cells in mouse embryos. Breeding tests among mice carrying different mutations revealed that E2-2 and HEB interact with E2A in many developmental processes including generation of B cells. Specifically, mice transheterozygous for any two mutations of these three genes produced fewer pro-B cells than the singly heterozygous littermates. This study indicates that B-cell development is dependent not only on an essential function provided by the E2A gene but also on a combined dosage set by E2A, E2-2, and HEB. PMID:8649400

  20. The basic helix-loop-helix, leucine zipper transcription factor, USF (upstream stimulatory factor), is a key regulator of SF-1 (steroidogenic factor-1) gene expression in pituitary gonadotrope and steroidogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, A N; Mellon, P L

    1998-05-01

    Tissue-specific expression of the mammalian FTZ-F1 gene is essential for adrenal and gonadal development and sexual differentiation. The FTZ-F1 gene encodes an orphan nuclear receptor, termed SF-1 (steroidogenic factor-1) or Ad4BP, which is a primary transcriptional regulator of several hormone and steroidogenic enzyme genes that are critical for normal physiological function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in reproduction. The objective of the current study is to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation of SF-1 gene expression in the pituitary. We have studied a series of deletion and point mutations in the SF-1 promoter region for transcriptional activity in alphaT3-1 and L/betaT2 (pituitary gonadotrope), CV-1, JEG-3, and Y1 (adrenocortical) cell lines. Our results indicate that maximal expression of the SF-1 promoter in all cell types requires an E box element at -82/-77. This E box sequence (CACGTG) is identical to the binding element for USF (upstream stimulatory factor), a member of the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Studies of the SF-1 gene E box element using gel mobility shift and antibody supershift assays indicate that USF may be a key transcriptional regulator of SF-1 gene expression.

  1. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Heterocomplex of Yas1p and Yas2p Regulates Cytochrome P450 Expression in Response to Alkanes in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica▿

    PubMed Central

    Endoh-Yamagami, Setsu; Hirakawa, Kiyoshi; Morioka, Daisuke; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2007-01-01

    The expression of the ALK1 gene, which encodes cytochrome P450, catalyzing the first step of alkane oxidation in the alkane-assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, is highly regulated and can be induced by alkanes. Previously, we identified a cis-acting element (alkane-responsive element 1 [ARE1]) in the ALK1 promoter. We showed that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, Yas1p, binds to ARE1 in vivo and mediates alkane-dependent transcription induction. Yas1p, however, does not bind to ARE1 by itself in vitro, suggesting that Yas1p requires another bHLH protein partner for its DNA binding, as many bHLH transcription factors function by forming heterodimers. To identify such a binding partner of Yas1p, here we screened open reading frames encoding proteins with the bHLH motif from the Y. lipolytica genome database and identified the YAS2 gene. The deletion of the YAS2 gene abolished the alkane-responsive induction of ALK1 transcription and the growth of the yeast on alkanes. We revealed that Yas2p has transactivation activity. Furthermore, Yas1p and Yas2p formed a protein complex that was required for the binding of these proteins to ARE1. These findings allow us to postulate a model in which bHLH transcription factors Yas1p and Yas2p form a heterocomplex and mediate the transcription induction in response to alkanes. PMID:17322346

  2. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Bmsage Is Involved in Regulation of fibroin H-chain Gene via Interaction with SGF1 in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong-Yan; Hu, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Meng-Ting; Nie, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Yin-Xia; Peng, Zhang-Chuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qing-You

    2014-01-01

    Silk glands are specialized in the synthesis of several secretory proteins. Expression of genes encoding the silk proteins in Bombyx mori silk glands with strict territorial and developmental specificities is regulated by many transcription factors. In this study, we have characterized B. mori sage, which is closely related to sage in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. It is termed Bmsage; it encodes transcription factor Bmsage, which belongs to the Mesp subfamily, containing a basic helix–loop–helix motif. Bmsage transcripts were detected specifically in the silk glands of B. mori larvae through RT-PCR analysis. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed the Bmsage protein existed exclusively in B. mori middle and posterior silk gland cells. Bmsage has a low level of expression in the 4th instar molting stages, which increases gradually in the 5th instar feeding stages and then declines from the wandering to the pupation stages. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested the expression level of Bmsage in a high silk strain was higher compared to a lower silk strain on day 3 of the larval 5th instar. Furthermore, far western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed the Bmsage protein interacted with the fork head transcription factor silk gland factor 1 (SGF1). An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins bound to the A and B elements in the promoter of fibroin H-chain gene(fib-H), respectively. Luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins increased the expression of fib-H. Together, these results suggest Bmsage is involved in the regulation of the expression of fib-H by being together with SGF1 in B. mori PSG cells. PMID:24740008

  3. A Triple Helix-Loop-Helix/Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Cascade Controls Cell Elongation Downstream of Multiple Hormonal and Environmental Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming-Yi; Fan, Min; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Environmental and endogenous signals, including light, temperature, brassinosteroid (BR), and gibberellin (GA), regulate cell elongation largely by influencing the expression of the paclobutrazol-resistant (PRE) family helix-loop-helix (HLH) factors, which promote cell elongation by interacting antagonistically with another HLH factor, IBH1. However, the molecular mechanism by which PREs and IBH1 regulate gene expression has remained unknown. Here, we show that IBH1 interacts with and inhibits a DNA binding basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, HBI1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of HBI1 increased hypocotyl and petiole elongation, whereas dominant inactivation of HBI1 and its homologs caused a dwarf phenotype, indicating that HBI1 is a positive regulator of cell elongation. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that HBI1 directly bound to the promoters and activated two EXPANSIN genes encoding cell wall–loosening enzymes; HBI1’s DNA binding and transcriptional activities were inhibited by IBH1, but the inhibitory effects of IBH1 were abolished by PRE1. The results indicate that PREs activate the DNA binding bHLH factor HBI1 by sequestering its inhibitor IBH1. Altering each of the three factors affected plant sensitivities to BR, GA, temperature, and light. Our study demonstrates that PREs, IBH1, and HBI1 form a chain of antagonistic switches that regulates cell elongation downstream of multiple external and endogenous signals. PMID:23221598

  4. A Composite Element that Binds Basic Helix Loop Helix and Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors Is Important for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulation of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Hou, Melody Y.; Gregory, Susan J.; Kam, Kyung-Yoon; Xu, Shuyun; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2008-01-01

    Although FSH plays an essential role in controlling gametogenesis, the biology of FSHβ transcription remains poorly understood, but is known to involve the complex interplay of multiple endocrine factors including GnRH. We have identified a GnRH-responsive element within the rat FSHβ promoter containing an E-box and partial cAMP response element site that are bound by the basic helix loop helix transcription factor family members, upstream stimulating factor (USF)-1/USF-2, and the basic leucine zipper member, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), respectively. Expression studies with CREB, USF-1/USF-2, and activating protein-1 demonstrated that the USF transcription factors increased basal transcription, an effect not observed if the cognate binding site was mutated. Conversely, expression of a dominant negative CREB mutant or CREB knockdown attenuated induction by GnRH, whereas dominant negative Fos or USF had no effect on the GnRH response. GnRH stimulation specifically induced an increase in phosphorylated CREB occupation of the FSHβ promoter, leading to the recruitment of CREB-binding protein to enhance gene transcription. In conclusion, a composite element bound by both USF and CREB serves to integrate signals for basal and GnRH-stimulated transcription of the rat FSHβ gene. PMID:18550775

  5. E Proteins and ID Proteins: Helix-Loop-Helix Partners in Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E

    2015-11-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins represent a well-known class of transcriptional regulators. Many bHLH proteins act as heterodimers with members of a class of ubiquitous partners, the E proteins. A widely expressed class of inhibitory heterodimer partners-the Inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID) proteins-also exists. Genetic and molecular analyses in humans and in knockout mice implicate E proteins and ID proteins in a wide variety of diseases, belying the notion that they are non-specific partner proteins. Here, we explore relationships of E proteins and ID proteins to a variety of disease processes and highlight gaps in knowledge of disease mechanisms.

  6. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  7. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-10-12

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers.

  8. Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway in a developmental checkpoint monitoring Helix-Loop-Helix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    The E-proteins and Id-proteins are, respectively, the positive and negative heterodimer partners for the basic-helix-loop-helix protein family, and as such contribute to a remarkably large number of cell fate decisions. E-proteins and Id-proteins also function to inhibit or promote cell proliferation and cancer. Using a genetic modifier screen in Drosophila, we show that the Id-protein Extramacrochaetae enables growth by suppressing activation of the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway of tumor suppressors, activation that requires transcriptional activation of the expanded gene by the E-protein Daughterless. Daughterless protein binds to an intronic enhancer in the expanded gene, both activating the SWH pathway independently of the transmembrane protein Crumbs, and bypassing the negative feedback regulation that targets the same expanded enhancer. Thus the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway has a cell-autonomous function to prevent inappropriate differentiation due to transcription factor imbalance, and monitors the intrinsic developmental status of progenitor cells, distinct from any responses to cell-cell interactions. PMID:25579975

  9. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Transcriptional Activation by ETS and Leucine Zipper-Containing Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gang; Erman, Batu; Ishii, Haruhiko; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S.; Sen, Ranjan

    1999-01-01

    The immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain gene enhancer contains closely juxtaposed binding sites for ETS and leucine zipper-containing basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH-zip) proteins. To understand the μ enhancer function, we have investigated transcription activation by the combination of ETS and bHLH-zip proteins. The bHLH-zip protein TFE3, but not USF, cooperated with the ETS domain proteins PU.1 and Ets-1 to activate a tripartite domain of this enhancer. Deletion mutants were used to identify the domains of the proteins involved. Both TFE3 and USF enhanced Ets-1 DNA binding in vitro by relieving the influence of an autoinhibitory domain in Ets-1 by direct protein-protein associations. Several regions of Ets-1 were found to be necessary, whereas the bHLH-zip domain was sufficient for this effect. Our studies define novel interactions between ETS and bHLH-zip proteins that may regulate combinatorial transcription activation by these protein families. PMID:10082562

  11. Preferred sequences for DNA recognition by the TAL1 helix-loop-helix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, H L; Huang, L; Tsan, J T; Funk, W; Wright, W E; Hu, J S; Kingston, R E; Baer, R

    1994-01-01

    Tumor-specific activation of the TAL1 gene is the most common genetic alteration seen in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TAL1 gene products contain the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain, a protein dimerization and DNA-binding motif common to several known transcription factors. A binding-site selection procedure has now been used to evaluate the DNA recognition properties of TAL1. These studies demonstrate that TAL1 polypeptides do not have intrinsic DNA-binding activity, presumably because of their inability to form bHLH homodimers. However, TAL1 readily interacts with any of the known class A bHLH proteins (E12, E47, E2-2, and HEB) to form heterodimers that bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The TAL1 heterodimers preferentially recognize a subset of E-box elements (CANNTG) that can be represented by the consensus sequence AACAGATGGT. This consensus is composed of half-sites for recognition by the participating class A bHLH polypeptide (AACAG) and the TAL1 polypeptide (ATGGT). TAL1 heterodimers with DNA-binding activity are readily detected in nuclear extracts of Jurkat, a leukemic cell line derived from a patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hence, TAL1 is likely to bind and regulate the transcription of a unique subset of subordinate target genes, some of which may mediate the malignant function of TAL1 during T-cell leukemogenesis. Images PMID:8289805

  12. Suppression of Chondrogenesis by Id Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Murine Embryonic Orofacial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rezzoug, Francine; Webb, Cynthia L.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of differentiation (Id) proteins are helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors lacking a DNA binding domain. Id proteins modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation in embryonic/fetal tissue. Perturbation of any of these processes in cells of the developing orofacial region results in orofacial anomalies. Chondrogenesis, a process integral to normal orofacial ontogenesis, is known to be modulated, in part, by Id proteins. In the present study, the mRNA and protein expression patterns of Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 were examined in developing murine orofacial tissue in vivo, as well as in murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells in vitro. The functional role of Ids during chondrogenesis was also explored in vitro. Results reveal that cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue: (1) express Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 mRNAs and proteins on each of gestational days 12-14, (2) express all four Id proteins in a developmentally regulated manner, (3) undergo chondrogenesis and express genes encoding various chondrogenic marker proteins (e.g. Runx2, Type X collagen, Sox9) when cultured under micromass conditions, and (4) can have their chondrogenic potential regulated via alteration of Id protein function through overexpression of a basic HLH factor. In summary, results from the current report reveal for the first time, the expression of all four Id proteins in cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue, and demonstrate a functional role for the Ids in regulating the ability of these cells to undergo chondrogenesis. PMID:19349107

  13. An Id-related helix-loop-helix protein encoded by a growth factor-inducible gene.

    PubMed Central

    Christy, B A; Sanders, L K; Lau, L F; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Nathans, D

    1991-01-01

    An mRNA encoding a helix-loop-helix protein that we have named HLH462 is induced in mouse 3T3 cells as part of the immediate early transcriptional response to growth factors and other signaling agents. The RNA is present in a number of mouse tissues and in the developing mouse fetus. The HLH462 gene has been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis to the distal region of mouse chromosome 4. In its helix-loop-helix region HLH462 is closely related to the Id protein and the Drosophila emc protein. Like Id, HLH462 lacks a basic region required for DNA binding, and it inhibits the DNA-binding activities of other helix-loop-helix proteins. On the basis of its structural and functional similarity to Id, we suggest that HLH462 may inhibit the activities of helix-loop-helix transcription factors during the cellular growth response and during development. Images PMID:2000388

  14. The Arabidopsis Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor FamilyW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Huq, Enamul; Quail, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a superfamily of transcription factors that bind as dimers to specific DNA target sites and that have been well characterized in nonplant eukaryotes as important regulatory components in diverse biological processes. Based on evidence that the bHLH protein PIF3 is a direct phytochrome reaction partner in the photoreceptor's signaling network, we have undertaken a comprehensive computational analysis of the Arabidopsis genome sequence databases to define the scope and features of the bHLH family. Using a set of criteria derived from a previously defined consensus motif, we identified 147 bHLH protein–encoding genes, making this one of the largest transcription factor families in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis of the bHLH domain sequences permits classification of these genes into 21 subfamilies. The evolutionary and potential functional relationships implied by this analysis are supported by other criteria, including the chromosomal distribution of these genes relative to duplicated genome segments, the conservation of variant exon/intron structural patterns, and the predicted DNA binding activities within subfamilies. Considerable diversity in DNA binding site specificity among family members is predicted, and marked divergence in protein sequence outside of the conserved bHLH domain is observed. Together with the established propensity of bHLH factors to engage in varying degrees of homodimerization and heterodimerization, these observations suggest that the Arabidopsis bHLH proteins have the potential to participate in an extensive set of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to be involved in the regulation of a multiplicity of transcriptional programs. We provide evidence from yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays that two related phytochrome-interacting members in the Arabidopsis family, PIF3 and PIF4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers and that all three dimeric

  15. A Classification of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Karen A.; Hudson, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of soybean allows an unprecedented opportunity for the discovery of the genes controlling important traits. In particular, the potential functions of regulatory genes are a priority for analysis. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors is known to be involved in controlling a wide range of systems critical for crop adaptation and quality, including photosynthesis, light signalling, pigment biosynthesis, and seed pod development. Using a hidden Markov model search algorithm, 319 genes with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor domains were identified within the soybean genome sequence. These were classified with respect to their predicted DNA binding potential, intron/exon structure, and the phylogeny of the bHLH domain. Evidence is presented that the vast majority (281) of these 319 soybean bHLH genes are expressed at the mRNA level. Of these soybean bHLH genes, 67% were found to exist in two or more homeologous copies. This dataset provides a framework for future studies on bHLH gene function in soybean. The challenge for future research remains to define functions for the bHLH factors encoded in the soybean genome, which may allow greater flexibility for genetic selection of growth and environmental adaptation in this widely grown crop. PMID:25763382

  16. The basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor Mitf is conserved in Drosophila and functions in eye development.

    PubMed Central

    Hallsson, Jón H; Haflidadóttir, Benedikta S; Stivers, Chad; Odenwald, Ward; Arnheiter, Heinz; Pignoni, Francesca; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur

    2004-01-01

    The MITF protein is a member of the MYC family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors and is most closely related to the TFE3, TFEC, and TFEB proteins. In the mouse, MITF is required for the development of several different cell types, including the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye. In Mitf mutant mice, the presumptive RPE cells hyperproliferate, abnormally express the retinal transcriptional regulator Pax6, and form an ectopic neural retina. Here we report the structure of the Mitf gene in Drosophila and demonstrate expression during embryonic development and in the eye-antennal imaginal disc. In vitro, transcriptional regulation by Drosophila Mitf, like its mouse counterpart, is modified by the Eyeless (Drosophila Pax6) transcription factor. In vivo, targeted expression of wild-type or dominant-negative Drosophila Mitf results in developmental abnormalities reminiscent of Mitf function in mouse eye development. Our results suggest that the Mitf gene is the original member of the Mitf-Tfe subfamily of bHLH-Zip proteins and that its developmental function is at least partially conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates. These findings further support the common origin of the vertebrate and invertebrate eyes. PMID:15166150

  17. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DvIVS determines flower color intensity in cyanic dahlia cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sho; Deguchi, Ayumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Doi, Motoaki

    2013-08-01

    The study was aimed to identify the factors that regulate the intensity of flower color in cyanic dahlia (Dahlia variabilis), using fifteen cultivars with different color intensities in their petals. The cultivars were classified into three groups based on their flavonoid composition: ivory white cultivars with flavones; purple and pink cultivars with flavones and anthocyanins; and red cultivars with flavones, anthocyanins, and chalcones. Among the purple, pink, and ivory white cultivars, an inverse relationship was detected between lightness, which was used as an indicator for color intensity and anthocyanin content. A positive correlation was detected between anthocyanin contents and the expression of some structural genes in the anthocyanin synthesis pathway that are regulated by DvIVS, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. A positive correlation between anthocyanin content and expression of DvIVS was also found. The promoter region of DvIVS was classified into three types, with cultivars carrying Type 1 promoter exhibited deep coloring, those carrying Type 2 and/or Type 3 exhibited pale coloring, and those carrying Type 1 and Type 2 and/or Type 3 exhibited medium coloring. The transcripts of the genes from these promoters encoded full-length predicted proteins. These results suggested that the genotype of the promoter region in DvIVS is one of the key factors determining the flower color intensity. PMID:23689377

  18. Characterization of ABF-1, a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor expressed in activated B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Massari, M E; Rivera, R R; Voland, J R; Quong, M W; Breit, T M; van Dongen, J J; de Smit, O; Murre, C

    1998-06-01

    Proteins of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family are required for a number of different developmental pathways, including neurogenesis, lymphopoiesis, myogenesis, and sex determination. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified a new bHLH transcription factor, ABF-1, from a human B-cell cDNA library. Within the bHLH region, ABF-1 shows a remarkable conservation with other HLH proteins, including tal-1, NeuroD, and paraxis. Its expression pattern is restricted to a subset of lymphoid tissues, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines, and activated human B cells. ABF-1 is capable of binding an E-box element either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with E2A. Furthermore, a heterodimeric complex containing ABF-1 and E2A can be detected in EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. ABF-1 contains a transcriptional repression domain and is capable of inhibiting the transactivation capability of E47 in mammalian cells. ABF-1 represents the first example of a B-cell-restricted bHLH protein, and its expression pattern suggests that ABF-1 may play a role in regulating antigen-dependent B-cell differentiation.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Family in Rice and Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxing; Duan, Xuepeng; Jiang, Haixiong; Sun, Yujin; Tang, Yuanping; Yuan, Zheng; Guo, Jingkang; Liang, Wanqi; Chen, Liang; Yin, Jingyuan; Ma, Hong; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors and their homologs form a large family in plant and animal genomes. They are known to play important roles in the specification of tissue types in animals. On the other hand, few plant bHLH proteins have been studied functionally. Recent completion of whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) allows genome-wide analysis and comparison of the bHLH family in flowering plants. We have identified 167 bHLH genes in the rice genome, and their phylogenetic analysis indicates that they form well-supported clades, which are defined as subfamilies. In addition, sequence analysis of potential DNA-binding activity, the sequence motifs outside the bHLH domain, and the conservation of intron/exon structural patterns further support the evolutionary relationships among these proteins. The genome distribution of rice bHLH genes strongly supports the hypothesis that genome-wide and tandem duplication contributed to the expansion of the bHLH gene family, consistent with the birth-and-death theory of gene family evolution. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that rice bHLH proteins can potentially participate in a variety of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to regulate a multitude of transcriptional programs. In addition, similar expression patterns suggest functional conservation between some rice bHLH genes and their close Arabidopsis homologs. PMID:16896230

  20. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is an important process in multicellular organisms. Plant epidermis is a readily-accessible, well-used model for the study of cell fate determination. Our knowledge of cell fate determination is growing steadily due to genetic and molecular analyses of root hairs, trichomes, and stomata, which are derived from the epidermal cells of roots and aerial tissues. Studies have shown that a large number of factors are involved in the establishment of these cell types, especially members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) superfamily, which is an important family of transcription factors. In this mini-review, we focus on the role of bHLH transcription factors in cell fate determination in Arabidopsis. PMID:23073001

  1. A genome-wide identification of basic helix-loop-helix motifs in Pediculus humanus corporis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Zhang, De-Bao; Liu, A-Ke; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins comprise a large superfamily of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of various developmental processes. bHLH family members are widely distributed in various eukaryotes including yeast, fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse, and human. In this study, we identified 55 bHLH motifs encoded in genome sequence of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus corporis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae). Phylogenetic analyses of the identified P. humanus corporis bHLH (PhcbHLH) motifs revealed that there are 23, 11, 9, 1, 10, and 1 member(s) in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Examination to GenBank annotations of the 55 PhcbHLH members indicated that 29 PhcbHLH proteins were annotated in consistence with our analytical result, 8 were annotated different with our analytical result, 12 were merely annotated as hypothetical protein, and the rest 6 were not deposited in GenBank. A comparison on insect bHLH gene composition revealed that human body louse possibly has more hairy and E(spl) genes than other insect species. Because hairy and E(spl) genes have been found to negatively regulate the differentiation of insect preneural cells, it is suggested that the existence of additional hairy and E(spl) genes in human body louse is probably the consequence of its long period adaptation to the relatively dark and stable environment. These data provide good references for further studies on regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of human body louse. PMID:25434030

  2. Macrocyclization and labeling of helix-loop-helix peptide with intramolecular bis-thioether linkage.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Toshio; Kitada, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-11-01

    Conformationally constrained peptides have been developed as an inhibitor for protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and we have de novo designed cyclized helix-loop-helix (cHLH) peptide with a disulfide bond consisting of 40 amino acids to generate molecular-targeting peptides. However, synthesis of long peptides has sometimes resulted in low yield according to the respective amino acid sequences. Here we developed a method for efficient synthesis and labeling for cHLH peptides. First, we synthesized two peptide fragments and connected them by the copper-mediated alkyne and azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Cyclization was performed by bis-thioether linkage using 1,3-dibromomethyl-5-propargyloxybenzene, and subsequently, the cHLH peptide was labeled with an azide-labeled probe. Finally, we designed and synthesized a peptide inhibitor for the p53-HDM2 interaction using a structure-guided design and successfully labeled it with a fluorescent probe or a functional peptide, respectively, by click chemistry. This macrocyclization and labeling method for cHLH peptide would facilitate the discovery of de novo bioactive ligands and therapeutic leads. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 415-421, 2016. PMID:26917088

  3. Origin and Diversification of Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno; Dolan, Liam

    2010-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a class of transcription factors found throughout eukaryotic organisms. Classification of the complete sets of bHLH proteins in the sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (rice) has defined the diversity of these proteins among flowering plants. However, the evolutionary relationships of different plant bHLH groups and the diversity of bHLH proteins in more ancestral groups of plants are currently unknown. In this study, we use whole-genome sequences from nine species of land plants and algae to define the relationships between these proteins in plants. We show that few (less than 5) bHLH proteins are encoded in the genomes of chlorophytes and red algae. In contrast, many bHLH proteins (100–170) are encoded in the genomes of land plants (embryophytes). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that plant bHLH proteins are monophyletic and constitute 26 subfamilies. Twenty of these subfamilies existed in the common ancestors of extant mosses and vascular plants, whereas six further subfamilies evolved among the vascular plants. In addition to the conserved bHLH domains, most subfamilies are characterized by the presence of highly conserved short amino acid motifs. We conclude that much of the diversity of plant bHLH proteins was established in early land plants, over 440 million years ago. PMID:19942615

  4. An exploration of alternative visualisations of the basic helix-loop-helix protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Brian J; Pinney, John W; Lovell, Simon C; Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Robertson, David L

    2007-01-01

    Background Alternative representations of biochemical networks emphasise different aspects of the data and contribute to the understanding of complex biological systems. In this study we present a variety of automated methods for visualisation of a protein-protein interaction network, using the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors as an example. Results Network representations that arrange nodes (proteins) according to either continuous or discrete information are investigated, revealing the existence of protein sub-families and the retention of interactions following gene duplication events. Methods of network visualisation in conjunction with a phylogenetic tree are presented, highlighting the evolutionary relationships between proteins, and clarifying the context of network hubs and interaction clusters. Finally, an optimisation technique is used to create a three-dimensional layout of the phylogenetic tree upon which the protein-protein interactions may be projected. Conclusion We show that by incorporating secondary genomic, functional or phylogenetic information into network visualisation, it is possible to move beyond simple layout algorithms based on network topology towards more biologically meaningful representations. These new visualisations can give structure to complex networks and will greatly help in interpreting their evolutionary origins and functional implications. Three open source software packages (InterView, TVi and OptiMage) implementing our methods are available. PMID:17683601

  5. Gene replacement strategies to test the functional redundancy of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Anthony B; Firulli, Beth A; Wang, Jian; Rogers, Rhonda H; Conway, Simon J

    2010-04-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors control developmental decisions for a wide range of embryonic cell types. Hand1 and Hand2 are closely related bHLH proteins that control cardiac, craniofacial, and limb development. Within the developing heart, Hand1 expression becomes restricted predominantly to the left ventricle, whereas Hand2 becomes restricted predominantly to the left ventricle, for which findings have shown each Hand factor to be necessary for normal chamber formation. Forced overexpression of Hand1 throughout the early developing heart induces abnormal interventricular septal development, with resulting pathogenesis of congenital heart defects. To investigate the potential transcriptional mechanisms involved in heart morphogenesis by Hand2, this study used a replacement targeting approach to knock Hand2 into the Hand1 locus and ectopically express one copy of Hand2 within the endogenous Hand1 expression domain in the developing hearts of transgenic mice. The findings show that high-percentage Hand1 ( Hand2 ) chimeras die at birth and exhibit a range of congenital heart defects. These findings suggest that Hand factors may act via unique transcriptional mechanisms mediated by bHLH factor partner choice, supporting the notion that alterations of Hand factor stoichiometry may be as deleterious to normal heart morphogenesis as Hand factor loss of function.

  6. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a method to calculate the dimerization strength of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Victoria E.; Firulli, Beth A.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2004-01-01

    Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor HAND1, we show that HAND1 is phosphorylated during the trophoblast giant cell differentiation on residues residing in Helix I of the bHLH domain. Our hypothesis is that these modifications result in changes in HAND1 dimerization affinities with other bHLH factors. To test this idea, we employed FRET to measure the protein-protein interactions of HAND1 and HAND1 point mutants in HEK293 cells using YFP and CFP fusion proteins and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  7. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human nescient helix-loop-helix 2 (NHLH2) gene reduce mRNA stability and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Al Rayyan, Numan; Wankhade, Umesh D; Bush, Korie; Good, Deborah J

    2013-01-01

    Nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, which has been implicated, using mouse knockouts, in adult body weight regulation and fertility. A scan of the known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NHLH2 gene revealed one in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), which lies within an AUUUA RNA stability motif. A second SNP is nonsynonymous within the coding region of NHLH2, and was found in a genome-wide association study for obesity. Both of these SNPs were examined for their effect on NLHL2 by creating mouse mimics and examining mRNA stability, and protein function in mouse hypothalamic cell lines. The 3'UTR SNP causes increased instability and, when the SNP-containing Nhlh2 3'UTR is attached to luciferase mRNA, reduced protein levels in cells. The nonsynonymous SNP at position 83 in the protein changes an alanine residue, conserved in NHLH2 orthologs through the Drosophila sp. to a proline residue. This change affects migration of the protein on an SDS-PAGE gel, and appears to alter secondary structure of the protein, as predicted using in silico methods. These results provide functional information on two rare human SNPs in the NHLH2 gene. One of these has been linked to human obese phenotypes, while the other is present in a relatively high proportion of individuals. Given their effects on NHLH2 protein levels, both SNPs deserve further analysis in whether they are causative and/or additive for human body weight and fertility phenotypes.

  8. A novel target recognition revealed by calmodulin in complex with the basic helix--loop--helix transcription factor SEF2-1/E2-2.

    PubMed

    Larsson, G; Schleucher, J; Onions, J; Hermann, S; Grundström, T; Wijmenga, S S

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin is the predominant intracellular receptor for Ca(2+) signals, mediating the regulation of numerous cellular processes. It can inhibit the DNA binding of basic helix--loop--helix transcription factors by a direct interaction of a novel type. To structurally characterize this novel calmodulin-target interaction, we decided to study the complex of calmodulin with a dimeric peptide corresponding to the DNA-binding domains of the dimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SEF2-1 (SEF2-1mp) using NMR. Here, we report that the stoichiometry of the calmodulin:SEF2-1mp complex is one dimeric peptide binding two calmodulin molecules. We also report the 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments and the secondary structure of calmodulin in this for NMR large (approximately 38 kD) complex, as well as the 1H assignments and secondary structure of SEF2-1mp. In addition, we determined the amide proton exchange rates of calmodulin and measured intermolecular calmodulin:SEF2-1mp and calmodulin:calmodulin NOE contacts. The isotope-filtered experiments show a large number of SEF2-1mp to calmodulin NOE contacts indicating that a tight complex is formed, which is confirmed by an intermolecular calmodulin:calmodulin NOE contact. The secondary structure and amide proton exchange data show that the binding does not occur via the classical wraparound binding mode. Instead, the data indicate that calmodulin interacts with SEF2-1mp in a more open conformation, although the hydrophobic surfaces of the N- and C-terminal domains still form the main interaction sites. Interactions involving charged residues are also identified in agreement with the known relatively high sensitivity of the binding to ionic strength. Finally, the peptide does not form an alpha-helix as in the classical wraparound binding mode. PMID:11266605

  9. The Rice Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor TDR INTERACTING PROTEIN2 Is a Central Switch in Early Anther Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenzhen; Yu, Jing; Cheng, Xiaowei; Zong, Xu; Xu, Jie; Chen, Mingjiao; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2014-04-22

    In male reproductive development in plants, meristemoid precursor cells possessing transient, stem cell-like features undergo cell divisions and differentiation to produce the anther, the male reproductive organ. The anther contains centrally positioned microsporocytes surrounded by four distinct layers of wall: the epidermis, endothecium, middle layer, and tapetum. Here, we report that the rice (Oryza sativa) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein TDR INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (TIP2) functions as a crucial switch in the meristemoid transition and differentiation during early anther development. The tip2 mutants display undifferentiated inner three anther wall layers and abort tapetal programmed cell death, causing complete male sterility. TIP2 has two paralogs in rice, TDR and EAT1, which are key regulators of tapetal programmed cell death. We revealed that TIP2 acts upstream of TDR and EAT1 and directly regulates the expression of TDR and EAT1. In addition, TIP2 can interact with TDR, indicating a role of TIP2 in later anther development. Our findings suggest that the bHLH proteins TIP2, TDR, and EAT1 play a central role in regulating differentiation, morphogenesis, and degradation of anther somatic cell layers, highlighting the role of paralogous bHLH proteins in regulating distinct steps of plant cell-type determination.

  10. The Rice Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor TDR INTERACTING PROTEIN2 Is a Central Switch in Early Anther Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhenzhen; Yu, Jing; Cheng, Xiaowei; Zong, Xu; Xu, Jie; Chen, Mingjiao; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2014-01-01

    In male reproductive development in plants, meristemoid precursor cells possessing transient, stem cell–like features undergo cell divisions and differentiation to produce the anther, the male reproductive organ. The anther contains centrally positioned microsporocytes surrounded by four distinct layers of wall: the epidermis, endothecium, middle layer, and tapetum. Here, we report that the rice (Oryza sativa) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein TDR INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (TIP2) functions as a crucial switch in the meristemoid transition and differentiation during early anther development. The tip2 mutants display undifferentiated inner three anther wall layers and abort tapetal programmed cell death, causing complete male sterility. TIP2 has two paralogs in rice, TDR and EAT1, which are key regulators of tapetal programmed cell death. We revealed that TIP2 acts upstream of TDR and EAT1 and directly regulates the expression of TDR and EAT1. In addition, TIP2 can interact with TDR, indicating a role of TIP2 in later anther development. Our findings suggest that the bHLH proteins TIP2, TDR, and EAT1 play a central role in regulating differentiation, morphogenesis, and degradation of anther somatic cell layers, highlighting the role of paralogous bHLH proteins in regulating distinct steps of plant cell–type determination. PMID:24755456

  11. Transcriptome-wide analysis of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in Isatis indigotica and their methyl jasmonate responsive expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Junfeng; Li, Qing; Chen, Wansheng

    2016-01-15

    Jasmonates (JAs) act as conserved elicitors of plant secondary metabolism. JAs perception triggers extensive transcriptional reprogramming leading to activation of the entire metabolic pathways. The family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) has essential roles in JA signaling; however, little is known about their roles in regulation of secondary metabolites in Isatis indigotica. In this study, we identified 78 putative IibHLH sequences using the annotation of I. indigotica transcriptome. The identified proteins were characterized based on phylogenetic and conserved motif analyses. Using RNA sequencing, 16 IibHLHs showed significant positive response to MeJA (methyl jasmonate) at 1h, indicating their roles as early signaling events of JA-mediated transcriptional reprogramming. Ten IibHLHs presented co-expression pattern with biosynthetic pathway genes, suggesting their regulating role in secondary metabolite synthesis. These gene expression profiling data indicate that bHLHs can be used as candidate genes in molecular breeding programs to improve metabolite production in I. indigotica.

  12. Expression of the helix-loop-helix protein inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID-1) is activated by all-trans retinoic acid in normal human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, C.M.; White, L.A. . E-mail: lawhite@aesop.rutgers.edu

    2006-08-01

    The ID (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding) helix-loop-helix proteins are important mediators of cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types through regulation of gene expression. Overexpression of the ID proteins in normal human keratinocytes results in extension of culture lifespan, indicating that these proteins are important for epidermal differentiation. Our hypothesis is that the ID proteins are targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway in keratinocytes. Retinoids, vitamin A analogues, are powerful regulators of cell growth and differentiation and are widely used in the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancers in humans. Furthermore, retinoic acid is necessary for the maintenance of epithelial differentiation and demonstrates an inhibitory action on skin carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of all-trans retinoic acid on expression of ID-1, -2, -3, and -4 in normal human keratinocytes and found that exposure of these cells to all-trans retinoic acid causes an increase in both ID-1 and ID-3 gene expression. Furthermore, our data show that this increase is mediated by increased transcription involving several cis-acting elements in the distal portion of the promoter, including a CREB-binding site, an Egr1 element, and an YY1 site. These data demonstrate that the ID proteins are direct targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. Given the importance of the ID proteins to epidermal differentiation, these results suggest that IDs may be mediating some of the effects of all-trans retinoic acid in normal human keratinocytes.

  13. Molecular cloning of ID4, a novel dominant negative helix-loop-helix human gene on chromosome 6p21.3-p22

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliuca, A.; Bartoli, P.C.; Saccone, S.

    1995-05-01

    Transcription factors containing a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif regulate the expression of tissue-specific genes in a number of mammalian and insect systems. DNA-binding activity of the bHLH proteins is dependent upon formation of homo- and/or heterodimers. Dominant negative HLH proteins (Id-related genes) also contain the HLH-dimerization domain but lack the DNA-binding basic domain. Consequently, Id proteins inhibit binding to DNA and transcriptional transactivation by heterodimerization with bHLH proteins. The authors report here the cDNA sequence of a novel human HLH gene (HGMW-approved symbol ID4) that lacks the basic domain. ID4 is differentially expressed in adult organs in four mRNA molecules, which are presumably a result of differential splicing and/or alternative usage of the polyadenylation sites. Transfection experiments indicated that enforced expression of Id-4H protein inhibits the trans-activation of the muscle creatine kinase E-box enhancer by MyoD. Finally, the authors localized the ID4 gene to the chromosome 6p21-p22 region. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Targeted disruption of NeuroD, a proneural basic helix-loop-helix factor, impairs distal lung formation and neuroendocrine morphology in the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Neptune, Enid R; Podowski, Megan; Calvi, Carla; Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Garcia, Joe G N; Tuder, Rubin; Linnoila, R Ilona; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Dietz, Harry C

    2008-07-25

    Despite the importance of airspace integrity in vertebrate gas exchange, the molecular pathways that instruct distal lung formation are poorly understood. Recently, we found that fibrillin-1 deficiency in mice impairs alveolar formation and recapitulates the pulmonary features of human Marfan syndrome. To further elucidate effectors involved in distal lung formation, we performed expression profiling analysis comparing the fibrillin-1-deficient and wild-type developing lung. NeuroD, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, fulfilled the expression criteria for a candidate mediator of distal lung development. We investigated its role in murine lung development using genetically targeted NeuroD-deficient mice. We found that NeuroD deficiency results in both impaired alveolar septation and altered morphology of the pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. NeuroD-deficient mice had enlarged alveoli associated with reduced epithelial proliferation in the airway and airspace compartments during development. Additionally, the neuroendocrine compartment in these mice manifested an increased number of neuroepithelial bodies but a reduced number of solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in the neonatal lung. Overexpression of NeuroD in a murine lung epithelial cell line conferred a neuroendocrine phenotype characterized by the induction of neuroendocrine markers as well as increased proliferation. These results support an unanticipated role for NeuroD in the regulation of pulmonary neuroendocrine and alveolar morphogenesis and suggest an intimate connection between the neuroendocrine compartment and distal lung development.

  15. The p48 DNA-binding subunit of transcription factor PTF1 is a new exocrine pancreas-specific basic helix-loop-helix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Krapp, A; Knöfler, M; Frutiger, S; Hughes, G J; Hagenbüchle, O; Wellauer, P K

    1996-01-01

    We report the isolation of cDNA for the p48 DNA-binding subunit of the heterooligomeric transcription factor PTF1. A sequence analysis of the cDNA demonstrates that p48 is a new member of the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. The p48 bHLH domain shows striking amino acid sequence similarity with the bHLH domain of proteins that act as developmental regulators, including the twist gene product, myogenic factors and proteins involved in hematopoietic differentiation. We show that reduced p48 synthesis correlates with a diminished expression of genes encoding exocrine pancreas-specific functions. The synthesis of p48 mRNAs, and therefore also the protein, is restricted to cells of the exocrine pancreas in the adult and to the pancreatic primordium in the embryo. Thus the pancreas-specific DNA-binding activity of PTF1 originates from the synthesis of at least one cell-specific component rather than from a cell-specific assembly of more widely distributed proteins. Images PMID:8861960

  16. Expression of a chimeric helix-loop-helix gene, Id-SCL, in K562 human leukemic cells is associated with nuclear segmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, A. N.; Wolf, M. L.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have designed a chimeric gene, Id-SCL, in which the 3' helix-loop-helix encoding portion of the presumptive oncogene SCL/tal is joined to the 5' coding portion of Id, an inhibitory helix-loop-helix gene. The predicted protein product of this chimeric gene contains the helix-loop-helix dimerization domain of SCL/tal, but, lacking a basic DNA binding domain, is predicted to have the inhibitory function of the Id product. Expression of the Id-SCL fusion gene in stably transfected K562 cells reproducibly resulted in nuclear segmentation and depressed growth rates; both of these phenotypic effects demonstrated a dosage dependence on the levels of Id-SCL mRNA and protein expressed in the various clones. Electron microscopy of cells expressing high levels of Id-SCL mRNA showed a significant increase in cytoplasmic perinuclear thin filaments and diminution of marginal heterochromatin in the nuclei. No other changes in hematopoietic differentiation status were observed in association with Id-SCL expression. Expression of intact Id and SCL/tal genes, as well as deletion mutants of Id and SCL/tal, independently transfected into K562 cells, indicated that the nuclear segmentation effect is dependent on the presence of a protein possessing a helix-loop-helix domain but lacking a basic domain. Our studies suggest that the balance of transcriptional inhibitory and stimulatory helix-loop-helix proteins in cells may be important determinants of proliferation and of structural organization within cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:1443047

  17. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 - Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seol Ah; Choi, Young-Im; Cho, Jin-Seong; Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems.

  18. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seol Ah Choi, Young-Im Cho, Jin-Seong Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  19. Human Hand1 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein: extra-embryonic expression pattern, interaction partners and identification of its transcriptional repressor domains.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, Martin; Meinhardt, Gudrun; Bauer, Sandra; Loregger, Thomas; Vasicek, Richard; Bloor, Debra J; Kimber, Susan J; Husslein, Peter

    2002-02-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, Hand1, plays an important role in the development of the murine extra-embryonic trophoblast cell lineage. In the present study, we have analysed the expression of Hand1 in human extra-embryonic cell types and determined its binding specificity and transcriptional activity upon interaction with different class A bHLH factors. Northern blotting and in situ hybridization showed that Hand1 mRNA is specifically expressed in amnion cells at different stages of gestation. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the protein is exclusively produced in the amniotic epithelium in vivo and in purified amnion cells in vitro using a novel polyclonal Hand1 antiserum. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunohistochemical staining of blastocysts revealed the production of Hand1 mRNA and polypeptide in the trophectodermal cell layer. In the presence of E12/E47, Hand1 stimulated the transcription of luciferase reporters harbouring degenerate E-boxes, suggesting that E-proteins are potential dimerization partners in trophoblastic tumour and amnion cells. In contrast, Hand1 diminished E12/E47-dependent transcription of reporters containing perfect E-boxes by inhibiting the interaction of Hand1/E-protein heterodimers with the palindromic cognate sequence. Furthermore, we show that Hand1 down-regulated GAL-E12-dependent reporter expression, indicating that the protein can also act directly as a transcriptional repressor. Mutational analyses of GAL-Hand1 suggested that two protein regions located within its N-terminal portion mainly confer the repressing activity. In conclusion, human Hand1 may play an important role in the differentiation of the amniotic membrane and the pre-implanting trophoblast. Furthermore, the data suggest that Hand1 can act as a repressor by two independent mechanisms; sequestration of class A bHLH factors from E-boxes and inhibition of their transcriptional activity.

  20. Genome-wide identification and analysis of basic helix-loop-helix domains in dog, Canis lupus familiaris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Liu, A-Ke; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain is a highly conserved amino acid motif that defines a group of DNA-binding transcription factors. bHLH proteins play essential regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes in animal, plant, and fungus. The domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, is a good model organism for genetic, physiological, and behavioral studies. In this study, we identified 115 putative bHLH genes in the dog genome. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, 51, 26, 14, 4, 12, and 4 dog bHLH genes were assigned to six separate groups (A-F); four bHLH genes were categorized as ''orphans''. Within-group evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis were consistent with positional conservation, other conserved domains flanking the bHLH motif, and highly conserved intron/exon patterns in other vertebrates. Our analytical results confirmed the GenBank annotations of 89 dog bHLH proteins and provided information that could be used to update the annotations of the remaining 26 dog bHLH proteins. These data will provide good references for further studies on the structures and regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of dogs, which may help in understanding the mechanisms that underlie the physical and behavioral differences between dogs and wolves. PMID:25403511

  1. A novel basic helix-loop-helix protein is expressed in muscle attachment sites of the Drosophila epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Armand, P; Knapp, A C; Hirsch, A J; Wieschaus, E F; Cole, M D

    1994-01-01

    We have found that a novel basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein is expressed almost exclusively in the epidermal attachments sites for the somatic muscles of Drosophila melanogaster. A Drosophila cDNA library was screened with radioactively labeled E12 protein, which can dimerize with many HLH proteins. One clone that emerged from this screen encoded a previously unknown protein of 360 amino acids, named delilah, that contains both basic and HLH domains, similar to a group of cellular transcription factors implicated in cell type determination. Delilah protein formed heterodimers with E12 that bind to the muscle creatine kinase promoter. In situ hybridization with the delilah cDNA localized the expression of the gene to a subset of cells in the epidermis which form a distinct pattern involving both the segmental boundaries and intrasegmental clusters. This pattern was coincident with the known sites of attachment of the somatic muscles to tendon cells in the epidermis. delilah expression persists in snail mutant embryos which lack mesoderm, indicating that expression of the gene was not induced by attachment of the underlying muscles. The similarity of this gene to other bHLH genes suggests that it plays an important role in the differentiation of epidermal cells into muscle attachment sites. Images PMID:8196652

  2. Genome-wide identification and analysis of basic helix-loop-helix domains in dog, Canis lupus familiaris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Liu, A-Ke; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain is a highly conserved amino acid motif that defines a group of DNA-binding transcription factors. bHLH proteins play essential regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes in animal, plant, and fungus. The domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, is a good model organism for genetic, physiological, and behavioral studies. In this study, we identified 115 putative bHLH genes in the dog genome. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, 51, 26, 14, 4, 12, and 4 dog bHLH genes were assigned to six separate groups (A-F); four bHLH genes were categorized as ''orphans''. Within-group evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis were consistent with positional conservation, other conserved domains flanking the bHLH motif, and highly conserved intron/exon patterns in other vertebrates. Our analytical results confirmed the GenBank annotations of 89 dog bHLH proteins and provided information that could be used to update the annotations of the remaining 26 dog bHLH proteins. These data will provide good references for further studies on the structures and regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of dogs, which may help in understanding the mechanisms that underlie the physical and behavioral differences between dogs and wolves.

  3. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 [RHD6], RHD6-LIKE1 [RSL1], RSL2, Lj-RHL1-LIKE1 [LRL1], and LRL2) as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and posttranslational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven GFP fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  4. ZmZHOUPI, an endosperm-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in maize seed development.

    PubMed

    Grimault, Aurélie; Gendrot, Ghislaine; Chamot, Sophy; Widiez, Thomas; Rabillé, Hervé; Gérentes, Marie-France; Creff, Audrey; Thévenin, Johanne; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Ingram, Gwyneth C; Rogowsky, Peter M; Depège-Fargeix, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    In angiosperm seeds the embryo is embedded within the endosperm, which is in turn enveloped by the seed coat, making inter-compartmental communication essential for coordinated seed growth. In this context the basic helix-loop-helix domain transcription factor AtZHOUPI (AtZOU) fulfils a key role in both the lysis of the transient endosperm and in embryo cuticle formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. In maize (Zea mays), a cereal with a persistent endosperm, a single gene, ZmZOU, falls into the same phylogenetic clade as AtZOU. Its expression is limited to the endosperm where it peaks during the filling stage. In ZmZOU-RNA interference knock-down lines embryo size is slightly reduced and the embryonic suspensor and the adjacent embryo surrounding region show retarded breakdown. Ectopic expression of ZmZOU reduces stomatal number, possibly due to inappropriate protein interactions. ZmZOU forms functional heterodimers with AtICE/AtSCREAM and the closely related maize proteins ZmICEb and ZmICEc, but its interaction is more efficient with the ZmICEa protein, which shows sequence divergence and only has close homologues in other monocotyledonous species. Consistent with the observation that these complexes can trans-activate target gene promoters from Arabidopsis, ZmZOU partially complements the Atzou-4 mutant. However, structural, trans-activation and gene expression data support the hypothesis that ZmZOU and ZmICEa may have coevolved to form a functional complex unique to monocot seeds. This divergence may explain the reduced functionality of ZmZOU in Arabidopsis, and reflect functional specificities which are unique to the monocotyledon lineage. PMID:26361885

  5. OsbHLH148, a basic helix-loop-helix protein, interacts with OsJAZ proteins in a jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ju-Seok; Joo, Joungsu; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Nahm, Baek Hie; Song, Sang Ik; Cheong, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong Seob; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Yang Do

    2011-03-01

    Jasmonates play important roles in development, stress responses and defense in plants. Here, we report the results of a study using a functional genomics approach that identified a rice basic helix-loop-helix domain gene, OsbHLH148, that conferred drought tolerance as a component of the jasmonate signaling module in rice. OsbHLH148 transcript levels were rapidly increased by treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or abscisic acid, and abiotic stresses including dehydration, high salinity, low temperature and wounding. Transgenic over-expression of OsbHLH148 in rice confers plant tolerance to drought stress. Expression profiling followed by DNA microarray and RNA gel-blot analyses of transgenic versus wild-type rice identified genes that are up-regulated by OsbHLH148 over-expression. These include OsDREB and OsJAZ genes that are involved in stress responses and the jasmonate signaling pathway, respectively. OsJAZ1, a rice ZIM domain protein, interacted with OsbHLH148 in yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, but it interacted with the putative OsCOI1 only in the presence of coronatine. Furthermore, the OsJAZ1 protein was degraded by rice and Arabidopsis extracts in the presence of coronatine, and its degradation was inhibited by MG132, a 26S proteasome inhibitor, suggesting 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of OsJAZ1 via the SCF(OsCOI1) complex. The transcription level of OsJAZ1 increased upon exposure of rice to MeJA. These results show that OsJAZ1 could act as a transcriptional regulator of the OsbHLH148-related jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance. Thus, our study suggests that OsbHLH148 acts on an initial response of jasmonate-regulated gene expression toward drought tolerance, constituting the OsbHLH148-OsJAZ-OsCOI1 signaling module in rice.

  6. A Novel Molecular Recognition Motif Necessary for Targeting Photoactivated Phytochrome Signaling to Specific Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription FactorsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rajnish; Huq, Enamul; Kikis, Elise A.; Al-Sady, Bassem; Lanzatella, Christina; Quail, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA to phyE) in Arabidopsis thaliana control plant developmental transitions in response to informational light signals throughout the life cycle. The photoactivated conformer of the photoreceptor Pfr has been shown to translocate into the nucleus where it induces changes in gene expression by an unknown mechanism. Here, we have identified two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, designated PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR5 (PIF5) and PIF6, which interact specifically with the Pfr form of phyB. These two factors cluster tightly with PIF3 and two other phy-interacting bHLH proteins in a phylogenetic subfamily within the large Arabidopsis bHLH (AtbHLH) family. We have identified a novel sequence motif (designated the active phytochrome binding [APB] motif) that is conserved in these phy-interacting AtbHLHs but not in other noninteractors. Using the isolated domain and site-directed mutagenesis, we have shown that this motif is both necessary and sufficient for binding to phyB. Transgenic expression of the native APB-containing AtbHLH protein, PIF4, in a pif4 null mutant, rescued the photoresponse defect in this mutant, whereas mutated PIF4 constructs with site-directed substitutions in conserved APB residues did not. These data indicate that the APB motif is necessary for PIF4 function in light-regulated seedling development and suggest that conformer-specific binding of phyB to PIF4 via the APB motif is necessary for this function in vivo. Binding assays with the isolated APB domain detected interaction with phyB, but none of the other four Arabidopsis phys. Collectively, the data suggest that the APB domain provides a phyB-specific recognition module within the AtbHLH family, thereby conferring photoreceptor target specificity on a subset of these transcription factors and, thus, the potential for selective signal channeling to segments of the transcriptional network. PMID:15486100

  7. Heterogeneity of myotubes generated by the MyoD and E12 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in otherwise non-differentiation growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Grubišić, Vladimir; Gottipati, Manoj K; Stout, Randy F; Grammer, J Robert; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    We used a synthetic biology approach to produce myotubes from mammalian C2C12 myoblasts in non-differentiation growth conditions using the expression of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, MyoD and E12, in various combinations and configurations. Our approach not only recapitulated the basics of muscle development and physiology, as the obtained myotubes showed qualities similar to those seen in striated muscle fibers in vivo, but also allowed for the synthesis of populations of myotubes which assumed distinct morphology, myofibrillar development and Ca(2+) dynamics. This fashioned class of biomaterials is suitable for the building blocks of soft actuators in micro-scale biomimetic robotics. This production line strategy can be embraced in reparative medicine as synthetic human myotubes with predetermined morphological/functional properties could be obtained using this very approach. This methodology can be adopted beyond striated muscle for the engineering of other tissue components/cells whose differentiation is governed by the principles of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, as in the case, for example, of neural or immune cell types.

  8. The Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor MYC2 Directly Represses PLETHORA Expression during Jasmonate-Mediated Modulation of the Root Stem Cell Niche in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Sun, Jiaqiang; Zhai, Qingzhe; Zhou, Wenkun; Qi, Linlin; Xu, Li; Wang, Bao; Chen, Rong; Jiang, Hongling; Qi, Jing; Li, Xugang; Palme, Klaus; Li, Chuanyou

    2011-01-01

    The root stem cell niche, which in the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem is an area of four mitotically inactive quiescent cells (QCs) and the surrounding mitotically active stem cells, is critical for root development and growth. We report here that during jasmonate-induced inhibition of primary root growth, jasmonate reduces root meristem activity and leads to irregular QC division and columella stem cell differentiation. Consistently, jasmonate reduces the expression levels of the AP2-domain transcription factors PLETHORA1 (PLT1) and PLT2, which form a developmentally instructive protein gradient and mediate auxin-induced regulation of stem cell niche maintenance. Not surprisingly, the effects of jasmonate on root stem cell niche maintenance and PLT expression require the functioning of MYC2/JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that involves versatile aspects of jasmonate-regulated gene expression. Gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that MYC2 directly binds the promoters of PLT1 and PLT2 and represses their expression. We propose that MYC2-mediated repression of PLT expression integrates jasmonate action into the auxin pathway in regulating root meristem activity and stem cell niche maintenance. This study illustrates a molecular framework for jasmonate-induced inhibition of root growth through interaction with the growth regulator auxin. PMID:21954460

  9. The basic helix-loop-helix region of the transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 is preorganized to bind DNA.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Matija; Wienk, Hans; Coglievina, Maristella; Boelens, Rolf; Pongor, Sándor; Pintar, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1, one of the main downstream effectors in Notch signaling, is a transcriptional repressor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. Using nuclear magnetic resonance methods, we have determined the structure and dynamics of a recombinant protein, H1H, which includes an N-terminal segment, b1, containing functionally important phosphorylation sites, the basic region b2, required for binding to DNA, and the HLH domain. We show that a proline residue in the sequence divides the protein in two parts, a flexible and disordered N-terminal region including b1 and a structured, mainly helical region comprising b2 and the HLH domain. Binding of H1H to a double strand DNA oligonucleotide was monitored through the chemical shift perturbation of backbone amide resonances, and showed that the interaction surface involves not only the b2 segment but also several residues in the b1 and HLH regions.

  10. Novel basic-region helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AnBH1) of Aspergillus nidulans counteracts the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF in the promoter of a penicillin biosynthesis gene.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Maria Louise; Litzka, Olivier; Martic, Goran; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Brakhage, Axel A

    2002-10-25

    Cis-acting CCAAT elements are found frequently in eukaryotic promoter regions. Many of the genes containing such elements in their promoters are regulated by a conserved multimeric CCAAT-binding complex. In the fungus Emericella (Aspergillus) nidulans, this complex was designated AnCF (A.nidulans CCAAT-binding factor). AnCF regulates several genes, including the penicillin biosynthesis genes ipnA and aatA. Since it is estimated that the CCAAT-binding complex regulates more than 200 genes, an important question concerns the regulation mechanism that allows so many genes to be regulated by a single complex in a gene-specific manner. One of the answers to this question appears to lie in the interaction of AnCF with other transcription factors. Here, a novel transcription factor designated AnBH1 was isolated. The corresponding anbH1 gene was cloned and found to be located on chromosome IV. The deduced AnBH1 protein belongs to the family of basic-region helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. AnBH1 binds in vitro as a homodimer to an, not previously described, asymmetric E-box within the aatA promoter that overlaps with the AnCF-binding site. This is the first report demonstrating that the CCAAT-binding complex and a bHLH transcription factor bind to overlapping sites. Since deletion of anbH1 appears to be lethal, the anbH1 gene was replaced by a regulatable alcAp-anbH1 gene fusion. The analysis of aatAp-lacZ expression in such a strain indicated that AnBH1 acts as a repressor of aatA gene expression and therefore counteracts the positive action of AnCF.

  11. A Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor, PtrbHLH, of Poncirus trifoliata Confers Cold Tolerance and Modulates Peroxidase-Mediated Scavenging of Hydrogen Peroxide1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-San; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are involved in a variety of physiological processes. However, plant bHLHs functioning in cold tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of PtrbHLH isolated from trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata). The transcript levels of PtrbHLH were up-regulated under various abiotic stresses, particularly cold. PtrbHLH was localized in the nucleus with transactivation activity. Overexpression of PtrbHLH in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) or lemon (Citrus limon) conferred enhanced tolerance to cold under chilling or freezing temperatures, whereas down-regulation of PtrbHLH in trifoliate orange by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in elevated cold sensitivity. A range of stress-responsive genes was up-regulated or down-regulated in the transgenic lemon. Of special note, several peroxidase (POD) genes were induced after cold treatment. Compared with the wild type, POD activity was increased in the overexpression plants but decreased in the RNAi plants, which was inversely correlated with the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels in the tested lines. Treatment of the transgenic tobacco plants with POD inhibitors elevated the H2O2 levels and greatly compromised their cold tolerance, while exogenous replenishment of POD enhanced cold tolerance of the RNAi line. In addition, transgenic tobacco and lemon plants were more tolerant to oxidative stresses. Yeast one-hybrid assay and transient expression analysis demonstrated that PtrbHLH could bind to the E-box elements in the promoter region of a POD gene. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrbHLH plays an important role in cold tolerance, at least in part, by positively regulating POD-mediated reactive oxygen species removal. PMID:23624854

  12. Dynamic antagonism between phytochromes and PIF family basic helix-loop-helix factors induces selective reciprocal responses to light and shade in a rapidly responsive transcriptional network in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Leivar, Pablo; Tepperman, James M; Cohn, Megan M; Monte, Elena; Al-Sady, Bassem; Erickson, Erika; Quail, Peter H

    2012-04-01

    Plants respond to shade-modulated light signals via phytochrome (phy)-induced adaptive changes, termed shade avoidance. To examine the roles of Phytochrome-Interacting basic helix-loop-helix Factors, PIF1, 3, 4, and 5, in relaying such signals to the transcriptional network, we compared the shade-responsive transcriptome profiles of wild-type and quadruple pif (pifq) mutants. We identify a subset of genes, enriched in transcription factor-encoding loci, that respond rapidly to shade, in a PIF-dependent manner, and contain promoter G-box motifs, known to bind PIFs. These genes are potential direct targets of phy-PIF signaling that regulate the primary downstream transcriptional circuitry. A second subset of PIF-dependent, early response genes, lacking G-box motifs, are enriched for auxin-responsive loci, and are thus potentially indirect targets of phy-PIF signaling, mediating the rapid cell expansion induced by shade. Comparing deetiolation- and shade-responsive transcriptomes identifies another subset of G-box-containing genes that reciprocally display rapid repression and induction in response to light and shade signals. These data define a core set of transcriptional and hormonal processes that appear to be dynamically poised to react rapidly to light-environment changes via perturbations in the mutually antagonistic actions of the phys and PIFs. Comparing the responsiveness of the pifq and triple pif mutants to light and shade confirms that the PIFs act with overlapping redundancy on seedling morphogenesis and transcriptional regulation but that each PIF contributes differentially to these responses.

  13. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  14. A single amino acid substitution in IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor AtMYC1 leads to trichome and root hair patterning defects by abolishing its interaction with partner proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Dandan; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-04-20

    Plant trichomes and root hairs are powerful models for the study of cell fate determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, trichome and root hair initiation requires a combination of three groups of proteins, including the WD40 repeat protein transparent TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), R2R3 repeat MYB protein GLABRA1 (GL1), or werewolf (WER) and the IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein GLABRA3 (GL3) or enhancer of GLABRA3 (EGL3). The bHLH component acts as a docking site for TTG1 and MYB proteins. Here, we isolated a mutant showing defects in trichome and root hair patterning that carried a point mutation (R173H) in AtMYC1 that encodes the fourth member of IIIf bHLH family protein. Genetic analysis revealed partial redundant yet distinct function between AtMYC1 and GL3/EGL3. GLABRA2 (GL2), an important transcription factor involved in trichome and root hair control, was down-regulated in Atmyc1 plants, suggesting the requirement of AtMYC1 for appropriate GL2 transcription. Like its homologs, AtMYC1 formed a complex with TTG1 and MYB proteins but did not dimerized. In addition, the interaction of AtMYC1 with MYB proteins and TTG1 was abrogated by the R173H substitution in Atmyc1-1. We found that this amino acid (Arg) is conserved in the AtMYC1 homologs GL3/EGL3 and that it is essential for their interaction with MYB proteins and for their proper functions. Our findings indicate that AtMYC1 is an important regulator of trichome and root hair initiation, and they reveal a novel amino acid necessary for protein-protein interactions and gene function in IIIf subfamily bHLH transcription factors.

  15. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) acts as an inhibitor of ID-1, -2 and -3 and promotes basic helix loop helix (bHLH) E47 DNA binding and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Chinaranagari, Swathi; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-05-01

    The four known ID proteins (ID1-4, Inhibitor of Differentiation) share a homologous helix loop helix (HLH) domain and act as dominant negative regulators of basic-HLH transcription factors. ID proteins also interact with many non-bHLH proteins in complex networks. The expression of ID proteins is increasingly observed in many cancers. Whereas ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3, are generally considered as tumor promoters, ID4 on the contrary has emerged as a tumor suppressor. In this study we demonstrate that ID4 heterodimerizes with ID-1, -2 and -3 and promote bHLH DNA binding, essentially acting as an inhibitor of inhibitors of differentiation proteins. Interaction of ID4 was observed with ID1, ID2 and ID3 that was dependent on intact HLH domain of ID4. Interaction with bHLH protein E47 required almost 3 fold higher concentration of ID4 as compared to ID1. Furthermore, inhibition of E47 DNA binding by ID1 was restored by ID4 in an EMSA binding assay. ID4 and ID1 were also colocalized in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. The alpha helix forming alanine stretch N-terminal, unique to HLH ID4 domain was required for optimum interaction. Ectopic expression of ID4 in DU145 prostate cancer line promoted E47 dependent expression of CDKNI p21. Thus counteracting the biological activities of ID-1, -2 and -3 by forming inactive heterodimers appears to be a novel mechanism of action of ID4. These results could have far reaching consequences in developing strategies to target ID proteins for cancer therapy and understanding biologically relevant ID-interactions.

  16. Inhibitor of Differentiation 4 (ID4) Acts as an Inhibitor of ID-1, -2 and -3 and Promotes basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH) E47 DNA Binding and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pankaj; Chinaranagari, Swathi; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    The four known ID proteins (ID1-4, Inhibitor of Differentiation) share a homologous helix loop helix (HLH) domain and act as dominant negative regulators of basic-HLH transcription factors. ID proteins also interact with many non-bHLH proteins in complex networks. The expression of ID proteins is increasingly observed in many cancers. Whereas ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3, are generally considered as tumor promoters, ID4 on the contrary has emerged as a tumor suppressor. In this study we demonstrate that ID4 heterodimerizes with ID-1, -2 and -3 and promote bHLH DNA binding, essentially acting as an inhibitor of inhibitors of differentiation proteins. Interaction of ID4 was observed with ID1, ID2 and ID3 that was dependent on intact HLH domain of ID4. Interaction with bHLH protein E47 required almost 3 fold higher concentration of ID4 as compared to ID1. Furthermore, inhibition of E47 DNA binding by ID1 was restored by ID4 in an EMSA binding assay. ID4 and ID1 were also colocalized in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. The alpha helix forming alanine stretch N-terminal, unique to HLH ID4 domain was required for optimum interaction. Ectopic expression of ID4 in DU145 prostate cancer line promoted E47 dependent expression of CDKNI p21. Thus counteracting the biological activities of ID-1, -2 and -3 by forming inactive heterodimers appears to be a novel mechanism of action of ID4. These results could have far reaching consequences in developing strategies to target ID proteins for cancer therapy and understanding biologically relevant ID- interactions. PMID:25778840

  17. Effects of postweaning administration of conjugated linoleic acid on development of obesity in nescient basic helix-loop-helix 2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Good, Deborah J; Park, Yeonhwa

    2015-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been reported to prevent body weight gain and fat accumulation in part by improving physical activity in mice. However, the effects of postweaning administration of CLA on the development of obesity later in life have not yet been demonstrated. The current study investigated the role of postweaning CLA treatment on skeletal muscle energy metabolism in genetically induced inactive adult-onset obese model, nescient basic helix-loop-helix 2 knockout (N2KO) mice. Four-week-old male N2KO and wild type mice were fed either control or a CLA-containing diet (0.5%) for 4 weeks, and then CLA was withdrawn and control diet provided to all mice for the following 8 weeks. Postweaning CLA supplementation in wild type animals, but not N2KO mice, may activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) as well as promote desensitization of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and sensitization of protein kinase B (AKT) at threonine 308 in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle, improving voluntary activity and glucose homeostasis. We suggest that postweaning administration of CLA may in part stimulate the underlying molecular targets involved in muscle energy metabolism to reduce weight gain in normal animals, but not in the genetically induced inactive adult-onset animal model.

  18. Identification and functional analysis of porcine basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional factor 3 (TCF3) and its alternative splicing isoforms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Yajun; Wang, Huayan

    2016-04-01

    The transcription factor 3 (TCF3) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor and is essential for lymphocyte development and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The splicing isoform, genomic organization and physiological roles of TCF3 have not been elucidated well in pig. Based on RNA-seq database, four alternative splicing isoforms were identified. Splicing isoforms TCF3(E12), TCF3(E47), and TCF3A expressed globally in porcine tissues, but TCF3B mainly expressed in spleen and endoderm derived tissues, such as pancreas and lung. The functional analysis showed that TCF3(E12), TCF3(E47), and TCF3B were translocated exclusively into nuclei, yet TCF3A was distributed in cytoplasm. The investigation of clinical specimens showed that TCF3 expression was significantly reduced in spleen tissues that were infected by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). This study is for the first time to report two novel splicing isoforms TCF3A and TCF3B, which may play an important role in lymphocyte maturation and have the correlation with CSFV evasion. PMID:27033898

  19. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Muzaddid; de Antueno, Roberto; Langelaan, David N.; Parmar, Hiren B.; Shin, Kyungsoo; Rainey, Jan K.; Duncan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS) in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS) but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation. PMID:26061049

  20. PH4 of Petunia Is an R2R3 MYB Protein That Activates Vacuolar Acidification through Interactions with Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of the Anthocyanin Pathway[W

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocchio, Francesca; Verweij, Walter; Kroon, Arthur; Spelt, Cornelis; Mol, Joseph; Koes, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    The Petunia hybrida genes ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1) and AN2 encode transcription factors with a basic-helix-loop-helix (BHLH) and a MYB domain, respectively, that are required for anthocyanin synthesis and acidification of the vacuole in petal cells. Mutation of PH4 results in a bluer flower color, increased pH of petal extracts, and, in certain genetic backgrounds, the disappearance of anthocyanins and fading of the flower color. PH4 encodes a MYB domain protein that is expressed in the petal epidermis and that can interact, like AN2, with AN1 and the related BHLH protein JAF13 in yeast two-hybrid assays. Mutation of PH4 has little or no effect on the expression of structural anthocyanin genes but strongly downregulates the expression of CAC16.5, encoding a protease-like protein of unknown biological function. Constitutive expression of PH4 and AN1 in transgenic plants is sufficient to activate CAC16.5 ectopically. Together with the previous finding that AN1 domains required for anthocyanin synthesis and vacuolar acidification can be partially separated, this suggests that AN1 activates different pathways through interactions with distinct MYB proteins. PMID:16603655

  1. Development of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells depends on the combined action of the basic helix-loop-helix factor E2-2 and the Ets factor Spi-B.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Maho; Schmidlin, Heike; Hazekamp, Mark G; Schotte, Remko; Blom, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are central players in the innate and adaptive immune response against viral infections. The molecular mechanism that underlies pDC development from progenitor cells is only beginning to be elucidated. Previously, we reported that the Ets factor Spi-B and the inhibitors of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) or Id3, which antagonize E-protein activity, are crucially involved in promoting or impairing pDC development, respectively. Here we show that the basic helix-loop-helix protein E2-2 is predominantly expressed in pDC, but not in their progenitor cells or conventional DC. Forced expression of E2-2 in progenitor cells stimulated pDC development. Conversely, inhibition of E2-2 expression by RNA interference impaired the generation of pDC suggesting a key role of E2-2 in development of these cells. Notably, Spi-B was unable to overcome the Id2 enforced block in pDC development and moreover Spi-B transduced pDC expressed reduced Id2 levels. This might indicate that Spi-B contributes to pDC development by promoting E2-2 activity. Consistent with notion, simultaneous overexpression of E2-2 and Spi-B in progenitor cells further stimulated pDC development. Together our results provide additional insight into the transcriptional network controlling pDC development as evidenced by the joint venture of E2-2 and Spi-B.

  2. Backbone dynamics of a symmetric calmodulin dimer in complex with the calmodulin-binding domain of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor SEF2-1/E2-2: a highly dynamic complex.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Göran; Schleucher, Jürgen; Onions, Jacqueline; Hermann, Stefan; Grundström, Thomas; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2005-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) interacts specifically as a dimer with some dimeric basic-Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors via a novel high affinity binding mode. Here we report a study of the backbone dynamics by (15)N-spin relaxation on the CaM dimer in complex with a dimeric peptide that mimics the CaM binding region of the bHLH transcription factor SEF2-1. The relaxation data were measured at multiple magnetic fields, and analyzed in a model-free manner using in-house written software designed to detect nanosecond internal motion. Besides picosecond motions, all residues also experience internal motion with an effective correlation time of approximately 2.5 ns with squared order parameter (S(2)) of approximately 0.75. Hydrodynamic calculations suggest that this can be attributed to motions of the N- and C-terminal domains of the CaM dimer in the complex. Moreover, residues with significant exchange broadening are found. They are clustered in the CaM:SEF2-1mp binding interface, the CaM:CaM dimer interface, and in the flexible helix connecting the CaM N- and C-terminal domains, and have similar exchange times (approximately 50 micros), suggesting a cooperative mechanism probably caused by protein:protein interactions. The dynamic features presented here support the conclusion that the conformationally heterogeneous bHLH mimicking peptide trapped inside the CaM dimer exchanges between different binding sites on both nanosecond and microsecond timescales. Nature has thus found a way to specifically recognize a relatively ill-fitting target. This novel mode of target-specific binding, which neither belongs to lock-and-key nor induced-fit binding, is characterized by dimerization and continuous exchange between multiple flexible binding alternatives. PMID:15894636

  3. Functional characterization of a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor GhDEL65 from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Xiu-Fang; Wang, Ling-Jian

    2016-10-01

    Cotton fiber is proposed to share some similarity with the Arabidopsis thaliana leaf trichome, which is regulated by the MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex. Although several MYB transcription factors and WD40 family proteins in cotton have been characterized, little is known about the role of bHLH family proteins in cotton. Here, we report that GhDEL65, a bHLH protein from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), is a functional homologue of Arabidopsis GLABRA3 (GL3) and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3) in regulating trichome development. Transcripts of GhDEL65 were detected in 0 ∼ 1 days post-anthesis (DPA) ovules and abundant in 3-DPA fibers, implying that GhDEL65 may act in early fiber development. Ectopic expression of GhDEL65 in Arabidopsis gl3 egl3 double mutant partly rescued the trichome development, and constitutive expression of GhDEL65 in wild-type plants led to increased trichome density on rosette leaves and stems, mainly by activating the transcription of two key positive regulators of trichome development, GLABRA1 (GL1) and GLABRA2 (GL2), and suppressed the expression of a R3 single-repeat MYB factor TRIPTYCHON (TRY). GhDEL65 could interact with cotton R2R3 MYB transcription factors GhMYB2 and GhMYB3, as well as the WD40 protein GhTTG3, suggesting that the MYB-bHLH-WD40 protein complex also exists in cotton fiber cell, though its function in cotton fiber development awaits further investigation.

  4. Functional diversification of the potato R2R3 MYB anthocyanin activators AN1, MYBA1, and MYB113 and their interaction with basic helix-loop-helix cofactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Espley, Richard V; Wang, Li; Yang, Hongyu; Yu, Bin; Dare, Andrew; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Junlian; Wang, Di; Allan, Andrew C

    2016-04-01

    In potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), R2R3 MYBs are involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis. We examined sequences of these MYBs in cultivated potatoes, which are more complex than diploid potato due to ploidy and heterozygosity. We found amino acid variants in the C-terminus of the MYB StAN1, termed R0, R1, and R3, due to the presence of a repeated 10-amino acid motif. These variant MYBs showed some expression in both white and pigmented tubers. We found several new alleles or gene family members of R2R3 MYBs,StMYBA1 and StMYB113, which were also expressed in white potato tubers. From functional analysis in tobacco, we showed that the presence of a C-terminal 10-amino acid motif is optimal for activating anthocyanin accumulation. Engineering a motif back into a MYB lacking this sequence enhanced its activating ability. Versions of StMYBA1 and StMYB113 can also activate anthocyanin accumulation in tobacco leaves, with the exception of StMYB113-3, which has a partial R2R3 domain. We isolated five family members of potato StbHLH1, and one StJAF13, to test their ability to interact with MYB variants. The results showed that two alleles of StbHLH1 from white skin and red skin are non-functional, while three other StbHLH1s have different co-regulating abilities, and need to be activated by StJAF13. Combined with expression analysis in potato tuber, results suggest that StbHLH1 and StJAF13a re key co-regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis, while the transcripts of MYB variants StAN1,StMYBA1, and StMYB113 are well expressed, even in the absence of pigmentation.

  5. Functional diversification of the potato R2R3 MYB anthocyanin activators AN1, MYBA1, and MYB113 and their interaction with basic helix-loop-helix cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Espley, Richard V.; Wang, Li; Yang, Hongyu; Yu, Bin; Dare, Andrew; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Junlian; Wang, Di; Allan, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    In potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), R2R3 MYBs are involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis. We examined sequences of these MYBs in cultivated potatoes, which are more complex than diploid potato due to ploidy and heterozygosity. We found amino acid variants in the C-terminus of the MYB StAN1, termed R0, R1, and R3, due to the presence of a repeated 10-amino acid motif. These variant MYBs showed some expression in both white and pigmented tubers. We found several new alleles or gene family members of R2R3 MYBs, StMYBA1 and StMYB113, which were also expressed in white potato tubers. From functional analysis in tobacco, we showed that the presence of a C-terminal 10-amino acid motif is optimal for activating anthocyanin accumulation. Engineering a motif back into a MYB lacking this sequence enhanced its activating ability. Versions of StMYBA1 and StMYB113 can also activate anthocyanin accumulation in tobacco leaves, with the exception of StMYB113-3, which has a partial R2R3 domain. We isolated five family members of potato StbHLH1, and one StJAF13, to test their ability to interact with MYB variants. The results showed that two alleles of StbHLH1 from white skin and red skin are non-functional, while three other StbHLH1s have different co-regulating abilities, and need to be activated by StJAF13. Combined with expression analysis in potato tuber, results suggest that StbHLH1 and StJAF13 are key co-regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis, while the transcripts of MYB variants StAN1, StMYBA1, and StMYB113 are well expressed, even in the absence of pigmentation. PMID:26884602

  6. Overexpression of a citrus basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (CubHLH1), which is homologous to Arabidopsis activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1 interacting factor genes, modulates carotenoid metabolism in transgenic tomato.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tomoko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Aiko; Nakano, Michiharu; Nakajima, Naoko; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Omura, Mitsuo; Shimada, Takehiko

    2016-02-01

    To explore the transcription factors associated with carotenoid metabolism in citrus fruit, one transcription factor (CubHLH1) was selected through microarray screening in Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruit, which was treated with exogenous ethylene or gibberellin (GA), accelerating or retarding carotenoid accumulation in peel, respectively. The amino acid sequence of CubHLH1 has homology to Arabidopsis activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1 (ATBS1) interacting factor (AIF), which is functionally characterized as a negative regulator of the brassinolide (BR) signalling pathway. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that protein for CubHLH1 could interact with Arabidopsis and tomato ATBS1. Overexpression of CubHLH1 caused a dwarf phenotype in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), suggesting that CubHLH1 has a similar function to Arabidopsis AIF. In the transgenic tomato fruit at ripening stage, the lycopene content was reduced along with the changes in carotenoid biosynthetic gene expression. The abscisic acid (ABA) content of all the transgenic tomato fruit was higher than that of the wild type. These results implied that CubHLH1 is considered to have a similar function to Arabidopsis AIFs and might be directly involved in carotenoid metabolism in mature citrus fruit.

  7. The regulation and function of the Id proteins in lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R; Murre, C

    2001-12-20

    Helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins are essential factors for lymphocyte development and function. One class of HLH proteins, the E-proteins, regulate many aspects of lymphocyte maturation, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. E-proteins are negatively regulated by another class of HLH proteins known as the Id proteins. The Id proteins function as dominant negative inhibitors of E-proteins by inhibiting their ability to bind DNA. Here we discuss the function and regulation of the Id proteins in lymphocyte development.

  8. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  9. PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) regulates auxin biosynthesis at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Keara A.; Lee, Sang Ho; Patel, Dhaval; Kumar, S. Vinod; Spartz, Angela K.; Gu, Chen; Ye, Songqing; Yu, Peng; Breen, Gordon; Cohen, Jerry D.; Wigge, Philip A.; Gray, William M.

    2011-01-01

    At high ambient temperature, plants display dramatic stem elongation in an adaptive response to heat. This response is mediated by elevated levels of the phytohormone auxin and requires auxin biosynthesis, signaling, and transport pathways. The mechanisms by which higher temperature results in greater auxin accumulation are unknown, however. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4), is also required for hypocotyl elongation in response to high temperature. PIF4 also acts redundantly with its homolog, PIF5, to regulate diurnal growth rhythms and elongation responses to the threat of vegetative shade. PIF4 activity is reportedly limited in part by binding to both the basic helix-loop-helix protein LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED 1 and the DELLA family of growth-repressing proteins. Despite the importance of PIF4 in integrating multiple environmental signals, the mechanisms by which PIF4 controls growth are unknown. Here we demonstrate that PIF4 regulates levels of auxin and the expression of key auxin biosynthesis genes at high temperature. We also identify a family of SMALL AUXIN UP RNA (SAUR) genes that are expressed at high temperature in a PIF4-dependent manner and promote elongation growth. Taken together, our results demonstrate direct molecular links among PIF4, auxin, and elongation growth at high temperature. PMID:22123947

  10. Overexpression of Inhibitor of DNA-Binding 2 Attenuates Pulmonary Fibrosis through Regulation of c-Abl and Twist

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Agarwal, Manisha; Disayabutr, Supparerk; Wolters, Paul J.; Kim, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a multicellular process leading to excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Factors that affect lung epithelial cell proliferation and activation may be important regulators of the extent of fibrosis after injury. We and others have shown that activated alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) directly contribute to fibrogenesis by secreting mesenchymal proteins, such as type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial cell acquisition of mesenchymal features during carcinogenesis and fibrogenesis is regulated by several mesenchymal transcription factors. Induced expression of direct inhibitors to these mesenchymal transcription factors offers a potentially novel therapeutic strategy. Inhibitor of DNA-binding 2 (Id2) is an inhibitory helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is highly expressed by lung epithelial cells during development and has been shown to coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation of cancer cells. We found that overexpression of Id2 in primary AECs promotes proliferation by inhibiting a retinoblastoma protein/c-Abl interaction leading to greater c-Abl activity. Id2 also blocks transforming growth factor β1–mediated expression of type I collagen by inhibiting Twist, a prominent mesenchymal basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. In vivo, Id2 induced AEC proliferation and protected mice from lung fibrosis. By using a high-throughput screen, we found that histone deacetylase inhibitors induce Id2 expression by adult AECs. Collectively, these findings suggest that Id2 expression by AECs can be induced, and overexpression of Id2 affects AEC phenotype, leading to protection from fibrosis. PMID:25661109

  11. The MYB182 Protein Down-Regulates Proanthocyanidin and Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Poplar by Repressing Both Structural and Regulatory Flavonoid Genes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazuko; Ma, Dawei; Constabel, C. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Trees in the genus Populus (poplar) contain phenolic secondary metabolites including the proanthocyanidins (PAs), which help to adapt these widespread trees to diverse environments. The transcriptional activation of PA biosynthesis in response to herbivory and ultraviolet light stress has been documented in poplar leaves, and a regulator of this process, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB134, has been identified. MYB134-overexpressing transgenic plants show a strong high-PA phenotype. Analysis of these transgenic plants suggested the involvement of additional MYB transcription factors, including repressor-like MYB factors. Here, MYB182, a subgroup 4 MYB factor, was found to act as a negative regulator of the flavonoid pathway. Overexpression of MYB182 in hairy root culture and whole poplar plants led to reduced PA and anthocyanin levels as well as a reduction in the expression of key flavonoid genes. Similarly, a reduced accumulation of transcripts of a MYB PA activator and a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor was observed in MYB182-overexpressing hairy roots. Transient promoter activation assays in poplar cell culture demonstrated that MYB182 can disrupt transcriptional activation by MYB134 and that the basic helix-loop-helix-binding motif of MYB182 was essential for repression. Microarray analysis of transgenic plants demonstrated that down-regulated targets of MYB182 also include shikimate pathway genes. This work shows that MYB182 plays an important role in the fine-tuning of MYB134-mediated flavonoid metabolism. PMID:25624398

  12. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein-mediated regulation of hepatocyte metabolic pathways affects viral replication.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Sumedha; Rawat, Siddhartha; Ajenjo, Marcia; Bouchard, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Chronic HBV infection is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV HBx protein stimulates HBV replication and likely influences the development of HBV-associated HCC. Whether HBx affects regulators of metabolism in normal hepatocytes has not been addressed. We used an ex vivo, cultured primary rat hepatocyte system to assess the interplay between HBV replication and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. HBx activated mTORC1 signaling; however, inhibition of mTORC1 enhanced HBV replication. HBx also decreased ATP levels and activated the energy-sensing factor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inhibition of AMPK decreased HBV replication. Inhibition of AMPK activates mTORC1, and we showed that activated mTORC1 is one factor that reduces HBV replication when AMPK is inhibited. HBx activation of both AMPK and mTORC1 suggests that these activities could provide a balancing mechanism to facilitate persistent HBV replication. HBx activation of mTORC1 and AMPK could also influence HCC development.

  13. Genetic regulation of vertebrate eye development.

    PubMed

    Zagozewski, J L; Zhang, Q; Eisenstat, D D

    2014-11-01

    Eye development is a complex and highly regulated process that consists of several overlapping stages: (i) specification then splitting of the eye field from the developing forebrain; (ii) genesis and patterning of the optic vesicle; (iii) regionalization of the optic cup into neural retina and retina pigment epithelium; and (iv) specification and differentiation of all seven retinal cell types that develop from a pool of retinal progenitor cells in a precise temporal and spatial manner: retinal ganglion cells, horizontal cells, cone photoreceptors, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, rod photoreceptors and Müller glia. Genetic regulation of the stages of eye development includes both extrinsic (such as morphogens, growth factors) and intrinsic factors (primarily transcription factors of the homeobox and basic helix-loop helix families). In the following review, we will provide an overview of the stages of eye development highlighting the role of several important transcription factors in both normal developmental processes and in inherited human eye diseases.

  14. Characterization of npas3, a novel basic helix-loop-helix PAS gene expressed in the developing mouse nervous system.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, E W; Witte, D P; Shreiner, A B; Potter, S S

    1999-11-01

    Here we describe the cloning and expression pattern of a new bHLH-PAS domain gene, Npas3. Npas3 shares 50.2% amino acid sequence identity with Npas1 and a lesser similarity with other members of the bHLH-PAS domain family of transcription factors. Northern blot analysis detected Npas3 mRNA between 11.5 and 17.5 d.p.c. in embryonic development and exclusively in the adult brain. Whole-mount and section in situ hybridization assays revealed expression of Npas3 between 9.5 and 11.5 d.p.c. in the developing neural tube. In addition, Npas3 mRNA was expressed throughout the neuroepithelium of the developing central nervous system between 10. 5 and 12.5 d.p.c. Interestingly, at 14.5 d.p.c., the expression of Npas3 mRNA became restricted to the neopallial layer of the cortex. At 12.5 d.p.c., Npas3 mRNA was evident in nonneural tissues such as the developing dermis and mesenchyme surrounding the otic and nasal placodes. Expression was also detected in the developing cardiac valves, limb and developing kidney. PMID:10534623

  15. Identifying Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Genes in "Caenorhabditis elegans" through a Classroom Demonstration of Functional Genomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Vernetta; McMiller, Tracee; Jones, Erika; Johnson, Casonya M.

    2003-01-01

    A 14-week, undergraduate-level Genetics and Population Biology course at Morgan State University was modified to include a demonstration of functional genomics in the research laboratory. Students performed a rudimentary sequence analysis of the "Caenorhabditis elegans" genome and further characterized three sequences that were predicted to encode…

  16. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27420058

  17. p53 Protein-mediated regulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) is crucial for the apoptotic response upon serine starvation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yang; Wang, Shang-Jui; Jiang, Le; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although p53 is frequently mutated in human cancers, about 80% of human melanomas retain wild-type p53. Here we report that PHGDH, the key metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of the serine biosynthesis pathway, is a target of p53 in human melanoma cells. p53 suppresses PHGDH expression and inhibits de novo serine biosynthesis. Notably, upon serine starvation, p53-mediated cell death is enhanced dramatically in response to Nutlin-3 treatment. Moreover, PHGDH has been found recently to be amplified frequently in human melanomas. We found that PHGDH overexpression significantly suppresses the apoptotic response, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous PHGDH promotes apoptosis under the same treatment. These results demonstrate an important role of p53 in regulating the serine biosynthesis pathway through suppressing PHGDH expression and reveal serine deprivation as a novel approach to sensitize p53-mediated apoptotic responses in human melanoma cells. PMID:25404730

  18. An Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized RRL protein mediates abscisic acid signal transduction through mitochondrial retrograde regulation involving ABI4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Li, Juanjuan; Liu, Jianping; Liu, Kede

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling have been studied for many years; however, how mitochondria-localized proteins play roles in ABA signalling remains unclear. Here an Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRL (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH-LIKE) was shown to function in ABA signalling. A previous study had revealed that the Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRG (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH) is required for cell division in the root meristem. RRL shares 54% and 57% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with RRG; nevertheless, RRL shows a different function in Arabidopsis. In this study, disruption of RRL decreased ABA sensitivity whereas overexpression of RRL increased ABA sensitivity during seed germination and seedling growth. High expression levels of RRL were found in germinating seeds and developing seedlings, as revealed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining of ProRRL-GUS transgenic lines. The analyses of the structure and function of mitochondria in the knockout rrl mutant showed that the disruption of RRL causes extensively internally vacuolated mitochondria and reduced ABA-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) in the alternative respiratory pathway is increased by mitochondrial retrograde regulation to regain ROS levels when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is impaired. The APETALA2 (AP2)-type transcription factor ABI4 is a regulator of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a (AOX1a) in mitochondrial retrograde signalling. This study showed that ABA-induced AOX1a and ABI4 expression was inhibited in the rrl mutant, suggesting that RRL is probably involved in ABI4-mediated mitochondrial retrograde signalling. Furthermore, the results revealed that ABI4 is a downstream regulatory factor in RRL-mediated ABA signalling in seed germination and seedling growth.

  19. Amyloid protein-mediated differential DNA methylation status regulates gene expression in Alzheimer's disease model cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam; Ahn Jo, Sangmee; Oh, Seikwan; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in Alzheimer's disease model cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify three Swedish mutant target genes; CTIF, NXT2 and DDR2 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Swedish mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and gene expression. -- Abstract: The Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APP-sw) has been reported to dramatically increase beta amyloid production through aberrant cleavage at the beta secretase site, causing early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). DNA methylation has been reported to be associated with AD pathogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism of APP-sw-mediated epigenetic alterations in AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We analyzed genome-wide interplay between promoter CpG DNA methylation and gene expression in an APP-sw-expressing AD model cell line. To identify genes whose expression was regulated by DNA methylation status, we performed integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles, and identified three target genes of the APP-sw mutant; hypomethylated CTIF (CBP80/CBP20-dependent translation initiation factor) and NXT2 (nuclear exporting factor 2), and hypermethylated DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2). Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine restored mRNA expression of these three genes, implying methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation. The profound alteration in the methylation status was detected at the -435, -295, and -271 CpG sites of CTIF, and at the -505 to -341 region in the promoter of DDR2. In the promoter region of NXT2, only one CpG site located at -432 was differentially unmethylated in APP-sw cells. Thus, we demonstrated the effect of the APP-sw mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and subsequent gene expression. This epigenetic regulatory mechanism may

  20. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L.; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species. PMID:26464512

  1. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-10-27

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species.

  2. Negative regulation of Yap during neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huanqing; Deo, Monika; Thompson, Robert C.; Uhler, Michael D.; Turner, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Regulated proliferation and cell cycle exit are essential aspects of neurogenesis. The Yap transcriptional coactivator controls proliferation in a variety of tissues during development, and this activity is negatively regulated by kinases in the Hippo signaling pathway. We find that Yap is expressed in mitotic mouse retinal progenitors and it is downregulated during neuronal differentiation. Forced expression of Yap prolongs proliferation in the postnatal mouse retina, whereas inhibition of Yap by RNA interference (RNAi) decreases proliferation and increases differentiation. We show Yap is subject to post-translational inhibition in the retina, and also downregulated at the level of mRNA expression. Using a cell culture model, we find that expression of the proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors Neurog2 or Ascl1 downregulates Yap mRNA levels, and simultaneously inhibits Yap protein via activation of the Lats1 and/or Lats2 kinases. Conversely, overexpression of Yap prevents proneural bHLH proteins from initiating cell cycle exit. We propose that mutual inhibition between proneural bHLH proteins and Yap is an important regulator of proliferation and cell cycle exit during mammalian neurogenesis. PMID:22037235

  3. ERK5 MAP Kinase Regulates Neurogenin1 during Cortical Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Paige; Liu, Lidong; Wang, Yupeng; Zou, Junhui; Pan, Yung-Wei; Abel, Glen; Duan, Xin; Ming, Guo-li; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert; Xia, Zhengui

    2009-01-01

    The commitment of multi-potent cortical progenitors to a neuronal fate depends on the transient induction of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors including Neurogenin 1 (Neurog1). Previous studies have focused on mechanisms that control the expression of these proteins while little is known about whether their pro-neural activities can be regulated by kinase signaling pathways. Using primary cultures and ex vivo slice cultures, here we report that both the transcriptional and pro-neural activities of Neurog1 are regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 5 signaling in cortical progenitors. Activation of ERK5 potentiated, while blocking ERK5 inhibited Neurog1-induced neurogenesis. Furthermore, endogenous ERK5 activity was required for Neurog1-initiated transcription. Interestingly, ERK5 activation was sufficient to induce Neurog1 phosphorylation and ERK5 directly phosphorylated Neurog1 in vitro. We identified S179/S208 as putative ERK5 phosphorylation sites in Neurog1. Mutations of S179/S208 to alanines inhibited the transcriptional and pro-neural activities of Neurog1. Our data identify ERK5 phosphorylation of Neurog1 as a novel mechanism regulating neuronal fate commitment of cortical progenitors. PMID:19365559

  4. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy in aging.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Louis R; Kumsta, Caroline; Sandri, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Hansen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major intracellular degradation process recognized as playing a central role in cell survival and longevity. This multistep process is extensively regulated at several levels, including post-translationally through the action of conserved longevity factors such as the nutrient sensor TOR. More recently, transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes has emerged as an important mechanism for ensuring the somatic maintenance and homeostasis necessary for a long life span. Autophagy is increased in many long-lived model organisms and contributes significantly to their longevity. In turn, conserved transcription factors, particularly the helix-loop-helix transcription factor TFEB and the forkhead transcription factor FOXO, control the expression of many autophagy-related genes and are important for life-span extension. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contribution of these transcription factors to macroautophagy regulation in the context of aging. We also review current research on epigenetic changes, such as histone modification by the deacetylase SIRT1, that influence autophagy-related gene expression and additionally affect aging. Understanding the molecular regulation of macroautophagy in relation to aging may offer new avenues for the treatment of age-related diseases.

  5. Inhibitors of differentiation and DNA binding (Ids) regulate Math1 and hair cell formation during the development of the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer M; Montcouquiol, Mireille; Dabdoub, Alain; Woods, Chad; Kelley, Matthew W

    2006-01-11

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Math1 (also called Atoh1) is both necessary and sufficient for hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea (Bermingham et al., 1999; Zheng and Gao, 2000). Previous studies have demonstrated that a dynamic pattern of Math1 expression plays a key role in regulating the number and position of mechanosensory hair cells. However, the factors that regulate the temporal and spatial expression of Math1 within the cochlea are unknown. The bHLH-related inhibitors of differentiation and DNA binding (Id) proteins are known to negatively regulate many bHLH transcription factors, including Math1, in a number of different systems. Therefore, Id proteins are good candidates for regulating Math1 in the cochlea. Results from PCR and in situ hybridization indicate that Id1, Id2, and Id3 are expressed within the cochlear duct in a pattern that is consistent with a role in regulation of hair cell development. In particular, expression of Ids and Math1 overlapped in cochlear progenitor cells before cellular differentiation, but a specific downregulation of Id expression was observed in individual cells that differentiated as hair cells. In addition, progenitor cells in which the expression of Ids was maintained during the time period for hair cell differentiation were inhibited from developing as hair cells. These results indicate a key role for Ids in the regulation of expression of Math1 and hair cell differentiation in the developing cochlea.

  6. Expression of Id proteins is regulated by the Bcl-3 proto-oncogene in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, K; Saamarthy, K; Syed Khaja, A S; Bjartell, A; Massoumi, R

    2013-03-21

    B-cell leukemia 3 (Bcl-3) is a member of the inhibitor of κB family, which regulates a wide range of biological processes by functioning as a transcriptional activator or as a repressor of target genes. As high levels of Bcl-3 expression and activation have been detected in different types of human cancer, Bcl-3 has been labeled a proto-oncogene. Our study uncovered a markedly upregulated Bcl-3 expression in human prostate cancer (PCa), where inflammatory cell infiltration was observed. Elevated Bcl-3 expression in PCa was dependent on the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6-mediated STAT3 activation. Microarray analyses, using Bcl-3 knockdown in PCa cells, identified the inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) family of helix-loop-helix proteins as potential Bcl-3-regulated genes. Bcl-3 knockdown reduced the abundance of Id-1 and Id-2 proteins and boosted PCa cells to be more receptive to undergoing apoptosis following treatment with anticancer drug. Our data imply that inactivation of Bcl-3 may lead to sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, thus suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy in PCa treatment.

  7. The Transcription Factor Hand1 Is Involved In Runx2-Ihh-Regulated Endochondral Ossification.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Lindsay E; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Saga, Yumiko; Funato, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The developing long bone is a model of endochondral ossification that displays the morphological layers of chondrocytes toward the ossification center of the diaphysis. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a member of the hedgehog family of secreted molecules, regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, as well as osteoblast differentiation, through the process of endochondral ossification. Here, we report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1, which is expressed in the cartilage primordia, is involved in proper osteogenesis of the bone collar via its control of Ihh production. Genetic overexpression of Hand1 in the osteochondral progenitors resulted in prenatal hypoplastic or aplastic ossification in the diaphyses, mimicking an Ihh loss-of-function phenotype. Ihh expression was downregulated in femur epiphyses of Hand1-overexpressing mice. We also confirmed that Hand1 downregulated Ihh gene expression in vitro by inhibiting Runx2 transactivation of the Ihh proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that Hand1 in chondrocytes regulates endochondral ossification, at least in part through the Runx2-Ihh axis. PMID:26918743

  8. Arabidopsis MYC2 Interacts with DELLA Proteins in Regulating Sesquiterpene Synthase Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Gao-Jie; Xue, Xue-Yi; Mao, Ying-Bo; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana flowers emit volatile terpenes, which may function in plant–insect interactions. Here, we report that Arabidopsis MYC2, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, directly binds to promoters of the sesquiterpene synthase genes TPS21 and TPS11 and activates their expression. Expression of TPS21 and TPS11 can be induced by the phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA), and both inductions require MYC2. The induction of TPS21 and TPS11 results in increased emission of sesquiterpene, especially (E)-β-caryophyllene. DELLAs, the GA signaling repressors, negatively affect sesquiterpene biosynthesis, as the sesquiterpene synthase genes were repressed in plants overaccumulating REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA), one of the Arabidopsis DELLAs, and upregulated in a penta DELLA-deficient mutant. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that DELLAs, represented by RGA, directly interact with MYC2. In yeast cells, the N terminus of MYC2 was responsible for binding to RGA. MYC2 has been proposed as a major mediator of JA signaling and crosstalk with abscisic acid, ethylene, and light signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that MYC2 is also connected to GA signaling in regulating a subset of genes. In Arabidopsis inflorescences, it integrates both GA and JA signals into transcriptional regulation of sesquiterpene synthase genes and promotes sesquiterpene production. PMID:22669881

  9. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  10. The Transcription Factor Hand1 Is Involved In Runx2-Ihh-Regulated Endochondral Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Lindsay E.; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Saga, Yumiko; Funato, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The developing long bone is a model of endochondral ossification that displays the morphological layers of chondrocytes toward the ossification center of the diaphysis. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a member of the hedgehog family of secreted molecules, regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, as well as osteoblast differentiation, through the process of endochondral ossification. Here, we report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1, which is expressed in the cartilage primordia, is involved in proper osteogenesis of the bone collar via its control of Ihh production. Genetic overexpression of Hand1 in the osteochondral progenitors resulted in prenatal hypoplastic or aplastic ossification in the diaphyses, mimicking an Ihh loss-of-function phenotype. Ihh expression was downregulated in femur epiphyses of Hand1-overexpressing mice. We also confirmed that Hand1 downregulated Ihh gene expression in vitro by inhibiting Runx2 transactivation of the Ihh proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that Hand1 in chondrocytes regulates endochondral ossification, at least in part through the Runx2-Ihh axis. PMID:26918743

  11. Hand factors as regulators of cardiac morphogenesis and implications for congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Vincentz, Joshua W; Barnes, Ralston M; Firulli, Anthony B

    2011-06-01

    Almost 15 years of careful study have established the related basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors Hand1 and Hand2 as critical for heart development across evolution. Hand factors make broad contributions, revealed through animal models, to the development of multiple cellular lineages that ultimately contribute to the heart. They perform critical roles in ventricular cardiomyocyte growth, differentiation, morphogenesis, and conduction. They are also important for the proper development of the cardiac outflow tract, epicardium, and endocardium. Molecularly, they function both through DNA binding and through protein-protein interactions, which are regulated transcriptionally, posttranscriptionally by microRNAs, and posttranslationally through phosphoregulation. Although direct Hand factor transcriptional targets are progressively being identified, confirmed direct targets of Hand factor transcriptional activity in the heart are limited. Identification of these targets will be critical to model the mechanisms by which Hand factor bHLH interactions affect developmental pathways. Improved understanding of Hand factor-mediated transcriptional cascades will be necessary to determine how Hand factor dysregulation translates to human disease phenotypes. This review summarizes the insight that animal models have provided into the regulation and function of these factors during heart development, in addition to the recent findings that suggest roles for HAND1 and HAND2 in human congenital heart disease.

  12. The Transcription Factor Hand1 Is Involved In Runx2-Ihh-Regulated Endochondral Ossification.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Lindsay E; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Saga, Yumiko; Funato, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The developing long bone is a model of endochondral ossification that displays the morphological layers of chondrocytes toward the ossification center of the diaphysis. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a member of the hedgehog family of secreted molecules, regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, as well as osteoblast differentiation, through the process of endochondral ossification. Here, we report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1, which is expressed in the cartilage primordia, is involved in proper osteogenesis of the bone collar via its control of Ihh production. Genetic overexpression of Hand1 in the osteochondral progenitors resulted in prenatal hypoplastic or aplastic ossification in the diaphyses, mimicking an Ihh loss-of-function phenotype. Ihh expression was downregulated in femur epiphyses of Hand1-overexpressing mice. We also confirmed that Hand1 downregulated Ihh gene expression in vitro by inhibiting Runx2 transactivation of the Ihh proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that Hand1 in chondrocytes regulates endochondral ossification, at least in part through the Runx2-Ihh axis.

  13. The Transcriptional Repressor MYB2 Regulates Both Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Proanthocyandin and Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ji Hyung; Liu, Chenggang; Xiao, Xirong; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) is limited to specific cell types and developmental stages, but little is known about how antagonistically acting transcriptional regulators work together to determine temporal and spatial patterning of pigmentation at the cellular level, especially for PAs. Here, we characterize MYB2, a transcriptional repressor regulating both anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MYB2 was strongly upregulated by MYB5, a major regulator of PA biosynthesis in M. truncatula and a component of MYB-basic helix loop helix-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes. Overexpression of MYB2 abolished anthocyanin and PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, respectively. Anthocyanin deposition was expanded in myb2 mutant seedlings and flowers accompanied by increased anthocyanin content. PA mainly accumulated in the epidermal layer derived from the outer integument in the M. truncatula seed coat, starting from the hilum area. The area of PA accumulation and ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE expression was expanded into the seed body at the early stage of seed development in the myb2 mutant. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological evidence suggests that MYB2 functions as part of a multidimensional regulatory network to define the temporal and spatial pattern of anthocyanin and PA accumulation linked to developmental processes.

  14. Coordinated transcriptional regulation of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthetic pathway enzymes in plastids by phytochrome-interacting factor 5.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Kazuto; Matsumoto, Takuro; Takahashi, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Yuta; Tsukagoshi, Masanori; Sano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Shibata, Daisuke; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Nakayama, Toru

    2014-01-10

    All isoprenoids are derived from a common C5 unit, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In plants, IPP is synthesized via two distinct pathways; the cytosolic mevalonate pathway and the plastidial non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we used a co-expression analysis to identify transcription factors that coordinately regulate the expression of multiple genes encoding enzymes in the IPP biosynthetic pathway. Some candidates showed especially strong correlations with multiple genes encoding MEP-pathway enzymes. We report here that phytochrome-interacting factor 5 (PIF5), a basic-helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, functions as a positive regulator of the MEP pathway. Its overexpression in T87 suspension cultured cells resulted in increased accumulation of chlorophylls and carotenoids. Detailed analyses of carotenoids by HPLC indicated that some carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were concomitantly up-regulated, possibly as a result of enhanced IPP metabolic flow. Our results also revealed other PIF family proteins that play different roles from that of PIF5 in IPP metabolism.

  15. A Conserved Network of Transcriptional Activators and Repressors Regulates Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Eudicots[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Davies, Kevin M.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Montefiori, Mirco; Brendolise, Cyril; Boase, Murray R.; Ngo, Hanh; Jameson, Paula E.; Schwinn, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Plants require sophisticated regulatory mechanisms to ensure the degree of anthocyanin pigmentation is appropriate to myriad developmental and environmental signals. Central to this process are the activity of MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) complexes that regulate the transcription of anthocyanin genes. In this study, the gene regulatory network that regulates anthocyanin synthesis in petunia (Petunia hybrida) has been characterized. Genetic and molecular evidence show that the R2R3-MYB, MYB27, is an anthocyanin repressor that functions as part of the MBW complex and represses transcription through its C-terminal EAR motif. MYB27 targets both the anthocyanin pathway genes and basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1), itself an essential component of the MBW activation complex for pigmentation. Other features of the regulatory network identified include inhibition of AN1 activity by the competitive R3-MYB repressor MYBx and the activation of AN1, MYB27, and MYBx by the MBW activation complex, providing for both reinforcement and feedback regulation. We also demonstrate the intercellular movement of the WDR protein (AN11) and R3-repressor (MYBx), which may facilitate anthocyanin pigment pattern formation. The fundamental features of this regulatory network in the Asterid model of petunia are similar to those in the Rosid model of Arabidopsis thaliana and are thus likely to be widespread in the Eudicots. PMID:24642943

  16. Circadian CLOCK-mediated regulation of target-tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids: implications for cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, the end-products of the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal (HPA) axis, influence the functions of virtually all organs and tissues through the nuclear glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Circulating levels of glucocorticoids fluctuate naturally in a circadian fashion under the strong influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian CLOCK system, and regulate the transcriptional activity of the GR in the brain and peripheral target tissues. We recently reported that the basic helix-loop- helix transcription factor Clock, which is a histone acetyltransferase and a central component of the self-oscillating transcription factor loop that generates circadian rhythms, represses GR transcriptional activity by acetylating lysine residues within the 'lysine cluster' located in the hinge region of the receptor. This Clock-mediated repression of GR transcriptional activity oscillates in inverse phase to the HPA axis, acting as a target tissue counter-regulatory mechanism to the diurnally fluctuating circulating glucocorticoids. Interestingly, mild evening elevations of corti-sol, as occurs in chronic stress situations, and frequent uncoupling of the SCN CLOCK-directed HPA axis from the daily oscillation of target tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids, as happens in trans-time zone travel and night shift work, produce functional hypercortisolism and, hence, multiple components of the metabolic syndrome with resultant cardiovascular complications.

  17. A Light-Regulated Genetic Module Was Recruited to Carpel Development in Arabidopsis following a Structural Change to SPATULA[W

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, Mathieu C.; Brunoud, Géraldine; Chauvet, Aurélie; Martínez-Garcia, Jaime F.; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Monéger, Françoise; Scutt, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    A key innovation of flowering plants is the female reproductive organ, the carpel. Here, we show that a mechanism that regulates carpel margin development in the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana was recruited from light-regulated processes. This recruitment followed the loss from the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SPATULA (SPT) of a domain previously responsible for its negative regulation by phytochrome. We propose that the loss of this domain was a prerequisite for the light-independent expression in female reproductive tissues of a genetic module that also promotes shade avoidance responses in vegetative organs. Striking evidence for this proposition is provided by the restoration of wild-type carpel development to spt mutants by low red/far-red light ratios, simulating vegetation shade, which we show to occur via phytochrome B, PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4), and PIF5. Our data illustrate the potential of modular evolutionary events to generate rapid morphological change and thereby provide a molecular basis for neo-Darwinian theories that describe this nongradualist phenomenon. Furthermore, the effects shown here of light quality perception on carpel development lead us to speculate on the potential role of light-regulated mechanisms in plant organs that, like the carpel, form within the shade of surrounding tissues. PMID:22851763

  18. Regulation of the Mechanism of TWIST1 Transcription by BHLHE40 and BHLHE41 in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Asanoma, Kazuo; Liu, Ge; Yamane, Takako; Miyanari, Yoko; Takao, Tomoka; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ohgami, Tatsuhiro; Ichinoe, Akimasa; Sonoda, Kenzo; Wake, Norio; Kato, Kiyoko

    2015-12-01

    BHLHE40 and BHLHE41 (BHLHE40/41) are basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factors that play key roles in multiple cell behaviors. BHLHE40/41 were recently shown to be involved in an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the precise mechanism of EMT control by BHLHE40/41 remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that BHLHE40/41 expression was controlled in a pathological stage-dependent manner in human endometrial cancer (HEC). Our in vitro assays showed that BHLHE40/41 suppressed tumor cell invasion. BHLHE40/41 also suppressed the transcription of the EMT effectors SNAI1, SNAI2, and TWIST1. We identified the critical promoter regions of TWIST1 for its basal transcriptional activity. We elucidated that the transcription factor SP1 was involved in the basal transcriptional activity of TWIST1 and that BHLHE40/41 competed with SP1 for DNA binding to regulate gene transcription. This study is the first to report the detailed functions of BHLHE40 and BHLHE41 in the suppression of EMT effectors in vitro. Our results suggest that BHLHE40/41 suppress tumor cell invasion by inhibiting EMT in tumor cells. We propose that BHLHE40/41 are promising markers to predict the aggressiveness of each HEC case and that molecular targeting strategies involving BHLHE40/41 and SP1 may effectively regulate HEC progression.

  19. DEC2 is a negative regulator for the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocyte lineage-committed mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Tomoko; Fujimoto, Katsumi; Kanawa, Masami; Kimura, Junko; Takeuchi, Junpei; Harada, Naoko; Goto, Noriko; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Noshiro, Mitsuhide; Suardita, Ketut; Tanne, Kazuo; Kato, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Differentiated embryo chondrocyte 2 (DEC2) is a basic helix-loop-helix-Orange transcription factor that regulates cell differentiation in various mammalian tissues. DEC2 has been shown to suppress the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into myocytes and adipocytes. In the present study, we examined the role of DEC2 in the chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs. The overexpression of DEC2 exerted minimal effects on the proliferation of MSCs in monolayer cultures with the growth medium under undifferentiating conditions, whereas it suppressed increases in DNA content, glycosaminoglycan content, and the expression of several chondrocyte-related genes, including aggrecan and type X collagen alpha 1, in MSC pellets in centrifuge tubes under chondrogenic conditions. In the pellets exposed to chondrogenesis induction medium, DEC2 overexpression downregulated the mRNA expression of fibroblast growth factor 18, which is involved in the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and upregulated the expression of p16INK4, which is a cell cycle inhibitor. These findings suggest that DEC2 is a negative regulator of the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocyte lineage-committed mesenchymal cells. PMID:27430159

  20. The proneural proteins Atonal and Scute regulate neural target genes through different E-box binding sites.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lynn M; Zur Lage, Petra I; Prentice, David R A; Senthinathan, Biruntha; Jarman, Andrew P

    2004-11-01

    For a particular functional family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, there is ample evidence that different factors regulate different target genes but little idea of how these different target genes are distinguished. We investigated the contribution of DNA binding site differences to the specificities of two functionally related proneural bHLH transcription factors required for the genesis of Drosophila sense organ precursors (Atonal and Scute). We show that the proneural target gene, Bearded, is regulated by both Scute and Atonal via distinct E-box consensus binding sites. By comparing with other Ato-dependent enhancer sequences, we define an Ato-specific binding consensus that differs from the previously defined Scute-specific E-box consensus, thereby defining distinct E(Ato) and E(Sc) sites. These E-box variants are crucial for function. First, tandem repeats of 20-bp sequences containing E(Ato) and E(Sc) sites are sufficient to confer Atonal- and Scute-specific expression patterns, respectively, on a reporter gene in vivo. Second, interchanging E(Ato) and E(Sc) sites within enhancers almost abolishes enhancer activity. While the latter finding shows that enhancer context is also important in defining how proneural proteins interact with these sites, it is clear that differential utilization of DNA binding sites underlies proneural protein specificity.

  1. Regulation of p21 by TWIST2 contributes to its tumor-suppressor function in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Ma, W; Cui, J; Yao, H; Zhou, H; Ge, Y; Xiao, L; Hu, X; Liu, B-H; Yang, J; Li, Y-Y; Chen, S; Eaves, C J; Wu, D; Zhao, Y

    2015-06-01

    TWIST2 has a dual function in tumors. Its implication in the initiation and metastasis of various solid tumors is well established, and its tumor-suppressor role in murine osteosarcoma cells has been reported recently. However, the function of TWIST2 and its underlying mechanisms in human normal and malignant hematopoiesis remain unclear. In the present study, we found that TWIST2 directly regulated p21 in human hematopoietic cells and whose silence promoted cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Hypermethylation of TWIST2 occurred to 23 out of the 75 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and resulted in the impaired expression of both TWIST2 and p21. Conversely, TWIST2 overexpression inhibited the growth of AML cells partially through its direct activation of p21 with intact HLH (helix-loop-helix) domain. The microarray data and gene expression validation showed that TWIST2 was sufficient to activate known tumor-suppressor genes, whereas suppress known oncogenes, which further supported its inhibitory effect against AML cells. Taken together, our data have identified a novel TWIST2-p21 axis that modulates the cell cycle of both normal and leukemic cells and demonstrated that the direct regulation of p21 by TWIST2 has a role in its tumor-suppressor function in AML.

  2. The transcription factor, the Cdk, its cyclin and their regulator: directing the transcriptional response to a nutritional signal.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, K; Fisher, F; McAndrew, P C; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex prevents transcription of PHO5 by inhibiting the ability of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor Pho4 to activate transcription in response to high phosphate conditions. In low phosphate the Pho80-Pho85 complex is inactivated and Pho4 is then able to activate the acid phosphatase gene PHO5. We show here that Pho4 and the homeobox protein Pho2 interact in vivo and act cooperatively to activate the PHO5 UAS, with interaction being regulated by the phosphate switch. In addition, we also demonstrate that an additional factor, Pho81, interacts in high phosphate with both the Pho80 cyclin and with Pho4. In low phosphate, Pho80 and Pho81 dissociate from Pho4, but retain the ability to interact with each other. The evidence presented here supports the idea that Pho81 acts as a phosphate-sensitive trigger that regulates the ability of the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex to bind Pho4, while DNA binding by Pho4 is dependent on the phosphate-sensitive interaction with Pho2. Images PMID:7957107

  3. USP17- and SCFβTrCP--regulated degradation of DEC1 controls the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; D'Annibale, Sara; Magliozzi, Roberto; Low, Teck Yew; Jansen, Petra; Shaltiel, Indra A; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Medema, Rene H; Guardavaccaro, Daniele

    2014-11-15

    In response to genotoxic stress, DNA damage checkpoints maintain the integrity of the genome by delaying cell cycle progression to allow for DNA repair. Here we show that the degradation of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor DEC1, a critical regulator of cell fate and circadian rhythms, controls the DNA damage response. During unperturbed cell cycles, DEC1 is a highly unstable protein that is targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation by the SCF(βTrCP) ubiquitin ligase in cooperation with CK1. Upon DNA damage, DEC1 is rapidly induced in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner. DEC1 induction results from protein stabilization via a mechanism that requires the USP17 ubiquitin protease. USP17 binds and deubiquitylates DEC1, markedly extending its half-life. Subsequently, during checkpoint recovery, DEC1 proteolysis is reestablished through βTrCP-dependent ubiquitylation. Expression of a degradation-resistant DEC1 mutant prevents checkpoint recovery by inhibiting the downregulation of p53. These results indicate that the regulated degradation of DEC1 is a key factor controlling the DNA damage response.

  4. Lactoferrin from bovine colostrum regulates prolyl hydroxylase 2 activity and prevents prion protein-mediated neuronal cell damage via cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-G; Moon, J-H; Park, S-Y

    2014-08-22

    Prion disorders are associated with the conversion of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to the abnormal scrapie isoform of prion protein (PrPsc). Recent studies have shown that expression of normal PrPc is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and that lactoferrin increases full-length PrPc on the cell surface. Lactoferrin is an 80-kDa iron-binding glycoprotein with various biological activities, including iron-chelating ability. HIF-1α and the associated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway are regulated by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases 2 (PHD2). We hypothesized that lactoferrin regulates PHD2 expression and enzymatic activity, and the PHD2 regulation promotes HIF-1α stability and prevention of neuronal cell death mediated by prion protein (PrP) residues (106-126). Lactoferrin prevented PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity by the induction of PrPc expression via promoting HIF-1α stability in neuronal cells. Our results demonstrated that lactoferrin prevented PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity via the up-regulation of HIF-1α stability determined by PHD2 expression and enzymatic activity. These findings suggest that possible therapies such as PHD2 inhibition, or promotion of lactoferrin secretion, may have clinical benefits in neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease. PMID:24875174

  5. The Liver Clock Controls Cholesterol Homeostasis through Trib1 Protein-mediated Regulation of PCSK9/Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) Axis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Di; Liu, Tongyu; Chang, Lin; Rui, Crystal; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Li, Siming; Hogenesch, John B; Chen, Y Eugene; Lin, Jiandie D

    2015-12-25

    Disruption of the body clock has been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. How the circadian pacemaker interacts with the genetic factors associated with plasma lipid traits remains poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified an expanding list of genetic variants that influence plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Here we analyzed circadian regulation of lipid-associated candidate genes in the liver and identified two distinct groups exhibiting rhythmic and non-rhythmic patterns of expression during light-dark cycles. Liver-specific inactivation of Bmal1 led to elevated plasma LDL/VLDL cholesterol levels as a consequence of the disruption of the PCSK9/LDL receptor regulatory axis. Ablation of the liver clock perturbed diurnal regulation of lipid-associated genes in the liver and markedly reduced the expression of the non-rhythmically expressed gene Trib1. Adenovirus-mediated rescue of Trib1 expression lowered plasma PCSK9 levels, increased LDL receptor protein expression, and restored plasma cholesterol homeostasis in mice lacking a functional liver clock. These results illustrate an unexpected mechanism through which the biological clock regulates cholesterol homeostasis through its regulation of non-rhythmic genes in the liver.

  6. The Transcriptional Repressor MYB2 Regulates Both Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Proanthocyandin and Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Medicago truncatula[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) is limited to specific cell types and developmental stages, but little is known about how antagonistically acting transcriptional regulators work together to determine temporal and spatial patterning of pigmentation at the cellular level, especially for PAs. Here, we characterize MYB2, a transcriptional repressor regulating both anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MYB2 was strongly upregulated by MYB5, a major regulator of PA biosynthesis in M. truncatula and a component of MYB-basic helix loop helix-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes. Overexpression of MYB2 abolished anthocyanin and PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, respectively. Anthocyanin deposition was expanded in myb2 mutant seedlings and flowers accompanied by increased anthocyanin content. PA mainly accumulated in the epidermal layer derived from the outer integument in the M. truncatula seed coat, starting from the hilum area. The area of PA accumulation and ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE expression was expanded into the seed body at the early stage of seed development in the myb2 mutant. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological evidence suggests that MYB2 functions as part of a multidimensional regulatory network to define the temporal and spatial pattern of anthocyanin and PA accumulation linked to developmental processes. PMID:26410301

  7. COP1 and phyB Physically Interact with PIL1 to Regulate Its Stability and Photomorphogenic Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qian; Lian, Hong-Li; He, Sheng-Bo; Li, Ling; Jia, Kun-Peng; Yang, Hong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the cryptochrome and phytochrome photoreceptors act together to promote photomorphogenic development. The cryptochrome and phytochrome signaling mechanisms interact directly with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), a RING motif–containing E3 ligase that acts to negatively regulate photomorphogenesis. COP1 interacts with and ubiquitinates the transcription factors that promote photomorphogenesis, such as ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 and LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1), to inhibit photomorphogenic development. Here, we show that COP1 physically interacts with PIF3-LIKE1 (PIL1) and promotes PIL1 degradation via the 26S proteasome. We further demonstrate that phyB physically interacts with PIL1 and enhances PIL1 protein accumulation upon red light irradiation, probably through suppressing the COP1–PIL1 association. Biochemical and genetic studies indicate that PIL1 and HFR1 form heterodimers and promote photomorphogenesis cooperatively. Moreover, we demonstrate that PIL1 interacts with PIF1, 3, 4, and 5, resulting in the inhibition of the transcription of PIF direct-target genes. Our results reveal that PIL1 stability is regulated by phyB and COP1, likely through physical interactions, and that PIL1 coordinates with HFR1 to inhibit the transcriptional activity of PIFs, suggesting that PIL1, HFR1, and PIFs constitute a subset of antagonistic basic helix-loop-helix factors acting downstream of phyB and COP1 to regulate photomorphogenic development. PMID:24951480

  8. PIL5, a phytochrome-interacting bHLH protein, regulates gibberellin responsiveness by binding directly to the GAI and RGA promoters in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hu, Jianhong; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Jung, Byunghyuck; Paik, Inyup; Lee, Hee-Seung; Sun, Tai-ping; Kamiya, Yuji; Choi, Giltsu

    2007-04-01

    Previous work showed that PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3-LIKE5 (PIL5), a light-labile basic helix-loop-helix protein, inhibits seed germination by repressing GIBBERELLIN 3beta-HYDROXYLASE1 (GA3ox1) and GA3ox2 and activating a gibberellic acid (GA) catabolic gene (GA2ox2). However, we show persistent light-dependent and PIL5-inhibited germination behavior in the absence of both de novo GA biosynthesis and deactivation by GA2ox2, suggesting that PIL5 regulates not only GA metabolism but also GA responsiveness. PIL5 increases the expression of two GA repressor (DELLA) genes, GA-INSENSITIVE (GAI) and REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA/RGA1), in darkness. The hypersensitivity of gai-t6 rga-28 to red light and the suppression of germination defects of a rga-28 PIL5 overexpression line show the significant role of this transcriptional regulation in seed germination. PIL5 also increases abscisic acid (ABA) levels by activating ABA biosynthetic genes and repressing an ABA catabolic gene. PIL5 binds directly to GAI and RGA promoters but not to GA and ABA metabolic gene promoters. Together, our results show that light signals perceived by phytochromes cause a reduction in the PIL5 protein level, which in turn regulates the transcription of two DELLA genes directly and that of GA and ABA metabolic genes indirectly.

  9. The bHLH Factors Extramacrochaetae and Daughterless Control Cell Cycle in Drosophila Imaginal Discs through the Transcriptional Regulation of the cdc25 Phosphatase string

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Zapata, Irene; Baonza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    One of the major issues in developmental biology is about having a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate organ growth. Identifying these mechanisms is essential to understand the development processes that occur both in physiological and pathological conditions, such as cancer. The E protein family of basic helix-loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors, and their inhibitors the Id proteins, regulate cell proliferation in metazoans. This notion is further supported because the activity of these factors is frequently deregulated in cancerous cells. The E protein orthologue Daughterless (Da) and the Id orthologue Extramacrochaetae (Emc) are the only members of these classes of bHLH proteins in Drosophila. Although these factors are involved in controlling proliferation, the mechanism underlying this regulatory activity is poorly understood. Through a genetic analysis, we show that during the development of epithelial cells in the imaginal discs, the G2/M transition, and hence cell proliferation, is controlled by Emc via Da. In eukaryotic cells, the main activator of this transition is the Cdc25 phosphatase, string. Our genetic analyses reveal that the ectopic expression of string in cells with reduced levels of Emc or high levels of Da is sufficient to rescue the proliferative defects seen in these mutant cells. Moreover, we present evidence demonstrating a role of Da as a transcriptional repressor of string. Taken together, these findings define a mechanism through which Emc controls cell proliferation by regulating the activity of Da, which transcriptionally represses string. PMID:24651265

  10. DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) is regulated by cyclin-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, E; Mayr, P; Coda-Zabetta, F; Woodman, P G; Boam, D S

    1999-01-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor (USF) 1 is a member of the bzHLH (leucine zipper-basic-helix-loop-helix) family, which is structurally related to the Myc family of proteins. It plays a role in the regulation of many genes, including the cyclin B1 gene, which is active during the G2/M and M phases of the cell cycle and may also play a role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. We show that the affinity of recombinant USF-1 for DNA is greatly increased by treatment with active cyclin A2-p34(cdc2) or cyclin B1-p34(cdc2) complexes and that its interaction with DNA is dependent on p34(cdc2)-mediated phosphorylation. We have localized the phosphorylation site(s) to a region that lies outside the minimal DNA-binding domain but overlaps with the previously identified USF-specific region. Deletion studies of USF-1 suggest that amino acids 143-197 regulate DNA-binding activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:10548544

  11. The bHLH factors extramacrochaetae and daughterless control cell cycle in Drosophila imaginal discs through the transcriptional regulation of the Cdc25 phosphatase string.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Zapata, Irene; Baonza, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    One of the major issues in developmental biology is about having a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate organ growth. Identifying these mechanisms is essential to understand the development processes that occur both in physiological and pathological conditions, such as cancer. The E protein family of basic helix-loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors, and their inhibitors the Id proteins, regulate cell proliferation in metazoans. This notion is further supported because the activity of these factors is frequently deregulated in cancerous cells. The E protein orthologue Daughterless (Da) and the Id orthologue Extramacrochaetae (Emc) are the only members of these classes of bHLH proteins in Drosophila. Although these factors are involved in controlling proliferation, the mechanism underlying this regulatory activity is poorly understood. Through a genetic analysis, we show that during the development of epithelial cells in the imaginal discs, the G2/M transition, and hence cell proliferation, is controlled by Emc via Da. In eukaryotic cells, the main activator of this transition is the Cdc25 phosphatase, string. Our genetic analyses reveal that the ectopic expression of string in cells with reduced levels of Emc or high levels of Da is sufficient to rescue the proliferative defects seen in these mutant cells. Moreover, we present evidence demonstrating a role of Da as a transcriptional repressor of string. Taken together, these findings define a mechanism through which Emc controls cell proliferation by regulating the activity of Da, which transcriptionally represses string.

  12. DEC2 suppresses tumor proliferation and metastasis by regulating ERK/NF-κB pathway in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Jia, Yan-Fei; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Yan; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Yao; Zong, Shuai; Chen, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated embryonic chondrocyte expressed gene 2 (DEC2; BHLHE41/Sharp1) is a helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, and its deregulation has been observed in several tumors. However, this gene's effects on tumor progression are controversial, and its roles in gastric cancer (GC) remain unclear. In the present study, we found that DEC2 expression level is lower in GC tissues compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, and negatively correlated with tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and poor survival of GC patients. Positive clinical correlations of DEC2 with EMT regulator, E-cadherin, were also observed in the tissue sections. Overexpression of DEC2 inhibits cell proliferation and EMT in vitro, as well as tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. DEC2 expression also induces cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the anti-metastatic effect of DEC2 was mediated by inhibiting ERK/NF-κB/EMT axis. After treatment with ERK1/2 chemical inhibitor (U0126), DEC2's inhibitory effect on ERK/NF-κB/EMT was further decreased. Collectively, these data helped to characterize DEC2, which might be a potential molecular target for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for GC. PMID:27648362

  13. Transcriptional targets of TWIST1 in the cranial mesoderm regulate cell-matrix interactions and mesenchyme maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bildsoe, Heidi; Fan, Xiaochen; Wilkie, Emilie E; Ashoti, Ator; Jones, Vanessa J; Power, Melinda; Qin, Jing; Wang, Junwen; Tam, Patrick P L; Loebel, David A F

    2016-10-01

    TWIST1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor is essential for the development of cranial mesoderm and cranial neural crest-derived craniofacial structures. We have previously shown that, in the absence of TWIST1, cells within the cranial mesoderm adopt an abnormal epithelial configuration via a process reminiscent of a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). Here, we show by gene expression analysis that loss of TWIST1 in the cranial mesoderm is accompanied by a reduction in the expression of genes that are associated with cell-extracellular matrix interactions and the acquisition of mesenchymal characteristics. By comparing the transcriptional profiles of cranial mesoderm-specific Twist1 loss-of-function mutant and control mouse embryos, we identified a set of genes that are both TWIST1-dependent and predominantly expressed in the mesoderm. ChIP-seq was used to identify TWIST1-binding sites in an in vitro model of a TWIST1-dependent mesenchymal cell state, and the data were combined with the transcriptome data to identify potential target genes. Three direct transcriptional targets of TWIST1 (Ddr2, Pcolce and Tgfbi) were validated by ChIP-PCR using mouse embryonic tissues and by luciferase assays. Our findings reveal that the mesenchymal properties of the cranial mesoderm are likely to be regulated by a network of TWIST1 targets that influences the extracellular matrix and cell-matrix interactions, and collectively they are required for the morphogenesis of the craniofacial structures. PMID:27546376

  14. DEC2 suppresses tumor proliferation and metastasis by regulating ERK/NF-κB pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jia, Yan-Fei; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Yan; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Yao; Zong, Shuai; Chen, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated embryonic chondrocyte expressed gene 2 (DEC2; BHLHE41/Sharp1) is a helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, and its deregulation has been observed in several tumors. However, this gene’s effects on tumor progression are controversial, and its roles in gastric cancer (GC) remain unclear. In the present study, we found that DEC2 expression level is lower in GC tissues compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, and negatively correlated with tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and poor survival of GC patients. Positive clinical correlations of DEC2 with EMT regulator, E-cadherin, were also observed in the tissue sections. Overexpression of DEC2 inhibits cell proliferation and EMT in vitro, as well as tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. DEC2 expression also induces cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the anti-metastatic effect of DEC2 was mediated by inhibiting ERK/NF-κB/EMT axis. After treatment with ERK1/2 chemical inhibitor (U0126), DEC2’s inhibitory effect on ERK/NF-κB/EMT was further decreased. Collectively, these data helped to characterize DEC2, which might be a potential molecular target for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for GC. PMID:27648362

  15. DEC2 suppresses tumor proliferation and metastasis by regulating ERK/NF-κB pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jia, Yan-Fei; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Yan; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Yao; Zong, Shuai; Chen, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated embryonic chondrocyte expressed gene 2 (DEC2; BHLHE41/Sharp1) is a helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, and its deregulation has been observed in several tumors. However, this gene’s effects on tumor progression are controversial, and its roles in gastric cancer (GC) remain unclear. In the present study, we found that DEC2 expression level is lower in GC tissues compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, and negatively correlated with tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and poor survival of GC patients. Positive clinical correlations of DEC2 with EMT regulator, E-cadherin, were also observed in the tissue sections. Overexpression of DEC2 inhibits cell proliferation and EMT in vitro, as well as tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. DEC2 expression also induces cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the anti-metastatic effect of DEC2 was mediated by inhibiting ERK/NF-κB/EMT axis. After treatment with ERK1/2 chemical inhibitor (U0126), DEC2’s inhibitory effect on ERK/NF-κB/EMT was further decreased. Collectively, these data helped to characterize DEC2, which might be a potential molecular target for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for GC.

  16. A bHLH transcription factor, DvIVS, is involved in regulation of anthocyanin synthesis in dahlia (Dahlia variabilis).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sho; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kitamura, Yoshikuni; Morita, Yasumasa; Park, Kyeung-Ii; Nakashima, Akiko; Deguchi, Ayumi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Doi, Motoaki; Iida, Shigeru; Yazawa, Susumu

    2011-10-01

    Dahlias (Dahlia variabilis) exhibit a wide range of flower colours because of accumulation of anthocyanin and other flavonoids in their ray florets. Two lateral mutants were used that spontaneously occurred in 'Michael J' (MJW) which has yellow ray florets with orange variegation. MJOr, a bud mutant producing completely orange ray florets, accumulates anthocyanins, flavones, and butein, and MJY, another mutant producing completely yellow ray florets, accumulates flavones and butein. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that expression of chalcone synthase 1 (DvCHS1), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (DvF3H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DvDFR), anthocyanidin synthase (DvANS), and DvIVS encoding a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor were suppressed, whereas that of chalcone isomerase (DvCHI) and DvCHS2, another CHS with 69% nucleotide identity with DvCHS1, was not suppressed in the yellow ray florets of MJY. A 5.4 kb CACTA superfamily transposable element, transposable element of Dahlia variabilis 1 (Tdv1), was found in the fourth intron of the DvIVS gene of MJW and MJY, and footprints of Tdv1 were detected in the variegated flowers of MJW. It is shown that only one type of DvIVS gene was expressed in MJOr, whereas these plants are likely to have three types of the DvIVS gene. On the basis of these results, the mechanism regulating the formation of orange and yellow ray florets in dahlia is discussed. PMID:21765172

  17. RICE SALT SENSITIVE3 Forms a Ternary Complex with JAZ and Class-C bHLH Factors and Regulates Jasmonate-Induced Gene Expression and Root Cell Elongation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yosuke; Tanaka, Maiko; Ogawa, Daisuke; Kurata, Kyo; Kurotani, Ken-ichi; Habu, Yoshiki; Ando, Tsuyu; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Katoh, Etsuko; Abe, Kiyomi; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Hattori, Tsukaho; Takeda, Shin

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity of root growth in response to environmental cues and stresses is a fundamental characteristic of land plants. However, the molecular basis underlying the regulation of root growth under stressful conditions is poorly understood. Here, we report that a rice nuclear factor, RICE SALT SENSITIVE3 (RSS3), regulates root cell elongation during adaptation to salinity. Loss of function of RSS3 only moderately inhibits cell elongation under normal conditions, but it provokes spontaneous root cell swelling, accompanied by severe root growth inhibition, under saline conditions. RSS3 is preferentially expressed in the root tip and forms a ternary complex with class-C basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors and JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN proteins, the latter of which are the key regulators of jasmonate (JA) signaling. The mutated protein arising from the rss3 allele fails to interact with bHLH factors, and the expression of a significant portion of JA-responsive genes is upregulated in rss3. These results, together with the known roles of JAs in root growth regulation, suggest that RSS3 modulates the expression of JA-responsive genes and plays a crucial role in a mechanism that sustains root cell elongation at appropriate rates under stressful conditions. PMID:23715469

  18. Integrated Expression Profiling and Genome-Wide Analysis of ChREBP Targets Reveals the Dual Role for ChREBP in Glucose-Regulated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Ha-Jung; Han, Jung-Youn; Im, Seung-Soon; Chong, Hansook Kim; Kwon, Je-Keun; Cho, Yun-Ho; Kim, Woo Kyung; Osborne, Timothy F.; Horton, Jay D.; Jun, Hee-Sook; Ahn, Yong-Ho; Ahn, Sung-Min; Cha, Ji-Young

    2011-01-01

    The carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP), a basic helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper transcription factor, plays a critical role in the control of lipogenesis in the liver. To identify the direct targets of ChREBP on a genome-wide scale and provide more insight into the mechanism by which ChREBP regulates glucose-responsive gene expression, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing and gene expression analysis. We identified 1153 ChREBP binding sites and 783 target genes using the chromatin from HepG2, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. A motif search revealed a refined consensus sequence (CABGTG-nnCnG-nGnSTG) to better represent critical elements of a functional ChREBP binding sequence. Gene ontology analysis shows that ChREBP target genes are particularly associated with lipid, fatty acid and steroid metabolism. In addition, other functional gene clusters related to transport, development and cell motility are significantly enriched. Gene set enrichment analysis reveals that ChREBP target genes are highly correlated with genes regulated by high glucose, providing a functional relevance to the genome-wide binding study. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that ChREBP may function as a transcriptional repressor as well as an activator. PMID:21811631

  19. The bHLH142 Transcription Factor Coordinates with TDR1 to Modulate the Expression of EAT1 and Regulate Pollen Development in Rice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Swee-Suak; Li, Min-Jeng; Sun-Ben Ku, Maurice; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Chuang, Ming-Hsing; Hsing, Hong-Xian; Lien, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hui-Ting; Chang, Hung-Chia; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2014-06-01

    Male sterility plays an important role in F1 hybrid seed production. We identified a male-sterile rice (Oryza sativa) mutant with impaired pollen development and a single T-DNA insertion in the transcription factor gene bHLH142. Knockout mutants of bHLH142 exhibited retarded meiosis and defects in tapetal programmed cell death. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that bHLH142 is specifically expressed in the anther, in the tapetum, and in meiocytes during early meiosis. Three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, UDT1 (bHLH164), TDR1 (bHLH5), and EAT1/DTD1 (bHLH141) are known to function in rice pollen development. bHLH142 acts downstream of UDT1 and GAMYB but upstream of TDR1 and EAT1 in pollen development. In vivo and in vitro assays demonstrated that bHLH142 and TDR1 proteins interact. Transient promoter assays demonstrated that regulation of the EAT1 promoter requires bHLH142 and TDR1. Consistent with these results, 3D protein structure modeling predicted that bHLH142 and TDR1 form a heterodimer to bind to the EAT1 promoter. EAT1 positively regulates the expression of AP37 and AP25, which induce tapetal programmed cell death. Thus, in this study, we identified bHLH142 as having a pivotal role in tapetal programmed cell death and pollen development.

  20. NeuroD1 mediates nicotine-induced migration and invasion via regulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in a subset of neural and neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jihan K; Guerra, Marcy L; Gonzales, Joshua X; McMillan, Elizabeth A; Minna, John D; Cobb, Melanie H

    2014-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for acquisition of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A role has been demonstrated for the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 in the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancer, including SCLC. In the present study we investigate the possible function of NeuroD1 in established tumors, as well as actions early on in pathogenesis, in response to nicotine. We demonstrate that nicotine up-regulates NeuroD1 in immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cells and a subset of undifferentiated carcinomas. Increased expression of NeuroD1 subsequently leads to regulation of expression and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit cluster of α3, α5, and β4. In addition, we find that coordinated expression of these subunits by NeuroD1 leads to enhanced nicotine-induced migration and invasion, likely through changes in intracellular calcium. These findings suggest that aspects of the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancers may be affected by a nicotine- and NeuroD1-induced positive feedback loop.

  1. The bHLH142 Transcription Factor Coordinates with TDR1 to Modulate the Expression of EAT1 and Regulate Pollen Development in Rice[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Swee-Suak; Li, Min-Jeng; Sun-Ben Ku, Maurice; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Chuang, Ming-Hsing; Hsing, Hong-Xian; Lien, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hui-Ting; Chang, Hung-Chia; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2014-01-01

    Male sterility plays an important role in F1 hybrid seed production. We identified a male-sterile rice (Oryza sativa) mutant with impaired pollen development and a single T-DNA insertion in the transcription factor gene bHLH142. Knockout mutants of bHLH142 exhibited retarded meiosis and defects in tapetal programmed cell death. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that bHLH142 is specifically expressed in the anther, in the tapetum, and in meiocytes during early meiosis. Three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, UDT1 (bHLH164), TDR1 (bHLH5), and EAT1/DTD1 (bHLH141) are known to function in rice pollen development. bHLH142 acts downstream of UDT1 and GAMYB but upstream of TDR1 and EAT1 in pollen development. In vivo and in vitro assays demonstrated that bHLH142 and TDR1 proteins interact. Transient promoter assays demonstrated that regulation of the EAT1 promoter requires bHLH142 and TDR1. Consistent with these results, 3D protein structure modeling predicted that bHLH142 and TDR1 form a heterodimer to bind to the EAT1 promoter. EAT1 positively regulates the expression of AP37 and AP25, which induce tapetal programmed cell death. Thus, in this study, we identified bHLH142 as having a pivotal role in tapetal programmed cell death and pollen development. PMID:24894043

  2. NeuroD1 mediates nicotine-induced migration and invasion via regulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in a subset of neural and neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Jihan K.; Guerra, Marcy L.; Gonzales, Joshua X.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Minna, John D.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for acquisition of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A role has been demonstrated for the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 in the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancer, including SCLC. In the present study we investigate the possible function of NeuroD1 in established tumors, as well as actions early on in pathogenesis, in response to nicotine. We demonstrate that nicotine up-regulates NeuroD1 in immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cells and a subset of undifferentiated carcinomas. Increased expression of NeuroD1 subsequently leads to regulation of expression and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit cluster of α3, α5, and β4. In addition, we find that coordinated expression of these subunits by NeuroD1 leads to enhanced nicotine-induced migration and invasion, likely through changes in intracellular calcium. These findings suggest that aspects of the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancers may be affected by a nicotine- and NeuroD1-induced positive feedback loop. PMID:24719457

  3. The bHLH Transcription Factor Hand Regulates the Expression of Genes Critical to Heart and Muscle Function in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hallier, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Julia; Roeder, Thomas; Tögel, Markus; Meyer, Heiko; Paululat, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Hand proteins belong to the highly conserved family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors and are critical to distinct developmental processes, including cardiogenesis and neurogenesis in vertebrates. In Drosophila melanogaster a single orthologous hand gene is expressed with absence of the respective protein causing semilethality during early larval instars. Surviving adult animals suffer from shortened lifespan associated with a disorganized myofibrillar structure being apparent in the dorsal vessel, the wing hearts and in midgut tissue. Based on these data, the major biological significance of Hand seems to be related to muscle development, maintenance or function; however, up to now the physiological basis for Hand functionality remains elusive. Thus, the identification of genes whose expression is, directly or indirectly, regulated by Hand has considerable relevance with respect to understanding its biological functionality in flies and vertebrates. Beneficially, hand mutants are viable and exhibit affected tissues, which renders Drosophila an ideal model to investigate up- or downregulated target genes by a comparative microarray approach focusing on the respective tissues from mutant specimens. Our present work reveals for the first time that Drosophila Hand regulates the expression of numerous genes of diverse physiological relevancy, including distinct factors required for proper muscle development and function such as Zasp52 or Msp-300. These results relate Hand activity to muscle integrity and functionality and may thus be highly beneficial to the evaluation of corresponding hand phenotypes. PMID:26252215

  4. A site on the influenza A virus NS1 protein mediates both inhibition of PKR activation and temporal regulation of viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Li, Shoudong; Sen, Ganes C; Krug, Robert M

    2007-06-20

    It is not known how influenza A viruses, important human pathogens, counter PKR activation, a crucial host antiviral response. Here we elucidate this mechanism. We show that the direct binding of PKR to the NS1 protein in vitro that results in inhibition of PKR activation requires the NS1 123-127 amino acid sequence. To establish whether such direct binding of PKR to the NS1 protein is responsible for inhibiting PKR activation in infected cells, we generated recombinant influenza A/Udorn/72 viruses expressing NS1 proteins in which amino acids 123/124 or 126/127 are changed to alanines. In cells infected with these mutant viruses, PKR is activated, eIF-2alpha is phosphorylated and viral protein synthesis is inhibited, indicating that direct binding of PKR to the 123-127 sequence of the NS1 protein is necessary and sufficient to block PKR activation in influenza A virus-infected cells. Unexpectedly, the 123/124 mutant virus is not attenuated because reduced viral protein synthesis is offset by enhanced viral RNA synthesis at very early times of infection. These early viral RNAs include those synthesized predominantly at later times during wild-type virus infection, demonstrating that wild-type temporal regulation of viral RNA synthesis is absent in 123/124 virus-infected cells. Enhanced early viral RNA synthesis after 123/124 virus infection also occurs in mouse PKR-/- cells, demonstrating that PKR activation and deregulation of the time course of viral RNA synthesis are not coupled. These results indicate that the 123/124 site of the NS1A protein most likely functionally interacts with the viral polymerase to mediate temporal regulation of viral RNA synthesis. This interaction would occur in the nucleus, whereas PKR would bind to NS1A proteins in the cytoplasm prior to their import into the nucleus.

  5. GsSKP21, a Glycine soja S-phase kinase-associated protein, mediates the regulation of plant alkaline tolerance and ABA sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ailin; Yu, Yang; Duan, Xiangbo; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Plant SKP1-like family proteins, components of the SCF complex E3 ligases, are involved in the regulation of plant development and stress responses. Little is known about the precise function of SKP genes in plant responses to environmental stresses. GsSKP21 was initially identified as a potential stress-responsive gene based on the transcriptome sequencing of Glycine soja. In this study, we found that GsSKP21 protein contains highly conserved SKP domains in its N terminus and an extra unidentified domain in its C terminus. The transcript abundance of GsSKP21, detected by quantitative real-time PCR, was induced under the treatment of alkali and salt stresses. Overexpression of GsSKP21 in Arabidopsis dramatically increased plant tolerance to alkali stress. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsSKP21 resulted in decreased ABA sensitivity during both the seed germination and early seedling growth stages. GsSKP21 mediated ABA signaling by altering the expression levels of the ABA signaling-related and ABA-induced genes. We also investigated the tissue expression specificity and subcellular localization of GsSKP21. These results suggest that GsSKP21 is important for plant tolerance to alkali stress and plays a critical regulatory role in the ABA-mediated stress response.

  6. Circadian clock and PIF4-mediated external coincidence mechanism coordinately integrates both of the cues from seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature to regulate plant growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Yuji; Kubozono, Saori; Miyachi, Miki; Yamashino, Takafumi; Nakamichi, Norihito; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the circadian clock regulates the photoperiodic plant growth including the elongation of hypocotyls in a short-days (SDs)-specific manner. The clock-controlled PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) gene encoding a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor plays crucial roles in this regulation. The SDs-specific elongation of hypocotyls is best explained by accumulation of the active PIF4 proteins at the end of night specifically in SDs due to coincidence between internal (circadian clock) and external (photoperiod) cues. However, this external coincidence model was challenged with the recent finding that the elongation of hypocotyls is markedly promoted at high growth temperature (28˚C) even in long-days (LDs), implying that the model to explain the photoperiodic response of plant architecture appears to be conditional on ambient temperature. With regard to this problem, the results of this and previous studies showed that the model holds under a wide range of ambient temperature conditions (16˚C to 28˚C). We propose that the circadian clock and PIF4-mediated external coincidence mechanism coordinately integrates both of the cues from seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature to regulate plant growth in natural habitats.

  7. The Ankrd13 Family of Ubiquitin-interacting Motif-bearing Proteins Regulates Valosin-containing Protein/p97 Protein-mediated Lysosomal Trafficking of Caveolin 1.

    PubMed

    Burana, Daocharad; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Tanno, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komada, Masayuki

    2016-03-18

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an oligomeric protein that forms flask-shaped, lipid-rich pits, termed caveolae, on the plasma membrane. Cav-1 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in ubiquitination- and valosin-containing protein (VCP)-dependent manners. VCP, an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities that remodels or segregates ubiquitinated protein complexes, has been proposed to disassemble Cav-1 oligomers on the endosomal membrane, facilitating the trafficking of Cav-1 to the lysosome. Genetic mutations in VCP compromise the lysosomal trafficking of Cav-1, leading to a disease called inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of bone and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Here we identified the Ankrd13 family of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM)-containing proteins as novel VCP-interacting molecules on the endosome. Ankrd13 proteins formed a ternary complex with VCP and Cav-1 and exhibited high binding affinity for ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers in an UIM-dependent manner. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that Cav-1 undergoes Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination, which serves as a lysosomal trafficking signal, and that the UIMs of Ankrd13 proteins bind preferentially to this ubiquitin chain type. The overexpression of Ankrd13 caused enlarged hollow late endosomes, which was reminiscent of the phenotype of the VCP mutations in IBMPFD. Overexpression of Ankrd13 proteins also stabilized ubiquitinated Cav-1 oligomers on the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes. The interaction with Ankrd13 was abrogated in IMBPFD-associated VCP mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ankrd13 proteins cooperate with VCP to regulate the lysosomal trafficking of ubiquitinated Cav-1.

  8. Phosphorylation of the human respiratory syncytial virus P protein mediates M2-2 regulation of viral RNA synthesis, a process that involves two P proteins.

    PubMed

    Asenjo, Ana; Villanueva, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    The M2-2 protein regulates the balance between human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) transcription and replication. Here it is shown that M2-2 mediated transcriptional inhibition is managed through P protein phosphorylation. Transcription inhibition by M2-2 of the HRSV based minigenome pRSVluc, required P protein phosphorylation at serines (S) in positions 116, 117, 119 and increased inhibition is observed if S232 or S237 is also phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of these residues is required for viral particle egression from infected cells. Viral RNA synthesis complementation assays between P protein variants, suggest that two types of P proteins participate in the process as components of RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Type I is only functional when, as a homotetramer, it is bound to N and L proteins through residues 203-241. Type II is functionally independent of these interactions and binds to N protein at a region outside residues 232-241. P protein type I phosphorylation at S116, S117 and S119, did not affect the activity of RdRp but this phosphorylation in type II avoids its interaction with N protein and impairs RdRp functionality for transcription and replication. Structural changes in the RdRp, mediated by phosphorylation turnover at the indicated residues, in the two types of P proteins, may result in a fine adjustment, late in the infectious cycle, of transcription, replication and progression in the morphogenetic process that ends in egression of the viral particles from infected cells.

  9. 3D Structure, Dimerization Modeling, and Lead Discovery by Ligand-protein Interaction Analysis of p60 Transcription Regulator Protein (p60TRP).

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Subrata; Kutzner, Arne; Heese, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The p60 transcription regulator protein (p60TRP) is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain-containing neuroprotective protein and a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-associated sorting protein (GPRASP) family. In the present study, multiple theoretical physico-chemical methods (e.g. Modeller v.9.13, I-TASSER, PROCHECK and ClusPro v2.0 with PIPER) were applied to unveil the three-dimensional (3D) protein structure of the p60TRP homo-dimer protein and explore potential ligand-protein interactions. Our results suggest a Mg(2+) -containing 3D p60TRP dimer protein that potentially interacts with 5-(1-aziridinyl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954) and [2-(3-dodecylimidazolidin-1-yl)-1-phosphonoethyl] phosphonic acid (B73). The discovery of CB1954 and B73 may serve as a potential lead for further drug screening tests to normalize the p60TRP signaling pathway in neurodegenerative diseases. Interference with p60TRP signaling via CB1954/B73-related molecules might be a novel option for modifying neurodegenerative signaling pathways (e.g. RIN1, PP2A, RanBP5, CREB and SYNJ1) to treat various brain diseases. PMID:27491919

  10. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 Regulates Arabidopsis Petal Growth by Interacting with the bHLH Transcription Factor BIGPETALp[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Varaud, Emilie; Brioudes, Florian; Szécsi, Judit; Leroux, Julie; Brown, Spencer; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Bendahmane, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Plant organ growth and final size are determined by coordinated cell proliferation and expansion. The BIGPETALp (BPEp) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor was shown to limit Arabidopsis thaliana petal growth by influencing cell expansion. We demonstrate here that BPEp interacts with AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 (ARF8) to affect petal growth. This interaction is mediated through the BPEp C-terminal domain (SDBPEp) and the C-terminal domain of ARF8. Site-directed mutagenesis identified an amino acid consensus motif in SDBPEp that is critical for mediating BPEp-ARF8 interaction. This motif shares sequence similarity with motif III of ARF and AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID proteins. Petals of arf8 mutants are significantly larger than those of the wild type due to increased cell number and increased cell expansion. bpe arf8 double mutant analyses show that during early petal development stages, ARF8 and BPEp work synergistically to limit mitotic growth. During late stages, ARF8 and BPEp interact to limit cell expansion. The alterations in cell division and cell expansion observed in arf8 and/or bpe mutants are associated with a change in expression of early auxin-responsive genes. The data provide evidence of an interaction between an ARF and a bHLH transcription factor and of its biological significance in regulating petal growth, with local auxin levels likely influencing such a biological function. PMID:21421811

  11. Twist2 promotes kidney cancer cell proliferation and invasion by regulating ITGA6 and CD44 expression in the ECM-receptor interaction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao-jie; Tao, Jing; Sheng, Lu; Hu, Xin; Rong, Rui-ming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tong-yu

    2016-01-01

    Twist2 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family and plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Growing evidence has proven that Twist2 is involved in tumor progression; however, the role of Twist2 in human kidney cancer and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of Twist2 in kidney cancer cells and tissues. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assay were analyzed using the Cell Count Kit-8, flow cytometry, wound healing, and Transwell analysis, respectively. In this study, we showed that Twist2 was upregulated in human kidney cancer tissues compared with normal kidney tissues. Twist2 promoted cell proliferation, inhibited cell apoptosis, and augmented cell migration and invasion in human kidney-cancer-derived cells in vitro. Twist2 also promoted tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, we found that the knockdown of Twist2 decreased the levels of ITGA6 and CD44 expression. This result indicates that Twist2 may promote migration and invasion of kidney cancer cells by regulating ITGA6 and CD44 expression. Therefore, our data demonstrated that Twist2 is involved in kidney cancer progression. The identification of the role of Twist2 in the migration and invasion of kidney cancer provides a potential appropriate treatment for human kidney cancer. PMID:27099513

  12. An RNA virus-encoded zinc-finger protein acts as a plant transcription factor and induces a regulator of cell size and proliferation in two tobacco species.

    PubMed

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I; Solovieva, Anna D; Boddeti, Santosh K; Thaduri, Srinivas; Solovyev, Andrey G; Savenkov, Eugene I

    2013-03-01

    Plant viruses cause a variety of diseases in susceptible hosts. The disease symptoms often include leaf malformations and other developmental abnormalities, suggesting that viruses can affect plant development. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying virus interference with plant morphogenesis. Here, we show that a C-4 type zinc-finger (ZF) protein, p12, encoded by a carlavirus (chrysanthemum virus B) can induce cell proliferation, which results in hyperplasia and severe leaf malformation. We demonstrate that the p12 protein activates expression of a regulator of cell size and proliferation, designated upp-L (upregulated by p12), which encodes a transcription factor of the basic/helix-loop-helix family sufficient to cause hyperplasia. The induction of upp-L requires translocation of the p12 protein into the nucleus and ZF-dependent specific interaction with the conserved regulatory region in the upp-L promoter. Our results establish the role of the p12 protein in modulation of host cell morphogenesis. It is likely that other members of the conserved C-4 type ZF family of viral proteins instigate reprogramming of plant development by mimicking eukaryotic transcriptional activators.

  13. Nuclear translocation of Hand-1 acts as a molecular switch to regulate vascular radiosensitivity in medulloblastoma tumors: the protein uPAR is a cytoplasmic sequestration factor for Hand-1.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Rao, Jasti S; Velpula, Kiran Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is overexpressed in the tumor-stromal invasive microenvironment in many human cancers, including medulloblastoma. The role of uPAR in tumor progression and angiogenesis has been well characterized. Previously, in medulloblastoma cells, we showed that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced uPAR is a potent activator of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties and is associated with various transcription factors that are involved during embryonic development and cancer. In the present study, we show that uPAR protein acts as a cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand-1. The Hand-1 protein plays an essential role in the differentiation of trophoblast giant cells and cardiac morphogenesis, and yet its precise cellular function and its contribution to cancer remain mostly unknown. We also observed that the Hand-1 protein is upregulated in uPAR short hairpin RNA-treated medulloblastoma cells and accompanies sustained cell growth and angiogenesis. Furthermore, IR-induced uPAR overexpression negatively regulates Hand-1 activity and results in the stabilization of angiogenesis-promoting molecules, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, uPAR overexpression and its association with Hand-1 after IR treatment indicate that uPAR is capable of regulating Hand-1 and that uPAR has a role in the process of IR-induced tumor angiogenesis.

  14. Up-regulation of the Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) genes in white adipose tissue of Id1 protein-deficient mice: implications in the protection against diet and age-induced glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Ling, Flora; Griffin, Timothy M; He, Ting; Towner, Rheal; Ruan, Hong; Sun, Xiao-Hong

    2014-10-17

    Id1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inhibits the function of basic HLH E protein transcription factors in lymphoid cells, has been implicated in diet- and age-induced obesity by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that Id1-deficient mice are resistant to a high fat diet- and age-induced obesity, as revealed by reduced weight gain and body fat, increased lipid oxidation, attenuated hepatosteatosis, lower levels of lipid droplets in brown adipose tissue, and smaller white adipocytes after a high fat diet feeding or in aged animals. Id1 deficiency improves glucose tolerance, lowers serum insulin levels, and reduces TNFα gene expression in white adipose tissue. Id1 deficiency also increased expression of Sirtuin 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure, in the white adipose tissue. This effect was accompanied by the elevation of several genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation, such as cytochrome c, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and adipocyte protein 2. Moreover, the phenotype for Id1 deficiency was similar to that of mice expressing an E protein dominant-positive construct, ET2, suggesting that the balance between Id and E proteins plays a role in regulating lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. PMID:25190816

  15. Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Displaced SREBP Proteins as the Major Sterol Regulators during Saccharomycotina Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L.; Wang, Can; Holland, Linda M.; Brunel, François; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Zavrel, Martin; White, Theodore C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs), which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1) and C. albicans (Cph2) have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1) and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina. PMID:24453983

  16. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORα (PPARα) AGONISTS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE INHIBITOR OF DNA BINDING (ID2) EXPRESSION IN RODENTS AND HUMAN CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor family whose members play important roles in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones,...

  17. Regulation of BDNF chromatin status and promoter accessibility in a neural correlate of associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ganesh; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression critically controls learning and its aberrant regulation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and a host of neurodevelopmental disorders. The BDNF gene is target of known DNA regulatory mechanisms but details of its activity-dependent regulation are not fully characterized. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the turtle BDNF gene (tBDNF) during a neural correlate of associative learning using an in vitro model of eye blink classical conditioning. Shortly after conditioning onset, the results from ChIP-qPCR show conditioning-dependent increases in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and repressor basic helix-loop-helix binding protein 2 (BHLHB2) binding to tBDNF promoter II that corresponds with transcriptional repression. In contrast, enhanced binding of ten-eleven translocation protein 1 (Tet1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promoter III corresponds with transcriptional activation. These actions are accompanied by rapid modifications in histone methylation and phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Significantly, these remarkably coordinated changes in epigenetic factors for two alternatively regulated tBDNF promoters during conditioning are controlled by Tet1 and ERK1/2. Our findings indicate that Tet1 and ERK1/2 are critical partners that, through complementary functions, control learning-dependent tBDNF promoter accessibility required for rapid transcription and acquisition of classical conditioning. PMID:26336984

  18. The SCL gene product: a positive regulator of erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Nakahara, K; Orkin, S H; Kirsch, I R

    1992-01-01

    The SCL (tal-1, TCL5) gene is a member of the basic domain, helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class of putative transcription factors. We found that (i) the SCL promoter for exon Ia contains a potential recognition site for GATA-binding transcription factors, (ii) SCL mRNA is expressed in all erythroid tissues and cell lines examined, and (iii) SCL mRNA increases upon induced differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells, and inferred that SCL may play a physiologic role in erythroid differentiation. We used gel shift and transfection assays to demonstrate that the GATA motif in the SCL promoter binds GATA-1 (and GATA-2), and also mediates transcriptional transactivation. To identify a role for SCL in erythroid differentiation, we generated stable transfectants of MEL and K562 (a human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line that can differentiate along the erythroid pathway) cells overexpressing wild-type, antisense or mutant SCL cDNA. Increasing the level of SCL expression in two independent MEL lines (F4-6 and C19, a 745 derivative) and K562 cells increased the rate of spontaneous (i.e. in the absence of inducer) erythroid differentiation. Conversely, induced differentiation was inhibited in MEL transfectants expressing either antisense SCL cDNA or a mutant SCL lacking the basic domain. Our experiments suggest that the SCL gene can be a target for the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 and that the SCL gene product serves as a positive regulator of erythroid differentiation. Images PMID:1396592

  19. CjbHLH1 homologs regulate sanguinarine biosynthesis in Eschscholzia californica cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Motomura, Yukiya; Sato, Fumihiko

    2015-05-01

    Isoquinoline alkaloids (IQAs), terpenoid indole alkaloid and nicotine are some of the most studied alkaloids. Recently, several groups have reported that the biosynthesis of these alkaloids is regulated by basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Whereas the biosyntheses of nicotine and terpenoid indole alkaloid in Nicotiana plants and Catharanthus roseus are directly or indirectly regulated by Arabidopsis thaliana MYC2 homologs, a non-MYC2-type bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, comprehensively regulates berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica. Interestingly, CjbHLH1 homologous genes were found in many IQA-producing plant species, which suggests that non-MYC2-type CjbHLH homologs are specifically associated with IQA biosynthesis. To test whether CjbHLH1 homologs are involved in the biosynthesis of IQA in a plant other than C. japonica, we isolated two genes homologous to CjbHLH1, i.e. EcbHLH1-1 and EcbHLH1-2, from Eschscholzia californica (California poppy). Stable transformants in which the expression levels of EcbHLH1 genes were constitutively suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) showed a reduced expression of some IQA biosynthetic enzyme genes. A metabolite analysis confirmed that the suppression of EcbHLH1, particularly EcbHLH1-2, caused a decrease in sanguinarine accumulation in transgenic cultured cells. These results indicate that non-MYC2-type EcbHLH1s regulate IQA biosynthesis in California poppy like CjbHLH1 in C. japonica.

  20. Regulation of chick early B-cell factor-1 gene expression in feather development.

    PubMed

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Sayed-Ahmed, Ahmed; Awad, Ashraf; Shukry, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    The chick Ebf1 (early B-cell factor-1) gene is a member of a novel family of helix loop helix transcription factors. The expression profile, regulation and significance of this gene have been extensively studied in lymphatic, nervous, adipose and muscular tissues. However, cEbf1 expression, regulation and function in the feather of chick embryo have not yet been investigated. cEbf1 expression was first detected throughout the mesenchymal core of some few feather placodes (D7-D7.5). After feathers became mature and grew distally (D9 and D10), the mesenchymal expression of cEbf1 became confined to the caudal margin of the proximal half of all formed feather buds. Because this dynamic pattern of expression resembles that of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein and bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp4) plus the crucial role of these two major signals in feather development, we hypothesized that cEbf1 expression in the feather may be regulated by Shh and Bmp4. In a feather explant culture system, Shh signals are necessary to initiate and maintain cEbf1 expression in the posterior half of the feather bud, while Bmp4 is crucial for the initial cEbf1 expression in the anterior half of the feather bud. Inhibition of Shh, not only down-regulates cEbf1, but also changes the morphology of feather buds, which become irregular and fused. This is the first study to demonstrate that cEbf1 expression in the feather bud is under the control of Shh and Bmp4 signals and that expression may play a role in the normal development of feathers.

  1. Recent advances in the transcriptional regulation of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hichri, Imène; Barrieu, François; Bogs, Jochen; Kappel, Christian; Delrot, Serge; Lauvergeat, Virginie

    2011-05-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites involved in several aspects of plant development and defence. They colour fruits and flowers, favouring seed and pollen dispersal, and contribute to plant adaptation to environmental conditions such as cold or UV stresses, and pathogen attacks. Because they affect the quality of flowers (for horticulture), fruits and vegetables, and their derivatives (colour, aroma, stringency, etc.), flavonoids have a high economic value. Furthermore, these compounds possess pharmaceutical properties extremely attractive for human health. Thanks to easily detectable mutant phenotypes, such as modification of petal pigmentation and seeds exhibiting transparent testa, the enzymes involved in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway have been characterized in several plant species. Conserved features as well as specific differences have been described. Regulation of structural gene expression appears tightly organized in a spatial and temporal way during plant development, and is orchestrated by a ternary complex involving transcription factors from the R2R3-MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40 classes. This MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex regulates the genes that encode enzymes specifically involved in the late steps of the pathway leading to the biosynthesis of anthocyanins and condensed tannins. Although several genes encoding transcription factors from these three families have been identified, many gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of this biosynthetic pathway, especially about the respective roles of bHLH and WD40 proteins. A better knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of the flavonoid pathway is likely to favour the development of new biotechnological tools for the generation of value-added plants with optimized flavonoid content.

  2. Characterization of species-specific genes regulated by E2-2 in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Menglan; Zhang, Xuyuan; Yu, Haisheng; Du, Peishuang; Plumas, Joël; Chaperot, Laurance; Su, Lishan; Zhang, Liguo

    2015-07-17

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinels of the immune system and comprise two distinct subsets: conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Human pDCs are distinguished from mouse pDCs phenotypically and functionally. Basic helix-loop-helix protein E2-2 is defined as an essential transcription factor for mouse pDC development, cell fate maintenance and gene programe. It is unknown whether E2-2 regulation contributes to this species-specific difference. Here we investigated the function of E2-2 in human pDCs and screened human-specific genes regulated by E2-2. Reduced E2-2 expression in human pDC cell line GEN2.2 resulted in diminished IFN-α production in response to CpG but elevated antigen presentation capacity. Gene expression profiling showed that E2-2 silence down-regulated pDC signature genes but up-regulated cDC signature genes. Thirty human-specific genes regulated by E2-2 knockdown were identified. Among these genes, we confirmed that expression of Siglec-6 was inhibited by E2-2. Further more, Siglec-6 was expressed at a higher level on a human pDC subset with drastically lower expression of E2-2. Collectively, these results highlight that E2-2 modulates pDC function in a species-specific manner, which may provide insights for pDC development and functions.

  3. Characterization of species-specific genes regulated by E2-2 in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Menglan; Zhang, Xuyuan; Yu, Haisheng; Du, Peishuang; Plumas, Joël; Chaperot, Laurance; Su, Lishan; Zhang, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinels of the immune system and comprise two distinct subsets: conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Human pDCs are distinguished from mouse pDCs phenotypically and functionally. Basic helix-loop-helix protein E2-2 is defined as an essential transcription factor for mouse pDC development, cell fate maintenance and gene programe. It is unknown whether E2-2 regulation contributes to this species-specific difference. Here we investigated the function of E2-2 in human pDCs and screened human-specific genes regulated by E2-2. Reduced E2-2 expression in human pDC cell line GEN2.2 resulted in diminished IFN-α production in response to CpG but elevated antigen presentation capacity. Gene expression profiling showed that E2-2 silence down-regulated pDC signature genes but up-regulated cDC signature genes. Thirty human-specific genes regulated by E2-2 knockdown were identified. Among these genes, we confirmed that expression of Siglec-6 was inhibited by E2-2. Further more, Siglec-6 was expressed at a higher level on a human pDC subset with drastically lower expression of E2-2. Collectively, these results highlight that E2-2 modulates pDC function in a species-specific manner, which may provide insights for pDC development and functions. PMID:26182859

  4. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  5. Differential regulation of Hand1 homodimer and Hand1-E12 heterodimer activity by the cofactor FHL2.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alison A; Riley, Paul R

    2004-11-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor Hand1 plays an essential role in cardiac morphogenesis, and yet its precise function remains unknown. Protein-protein interactions involving Hand1 provide a means of determining how Hand1-induced gene expression in the developing heart might be regulated. Hand1 is known to form either heterodimers with near-ubiquitous E-factors and other lineage-restricted class B bHLH proteins or homodimers with itself in vitro. To date, there have been no reported Hand1 protein interactions involving non-bHLH proteins. Heterodimer-versus-homodimer choice is mediated by the phosphorylation status of Hand1; however, little is known about the in vivo function of these dimers or, importantly, how they are regulated. In an effort to understand how Hand1 activity in the heart might be regulated postdimerization, we have investigated tertiary Hand1-protein interactions with non-bHLH factors. We describe a novel interaction of Hand1 with the LIM domain protein FHL2, a known transcriptional coactivator and corepressor expressed in the developing cardiovascular system. FHL2 interacts with Hand1 via the bHLH domain and is able to repress Hand1/E12 heterodimer-induced transcription but has no effect on Hand1/Hand1 homodimer activity. This effect of FHL2 is not mediated either at the level of dimerization or via an effect of Hand1/E12 DNA binding. In summary, our data describe a novel differential regulation of Hand1 heterodimers versus homodimers by association of the cofactor FHL2 and provide insight into the potential for a tertiary level of control of Hand1 activity in the developing heart.

  6. A functional genomics screen identifies diverse transcription factors that regulate alkaloid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrea T; Liu, Enwu; Polvi, Sandra L; Pammett, Robert T; Page, Jonathan E

    2010-05-01

    Biosynthesis of the alkaloid nicotine in Nicotiana species is induced by insect damage and jasmonate application. To probe the transcriptional regulation of the nicotine pathway, we constructed two subtracted cDNA libraries from methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-treated Nicotiana benthamiana roots directly in a viral vector suitable for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Sequencing of cDNA inserts produced a data set of 3271 expressed sequence tags (ESTs; 1898 unigenes), which were enriched in jasmonate-responsive genes, and included 69 putative transcription factors (TFs). After a VIGS screen to determine their effect on nicotine metabolism, six TFs from three different TF families altered constitutive and MeJA-induced leaf nicotine levels. VIGS of a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) TF, NbbHLH3, and an auxin response factor TF, NbARF1, increased nicotine content compared with control plants; silencing the bHLH family members, NbbHLH1 and NbbHLH2, an ethylene response factor TF, NbERF1, and a homeobox domain-like TF, NbHB1, reduced nicotine levels. Transgenic N. benthamiana plants overexpressing NbbHLH1 or NbbHLH2 showed increased leaf nicotine levels compared with vector controls. RNAi silencing led to both reduced nicotine and decreased levels of transcript encoding of enzymes of the nicotine pathway. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant NbbHLH1 and NbbHLH2 directly bind G-box elements identified from the putrescine N-methyltransferase promoter. We conclude that NbbHLH1 and NbbHLH2 function as positive regulators in the jasmonate activation of nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:20202168

  7. The Cardiomyocyte Molecular Clock Regulates the Circadian Expression of Kcnh2 and Contributes to Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Burgess, Don E.; Zhang, Xiping; Lefta, Mellani; Smith, Jennifer L.; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Bartos, Daniel C.; Elayi, Claude S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Delisle, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) follows a diurnal variation. Data suggest the timing of SCD is influenced by circadian (~24 hour) changes in neurohumoral and cardiomyocyte-specific regulation of the heart’s electrical properties. Objective The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK coordinate the circadian expression of select genes. We tested whether Bmal1 expression in cardiomyocytes contributes to K+ channel expression and diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization. Methods We utilized transgenic mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1−/−). We used quantitative PCR, voltage-clamping, promoter-reporter bioluminescence assays, and electrocardiographic (ECG) telemetry. Results Although several K+ channel gene transcripts were downregulated in iCSΔBmal1−/− mouse hearts, only Kcnh2 exhibited a robust circadian pattern of expression that was disrupted in iCSΔBmal1−/− hearts. Kcnh2 underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K+ current (IKr), and IKr recorded from iCSΔBmal1−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes was ~50% compared to control myocytes. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrated that the human Kcnh2 promoter is transactivated by the co-expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK. ECG analysis showed iCSΔBmal1−/− mice developed a prolongation in the heart rate corrected QT (QTc) interval during the light (resting)-phase. This was secondary to an augmented circadian rhythm in the uncorrected QT interval without a corresponding change in the RR interval. Conclusion The molecular clock in the heart regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2, modifies K+ channel gene expression and is important for normal ventricular repolarization. Disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock mechanism likely unmasks diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization that could contribute to an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias/SCD. PMID:25701773

  8. Hand1 regulates cardiomyocyte proliferation versus differentiation in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Risebro, Catherine A; Smart, Nicola; Dupays, Laurent; Breckenridge, Ross; Mohun, Timothy J; Riley, Paul R

    2006-11-01

    The precise origins of myocardial progenitors and their subsequent contribution to the developing heart has been an area of considerable activity within the field of cardiovascular biology. How these progenitors are regulated and what signals are responsible for their development are, however, much less well understood. Clearly, not only is there a need to identify factors that regulate the transition from proliferation of cardioblasts to differentiation of cardiac muscle, but it is also necessary to identify factors that maintain an adequate pool of undifferentiated myocyte precursors as a prerequisite to preventing organ hypoplasia and congenital heart disease. Here, we report how upregulation of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Hand1, restricted exclusively to Hand1-expressing cells, brings about a significant extension of the heart tube and extraneous looping caused by the elevated proliferation of cardioblasts in the distal outflow tract. This activity is independent of the further recruitment of extracardiac cells from the secondary heart field and permissive for the continued differentiation of adjacent myocardium. Culture studies using embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived cardiomyocytes revealed that, in a Hand1-null background, there is significantly elevated cardiomyocyte differentiation, with an apparent default mesoderm pathway to a cardiomyocyte fate. However, Hand1 gain of function maintains proliferating precursors resulting in delayed and significantly reduced cardiomyocyte differentiation that is mediated by the prevention of cell-cycle exit, by G1 progression and by increased cell division. Thus, this work identifies Hand1 as a crucial cardiac regulatory protein that controls the balance between proliferation and differentiation in the developing heart, and fills a significant gap in our understanding of how the myocardium of the embryonic heart is established.

  9. A novel bHLH transcription factor PebHLH35 from Populus euphratica confers drought tolerance through regulating stomatal development, photosynthesis and growth in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Wang, Congpeng; Han, Xiao; Tang, Sha; Liu, Sha; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • PebHLH35 is firstly cloned from Populus euphratica and characterized its functions. • PebHLH35 is important for earlier seedling establishment and vegetative growth. • PebHLH35 enhances tolerance to drought by regulating growth. • PebHLH35 enhances tolerance to drought by regulating stomatal development. • PebHLH35 enhances tolerance to drought by regulating photosynthesis and transpiration. - Abstract: Plant basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) are involved in a variety of physiological processes including the regulation of plant responses to various abiotic stresses. However, few drought-responsive bHLH family members in Populus have been reported. In this study, a novel bHLH gene (PebHLH35) was cloned from Populus euphratica. Expression analysis in P. euphratica revealed that PebHLH35 was induced by drought and abscisic acid. Subcellular localization studies using a PebHLH35-GFP fusion showed that the protein was localized to the nucleus. Ectopic overexpression of PebHLH35 in Arabidopsis resulted in a longer primary root, more leaves, and a greater leaf area under well-watered conditions compared with vector control plants. Notably, PebHLH35 overexpression lines showed enhanced tolerance to water-deficit stress. This finding was supported by anatomical and physiological analyses, which revealed a reduced stomatal density, stomatal aperture, transpiration rate, and water loss, and a higher chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate. Our results suggest that PebHLH35 functions as a positive regulator of drought stress responses by regulating stomatal density, stomatal aperture, photosynthesis and growth.

  10. Pervasive regulation of Drosophila Notch target genes by GY-box-, Brd-box-, and K-box-class microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Eric C; Tam, Bergin; Rubin, Gerald M

    2005-05-01

    Although hundreds of distinct animal microRNAs (miRNAs) are known, the specific biological functions of only a handful are understood at present. Here, we demonstrate that three different families of Drosophila miRNAs directly regulate two large families of Notch target genes, including basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) repressor and Bearded family genes. These miRNAs regulate Notch target gene activity via GY-box (GUCUUCC), Brd-box (AGCUUUA), and K-box (cUGUGAUa) motifs. These are conserved sites in target 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) that are complementary to the 5'-ends of miRNAs, or "seed" regions. Collectively, these motifs represent >40 miRNA-binding sites in Notch target genes, and we show all three classes of motif to be necessary and sufficient for miRNA-mediated regulation in vivo. Importantly, many of the validated miRNA-binding sites have limited pairing to miRNAs outside of the "box:seed" region. Consistent with this, we find that seed-related miRNAs that are otherwise quite divergent can regulate the same target sequences. Finally, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of several Notch-regulating miRNAs induces mutant phenotypes that are characteristic of Notch pathway loss of function, including loss of wing margin, thickened wing veins, increased bristle density, and tufted bristles. Collectively, these data establish insights into miRNA target recognition and demonstrate that the Notch signaling pathway is a major target of miRNA-mediated regulation in Drosophila.

  11. The bHLH Transcription Factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 Regulate Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jan; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING REGULATOR1 (TSAR1) and TSAR2, which direct triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula. TSAR1 and TSAR2 are coregulated with and transactivate the genes encoding 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1 (HMGR1) and MAKIBISHI1, the rate-limiting enzyme for triterpene biosynthesis and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls HMGR1 levels, respectively. Transactivation is mediated by direct binding of TSARs to the N-box in the promoter of HMGR1. In transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts, TSAR1 and TSAR2 exhibit different patterns of transactivation of downstream triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes, hinting at distinct functionalities within the regulation of the pathway. Correspondingly, overexpression of TSAR1 or TSAR2 in M. truncatula hairy roots resulted in elevated transcript levels of known triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes and strongly increased the accumulation of triterpene saponins. TSAR2 overexpression specifically boosted hemolytic saponin biosynthesis, whereas TSAR1 overexpression primarily stimulated nonhemolytic soyasaponin biosynthesis. Both TSARs also activated all genes of the precursor mevalonate pathway but did not affect sterol biosynthetic genes, pointing to their specific role as regulators of specialized triterpene metabolism in M. truncatula.

  12. Transcripts encoding HAND genes are differentially expressed and regulated by BMP4 and GDNF in developing avian gut.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Howard, Marthe J

    2002-01-01

    Growth and transcription factors provide important developmental cues to neural crest-derived precursors of enteric neurons. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, HAND2 and HAND1, are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, but neither the growth factors that induce their expression nor the cell types that express them in the gut are known. We show that transcripts encoding HAND2 are expressed in all segments of the developing gut while those encoding HAND1 are confined to the small intestine and colon. Using in situ hybridization combined with immunostaining using cell type-specific antigens, we demonstrate that transcripts encoding HAND2 are expressed in neurons of both the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. Transcripts encoding HAND1 are expressed by cells in the epithelial lining of the small intestine and colon. The differential localization of HAND2 and HAND1 is reflected in nonoverlapping patterns of regulation by gut-derived factors. The expression of transcripts encoding HAND2 is increased in neural crest-derived cells when cocultured with E4 gut, suggesting a gut-derived factor regulates expression of HAND genes. Exposure of gut-derived neural crest-derived cells to BMP4 significantly increased the expression of HAND2 in all gut segments. In the esophagus and gizzard, where HAND1 is not normally expressed, treatment with BMP4 induced the expression of transcripts encoding HAND1 in nonneural crest-derived cells. GDNF failed to induce consistent expression of transcripts encoding HAND2 in neural crest cells but did support a modest increase in HAND2 expression in gut-derived crest cells obtained from the esophagus and colon. GDNF had no detectable effect on the expression of transcripts encoding HAND1. These results suggest; 1) that HAND2 has a function in the development of enteric neurons, and 2) that BMP and GDNF differentially regulate HAND2 and HAND1 gene expression in the developing gastrointestinal tract.

  13. The bHLH Transcription Factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 Regulate Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING REGULATOR1 (TSAR1) and TSAR2, which direct triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula. TSAR1 and TSAR2 are coregulated with and transactivate the genes encoding 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1 (HMGR1) and MAKIBISHI1, the rate-limiting enzyme for triterpene biosynthesis and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls HMGR1 levels, respectively. Transactivation is mediated by direct binding of TSARs to the N-box in the promoter of HMGR1. In transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts, TSAR1 and TSAR2 exhibit different patterns of transactivation of downstream triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes, hinting at distinct functionalities within the regulation of the pathway. Correspondingly, overexpression of TSAR1 or TSAR2 in M. truncatula hairy roots resulted in elevated transcript levels of known triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes and strongly increased the accumulation of triterpene saponins. TSAR2 overexpression specifically boosted hemolytic saponin biosynthesis, whereas TSAR1 overexpression primarily stimulated nonhemolytic soyasaponin biosynthesis. Both TSARs also activated all genes of the precursor mevalonate pathway but did not affect sterol biosynthetic genes, pointing to their specific role as regulators of specialized triterpene metabolism in M. truncatula. PMID:26589673

  14. Twist1 Directly Regulates Genes That Promote Cell Proliferation and Migration in Developing Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mary P.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2011-01-01

    Twist1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is expressed in mesenchymal precursor populations during embryogenesis and in metastatic cancer cells. In the developing heart, Twist1 is highly expressed in endocardial cushion (ECC) valve mesenchymal cells and is down regulated during valve differentiation and remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that Twist1 promotes cell proliferation, migration, and expression of primitive extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in ECC mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, Twist1 expression is induced in human pediatric and adult diseased heart valves. However, the Twist1 downstream target genes that mediate increased cell proliferation and migration during early heart valve development remain largely unknown. Candidate gene and global gene profiling approaches were used to identify transcriptional targets of Twist1 during heart valve development. Candidate target genes were analyzed for evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs) containing E-box consensus sequences that are potential Twist1 binding sites. ECRs containing conserved E-box sequences were identified for Twist1 responsive genes Tbx20, Cdh11, Sema3C, Rab39b, and Gadd45a. Twist1 binding to these sequences in vivo was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, and binding was detected in ECCs but not late stage remodeling valves. In addition identified Twist1 target genes are highly expressed in ECCs and have reduced expression during heart valve remodeling in vivo, which is consistent with the expression pattern of Twist1. Together these analyses identify multiple new genes involved in cell proliferation and migration that are differentially expressed in the developing heart valves, are responsive to Twist1 transcriptional function, and contain Twist1-responsive regulatory sequences. PMID:22242143

  15. Id-1: Regulator of EGFR and VEGF and potential target for colorectal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meteoglu, Ibrahim; Meydan, Nezih; Erkus, Muhan

    2008-01-01

    Background The helix-loop-helix transcription factor Id-1 (an inhibitor of differentiation and DNA binding) plays a role in development and progression of many tumours. Id-1 is known to exert its effects on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of this study was to reveal whether there was a relationship between Id-1 and EGFR and VEGF in colorectal carcinoma. Methods Tumour and non-tumour tissue specimens from 46 cases of colorectal carcinoma were exposed to immunohistochemical staining for Id-1, EGFR and VEGF. The relationship between the degree of staining and tumour grade, tumour stage and all tumour markers was investigated. Results Tumour cells showed positive staining for Id-1 in 43 cases (93.5%), for EGFR in 41 cases (89%) and for VEGF in 42 cases (91%). There was a significant relation between the tumour grade and the degree of staining for Id-1, EGFR and VEGF. The relation between the tumour stage and the degree of staining for Id-1, EGFR and VEGF was also significant. There was a significant relation between Id-1 expression and EGFR and VEGF expressions. Non-tumoural tissue specimens were not stained with Id-1 and EGFR antibodies in any of the cases, but stained with VEGF antibody in 3 cases. Conclusion This study revealed that Id-1, EGFR and VEGF took part in development and progression of colorectal carcinomas and that Id-1 was associated with regulations of EGFR and VEGF. The results of this study support the idea that not only EGFR and VEGF but also Id-1 could be new targets in cancer treatment. PMID:19014499

  16. Polycomb group gene OsFIE2 regulates rice (Oryza sativa) seed development and grain filling via a mechanism distinct from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Zhang, Jian; Mujahid, Hana; Malone, Brandon M; Bridges, Susan M; Peng, Zhaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cereal endosperm represents 60% of the calories consumed by human beings worldwide. In addition, cereals also serve as the primary feedstock for livestock. However, the regulatory mechanism of cereal endosperm and seed development is largely unknown. Polycomb complex has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of endosperm development in Arabidopsis, but its role in cereal endosperm development remains obscure. Additionally, the enzyme activities of the polycomb complexes have not been demonstrated in plants. Here we purified the rice OsFIE2-polycomb complex using tandem affinity purification and demonstrated its specific H3 methyltransferase activity. We found that the OsFIE2 gene product was responsible for H3K27me3 production specifically in vivo. Genetic studies showed that a reduction of OsFIE2 expression led to smaller seeds, partially filled seeds, and partial loss of seed dormancy. Gene expression and proteomics analyses found that the starch synthesis rate limiting step enzyme and multiple storage proteins are down-regulated in OsFIE2 reduction lines. Genome wide ChIP-Seq data analysis shows that H3K27me3 is associated with many genes in the young seeds. The H3K27me3 modification and gene expression in a key helix-loop-helix transcription factor is shown to be regulated by OsFIE2. Our results suggest that OsFIE2-polycomb complex positively regulates rice endosperm development and grain filling via a mechanism highly different from that in Arabidopsis.

  17. DNA-dependent protein kinase is a context dependent regulator of Lmx1a and midbrain specification.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Cameron P; Fabb, Stewart A; Pouton, Colin W; Haynes, John M

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules capable of directing pluripotent cell differentiation towards specific lineages is highly desirable to both reduce cost, and increase efficiency. Within neural progenitors, LIM homeobox transcription factor 1 alpha (Lmx1a) is required for proper development of roof plate and cortical hem structures of the forebrain, as well as the development of floor plate and midbrain dopaminergic neurons. In this study we generated homologous recombinant cell lines expressing either luciferase or β-lactamase under the control of the Lmx1a promoter, and used these cell lines to investigate kinase-mediated regulation of Lmx1a activity during neuronal differentiation. A screen of 143 small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors yielded 16 compounds that positively or negatively modulated Lmx1a activity. Inhibition of EGF, VEGF and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling significantly upregulated Lmx1a activity whereas MEK inhibition strongly downregulated its activity. Quantitative FACS analysis revealed that the DNA-PK inhibitor significantly increased the number of Lmx1a+ progenitors while subsequent qPCR showed an upregulation of Notch effectors, the basic helix-loop-helix genes, Hes5 and Hey1. FACS further revealed that DNA-PK-mediated regulation of Lmx1a+ cells is dependent on the rapamycin-sensitive complex, mTORC1. Interestingly, this DNA-PK inhibitor effect was preserved in a co-culture differentiation protocol. Terminal differentiation assays showed that DNA-PK inhibition shifted development of neurons from forebrain toward midbrain character as assessed by Pitx3/TH immunolabeling and corresponding upregulation of midbrain (En1), but not forebrain (FoxG1) transcripts. These studies show that Lmx1a signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells contributes to a molecular cascade establishing neuronal specification. The data presented here identifies a novel regulatory pathway where signaling from DNA-PK appears to suppress midbrain

  18. Discoveries and controversies in BCL-2 protein-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Janet H; Viacava Follis, Ariele; Kriwacki, Richard W; Moldoveanu, Tudor

    2016-07-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins mediate mitochondrial apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which leads to the activation of the downstream caspase cascade to execute apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins function through protein-protein interactions in soluble and membrane-associated states. How soluble BCL-2 proteins interact is well understood. Anti-apoptotic proteins, such as BCL-2 and BCL-xL, and the pro-apoptotic effectors of MOMP, including BAK and BAX, interact with pro-apoptotic BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only proteins similarly. Whereas anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins tightly bind all the BH3-only proteins to block apoptosis initiation, the effector BCL-2 proteins are potently triggered by specific BH3-only proteins to undergo conformational changes, membrane association and insertion, oligomerization, and pore formation. The anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins also inhibit the activated effectors. p53 is a direct BAX activator inhibited by BCL-xL, defining a prototype non-canonical modulator of BCL-2 proteins-mediated MOMP. How BCL-2 proteins cooperate in the presence of membranes remains poorly understood, impeding our understanding of MOMP and apoptosis. Here, we highlight the latest structural views of MOMP by BCL-2 proteins.

  19. Tis21 is required for adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and for olfactory behavior regulating cyclins, BMP4, Hes1/5 and Ids.

    PubMed

    Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Saraulli, Daniele; Micheli, Laura; Cannas, Sara; D'Alessandro, Francesca; Scardigli, Raffaella; Leonardi, Luca; Cinà, Irene; Costanzi, Marco; Mattera, Andrea; Cestari, Vincenzo; Tirone, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and the Notch pathway regulate quiescence and self-renewal of stem cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ), an adult neurogenic niche. Here we analyze the role at the intersection of these pathways of Tis21 (Btg2/PC3), a gene regulating proliferation and differentiation of adult SVZ stem and progenitor cells. In Tis21-null SVZ and cultured neurospheres, we observed a strong decrease in the expression of BMP4 and its effectors Smad1/8, while the Notch anti-neural mediators Hes1/5 and the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) inhibitors Id1-3 increased. Consistently, expression of the proneural bHLH gene NeuroD1 decreased. Moreover, cyclins D1/2, A2, and E were strongly up-regulated. Thus, in the SVZ Tis21 activates the BMP pathway and inhibits the Notch pathway and the cell cycle. Correspondingly, the Tis21-null SVZ stem cells greatly increased; nonetheless, the proliferating neuroblasts diminished, whereas the post-mitotic neuroblasts paradoxically accumulated in SVZ, failing to migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. The ability, however, of neuroblasts to migrate from SVZ explants was not affected, suggesting that Tis21-null neuroblasts do not migrate to the olfactory bulb because of a defect in terminal differentiation. Notably, BMP4 addition or Id3 silencing rescued the defective differentiation observed in Tis21-null neurospheres, indicating that they mediate the Tis21 pro-differentiative action. The reduced number of granule neurons in the Tis21-null olfactory bulb led to a defect in olfactory detection threshold, without effect on olfactory memory, also suggesting that within olfactory circuits new granule neurons play a primary role in odor sensitivity rather than in memory.

  20. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  1. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Nancy; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, end products of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, influence functions of virtually all organs and tissues through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Circulating levels of glucocorticoids fluctuate naturally in a circadian fashion and regulate the transcriptional activity of GR in target tissues. The basic helix-loop-helix protein CLOCK, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), and its heterodimer partner BMAL1 are self-oscillating transcription factors that generate circadian rhythms in both the central nervous system and periphery. We found that CLOCK/BMAL1 repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity in a HAT-activity- dependent fashion. In serum-shock-synchronized cells, transactivational activity of GR, accessed by mRNA expression of an endogenous-responsive gene, fluctuated spontaneously in a circadian fashion in reverse phase with CLOCK/BMAL1 mRNA expression. CLOCK and GR interacted with each other physically, and CLOCK suppressed binding of GR to its DNA recognition sequences by acetylating multiple lysine residues located in its hinge region. These findings indicate that CLOCK/BMAL1 functions as a reverse-phase negative regulator of glucocorticoid action in target tissues, possibly by antagonizing biological actions of diurnally fluctuating circulating glucocorticoids. Further, these results suggest that a peripheral target tissue circadian rhythm indirectly influences the functions of every organ and tissue inside the body through modulation of the ubiquitous and diverse actions of glucocorticoids.—Nader, N., Chrousos, G. P., Kino, T. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications. PMID:19141540

  2. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays.Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies.

  3. bHLH05 Is an Interaction Partner of MYB51 and a Novel Regulator of Glucosinolate Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gigolashvili, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    By means of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screening, we identified basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor05 (bHLH05) as an interacting partner of MYB51, the key regulator of indolic glucosinolates (GSLs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Furthermore, we show that bHLH04, bHLH05, and bHLH06/MYC2 also interact with other R2R3-MYBs regulating GSL biosynthesis. Analysis of bhlh loss-of-function mutants revealed that the single bhlh mutants retained GSL levels that were similar to those in wild-type plants, whereas the triple bhlh04/05/06 mutant was depleted in the production of GSL. Unlike bhlh04/06 and bhlh05/06 mutants, the double bhlh04/05 mutant was strongly affected in the production of GSL, pointing to a special role of bHLH04 and bHLH05 in the control of GSL levels in the absence of jasmonic acid. The combination of two specific gain-of-function alleles of MYB and bHLH proteins had an additive effect on GSL levels, as demonstrated by the analysis of the double MYB34-1D bHLH05D94N mutant, which produces 20-fold more indolic GSLs than bHLH05D94N and ecotype Columbia-0 of Arabidopsis. The amino acid substitution D94N in bHLH05D94N negatively affects the interaction with JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN protein, thereby resulting in constitutive activation of bHLH05 and mimicking jasmonic acid treatment. Our study revealed the bHLH04, bHLH05, and bHLH06/MYC2 factors as novel regulators of GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:25049362

  4. Fruit development: new directions for an old pathway.

    PubMed

    Moran, Colin N; Halliday, Karen J

    2010-12-21

    A recent study investigating the molecular mechanisms of seed pod shattering has shown that the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT and ALCATRAZ appear to regulate fruit patterning through gibberellic acid (GA)-DELLA signalling, revealing a central role for bHLH family members in GA response specificity. PMID:21172630

  5. EF-hand proteins and the regulation of actin-myosin interaction in the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi (tardigrada).

    PubMed

    Prasath, Thiruketheeswaran; Greven, Hartmut; D'Haese, Jochen

    2012-06-01

    Many tardigrade species resist harsh environmental conditions by entering anhydrobiosis or cryobiosis. Desiccation as well as freeze resistance probably leads to changes of the ionic balance that includes the intracellular calcium concentration. In order to search for protein modifications affecting the calcium homoeostasis, we studied the regulatory system controlling actin-myosin interaction of the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi and identified full-length cDNA clones for troponin C (TnC, 824 bp), calmodulin (CaM, 1,407 bp), essential myosin light chain (eMLC, 1,015 bp), and regulatory myosin light chain (rMLC, 984 bp) from a cDNA library. All four proteins belong to the EF-hand superfamily typified by a calcium coordinating helix-loop-helix motif. Further, we cloned and obtained recombinant TnC and both MLCs. CaM and TnC revealed four and two potential calcium-binding domains, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated calcium-induced conformational transition of TnC. From both MLCs, only the rMLC showed one potential N-terminal EF-hand domain. Additionally, sequence properties suggest phosphorylation of this myosin light chain. Based on our results, we suggest a dual-regulated system at least in somatic muscles for tardigrades with a calcium-dependent tropomyosin-troponin complex bound to the actin filaments and a phosphorylation of the rMLC turning on and off both actin and myosin. Our results indicate no special modifications of the molecular structure and function of the EF-hand proteins in tardigrades. Phylogenetic trees of 131 TnCs, 96 rMLCs, and 62 eMLCs indicate affinities to Ecdysozoa, but also to some other taxa suggesting that our results reflect the complex evolution of these proteins rather than phylogenetic relationships.

  6. EF-hand proteins and the regulation of actin-myosin interaction in the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi (tardigrada).

    PubMed

    Prasath, Thiruketheeswaran; Greven, Hartmut; D'Haese, Jochen

    2012-06-01

    Many tardigrade species resist harsh environmental conditions by entering anhydrobiosis or cryobiosis. Desiccation as well as freeze resistance probably leads to changes of the ionic balance that includes the intracellular calcium concentration. In order to search for protein modifications affecting the calcium homoeostasis, we studied the regulatory system controlling actin-myosin interaction of the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi and identified full-length cDNA clones for troponin C (TnC, 824 bp), calmodulin (CaM, 1,407 bp), essential myosin light chain (eMLC, 1,015 bp), and regulatory myosin light chain (rMLC, 984 bp) from a cDNA library. All four proteins belong to the EF-hand superfamily typified by a calcium coordinating helix-loop-helix motif. Further, we cloned and obtained recombinant TnC and both MLCs. CaM and TnC revealed four and two potential calcium-binding domains, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated calcium-induced conformational transition of TnC. From both MLCs, only the rMLC showed one potential N-terminal EF-hand domain. Additionally, sequence properties suggest phosphorylation of this myosin light chain. Based on our results, we suggest a dual-regulated system at least in somatic muscles for tardigrades with a calcium-dependent tropomyosin-troponin complex bound to the actin filaments and a phosphorylation of the rMLC turning on and off both actin and myosin. Our results indicate no special modifications of the molecular structure and function of the EF-hand proteins in tardigrades. Phylogenetic trees of 131 TnCs, 96 rMLCs, and 62 eMLCs indicate affinities to Ecdysozoa, but also to some other taxa suggesting that our results reflect the complex evolution of these proteins rather than phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25363580

  7. FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 activates SEPALLATA2 but inhibits CLAVATA3 to regulate meristem determinacy and maintenance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongming; Fu, Xing; Guo, Lin; Huang, Zhigang; Li, Yongpeng; Liu, Yang; He, Zishan; Cao, Xiuwei; Ma, Xiaohan; Zhao, Meicheng; Zhu, Guohui; Xiao, Langtao; Wang, Haiyang; Chen, Xuemei; Liu, Renyi; Liu, Xigang

    2016-08-16

    Plant meristems are responsible for the generation of all plant tissues and organs. Here we show that the transcription factor (TF) FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 (FHY3) plays an important role in both floral meristem (FM) determinacy and shoot apical meristem maintenance in Arabidopsis, in addition to its well-known multifaceted roles in plant growth and development during the vegetative stage. Through genetic analyses, we show that WUSCHEL (WUS) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3), two central players in the establishment and maintenance of meristems, are epistatic to FHY3 Using genome-wide ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data, we identify hundreds of FHY3 target genes in flowers and find that FHY3 mainly acts as a transcriptional repressor in flower development, in contrast to its transcriptional activator role in seedlings. Binding motif-enrichment analyses indicate that FHY3 may coregulate flower development with three flower-specific MADS-domain TFs and four basic helix-loop-helix TFs that are involved in photomorphogenesis. We further demonstrate that CLV3, SEPALLATA1 (SEP1), and SEP2 are FHY3 target genes. In shoot apical meristem, FHY3 directly represses CLV3, which consequently regulates WUS to maintain the stem cell pool. Intriguingly, CLV3 expression did not change significantly in fhy3 and phytochrome B mutants before and after light treatment, indicating that FHY3 and phytochrome B are involved in light-regulated meristem activity. In FM, FHY3 directly represses CLV3, but activates SEP2, to ultimately promote FM determinacy. Taken together, our results reveal insights into the mechanisms of meristem maintenance and determinacy, and illustrate how the roles of a single TF may vary in different organs and developmental stages. PMID:27469166

  8. A role for PacMYBA in ABA-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in red-colored sweet cherry cv. Hong Deng (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinjie; Zhao, Kai; Liu, Linlin; Zhang, Kaichun; Yuan, Huazhao; Liao, Xiong; Wang, Qi; Guo, Xinwei; Li, Fang; Li, Tianhong

    2014-05-01

    The MYB transcription factors and plant hormone ABA have been suggested to play a role in fruit anthocyanin biosynthesis, but supporting genetic evidence has been lacking in sweet cherry. The present study describes the first functional characterization of an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, PacMYBA, from red-colored sweet cherry cv. Hong Deng (Prunus avium L.). Transient promoter assays demonstrated that PacMYBA physically interacted with several anthocyanin-related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to activate the promoters of PacDFR, PacANS and PacUFGT, which are thought to be involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, the immature seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PacMYBA exhibited ectopic pigmentation. Silencing of PacMYBA, using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-induced gene silencing technique, resulted in sweet cherry fruit that lacked red pigment. ABA treatment significantly induced anthocyanin accumulation, while treatment with the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) blocked anthocyanin production. PacMYBA expression peaked after 2 h of pre-incubation in ABA and was 15.2-fold higher than that of sweet cherries treated with NDGA. The colorless phenotype was also observed in the fruits silenced in PacNCED1, which encodes a key enzyme in the ABA biosynthesis pathway. The endogenous ABA content as well as the transcript levels of six structural genes and PacMYBA in PacNCED1-RNAi (RNA interference) fruit were significantly lower than in the TRV vector control fruit. These results suggest that PacMYBA plays an important role in ABA-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis and ABA is a signal molecule that promotes red-colored sweet cherry fruit accumulating anthocyanin. PMID:24443499

  9. A role for PacMYBA in ABA-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in red-colored sweet cherry cv. Hong Deng (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinjie; Zhao, Kai; Liu, Linlin; Zhang, Kaichun; Yuan, Huazhao; Liao, Xiong; Wang, Qi; Guo, Xinwei; Li, Fang; Li, Tianhong

    2014-05-01

    The MYB transcription factors and plant hormone ABA have been suggested to play a role in fruit anthocyanin biosynthesis, but supporting genetic evidence has been lacking in sweet cherry. The present study describes the first functional characterization of an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, PacMYBA, from red-colored sweet cherry cv. Hong Deng (Prunus avium L.). Transient promoter assays demonstrated that PacMYBA physically interacted with several anthocyanin-related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to activate the promoters of PacDFR, PacANS and PacUFGT, which are thought to be involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, the immature seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PacMYBA exhibited ectopic pigmentation. Silencing of PacMYBA, using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-induced gene silencing technique, resulted in sweet cherry fruit that lacked red pigment. ABA treatment significantly induced anthocyanin accumulation, while treatment with the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) blocked anthocyanin production. PacMYBA expression peaked after 2 h of pre-incubation in ABA and was 15.2-fold higher than that of sweet cherries treated with NDGA. The colorless phenotype was also observed in the fruits silenced in PacNCED1, which encodes a key enzyme in the ABA biosynthesis pathway. The endogenous ABA content as well as the transcript levels of six structural genes and PacMYBA in PacNCED1-RNAi (RNA interference) fruit were significantly lower than in the TRV vector control fruit. These results suggest that PacMYBA plays an important role in ABA-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis and ABA is a signal molecule that promotes red-colored sweet cherry fruit accumulating anthocyanin.

  10. Jasmonic acid promotes degreening via MYC2/3/4- and ANAC019/055/072-mediated regulation of major chlorophyll catabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Junyi; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Gao, Shan; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2015-11-01

    Degreening caused by rapid chlorophyll (Chl) degradation is a characteristic event during green organ senescence or maturation. Pheophorbide a oxygenase gene (PAO) encodes a key enzyme of Chl degradation, yet its transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, coupled with in vitro and in vivo assays, we revealed that Arabidopsis MYC2/3/4 basic helix-loop-helix proteins directly bind to PAO promoter. Overexpression of the MYCs significantly enhanced the transcriptional activity of PAO promoter in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment greatly induced PAO expression in wild-type Arabidopsis plants, but the induction was abolished in myc2 myc3 myc4. In addition, MYC2/3/4 proteins could promote the expression of another Chl catabolic enzyme gene, NYC1, as well as a key regulatory gene of Chl degradation, NYE1/SGR1, by directly binding to their promoters. More importantly, the myc2 myc3 myc4 triple mutant showed a severe stay-green phenotype, whereas the lines overexpressing the MYCs showed accelerated leaf yellowing upon MeJA treatment. These results suggest that MYC2/3/4 proteins may mediate jasmonic acid (JA)-induced Chl degradation by directly activating these Chl catabolic genes (CCGs). Three NAC family proteins, ANAC019/055/072, downstream from MYC2/3/4 proteins, could also directly promote the expression of a similar set of CCGs (NYE1/SGR1, NYE2/SGR2 and NYC1) during Chl degradation. In particular, anac019 anac055 anac072 triple mutant displayed a severe stay-green phenotype after MeJA treatment. Finally, we revealed that MYC2 and ANAC019 may interact with each other and synergistically enhance NYE1 expression. Together, our study reveals a hierarchical and coordinated regulatory network of JA-induced Chl degradation.

  11. Expression of the human Hand1 gene in trophoblastic cells is transcriptionally regulated by activating and repressing specificity protein (Sp)-elements.

    PubMed

    Vasicek, Richard; Meinhardt, Gudrun; Haidweger, Eva; Rotheneder, Hans; Husslein, Peter; Knöfler, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The tissue-specific basic helix-loop-helix protein Hand1 is essential for the formation of trophoblast giant cells of the murine placenta. In humans, Hand1 is detectable in trophoblastic tumour cells suggesting an equivalent role in trophoblast differentiation. To understand its mode of expression we have cloned and characterized the human Hand1 gene promoter. Primer extension analyses suggest that transcription initiates 19 nucleotides downstream of the TATA element of the proximal 5' flanking region. Expression of luciferase reporter constructs harboring deletions of the 9.5 kb Hand1 5' flanking sequence defines a promoter region within 274 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Compared to a reporter bearing only the TATA box, the proximal promoter activates transcription up to 30-fold. However, transcriptional activity of the region was observed in both Hand1-expressing and non-expressing cell lines. Sequencing, DNAseI footprint analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal the presence of four GC-rich sequences, which show different affinities to the endogenous specificity proteins (Sp), and a CCAAT box. In vitro, the Sp-elements mainly interact with Sp1 and Sp3 while the CCAAT element is recognized by the alpha CAAT binding factor protein. Mutant luciferase reporters bearing single active or inactive recognition sites demonstrate that two of the four Sp-binding sites (I and IV) contribute little to the overall transcription rate. The two other Sp-cognate sequences, II and III, downregulate and activate reporter expression 2.3- and 2.6-fold, respectively. Co-transfections of Sp1/Sp3 expression vectors and mutated reporter constructs in Sp-deficient SL2 cells indicate that the Sp-binding site II and III indeed function as repressing and activating enhancer sequences. In summary, the data suggest that constitutive expression of the Hand1 gene in cultured cells is regulated by a complex interplay of Sp-proteins interacting with activator and

  12. Arabidopsis AtbHLH112 regulates the expression of genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance by binding to their E-box and GCG-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujia; Ji, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xianguang; Qu, Min; Zheng, Lei; Tan, Zilong; Zhao, Huimin; Huo, Lin; Liu, Shengnan; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yucheng

    2015-08-01

    Plant basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play essential roles in abiotic stress tolerance. However, most bHLHs have not been functionally characterized. Here, we characterized the functional role of a bHLH transcription factor from Arabidopsis, AtbHLH112, in response to abiotic stress. AtbHLH112 is a nuclear-localized protein, and its nuclear localization is induced by salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). In addition, AtbHLH112 serves as a transcriptional activator, with the activation domain located at its N-terminus. In addition to binding to the E-box motifs of stress-responsive genes, AtbHLH112 binds to a novel motif with the sequence 'GG[GT]CC[GT][GA][TA]C' (GCG-box). Gain- and loss-of-function analyses showed that the transcript level of AtbHLH112 is positively correlated with salt and drought tolerance. AtbHLH112 mediates stress tolerance by increasing the expression of P5CS genes and reducing the expression of P5CDH and ProDH genes to increase proline levels. AtbHLH112 also increases the expression of POD and SOD genes to improve reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. We present a model suggesting that AtbHLH112 is a transcriptional activator that regulates the expression of genes via binding to their GCG- or E-boxes to mediate physiological responses, including proline biosynthesis and ROS scavenging pathways, to enhance stress tolerance.

  13. Specificity for the Hairy/enhancer of split basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins maps outside the bHLH domain and suggests two separable modes of transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.R.; Turner, D.L.; Weintraub, H.; Parkhurst, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates transcriptional repressors in Drosophila melanogaster and their function in and effect on developmental processes such as sex determination. Details on the mechanism of function of these transcriptional repressors are also discussed. 50 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Protein-mediated boundary lubrication in arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, M P; Widmer, M R; Zobeley, E; Glockshuber, R; Spencer, N D

    2005-04-01

    Wear of articulated surfaces can be a major lifetime-limiting factor in arthroplasty. In the natural joint, lubrication is effected by the body's natural synovial fluid. Following arthroplasty, and the subsequent reformation of the synovial membrane, a fluid of similar composition surrounds the artificial joint. Synovial fluid contains, among many other constituents, a substantial concentration of the readily adsorbing protein albumin. The ability of human serum albumin to act as a boundary lubricant in joint prostheses has been investigated using a pin-on-disc tribometer. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was employed to follow the temperature- and time-dependent conformational changes of human serum albumin in the model lubricant solution. Effects of protein conformation and polymer surface hydrophilicity on protein adsorption and the resulting friction in the boundary lubrication regime have been investigated. Unfolded proteins preferentially adsorb onto hydrophobic polymer surfaces, where they form a compact, passivating layer and increase sliding friction-an effect that can be largely suppressed by rendering the substrate more hydrophilic. A molecular model for protein-mediated boundary friction is proposed to consolidate the observations. The relevance of the results for in vivo performance and ex vivo hip-joint testing are discussed.

  15. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA) identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51) regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression.

  16. Mechanics of Protein-Mediated DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of looped DNA-protein complexes in which a protein or protein assembly binds to multiple distant operator sites on the DNA is a common feature for many regulatory schemes on the transcriptional level. In a living cell, a multitude of mechanical forces and constraints act on these complexes, and it is imperative to understand their effects on biological function. For this aim, we study the lactose repressor as a model system for protein-mediated DNA looping in single-molecule experiments. Using a novel axial constant-force optical trapping scheme that allows us to manipulate sub-micron DNA fragments with well-controlled forces down to the 10 fN range, we show that mechanical tension in the substrate DNA of hundred femtonewton is sufficient to disrupt the loop formation process, which suggests that such mechanical tension may provide a mechanical pathway to controlling gene expression in vivo. From the force sensitivity of the loop formation process, we can also infer the topology of the looped complex; in our case an antiparallel conformation. In addition, we will present new tethered-particle microscopy data that shows lifetimes of the looped complexes that are two to three orders of magnitude shorter than those measured in biochemical competition assays and discuss possible interpretations, including the suggestion that operator binding of the lactose repressor tetramer leads to a destabilization of the dimer-dimer interface and that thus the loop breakdown process is mostly a dissociation of the tetramer into two dimers, instead, as widely assumed, an unbinding of the tetramer from the DNA.

  17. Loading-related regulation of transcription factor EGR2/Krox-20 in bone cells is ERK1/2 protein-mediated and prostaglandin, Wnt signaling pathway-, and insulin-like growth factor-I axis-dependent.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Gul; Sunters, Andrew; Galea, Gabriel L; Javaheri, Behzad; Saxon, Leanne K; Moustafa, Alaa; Armstrong, Victoria J; Price, Joanna S; Lanyon, Lance E

    2012-02-01

    Of the 1,328 genes revealed by microarray to be differentially regulated by disuse, or at 8 h following a single short period of osteogenic loading of the mouse tibia, analysis by predicting associated transcription factors from annotated affinities revealed the transcription factor EGR2/Krox-20 as being more closely associated with more pathways and functions than any other. Real time quantitative PCR confirmed up-regulation of Egr2 mRNA expression by loading of the tibia in vivo. In vitro studies where strain was applied to primary cultures of mouse tibia-derived osteoblastic cells and the osteoblast UMR106 cell line also showed up-regulation of Egr2 mRNA expression. In UMR106 cells, inhibition of β1/β3 integrin function had no effect on strain-related Egr2 expression, but it was inhibited by a COX2-selective antagonist and imitated by exogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). This response to PGE(2) was mediated chiefly through the EP1 receptor and involved stimulation of PKC and attenuation by cAMP/PKA. Neither activators nor inhibitors of nitric oxide, estrogen signaling, or LiCl had any effect on Egr2 mRNA expression, but it was increased by both insulin-like growth factor-1 and high, but not low, dose parathyroid hormone and exogenous Wnt-3a. The increases by strain, PGE2, Wnt-3a, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate were attenuated by inhibition of MEK-1. EGR2 appears to be involved in many of the signaling pathways that constitute early responses of bone cells to strain. These pathways all have multiple functions. Converting their strain-related responses into coherent "instructions" for adaptive (re)modeling is likely to depend upon their contextual activation, suppression, and interaction probably on more than one occasion. PMID:22049075

  18. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent translational regulation of Id1 involves the PPM1G phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaiming; Wang, Lanfang; Feng, Wei; Feng, Yue; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.

    2016-01-01

    Id1 is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional modulator that increases the aggressiveness of malignant glial neoplasms. Since most glioblastomas (GBMs) show increased phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) signaling, we sought to determine whether this pathway regulates Id1 expression. Higher basal Id1 expression correlates with dysregulated PI-3K signaling in multiple established GBM cell lines. Further characterization of PI-3K-dependent Id1 regulation reveals that chemical or genetic inhibition of PI-3K signaling reduces Id1 protein but not mRNA expression. Overall, PI-3K signaling appears to enhance Id1 translation with no significant effect on its stability. PI-3K signaling is known to regulate protein translation through mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, which reduces its association with and inhibition of the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Interestingly, while inhibition of PI-3K and AKT lowers 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and expression of Id1 in all cases, inhibition of TORC1 with rapamycin does not consistently have a similar effect suggesting an alternative mechanism for PI-3K-dependent regulation of Id1 translation. We now identify a potential role for the serine-threonine phosphatase PPM1G in translational regulation of Id1 protein expression. PPM1G knockdown by siRNA increase both 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and Id1 expression and PPM1G and 4E-BP1 co-associates in GBM cells. Furthermore, PPM1G is a phosphoprotein and this phosphorylation appears to be regulated by PI-3K activity. Finally, PI-3K inhibition increases PPM1G activity when assessed by an in vitro phosphatase assay. Our findings provide the first evidence that the PI-3K/AKT signaling pathway modulates PPM1G activity resulting in a shift in the balance between hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and translational regulation of Id1 expression. PMID:27065332

  19. C2-domain abscisic acid-related proteins mediate the interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR abscisic acid receptors with the plasma membrane and regulate abscisic acid sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A; Mulet, Jose M; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2014-12-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling. PMID:25465408

  20. C2-domain abscisic acid-related proteins mediate the interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR abscisic acid receptors with the plasma membrane and regulate abscisic acid sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A; Mulet, Jose M; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2014-12-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling.

  1. C2-Domain Abscisic Acid-Related Proteins Mediate the Interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR Abscisic Acid Receptors with the Plasma Membrane and Regulate Abscisic Acid Sensitivity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lesia; Diaz, Maira; Rodrigues, Americo; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana C.; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Fernandez, Maria A.; Antoni, Regina; Fernandez, Daniel; Marquez, Jose A.; Mulet, Jose M.; Albert, Armando; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-delimited abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction plays a critical role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms linking core signaling components to the plasma membrane are unclear. We show that transient calcium-dependent interactions of PYR/PYL ABA receptors with membranes are mediated through a 10-member family of C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we found that PYL4 interacted in an ABA-independent manner with CAR1 in both the plasma membrane and nucleus of plant cells. CAR1 belongs to a plant-specific gene family encoding CAR1 to CAR10 proteins, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PYL4-CAR1 as well as other PYR/PYL-CAR pairs interacted in plant cells. The crystal structure of CAR4 was solved, which revealed that, in addition to a classical calcium-dependent lipid binding C2 domain, a specific CAR signature is likely responsible for the interaction with PYR/PYL receptors and their recruitment to phospholipid vesicles. This interaction is relevant for PYR/PYL function and ABA signaling, since different car triple mutants affected in CAR1, CAR4, CAR5, and CAR9 genes showed reduced sensitivity to ABA in seedling establishment and root growth assays. In summary, we identified PYR/PYL-interacting partners that mediate a transient Ca2+-dependent interaction with phospholipid vesicles, which affects PYR/PYL subcellular localization and positively regulates ABA signaling. PMID:25465408

  2. Regulation of the cycling of timeless (tim) RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, G K; Ousley, A; Darlington, T K; Chen, D; Chen, Y; Fu, W; Hickman, L J; Kay, S A; Sehgal, A

    2001-06-01

    Circadian rhythms in Drosophila depend upon expression of the timeless (tim) and period (per) genes, which encode interacting components of the endogenous clock. These two clock genes show a robust circadian oscillation in transcription rate as well as RNA and protein levels. Transcriptional activation of both genes requires the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) PAS transcription factors dCLOCK (dCLK) and CYCLE (CYC), which bind E-box elements. We investigated the role of E-box elements in regulating behavioral rhythmicity and tim gene expression. We show that mutation of the upstream E-box in the tim gene prevents the rescue by tim cDNA sequences of the arrhythmic tim(01) phenotype. RNA encoded by this mutated tim transgene fails to cycle and is expressed at low levels. While a tim transgene carrying a wild-type E-box restores behavioral rhythms, tim RNA levels are intermediate to those of the mutant E-box transgenic lines and wild type, and do not display high amplitude cycling. On the other hand, high-amplitude RNA cycling was consistently obtained with a tim transgene that contains genomic, rather than cDNA, sequences. To identify additional sequences that may be required for tim cycling, we investigated the role of an E-box in the first intron of the tim gene through cell culture experiments. In these experiments, the presence of this intron did not have any effect on the activation of tim transcription by dCLK/CYC. As the upstream E-box was implicated in activation by dCLK/CYC in cell culture, we assayed sequences containing this E-box for association with proteins in fly head extracts. These studies provide the first biochemical evidence for an in vivo complex containing dCLK and CYC that binds the tim upstream sequence and is detected at all times of day. Together, these data highlight molecular mechanisms that are critical for behavioral rhythms.

  3. Transcriptome Profiling of Light-Regulated Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in the Pericarp of Litchi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Wei-Cai; Wang, Hui-Cong; Shi, Sheng-You; Shu, Bo; Liu, Li-Qin; Wei, Yong-Zan; Xie, Jiang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Light is a key environmental factor that affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. To enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in the pericarp of litchi, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the basis of Illumina sequencing. Fruit clusters were bagged with double-layer Kraft paper bags at 42 days after anthesis. The bags were removed after 2 weeks. Under light conditions, anthocyanins accumulated rapidly in the pericarp. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 75,935 unigenes with an average length of 913 bp. Approximately 74.5% of unigenes (56,601) were annotated against four public protein databases. A total of 16,622 unigenes that significantly differed in terms of abundance were identified. These unigenes are implicated in light signal perception and transduction, flavonoid biosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis. In photoreceptors, the expression levels of UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8), Phototropin 2 (PHOT2), Phytochrome B (PHYB), and Phytochrome C (PHYC) increased significantly when the fruits were exposed to light. This result indicated that they likely play important roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After analyzed digital gene expression (DGE), we found that the light signal transduction elements of COP1 and COP10 might be responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After the bags were removed, nearly all structural and regulatory genes, such as UDP-glucose: flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40, involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were upregulated. In addition to MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (HY5), NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC), homeodomain leucine zipper proteins (ATHBs), and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (FHY) possibly participate in light-induced responses. On the basis of DGEs and qRT-PCR validation, we observed a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis

  4. Transcriptome Profiling of Light-Regulated Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in the Pericarp of Litchi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Wei-Cai; Wang, Hui-Cong; Shi, Sheng-You; Shu, Bo; Liu, Li-Qin; Wei, Yong-Zan; Xie, Jiang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Light is a key environmental factor that affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. To enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in the pericarp of litchi, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the basis of Illumina sequencing. Fruit clusters were bagged with double-layer Kraft paper bags at 42 days after anthesis. The bags were removed after 2 weeks. Under light conditions, anthocyanins accumulated rapidly in the pericarp. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 75,935 unigenes with an average length of 913 bp. Approximately 74.5% of unigenes (56,601) were annotated against four public protein databases. A total of 16,622 unigenes that significantly differed in terms of abundance were identified. These unigenes are implicated in light signal perception and transduction, flavonoid biosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis. In photoreceptors, the expression levels of UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8), Phototropin 2 (PHOT2), Phytochrome B (PHYB), and Phytochrome C (PHYC) increased significantly when the fruits were exposed to light. This result indicated that they likely play important roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After analyzed digital gene expression (DGE), we found that the light signal transduction elements of COP1 and COP10 might be responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After the bags were removed, nearly all structural and regulatory genes, such as UDP-glucose: flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40, involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were upregulated. In addition to MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (HY5), NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC), homeodomain leucine zipper proteins (ATHBs), and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (FHY) possibly participate in light-induced responses. On the basis of DGEs and qRT-PCR validation, we observed a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis

  5. Transcriptome Profiling of Light-Regulated Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in the Pericarp of Litchi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Wei-Cai; Wang, Hui-Cong; Shi, Sheng-You; Shu, Bo; Liu, Li-Qin; Wei, Yong-Zan; Xie, Jiang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Light is a key environmental factor that affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. To enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in the pericarp of litchi, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the basis of Illumina sequencing. Fruit clusters were bagged with double-layer Kraft paper bags at 42 days after anthesis. The bags were removed after 2 weeks. Under light conditions, anthocyanins accumulated rapidly in the pericarp. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 75,935 unigenes with an average length of 913 bp. Approximately 74.5% of unigenes (56,601) were annotated against four public protein databases. A total of 16,622 unigenes that significantly differed in terms of abundance were identified. These unigenes are implicated in light signal perception and transduction, flavonoid biosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis. In photoreceptors, the expression levels of UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8), Phototropin 2 (PHOT2), Phytochrome B (PHYB), and Phytochrome C (PHYC) increased significantly when the fruits were exposed to light. This result indicated that they likely play important roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After analyzed digital gene expression (DGE), we found that the light signal transduction elements of COP1 and COP10 might be responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After the bags were removed, nearly all structural and regulatory genes, such as UDP-glucose: flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40, involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were upregulated. In addition to MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (HY5), NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC), homeodomain leucine zipper proteins (ATHBs), and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (FHY) possibly participate in light-induced responses. On the basis of DGEs and qRT-PCR validation, we observed a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis

  6. miRNA-342 Regulates CEACAM1-induced Lumen Formation in a Three-dimensional Model of Mammary Gland Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunyue; Nguyen, Tung; Shively, John E

    2016-08-01

    Lumen formation of breast epithelium is rapidly lost during tumorigenesis along with expression of cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1. CEACAM1 induces lumena in a three-dimensional culture of MCF7/CEACAM1 cells that otherwise fail to form lumena. We hypothesized miRNAs may be involved because >400 genes were up- or down-regulated in MCF7/CEACAM1 cells and miRNAs may modify global expression patterns. Comparative analysis of miRNA expression in MCF7 versus MCF7/CEACAM1 cells revealed two miRNAs significantly down-regulated (hsa-miR-30a-3p by 6.73-fold and hsa-miR-342-5p by 5.68-fold). Location of miR-342 within an intron of the EVL gene, hypermethylated and involved in tumorigenesis, suggested that miR-342 overexpression may block lumen formation. In fact, overexpression of miR-342 in MCF7/CEACAM1 cells significantly blocked lumen formation (p < 0.001). ID4, a dominant-negative inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, up-regulated in MCF7/CEACAM1 cells, down-regulated in breast cancer, and containing a miR-342 binding site, was tested as a potential target of miR-342. The ratio of ID4 to miR-342 increased from 1:2 in MCF7 cells to 30:1 in MCF7/CEACAM1 cells and a miR-342 inhibitor was able to induce 3'-UTR ID4 reporter activity in MCF7 cells. Because 5-methylcytosine methyltransferase DNMT1 is also a potential target of miR-342, we inhibited miR-342 in MCF7 cells and found DNMT1 was up-regulated with no change in EVL expression, suggesting that miR-342 regulates DNMT1 expression but DNMT1 does not affect the EVL expression in these cells. We conclude that the regulation of lumen formation by miR-342 involves at least two of its known targets, namely ID4 and DNMT1.

  7. miR-342 Regulates BRCA1 Expression through Modulation of ID4 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Elisabetta; Lusa, Lara; De Cecco, Loris; Marchesi, Edoardo; Calin, George Adrian; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    A miRNAs profiling on a group of familial and sporadic breast cancers showed that miRNA-342 was significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER) levels. To investigate at functional level the role of miR-342 in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, we focused our attention on its “in silico” predicted putative target gene ID4, a transcription factor of the helix-loop-helix protein family whose expression is inversely correlated with that of ER. ID4 is expressed in breast cancer and can negatively regulate BRCA1 expression. Our results showed an inverse correlation between ID4 and miR-342 as well as between ID4 and BRCA1 expression. We functionally validated the interaction between ID4 and miR-342 in a reporter Luciferase system. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that regulation of ID4 mediated by miR-342 could be involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer by downregulating BRCA1 expression. We functionally demonstrated the interactions between miR-342, ID4 and BRCA1 in a model provided by ER-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line that presented high levels of ID4. Overexpression of miR-342 in these cells reduced ID4 and increased BRCA1 expression, supporting a possible role of this mechanism in breast cancer. In the ER-positive MCF7 and in the BRCA1-mutant HCC1937 cell lines miR-342 over-expression only reduced ID4. In the cohort of patients we studied, a correlation between miR-342 and BRCA1 expression was found in the ER-negative cases. As ER-negative cases were mainly BRCA1-mutant, we speculate that the mechanism we demonstrated could be involved in the decreased expression of BRCA1 frequently observed in non BRCA1-mutant breast cancers and could be implicated as a causal factor in part of the familial cases grouped in the heterogeneous class of non BRCA1 or BRCA2-mutant cases (BRCAx). To validate this hypothesis, the study should be extended to a larger cohort of ER-negative cases, including those belonging to the BRCAx class. PMID:24475217

  8. HEY1 functions are regulated by its phosphorylation at Ser-68.

    PubMed

    López-Mateo, Irene; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Artaza-Irigaray, Cristina; López, Juan A; Calvo, Enrique; Belandia, Borja

    2016-07-01

    HEY1 (hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif 1) is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix-orange (bHLH-O) family of transcription repressors that mediate Notch signalling. HEY1 acts as a positive regulator of the tumour suppressor p53 via still unknown mechanisms. A MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis has uncovered a novel HEY1 regulatory phosphorylation event at Ser-68. Strikingly, this single phosphorylation event controls HEY1 stability and function: simulation of HEY1 Ser-68 phosphorylation increases HEY1 protein stability but inhibits its ability to enhance p53 transcriptional activity. Unlike wild-type HEY1, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant HEY1-S68D failed to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and it did not sensitize U2OS cells to p53-activating chemotherapeutic drugs. We have identified two related kinases, STK38 (serine/threonine kinase 38) and STK38L (serine/threonine kinase 38 like), which interact with and phosphorylate HEY1 at Ser-68. HEY1 is phosphorylated at Ser-68 during mitosis and it accumulates in the centrosomes of mitotic cells, suggesting a possible integration of HEY1-dependent signalling in centrosome function. Moreover, HEY1 interacts with a subset of p53-activating ribosomal proteins. Ribosomal stress causes HEY1 relocalization from the nucleoplasm to perinucleolar structures termed nucleolar caps. HEY1 interacts physically with at least one of the ribosomal proteins, RPL11, and both proteins cooperate in the inhibition of MDM2-mediated p53 degradation resulting in a synergistic positive effect on p53 transcriptional activity. HEY1 itself also interacts directly with MDM2 and it is subjected to MDM2-mediated degradation. Simulation of HEY1 Ser-68 phosphorylation prevents its interaction with p53, RPL11 and MDM2 and abolishes HEY1 migration to nucleolar caps upon ribosomal stress. Our findings uncover a novel mechanism for cross-talk between Notch signalling and nucleolar stress. PMID:27129302

  9. Two LcbHLH Transcription Factors Interacting with LcMYB1 in Regulating Late Structural Genes of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Nicotiana and Litchi chinensis During Anthocyanin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Biao; Du, Li-Na; Liu, Rui; Hu, Bing; Su, Wen-Bing; Qin, Yong-Hua; Zhao, Jie-Tang; Wang, Hui-Cong; Hu, Gui-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Anthocyanin biosynthesis requires the MYB-bHLH-WD40 protein complex to activate the late biosynthetic genes. LcMYB1 was thought to act as key regulator in anthocyanin biosynthesis of litchi. However, basic helix-loop-helix proteins (bHLHs) as partners have not been identified yet. The present study describes the functional characterization of three litchi bHLH candidate anthocyanin regulators, LcbHLH1, LcbHLH2, and LcbHLH3. Although these three litchi bHLHs phylogenetically clustered with bHLH proteins involved in anthcoyanin biosynthesis in other plant, only LcbHLH1 and LcbHLH3 were found to localize in the nucleus and physically interact with LcMYB1. The transcription levels of all these bHLHs were not coordinated with anthocyanin accumulation in different tissues and during development. However, when co-infiltrated with LcMYB1, both LcbHLH1 and LcbHLH3 enhanced anthocyanin accumulation in tobacco leaves with LcbHLH3 being the best inducer. Significant accumulation of anthocyanins in leaves transformed with the combination of LcMYB1 and LcbHLH3 were noticed, and this was associated with the up-regulation of two tobacco endogenous bHLH regulators, NtAn1a and NtAn1b, and late structural genes, like NtDFR and NtANS. Significant activity of the ANS promoter was observed in transient expression assays either with LcMYB1-LcbHLH1 or LcMYB1-LcbHLH3, while only minute activity was detected after transformation with only LcMYB1. In contrast, no activity was measured after induction with the combination of LcbHLH2 and LcMYB1. Higher DFR expression was also oberseved in paralleling with higher anthocyanins in co-transformed lines. LcbHLH1 and LcbHLH3 are essential partner of LcMYB1 in regulating the anthocyanin production in tobacco and probably also in litchi. The LcMYB1-LcbHLH complex enhanced anthocyanin accumulation may associate with activating the transcription of DFR and ANS. PMID:26925082

  10. Two LcbHLH Transcription Factors Interacting with LcMYB1 in Regulating Late Structural Genes of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Nicotiana and Litchi chinensis During Anthocyanin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Biao; Du, Li-Na; Liu, Rui; Hu, Bing; Su, Wen-Bing; Qin, Yong-Hua; Zhao, Jie-Tang; Wang, Hui-Cong; Hu, Gui-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Anthocyanin biosynthesis requires the MYB-bHLH-WD40 protein complex to activate the late biosynthetic genes. LcMYB1 was thought to act as key regulator in anthocyanin biosynthesis of litchi. However, basic helix-loop-helix proteins (bHLHs) as partners have not been identified yet. The present study describes the functional characterization of three litchi bHLH candidate anthocyanin regulators, LcbHLH1, LcbHLH2, and LcbHLH3. Although these three litchi bHLHs phylogenetically clustered with bHLH proteins involved in anthcoyanin biosynthesis in other plant, only LcbHLH1 and LcbHLH3 were found to localize in the nucleus and physically interact with LcMYB1. The transcription levels of all these bHLHs were not coordinated with anthocyanin accumulation in different tissues and during development. However, when co-infiltrated with LcMYB1, both LcbHLH1 and LcbHLH3 enhanced anthocyanin accumulation in tobacco leaves with LcbHLH3 being the best inducer. Significant accumulation of anthocyanins in leaves transformed with the combination of LcMYB1 and LcbHLH3 were noticed, and this was associated with the up-regulation of two tobacco endogenous bHLH regulators, NtAn1a and NtAn1b, and late structural genes, like NtDFR and NtANS. Significant activity of the ANS promoter was observed in transient expression assays either with LcMYB1-LcbHLH1 or LcMYB1-LcbHLH3, while only minute activity was detected after transformation with only LcMYB1. In contrast, no activity was measured after induction with the combination of LcbHLH2 and LcMYB1. Higher DFR expression was also oberseved in paralleling with higher anthocyanins in co-transformed lines. LcbHLH1 and LcbHLH3 are essential partner of LcMYB1 in regulating the anthocyanin production in tobacco and probably also in litchi. The LcMYB1-LcbHLH complex enhanced anthocyanin accumulation may associate with activating the transcription of DFR and ANS. PMID:26925082

  11. Proneural proteins Achaete and Scute associate with nuclear actin to promote formation of external sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yun-Ling; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Yi-Jie; Yeh, Hsiao-Fong; Huang, Yi-Chun; Pi, Haiwei

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proneural proteins promote neurogenesis through transcriptional regulation. Although much is known about the tissue-specific regulation of proneural gene expression, how proneural proteins interact with transcriptional machinery to activate downstream target genes is less clear. Drosophila proneural proteins Achaete (Ac) and Scute (Sc) induce external sensory organ formation by activating neural precursor gene expression. Through co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that nuclear but not cytoplasmic actin associated with the Ac and Sc proteins in Drosophila S2 cells. Daughterless (Da), the common heterodimeric partner of Drosophila bHLH proteins, was observed to associate with nuclear actin through proneural proteins. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the binding specificity between actin and Ac or Sc was conserved in yeast nuclei without the presence of additional Drosophila factors. We further show that actin is required in external sensory organ formation. Reduction in actin gene activity impaired proneural-protein-dependent expression of the neural precursor genes, as well as formation of neural precursors. Furthermore, increased nuclear actin levels, obtained by expression of nucleus-localized actin, elevated Ac-Da-dependent gene transcription as well as Ac-mediated external sensory organ formation. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest a novel link for actin in proneural-protein-mediated transcriptional activation and neural precursor differentiation.

  12. A Genetic Basis for Motivated Exercise.

    PubMed

    Good, Deborah J; Li, Mengjiao; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2015-10-01

    Prior research has demonstrated a genetic basis for motivated exercise, with evidence of a role for nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2/Nhlh2). Nhlh2 transcriptionally regulates the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene. This article examines the evidence for the hypothesis that polymorphisms in NHLH2 or MAO-A contribute to differences in the human motivation for exercise and physical activity. The genetic pathways that link exercise and motivation are discussed. PMID:26196864

  13. A Genetic Basis for Motivated Exercise.

    PubMed

    Good, Deborah J; Li, Mengjiao; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2015-10-01

    Prior research has demonstrated a genetic basis for motivated exercise, with evidence of a role for nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2/Nhlh2). Nhlh2 transcriptionally regulates the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene. This article examines the evidence for the hypothesis that polymorphisms in NHLH2 or MAO-A contribute to differences in the human motivation for exercise and physical activity. The genetic pathways that link exercise and motivation are discussed.

  14. TabHLH1, a bHLH-type transcription factor gene in wheat, improves plant tolerance to Pi and N deprivation via regulation of nutrient transporter gene transcription and ROS homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongren; Hao, Lin; Yao, Sufei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Lu, Wenjing; Xiao, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) comprise a large TF family and act as crucial regulators in various biological processes in plants. Here, we report the functional characterization of TabHLH1, a bHLH TF member in wheat (Triticum aestivum). TabHLH1 shares conserved bHLH domain and targets to nucleus with transactivation activity. Upon Pi and N deprivation, the expression of TabHLH1 was up-regulated in roots and leaves, showing a pattern to be gradually increased within 23-h treatment regimes. The lines with overexpression of TabHLH1 exhibited drastically improved tolerance to Pi and N deprivation, showing larger plant phenotype, more biomass, higher concentration and more accumulation of P and N than wild type (WT) upon the Pi- and N-starvation stresses. NtPT1 and NtNRT2.2, the genes encoding phosphate transporter (PT) and nitrate transporter (NRT) in tobacco, respectively, showed up-regulated expression in TabHLH1-overexpressing plants; knockdown expression of them led to deteriorated growth feature, lowered biomass, and decreased nutrient accumulation of plants under Pi- and N-deficient conditions. Compared with WT, the TabHLH1-overexpressing plants also showed lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and improved antioxidant enzyme (AE) activities, such as those of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD). NtSOD1, NtCAT1, and NtPOD1;6 that encode SOD, CAT, and POD, respectively, were up-regulated in TabHLH1-overexpressing plants. Further knockdown of these AE gene expression caused reduced antioxidant enzymatic activities, indicative of their crucial roles in mediating cellular ROS homeostasis in Pi- and N-starvation conditions. Together, TabHLH1 plays an important role in mediating adaptation to the Pi- and N-starvation stresses through transcriptional regulation of a set of genes encoding PT, NRT and AEs that mediate the taken up of Pi and N and the cellular homeostasis of ROS initiated by the nutrient

  15. TabHLH1, a bHLH-type transcription factor gene in wheat, improves plant tolerance to Pi and N deprivation via regulation of nutrient transporter gene transcription and ROS homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongren; Hao, Lin; Yao, Sufei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Lu, Wenjing; Xiao, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) comprise a large TF family and act as crucial regulators in various biological processes in plants. Here, we report the functional characterization of TabHLH1, a bHLH TF member in wheat (Triticum aestivum). TabHLH1 shares conserved bHLH domain and targets to nucleus with transactivation activity. Upon Pi and N deprivation, the expression of TabHLH1 was up-regulated in roots and leaves, showing a pattern to be gradually increased within 23-h treatment regimes. The lines with overexpression of TabHLH1 exhibited drastically improved tolerance to Pi and N deprivation, showing larger plant phenotype, more biomass, higher concentration and more accumulation of P and N than wild type (WT) upon the Pi- and N-starvation stresses. NtPT1 and NtNRT2.2, the genes encoding phosphate transporter (PT) and nitrate transporter (NRT) in tobacco, respectively, showed up-regulated expression in TabHLH1-overexpressing plants; knockdown expression of them led to deteriorated growth feature, lowered biomass, and decreased nutrient accumulation of plants under Pi- and N-deficient conditions. Compared with WT, the TabHLH1-overexpressing plants also showed lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and improved antioxidant enzyme (AE) activities, such as those of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD). NtSOD1, NtCAT1, and NtPOD1;6 that encode SOD, CAT, and POD, respectively, were up-regulated in TabHLH1-overexpressing plants. Further knockdown of these AE gene expression caused reduced antioxidant enzymatic activities, indicative of their crucial roles in mediating cellular ROS homeostasis in Pi- and N-starvation conditions. Together, TabHLH1 plays an important role in mediating adaptation to the Pi- and N-starvation stresses through transcriptional regulation of a set of genes encoding PT, NRT and AEs that mediate the taken up of Pi and N and the cellular homeostasis of ROS initiated by the nutrient

  16. Analysis of interactions between heterologously produced bHLH and MYB proteins that regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis: quantitative interaction kinetics by Microscale Thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Heidari, Behzad; Blaise, Mickael; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-03-01

    The two Arabidopsis basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factors GLABRA3 (GL3) and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3) are positive regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis, and form protein complexes (MBW complexes) with various R2R3 MYB transcription factors and a WD40 repeat protein TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABROUS1 (TTG1). In earlier studies, GL3, in contrast to EGL3, was shown to be essential for accumulation of anthocyanins in response to nitrogen depletion. This could not be fully explained by the strong induction of GL3 in response to nitrogen depletion because the EGL3 transcripts were constitutively at a relatively high level and transcripts levels of the two genes were similar under nitrogen depletion. Here the GL3 and EGL3 proteins were characterized with respect to their affinities for PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT2 (PAP2), a R2R3-MYB which is induced by nitrogen depletion and is part of MBW complexes promoting anthocyanin synthesis. GL3 and EGL3 were also tested for their binding to MYBL2, a negative regulator of anthocyanin synthesis and MBW complexes. Using heterologously expressed proteins and Microscale Thermophoresis, GL3 showed binding constants (Kd) of 3.5±1.7 and 22.7±3.7 μM, whereas EGL3 showed binding constants of 7.5±2.3 and 8.9±1.4 μM for PAP2 and MYBL2, respectively. This implies that MYBL2 will not inhibit a MBW complex containing GL3 as easily as for a complex containing EGL3. In transgenic plants where EGL3 reaches high concentrations compared with MYBL2 the equilibrium is shifted and MYBL2 is not likely to be an efficient competitor, hence anthocyanin formation could be restored by either EGL3 or GL3 genes when overexpressed by help of the 35S promoter. The present work underpins that GL3 is essential for anthocyanin accumulation under nitrogen depletion not only due to transcriptional activation, but also because of binding properties to proteins promoting or inhibiting the activity of the MBW complex. PMID:25659750

  17. Protein Mediators of Sterol Transport Across Intestinal Brush Border Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Yu, Liqing

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cholesterol balance contributes significantly to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), the leading cause of death in the United States. The intestine has the unique capability to act as a gatekeeper for entry of cholesterol into the body, and inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption is now widely regarded as an attractive non-statin therapeutic strategy for ASCVD prevention. In this chapter we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding sterol transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. The purpose of this work is to summarize substantial progress made in the last decade in regards to protein-mediated sterol trafficking, and to discuss this in the context of human disease. PMID:20213550

  18. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  19. Ets proteins: new factors that regulate immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R R; Stuiver, M H; Steenbergen, R; Murre, C

    1993-11-01

    We used a DNA-protein interaction screening method to isolate a cDNA, Erg-3, whose product binds to a site, designated pi, present in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain gene enhancer. Erg-3 is an alternatively spliced product of the erg gene and contains an Ets DNA-binding domain. Fli-1 and PU.1, related Ets proteins, also bind to the same site. In addition, PU.1 binds to a second site, designated microB, in the Ig heavy-chain enhancer. We demonstrate that the pi binding site is crucial for Ig heavy-chain gene enhancer function. In addition, we show that Erg-3 and Fli.1, but not PU.1, can activate a reporter construct containing a multimer of protein-binding sites, synergistically with helix-loop-helix protein E12. We discuss how combinatorial interactions between members of the helix-loop-helix and Ets families may account for the tissue specificity of these proteins.

  20. Armet is an effector protein mediating aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Dai, Huaien; Zhang, Yi; Chandrasekar, Raman; Luo, Lan; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Sheng, Changzhong; Peng, Gongxin; Chen, Shaoliang; Tomich, John M; Reese, John; Edwards, Owain; Kang, Le; Reeck, Gerald; Cui, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Aphid saliva is predicted to contain proteins that modulate plant defenses and facilitate feeding. Armet is a well-characterized bifunctional protein in mammalian systems. Here we report a new role of Armet, namely as an effector protein in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Pea aphid Armet's physical and chemical properties and its intracellular role are comparable to those reported for mammalian Armets. Uniquely, we detected Armet in aphid watery saliva and in the phloem sap of fava beans fed on by aphids. Armet's transcript level is several times higher in the salivary gland when aphids feed on bean plants than when they feed on an artificial diet. Knockdown of the Armet transcript by RNA interference disturbs aphid feeding behavior on fava beans measured by the electrical penetration graph technique and leads to a shortened life span. Inoculation of pea aphid Armet protein into tobacco leaves induced a transcriptional response that included pathogen-responsive genes. The data suggest that Armet is an effector protein mediating aphid-plant interactions.

  1. Armet is an effector protein mediating aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Dai, Huaien; Zhang, Yi; Chandrasekar, Raman; Luo, Lan; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Sheng, Changzhong; Peng, Gongxin; Chen, Shaoliang; Tomich, John M; Reese, John; Edwards, Owain; Kang, Le; Reeck, Gerald; Cui, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Aphid saliva is predicted to contain proteins that modulate plant defenses and facilitate feeding. Armet is a well-characterized bifunctional protein in mammalian systems. Here we report a new role of Armet, namely as an effector protein in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Pea aphid Armet's physical and chemical properties and its intracellular role are comparable to those reported for mammalian Armets. Uniquely, we detected Armet in aphid watery saliva and in the phloem sap of fava beans fed on by aphids. Armet's transcript level is several times higher in the salivary gland when aphids feed on bean plants than when they feed on an artificial diet. Knockdown of the Armet transcript by RNA interference disturbs aphid feeding behavior on fava beans measured by the electrical penetration graph technique and leads to a shortened life span. Inoculation of pea aphid Armet protein into tobacco leaves induced a transcriptional response that included pathogen-responsive genes. The data suggest that Armet is an effector protein mediating aphid-plant interactions. PMID:25678626

  2. Prostacyclin-induced hyperthermia - Implication of a protein mediator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the prostacyclin-linked hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. Results show that intracerebroventricular administration of prostacyclin (PGI2) induces dose-related hyperthermia at room temperature (21 C), as well as at low (4 C) and high (30 C) ambient temperatures. It is found that this PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not mediated by its stable metabolite 6-keto prostaglandin F-1(alpha). Only one of the three anion transport systems, the liver transport system, appears to be important to the central inactivation of pyrogen, prostaglandin E2, and PGI2. Phenoxybenzamine and pimozide have no thermolytic effect on PGI2-induced hyperthermia, while PGI2 still induces hyperthermia after norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine levels are depleted by 6-hydroxydopamine. Indomethacin and SC-19220 (a PG antagonist) do not antagonize PGI2 induced hyperthermia, while theophylline does not accentuate the PGI2-induced hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to PGI2 is attenuated by central administration of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. It is concluded that PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not induced by NE, dopamine, or cyclic AMP, but rather that a protein mediator is implicated in the induction of fever by PG12.

  3. The “Sharp” blade against HIF-mediated metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Melino, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) control cellular adaptation to oxygen deprivation. Cancer cells engage HIFs to sustain their growth in adverse conditions, thus promoting a cellular reprograming that includes metabolism, proliferation, survival and mobility. HIFs overexpression in human cancer biopsies correlates with high metastasis and mortality. A recent report has elucidated a novel mechanism for HIFs regulation in triple-negative breast cancer. Specifically, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), Sharp-1, serves HIF1α to the proteasome and promotes its O2-indendpendet degradation, counteracting HIF-mediated metastasis. These findings shed light on how HIFs are manipulated during cancer pathogenesis. PMID:23187809

  4. Epigenetic regulation of puberty via Zinc finger protein-mediated transcriptional repression

    PubMed Central

    Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Castellano, Juan Manuel; Matagne, Valerie; Toro, Carlos A.; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    In primates, puberty is unleashed by increased GnRH release from the hypothalamus following an interval of juvenile quiescence. GWAS implicates Zinc finger (ZNF) genes in timing human puberty. Here we show that hypothalamic expression of several ZNFs decreased in agonadal male monkeys in association with the pubertal reactivation of gonadotropin secretion. Expression of two of these ZNFs, GATAD1 and ZNF573, also decreases in peripubertal female monkeys. However, only GATAD1 abundance increases when gonadotropin secretion is suppressed during late infancy. Targeted delivery of GATAD1 or ZNF573 to the rat hypothalamus delays puberty by impairing the transition of a transcriptional network from an immature repressive epigenetic configuration to one of activation. GATAD1 represses transcription of two key puberty-related genes, KISS1 and TAC3, directly, and reduces the activating histone mark H3K4me2 at each promoter via recruitment of histone demethylase KDM1A. We conclude that GATAD1 epitomizes a subset of ZNFs involved in epigenetic repression of primate puberty. PMID:26671628

  5. Regulation of the NPC2 protein-mediated cholesterol trafficking by membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Gallala, Hichem D; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-03-01

    Recycling and turnover of cell membranes play a critical role in cell metabolism. The internalization of membranes through the different processes of endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy deliver a considerable amount of membranes and lipids to the endosomal and lysosomal system which is tasked with its degradation. Its failure to do so leads to severe fatal neurodegenerative diseases. In order to better understand how membranes are degraded, we have to investigate the complex interactions that take place in this compartment between complex membrane lipids, enzymes and lipid binding and transfer proteins involved. To this end, we developed lipid transfer and fusion assays which allow us to quantify these interactions and assess their specificity. The published results of these investigations are summarized in this article. One of our main conclusions is that we have provided evidence for the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase stimulates Niemann pick disease protein type 2-mediated cholesterol export substantially by converting sphingomyelin to ceramide in the inner membranes of late endosomes.

  6. Blue light photoreceptors are required for the stability and function of a resistance protein mediating viral defense in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kachroo, Aardr

    2010-01-01

    This light-perceiving ability of plants requires the activities of proteins termed photoreceptors. In addition to various growth and developmental processes, light also plays a role in plant defense against pathogens and is required for activation of several defense genes and regulation of the cell death response. However, the molecular or biochemical basis of light modulated regulation of defense signaling is largely unclear. We demonstrate a direct role for blue-light photoreceptors in resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense against Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV) in Arabidopsis. The blue-light photoreceptors, cryptochrome (CRY) 2 and phototropin (PHOT) 2, are specifically required for maintaining the stability of the R protein HRT, and thereby resistance to TCV. Exogenous application of the phytohormone salicylic acid elevates HRT levels in phot2 but not in cry2 background. These data indicate that CRY2 and PHOT2 function distinctly in maintaining post-transcriptional stability of HRT. HRT-mediated resistance is also dependent on CRY1 and PHOT1 proteins, but these do not contribute to the stability of HRT. HRT interacts with the CRY2/PHOT2-interacting protein COP1, a E3 ubiquitin ligase. Exogenous application of a proteasome inhibitor prevents blue-light-dependent degradation of HRT, suggesting that HRT is degraded via the 26S proteasome. These and the fact that PHOT2 interacts directly with the R protein RPS2 suggest that blue-light photoreceptors might be involved in regulation and/or signaling mediated by several R proteins. PMID:21057210

  7. A Juvenile Hormone Transcription Factor Bmdimm-Fibroin H Chain Pathway Is Involved in the Synthesis of Silk Protein in Silkworm, Bombyx mori*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Chun; Jiang, Li-Jun; Li, Qiong-Yan; Zhou, Meng-Ting; Cheng, Ting-Cai; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qing-You

    2015-01-01

    The genes responsible for silk biosynthesis are switched on and off at particular times in the silk glands of Bombyx mori. This switch appears to be under the control of endogenous and exogenous hormones. However, the molecular mechanisms by which silk protein synthesis is regulated by the juvenile hormone (JH) are largely unknown. Here, we report a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Bmdimm, its silk gland-specific expression, and its direct involvement in the regulation of fibroin H-chain (fib-H) by binding to an E-box (CAAATG) element of the fib-H gene promoter. Far-Western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Bmdimm protein interacted with another basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Bmsage. Immunostaining revealed that Bmdimm and Bmsage proteins are co-localized in nuclei. Bmdimm expression was induced in larval silk glands in vivo, in silk glands cultured in vitro, and in B. mori cell lines after treatment with a JH analog. The JH effect on Bmdimm was mediated by the JH-Met-Kr-h1 signaling pathway, and Bmdimm expression did not respond to JH by RNA interference with double-stranded BmKr-h1 RNA. These data suggest that the JH regulatory pathway, the transcription factor Bmdimm, and the targeted fib-H gene contribute to the synthesis of fibroin H-chain protein in B. mori. PMID:25371208

  8. Regulation of E-box DNA binding during in vivo and in vitro activation of rat and human hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, K; Jones, E; Arthur, M; Smart, D; Trim, J; Wright, M; Mann, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to a myofibroblastic phenotype is a key event in liver fibrosis. Identification of transcription factors with activities that are modulated during HSC activation will improve our understanding of the molecular events controlling HSC activation.
AIMS—To determine if changes in E-box DNA binding activity occur during in vitro and in vivo activation of rat and human HSCs and to investigate mechanisms underlying any observed changes.
METHODS—Nuclear extracts were prepared from rat HSCs isolated and cultured from normal and carbon tetrachloride injured rat livers and from HSCs isolated from human liver. EMSA analysis of E-box DNA binding activity was performed on nuclear extracts to determine changes during HSC activation. Western and northern blot analysis of MyoD and Id1 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins was performed to confirm expression in HSC.
RESULTS—HSC activation was associated with inducible expression of two low mobility E-box binding complexes that were immunoreactive with an anti-MyoD antibody. MyoD mRNA expression was found at similar levels in freshly isolated and activated HSCs; in contrast, MyoD protein expression was elevated in activated HSCs. Activation of rat HSCs was accompanied by reduced expression of the inhibitory bHLH protein Id1.
CONCLUSIONS—In vitro and in vivo activation of rat and human HSCs is accompanied by induction of MyoD binding to E-box DNA sequences which appears to be mechanistically associated with elevated MyoD protein expression and reduced expression of the inhibitory Id1 protein. Clarification of the role of MyoD and Id1 proteins in HSC activation and liver fibrogenesis is now required.


Keywords: liver fibrosis; hepatic stellate cell; basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors; MyoD; Id1 PMID:11600477

  9. The TIM Barrel Architecture Facilitated the Early Evolution of Protein-Mediated Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron David; Beatty, Joshua T; Landweber, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    The triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel protein fold is a structurally repetitive architecture that is present in approximately 10% of all enzymes. It is generally assumed that this ubiquity in modern proteomes reflects an essential historical role in early protein-mediated metabolism. Here, we provide quantitative and comparative analyses to support several hypotheses about the early importance of the TIM barrel architecture. An information theoretical analysis of protein structures supports the hypothesis that the TIM barrel architecture could arise more easily by duplication and recombination compared to other mixed α/β structures. We show that TIM barrel enzymes corresponding to the most taxonomically broad superfamilies also have the broadest range of functions, often aided by metal and nucleotide-derived cofactors that are thought to reflect an earlier stage of metabolic evolution. By comparison to other putatively ancient protein architectures, we find that the functional diversity of TIM barrel proteins cannot be explained simply by their antiquity. Instead, the breadth of TIM barrel functions can be explained, in part, by the incorporation of a broad range of cofactors, a trend that does not appear to be shared by proteins in general. These results support the hypothesis that the simple and functionally general TIM barrel architecture may have arisen early in the evolution of protein biosynthesis and provided an ideal scaffold to facilitate the metabolic transition from ribozymes, peptides, and geochemical catalysts to modern protein enzymes.

  10. Effect of Reactor Turbulence on the Binding-Protein-Mediated Aspartate Transport System in Thin Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T. Taylor; Bishop, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    This research documents an effect of reactor turbulence on the ability of gram-negative wastewater biofilm bacteria to actively transport l-aspartate via a binding-protein-mediated transport system. Biofilms which were not preadapted to turbulence and which possessed two separate and distinct aspartate transport systems (systems 1 and 2) were subjected to a turbulent flow condition in a hydrodynamically defined closed-loop reactor system. A shear stress treatment of 3.1 N · m−2 for 10 min at a turbulent Reynolds number (Re = 11,297) inactivated the low-affinity, high-capacity binding-protein-mediated transport system (system 2) and resolved the high-affinity, low-capacity membrane-bound proton symport system (system 1). The Kt and Vmax values for the resolved system were statistically similar to Kt and Vmax values for system 1 when system 2 was inactivated either by osmotic shock or arsenate, two treatments which are known to inactivate binding-protein-mediated transport systems. We hypothesize that shear stress disrupts system 2 by deforming the outer membranes of the firmly adhered gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16346830

  11. Relationship between brassinosteroids and genes controlling stomatal production in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sonia; Cañamero, Roberto C; Serna, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Stomata are excellent model systems for examining the mechanisms that regulate cell fate determination and pattern formation. It has recently been demonstrated that brassinosteroids control stomatal development by regulating both the MAPK kinase kinase YODA and the basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional factor SPEECHLESS. Here, we show that these plant regulators positively regulate stomatal formation in the hypocotyl and also accelerate their development. Hormone tests, reporter gene studies and mutant analyses revealed that brassinosteroids act upstream of the transcriptional factors CAPRICE and GLABRA2. These plant regulators control an earlier stage of stomatal production than those regulated by the membrane receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. This work highlights differences in the genetic control of stomatal development between cotyledons or leaves and hypocotyls.

  12. Targeting antitumor effect of rhTNF-α fusion protein mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin; Ren, Hui; Wang, Yue-Li; Wang, Fa; Hou, Gan; Huang, Di-Nan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the tumor therapy, targeting effects and side effects of tumor-targeting rhTNF-α fusion protein mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-2 in an animal model in order to provide experimental data for future development of drugs. The median lethal dose (LD50) was obtained from acute toxicity experiments. The A549 lung cancer xenograft model was established, and then randomly divided into the saline, standard substance, and low-, middle- and high-dose fusion protein experiment groups. Each group was administered drugs for 18 days. The length and width of the xenografts were measured every three days, after which the xenograft growth curve was drawn. The mice were sacrificed in each group following treatment and the tumor volume and weight were measured. The targeting, effectiveness and toxicity of the transformed fusion protein, and pathological changes of tumor and organ tissues were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Additionally, biochemical markers were used to detect damage of various organs after protein processing. Cell apoptosis and angiogenesis were determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) testing and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in different dose groups. Tumor growth was markedly retarded in the high-dose experimental and standard hTNF-α groups with antitumor rates of 85.91 and 72.25%, respectively, as compared with the control group. Furthermore, the tumor tissue showed obvious apoptosis (the apoptotic index was 78.78 and 66.65%, respectively) and pathological changes in the high-dose experimental and standard hTNF-α groups. Tumor angiogenesis in each fusion protein group was inhibited (P<0.01) and the biochemical markers of various organs were greatly reduced in the high-dose experimental group (P<0.05). This finding indicated that slight toxic effects of fusion proteins were evident for the heart, liver and kidney. The reforming fusion protein

  13. Heterotrimeric G protein mediates ethylene-induced stomatal closure via hydrogen peroxide synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao-Min; Cai, Hong-Li; Lei, Xue; Zhou, Xue; Yue, Ming; He, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins function as key players in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in plant cells, but whether G proteins mediate ethylene-induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure are not clear. Here, evidences are provided to show the Gα subunit GPA1 as a missing link between ethylene and H2O2 in guard cell ethylene signalling. In wild-type leaves, ethylene-triggered H2O2 synthesis and stomatal closure were dependent on activation of Gα. GPA1 mutants showed the defect of ethylene-induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure, whereas wGα and cGα overexpression lines showed faster stomatal closure and H2O2 production in response to ethylene. Ethylene-triggered H2O2 generation and stomatal closure were impaired in RAN1, ETR1, ERS1 and EIN4 mutants but not impaired in ETR2 and ERS2 mutants. Gα activator and H2O2 rescued the defect of RAN1 and EIN4 mutants or etr1-3 in ethylene-induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure, but only rescued the defect of ERS1 mutants or etr1-1 and etr1-9 in ethylene-induced H2O2 production. Stomata of CTR1 mutants showed constitutive H2O2 production and stomatal closure, but which could be abolished by Gα inhibitor. Stomata of EIN2, EIN3 and ARR2 mutants did not close in responses to ethylene, Gα activator or H2O2, but do generate H2O2 following challenge of ethylene or Gα activator. The data indicate that Gα mediates ethylene-induced stomatal closure via H2O2 production, and acts downstream of RAN1, ETR1, ERS1, EIN4 and CTR1 and upstream of EIN2, EIN3 and ARR2. The data also show that ETR1 and ERS1 mediate both ethylene and H2O2 signalling in guard cells.

  14. Grasses use an alternatively wired bHLH transcription factor network to establish stomatal identity.

    PubMed

    Raissig, Michael T; Abrash, Emily; Bettadapur, Akhila; Vogel, John P; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2016-07-19

    Stomata, epidermal valves facilitating plant-atmosphere gas exchange, represent a powerful model for understanding cell fate and pattern in plants. Core basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulating stomatal development were identified in Arabidopsis, but this dicot's developmental pattern and stomatal morphology represent only one of many possibilities in nature. Here, using unbiased forward genetic screens, followed by analysis of reporters and engineered mutants, we show that stomatal initiation in the grass Brachypodium distachyon uses orthologs of stomatal regulators known from Arabidopsis but that the function and behavior of individual genes, the relationships among genes, and the regulation of their protein products have diverged. Our results highlight ways in which a kernel of conserved genes may be alternatively wired to produce diversity in patterning and morphology and suggest that the stomatal transcription factor module is a prime target for breeding or genome modification to improve plant productivity. PMID:27382177

  15. Mdm31 protein mediates sensitivity to potassium ionophores but does not regulate mitochondrial morphology or phospholipid trafficking in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Branislav; Lajdova, Dana; Abelovska, Lenka; Balazova, Maria; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2015-03-01

    Mdm31p is an inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) protein with unknown function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutants lacking Mdm31p contain only a few giant spherical mitochondria with disorganized internal structure, altered phospholipid composition and disturbed ion homeostasis, accompanied by increased resistance to the electroneutral K+ /H+ ionophore nigericin. These phenotypes are interpreted as resulting from diverse roles of Mdm31p, presumably in linking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to the machinery involved in segregation of mitochondria, in mediating cation transport across IMM and in phospholipid shuttling between mitochondrial membranes. To investigate which of the roles of Mdm31p are conserved in ascomycetous yeasts, we analysed the Mdm31p orthologue in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our results demonstrate that, similarly to its S. cerevisiae counterpart, SpMdm31 is a mitochondrial protein and its absence results in increased resistance to nigericin. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, Sz. pombe cells lacking SpMdm31 are also less sensitive to the electrogenic K+ ionophore valinomycin. Moreover, mitochondria of the fission yeast mdm31Δ mutant display no changes in morphology or phospholipid composition. Therefore, in terms of function, the two orthologous proteins appear to have considerably diverged between these two evolutionarily distant yeast species, possibly sharing only their participation in ion homeostasis.

  16. The Rhodococcus opacus TadD protein mediates triacylglycerol metabolism by regulating intracellular NAD(P)H pools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive actinomycete Rhodococcus opacus is widely studied for its innate ability to store large amounts of carbon in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG). Several groups have demonstrated that R. opacus PD630 is capable of storing anywhere from 50 to 76% of its cell dry weight as TAG. While numerous studies have focused on phenomenological aspects of this process, few have sought to identify the underlying molecular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for the biosynthesis and storage of this molecule. Results Herein we further our previous efforts to illuminate the black box that is lipid metabolism in actinomycetes using a genetic approach. Utilizing a simple, colorimetric genetic screen, we have identified a gene, referred to herein as tadD (triacylglycerol accumulation deficient), which is critical for TAG biosynthesis in R. opacus PD630. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the purified protein product of this gene is capable of oxidizing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, while simultaneously reducing NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H. Supporting this biochemical data, we observed that the ratio of NAD(P)H to NAD(P)+ is elevated in wildtype cultures grown under lipid production conditions as compared to cultures grown under vegetative growth conditions, while the mutant strain demonstrated no change irrespective of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that over-expressing a putative phosphorylative glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase leads to decreased TAG production during growth on TAG accumulation conditions. Conclusion Taken together, the data support the identification of a key metabolic branch point separating vegetative growth and lipid accumulation lifestyles in Rhodococcus. PMID:24209886

  17. Id proteins: small molecules, mighty regulators.

    PubMed

    Ling, Flora; Kang, Bin; Sun, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The family of inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins is a group of evolutionarily conserved molecules, which play important regulatory roles in organisms ranging from Drosophila to humans. Id proteins are small polypeptides harboring a helix-loop-helix (HLH) motif, which are best known to mediate dimerization with other basic HLH proteins, primarily E proteins. Because Id proteins do not possess the basic amino acids adjacent to the HLH motif necessary for DNA binding, Id proteins inhibit the function of E protein homodimers, as well as heterodimers between E proteins and tissue-specific bHLH proteins. However, Id proteins have also been shown to have E protein-independent functions. The Id genes are broadly but differentially expressed in a variety of cell types. Transcription of the Id genes is controlled by transcription factors such as C/EBPβ and Egr as well as by signaling pathways triggered by different stimuli, which include bone morphogenic proteins, cytokines, and ligands of T cell receptors. In general, Id proteins are capable of inhibiting the differentiation of progenitors of different cell types, promoting cell-cycle progression, delaying cellular senescence, and facilitating cell migration. These properties of Id proteins enable them to play significant roles in stem cell maintenance, vasculogenesis, tumorigenesis and metastasis, the development of the immune system, and energy metabolism. In this review, we intend to highlight the current understanding of the function of Id proteins and discuss gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms whereby Id proteins exert their diverse effects in multiple cellular processes.

  18. The emerging roles of TCF4 in disease and development.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Marc P; Hill, Matthew J; Quantock, Andrew J; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Blake, Derek J

    2014-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified common variants in transcription factor 4 (TCF4) as susceptibility loci for schizophrenia, Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. By contrast, rare TCF4 mutations cause Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, a disorder characterized by intellectual disability and developmental delay, and have also been described in patients with other neurodevelopmental disorders. TCF4 therefore sits at the nexus between common and rare disorders. TCF4 interacts with other basic helix-loop-helix proteins, forming transcriptional networks that regulate the differentiation of several distinct cell types. Here, we review the role of TCF4 in these seemingly diverse disorders and discuss recent data implicating TCF4 as an important regulator of neurodevelopment and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:24594265

  19. Phytochrome Interacting Factors: central players in phytochrome-mediated light signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Castillon, Alicia; Shen, Hui; Huq, Enamul

    2007-11-01

    To adapt to the surrounding environment, plants constantly monitor and respond to changes in the red and far-red regions of the light spectrum through the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. Extensive efforts using genetic, molecular and photobiological techniques have led to the identification of a group of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called the Phytochrome Interacting Factors, PIFs, which directly bind to the photoactivated phytochromes. Members of the PIF family have been shown to control light-regulated gene expression directly and indirectly. PIF1, PIF3, PIF4 and PIF5 are degraded in response to light signals, and physical interaction of PIF3 with phytochromes is necessary for the light-induced phosphorylation and degradation of PIF3. PIFs constitute an excellent model for the investigation of the biochemical mechanisms of signal transfer from photoactivated phytochromes and the light-regulation of gene expression that controls photomorphogenesis in plants.

  20. [Research progress of the bHLH transcription factors involved in genic male sterility in plants].

    PubMed

    Yongming, Liu; Ling, Zhang; Jianyu, Zhou; Moju, Cao

    2015-12-01

    Male sterility exists widely in the spermatophytes. It contributes to the study of plant reproductive development and can be used as an effective tool for hybrid seed production in heterosis utilization. Therefore, the study on male sterility is of great value in both theory and application. As one of the largest transcription factor families in plants, basic helix-loop-helix proteins (bHLHs) play a crucial role in regulating plant growth and development. This paper introduces the mechanism of bHLH regulating stamen development in several important model plants. Furthermore, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of genic male sterility resulting from bHLH dysfunction to provide references for crop breeding and theoretical studies.

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Membrane Protein-Mediated Hypersaline Sensitivity and Adaptation in Halophilic Nocardiopsis xinjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Yanchang; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Mingzhi; Su, Na; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Lingsheng; Wei, Wei; Luo, Jing; Zhou, Yanxia; Xu, Yongru; Xu, Ping; Li, Wenjun; Tao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The genus Nocardiopsis is one of the most dominant Actinobacteria that survives in hypersaline environments. However, the adaptation mechanisms for halophilism are still unclear. Here, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification based quantitative proteomics to investigate the functions of the membrane proteome after salt stress. A total of 683 membrane proteins were identified and quantified, of which 126 membrane proteins displayed salt-induced changes in abundance. Intriguingly, bioinformatics analyses indicated that these differential proteins showed two expression patterns, which were further validated by phenotypic changes and functional differences. The majority of ABC transporters, secondary active transporters, cell motility proteins, and signal transduction kinases were up-regulated with increasing salt concentration, whereas cell differentiation, small molecular transporter (ions and amino acids), and secondary metabolism proteins were significantly up-regulated at optimum salinity, but down-regulated or unchanged at higher salinity. The small molecule transporters and cell differentiation-related proteins acted as sensing proteins that played a more important biological role at optimum salinity. However, the ABC transporters for compatible solutes, Na(+)-dependent transporters, and cell motility proteins acted as adaptive proteins that actively counteracted higher salinity stress. Overall, regulation of membrane proteins may provide a major protection strategy against hyperosmotic stress. PMID:26549328

  2. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Membrane Protein-Mediated Hypersaline Sensitivity and Adaptation in Halophilic Nocardiopsis xinjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Yanchang; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Mingzhi; Su, Na; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Lingsheng; Wei, Wei; Luo, Jing; Zhou, Yanxia; Xu, Yongru; Xu, Ping; Li, Wenjun; Tao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The genus Nocardiopsis is one of the most dominant Actinobacteria that survives in hypersaline environments. However, the adaptation mechanisms for halophilism are still unclear. Here, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification based quantitative proteomics to investigate the functions of the membrane proteome after salt stress. A total of 683 membrane proteins were identified and quantified, of which 126 membrane proteins displayed salt-induced changes in abundance. Intriguingly, bioinformatics analyses indicated that these differential proteins showed two expression patterns, which were further validated by phenotypic changes and functional differences. The majority of ABC transporters, secondary active transporters, cell motility proteins, and signal transduction kinases were up-regulated with increasing salt concentration, whereas cell differentiation, small molecular transporter (ions and amino acids), and secondary metabolism proteins were significantly up-regulated at optimum salinity, but down-regulated or unchanged at higher salinity. The small molecule transporters and cell differentiation-related proteins acted as sensing proteins that played a more important biological role at optimum salinity. However, the ABC transporters for compatible solutes, Na(+)-dependent transporters, and cell motility proteins acted as adaptive proteins that actively counteracted higher salinity stress. Overall, regulation of membrane proteins may provide a major protection strategy against hyperosmotic stress.

  3. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-08-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination.

  4. The emerging role of Twist proteins in hematopoietic cells and hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Merindol, N; Riquet, A; Szablewski, V; Eliaou, J-F; Puisieux, A; Bonnefoy, N

    2014-01-01

    Twist1 and Twist2 (Twist1–2) are two transcription factors, members of the basic helix-loop-helix family, that have been well established as master transcriptional regulators of embryogenesis and developmental programs of mesenchymal cell lineages. Their role in oncogenesis in epithelium-derived cancer and in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition has also been thoroughly characterized. Recently, emerging evidence also suggests a key role for Twist1–2 in the function and development of hematopoietic cells, as well as in survival and development of numerous hematological malignancies. In this review, we summarize the latest data that depict the role of Twist1–2 in monocytes, T cells and B lymphocyte activation, and in associated hematological malignancies. PMID:24769647

  5. Mechanical stress mediated by both endosperm softening and embryo growth underlies endosperm elimination in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Fourquin, Chloé; Beauzamy, Léna; Chamot, Sophy; Creff, Audrey; Goodrich, Justin; Boudaoud, Arezki; Ingram, Gwyneth

    2016-09-15

    Seed development in angiosperms demands the tightly coordinated development of three genetically distinct structures. The embryo is surrounded by the endosperm, which is in turn enclosed within the maternally derived seed coat. In Arabidopsis, final seed size is determined by early expansion of the coenocytic endosperm, which then cellularises and subsequently undergoes developmental programmed cell death, breaking down as the embryo grows. Endosperm breakdown requires the endosperm-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ZHOUPI. However, to date, the mechanism underlying the Arabidopsis endosperm breakdown process has not been elucidated. Here, we provide evidence that ZHOUPI does not induce the developmental programmed cell death of the endosperm directly. Instead ZHOUPI indirectly triggers cell death by regulating the expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, thus altering the physical properties of the endosperm to condition a mechanical environment permitting the compression of the cellularised endosperm by the developing embryo.

  6. Type I bHLH Proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 Restrict Neurite Branching and Synapse Formation by Repressing Neurexin in Postmitotic Neurons.

    PubMed

    D'Rozario, Mitchell; Zhang, Ting; Waddell, Edward A; Zhang, Yonggang; Sahin, Cem; Sharoni, Michal; Hu, Tina; Nayal, Mohammad; Kutty, Kaveesh; Liebl, Faith; Hu, Wenhui; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-04-12

    Proneural proteins of the class I/II basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family are highly conserved transcription factors. Class I bHLH proteins are expressed in a broad number of tissues during development, whereas class II bHLH protein expression is more tissue restricted. Our understanding of the function of class I/II bHLH transcription factors in both invertebrate and vertebrate neurobiology is largely focused on their function as regulators of neurogenesis. Here, we show that the class I bHLH proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 are expressed in postmitotic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and mice, respectively, where they function to restrict neurite branching and synapse formation. Our data indicate that Daughterless performs this function in part by restricting the expression of the cell adhesion molecule Neurexin. This suggests a role for these proteins outside of their established roles in neurogenesis.

  7. Functional domains of the transcriptional activator NUC-1 in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kang, S

    1993-08-25

    The NUC-1 regulatory protein directly controls the transcription of these genes and how the activity enzymes in Neurospora crassa. To understand how NUC-1 regulates the transcription of these genes and how the activity of NUC-1 is modulated by other regulatory proteins, two putative functional domains of NUC-1 were analysed: the DNA-binding domain and the regulatory domain. The DNA-binding activity of NUC-1 has not been directly demonstrated; however, results of deletion analysis, sequence analysis of the nuc-1 mutant alleles, and strong sequence similarity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PHO4 protein strongly suggest that the basic helix-loop-helix motif of NUC-1 forms a DNA-binding domain. Deletion and mutant analyses revealed that 39 amino acid (aa) residues (aa 463 to 501), or fewer, of NUC-1 are interacting with the negative regulatory factor(s), the PREG and/or PGOV proteins.

  8. Translocation of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1 into the nucleus is induced by phosphorus limitation.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Y; Addison, R; Aramayo, R; Metzenberg, R L

    1996-09-01

    NUC-1, a basic helix-loop-helix zipper protein, activates the expression of several genes involved in phosphorus acquisition in Neurospora crassa. In the present study we investigated whether posttranscriptional mechanisms control the activity of NUC-1. The NUC-1 level was higher (up to fivefold) in wild-type cells grown at low external phosphate concentration and in mutant strains expressing the phosphorus acquisition genes constitutively than in a wild-type strain grown at high external phosphate concentration. Using indirect immunofluorescence we demonstrated that NUC-1 is localized at least predominantly in the cytosol when wild-type N. crassa is grown with an adequate supply of phosphate, whereas NUC-1 is largely concentrated in the nucleus upon limitation of external phosphate. In mutant strains expressing the phosphorus acquisition genes constitutively, NUC-1 localization was also primarily in the nucleus. Thus, subcellular compartmentation of regulatory proteins is an important mechanism in regulating gene expression in filamentous fungi.

  9. Unique CCT repeats mediate transcription of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuma, Mizue; Funato, Noriko; Higashihori, Norihisa; Murakami, Masanori; Ohyama, Kimie; Nakamura, Masataka . E-mail: naka.gene@cmn.tmd.ac.jp

    2007-01-26

    TWIST1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays critical roles in embryo development, cancer metastasis and mesenchymal progenitor differentiation. Little is known about transcriptional regulation of TWIST1 expression. Here we identified DNA sequences responsible for TWIST1 expression in mesenchymal lineage cell lines. Reporter assays with TWIST1 promoter mutants defined the -102 to -74 sequences that are essential for TWIST1 expression in human and mouse mesenchymal cell lines. Tandem repeats of CCT, but not putative CREB and NF-{kappa}B sites in the sequences substantially supported activity of the TWIST1 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the DNA sequences with the CCT repeats formed complexes with nuclear factors, containing, at least, Sp1 and Sp3. These results suggest critical implication of the CCT repeats in association with Sp1 and Sp3 factors in sustaining expression of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cells.

  10. Structural organisation and chromosomal mapping of the human Id-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Deed, R W; Hirose, T; Mitchell, E L; Santibanez-Koref, M F; Norton, J D

    1994-12-30

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors plays a central role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and tumourigenesis. Members of the Id (inhibitor of DNA binding) class of these nuclear proteins are able to heterodimerise with and thereby antagonise the functions of other transcription factors of this family. We report here on the genomic organisation of the human Id3 (HLH 1R21/heir1) gene. Comparison with the two other mammalian Id genes, Id1 and Id2, reveals a highly conserved protein coding gene organisation consistent with evolution from a common, ancestral Id-like gene. In addition, by using a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone of Id3, we have fine-scale mapped the gene to chromosome band 1p36.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and, using the same FISH technique, we have detected heterogeneity in tumour-associated 1p36 chromosome translocations.

  11. Suppression of E-protein activity interferes with the development of BCR-ABL-mediated myeloproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jinkyung; Patel, Nihal; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Frank, Oliver; Rivera, Richard R; Van Etten, Richard A; Murre, Cornelis

    2008-09-01

    E-proteins are a class of helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins, which play multiple roles throughout lymphoid development. The DNA binding activities of the E-proteins are regulated by a distinct class of antagonistic HLH proteins, named Id1-4. Here we demonstrate that Id2 deficient mice in a C57BL/6 genetic background exhibit increased cellularity in the granulocyte/myeloid progenitor compartment and show significantly higher numbers of maturing neutrophils. Within 6 months of age, Id2 deficient mice succumbed from overwhelming granulocytosis. The disease closely mimicked the distinctive features of human chronic myeloid leukemia: leukocytosis with maturing neutrophils, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and myeloid infiltration into peripheral tissues, including spleen, liver, and lungs. Strikingly, forced Id2 expression in murine bone marrow cells substantially delayed the onset of myeloproliferative disease (MPD). Collectively, these studies show that suppression of E-protein activity interferes with the development of BCR-ABL-mediated MPD.

  12. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-08-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  13. Phosphopeptide mapping of proteins ectopically expressed in tissue culture cell lines.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Beth A.; Virshup, David M.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2004-01-01

    Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor HAND1, it was suspected that HAND1 was being phosphorylated during trophoblast giant cell differentiation and that coexpression of a constitutively active kinase with HAND1 resulted in changes in the proteins dimerization profile. In order to accurately document HAND1 phosphorylation and identify the resides being modified, we employed metabolic cell labeling with (32)P of tissue culture cells coexpressing a Flag-epitope tagged HAND1 along with a number of active kinases and phosphatase subunits. We generated phosphopeptide maps of the phosphorylated HAND1 using the methods described below and linked these modifications to changes in HAND1 biological function.

  14. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-01-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  15. Impaired Thermogenesis and a Molecular Signature for Brown Adipose Tissue in Id2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Mathew, Deepa; Duffield, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Id2 null mice have sex-specific elevated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Here we further explored the role of Id2 in the regulation of core body temperature over the circadian cycle and the impact of Id2 deficiency on genes involved in insulin signaling and adipogenesis in BAT. We discovered a reduced core body temperature in Id2−/− mice. Moreover, in Id2−/− BAT, 30 genes including Irs1, PPARs, and PGC-1s were identified as differentially expressed in a sex-specific pattern. These data provide valuable insights into the impact of Id2 deficiency on energy homeostasis of mice in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27144179

  16. An atypical bHLH transcription factor regulates early xylem development downstream of auxin.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Matsukawa, Manami; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2013-03-01

    The vascular system in plants, which comprises xylem, phloem and vascular stem cells, originates from provascular cells and forms a continuous network throughout the plant body. Although various aspects of vascular development have been extensively studied, the early process of vascular development remains largely unknown. LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW), which encodes an atypical basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays an essential role in establishing vascular cells. Here, we report the analysis of LHW homologs in relation to vascular development. Three LHW homologs, LONESOME HIGHWAY LIKE 1-3 (LHL1-LHL3), were preferentially expressed in the plant vasculature. Genetic analysis indicated that, although the LHL3 loss-of-function mutant showed no obvious phenotype, the lhw lhl3 double mutant displayed more severe phenotypic defects in the vasculature of the cotyledons and roots than the lhw single mutant. Only one xylem vessel was formed at the metaxylem position in lhw lhl3 roots, whereas the lhw root formed one protoxylem and one or two metaxylem vessels. Conversely, overexpression of LHL3 enhanced xylem development in the roots. Moreover, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid caused ectopic LHL3 expression in accordance with induced auxin maximum. These results suggest that LHL3 plays a positive role in xylem differentiation downstream of auxin.

  17. Phosphorylation Regulates OLIG2 Cofactor Choice and the Motor Neuron-Oligodendrocyte Fate Switch

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiliang; Paes de Faria, Joana; Andrew, Paul; Nitarska, Justyna; Richardson, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A fundamental feature of central nervous system development is that neurons are generated before glia. In the embryonic spinal cord, for example, a group of neuroepithelial stem cells (NSCs) generates motor neurons (MNs), before switching abruptly to oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs). We asked how transcription factor OLIG2 participates in this MN-OLP fate switch. We found that Serine 147 in the helix-loop-helix domain of OLIG2 was phosphorylated during MN production and dephosphorylated at the onset of OLP genesis. Mutating Serine 147 to Alanine (S147A) abolished MN production without preventing OLP production in transgenic mice, chicks, or cultured P19 cells. We conclude that S147 phosphorylation, possibly by protein kinase A, is required for MN but not OLP genesis and propose that dephosphorylation triggers the MN-OLP switch. Wild-type OLIG2 forms stable homodimers, whereas mutant (unphosphorylated) OLIG2S147A prefers to form heterodimers with Neurogenin 2 or other bHLH partners, suggesting a molecular basis for the switch. PMID:21382552

  18. Early thymocyte development is regulated by modulation of E2A protein activity.

    PubMed

    Engel, I; Johns, C; Bain, G; Rivera, R R; Murre, C

    2001-09-17

    The E2A gene encodes the E47 and E12 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. T cell development in E2A-deficient mice is partially arrested before lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that E47 expression becomes uniformly high at the point at which thymocytes begin to commit towards the T cell lineage. E47 protein levels remain high until the double positive developmental stage, at which point they drop to relatively moderate levels, and are further downregulated upon transition to the single positive stage. However, stimuli that mimic pre-T cell receptor (TCR) signaling in committed T cell precursors inhibit E47 DNA-binding activity and induce the bHLH inhibitor Id3 through a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-dependent pathway. Consistent with these observations, a deficiency in E2A proteins completely abrogates the developmental block observed in mice with defects in TCR rearrangement. Thus E2A proteins are necessary for both initiating T cell differentiation and inhibiting development in the absence of pre-TCR expression. Mechanistically, these data link pre-TCR mediated signaling and E2A downstream target genes into a common pathway.

  19. A Role for Id2 in Regulating Photic Entrainment of the Mammalian Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Giles E.; Watson, Nathan P.; Mantani, Akio; Peirson, Stuart N.; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Loros, Jennifer J.; Israel, Mark A.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Inhibitor of DNA binding genes (Id1–Id4) encode helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional repressors associated with development and tumorigenesis [1, 2], but little is known concerning the function(s) of these genes in normal adult animals. Id2 was identified in DNA microarray screens for rhythmically expressed genes [3–5], and further analysis revealed a circadian pattern of expression of all four Id genes in multiple tissues including the suprachiasmatic nucleus. To explore an in vivo function, we generated and characterized deletion mutations of Id2 and of Id4. Id2−/− mice exhibit abnormally rapid entrainment and an increase in the magnitude of the phase shift of the pacemaker. A significant proportion of mice also exhibit disrupted rhythms when maintained under constant darkness. Conversely, Id4−/− mice did not exhibit a noticeable circadian phenotype. In vitro studies using an mPer1 and an AVP promoter reporter revealed the potential for ID1, ID2, and ID3 proteins to interact with the canonical basic HLH clock proteins BMAL1 and CLOCK. These data suggest that the Id genes may be important for entrainment and operation of the mammalian circadian system, potentially acting through BMAL1 and CLOCK targets. PMID:19217292

  20. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Gibberellin Signaling Fine-Tunes Arabidopsis Iron-Deficiency Responses.

    PubMed

    Wild, Michael; Davière, Jean-Michel; Regnault, Thomas; Sakvarelidze-Achard, Lali; Carrera, Esther; Lopez Diaz, Isabel; Cayrel, Anne; Dubeaux, Guillaume; Vert, Grégory; Achard, Patrick

    2016-04-18

    Iron is an essential element for most living organisms. Plants acquire iron from the rhizosphere and have evolved different biochemical and developmental responses to adapt to a low-iron environment. In Arabidopsis, FIT encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that activates the expression of iron-uptake genes in root epidermis upon iron deficiency. Here, we report that the gibberellin (GA)-signaling DELLA repressors contribute substantially in the adaptive responses to iron-deficient conditions. When iron availability decreases, DELLAs accumulate in the root meristem, thereby restraining root growth, while being progressively excluded from epidermal cells in the root differentiation zone. Such DELLA exclusion from the site of iron acquisition relieves FIT from DELLA-dependent inhibition and therefore promotes iron uptake. Consistent with this mechanism, expression of a non-GA-degradable DELLA mutant protein in root epidermis interferes with iron acquisition. Hence, spatial distribution of DELLAs in roots is essential to fine-tune the adaptive responses to iron availability.

  1. Hand transcription factors cooperatively regulate development of the distal midline mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana C; Funato, Noriko; Chapman, Shelby; McKee, Marc D; Richardson, James A; Olson, Eric N; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2007-10-01

    Hand proteins are evolutionally conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors implicated in development of neural crest-derived tissues, heart and limb. Hand1 is expressed in the distal (ventral) zone of the branchial arches, whereas the Hand2 expression domain extends ventrolaterally to occupy two-thirds of the mandibular arch. To circumvent the early embryonic lethality of Hand1 or Hand2-null embryos and to examine their roles in neural crest development, we generated mice with neural crest-specific deletion of Hand1 and various combinations of mutant alleles of Hand2. Ablation of Hand1 alone in neural crest cells did not affect embryonic development, however, further removing one Hand2 allele or deleting the ventrolateral branchial arch expression of Hand2 led to a novel phenotype presumably due to impaired growth of the distal midline mesenchyme. Although we failed to detect changes in proliferation or apoptosis between the distal mandibular arch of wild-type and Hand1/Hand2 compound mutants at embryonic day (E)10.5, dysregulation of Pax9, Msx2 and Prx2 was observed in the distal mesenchyme at E12.5. In addition, the inter-dental mesenchyme and distal symphysis of Meckel's cartilage became hypoplastic, resulting in the formation of a single fused lower incisor within the hypoplastic fused mandible. These findings demonstrate the importance of Hand transcription factors in the transcriptional circuitry of craniofacial and tooth development.

  2. Reciprocal Interaction of the Circadian Clock with the Iron Homeostasis Network in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sunghyun; Kim, Sun A.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; McClung, C. Robertson

    2013-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) uptake and homeostasis are critical for survival, and these processes are tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillating mechanisms that allow an organism to anticipate environmental changes to coordinate biological processes both with one another and with the environmental day/night cycle. The plant circadian clock controls many physiological processes through rhythmic expression of transcripts. In this study, we examined the expression of three Fe homeostasis genes (IRON REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 [IRT1], BASIC HELIX LOOP HELIX39, and FERRITIN1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using promoter:LUCIFERASE transgenic lines. Each of these promoters showed circadian regulation of transcription. The circadian clock monitors a number of clock outputs and uses these outputs as inputs to modulate clock function. We show that this is also true for Fe status. Fe deficiency results in a lengthened circadian period. We interrogated mutants impaired in the Fe homeostasis response, including irt1-1, which lacks the major high-affinity Fe transporter, and fit-2, which lacks Fe deficiency-induced TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor necessary for induction of the Fe deficiency response. Both mutants exhibit symptoms of Fe deficiency, including lengthened circadian period. To determine which components are involved in this cross talk between the circadian and Fe homeostasis networks, we tested clock- or Fe homeostasis-related mutants. Mutants defective in specific clock gene components were resistant to the change in period length under different Fe conditions observed in the wild type, suggesting that these mutants are impaired in cross talk between Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock. PMID:23250624

  3. High mobility group protein-mediated transcription requires DNA damage marker γ-H2AX

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Indrabahadur; Ozturk, Nihan; Cordero, Julio; Mehta, Aditi; Hasan, Diya; Cosentino, Claudia; Sebastian, Carlos; Krüger, Marcus; Looso, Mario; Carraro, Gianni; Bellusci, Saverio; Seeger, Werner; Braun, Thomas; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into chromatins, the physiological template for DNA-dependent processes including replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Chromatin-mediated transcription regulation involves DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, and histone modifications. However, chromatin also contains non-histone chromatin-associated proteins, of which the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant. Although it is known that HMG proteins induce structural changes of chromatin, the processes underlying transcription regulation by HMG proteins are poorly understood. Here we decipher the molecular mechanism of transcription regulation mediated by the HMG AT-hook 2 protein (HMGA2). We combined proteomic, ChIP-seq, and transcriptome data to show that HMGA2-induced transcription requires phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX at S139 (H2AXS139ph; γ-H2AX) mediated by the protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Furthermore, we demonstrate the biological relevance of this mechanism within the context of TGFβ1 signaling. The interplay between HMGA2, ATM, and H2AX is a novel mechanism of transcription initiation. Our results link H2AXS139ph to transcription, assigning a new function for this DNA damage marker. Controlled chromatin opening during transcription may involve intermediates with DNA breaks that may require mechanisms that ensure the integrity of the genome. PMID:26045162

  4. MicroProtein-Mediated Recruitment of CONSTANS into a TOPLESS Trimeric Complex Represses Flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Graeff, Moritz; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Tenai; Dolde, Ulla; Rodrigues, Vandasue; Brandt, Ronny; Wenkel, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    MicroProteins are short, single domain proteins that act by sequestering larger, multi-domain proteins into non-functional complexes. MicroProteins have been identified in plants and animals, where they are mostly involved in the regulation of developmental processes. Here we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana microProteins, miP1a and miP1b, physically interact with CONSTANS (CO) a potent regulator of flowering time. The miP1a/b-type microProteins evolved in dicotyledonous plants and have an additional carboxy-terminal PF(V/L)FL motif. This motif enables miP1a/b microProteins to interact with TOPLESS/TOPLESS-RELATED (TPL/TPR) proteins. Interaction of CO with miP1a/b/TPL causes late flowering due to a failure in the induction of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) expression under inductive long day conditions. Both miP1a and miP1b are expressed in vascular tissue, where CO and FT are active. Genetically, miP1a/b act upstream of CO thus our findings unravel a novel layer of flowering time regulation via microProtein-inhibition. PMID:27015278

  5. Wnt protein-mediated satellite cell conversion in adult and aged mice following voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Hidaka, Ryo; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2014-03-14

    Muscle represents an abundant, accessible, and replenishable source of adult stem cells. Skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, called satellite cells, play essential roles in regeneration after muscle injury in adult skeletal muscle. Although the molecular mechanism of muscle regeneration process after an injury has been extensively investigated, the regulation of satellite cells under steady state during the adult stage, including the reaction to exercise stimuli, is relatively unknown. Here, we show that voluntary wheel running exercise, which is a low stress exercise, converts satellite cells to the activated state due to accelerated Wnt signaling. Our analysis showed that up-regulated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling directly modulated chromatin structures of both MyoD and Myf5 genes, resulting in increases in the mRNA expression of Myf5 and MyoD and the number of proliferative Pax7(+)Myf5(+) and Pax7(+) MyoD(+) cells in skeletal muscle. The effect of Wnt signaling on the activation of satellite cells, rather than Wnt-mediated fibrosis, was observed in both adult and aged mice. The association of β-catenin, T-cell factor, and lymphoid enhancer transcription factors of multiple T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor regulatory elements, conserved in mouse, rat, and human species, with the promoters of both the Myf5 and MyoD genes drives the de novo myogenesis in satellite cells even in aged muscle. These results indicate that exercise-stimulated extracellular Wnts play a critical role in the regulation of satellite cells in adult and aged skeletal muscle.

  6. Id1 expression promotes T regulatory cell differentiation by facilitating TCR costimulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Yu, Sen; Jin, Rong; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Ge, Qing; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu

    2014-07-15

    T regulatory (Treg) cells play crucial roles in the regulation of cellular immunity. The development of Treg cells depends on signals from TCRs and IL-2Rs and is influenced by a variety of transcription factors. The basic helix-loop-helix proteins are known to influence TCR signaling thresholds. Whether this property impacts Treg differentiation is not understood. In this study, we interrogated the role of basic helix-loop-helix proteins in the production of Treg cells using the CD4 promoter-driven Id1 transgene. We found that Treg cells continued to accumulate as Id1 transgenic mice aged, resulting in a significant increase in Treg cell counts in the thymus as well as in the periphery compared with wild-type controls. Data from mixed bone marrow assays suggest that Id1 acts intrinsically on developing Treg cells. We made a connection between Id1 expression and CD28 costimulatory signaling because Id1 transgene expression facilitated the formation of Treg precursors in CD28(-/-) mice and the in vitro differentiation of Treg cells on thymic dendritic cells despite the blockade of costimulation by anti-CD80/CD86. Id1 expression also allowed in vitro Treg differentiation without anti-CD28 costimulation, which was at least in part due to enhanced production of IL-2. Notably, with full strength of costimulatory signals, however, Id1 expression caused modest but significant suppression of Treg induction. Finally, we demonstrate that Id1 transgenic mice were less susceptible to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, thus illustrating the impact of Id1-mediated augmentation of Treg cell levels on cellular immunity.

  7. Characterization of msim, a murine homologue of the Drosophila sim transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, P.; Reece, M.; Pelletier, J.

    1996-07-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene result in loss of precursor cells that give rise to midline cells of the embryonic central nervous system. During the course of an exon-trapping strategy aimed at identifying transcripts that contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome critical region showing significantly homology to the Drosophila sim gene. Using a cross-hybridization approach, we have isolated a murine homolog of Drosophila sim gene, which we designated msim. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence analyses of msim cDNA clones indicate the this gene encodes a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix class of transcription factors. The murine and Drosophila proteins share 88% residues within the basic-helix-loop helix domain, with an overall homology of 92%. In addition, the N-terminal domain of MSIM contains two PAS dimerization motifs also featured in the Drosophila sim gene product, as well as a small number of other transcription factors. Northern blot analysis of adult murine tissues revealed that the msim gene produces a single mRNA species of {approximately}4 kb expressed in a small number of tissues, with the highest levels in the kidneys and lower levels present in skeletal muscle, lung, testis, brain, and heart. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that msim is also expressed in early fetal development in the central nervous system and in cartilage primordia. The characteristics of the msim gene are consistent with its putative function as a transcriptional regulator. 51 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The genetics of rhizosheath size in a multiparent mapping population of wheat

    PubMed Central

    Delhaize, Emmanuel; Rathjen, Tina M.; Cavanagh, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Rhizosheaths comprise soil that adheres to plant roots and, in some species, are indicative of root hair length. In this study, the genetics of rhizosheath size in wheat was investigated by screening the progeny of multiparent advanced generation intercrosses (MAGIC). Two MAGIC populations were screened for rhizosheath size using a high throughput method. One MAGIC population was developed from intercrosses between four parents (4-way) and the other from intercrosses between eight parents (8-way). Transgressive segregation for rhizosheath size was observed in both the 4-way and 8-way MAGIC populations. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the 4-way population identified six major loci located on chromosomes 2B, 4D, 5A, 5B, 6A, and 7A together accounting for 42% of the variation in rhizosheath size. Rhizosheath size was strongly correlated with root hair length and was robust across different soil types in the absence of chemical constraints. Rhizosheath size in the MAGIC populations was a reliable surrogate for root hair length and, therefore, the QTL identified probably control root hair elongation. Members of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors have previously been identified to regulate root hair length in Arabidopsis and rice. Since several wheat members of the basic helix-loop-helix family of genes are located within or near the QTL, these genes are candidates for controlling the long root hair trait. The QTL for rhizosheath size identified in this study provides the opportunity to implement marker-assisted selection to increase root hair length for improved phosphate acquisition in wheat. PMID:25969556

  9. Ca2+ channels as integrators of G protein-mediated signaling in neurons.

    PubMed

    Strock, Jesse; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2004-11-01

    The observations from Dunlap and Fischbach that transmitter-mediated shortening of the duration of action potentials could be caused by a decrease in calcium conductance led to numerous studies of the mechanisms of modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by receptor-G protein pathways, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Inhibition of Ca(2+) channels can be mediated by G protein betagamma-subunits or by kinases, such as protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. In the last few years, it has been shown that integration of G protein signaling can take place at the level of the calcium channel by regulation of the interaction of the channel pore-forming subunit with different cellular proteins.

  10. Z-DNA Binding Protein Mediates Host Control of Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Kelly J; Cervantes, Patrick W; Knoll, Laura J

    2016-10-01

    Intrinsic to Toxoplasma gondii infection is the parasite-induced modulation of the host immune response, which ensures establishment of a chronic lifelong infection. This manipulation of the host immune response allows T. gondii to not only dampen the ability of the host to eliminate the parasite but also trigger parasite differentiation to the slow-growing, encysted bradyzoite form. We previously used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to profile the transcriptomes of mice and T. gondii during acute and chronic stages of infection. One of the most abundant host transcripts during acute and chronic infection was Z-DNA binding protein 1 (ZBP1). In this study, we determined that ZBP1 functions to control T. gondii growth. In activated macrophages isolated from ZBP1 deletion (ZBP1(-/-)) mice, T. gondii has an increased rate of replication and a decreased rate of degradation. We also identified a novel function for ZBP1 as a regulator of nitric oxide (NO) production in activated macrophages, even in the absence of T. gondii infection. Upon stimulation, T. gondii-infected ZBP1(-/-) macrophages display increased proinflammatory cytokines compared to wild-type macrophages under the same conditions. These in vitro phenotypes were recapitulated in vivo, with ZBP1(-/-) mice having increased susceptibility to oral challenge, higher cyst burdens during chronic infection, and elevated inflammatory cytokine responses. Taken together, these results highlight a role for ZBP1 in assisting host control of T. gondii infection. PMID:27481249

  11. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  12. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing.

  13. A receptor-like protein mediates the response to pectin modification by activating brassinosteroid signaling.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sebastian; van der Does, Dieuwertje; Ladwig, Friederike; Sticht, Carsten; Kolbeck, Andreas; Schürholz, Ann-Kathrin; Augustin, Sebastian; Keinath, Nana; Rausch, Thomas; Greiner, Steffen; Schumacher, Karin; Harter, Klaus; Zipfel, Cyril; Höfte, Herman

    2014-10-21

    The brassinosteroid (BR) signaling module is a central regulator of plant morphogenesis, as indicated by the large number of BR-responsive cell wall-related genes and the severe growth defects of BR mutants. Despite a detailed knowledge of the signaling components, the logic of this auto-/paracrine signaling module in growth control remains poorly understood. Recently, extensive cross-talk with other signaling pathways has been shown, suggesting that the outputs of BR signaling, such as gene-expression changes, are subject to complex control mechanisms. We previously provided evidence for a role of BR signaling in a feedback loop controlling the integrity of the cell wall. Here, we identify the first dedicated component of this feedback loop: a receptor-like protein (RLP44), which is essential for the compensatory triggering of BR signaling upon inhibition of pectin de-methylesterification in the cell wall. RLP44 is required for normal growth and stress responses and connects with the BR signaling pathway, presumably through a direct interaction with the regulatory receptor-like kinase BAK1. These findings corroborate a role for BR in controlling the sensitivity of a feedback signaling module involved in maintaining the physico-chemical homeostasis of the cell wall during cell expansion.

  14. Proteasomal Degradation of Nod2 Protein Mediates Tolerance to Bacterial Cell Wall Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Biswas, Amlan; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense by detecting microbes and initiating inflammatory responses. Although both Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are important for this process, their excessive activation is hazardous to hosts; thus, tight regulation is required. Endotoxin tolerance is refractory to repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and serves as a host defense mechanism against septic shock caused by an excessive TLR4 response during Gram-negative bacterial infection. Gram-positive bacteria as well as their cell wall components also induce shock. However, the mechanism underlying tolerance is not understood. Here, we show that activation of Nod2 by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the bacterial cell wall, induces rapid degradation of Nod2, which confers MDP tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Nod2 is constitutively associated with a chaperone protein, Hsp90, which is required for Nod2 stability and protects Nod2 from degradation. Upon MDP stimulation, Hsp90 rapidly dissociates from Nod2, which subsequently undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The SOCS-3 protein induced by Nod2 activation further facilitates this degradation process. Therefore, Nod2 protein stability is a key factor in determining responsiveness to MDP stimulation. This indicates that TLRs and NLRs induce a tolerant state through distinct molecular mechanisms that protect the host from septic shock. PMID:23019338

  15. Translocator Protein-Mediated Stabilization of Mitochondrial Architecture during Inflammation Stress in Colonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Issop, Leeyah; Ostuni, Mariano A.; Lee, Sunghoon; Laforge, Mireille; Péranzi, Gabriel; Rustin, Pierre; Benoist, Jean-François; Estaquier, Jérome; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract increasing the risk of cancer has been described to be linked to the high expression of the mitochondrial translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO). Accordingly, TSPO drug ligands have been shown to regulate cytokine production and to improve tissue reconstruction. We used HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells to evaluate the role of TSPO and its drug ligands in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced inflammation. TNF-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression, coupled to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was followed by TSPO overexpression. TNF also destabilized mitochondrial ultrastructure, inducing cell death by apoptosis. Treatment with the TSPO drug ligand PK 11195 maintained the mitochondrial ultrastructure, reducing IL-8 and ROS production and cell death. TSPO silencing and overexpression studies demonstrated that the presence of TSPO is essential to control IL-8 and ROS production, so as to maintain mitochondrial ultrastructure and to prevent cell death. Taken together, our data indicate that inflammation results in the disruption of mitochondrial complexes containing TSPO, leading to cell death and epithelia disruption. Significance: This work implicates TSPO in the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity and in the control of mitochondrial ROS production, ultimately favoring tissue regeneration. PMID:27054921

  16. RNA binding proteins mediate the ability of a fungus to adapt to the cold.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiguo; St Leger, Raymond J

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about how fungi adapt to chilling. In eubacteria, cold shock proteins (CSPs) facilitate translation by destabilizing RNA secondary structure. Animals and plants have homologous cold shock domains within proteins, and additional glycine-rich RNA binding proteins (GRPs), but their role in stress resistance is poorly understood. In this study, we identified GRP homologues in diverse fungi. However, only Aspergillus clavatus and Metarhizium anisopliae possessed cold shock domains. Both M. anisopliae's small eubacteria-like CSP (CRP1) and its GRP (CRP2) homologue were induced by cold. Disrupting either Crp1 or Crp2 greatly reduced metabolism and conidial germination rates at low temperatures, and decreased tolerance to freezing. However, while both Crp1 and Crp2 reduced freezing-induced production of reactive oxygen species, only Crp1 protected cells against H(2)O(2) and increased M. anisopliae's virulence to caterpillars. Unlike CRP2, CRP1 rescued the cold-sensitive growth defects of an Escherichia coli CSP deletion mutant, and CRP1 also demonstrated transcription anti-termination activity, so CRP1 can regulate transcription and translation at low temperature. Expressing either Crp1 or Crp2 in yeast increased metabolism at cold temperatures and Crp1 improved tolerance to freezing. Thus besides providing a model relevant to many biological systems, Crp1 and Crp2 have potential applications in biotechnology.

  17. A yeast BH3-only protein mediates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Sabrina; Ruli, Doris; Vögtle, F-Nora; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Moitzi, Barbara; Eisenberg, Tobias; Kepp, Oliver; Habernig, Lukas; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Laun, Peter; Breitenbach, Michael; Khoury, Chamel; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Rechberger, Gerald; Meisinger, Chris; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization is a watershed event in the process of apoptosis, which is tightly regulated by a series of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins belonging to the BCL-2 family, each characteristically possessing a BCL-2 homology domain 3 (BH3). Here, we identify a yeast protein (Ybh3p) that interacts with BCL-XL and harbours a functional BH3 domain. Upon lethal insult, Ybh3p translocates to mitochondria and triggers BH3 domain-dependent apoptosis. Ybh3p induces cell death and disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential via the mitochondrial phosphate carrier Mir1p. Deletion of Mir1p and depletion of its human orthologue (SLC25A3/PHC) abolish stress-induced mitochondrial targeting of Ybh3p in yeast and that of BAX in human cells, respectively. Yeast cells lacking YBH3 display prolonged chronological and replicative lifespans and resistance to apoptosis induction. Thus, the yeast genome encodes a functional BH3 domain that induces cell death through phylogenetically conserved mechanisms. PMID:21673659

  18. CD26-mediated regulation of periostin expression contributes to migration and invasion of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komiya, Eriko; Ohnuma, Kei; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Hatano, Ryo; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD26-expressing MPM cells upregulate production of periostin. • The intracytoplasmic region of CD26 mediates the upregulation of periostin. • CD26 expression leads to nuclear translocation of Twist1 via phosphorylation of Src. • Secreted periostin enhances migration and invasion of MPM cells. - Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignancy arising from mesothelial lining of pleura. It is generally associated with a history of asbestos exposure and has a very poor prognosis, partly due to the lack of a precise understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with its malignant behavior. In the present study, we expanded on our previous studies on the enhanced motility and increased CD26 expression in MPM cells, with a particular focus on integrin adhesion molecules. We found that expression of CD26 upregulates periostin secretion by MPM cells, leading to enhanced MPM cell migratory and invasive activity. Moreover, we showed that upregulation of periostin expression results from the nuclear translocation of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1, a process that is mediated by CD26-associated activation of Src phosphorylation. While providing new and profound insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in MPM biology, these findings may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for MPM.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    PubMed

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, María del Carmen; Corton, J. Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Álvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans. PMID:22701468

  1. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  2. Alcohol oxidase protein mediated in-situ synthesized and stabilized gold nanoparticles for developing amperometric alcohol biosensor.

    PubMed

    Chinnadayyala, Somasekhar R; Santhosh, Mallesh; Singh, Naveen K; Goswami, Pranab

    2015-07-15

    A simple one step method for the alcohol oxidases (AOx) protein mediated synthesis of gold nano-particles (AuNPs) in alkaline (pH 8.5) condition with simultaneous stabilization of the nanoparticles on the AOx protein surface under native environment has been developed. The formation of the AOx conjugated AuNPs was confirmed by advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The significant increase in zeta potential (ζ) value of -57mV for the synthesized AOx-AuNPs conjugate from the AOx (pI 4.5) protein (ζ, -30mV) implied good stability of the in-situ synthesized nano-conjugate. The AOx-AuNPs conjugate showed steady stability in alkaline (upto pH 8.5) and NaCl (up to 10(-1)M) solutions. The efficiency (Kcat/Km) of the AuNP conjugated AOx was increased by 18% from the free enzyme confirming the activating role of the surface stabilized AuNPs for the enzyme. The AuNPs-AOx conjugate was encapsulated with polyaniline (PANI) synthesized by oxidative polymerization of aniline using H2O2 generated in-situ from the AOx catalysed oxidation of alcohol. The PANI encapsulated AuNPs-AOx assembly was stabilized on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by chitosan-Nafion mixture and then utilized the fabricated bioelectrode for detection of alcohol amperometrically using H2O2 as redox indicator at +0.6V. The constructed biosensor showed high operational stability (6.3% loss after 25 measurements), wide linear detection range of 10µM-4.7mM (R(2)=0.9731), high sensitivity of 68.3±0.35µAmM(-1) and low detection limit of 7±0.027µM for ethanol. The fabricated bioelectrode was successfully used for the selective determination of alcohol in beverage samples.

  3. X-ray structures of Myc-Max and Mad-Max recognizing DNA. Molecular bases of regulation by proto-oncogenic transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Satish K; Burley, Stephen K

    2003-01-24

    X-ray structures of the basic/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper (bHLHZ) domains of Myc-Max and Mad-Max heterodimers bound to their common DNA target (Enhancer or E box hexanucleotide, 5'-CACGTG-3') have been determined at 1.9 A and 2.0 A resolution, respectively. E box recognition by these two structurally similar transcription factor pairs determines whether a cell will divide and proliferate (Myc-Max) or differentiate and become quiescent (Mad-Max). Deregulation of Myc has been implicated in the development of many human cancers, including Burkitt's lymphoma, neuroblastomas, and small cell lung cancers. Both quasisymmetric heterodimers resemble the symmetric Max homodimer, albeit with marked structural differences in the coiled-coil leucine zipper regions that explain preferential homo- and heteromeric dimerization of these three evolutionarily related DNA-binding proteins. The Myc-Max heterodimer, but not its Mad-Max counterpart, dimerizes to form a bivalent heterotetramer, which explains how Myc can upregulate expression of genes with promoters bearing widely separated E boxes.

  4. Myrosin Idioblast Cell Fate and Development Are Regulated by the Arabidopsis Transcription Factor FAMA, the Auxin Pathway, and Vesicular Trafficking[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Sack, Fred D.

    2014-01-01

    Crucifer shoots harbor a glucosinolate-myrosinase system that defends against insect predation. Arabidopsis thaliana myrosinase (thioglucoside glucohydrolase [TGG]) accumulates in stomata and in myrosin idioblasts (MIs). This work reports that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FAMA that is key to stomatal development is also expressed in MIs. The loss of FAMA function abolishes MI fate as well as the expression of the myrosinase genes TGG1 and TGG2. MI cells have previously been reported to be located in the phloem. Instead, we found that MIs arise from the ground meristem rather than provascular tissues and thus are not homologous with phloem. Moreover, MI patterning and morphogenesis are abnormal when the function of the ARF-GEF gene GNOM is lost as well as when auxin efflux and vesicular trafficking are chemically disrupted. Stomata and MI cells constitute part of a wider system that reduces plant predation, the so-called “mustard oil bomb,” in which vacuole breakage in cells harboring myrosinase and glucosinolate yields a brew toxic to many animals, especially insects. This identification of the gene that confers the fate of MIs, as well as stomata, might facilitate the development of strategies for engineering crops to mitigate predation. PMID:25304201

  5. Differential regulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma1 (PPARgamma1) and PPARgamma2 messenger RNA expression in the early stages of adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Saladin, R; Fajas, L; Dana, S; Halvorsen, Y D; Auwerx, J; Briggs, M

    1999-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is driven by the expression and activation of three transcription factor families: the differentially expressed CAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) alpha, beta, and delta; the helix-loop-helix adipocyte differentiation and determination factor-1; and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), expressed as two isoforms, PPARgamma1 and the adipocyte-specific PPARgamma2. Overexpression of PPARgamma can induce adipocyte differentiation; therefore, we analyzed the expression of the two PPARgamma isoforms during early stages of differentiation to determine whether one was preferentially induced as an early determining event. Surprisingly, in the first 24 h, a 3-6-fold increase of PPARgamma2 mRNA was observed, whereas PPARgamma1 mRNA remained unchanged. PPARgamma1 was induced 1 day later. Overexpression of C/EBPbeta has also been shown to induce adipocyte differentiation. A C/EBP site was identified only in the human PPARgamma2 promoter. Its deletion blunted the response of PPARgamma2 promoter to cotransfected C/EBPbeta or methylisobutylxanthine treatment. We hypothesize that PPARgamma2 initiates adipocyte differentiation.

  6. The Hand1 and Hand2 transcription factors regulate expansion of the embryonic cardiac ventricles in a gene dosage-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    McFadden, David G; Barbosa, Ana C; Richardson, James A; Schneider, Michael D; Srivastava, Deepak; Olson, Eric N

    2005-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors Hand1 and Hand2 display dynamic and spatially restricted expression patterns in the developing heart. Mice that lack Hand2 die at embryonic day 10.5 from right ventricular hypoplasia and vascular defects, whereas mice that lack Hand1 die at embryonic day 8.5 from placental and extra-embryonic abnormalities that preclude analysis of its potential role in later stages of heart development. To determine the cardiac functions of Hand1, we generated mice harboring a conditional Hand1-null allele and excised the gene by cardiac-specific expression of Cre recombinase. Embryos homozygous for the cardiac Hand1 gene deletion displayed defects in the left ventricle and endocardial cushions, and exhibited dysregulated ventricular gene expression. However, these embryos survived until the perinatal period when they died from a spectrum of cardiac abnormalities. Creation of Hand1/2 double mutant mice revealed gene dose-sensitive functions of Hand transcription factors in the control of cardiac morphogenesis and ventricular gene expression. These findings demonstrate that Hand factors play pivotal and partially redundant roles in cardiac morphogenesis, cardiomyocyte differentiation and cardiac-specific transcription.

  7. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein induces release of histamine and interleukin-6 through G protein-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways in HMC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Che; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yeh, Ying-Chieh; Shih, Kuo-Shun; Du, Shin-Yi; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) activates several innate leukocytes including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells. It has been reported that HP-NAP induces degranulation and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion of rat peritoneal mast cells. However, the molecular mechanism is not very clear. Here, we show that HP-NAP activates human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1) cells to secrete histamine and IL-6. The secretion depends on pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins but not on Toll-like receptor 2. Moreover, HP-NAP induces PTX-sensitive G protein-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and Akt in HMC-1 cells. Inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppresses HP-NAP-induced release of histamine and IL-6 from HMC-1 cells. Thus, the activation of HMC-1 cells by HP-NAP is through Gi-linked G protein-coupled receptor-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  8. Id2 specifically alters regulation of the cell cycle by tumor suppressor proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lasorella, A; Iavarone, A; Israel, M A

    1996-01-01

    Cells which are highly proliferative typically lack expression of differentiated, lineage-specific characteristics. Id2, a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein family known to inhibit cell differentiation, binds to the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and abolishes its growth-suppressing activity. We found that Id2 but not Id1 or Id3 was able to bind in vitro not only pRb but also the related proteins p107 and p130. Also, an association between Id2 and p107 or p130 was observed in vivo in transiently transfected Saos-2 cells. In agreement with these results, expression of Id1 or Id3 did not affect the block of cell cycle progression mediated by pRb. Conversely, expression of Id2 specifically reversed the cell cycle arrest induced by each of the three members of the pRb family. Furthermore, the growth-suppressive activities of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 were efficiently antagonized by high levels of Id2 but not by Id1 Id3. Consistent with the role of p16 as a selective inhibitor of pRb and pRb-related protein kinase activity, p16-imposed cell cycle arrest was completely abolished by Id2. Only a partial reversal of p21-induced growth suppression was observed, which correlated with the presence of a functional pRb. We also documented decreased levels of cyclin D1 protein and mRNA and the loss of cyclin D1-cdk4 complexes in cells constitutively expressing Id2. These data provide evidence for important Id2-mediated alterations in cell cycle components normally involved in the regulatory events of cell cycle progression, and they highlight a specific role for Id2 as an antagonist of multiple tumor suppressor proteins. PMID:8649364

  9. Extra-embryonic vasculature development is regulated by the transcription factor HAND1.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Yuka; Cserjesi, Peter

    2004-05-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor HAND1 (also called eHAND) is expressed in numerous tissues during development including the heart, limbs, neural crest derivatives and extra-embryonic membranes. To investigate the role of Hand1 during development, we generated a Hand1 knockout mouse. Hand1-null mice survived to the nine somite stage at which time they succumbed to numerous developmental defects. One striking defect in Hand1-null embryos was the accumulation of hematopoietic cells between the yolk sac and the amnion because of defects in the yolk sac vasculature. In Hand1-null yolk sacs, vasculogenesis occurs but vascular refinement was arrested. Analysis of angiogenic genes in extra-embryonic membranes showed that most are expressed at normal levels in Hand1-null embryos but several, including Vegf, Ang1 and ephrin B2, and gene components of the Notch pathway are upregulated. In the absence of Hand1 the expression of the bHLH factor Hand2 is also enhanced. Although HAND1 and HAND2 share many structural features, and Hand2 is required for vasculature development in yolk sacs, enhanced expression of Hand2 is insufficient to compensate for the loss of Hand1. The most striking aspect of the vascular defect in Hand1 mutant yolk sacs is the abnormal distribution of smooth muscle cells. During normal angiogenesis, vascular smooth muscle precursors are recruited to the peri-endothelial tissue before differentiation, however, in Hand1 null yolk sacs, smooth muscle cells are not recruited but differentiate in clusters distributed throughout the mesoderm. These data indicate that Hand1 is required for angiogenesis and vascular smooth muscle recruitment in the yolk sac.

  10. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  11. The Hem protein mediates neuronal migration by inhibiting WAVE degradation and functions opposite of Abelson tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zengrong; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2011-01-01

    In the nervous system, neurons form in different regions, then they migrate and occupy specific positions. We have previously shown that RP2/sib, a well-studied neuronal pair in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord (VNC), has a complex migration route. Here, we show that the Hem protein, via the WAVE complex, regulates migration of GMC-1 and its progeny RP2 neuron. In Hem or WAVE mutants, RP2 neuron either abnormally migrates, crossing the midline from one hemisegment to the contralateral hemisegment, or does not migrate at al and fail to send out its axon projection. We report that Hem regulates neuronal migration through stabilizing WAVE. Since Hem and WAVE normally form a complex, our data argues that in the absence of Hem, WAVE, which is presumably no longer in a complex, becomes susceptible to degradation. We also find that Abelson Tyrosine kinase affects RP2 migration in a similar manner as Hem and WAVE, and appears to operate via WAVE. However, while Abl negatively regulates the levels of WAVE, it regulates migration via regulating the activity of WAVE. Our results also show that during the degradation of WAVE, Hem function is opposite to that of and downstream of Abl. PMID:21726548

  12. Joint-linkage mapping and GWAS reveal extensive genetic loci that regulate male inflorescence size in maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xun; Li, Yongxiang; Shi, Yunsu; Song, Yanchun; Zhang, Dengfeng; Li, Chunhui; Buckler, Edward S; Li, Yu; Zhang, Zhiwu; Wang, Tianyu

    2016-07-01

    Both insufficient and excessive male inflorescence size leads to a reduction in maize yield. Knowledge of the genetic architecture of male inflorescence is essential to achieve the optimum inflorescence size for maize breeding. In this study, we used approximately eight thousand inbreds, including both linkage populations and association populations, to dissect the genetic architecture of male inflorescence. The linkage populations include 25 families developed in the U.S. and 11 families developed in China. Each family contains approximately 200 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The association populations include approximately 1000 diverse lines from the U.S. and China. All inbreds were genotyped by either sequencing or microarray. Inflorescence size was measured as the tassel primary branch number (TBN) and tassel length (TL). A total of 125 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified (63 for TBN, 62 for TL) through linkage analyses. In addition, 965 quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs) were identified through genomewide study (GWAS) at a bootstrap posterior probability (BPP) above a 5% threshold. These QTLs/QTNs include 24 known genes that were cloned using mutants, for example Ramosa3 (ra3), Thick tassel dwarf1 (td1), tasselseed2 (ts2), liguleless2 (lg2), ramosa1 (ra1), barren stalk1 (ba1), branch silkless1 (bd1) and tasselseed6 (ts6). The newly identified genes encode a zinc transporter (e.g. GRMZM5G838098 and GRMZM2G047762), the adapt in terminal region protein (e.g. GRMZM5G885628), O-methyl-transferase (e.g. GRMZM2G147491), helix-loop-helix (HLH) DNA-binding proteins (e.g. GRMZM2G414252 and GRMZM2G042895) and an SBP-box protein (e.g. GRMZM2G058588). These results provide extensive genetic information to dissect the genetic architecture of inflorescence size for the improvement of maize yield.

  13. Transcription coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein/mediator 1 deficiency abrogates acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuzhi; Guo, Grace L.; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Sarkar, Joy; Qi, Chao; Guo, Dongsheng; Xia, Jun; Kashireddi, Papreddy; Yu, Songtao; Cho, Young-Wook; Rao, M. Sambasiva; Kemper, Byron; Ge, Kai; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein (PBP), also known as thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220/vitamin D receptor-interacting protein 205/mediator 1, an anchor for multisubunit mediator transcription complex, functions as a transcription coactivator for nuclear receptors. Disruption of the PBP gene results in embryonic lethality around embryonic day 11.5 by affecting placental and multiorgan development. Here, we report that targeted deletion of PBP in liver parenchymal cells (PBPLiv-/-) results in the abrogation of hypertrophic and hyperplastic influences in liver mediated by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) ligands phenobarbital (PB) and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, and of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. CAR interacts with the two nuclear receptor-interacting LXXLL (L, leucine; X, any amino acid) motifs in PBP in a ligand-dependent manner. We also show that PBP interacts with the C-terminal portion of CAR, suggesting that PBP is involved in the regulation of CAR function. Although the full-length PBP only minimally increased CAR transcriptional activity, a truncated form of PBP (amino acids 487-735) functioned as a dominant negative repressor, establishing that PBP functions as a coactivator for CAR. A reduction in CAR mRNA and protein level observed in PBPLiv-/- mouse liver suggests that PBP may regulate hepatic CAR expression. PBP-deficient hepatocytes in liver failed to reveal PB-dependent translocation of CAR to the nucleus. Adenoviral reconstitution of PBP in PBPLiv-/- mouse livers restored PB-mediated nuclear translocation of CAR as well as inducibility of CYP1A2, CYP2B10, CYP3A11, and CYP7A1 expression. We conclude that transcription coactivator PBP/TRAP220/MED1 is involved in the regulation of hepatic CAR function and that PBP deficiency in liver abrogates acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. PMID:16109766

  14. Hpr6.6 protein mediates cell death from oxidative damage in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hand, Randal A; Craven, Rolf J

    2003-10-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause cell death and are associated with a variety of maladies, from trauma and infection to organ degeneration and cancer. Cells mount a complex response to oxidative damage that includes signaling from transmembrane receptors and intracellular kinases. We have analyzed the response to oxidative damage in human breast cancer cells expressing the Hpr6.6 (human membrane progesterone receptor) protein. Although Hpr6.6 is related to a putative progesterone-binding protein, Hpr6.6 is widely expressed in epithelial tissues and shares close homology with a budding yeast damage response protein called Dap1p (damage response protein related to membrane progesterone receptor). We report here that the Hpr6.6 protein regulates the response to oxidative damage in breast cancer cells. Expression of Hpr6.6 in MCF-7 cells sensitized the cells to death following long-term/low dose or short-term/high dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Cell death did not occur through a typical apoptotic mechanism and corresponded with hyperphosphorylation of the Akt and IkappaB proteins. However, inhibition of Akt activation and IkappaB degradation had no effect on Hpr6.6-mediated cell death, suggesting that Hpr6.6 regulates cell death through a novel oxidative damage response pathway. Our work indicates a key regulatory function for Hpr6.6 in epithelial tissues exposed to oxidative damage.

  15. Outer membrane protein mediating iron uptake via pyoverdinpss, the fluorescent siderophore produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Y S; Gross, D C

    1987-01-01

    In an iron-limited environment Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B301D produces a yellow-green fluorescent siderophore called pyoverdinpss which functions in high-affinity iron transport. Two-dimensional electrophoretic comparisons of the outer membrane proteins of strain B301D identified nine proteins which were expressed at low (50 nM) but not at high (10 microM) iron concentrations. Except for the minor protein 8e, the iron-regulated proteins exhibited high molecular weights ranging from approximately 74,000 to 80,000. A mutant of strain B301D incapable of iron uptake (Iu-) from ferric pyoverdinpss lacked the 74,000-molecular-weight protein 4a, which was the major iron-regulated outer membrane protein. In contrast, a nonfluorescent mutant (Flu-) unable to synthesize pyoverdinpss showed no quantitative or qualitative difference in its outer membrane profile from that of the wild-type strain. In plant pathogenicity tests the Iu- and Flu- strains caused typical brown necrotic and sunken lesions in immature sweet cherry fruit which were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. Thus, excretion of pyoverdinpss and subsequent Fe(III) uptake do not have a determinative role in the pathogenicity or virulence of P. syringae pv. syringae. Images PMID:3032911

  16. Calcium Channel α2δ1 Proteins Mediate Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain States Associated with Aberrant Excitatory Synaptogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang-Wu; Yu, Yanhui Peter; Zhou, Chunyi; Kim, Doo-Sik; Lin, Bin; Sharp, Kelli; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z. David

    2014-01-01

    To investigate a potential mechanism underlying trigeminal nerve injury-induced orofacial hypersensitivity, we used a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION) to study whether CCI-ION caused calcium channel α2δ1 (Cavα2δ1) protein dysregulation in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 cervical dorsal spinal cord (Vc/C2). Furthermore, we studied whether this neuroplasticity contributed to spinal neuron sensitization and neuropathic pain states. CCI-ION caused orofacial hypersensitivity that correlated with Cavα2δ1 up-regulation in trigeminal ganglion neurons and Vc/C2. Blocking Cavα2δ1 with gabapentin, a ligand for the Cavα2δ1 proteins, or Cavα2δ1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides led to a reversal of orofacial hypersensitivity, supporting an important role of Cavα2δ1 in orofacial pain processing. Importantly, increased Cavα2δ1 in Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn was associated with increased excitatory synaptogenesis and increased frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in dorsal horn neurons that could be blocked by gabapentin. Thus, CCI-ION-induced Cavα2δ1 up-regulation may contribute to orofacial neuropathic pain states through abnormal excitatory synapse formation and enhanced presynaptic excitatory neurotransmitter release in Vc/C2. PMID:24459143

  17. Bactofilins, a ubiquitous class of cytoskeletal proteins mediating polar localization of a cell wall synthase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Juliane; Briegel, Ariane; Mörschel, Erhard; Kahnt, Jörg; Leser, Katja; Wick, Stephanie; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-20

    The cytoskeleton has a key function in the temporal and spatial organization of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of a new class of polymer-forming proteins, termed bactofilins, that are widely conserved among bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus, two bactofilin paralogues cooperate to form a sheet-like structure lining the cytoplasmic membrane in proximity of the stalked cell pole. These assemblies mediate polar localization of a peptidoglycan synthase involved in stalk morphogenesis, thus complementing the function of the actin-like cytoskeleton and the cell division machinery in the regulation of cell wall biogenesis. In other bacteria, bactofilins can establish rod-shaped filaments or associate with the cell division apparatus, indicating considerable structural and functional flexibility. Bactofilins polymerize spontaneously in the absence of additional cofactors in vitro, forming stable ribbon- or rod-like filament bundles. Our results suggest that these structures have evolved as an alternative to intermediate filaments, serving as versatile molecular scaffolds in a variety of cellular pathways.

  18. Karyopherin α 3 and karyopherin α 4 proteins mediate the nuclear import of methyl-CpG binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Baker, Steven Andrew; Lombardi, Laura Marie; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya

    2015-09-11

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a nuclear protein with important roles in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression, and mutations in MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT). Within the MeCP2 protein sequence, the nuclear localization signal (NLS) is reported to reside between amino acids 255-271, and certain RTT-causing mutations overlap with the MeCP2 NLS, suggesting that they may alter nuclear localization. One such mutation, R270X, is predicted to interfere with the localization of MeCP2, but recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that this mutant remains entirely nuclear. To clarify the mechanism of MeCP2 nuclear import, we isolated proteins that interact with the NLS and identified karyopherin α 3 (KPNA3 or Kap-α3) and karyopherin α 4 (KPNA4 or Kap-α4) as key binding partners of MeCP2. MeCP2-R270X did not interact with KPNA4, consistent with a requirement for an intact NLS in this interaction. However, this mutant retains binding to KPNA3, accounting for the normal localization of MeCP2-R270X to the nucleus. These data provide a mechanism for MeCP2 nuclear import and have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at modulating the function of MeCP2 in RTT patients.

  19. Vagal modulation of high mobility group box-1 protein mediates electroacupuncture-induced cardioprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Yong, Yue; Li, Xing; Hu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-qiang; Song, Wei; Chen, Wen-ting; Xie, Jian; Chen, Xue-mei; Lv, Xin; Hou, Li-li; Wang, Ke; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Xiang-rui; Song, Jian-gang

    2015-01-01

    Excessive release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein from ischemic cardiomyocytes activates inflammatory cascades and enhances myocardial injury after reperfusion. Here we report evidence that electroacupuncture of mice at Neiguan acupoints can inhibit the up-regulation of cardiac HMGB1 following myocardial ischemia and attenuate the associated inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion. These benefits of electroacupuncture were partially reversed by administering recombinant HMGB1 to the mice, and further potentiated by administering anti-HMGB1 antibody. Electroacupuncture-induced inhibition of HMGB1 release was markedly reduced by unilateral vagotomy or administration of nicotinic receptor antagonist, but not by chemical sympathectomy. The cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine mimicked the effects of electroacupuncture on HMGB1 release and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Culture experiments with isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes showed that acetylcholine, but not noradrenaline, inhibited hypoxia-induced release of HMGB1 via a α7nAchR-dependent pathway. These results suggest that electroacupuncture acts via the vagal nerve and its nicotinic receptor-mediated signaling to inhibit HMGB1 release from ischemic cardiomyocytes. This helps attenuate pro-inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion. PMID:26499847

  20. Adjacent positioning of cellular structures enabled by a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein-mediated zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Howell, Audrey S; Bose, Indrani; Lew, Daniel J; Bi, Erfei

    2007-12-31

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are born carrying localized transmembrane landmark proteins that guide the subsequent establishment of a polarity axis and hence polarized growth to form a bud in the next cell cycle. In haploid cells, the relevant landmark proteins are concentrated at the site of the preceding cell division, to which they recruit Cdc24, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the conserved polarity regulator Cdc42. However, instead of polarizing at the division site, the new polarity axis is directed next to but not overlapping that site. Here, we show that the Cdc42 guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) Rga1 establishes an exclusion zone at the division site that blocks subsequent polarization within that site. In the absence of localized Rga1 GAP activity, new buds do in fact form within the old division site. Thus, Cdc42 activators and GAPs establish concentric zones of action such that polarization is directed to occur adjacent to but not within the previous cell division site.

  1. Effect of phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol on myelin basic protein-mediated binding of actin filaments to lipid bilayers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Joan M; Rangaraj, Godha; Dicko, Awa

    2012-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to negatively charged lipids on the cytosolic surface of oligodendrocytes and is believed to be responsible for adhesion of these surfaces in the multilayered myelin sheath. It can also assemble actin filaments and tether them to lipid bilayers through electrostatic interactions. Here we investigate the effect of increased negative charge of the lipid bilayer due to phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) on MBP-mediated binding of actin to the lipid bilayer, by substituting phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate for PI in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol lipid vesicles. Phosphorylation of PI caused dissociation of the MBP/actin complex from the lipid vesicles due to repulsion of the negatively charged complex from the negatively charged membrane surface. An effect of phosphorylation could be detected even if the inositol lipid was only 2mol% of the total lipid. Calcium-calmodulin dissociated actin from the MBP-lipid vesicles and phosphorylation of PI increased the amount dissociated. These results show that changes to the lipid composition of myelin, which could occur during signaling or other physiological events, could regulate the ability of MBP to act as a scaffolding protein and bind actin filaments to the lipid bilayer.

  2. Prostate cancer cells and bone stromal cells mutually interact with each other through bone morphogenetic protein-mediated signals.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Hikaru; Ehata, Shogo; Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Katsuno, Yoko; Miyazono, Kohei

    2012-06-01

    Functional interactions between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment contribute to the development of bone metastasis. Although the bone metastasis of prostate cancer is characterized by increased ossification, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not fully understood. Here, the roles of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the interactions between prostate cancer cells and bone stromal cells were investigated. In human prostate cancer LNCaP cells, BMP-4 induced the production of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) through a Smad-dependent pathway. In mouse stromal MC3T3-E1 cells, SHH up-regulated the expression of activin receptor IIB (ActR-IIB) and Smad1, which in turn enhanced BMP-responsive reporter activities in these cells. The combined stimulation with BMP-4 and SHH of MC3T3-E1 cells cooperatively induced the expression of osteoblastic markers, including alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, collagen type II α1, and osteocalcin. When MC3T3-E1 cells and LNCaP cells were co-cultured, the osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells, which was induced by BMP-4, was accelerated by SHH from LNCaP cells. Furthermore, LNCaP cells and BMP-4 cooperatively induced the production of growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in MC3T3-E1 cells, and these may promote the proliferation of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that BMPs provide favorable circumstances for the survival of prostate cancer cells and the differentiation of bone stromal cells in the bone microenvironment, possibly leading to the osteoblastic metastasis of prostate cancer.

  3. Destabilization of Heterologous Proteins Mediated by the GSK3β Phosphorylation Domain of the β-Catenin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Xian; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Wu, Ningning; He, Yunfeng; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hongmei; Wen, Sheng; Deng, Fang; Liao, Zhan; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junhui; Qin, Xinyue; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; He, Tong-Chuan; Zhou, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in development and cellular processes. The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling activation is the stabilization of β-catenin protein in cytoplasm and/or nucleus. The stability of β-catenin is the key to its biological functions and is controlled by the phosphorylation of its amino-terminal degradation domain. Aberrant activation of β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of human cancers. It has been recently suggested that GSK3β may play an essential role in regulating global protein turnover. Here, we investigate if the GSK3β phosphorylation site-containing degradation domain of β-catenin is sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins. Methods and Results We engineer chimeric proteins by fusing β-catenin degradation domain at the N- and/or C-termini of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In both transient and stable expression experiments, the chimeric GFP proteins exhibit a significantly decreased stability, which can be effectively antagonized by lithium and Wnt1. An activating mutation in the destruction domain significantly stabilizes the fusion protein. Furthermore, GSK3 inhibitor SB-216763 effectively increases the GFP signal of the fusion protein. Conversely, the inhibition of Wnt signaling with tankyrase inhibitor XAV939 results in a decrease in GFP signal of the fusion proteins, while these small molecules have no significant effects on the mutant destruction domain-GFP fusion protein. Conclusion Our findings strongly suggest that the β-catenin degradation domain may be sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins in Wnt signaling-dependent manner. It is conceivable that the chimeric GFP proteins may be used as a functional reporter to measure the dynamic status of β-catenin signaling, and to identify potential anticancer drugs that target β-catenin signaling. PMID:24335169

  4. IGF-binding proteins mediate TGF-beta 1-induced apoptosis in bovine mammary epithelial BME-UV1 cells.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Małgorzata; Motyl, Tomasz

    2004-10-01

    TGF-beta 1 is an antiproliferative and apoptogenic factor for mammary epithelial cells (MEC) acting in an auto/paracrine manner and thus considered an important local regulator of mammary tissue involution. However, the apoptogenic signaling pathway induced by this cytokine in bovine MEC remains obscure. The present study was focused on identification of molecules involved in apoptogenic signaling of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in the model of bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1). Laser scanning cytometry (LSC), Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) were used for analysis of expression and activity of TGF-beta 1-related signaling molecules. The earliest response occurring within 1-2 h after TGF-beta 1 administration was an induction and activation of R-Smads (Smad2 and Smad3) and Co-Smad (Smad4). An evident formation of Smad-DNA complexes began from 2nd hour after MEC exposure to TGF-beta 1. Similarly to Smads, proteins of AP1 complex: phosphorylated c-Jun and JunD appeared to be early reactive molecules; however, an increase in their expression was detected only in cytosolic fraction. In the next step, an increase of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and IGFBP-4 expression was observed from 6th hour followed by a decrease in the activity of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), which occurred after 24 h of MEC exposure to TGF-beta 1. The decrease in PKB/Akt activity coincided in time with the decline of phosphorylated Bad expression (inactive form). Present study supported additional evidence that stimulation of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) was associated with complete abrogation of TGF-beta 1-induced activation of Bad and Bax and in the consequence protection against apoptosis. In conclusion, apoptotic effect of TGF-beta 1 in bovine MEC is mediated by IGFBPs and occurs through IGF-I sequestration, resulting in inhibition of PKB/Akt-dependent survival pathway. PMID:15556067

  5. Evolving gene regulation networks into cellular networks guiding adaptive behavior: an outline how single cells could have evolved into a centralized neurosensory system

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Elliott, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the neurosensory system of man, able to reflect on its own origin, is one of the major goals of comparative neurobiology. Details of the origin of neurosensory cells, their aggregation into central nervous systems and associated sensory organs, their localized patterning into remarkably different cell types aggregated into variably sized parts of the central nervous system begin to emerge. Insights at the cellular and molecular level begin to shed some light on the evolution of neurosensory cells, partially covered in this review. Molecular evidence suggests that high mobility group (HMG) proteins of pre-metazoans evolved into the definitive Sox [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box] genes used for neurosensory precursor specification in metazoans. Likewise, pre-metazoan basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes evolved in metazoans into the group A bHLH genes dedicated to neurosensory differentiation in bilaterians. Available evidence suggests that the Sox and bHLH genes evolved a cross-regulatory network able to synchronize expansion of precursor populations and their subsequent differentiation into novel parts of the brain or sensory organs. Molecular evidence suggests metazoans evolved patterning gene networks early and not dedicated to neuronal development. Only later in evolution were these patterning gene networks tied into the increasing complexity of diffusible factors, many of which were already present in pre-metazoans, to drive local patterning events. It appears that the evolving molecular basis of neurosensory cell development may have led, in interaction with differentially expressed patterning genes, to local network modifications guiding unique specializations of neurosensory cells into sensory organs and various areas of the central nervous system. PMID:25416504

  6. Gq protein mediates UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by stimulating HB-EGF secretion from HaCaT human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, MiRan; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2010-03-05

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression to produce cellular responses including aging and carcinogenesis in skin. We hypothesised that heterotrimeric G proteins mediate UV-induced COX-2 expression by stimulating secretion of soluble HB-EGF (sHB-EGF). In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of the {alpha} subunit of Gq protein (G{alpha}q) in UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion and COX-2 induction. We found that expression of constitutively active G{alpha}q (G{alpha}qQL) augmented UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion, which was abolished by knockdown of G{alpha}q with shRNA in HaCaT human keratinocytes. G{alpha}q was found to mediate the UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion by sequential activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), and matrix metaloprotease-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, G{alpha}qQL mediated UVB-induced COX-2 expression in an HB-EGF-, EGFR-, and p38-dependent manner. From these results, we concluded that G{alpha}q mediates UV-induced COX-2 expression through activation of EGFR by HB-EGF, of which ectodomain shedding was stimulated through sequential activation of PLC, PKC{delta} and MMP-2 in HaCaT cells.

  7. Phosphorylation-Coupled Proteolysis of the Transcription Factor MYC2 Is Important for Jasmonate-Signaled Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qingzhe; Yan, Liuhua; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rong; Sun, Jiaqiang; Gao, Liyan; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-01-01

    As a master regulator of jasmonic acid (JA)–signaled plant immune responses, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) Leu zipper transcription factor MYC2 differentially regulates different subsets of JA–responsive genes through distinct mechanisms. However, how MYC2 itself is regulated at the protein level remains unknown. Here, we show that proteolysis of MYC2 plays a positive role in regulating the transcription of its target genes. We discovered a 12-amino-acid element in the transcription activation domain (TAD) of MYC2 that is required for both the proteolysis and the transcriptional activity of MYC2. Interestingly, MYC2 phosphorylation at residue Thr328, which facilitates its turnover, is also required for the MYC2 function to regulate gene transcription. Together, these results reveal that phosphorylation-coupled turnover of MYC2 stimulates its transcription activity. Our results exemplify that, as with animals, plants employ an “activation by destruction” mechanism to fine-tune their transcriptome to adapt to their ever-changing environment. PMID:23593022

  8. SIM2 maintains innate host defense of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Lizaso, Analyn; Lee, Ying-Hue

    2014-12-01

    The single-minded 2 (SIM2) protein is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor regulating central nervous system (CNS) development in Drosophila. In humans, SIM2 is located within the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21 and may be involved in the development of mental retardation phenotype in Down syndrome. In this study, knockout of SIM2 expression in mice resulted in a gas distention phenotype in the gastrointestinal tract. We found that SIM2 is required for the expression of all cryptdins and numerous other antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed in the small intestine. The mechanism underlying how SIM2 controls AMP expression involves both direct and indirect regulations. For the cryptdin genes, SIM2 regulates their expression by modulating transcription factor 7-like 2, a crucial regulator in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, while for other AMP genes, such as RegIIIγ, SIM2 directly activates their promoter activity. Our results establish that SIM2 is a crucial regulator in controlling expression of intestinal AMPs to maintain intestinal innate immunity against microbes.

  9. Diterpenoid phytoalexin factor, a bHLH transcription factor, plays a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Chihiro; Mizutani, Emi; Okada, Kazunori; Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Setsuko; Tanaka, Atsunori; Maeda, Satoru; Kamakura, Takashi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) produces diterpenoid phytoalexins (DPs), momilactones and phytocassanes as major phytoalexins. Accumulation of DPs is induced in rice by blast fungus infection, copper chloride or UV light. Here, we describe a rice transcription factor named diterpenoid phytoalexin factor (DPF), which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. The gene encoding DPF is expressed mainly in roots and panicles, and is inducible in leaves by blast infection, copper chloride or UV. Expression of all DP biosynthetic genes and accumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes were remarkably increased and decreased in DPF over-expressing and DPF knockdown rice, respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that DPF positively regulates DP accumulation via transcriptional regulation of DP biosynthetic genes, and plays a central role in the biosynthesis of DPs in rice. Furthermore, DPF activated the promoters of COPALYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE2 (CPS2) and CYTOCHROME P450 MONOOXYGENASE 99A2 (CYP99A2), whose products are implicated in the biosynthesis of phytocassanes and momilactones, respectively. Mutations in the N-boxes in the CPS2 upstream region, to which several animal bHLH transcription factors bind, decreased CPS2 transcription, indicating that DPF positively regulates CPS2 transcription through the N-boxes. In addition, DPF partly regulates CYP99A2 through the N-box. This study demonstrates that DPF acts as a master transcription factor in DP biosynthesis.

  10. DEC1 and DEC2 Crosstalk between Circadian Rhythm and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fuyuki; Bhawal, Ujjal K.; Yoshimura, Tomohiro; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2016-01-01

    Clock genes, major regulators of circadian rhythm, are involved in tumor progression. We have shown that clock genes basic helix-loop-helix (BHLH) transcription factors, differentiated embryonic chondrocyte gene 1 (DEC1/BHLHE40/Sharp2/Stra13) and DEC2 (BHLHE41/Sharp1) play important roles in circadian rhythm, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia response, various stresses, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Various stresses, such as exposure to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), hypoxia, cytokines, serum-free, and anti-tumor drugs affect DEC1 and DEC2 expression. An increased or decreased expression of DEC1 and DEC2 regulated tumor progression. However, DEC1 and DEC2 have opposite effects in tumor progression, where the reason behind remains unclear. We found that DEC2 has circadian expression in implanted mouse sarcoma cells, suggesting that DEC2 regulates tumor progression under circadian rhythm. In addition to that, we showed that DEC1 and DEC2 regulate target genes via positive or negative feedback system in tumor progression. We propose that DEC1 and DEC2 act as an accelerator or a brake in tumor progression. In this review, we summarize current progress of knowledge in the function of DEC1 and DEC2 genes in tumor progression. PMID:26819638

  11. Conserved regulatory mechanism controls the development of cells with rooting functions in land plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, Thomas Ho Yuen; Catarino, Bruno; Dolan, Liam

    2015-07-21

    Land plants develop filamentous cells-root hairs, rhizoids, and caulonemata-at the interface with the soil. Members of the group XI basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors encoded by LOTUS JAPONICUS ROOTHAIRLESS1-LIKE (LRL) genes positively regulate the development of root hairs in the angiosperms Lotus japonicus, Arabidopsis thaliana, and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that auxin promotes rhizoid and caulonema development by positively regulating the expression of PpLRL1 and PpLRL2, the two LRL genes in the Physcomitrella patens genome. Although the group VIII bHLH proteins, AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 and AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1, promote root-hair development by positively regulating the expression of AtLRL3 in A. thaliana, LRL genes promote rhizoid development independently of PpROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 and PpROOT HAIR DEFECITVE SIX-LIKE2 (PpRSL1 and PpRSL2) gene function in P. patens. Together, these data demonstrate that both LRL and RSL genes are components of an ancient auxin-regulated gene network that controls the development of tip-growing cells with rooting functions among most extant land plants. Although this network has diverged in the moss and the angiosperm lineages, our data demonstrate that the core network acted in the last common ancestor of the mosses and angiosperms that existed sometime before 420 million years ago. PMID:26150509

  12. PIFs: Systems Integrators in Plant Development[W

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Monte, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) are members of the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix family of transcriptional regulators that interact specifically with the active Pfr conformer of phytochrome (phy) photoreceptors. PIFs are central regulators of photomorphogenic development that act to promote stem growth, and this activity is reversed upon interaction with phy in response to light. Recently, significant progress has been made in defining the transcriptional networks directly regulated by PIFs, as well as the convergence of other signaling pathways on the PIFs to modulate growth. Here, we summarize and highlight these findings in the context of PIFs acting as integrators of light and other signals. We discuss progress in our understanding of the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of PIFs that illustrates the integration of light with hormonal pathways and the circadian clock, and we review seedling hypocotyl growth as a paradigm of PIFs acting at the interface of these signals. Based on these advances, PIFs are emerging as required factors for growth, acting as central components of a regulatory node that integrates multiple internal and external signals to optimize plant development. PMID:24481072

  13. DEC1 and DEC2 Crosstalk between Circadian Rhythm and Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Sato, Fuyuki; Bhawal, Ujjal K; Yoshimura, Tomohiro; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2016-01-01

    Clock genes, major regulators of circadian rhythm, are involved in tumor progression. We have shown that clock genes basic helix-loop-helix (BHLH) transcription factors, differentiated embryonic chondrocyte gene 1 (DEC1/BHLHE40/Sharp2/Stra13) and DEC2 (BHLHE41/Sharp1) play important roles in circadian rhythm, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia response, various stresses, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Various stresses, such as exposure to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), hypoxia, cytokines, serum-free, and anti-tumor drugs affect DEC1 and DEC2 expression. An increased or decreased expression of DEC1 and DEC2 regulated tumor progression. However, DEC1 and DEC2 have opposite effects in tumor progression, where the reason behind remains unclear. We found that DEC2 has circadian expression in implanted mouse sarcoma cells, suggesting that DEC2 regulates tumor progression under circadian rhythm. In addition to that, we showed that DEC1 and DEC2 regulate target genes via positive or negative feedback system in tumor progression. We propose that DEC1 and DEC2 act as an accelerator or a brake in tumor progression. In this review, we summarize current progress of knowledge in the function of DEC1 and DEC2 genes in tumor progression.

  14. Diterpenoid phytoalexin factor, a bHLH transcription factor, plays a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Chihiro; Mizutani, Emi; Okada, Kazunori; Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Setsuko; Tanaka, Atsunori; Maeda, Satoru; Kamakura, Takashi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) produces diterpenoid phytoalexins (DPs), momilactones and phytocassanes as major phytoalexins. Accumulation of DPs is induced in rice by blast fungus infection, copper chloride or UV light. Here, we describe a rice transcription factor named diterpenoid phytoalexin factor (DPF), which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. The gene encoding DPF is expressed mainly in roots and panicles, and is inducible in leaves by blast infection, copper chloride or UV. Expression of all DP biosynthetic genes and accumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes were remarkably increased and decreased in DPF over-expressing and DPF knockdown rice, respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that DPF positively regulates DP accumulation via transcriptional regulation of DP biosynthetic genes, and plays a central role in the biosynthesis of DPs in rice. Furthermore, DPF activated the promoters of COPALYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE2 (CPS2) and CYTOCHROME P450 MONOOXYGENASE 99A2 (CYP99A2), whose products are implicated in the biosynthesis of phytocassanes and momilactones, respectively. Mutations in the N-boxes in the CPS2 upstream region, to which several animal bHLH transcription factors bind, decreased CPS2 transcription, indicating that DPF positively regulates CPS2 transcription through the N-boxes. In addition, DPF partly regulates CYP99A2 through the N-box. This study demonstrates that DPF acts as a master transcription factor in DP biosynthesis. PMID:26506081

  15. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  16. Protein-mediated enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-06-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principels of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties and the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth.

  17. Function and regulation of local axonal translation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E

    2013-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that local axonal translation is required for growing axons to respond appropriately to guidance cues and other stimuli. Recent studies suggest that asymmetrical synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins mediates growth cone turning and that local translation and retrograde transport of transcription factors mediate neuronal survival. Axonal translation is regulated partly by selective axonal localization of mRNAs and by translation initiation factors and RNA-binding proteins. We discuss possible rationales for local axonal translation, including distinct properties of nascent proteins, precise localization, and axonal autonomy. PMID:18508259

  18. A molecular framework of light-controlled phytohormone action in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shangwei; Shi, Hui; Xue, Chang; Wang, Lei; Xi, Yanpeng; Li, Jigang; Quail, Peter H; Deng, Xing Wang; Guo, Hongwei

    2012-08-21

    Environmental changes strongly affect plant growth and development. Phytohormones, endogenous plant-made small molecules such as ethylene, regulate a wide range of processes throughout the lifetime of plants. The ability of plants to integrate external signals with endogenous regulatory pathways is vital for their survival. Ethylene has been found to suppress hypocotyl elongation in darkness while promoting it in light. How ethylene regulates hypocotyl elongation in such opposite ways is largely unknown. In particular, how light modulates and even reverses the function of ethylene has yet to be characterized. Here we show that the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) is directly activated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3) and is indispensible for ethylene-induced hypocotyl elongation in light. Ethylene via EIN3 concomitantly activates two contrasting pathways: the PIF3-dependent growth-promoting pathway and an ethylene response factor 1 (ERF1)-mediated growth-inhibiting pathway. In the light, growth-promoting PIFs are limiting due to light-dependent destabilization, and thus ethylene stimulates growth under these conditions. In contrast, ERF1 is destabilized, and thus limiting, under dark conditions, explaining why ethylene inhibits growth in the dark. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into how light modulates internal hormone-regulated plant growth.

  19. Tgfβ-Smad and MAPK signaling mediate scleraxis and proteoglycan expression in heart valves.

    PubMed

    Barnette, Damien N; Hulin, Alexia; Ahmed, A S Ishtiaq; Colige, Alain C; Azhar, Mohamad; Lincoln, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Mature heart valves are complex structures consisting of three highly organized extracellular matrix layers primarily composed of collagens, proteoglycans and elastin. Collectively, these diverse matrix components provide all the necessary biomechanical properties for valve function throughout life. In contrast to healthy valves, myxomatous valve disease is the most common cause of mitral valve prolapse in the human population and is characterized by an abnormal abundance of proteoglycans within the valve tri-laminar structure. Despite the clinical significance, the etiology of this phenotype is not known. Scleraxis (Scx) is a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor that we previously showed to be required for establishing heart valve structure during remodeling stages of valvulogenesis. In this study, we report that remodeling heart valves from Scx null mice express decreased levels of proteoglycans, particularly chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), while overexpression in embryonic avian valve precursor cells and adult porcine valve interstitial cells increases CSPGs. Using these systems we further identify that Scx is positively regulated by canonical Tgfβ2 signaling during this process and this is attenuated by MAPK activity. Finally, we show that Scx is increased in myxomatous valves from human patients and mouse models, and overexpression in human mitral valve interstitial cells modestly increases proteoglycan expression consistent with myxomatous mitral valve phenotypes. Together, these studies identify an important role for Scx in regulating proteoglycans in embryonic and mature valve cells and suggest that imbalanced regulation could influence myxomatous pathogenesis.

  20. The Arabidopsis bHLH Transcription Factors MYC3 and MYC4 Are Targets of JAZ Repressors and Act Additively with MYC2 in the Activation of Jasmonate Responses[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Chini, Andrea; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chico, José-Manuel; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Geerinck, Jan; Eeckhout, Dominique; Schweizer, Fabian; Godoy, Marta; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Pauwels, Laurens; Witters, Erwin; Puga, María Isabel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Goossens, Alain; Reymond, Philippe; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) trigger an important transcriptional reprogramming of plant cells to modulate both basal development and stress responses. In spite of the importance of transcriptional regulation, only one transcription factor (TF), the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix MYC2, has been described so far as a direct target of JAZ repressors. By means of yeast two-hybrid screening and tandem affinity purification strategies, we identified two previously unknown targets of JAZ repressors, the TFs MYC3 and MYC4, phylogenetically closely related to MYC2. We show that MYC3 and MYC4 interact in vitro and in vivo with JAZ repressors and also form homo- and heterodimers with MYC2 and among themselves. They both are nuclear proteins that bind DNA with sequence specificity similar to that of MYC2. Loss-of-function mutations in any of these two TFs impair full responsiveness to JA and enhance the JA insensitivity of myc2 mutants. Moreover, the triple mutant myc2 myc3 myc4 is as impaired as coi1-1 in the activation of several, but not all, JA-mediated responses such as the defense against bacterial pathogens and insect herbivory. Our results show that MYC3 and MYC4 are activators of JA-regulated programs that act additively with MYC2 to regulate specifically different subsets of the JA-dependent transcriptional response. PMID:21335373

  1. Id2a is required for hepatic outgrowth during liver development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Mehwish; Choi, Tae-Young; So, Juhoon; Shin, Donghun

    2015-11-01

    During development, inhibitor of DNA binding (Id) proteins, a subclass of the helix-loop-helix family of proteins, regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various organs. However, a functional role of Id2a in liver development has not yet been reported. Here, using zebrafish as a model organism, we provide in vivo evidence that Id2a regulates hepatoblast proliferation and cell death during liver development. Initially, in the liver, id2a is expressed in hepatoblasts and after their differentiation, id2a expression is restricted to biliary epithelial cells. id2a knockdown in zebrafish embryos had no effect on hepatoblast specification or hepatocyte differentiation. However, liver size was greatly reduced in id2a morpholino-injected embryos, indicative of a hepatic outgrowth defect attributable to the significant decrease in proliferating hepatoblasts concomitant with the significant increase in hepatoblast cell death. Altogether, these data support the role of Id2a as an important regulator of hepatic outgrowth via modulation of hepatoblast proliferation and survival during liver development in zebrafish.

  2. Tgfβ-Smad and MAPK signaling mediate scleraxis and proteoglycan expression in heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Barnette, Damien N.; Hulin, Alexia; Ahmed, A.S. Ishtiaq; Colige, Alain C.; Azhar, Mohammed; Lincoln, Joy

    2013-01-01

    Mature heart valves are complex structures consisting of three highly organized extracellular matrix layers primarily composed of collagens, proteoglycans and elastin. Collectively, these diverse matrix components provide all the necessary biomechanical properties for valve function throughout life. In contrast to healthy valves, myxomatous valve disease is the most common cause of mitral valve prolapse in the human population and is characterized by an abnormal abundance of proteoglycans within the valve tri-laminar structure. Despite the clinical significance, the etiology of this phenotype is not known. Scleraxis (Scx) is a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor that we previously showed to be required for establishing heart valve structure during remodeling stages of valvulogenesis. In this study, we report that remodeling heart valves from Scx null mice express decreased levels of proteoglycans, particularly chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), while overexpression in embryonic avian valve precursor cells and adult porcine valve interstitial cells increases CSPGs. Using these systems we further identify that Scx is positively regulated by canonical Tgfβ2 signaling during this process and this is attenuated by MAPK activity. Finally, we show that Scx is increased in myxomatous valves from human patients and mouse models, and overexpression in human mitral valve interstitial cells modestly increases proteoglycan expression consistent with myxomatous mitral valve phenotypes. Together, these studies identify an important role for Scx in regulating proteoglycans in embryonic and mature valve cells and suggest that imbalanced regulation could influence myxomatous pathogenesis. PMID:24157418

  3. Role of Id proteins in B lymphocyte activation: new insights from knockout mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Manabu; Gonda, Hiroyuki; Nambu, Yukiko; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Shimizu, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Id (inhibitor of differentiation) proteins play important roles in cell differentiation, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. They act as negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix-type transcription factors, which positively regulate differentiation of various cell types. Id proteins work to block B lymphocyte (B cell) maturation at an early differentiation step, as demonstrated by gain-of-function studies. In recent years a series of gene-targeted mice lacking different Ids have been generated. Analyses of these gene-targeted mice provide information useful for understanding the physiological roles of Ids in B cell biology. Id3 is required for proper B cell functions and acts by controlling the cell cycle. Upon B cell activation, Id2 acts as a negative regulator to prevent potentially harmful effects brought about by excessive immunological reactions; one of its special roles is to maintain low serum concentrations of immunoglobulin E (IgE). The Id2 protein does this by antagonizing E2A and Pax5 activities, both of which are required for proper B cell activation. This review presents several new insights into B cell differentiation and activation programs and the physiological role of Id proteins in B cell activation. PMID:15184986

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana ICE2 gene: phylogeny, structural evolution and functional diversification from ICE1.

    PubMed

    Kurbidaeva, Amina; Ezhova, Tatiana; Novokreshchenova, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The ability to tolerate environmental stresses is crucial for all living organisms, and gene duplication is one of the sources for evolutionary novelties. Arabidopsis thaliana INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 and 2 (ICE1 and ICE2) encode MYC-type bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) transcription factors. They confer cold stress tolerance by induction of the CBF/DREB1 regulon and regulate stomata formation. Although ICE2 is closely related to ICE1, its origin and role in cold response remains uncertain. Here, we used a bioinformatics/phylogenetic approach to uncover the ICE2 evolutionary history, structural evolution and functional divergence from the putative ancestral gene. Sequence diversification from ICE1 included the gain of cis-acting elements in ICE2 promoter sequence that may provide meristem-specific and defense-related gene expression. By analyzing transgenic Arabidopsis lines with ICE2 over-expression we showed that it contributes to stomata formation, flowering time regulation and cold response. Constitutive ICE2 expression led to induced meristem freezing tolerance, resulting from activation of CBF1 and CBF3 genes and ABA biosynthesis by NCED3 induction. We presume that ICE2 gene has originated from a duplication event about 17.9MYA followed by sub- and neofunctionalization of the ancestral ICE1 gene. Moreover, we predict its role in pathogen resistance and flowering time regulation. PMID:25443829

  5. The role of Atonal factors in mechanosensory cell specification and function

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tiantian; Groves, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    atonal genes are basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that were first identified as regulating the formation of mechanoreceptors and photoreceptors in Drosophila. Isolation of vertebrate homologs of atonal genes has shown these transcription factors to play diverse roles in the development of neurons and their progenitors, gut epithelial cells and mechanosensory cells in the inner ear and skin. In this article, we review the molecular function and regulation of atonal genes and their targets, with particular emphasis on the function of Atoh1 in the development, survival and function of hair cells of the inner ear. We discuss cell-extrinsic signals that induce Atoh1 expression, and the transcriptional networks that regulate its expression during development. Finally, we discuss recent work showing how identification of Atoh1 target genes in the cerebellum, spinal cord and gut can be used to propose candidate Atoh1 targets in tissues such as the inner ear where cell numbers and biochemical material are limiting. PMID:25339580

  6. TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 and GLABRA1 Compete for Binding to GLABRA3 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Martina; Schultheiß, Ilka; Klopffleisch, Karsten; Clemen, Christoph S.; Hülskamp, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The MBW (for R2R3MYB, basic helix-loop-helix [bHLH], and WD40) genes comprise an evolutionarily conserved gene cassette that regulates several traits such as (pro)anthocyanin and anthocyanin biosynthesis and epidermal cell differentiation in plants. Trichome differentiation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is governed by GLABRA1 (GL1; R2R3MYB), GL3 (bHLH), and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1; WD40). They are thought to form a trimeric complex that acts as a transcriptional activation complex. We provide evidence that these three MBW proteins form either GL1 GL3 or GL3 TTG1 dimers. The formation of each dimer is counteracted by the respective third protein in yeast three-hybrid assays, pulldown experiments (luminescence-based mammalian interactome), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies. We further show that two target promoters, TRIPTYCHON (TRY) and CAPRICE (CPC), are differentially regulated: GL1 represses the activation of the TRY promoter by GL3 and TTG1, and TTG1 suppresses the activation of the CPC promoter by GL1 and GL3. Our data suggest that the transcriptional activation by the MBW complex involves alternative complex formation and that the two dimers can differentially regulate downstream genes. PMID:25926482

  7. Reconstitution of an E box-binding Myc:Max complex with recombinant full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Farina, Anthony; Faiola, Francesco; Martinez, Ernest

    2004-04-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein (Myc) is a DNA sequence-specific transcription factor that regulates transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in the control of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and its deregulated expression is implicated in many types of human cancer. Myc has an N-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) that interacts with various coactivators and a C-terminal basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) domain required for E box-specific DNA-binding and heterodimerization with its obligatory bHLHZip protein partner Max. The analysis of the mechanisms by which the Myc:Max complex regulates transcription at the molecular level in vitro has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining highly pure recombinant Myc:Max heterodimers that contain full-length Myc with its complete TAD domain and that have sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe a simple method to reconstitute recombinant Myc:Max complexes from highly purified full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that are soluble and highly active in E box-specific DNA-binding in vitro. The reconstituted Myc:Max complexes are stable and lack Max:Max homodimers. This procedure should facilitate the characterization of the DNA-binding and transcription activation functions of full-length Myc:Max complexes in vitro and in particular the role of Myc TAD-interacting cofactors and Myc:Max post-translational modifications.

  8. bHLH122 is important for drought and osmotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis and in the repression of ABA catabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Tai, Huanhuan; Li, Songsong; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Meng; Xie, Chuanxiao; Li, Wen-Xue

    2014-03-01

    • Although proteins in the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family are universal transcription factors in eukaryotes, the biological roles of most bHLH family members are not well understood in plants. • The Arabidopsis thaliana bHLH122 transcripts were strongly induced by drought, NaCl and osmotic stresses, but not by ABA treatment. Promoter::GUS analysis showed that bHLH122 was highly expressed in vascular tissues and guard cells. Compared with wild-type (WT) plants, transgenic plants overexpressing bHLH122 displayed greater resistance to drought, NaCl and osmotic stresses. In contrast, the bhlh122 loss-of-function mutant was more sensitive to NaCl and osmotic stresses than were WT plants. • Microarray analysis indicated that bHLH122 was important for the expression of a number of abiotic stress-responsive genes. In electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, bHLH122 could bind directly to the G-box/E-box cis-elements in the CYP707A3 promoter, and repress its expression. Further, up-regulation of bHLH122 substantially increased cellular ABA levels. • These results suggest that bHLH122 functions as a positive regulator of drought, NaCl and osmotic signaling. PMID:24261563

  9. Robust specification of sensory neurons by dual functions of charlatan, a Drosophila NRSF/REST-like repressor of extramacrochaetae and hairy.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasutoyo; Lim, Young-Mi; Niwa, Nao; Hayashi, Shigeo; Tsuda, Leo

    2011-08-01

    Sensory bristle formation in Drosophila is a well-characterized system for studying sensory organ development at the molecular level. The master proneural genes of the achaete-scute (ac-sc) complex, which encode basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, are necessary and sufficient for sensory bristle formation. charlatan (chn) was originally identified as a transcriptional activator of ac-sc gene expression through interaction with its enhancer, an activity that promotes sensory bristle development. In contrast, Chn was also identified as a functional homologue of mammalian neuron-restrictive silencing factor or RE1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST), an important transcriptional repressor during vertebrate neurogenesis and stem cell development that acts through epigenetic gene silencing. Here, we report that Chn acts as a repressor of extramacrochaetae (emc) and hairy, molecules that inhibit ac-sc expression. This double-negative mechanism, together with direct activation via the achaete enhancer, increases expression of achaete and ensures robust development of sensory neurons. A mutation in the C-terminal repressor motif of Chn, which causes Chn to lose its repression activity, converted Chn to an activator of emc and hairy, suggesting that Chn is a dual functional regulator of transcription. Because chn-like sequences are found among arthropods, regulation of neuronal development by Chn-like molecules may be widely conserved. PMID:21762412

  10. SPATULA links daytime temperature and plant growth rate.

    PubMed

    Sidaway-Lee, Kate; Josse, Eve-Marie; Brown, Alanna; Gan, Yinbo; Halliday, Karen J; Graham, Ian A; Penfield, Steven

    2010-08-24

    Plants exhibit a wide variety of growth rates that are known to be determined by genetic and environmental factors, and different plants grow optimally at different temperatures, indicating that this is a genetically determined character. Moderate decreases in ambient temperature inhibit vegetative growth, but the mechanism is poorly understood, although a decrease in gibberellin (GA) levels is known to be required. Here we demonstrate that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SPATULA (SPT), previously known to be a regulator of low temperature-responsive germination, mediates the repression of growth by cool daytime temperatures but has little or no growth-regulating role under warmer conditions. We show that only daytime temperatures affect vegetative growth and that SPT couples morning temperature to growth rate. In seedlings, warm temperatures inhibit the accumulation of the SPT protein, and SPT autoregulates its own transcript abundance in conjunction with diurnal effects. Genetic data show that repression of growth by SPT is independent of GA signaling and phytochrome B, as previously shown for PIF4. Our data suggest that SPT integrates time of day and temperature signaling to control vegetative growth rate.

  11. dysfusion Transcriptional Control of Drosophila Tracheal Migration, Adhesion, and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Crews, Stephen T.

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila dysfusion basic-helix-loop-helix-PAS transcription factor gene is expressed in specialized fusion cells that reside at the tips of migrating tracheal branches. dysfusion mutants were isolated, and genetic analysis of live embryos revealed that mutant tracheal branches migrate to close proximity but fail to recognize and adhere to each other. Misexpression of dysfusion throughout the trachea further indicated that dysfusion has the ability to both inhibit cell migration and promote ectopic tracheal fusion. Nineteen genes whose expression either increases or decreases in fusion cells during development were analyzed in dysfusion mutant embryos. dysfusion upregulates the levels of four genes, including the shotgun cell adhesion protein gene and the zona pellucida family transmembrane protein gene, CG13196. Misexpression experiments with CG13196 result in ectopic tracheal fusion events, suggesting that it also encodes a cell adhesion protein. Another target gene of dysfusion is members only, which inhibits protein nuclear export and influences tracheal fusion. dysfusion also indirectly downregulates protein levels of Trachealess, an important regulator of tracheal development. These results indicate that fusion cells undergo dynamic changes in gene expression as they switch from migratory to fusion modes and that dysfusion regulates a discrete, but important, set of these genes. PMID:16914738

  12. Ins and outs of T-channel structure function.

    PubMed

    Perez-Reyes, Edward; Lee, Jung-Ha

    2014-04-01

    We review the ins and outs of T-channel structure, focusing on the extracellular high-affinity metal-binding site and intracellular loops. The high-affinity metal-binding site was localized to repeat I of Cav3.2. Interestingly, a similar binding site was found in the high voltage-activated Cav2.3 channel where it controls the channels' voltage dependence. Histidine at position 191 has a particularly interesting role in the high-affinity binding site, and its modification plays an important role in channel regulation by pharmacological agents that alter redox reactions. The intracellular loop connecting repeats I and II plays two important roles in Cav3.2 properties: one, its gating; and two, its surface expression. These studies have also identified a highly conserved intracellular gating brake that is predicted to form a helix-loop-helix structure. We conclude that the gating brake establishes important contacts with the gating machinery, thereby stabilizing a closed state of T-channels. This interaction is disrupted by depolarization, allowing the S6 segments to open and allowing Ca(2+) ions to flow through. Studies in cultured hippocampal neurons provided novel insights into how mutations found in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients increase seizure susceptibility by both altering T-current pacemaker currents and by activating Ca-activated transcription factors that regulate dendritic arborization. These studies reveal novel roles for T-channels to control cellular physiology.

  13. Overexpression of SOCS3 inhibits astrogliogenesis and promotes maintenance of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Hata, Ryuji; Zhu, Pengxiang; Ma, Yong-Jie; Tanaka, Junya; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Koji; Niinobe, Michio; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Sakanaka, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the effects of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) on neural stem cell fate, stem cells were infected with an adenoviral vector expressing SOCS3. Three days later, western blot analysis and immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the protein level of MAP2 and the number of MAP2-positive cells were significantly increased in SOCS3-transfected cells, whereas the protein level of GFAP and the number of GFAP-positive cells were significantly decreased. Furthermore, promoter assay revealed a significant reduction in the transcriptional level of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in the transfected cells. In addition, the mRNA levels of Notch family member (notch1) and inhibitory basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors (hes5 and id3) were significantly up-regulated 1 day after overexpression of SOCS3. Three days after transfection, the mRNA level of hes5 was significantly decreased, whereas that of notch1 was still up-regulated. Moreover, all of SOCS3-positive cells expressed Nestin protein but did not express MAP2 or GFAP proteins. These data indicate that overexpression of SOCS3 induced neurogenesis and inhibited astrogliogenesis in neural stem cells. Our data also show that SOCS3 promoted maintenance of neural stem cells.

  14. Pubertal impairment in Nhlh2 null mice is associated with hypothalamic and pituitary deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Tiziana; Delgado-Romero, Petra; Norwitz, Errol R; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Kaiser, Ursula B; Wray, Susan; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2007-12-01

    Pubertal development is impaired in mice lacking the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nhlh2. The mechanisms underlying changes in reproduction in Nhlh2-deficient mice (Nhlh2(-/-)) are unclear. Here we show that hypothalamic GnRH-1 content is reduced in adult Nhlh2(-/-) mice as is the number of GnRH-1 neurons localized to mid- and caudal hypothalamic regions. This reduction was detected postnatally after normal migration of GnRH-1 neurons within nasal regions had occurred. Phenotype rescue experiments showed that female Nhlh2(-/-) mice were responsive to estrogen treatment. In contrast, puberty could not be primed in female Nhlh2(-/-) mice with a GnRH-1 regimen. The adenohypophysis of Nhlh2(-/-) mice was hypoplastic although it contained a full complement of the five anterior pituitary cell types. GnRH-1 receptors (GnRHRs) were reduced in Nhlh2(-/-) pituitary gonadotropes as compared with wild type. In vitro assays indicated that Nhlh2 expression is regulated in parallel with GnRHR expression. However, direct transcriptional activity of Nhlh2 on the GnRHR promoter was not found. These results indicate that Nhlh2 plays a role in the development and functional maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis at least at two levels: 1) in the hypothalamus by regulating the number and distribution of GnRH-1 neurons and, 2) in the developing and mature adenohypophysis.

  15. Can the 'neuron theory' be complemented by a universal mechanism for generic neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ernsberger, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    With the establishment of the 'neuron theory' at the turn of the twentieth century, this remarkably powerful term was introduced to name a breathtaking diversity of cells unified by a characteristic structural compartmentalization and unique information processing and propagating features. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, developmental, stem cell and reprogramming studies converged to suggest a common mechanism involved in the generation of possibly all vertebrate, and at least a significant number of invertebrate, neurons. Sox and, in particular, SoxB and SoxC proteins as well as basic helix-loop-helix proteins play major roles, even though their precise contributions to progenitor programming, proliferation and differentiation are not fully resolved. In addition to neuronal development, these transcription factors also regulate sensory receptor and endocrine cell development, thus specifying a range of cells with regulatory and communicative functions. To what extent microRNAs contribute to the diversification of these cell types is an upcoming question. Understanding the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of genes coding for cell type-specific cytoskeletal and motor proteins as well as synaptic and ion channel proteins, which mark differences but also similarities between the three communicator cell types, will provide a key to the comprehension of their diversification and the signature of 'generic neuronal' differentiation. Apart from the general scientific significance of a putative universal core instruction for neuronal development, the impact of this line of research for cell replacement therapy and brain tumor treatment will be of considerable interest.

  16. The myriad roles of Miro in the nervous system: axonal transport of mitochondria and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Lu, Bingwei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial rho GTPase (Miro) is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein containing two GTPase domains and two helix-loop-helix Ca2+-binding domains called EF hands. Pioneering genetic studies in Drosophila first revealed a key function of Miro in regulating the axonal transport of mitochondria, during which Miro forms a multi-protein transport complex with Milton and Kinesin heavy chain (KHC) to link trafficking mitochondria with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton. Recent studies showed that through binding to the EF hands of Miro and causing conformational changes of Miro and alteration of protein-protein interactions within the transport complex, Ca2+ can alter the engagement of mitochondria with the MT/kinesin network, offering one mechanism to match mitochondrial distribution with neuronal activity. Despite the importance of the Miro/Milton/Kinesin complex in regulating mitochondrial transport in metazoans, not all components of the transport complex are conserved in lower organisms, and transport-independent functions of Miro are emerging. Here we review the diverse functions of the evolutionarily conserved Miro proteins that are relevant to the development, maintenance, and functioning of the nervous system and discuss the potential contribution of Miro dysfunction to the pathogenesis of diseases of the nervous system. PMID:25389385

  17. Specification of jaw identity by the Hand2 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of the lower jaw (mandible) was evolutionarily important for jawed vertebrates. In humans, syndromic craniofacial malformations often accompany jaw anomalies. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand2, which is conserved among jawed vertebrates, is expressed in the neural crest in the mandibular process but not in the maxillary process of the first branchial arch. Here, we provide evidence that Hand2 is sufficient for upper jaw (maxilla)-to-mandible transformation by regulating the expression of homeobox transcription factors in mice. Altered Hand2 expression in the neural crest transformed the maxillae into mandibles with duplicated Meckel’s cartilage, which resulted in an absence of the secondary palate. In Hand2-overexpressing mutants, non-Hox homeobox transcription factors were dysregulated. These results suggest that Hand2 regulates mandibular development through downstream genes of Hand2 and is therefore a major determinant of jaw identity. Hand2 may have influenced the evolutionary acquisition of the mandible and secondary palate. PMID:27329940

  18. Multisite light-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor PIF3 is necessary for both its rapid degradation and concomitant negative feedback modulation of photoreceptor phyB levels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weimin; Xu, Shou-Ling; Chalkley, Robert J; Pham, Thao Nguyen D; Guan, Shenheng; Maltby, Dave A; Burlingame, Alma L; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Quail, Peter H

    2013-07-01

    Plants constantly monitor informational light signals using sensory photoreceptors, which include the phytochrome (phy) family (phyA to phyE), and adjust their growth and development accordingly. Following light-induced nuclear translocation, photoactivated phy molecules bind to and induce rapid phosphorylation and degradation of phy-interacting basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH) transcription factors (PIFs), such as PIF3, thereby regulating the expression of target genes. However, the mechanisms underlying the signal-relay process are still not fully understood. Here, using mass spectrometry, we identify multiple, in vivo, light-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites in PIF3. Using transgenic expression of site-directed mutants of PIF3, we provide evidence that a set of these phosphorylation events acts collectively to trigger rapid degradation of the PIF3 protein in response to initial exposure of dark-grown seedlings to light. In addition, we show that phyB-induced PIF3 phosphorylation is also required for the known negative feedback modulation of phyB levels in prolonged light, potentially through codegradation of phyB and PIF3. This mutually regulatory intermolecular transaction thus provides a mechanism with the dual capacity to promote early, graded, or threshold regulation of the primary, PIF3-controlled transcriptional network in response to initial light exposure, and later, to attenuate global sensitivity to the light signal through reductions in photoreceptor levels upon prolonged exposure. PMID:23903316

  19. Suppression of invasion and metastasis in aggressive salivary cancer cells through targeted inhibition of ID1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Murase, Ryuichi; Sumida, Tomoki; Kawamura, Rumi; Onishi-Ishikawa, Akiko; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki; McAllister, Sean D; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2016-07-10

    Salivary gland cancer (SGC) represents the most common malignancy in the head and neck region, and often metastasizes to the lungs. The helix-loop-helix ID1 protein has been shown to control metastatic progression in many types of cancers. Using two different approaches to target the expression of ID1 (genetic knockdown and progesterone receptor introduction combined with progesterone treatment), we previously determined that the aggressiveness of salivary gland tumor ACCM cells in culture was suppressed. Here, using the same approaches to target ID1 expression, we investigated the ability of ACCM cells to generate lung metastatic foci in nude mice. Moreover, since both approaches would be challenging for applications in humans, we added a third approach, i.e., treatment of mice with a non-toxic cannabinoid compound known to down-regulate ID1 gene expression. All approaches aimed at targeting the pro-metastatic ID1 gene led to a significant reduction in the formation of lung metastatic foci. Therefore, targeting a key transcriptional regulator using different means results in the same reduction of the metastatic spread of SGC cells in animal models, suggesting a novel approach for the treatment of patients with aggressive SGC. PMID:27087608

  20. DNazyme-mediated cleavage of Twist transcripts and increase in cellular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hjiantoniou, Eleni; Iseki, Sachiko; Uney, James B; Phylactou, Leonidas A

    2003-01-01

    DNazymes is a group of catalytic nucleic acids that can be designed to cleave target mRNA molecules in a base-specific way. Twist is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is involved in the regulation of cellular differentiation and apoptosis. Moreover, it was shown to function in skull development and cause craniosynostosis. DZ-TWT DNazyme was designed to down-regulate Twist expression. The ability of DZ-TWT to cleave mouse Twist mRNA was first shown in a cell-free environment against full-length Twist mRNA. Following transfections of the DZ-TWT in C3H10T1/2 cells, a significant reduction of Twist mRNA levels was observed. This was accompanied by a significant rise in p21 mRNA levels. Finally, DZ-TWT transfections resulted in an increase of cellular apoptosis, demonstrating the importance of Twist in apoptotic pathways. These results prove the usefulness of DNazymes to characterize Twist gene function and further experiments in animals should demonstrate its complete physiological role.

  1. Id4 functions downstream of Bmp signaling to restrict TCF function in endocardial cells during atrioventricular valve development.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Suchit; Dogra, Deepika; Stainier, Didier Y R; Reischauer, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The atrioventricular canal (AVC) connects the atrial and ventricular chambers of the heart and its formation is critical for the development of the cardiac valves, chamber septation and formation of the cardiac conduction system. Consequently, problems in AVC formation can lead to congenital defects ranging from cardiac arrhythmia to incomplete cardiac septation. While our knowledge about early heart tube formation is relatively comprehensive, much remains to be investigated about the genes that regulate AVC formation. Here we identify a new role for the basic helix-loop-helix factor Id4 in zebrafish AVC valve development and function. id4 is first expressed in the AVC endocardium and later becomes more highly expressed in the atrial chamber. TALEN induced inactivation of id4 causes retrograde blood flow at the AV canal under heat induced stress conditions, indicating defects in AV valve function. At the molecular level, we found that id4 inactivation causes misexpression of several genes important for AVC and AV valve formation including bmp4 and spp1. We further show that id4 appears to control the number of endocardial cells that contribute to the AV valves by regulating Wnt signaling in the developing AVC endocardium. PMID:26892463

  2. CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated endocrine differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chung-Kuang; Lai, Yi-Chyi; Lin, Yung-Fu; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chiang, Ming-Ko

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify CCAR1 to directly interact with Ngn3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCAR1 is co-localized with Ngn3 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCAR1 cooperates with Ngn3 in activating NeuroD expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated PANC-1 transdifferentiation. -- Abstract: Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that specifies pancreatic endocrine cell fates during pancreas development. It can also initiate a transdifferentiation program when expressed in pancreatic exocrine and ductal cells. However, how Ngn3 initiates a transcriptional cascade to achieve endocrine differentiation is still poorly understood. Here, we show that cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1), which is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors, also interacts with Ngn3. The association between Ngn3 and CCAR1 was verified by pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Using gene reporter assays, we found that CCAR1 is essential for Ngn3 to activate the expression of the reporter genes containing the NeuroD promoter. Moreover, down-regulation of endogenous CCAR1 in the PANC-1 pancreatic ductal cell line inhibits the transdifferentiation program initiated by Ngn3. CCAR1 is, therefore, a novel partner of Ngn3 in mediating endocrine differentiation.

  3. EBF2 promotes the recruitment of beige adipocytes in white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Rachel R.; Shapira, Suzanne N.; Lim, Hee-Woong; Ishibashi, Jeff; Harms, Matthew; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective The induction of beige/brite adipose cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) is associated with protection against high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in animals. The helix-loop-helix transcription factor Early B-Cell Factor-2 (EBF2) regulates brown adipose tissue development. Here, we asked if EBF2 regulates beige fat cell biogenesis and protects animals against obesity. Methods In addition to primary cell culture studies, we used ​Ebf2 knockout mice and mice overexpressing EBF2 in the adipose tissue to study the necessity and sufficiency of EBF2 to induce beiging in vivo. Results We found that EBF2 is required for beige adipocyte development in mice. Subcutaneous WAT or primary adipose cell cultures from Ebf2 knockout mice did not induce Uncoupling Protein 1 (UCP1) or a thermogenic program following adrenergic stimulation. Conversely, over-expression of EBF2 in adipocyte cultures induced UCP1 expression and a brown-like/beige fat-selective differentiation program. Transgenic expression of Ebf2 in adipose tissues robustly stimulated beige adipocyte development in the WAT of mice, even while housed at thermoneutrality. EBF2 overexpression was sufficient to increase mitochondrial function in WAT and protect animals against high fat diet-induced weight gain. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate that EBF2 controls the beiging process and suggest that activation of EBF2 in WAT could be used to reduce obesity. PMID:26844207

  4. Characterization of MxFIT, an iron deficiency induced transcriptional factor in Malus xiaojinensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lili; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Mudan; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Han, Zhenhai

    2014-02-01

    Iron deficiency often results in nutritional disorder in fruit trees. Transcription factors play an important role in the regulation of iron uptake. In this study, we isolated an iron deficiency response transcription factor gene, MxFIT, from an iron-efficient apple genotype of Malus xiaojinensis. MxFIT encoded a basic helix-loop-helix protein and contained a 966 bp open reading frame. MxFIT protein was targeted to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells and showed strong transcriptional activation in yeast cells. Spatiotemporal expression analysis revealed that MxFIT was up-regulated in roots under iron deficiency at both mRNA and protein levels, while almost no expression was detected in leaves irrespective of iron supply. Ectopic expression of MxFIT resulted in enhanced iron deficiency responses in Arabidopsis under iron deficiency and stronger resistance to iron deficiency. Thus, MxFIT might be involved in iron uptake and plays an important role in iron deficiency response.

  5. Arabidopsis MYC Transcription Factors Are the Target of Hormonal Salicylic Acid/Jasmonic Acid Cross Talk in Response to Pieris brassicae Egg Extract.

    PubMed

    Schmiesing, André; Emonet, Aurélia; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Reymond, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants recognize insect eggs and activate the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. As a consequence, expression of defense genes regulated by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is suppressed and larval performance is enhanced. Cross talk between defense signaling pathways is common in plant-pathogen interactions, but the molecular mechanism mediating this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that egg-induced SA/JA antagonism works independently of the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factor ORA59, which controls the ERF branch of the JA pathway. In addition, treatment with egg extract did not enhance expression or stability of JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors, and SA/JA cross talk did not involve JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKEs, which are negative regulators of the JA pathway. Investigating the stability of MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, we found that egg extract treatment strongly diminished MYC protein levels in an SA-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified WRKY75 as a novel and essential factor controlling SA/JA cross talk. These data indicate that insect eggs target the MYC branch of the JA pathway and uncover an unexpected modulation of SA/JA antagonism depending on the biological context in which the SA pathway is activated. PMID:26884488

  6. The C-terminal extension of PrhG impairs its activation of hrp expression and virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Yasuo, Igarashi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the second most destructive bacterial plant pathogens worldwide and HrpG is the master regulator of its pathogenicity. PrhG is a close paralogue of HrpG and both belong to OmpR/PhoB family of two-component response regulators. Despite a high similarity (72% global identity and 96% similarity in helix-loop-helix domain), they display distinct roles in pathogenicity. HrpG is necessary for the bacterial growth in planta and pathogenicity, while PrhG is dispensable for bacterial growth in planta and contributes little to pathogenicity. The main difference between HrpG and PrhG is the 50-amino-acid-long C-terminal extension in PrhG (amino-acid residues 230-283), which is absent in HrpG. When this extension is deleted, truncated PrhGs (under the control of its native promoter) allowed complete recovery of bacterial growth in planta and wild-type virulence of hrpG mutant. This novel finding demonstrates that the extension region in PrhG is responsible for the functional difference between HrpG and PrhG, which may block the binding of PrhG to target promoters and result in impaired activation of hrp expression by PrhG and reduced virulence of R. solanacearum.

  7. Identification and characterization of a T-cell-specific enhancer adjacent to the murine CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins is a tightly regulated process tied to the maturation of functionally distinct classes of thymocytes. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of expression of the genes encoding CD4 and CD8 is likely to yield important insight into regulation of the differentiated functions of T cells. Here, we report the identification of a T-cell-specific enhancer in a DNase I-hypersensitive region about 13 kb 5' of the transcription initiation site of the murine CD4 gene. Within the minimal enhancer element, at least three nuclear protein binding sites were identified by DNase I footprint analysis. One site contains the consensus motif for TCF-1 alpha/LEF-1, a recently identified HMG box transcription factor primarily expressed in pre-B and T cells. By Southwestern (DNA-protein) blotting and binding competition analyses, the protein binding to this site was found to be indistinguishable from TCF-1 alpha/LEF-1. Mutagenesis of this site resulted in loss of factor binding but had a relatively minor effect on enhancer activity. In contrast, mutations in another site, containing two consensus binding motifs for basic helix-loop-helix proteins, abolished factor binding and dramatically reduced enhancer activity. None of the protein binding sites had activity on its own, suggesting that the CD4 enhancer requires the interaction of multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1922061

  8. FCA mediates thermal adaptation of stem growth by attenuating auxin action in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jun; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cortés Llorca, Lucas; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Sangmin; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-11-17

    Global warming is predicted to profoundly affect plant distribution and crop yield in the near future. Higher ambient temperature can influence diverse aspects of plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Phytochrome-Interacting Factor 4 (PIF4) regulates temperature-induced adaptive responses by modulating auxin biosynthesis. At high temperature, PIF4 directly activates expression of YUCCA8 (YUC8), a gene encoding an auxin biosynthetic enzyme, resulting in auxin accumulation. Here we demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein FCA attenuates PIF4 activity by inducing its dissociation from the YUC8 promoter at high temperature. At 28 °C, auxin content is elevated in FCA-deficient mutants that exhibit elongated stems but reduced in FCA-overexpressing plants that exhibit reduced stem growth. We propose that the FCA-mediated regulation of YUC8 expression tunes down PIF4-induced architectural changes to achieve thermal adaptation of stem growth at high ambient temperature.

  9. Mutations within Helix I of Twist1 Result in Distinct Limb Defects and Variation of DNA-Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Beth A.; Redick, Bradley A.; Conway, Simon J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor that plays an important role in limb development. Haploinsufficiency of Twist1 results in polydactyly via the inability of Twist1 to antagonistically regulate the related factor Hand2. The mechanism modulating Twist1-Hand2 antagonism is via phosphoregulation of conserved threonine and serine residues in helix I of the bHLH domain. Phosphoregulation alters the dimerization affinities for both proteins. Here we show that the expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants result in distinct limb phenotypes in mice. In addition to dimer regulation, Twist1 phosphoregulation affects the DNA-binding affinities of Twist1 in a partner dependent and cis-element dependent manner. In order to gain a better understanding of the specific Twist1 transcriptional complexes that function during limb morphogensis, we employ a series of Twist1-tethered dimers that include the known Twist1 partners, E12 and Hand2, as well as a tethered Twist1 homodimer. We show that these dimers behave in a manner similar to monomerically expressed bHLH factors and result in distinct limb phenotypes that correlate well with those observed from the limb expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants. Taken together, this study shows that the Twist1 dimer affinity for a given partner can modulate the DNA binding affinity and that Twist1 dimer choice determines phenotypic outcome during limb development. PMID:17652084

  10. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Arianna; De Masi, Federico; Vaccari, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vertebrates, TFEB (transcription factor EB) and MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates both lysosomal function and organ development. However, it is not clear whether these 2 processes are interconnected. Here, we show that Mitf, the single TFEB and MITF ortholog in Drosophila, controls expression of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase pump (V-ATPase) subunits. Remarkably, we also find that expression of Vha16-1 and Vha13, encoding 2 key components of V-ATPase, is patterned in the wing imaginal disc. In particular, Vha16-1 expression follows differentiation of proneural regions of the disc. These regions, which will form sensory organs in the adult, appear to possess a distinctive endolysosomal compartment and Notch (N) localization. Modulation of Mitf activity in the disc in vivo alters endolysosomal function and disrupts proneural patterning. Similar to our findings in Drosophila, in human breast epithelial cells we observe that impairment of the Vha16-1 human ortholog ATP6V0C changes the size and function of the endolysosomal compartment and that depletion of TFEB reduces ligand-independent N signaling activity. Our data suggest that lysosomal-associated functions regulated by the TFEB-V-ATPase axis might play a conserved role in shaping cell fate. PMID:26727288

  11. Tomato Male sterile 1035 is essential for pollen development and meiosis in anthers.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kang, Jin-Ho; Zhao, Meiai; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Choi, Hak-Soon; Bae, Jung Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Joung, Young-Hee; Choi, Doil; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2014-12-01

    Male fertility in flowering plants depends on proper cellular differentiation in anthers. Meiosis and tapetum development are particularly important processes in pollen production. In this study, we showed that the tomato male sterile (ms10(35)) mutant of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) exhibited dysfunctional meiosis and an abnormal tapetum during anther development, resulting in no pollen production. We demonstrated that Ms10(35) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is specifically expressed in meiocyte and tapetal tissue from pre-meiotic to tetrad stages. Transgenic expression of the Ms10(35) gene from its native promoter complemented the male sterility of the ms10(35) mutant. In addition, RNA-sequencing-based transcriptome analysis revealed that Ms10(35) regulates 246 genes involved in anther development processes such as meiosis, tapetum development, cell-wall degradation, pollen wall formation, transport, and lipid metabolism. Our results indicate that Ms10(35) plays key roles in regulating both meiosis and programmed cell death of the tapetum during microsporogenesis.

  12. FAMA is an essential component for the differentiation of two distinct cell types, myrosin cells and guard cells, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Makoto; Ueda, Haruko; Nagano, Atsushi J; Shimada, Tomoo; Kohchi, Takayuki; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-10-01

    Brassicales plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, have an ingenious two-compartment defense system, which sequesters myrosinase from the substrate glucosinolate and produces a toxic compound when cells are damaged by herbivores. Myrosinase is stored in vacuoles of idioblast myrosin cells. The molecular mechanism that regulates myrosin cell development remains elusive. Here, we identify the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FAMA as an essential component for myrosin cell development along Arabidopsis leaf veins. FAMA is known as a regulator of stomatal development. We detected FAMA expression in myrosin cell precursors in leaf primordia in addition to stomatal lineage cells. FAMA deficiency caused defects in myrosin cell development and in the biosynthesis of myrosinases THIOGLUCOSIDE GLUCOHYDROLASE1 (TGG1) and TGG2. Conversely, ectopic FAMA expression conferred myrosin cell characteristics to hypocotyl and root cells, both of which normally lack myrosin cells. The FAMA interactors ICE1/SCREAM and its closest paralog SCREAM2/ICE2 were essential for myrosin cell development. DNA microarray analysis identified 32 candidate genes involved in myrosin cell development under the control of FAMA. This study provides a common regulatory pathway that determines two distinct cell types in leaves: epidermal guard cells and inner-tissue myrosin cells.

  13. Arabidopsis MYC Transcription Factors Are the Target of Hormonal Salicylic Acid/Jasmonic Acid Cross Talk in Response to Pieris brassicae Egg Extract1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schmiesing, André; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants recognize insect eggs and activate the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. As a consequence, expression of defense genes regulated by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is suppressed and larval performance is enhanced. Cross talk between defense signaling pathways is common in plant-pathogen interactions, but the molecular mechanism mediating this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that egg-induced SA/JA antagonism works independently of the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factor ORA59, which controls the ERF branch of the JA pathway. In addition, treatment with egg extract did not enhance expression or stability of JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors, and SA/JA cross talk did not involve JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKEs, which are negative regulators of the JA pathway. Investigating the stability of MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, we found that egg extract treatment strongly diminished MYC protein levels in an SA-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified WRKY75 as a novel and essential factor controlling SA/JA cross talk. These data indicate that insect eggs target the MYC branch of the JA pathway and uncover an unexpected modulation of SA/JA antagonism depending on the biological context in which the SA pathway is activated. PMID:26884488

  14. Expression profiling upon Nex1/MATH-2-mediated neuritogenesis in PC12 cells and its implication in regeneration.

    PubMed

    Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2004-12-01

    The expression of Nex1 peaks during brain development when neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis are highly active. We previously showed that Nex1 is a critical effector of the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway and its overexpression results in spontaneous neuritogenesis. Furthermore, the PC12-Nex1 cells exhibit accelerated neurite extension upon NGF exposure, and have the capacity to regenerate neurites in the absence of NGF. In this study, we identify the repertoire of genes targeted by Nex1 to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which Nex1 promotes differentiation and regeneration. Our transcriptional analysis reveals that Nex1 modulates a wide spectrum of genes with diverse functions, many of them being key downstream regulators of the NGF pathway, and critical to neuritogenesis, such as microtubules, microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and intermediate filaments. We also provide the first evidence that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein stimulates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors belonging to the INK4 family, which plays a role in promoting cell-cycle arrest. Finally, we show a dramatic synergistic effect between Nex1 and cAMP, resulting in an impressive regeneration of an elaborate and dense neurite network. Thus, Nex1 has endowed the PC12-Nex1 cells with a distinct combination of gene products that takes part in the complex regulation of neuritogenesis and regeneration.

  15. HES1 in immunity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Rani, Aradhana; Greenlaw, Roseanna; Smith, Richard A; Galustian, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split homolog-1 (HES1) is a part of an extensive family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins and plays a crucial role in the control and regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, cell differentiation, survival and apoptosis in neuronal, endocrine, T-lymphocyte progenitors as well as various cancers. HES1 is a transcription factor which is regulated by the NOTCH, Hedgehog and Wnt signalling pathways. Aberrant expression of these pathways is a common feature of cancerous cells. There appears to be a fine and complicated crosstalk at the molecular level between the various signalling pathways and HES1, which contributes to its effects on the immune response and cancers such as leukaemia. Several mechanisms have been proposed, including an enhanced invasiveness and metastasis by inducing epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), in addition to its strict requirement for tumour cell survival. In this review, we summarize the current biology and molecular mechanisms as well as its use as a clinical target in cancer therapeutics. PMID:27066918

  16. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Arianna; De Masi, Federico; Vaccari, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, TFEB (transcription factor EB) and MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates both lysosomal function and organ development. However, it is not clear whether these 2 processes are interconnected. Here, we show that Mitf, the single TFEB and MITF ortholog in Drosophila, controls expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase pump (V-ATPase) subunits. Remarkably, we also find that expression of Vha16-1 and Vha13, encoding 2 key components of V-ATPase, is patterned in the wing imaginal disc. In particular, Vha16-1 expression follows differentiation of proneural regions of the disc. These regions, which will form sensory organs in the adult, appear to possess a distinctive endolysosomal compartment and Notch (N) localization. Modulation of Mitf activity in the disc in vivo alters endolysosomal function and disrupts proneural patterning. Similar to our findings in Drosophila, in human breast epithelial cells we observe that impairment of the Vha16-1 human ortholog ATP6V0C changes the size and function of the endolysosomal compartment and that depletion of TFEB reduces ligand-independent N signaling activity. Our data suggest that lysosomal-associated functions regulated by the TFEB-V-ATPase axis might play a conserved role in shaping cell fate. PMID:26727288

  17. SIRT1 activates MAO-A in the brain to mediate anxiety and exploratory drive.

    PubMed

    Libert, Sergiy; Pointer, Kelli; Bell, Eric L; Das, Abhirup; Cohen, Dena E; Asara, John M; Kapur, Karen; Bergmann, Sven; Preisig, Martin; Otowa, Takeshi; Kendler, Kenneth S; Chen, Xiangning; Hettema, John M; van den Oord, Edwin J; Rubio, Justin P; Guarente, Leonard

    2011-12-23

    SIRT1 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that governs a number of genetic programs to cope with changes in the nutritional status of cells and organisms. Behavioral responses to food abundance are important for the survival of higher animals. Here we used mice with increased or decreased brain SIRT1 to show that this sirtuin regulates anxiety and exploratory drive by activating transcription of the gene encoding the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) to reduce serotonin levels in the brain. Indeed, treating animals with MAO-A inhibitors or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) normalized anxiety differences between wild-type and mutant animals. SIRT1 deacetylates the brain-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor NHLH2 on lysine 49 to increase its activation of the MAO-A promoter. Both common and rare variations in the SIRT1 gene were shown to be associated with risk of anxiety in human population samples. Together these data indicate that SIRT1 mediates levels of anxiety, and this regulation may be adaptive in a changing environment of food availability.

  18. Organ-specific effects of brassinosteroids on stomatal production coordinate with the action of Too Many Mouths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Yang, Kezhen; Le, Jie

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, stomatal development initiates after protodermal cells acquire stomatal lineage cell fate. Stomata or their precursors communicate with their neighbor epidermal cells to ensure the "one cell spacing" rule. The signals from EPF/EPFL peptide ligands received by Too Many Mouths (TMM) and ERECTA-family receptors are supposed to be transduced by YODA MAPK cascade. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SPEECHLESS (SPCH) is another key regulator of stomatal cell fate determination and asymmetric entry divisions, and SPCH activity is regulated by YODA MAPK cascade. Brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, one of the most well characterized signal transduction pathways in plants, contributes to the control of stomatal production. But opposite organ-specific effects of BR on stomatal production were reported. Here we confirm that stomatal production in hypocotyls is controlled by BR levels. YODA and CYCD4 are not essential for BR stomata-promoting function. Furthermore, we found that BR could confer tmm hypocotyls clustered stomatal phenotype, indicating that the BR organ-specific effects on stomatal production might coordinate with the TMM organ-specific actions.

  19. Virulence Factors of Geminivirus Interact with MYC2 to Subvert Plant Resistance and Promote Vector Performance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Weldegergis, Berhane T.; Li, Jie; Jung, Choonkyun; Qu, Jing; Sun, Yanwei; Qian, Hongmei; Tee, ChuanSia; van Loon, Joop J.A.; Dicke, Marcel; Chua, Nam-Hai; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A pathogen may cause infected plants to promote the performance of its transmitting vector, which accelerates the spread of the pathogen. This positive effect of a pathogen on its vector via their shared host plant is termed indirect mutualism. For example, terpene biosynthesis is suppressed in begomovirus-infected plants, leading to reduced plant resistance and enhanced performance of the whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) that transmit these viruses. Although begomovirus-whitefly mutualism has been known, the underlying mechanism is still elusive. Here, we identified βC1 of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus, a monopartite begomovirus, as the viral genetic factor that suppresses plant terpene biosynthesis. βC1 directly interacts with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2 to compromise the activation of MYC2-regulated terpene synthase genes, thereby reducing whitefly resistance. MYC2 associates with the bipartite begomoviral protein BV1, suggesting that MYC2 is an evolutionarily conserved target of begomoviruses for the suppression of terpene-based resistance and the promotion of vector performance. Our findings describe how this viral pathogen regulates host plant metabolism to establish mutualism with its insect vector. PMID:25490915

  20. Physiological loading of tendons induces scleraxis expression in epitenon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Bakhurin, Konstantin I; Lynch, Evan B; Brooks, Susan V

    2012-04-01

    Scleraxis is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that plays a central role in promoting fibroblast proliferation and matrix synthesis during the embryonic development of tendons. Mice with a targeted inactivation of scleraxis (Scx(-/-)) fail to properly form limb tendons, but the role that scleraxis has in regulating the growth and adaptation of tendons of adult organisms is unknown. To determine if scleraxis expression changes in response to a physiological growth stimulus to tendons, we subjected adult mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the scleraxis promoter (ScxGFP) to a 6-week-treadmill training program designed to induce adaptive growth in Achilles tendons. Age matched sedentary ScxGFP mice were used as controls. Scleraxis expression was sparsely observed in the epitenon region of sedentary mice, but in response to treadmill training, scleraxis was robustly expressed in fibroblasts that appeared to be emerging from the epitenon and migrating into the superficial regions of tendon fascicles. Treadmill training also led to an increase in scleraxis, tenomodulin, and type I collagen gene expression as measured by qPCR. These results suggest that in addition to regulating the embryonic formation of limb tendons, scleraxis also appears to play an important role in the adaptation of adult tendons to physiological loading.

  1. Analysis of bacteriophage phi X174 gene A protein-mediated termination and reinitiation of phi X DNA synthesis. I. Characterization of the termination and reinitiation reactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, D R; Roth, M J; Reinberg, D; Hurwitz, J

    1984-08-25

    The phi X174 (phi X) gene A protein-mediated termination and reinitiation of single-stranded circular (SS(c] phi X viral DNA synthesis in vitro were directly and independently analyzed. Following incubation together with purified DNA replication enzymes from Escherichia coli, ATP, [alpha-32P]dNTPs, and either the phi X A protein and phi X replicative form I (RF I) DNA, or the purified RF II X A complex, the phi X A protein was detected covalently linked to newly synthesized 32P-labeled DNA. Formation of the phi X A protein-[32P]DNA covalent complex required all the factors necessary for phi X (+) SS(c) DNA synthesis in vitro. Thus, it was a product of the reinitiation reaction and an intermediate of the replication cycle. Identification of this complex provided direct evidence that reinitiation of phi X (+) strand DNA synthesis involved regeneration of the RF II X A complex. Substitution of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine triphosphate (ddGTP) for dGTP in reaction mixtures resulted in the formation of covalent phi X A protein 32P-oligonucleotide complexes; these complexes were trapped analogues of the regenerated RF II X A complex. They could not act catalytically due to the presence of ddGMP residues at the 3'-termini of the oligonucleotide moieties. Reaction mixtures containing ddGTP also yielded nonradioactive (+) SS(c) DNA products derived from circularization of the displaced (+) strand of the input parental template DNA. The formation of the phi X A protein-32P-oligonucleotide complexes and nonradioactive (+) SS(c) DNA were used to assay both reinitiation and termination reactions, respectively. Both reactions required DNA synthesis from the 3'-hydroxyl primer at nucleotide residue 4305 which was formed by cleavage of phi X RF I DNA by the phi X A protein. Elongation of this primer by 18, but not 11 nucleotides was sufficient to support each reaction. Reinitiation reactions proceeded rapidly and were essentially complete after 90 s. In contrast, when ddGTP was replaced

  2. An evolutionarily conserved role for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in the regulation of movement.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan G; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Frochaux, Michael; Pandey, Ashutosh; Andreux, Pénélope A; Deplancke, Bart; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-09-01

    The BXD genetic reference population is a recombinant inbred panel descended from crosses between the C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) strains of mice, which segregate for about 5 million sequence variants. Recently, some of these variants have been established with effects on general metabolic phenotypes such as glucose response and bone strength. Here we phenotype 43 BXD strains and observe they have large variation (-5-fold) in their spontaneous activity during waking hours. QTL analyses indicate that -40% of this variance is attributable to a narrow locus containing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor with well-established roles in development and xenobiotic metabolism. Strains with the D2 allele of Ahr have reduced gene expression compared to those with the B6 allele, and have significantly higher spontaneous activity. This effect was also observed in B6 mice with a congenic D2 Ahr interval, and in B6 mice with a humanized AHR allele which, like the D2 allele, is expressed much less and has less enzymatic activity than the B6 allele. Ahr is highly conserved in invertebrates, and strikingly inhibition of its orthologs in D. melanogaster and C. elegans (spineless and ahr-1) leads to marked increases in basal activity. In mammals, Ahr has numerous ligands, but most are either non-selective (e.g. resveratrol) or highly toxic (e.g., 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)). Thus, we chose to examine a major environmental influence--long term feeding with high fat diet (HFD)--to see if the effects of Ahr are dependent on major metabolic differences. Interestingly, while HFD robustly halved movement across all strains, the QTL position and effects of Ahr remained unchanged, indicating that the effects are independent. The highly consistent effects of Ahr on movement indicate that changes in its constitutive activity have a role on spontaneous movement and may influence human behavior. PMID:25255223

  3. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulators SNAI2 and TWIST1 in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Darya; Hardin, Heather; Shan, Weihua; Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Rush, Patrick S; Asioli, Sofia; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is an important mechanism of epithelial tumor progression, local invasion and metastasis. The E-cadherin (CDH1) repressor SLUG (SNAI2) and the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TWIST1 inhibit CDH1 expression in poorly differentiated malignancies as inducers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition has been implicated in progression from well to poorly differentiated/anaplastic thyroid carcinoma but the expression of SNAI2 and TWIST1 proteins and their phenotypic association in human thyroid cancers has not been extensively studied. We examined the expression of SNAI2, TWIST1 and CDH1 by immunohistochemistry in a panel of well-differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers and by qRT-PCR in thyroid cell lines. Ten normal thyroids, 33 follicular adenomas, 56 papillary thyroid carcinomas including 28 follicular variants, 27 follicular carcinomas and 10 anaplastic thyroid carcinomas were assembled on a tissue microarray and immunostained for SNAI2, TWIST1 and CDH1. Most (8/10) anaplastic thyroid carcinomas demonstrated strong nuclear immunoreactivity for SNAI2 with associated absence of CDH1 in 6/8 cases (75%). TWIST1 was expressed in 5/10 anaplastic thyroid carcinomas with absence of CDH1 in 3/5 (60%) cases. These findings were confirmed in whole sections of all anaplastic thyroid carcinomas and in a separate validation set of 10 additional anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. All normal thyroids, follicular adenomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas were negative for SNAI2 and TWIST1 (P<0.0001) and all showed strong diffuse immunoreactivity for CDH1 (P=0.026). Expression of SNAI2, TWIST1 and CDH1 mRNA varied in a normal thyroid, papillary carcinoma and two anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines tested, but the highest levels of CDH1 mRNA were detected in the normal thyroid cell line while the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line demonstrated the highest levels of SNAI2 and TWIST1 m

  4. Low molecular weight inhibitors of Myc-Max interaction and function.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoying; Giap, Christine; Lazo, John S; Prochownik, Edward V

    2003-09-18

    c-Myc is helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (HLH-ZIP) oncoprotein that is frequently deregulated in human cancers. In order to bind DNA, regulate target gene expression, and function in a biological context, c-Myc must dimerize with another HLH-ZIP protein, Max. A large number of c-Myc target genes have been identified, and many of the encoded proteins are transforming. Such functional redundancy, however, complicates therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting any single target gene product. Given this consideration, we have instead attempted to identify ways by which c-Myc itself could be effectively disabled. We have used a yeast two-hybrid approach to identify low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit c-Myc-Max association. All of the compounds prevented transactivation by c-Myc-Max heterodimers, inhibited cell cycle progression, and prevented the in vitro growth of fibroblasts in a c-Myc-dependent manner. Several of the compounds also inhibited tumor growth in vivo. These results show that the yeast two-hybrid screen is useful for identifying compounds that can be exploited in mammalian cells. More specifically, they provide a means by which structural analogs, based upon these first-generation Myc-Max inhibitors, can be developed to enhance antitumor efficacy.

  5. A switch from Myc:Max to Mad:Max heterocomplexes accompanies monocyte/macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ayer, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-11-01

    Mad is a basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper protein that heterodimerizes with Max in vitro. Mad:Max heterodimers recognize the same E-box-related DNA-binding sites as Myc:Max heterodimers. However, in transient transfection assays Myc and Mad influence transcription in opposite ways through interaction with Max; Myc activates while Mad represses transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Mad protein is induced rapidly upon differentiation of cells of the myeloid lineage. The Mad protein is synthesized in human cells as a 35-kD nuclear phosphoprotein with an extremely short half-life (t1/2 = 15-30 min) and can be detected in vivo in a complex with Max. In the undifferentiated U937 monocyte cell line Max was found complexed with Myc but not Mad. However, Mad:Max complexes began to accumulate as early as 2 hr after induction of macrophage differentiation with TPA. By 48 hr following TPA treatment only Mad:Max complexes were detectable. These data show that differentiation is accompanied by a change in the composition of Max heterocomplexes. We speculate that this switch in heterocomplexes results in a change in the transcriptional regulation of Myc:Max target genes required for cell proliferation.

  6. Overexpression of a bHLH1 Transcription Factor of Pyrus ussuriensis Confers Enhanced Cold Tolerance and Increases Expression of Stress-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cong; Huang, Xiao-San; Li, Kong-Qing; Yin, Hao; Li, Lei-Ting; Yao, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are involved in arrays of physiological and biochemical processes. However, knowledge concerning the functions of bHLHs in cold tolerance remains poorly understood. In this study, a PubHLH1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. PubHLH1 was upregulated by cold, salt, and dehydration, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PubHLH1 had the transactivational activity and localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of PubHLH1 in transgenic tobacco conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress. The transgenic lines had higher survival rates, higher chlorophyll, higher proline contents, lower electrolyte leakages and MDA when compared with wild type (WT). In addition, transcript levels of eight genes associated with ROS scavenging, regulation, and stress defense were higher in the transgenic plants relative to the WT under the chilling stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PubHLH1 played a key role in cold tolerance and, at least in part, contributed to activation of stress-responsive genes. PMID:27092159

  7. Overexpression of a bHLH1 Transcription Factor of Pyrus ussuriensis Confers Enhanced Cold Tolerance and Increases Expression of Stress-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cong; Huang, Xiao-San; Li, Kong-Qing; Yin, Hao; Li, Lei-Ting; Yao, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are involved in arrays of physiological and biochemical processes. However, knowledge concerning the functions of bHLHs in cold tolerance remains poorly understood. In this study, a PubHLH1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. PubHLH1 was upregulated by cold, salt, and dehydration, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PubHLH1 had the transactivational activity and localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of PubHLH1 in transgenic tobacco conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress. The transgenic lines had higher survival rates, higher chlorophyll, higher proline contents, lower electrolyte leakages and MDA when compared with wild type (WT). In addition, transcript levels of eight genes associated with ROS scavenging, regulation, and stress defense were higher in the transgenic plants relative to the WT under the chilling stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PubHLH1 played a key role in cold tolerance and, at least in part, contributed to activation of stress-responsive genes. PMID:27092159

  8. Plant proximity perception dynamically modulates hormone levels and sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Galstyan, Anahit; Gallemí, Marçal; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolás; Molina-Contreras, Maria José; Salla-Martret, Mercè; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Martínez-García, Jaime F

    2014-06-01

    The shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) refers to a set of plant responses initiated after perception by the phytochromes of light enriched in far-red colour reflected from or filtered by neighbouring plants. These varied responses are aimed at anticipating eventual shading from potential competitor vegetation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the most obvious SAS response at the seedling stage is the increase in hypocotyl elongation. Here, we describe how plant proximity perception rapidly and temporally alters the levels of not only auxins but also active brassinosteroids and gibberellins. At the same time, shade alters the seedling sensitivity to hormones. Plant proximity perception also involves dramatic changes in gene expression that rapidly result in a new balance between positive and negative factors in a network of interacting basic helix-loop-helix proteins, such as HFR1, PAR1, and BIM and BEE factors. Here, it was shown that several of these factors act as auxin- and BR-responsiveness modulators, which ultimately control the intensity or degree of hypocotyl elongation. It was deduced that, as a consequence of the plant proximity-dependent new, dynamic, and local balance between hormone synthesis and sensitivity (mechanistically resulting from a restructured network of SAS regulators), SAS responses are unleashed and hypocotyls elongate.

  9. The molecular basis for venation patterning of pigmentation and its effect on pollinator attraction in flowers of Antirrhinum.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yongjin; Venail, Julien; Mackay, Steve; Bailey, Paul C; Schwinn, Kathy E; Jameson, Paula E; Martin, Cathie R; Davies, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    Pigment stripes associated with veins (venation) is a common flower colour pattern. The molecular genetics and function of venation were investigated in the genus Antirrhinum, in which venation is determined by Venosa (encoding an R2R3MYB transcription factor). Pollinator preferences were measured by field tests with Antirrhinum majus. Venosa function was examined using in situ hybridization and transient overexpression. The origin of the venation trait was examined by molecular phylogenetics. Venation and full-red flower colouration provide a comparable level of advantage for pollinator attraction relative to palely pigmented or white lines. Ectopic expression of Venosa confers pigmentation outside the veins. Venosa transcript is produced only in small areas of the corolla between the veins and the adaxial epidermis. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that venation patterning is an ancestral trait in Antirrhinum. Different accessions of three species with full-red pigmentation with or without venation patterning have been found. Epidermal-specific venation is defined through overlapping expression domains of the MYB (myoblastoma) and bHLH (basic Helix-Loop-Helix) co-regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis, with the bHLH providing epidermal specificity and Venosa vein specificity. Venation may be the ancestral trait, with full-red pigmentation a derived, polyphyletic trait. Venation patterning is probably not fixed once species evolve full-red floral pigmentation.

  10. Drosophila evolution challenges postulated redundancy in the E(spl) gene complex.

    PubMed

    Maier, D; Marte, B M; Schäfer, W; Yu, Y; Preiss, A

    1993-06-15

    The Enhancer of split [E(spl)] gene complex belongs to the class of neurogenic loci, which, in a concerted action, govern neurogenesis in Drosophila. Two genetically distinct functions, vital and neurogenic, reside within the complex defined by lethal mutations in the l(3) gro gene and by the typical neurogenic phenotype of deletions, respectively. Such deletions always affect several of the many embryonically active genes in the region, which cannot be mutated separately to lethality. Seven of these genes are extremely similar at the transcription and sequence level sharing the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif of transcriptional regulators. While these E(spl) bHLH genes seem to be required collectively for neurogenesis, they are nonessential individually, suggesting functional redundancy of the encoded gene products. No specific functions could yet be ascribed to any of the other genes located within the complex. One might expect these apparently dispensable genes, as well as the supposedly redundant bHLH genes, to be under little evolutionary constraint and, thus, to evolve most rapidly. However, we find the entire E(spl) gene complex highly conserved during Drosophila evolution, indicating that all the genes as well as their organization are of functional importance.

  11. NO FLOWERING IN SHORT DAY (NFL) is a bHLH transcription factor that promotes flowering specifically under short-day conditions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Xin, Ruijiao; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Sung, Sibum; Lange, Theo; Huq, Enamul

    2016-02-15

    Flowering in plants is a dynamic and synchronized process where various cues including age, day length, temperature and endogenous hormones fine-tune the timing of flowering for reproductive success. Arabidopsis thaliana is a facultative long day (LD) plant where LD photoperiod promotes flowering. Arabidopsis still flowers under short-day (SD) conditions, albeit much later than in LD conditions. Although factors regulating the inductive LD pathway have been extensively investigated, the non-inductive SD pathway is much less understood. Here, we identified a key basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor called NFL (NO FLOWERING IN SHORT DAY) that is essential to induce flowering specifically under SD conditions in Arabidopsis. nfl mutants do not flower under SD conditions, but flower similar to the wild type under LD conditions. The no-flowering phenotype in SD is rescued either by exogenous application of gibberellin (GA) or by introducing della quadruple mutants in the nfl background, suggesting that NFL acts upstream of GA to promote flowering. NFL is expressed at the meristematic regions and NFL is localized to the nucleus. Quantitative RT-PCR assays using apical tissues showed that GA biosynthetic genes are downregulated and the GA catabolic and receptor genes are upregulated in the nfl mutant compared with the wild type, consistent with the perturbation of the endogenous GA biosynthetic and catabolic intermediates in the mutant. Taken together, these data suggest that NFL is a key transcription factor necessary for promotion of flowering under non-inductive SD conditions through the GA signaling pathway.

  12. Enhanced generation of myeloid lineages in hematopoietic differentiation from embryonic stem cells by silencing transcriptional repressor Twist-2.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2009-12-01

    The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1(+) and F4/80(+) cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor.

  13. Identification and characterization of an anti-oxidative stress-associated mutant of Aspergillus fumigatus transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    FAN, ZHONGQI; YU, HUIMEI; GUO, QI; HE, DAN; XUE, BAIJI; XIE, XIANGLI; YOKOYAMA, KOJI; WANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi, surviving in various environmental conditions. Maintenance of the redox homeostasis of the fungus relies upon the well-organized regulation between reactive oxygen species generated by immune cells or its own organelles, and the activated anti-oxidative stress mechanism. To investigate such a mechanism, the present study obtained a number of randomly-inserted mutants of A. fumigatus, mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In addition, a high throughput hydrogen peroxide screening system was established to examine ~1,000 mutants. A total of 100 mutants exhibited changes in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, among which a significant increase in sensitivity was observed in the AFM2658 mutant. Further investigations of the mutant were also performed, in which the sequence of this mutant was characterized using thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction. This revealed that the insertion site was located on chromosome 2 afu1_92, and the 96 bp sequence was knocked out, which partially comprised a sequence localized between the integral membrane protein coding region and the helix-loop-helix transcription factor coding region. A decrease in the levels of anti-oxidative stress-associated mRNAs were observed, and an increase in reactive oxygen species were detected using fluorescence. The results of the present study demonstrated that this sequence may have a protective role in A. fumigatus in the presence of oxidative stress. PMID:26847000

  14. An essential role for chaperone-mediated autophagy in cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Hubbi, Maimon E; Semenza, Gregg L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has long been known to serve as a stimulus for cell cycle arrest. Hypoxia-mediated cell cycle arrest is mediated through the actions of HIF1α (hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit [basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor]), which has a nontranscriptional role as an inhibitor of MCM (minichromosome maintenance complex component) helicase activity. We identified chaperone-mediated autophagy as a pathway for selective degradation of HIF1α through lysosomes prior to the onset of DNA replication. CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) mediates degradation of HIF1α at the G1/S transition, whereas CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) increases HIF1α levels and transcriptional activity prior to the onset of G1 phase. Lysosomal inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest, which is recovered by knockdown of HIF1α and EPAS1/HIF2α. These findings establish lysosomes as essential regulators of cell cycle progression through the degradation of HIF1α. PMID:25945892

  15. Twist1 Controls a Cell-Specification Switch Governing Cell Fate Decisions within the Cardiac Neural Crest

    PubMed Central

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Beth A.; Lin, Andrea; Spicer, Douglas B.; Howard, Marthe J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitor cells that can generate both ectodermal cell types, such as neurons, and mesodermal cell types, such as smooth muscle. The mechanisms controlling this cell fate choice are not known. The basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor Twist1 is expressed throughout the migratory and post-migratory cardiac neural crest. Twist1 ablation or mutation of the Twist-box causes differentiation of ectopic neuronal cells, which molecularly resemble sympathetic ganglia, in the cardiac outflow tract. Twist1 interacts with the pro-neural factor Sox10 via its Twist-box domain and binds to the Phox2b promoter to repress transcriptional activity. Mesodermal cardiac neural crest trans-differentiation into ectodermal sympathetic ganglia-like neurons is dependent upon Phox2b function. Ectopic Twist1 expression in neural crest precursors disrupts sympathetic neurogenesis. These data demonstrate that Twist1 functions in post-migratory neural crest cells to repress pro-neural factors and thereby regulate cell fate determination between ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. PMID:23555309

  16. MicroRNA 146 (Mir146) modulates spermatogonial differentiation by retinoic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Huszar, Jessica M; Payne, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Impaired biogenesis of microRNAs disrupts spermatogenesis and leads to infertility in male mice. Spermatogonial differentiation is a key step in spermatogenesis, yet the mechanisms that control this event remain poorly defined. In this study, we discovered microRNA 146 (Mir146) to be highly regulated during spermatogonial differentiation, a process dependent on retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Mir146 transcript levels were diminished nearly 180-fold in differentiating spermatogonia when compared with undifferentiated spermatogonia. Luciferase assays revealed the direct binding of Mir146 to the 3' untranslated region of the mediator complex subunit 1 (Med1), a coregulator of retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs). Overexpression of Mir146 in cultured undifferentiated spermatogonia reduced Med1 transcript levels, as well as those of differentiation marker kit oncogene (Kit). MED1 protein was also diminished. Conversely, inhibition of Mir146 increased the levels of Kit. When undifferentiated spermatogonia were exposed to RA, Mir146 was downregulated along with a marker for undifferentiated germ cells, zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (Zbtb16; Plzf); Kit was upregulated. Overexpression of Mir146 in RA-treated spermatogonia inhibited the upregulation of Kit, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), and spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix 2 (Sohlh2). Inhibition of Mir146 in RA-treated spermatogonia greatly enhanced the upregulation of these genes. We conclude that Mir146 modulates the effects of RA on spermatogonial differentiation.

  17. MicroRNA 146 (Mir146) Modulates Spermatogonial Differentiation by Retinoic Acid in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Huszar, Jessica M.; Payne, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Impaired biogenesis of microRNAs disrupts spermatogenesis and leads to infertility in male mice. Spermatogonial differentiation is a key step in spermatogenesis, yet the mechanisms that control this event remain poorly defined. In this study, we discovered microRNA 146 (Mir146) to be highly regulated during spermatogonial differentiation, a process dependent on retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Mir146 transcript levels were diminished nearly 180-fold in differentiating spermatogonia when compared with undifferentiated spermatogonia. Luciferase assays revealed the direct binding of Mir146 to the 3′ untranslated region of the mediator complex subunit 1 (Med1), a coregulator of retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs). Overexpression of Mir146 in cultured undifferentiated spermatogonia reduced Med1 transcript levels, as well as those of differentiation marker kit oncogene (Kit). MED1 protein was also diminished. Conversely, inhibition of Mir146 increased the levels of Kit. When undifferentiated spermatogonia were exposed to RA, Mir146 was downregulated along with a marker for undifferentiated germ cells, zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (Zbtb16; Plzf); Kit was upregulated. Overexpression of Mir146 in RA-treated spermatogonia inhibited the upregulation of Kit, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), and spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix 2 (Sohlh2). Inhibition of Mir146 in RA-treated spermatogonia greatly enhanced the upregulation of these genes. We conclude that Mir146 modulates the effects of RA on spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:23221399

  18. Achaete-scute homologue-1 tapers neuroendocrine cell differentiation in lungs after exposure to naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Taubman, Sandra; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Linnoila, R Ilona

    2010-09-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor achaete-scute homologue-1 (ASH1) plays a critical role in regulating the neuroendocrine (NE) phenotype in normal and neoplastic lung. Transgenic (TG) mice that constitutively express human ASH1 (hASH1) under control of the Clara cell 10-kDa protein (CC10) promoter in non-NE airway lining cells display progressive epithelial hyperplasia and bronchiolar metaplasia or bronchiolization of the alveoli (BOA). However, little is known about the involvement of hASH1 in regeneration of the conducting airway. In this study, we investigated the impact of hASH1 on airway cell injury and repair in the TG mice following an intraperitoneal injection of naphthalene, which specifically ablates bronchiolar Clara cells and induces pulmonary NE cell hyperplasia. We discovered an overall attenuation of NE maturation coupled with increased proliferation in TG mice during post-naphthalene repair. In addition, BOA lesions revealed enhanced epithelial cell proliferation while preserving Clara cell markers CC10 and the principal naphthalene-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P4502F2. These data suggest that ASH1 may play an important role in maintaining a progenitor phenotype that promotes renewal of both NE and epithelial cells. Moreover, ASH1 may propagate a stem cell microenvironment in BOA where epithelium becomes resistant to naphthalene toxicity.

  19. Recurrent Mutations in the Basic Domain of TWIST2 Cause Ablepharon Macrostomia and Barber-Say Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marchegiani, Shannon; Davis, Taylor; Tessadori, Federico; van Haaften, Gijs; Brancati, Francesco; Hoischen, Alexander; Huang, Haigen; Valkanas, Elise; Pusey, Barbara; Schanze, Denny; Venselaar, Hanka; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Wolfe, Lynne A; Tifft, Cynthia J; Zerfas, Patricia M; Zambruno, Giovanna; Kariminejad, Ariana; Sabbagh-Kermani, Farahnaz; Lee, Janice; Tsokos, Maria G; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Ferraz, Victor; da Silva, Eduarda Morgana; Stevens, Cathy A; Roche, Nathalie; Bartsch, Oliver; Farndon, Peter; Bermejo-Sanchez, Eva; Brooks, Brian P; Maduro, Valerie; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramos, Feliciano J; Chung, Hon-Yin Brian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Martins, Fabiana; Jacyk, Witold K; Mazzanti, Laura; Brunner, Han G; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lin, Shuo; Malicdan, May Christine V; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; de Vries, Bert B A; van Haelst, Mieke M; Zenker, Martin; Markello, Thomas C

    2015-07-01

    Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome (AMS) and Barber-Say syndrome (BSS) are rare congenital ectodermal dysplasias characterized by similar clinical features. To establish the genetic basis of AMS and BSS, we performed extensive clinical phenotyping, whole exome and candidate gene sequencing, and functional validations. We identified a recurrent de novo mutation in TWIST2 in seven independent AMS-affected families, as well as another recurrent de novo mutation affecting the same amino acid in ten independent BSS-affected families. Moreover, a genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, because the two syndromes differed based solely upon the nature of the substituting amino acid: a lysine at TWIST2 residue 75 resulted in AMS, whereas a glutamine or alanine yielded BSS. TWIST2 encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the development of mesenchymal tissues. All identified mutations fell in the basic domain of TWIST2 and altered the DNA-binding pattern of Flag-TWIST2 in HeLa cells. Comparison of wild-type and mutant TWIST2 expressed in zebrafish identified abnormal developmental phenotypes and widespread transcriptome changes. Our results suggest that autosomal-dominant TWIST2 mutations cause AMS or BSS by inducing protean effects on the transcription factor's DNA binding. PMID:26119818

  20. Fruit growth in Arabidopsis occurs via DELLA-dependent and DELLA-independent gibberellin responses.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sara; Ljung, Karin; Sorefan, Karim; Alvey, Elizabeth; Harberd, Nicholas P; Østergaard, Lars

    2012-10-01

    Fruit growth and development depend on highly coordinated hormonal activities. The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) promotes growth by inducing degradation of the growth-repressing DELLA proteins; however, the extent to which DELLA proteins contribute to GA-mediated gynoecium and fruit development remains to be clarified. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the role of DELLA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana fruit growth. We show that DELLA proteins are key regulators of reproductive organ size and important for ensuring optimal fertilization. We demonstrate that the seedless fruit growth (parthenocarpy) observed in della mutants can be directly attributed to the constitutive activation of GA signaling. It has been known for >75 years that another hormone, auxin, can induce formation of seedless fruits. Using mutants with complete lack of DELLA activity, we show here that auxin-induced parthenocarpy occurs entirely through GA signaling in Arabidopsis. Finally, we uncover the existence of a DELLA-independent GA response that promotes fruit growth. This response requires GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1-mediated GA perception and a functional 26S proteasome and involves the basic helix-loop-helix protein SPATULA as a key component. Taken together, our results describe additional complexities in GA signaling during fruit development, which may be particularly important to optimize the conditions for successful reproduction. PMID:23064323

  1. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water. PMID:26725198

  2. Fruit Growth in Arabidopsis Occurs via DELLA-Dependent and DELLA-Independent Gibberellin Responses[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Sara; Ljung, Karin; Sorefan, Karim; Alvey, Elizabeth; Harberd, Nicholas P.; Østergaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Fruit growth and development depend on highly coordinated hormonal activities. The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) promotes growth by inducing degradation of the growth-repressing DELLA proteins; however, the extent to which DELLA proteins contribute to GA-mediated gynoecium and fruit development remains to be clarified. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the role of DELLA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana fruit growth. We show that DELLA proteins are key regulators of reproductive organ size and important for ensuring optimal fertilization. We demonstrate that the seedless fruit growth (parthenocarpy) observed in della mutants can be directly attributed to the constitutive activation of GA signaling. It has been known for >75 years that another hormone, auxin, can induce formation of seedless fruits. Using mutants with complete lack of DELLA activity, we show here that auxin-induced parthenocarpy occurs entirely through GA signaling in Arabidopsis. Finally, we uncover the existence of a DELLA-independent GA response that promotes fruit growth. This response requires GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1–mediated GA perception and a functional 26S proteasome and involves the basic helix-loop-helix protein SPATULA as a key component. Taken together, our results describe additional complexities in GA signaling during fruit development, which may be particularly important to optimize the conditions for successful reproduction. PMID:23064323

  3. INDEHISCENT and SPATULA Interact to Specify Carpel and Valve Margin Tissue and Thus Promote Seed Dispersal in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Girin, Thomas; Paicu, Teodora; Stephenson, Pauline; Fuentes, Sara; Körner, Evelyn; O’Brien, Martin; Sorefan, Karim; Wood, Thomas A.; Balanzá, Vicente; Ferrándiz, Cristina; Smyth, David R.; Østergaard, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Structural organization of organs in multicellular organisms occurs through intricate patterning mechanisms that often involve complex interactions between transcription factors in regulatory networks. For example, INDEHISCENT (IND), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, specifies formation of the narrow stripes of valve margin tissue, where Arabidopsis thaliana fruits open on maturity. Another bHLH transcription factor, SPATULA (SPT), is required for reproductive tissue development from carpel margins in the Arabidopsis gynoecium before fertilization. Previous studies have therefore assigned the function of SPT to early gynoecium stages and IND to later fruit stages of reproductive development. Here we report that these two transcription factors interact genetically and via protein–protein contact to mediate both gynoecium development and fruit opening. We show that IND directly and positively regulates the expression of SPT, and that spt mutants have partial defects in valve margin formation. Careful analysis of ind mutant gynoecia revealed slight defects in apical tissue formation, and combining mutations in IND and SPT dramatically enhanced both single-mutant phenotypes. Our data show that SPT and IND at least partially mediate their joint functions in gynoecium and fruit development by controlling auxin distribution and suggest that this occurs through cooperative binding to regulatory sequences in downstream target genes. PMID:21990939

  4. Hypogonadism and obesity in mice with a targeted deletion of the Nhlh2 gene.

    PubMed

    Good, D J; Porter, F D; Mahon, K A; Parlow, A F; Westphal, H; Kirsch, I R

    1997-04-01

    The family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes comprises transcription factors involved in many aspects of growth and development. We have previously described two bHLH transcription factors, Nhlh1 and Nhlh2 (originally named NSCL1 and NSCL2). The nucleotide and predicted protein sequences of Nhlh1 and Nhlh2 are homologous within their bHLH domain where there are only three conservative amino acid differences. During murine embryogenesis, Nhlh1 and Nhlh2 share an overlapping but distinct pattern of expression in the developing nervous system. To improve our understanding of the role of these genes during neurogenesis, we have generated mice containing targeted deletions of both genes and here describe our results for Nhlh2. Loss of Nhlh2 results in a disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in mice. Male Nhlh2-/- mice are microphallic, hypogonadal and infertile with alterations in circulating gonadotropins, a defect in spermatogenesis and a loss of instinctual male sexual behaviour. Female Nhlh2-/- mice reared alone are hypogonadal, but when reared in the presence of males, their ovaries and uteri develop normally and they are fertile. Both male and female homozygotes exhibit progressive adult-onset obesity. Nhlh2 is expressed in the ventral-medial and lateral hypothalamus, Rathke's pouch and in the anterior lobe of the adult pituitary. Our results support a role for Nhlh2 in the onset of puberty and the regulation of body weight metabolism.

  5. A bHLH gene from Tamarix hispida improves abiotic stress tolerance by enhancing osmotic potential and decreasing reactive oxygen species accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xianguang; Liu, Yujia; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Bing; Huo, Lin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-02-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) leucine-zipper transcription factors play important roles in abiotic stress responses. However, their specific roles in abiotic stress tolerance are not fully known. Here, we functionally characterized a bHLH gene, ThbHLH1, from Tamarix hispida in abiotic stress tolerance. ThbHLH1 specifically binds to G-box motif with the sequence of 'CACGTG'. Transiently transfected T. hispida plantlets with transiently overexpressed ThbHLH1 and RNAi-silenced ThbHLH1 were generated for gain- and loss-of-function analysis. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing ThbHLH1 were generated to confirm the gain- and loss-of-function analysis. Overexpression of ThbHLH1 significantly elevates glycine betaine and proline levels, increases Ca(2+) concentration and enhances peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities to decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Additionally, ThbHLH1 regulates the expression of the genes including P5CS, BADH, CaM, POD and SOD, to activate the above physiological changes, and also induces the expression of stress tolerance-related genes LEAs and HSPs. These data suggest that ThbHLH1 induces the expression of stress tolerance-related genes to improve abiotic stress tolerance by increasing osmotic potential, improving ROS scavenging capability and enhancing second messenger in stress signaling cascades. PMID:26786541

  6. Lineage-Restricted OLIG2-RTK Signaling Governs the Molecular Subtype of Glioma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Kupp, Robert; Shtayer, Lior; Tien, An-Chi; Szeto, Emily; Sanai, Nader; Rowitch, David H; Mehta, Shwetal

    2016-09-13

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor OLIG2 is a master regulator of oligodendroglial fate decisions and tumorigenic competence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dysregulation of OLIG2 function during gliomagenesis remains poorly understood. Here, we show that OLIG2 modulates growth factor signaling in two distinct populations of GSCs, characterized by expression of either the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Biochemical analyses of OLIG2 function in normal and malignant neural progenitors reveal a positive feedforward loop between OLIG2 and EGFR to sustain co-expression. Furthermore, loss of OLIG2 function results in mesenchymal transformation in PDGFRα(HIGH) GSCs, a phenomenon that appears to be circumscribed in EGFR(HIGH) GSCs. Exploitation of OLIG2's dual and antithetical, pro-mitotic (EGFR-driven), and lineage-specifying (PDGFRα-driven) functions by glioma cells appears to be critical for sustaining growth factor signaling and GSC molecular subtype. PMID:27626655

  7. HEMERA Couples the Proteolysis and Transcriptional Activity of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs in Arabidopsis Photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongjian; Li, Meina; Pasoreck, Elise K.; Long, Lingyun; Shi, Yiting; Galvão, Rafaelo M.; Chou, Conrad L.; Wang, He; Sun, Amanda Y.; Zhang, Yiyin C.; Jiang, Anna; Chen, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes (phys) are red and far-red photoreceptors that control plant development and growth by promoting the proteolysis of a family of antagonistically acting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, the PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs). We have previously shown that the degradation of PIF1 and PIF3 requires HEMERA (HMR). However, the biochemical function of HMR and the mechanism by which it mediates PIF degradation remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that HMR acts upstream of PIFs in regulating hypocotyl growth. Surprisingly, genome-wide analysis of HMR- and PIF-dependent genes reveals that HMR is also required for the transactivation of a subset of PIF direct-target genes. We show that HMR interacts with all PIFs. The HMR-PIF interaction is mediated mainly by HMR’s N-terminal half and PIFs’ conserved active-phytochrome B binding motif. In addition, HMR possesses an acidic nine-amino-acid transcriptional activation domain (9aaTAD) and a loss-of-function mutation in this 9aaTAD impairs the expression of PIF target genes and the destruction of PIF1 and PIF3. Together, these in vivo results support a regulatory mechanism for PIFs in which HMR is a transcriptional coactivator binding directly to PIFs and the 9aaTAD of HMR couples the degradation of PIF1 and PIF3 with the transactivation of PIF target genes. PMID:25944101

  8. Tal-1 induces T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accelerated by casein kinase IIalpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, M A; Seldin, D C; Leder, P

    1996-01-01

    Ectopic activation of the TAL-1 gene in T lymphocytes occurs in the majority of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), yet experiments to date have failed to demonstrate a direct transforming capability for tal-1. The tal-1 gene product is a serine phosphoprotein and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor known to regulate embryonic hematopoiesis. We have established a transgenic mouse model in which tal-1 mis-expression in the thymus results in the development of clonal T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Thus, overexpression of tal-1 alone can be transforming, verifying its pathogenic role in human T-ALL. In addition, leukemogenesis is accelerated dramatically by transgenic co-expression of tal-1 and the catalytic subunit of casein kinase IIalpha (CKIIalpha), a serine/threonine protein kinase known to modulate the activity of other bHLH transcription factors. Although tal-1 is a substrate for CKII, the synergy of the tal-1 and CKIIalpha transgenes appears to be indirect, perhaps mediated through the E protein heterodimeric partners of tal-1. These studies prove that dysregulated tal-1 is oncogenic, providing a direct molecular explanation for the malignancies associated with TAL-1 activation in human T-ALL. Images PMID:8895560

  9. Intrinsic Disorder of the C-Terminal Domain of Drosophila Methoprene-Tolerant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kolonko, Marta; Ożga, Katarzyna; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Taube, Michał; Kozak, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Greb-Markiewicz, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Methoprene tolerant protein (Met) has recently been confirmed as the long-sought juvenile hormone (JH) receptor. This protein plays a significant role in the cross-talk of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and JH signalling pathways, which are important for control of insect development and maturation. Met belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family of transcription factors. In these proteins, bHLH domains are typically responsible for DNA binding and dimerization, whereas the PAS domains are crucial for the choice of dimerization partner and the specificity of target gene activation. The C-terminal region is usually responsible for the regulation of protein complex activity. The sequence of the Met C-terminal region (MetC) is not homologous to any sequence deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and has not been structurally characterized to date. In this study, we show that the MetC exhibits properties typical for an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). The final averaged structure obtained with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments indicates that intrinsically disordered MetC exists in an extended conformation. This extended shape and the long unfolded regions characterise proteins with high flexibility and dynamics. Therefore, we suggest that the multiplicity of conformations adopted by the disordered MetC is crucial for its activity as a biological switch modulating the cross-talk of different signalling pathways in insects. PMID:27657508

  10. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Gabrielle S; Barker, Karen T; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Fleischmann, Christina; Coleman, Richard J; Garrett, Christine; Gloyn, Anna L; Edghill, Emma L; Hattersley, Andrew T; Wellauer, Peter K; Goodwin, Graham; Houlston, Richard S

    2004-12-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment. We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis in a genome-wide linkage search of a consanguineous Pakistani family. Here we report the further linkage analysis of this family and a second family of Northern European descent segregating an identical phenotype. Positional cloning identified the mutations 705insG and C886T in the gene PTF1A, encoding pancreas transcription factor 1alpha, as disease-causing sequence changes. Both mutations cause truncation of the expressed PTF1A protein C-terminal to the basic-helix-loop-helix domain. Reporter-gene studies using a minimal PTF1A deletion mutant indicate that the deleted region defines a new domain that is crucial for the function of this protein. PTF1A is known to have a role in mammalian pancreatic development, and the clinical phenotype of the affected individuals implicated the protein as a key regulator of cerebellar neurogenesis. The essential role of PTF1A in normal cerebellar development was confirmed by detailed neuropathological analysis of Ptf1a(-/-) mice. PMID:15543146

  11. Activation of NMDA receptors increases proliferation and differentiation of hippocampal neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jae-Yeol; Kim, Byung-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Sik; Park, Jin-Yong; Kim, Sunoh; Yun, Young-Joo; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Suk-Ho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Son, Hyeon

    2007-04-15

    The prolonged effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation on the proliferation and differentiation of hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs) were studied. Under conditions of mitogen-mediated proliferation, a single NMDA pulse (5 microM) increased the fraction of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive (BrdU(+)) cells after a delay of 72 hours. Similarly, a single systemic injection of NMDA (100 mg/kg) increased the number of BrdU(+) cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) after 28 days, but not after 3 days. NMDA receptor activation induced an immediate influx of Ca(2+) into the NPCs and the NPCs expressed and released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in an NMDA receptor-dependent manner within 72 hours. With repetitive stimulation at the same dose, NMDA stimulated the acquisition of a neuronal phenotype accompanied by an increase in the expression of proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors. Together these findings suggest that neurogenesis in the developing brain is likely to be both directly and indirectly regulated by complex interactions between Ca(2+) influx and excitation-releasable cytokines, even at mild levels of excitation. In addition, our results are the first to show that stimulation of NPCs may lead to either proliferation or neuronal differentiation, depending on the level of NMDA receptor activation.

  12. Wnt9a deficiency discloses a repressive role of Tcf7l2 on endocrine differentiation in the embryonic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Cervantes, S; Tutusaus, A; Ejarque, M; Sanchez, L; García, A; Esteban, Y; Fargas, L; Alsina, B; Hartmann, C; Gomis, R; Gasa, R

    2016-01-14

    Transcriptional and signaling networks establish complex cross-regulatory interactions that drive cellular differentiation during development. Using microarrays we identified the gene encoding the ligand Wnt9a as a candidate target of Neurogenin3, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that functions as a master regulator of pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Here we show that Wnt9a is expressed in the embryonic pancreas and that its deficiency enhances activation of the endocrine transcriptional program and increases the number of endocrine cells at birth. We identify the gene encoding the endocrine transcription factor Nkx2-2 as one of the most upregulated genes in Wnt9a-ablated pancreases and associate its activation to reduced expression of the Wnt effector Tcf7l2. Accordingly, in vitro studies confirm that Tcf7l2 represses activation of Nkx2-2 by Neurogenin3 and inhibits Nkx2-2 expression in differentiated β-cells. Further, we report that Tcf7l2 protein levels decline upon initiation of endocrine differentiation in vivo, disclosing the downregulation of this factor in the developing endocrine compartment. These findings highlight the notion that modulation of signalling cues by lineage-promoting factors is pivotal for controlling differentiation programs.

  13. Wnt9a deficiency discloses a repressive role of Tcf7l2 on endocrine differentiation in the embryonic pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pujadas, G.; Cervantes, S.; Tutusaus, A.; Ejarque, M.; Sanchez, L.; García, A.; Esteban, Y.; Fargas, L.; Alsina, B.; Hartmann, C.; Gomis, R.; Gasa, R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional and signaling networks establish complex cross-regulatory interactions that drive cellular differentiation during development. Using microarrays we identified the gene encoding the ligand Wnt9a as a candidate target of Neurogenin3, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that functions as a master regulator of pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Here we show that Wnt9a is expressed in the embryonic pancreas and that its deficiency enhances activation of the endocrine transcriptional program and increases the number of endocrine cells at birth. We identify the gene encoding the endocrine transcription factor Nkx2-2 as one of the most upregulated genes in Wnt9a-ablated pancreases and associate its activation to reduced expression of the Wnt effector Tcf7l2. Accordingly, in vitro studies confirm that Tcf7l2 represses activation of Nkx2-2 by Neurogenin3 and inhibits Nkx2-2 expression in differentiated β-cells. Further, we report that Tcf7l2 protein levels decline upon initiation of endocrine differentiation in vivo, disclosing the downregulation of this factor in the developing endocrine compartment. These findings highlight the notion that modulation of signalling cues by lineage-promoting factors is pivotal for controlling differentiation programs. PMID:26771085

  14. An upstream open reading frame represses expression of Lc, a member of the R/B family of maize transcriptional activators

    SciTech Connect

    Damiani, R.D. Jr.; Wessler, S.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The R/B genes of maize encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix proteins that determine where and when the anthocyanin-pigment pathway will be expressed in the plant. Previous studies showed that allelic diversity among family members reflects differences in gene expression, specifically in transcription initiation. The authors present evidence that the R gene Lc is under translational control. They demonstrate that the 235-nt transcript leader of Lc represses expression 25- to 30-fold in an in vivo assay. Repression is mediated by the presence in cis of a 38-codon upstream open reading frame. Furthermore, the coding capacity of the upstream open reading frame influences the magnitude of repression. It is proposed that translational control does not contribute to tissue specificity but prevents overexpression of the Lc protein. The diversity of promoter and 5' untranslated leader sequences among the R/B genes provides an opportunity to study the coevolution of transcriptional and translational mechanisms of gene regulation. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  15. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:26869299

  16. The plant-specific protein FEHLSTART controls male meiotic entry, initializing meiotic synchronization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Lindquist, Ingrid E; Farmer, Andrew D; Kelly, Bridget; Li, Tao; Smith, Alan G; Retzel, Ernest F; Mudge, Joann; Chen, Changbin

    2015-11-01

    Meiosis marks the transition from the sporophyte to the gametophyte generation in the life cycle of flowering plants, and creates genetic variations through homologous recombination. In most flowering plants, meiosis is highly synchronized within each anther, which is significant for efficient fertilization. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of entry into meiosis and exit from it, and only a few genes in Arabidopsis have been characterized with a role in regulating meiotic progression. In this study, we report the functional characterization of a plant-specific basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, FEHLSTART (FST), a defect in which leads to premature meiotic entry and asynchronous meiosis, and results in decreased seed yield. Investigation of the time course of meiosis showed that the onset of leptotene, the first stage of prophase I, frequently occurred earlier in fst-1 than in the wild type. Asynchronous meiosis followed, which could manifest in the disruption of regular spindle structures and symmetric cell divisions in fst-1 mutants during the meiosis I/II transition. In accordance with frequently accelerated meiotic entry, whole-transcriptome analysis of fst-1 anthers undergoing meiosis revealed that 19 circadian rhythm genes were affected and 47 pollen-related genes were prematurely expressed at a higher level. Taken together, we propose that FST is required for normal meiotic entry and the establishment of meiotic synchrony. PMID:26382719

  17. MDL-1, a growth- and tumor-suppressor, slows aging and prevents germline hyperplasia and hypertrophy in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Michèle; Feyst, Inna; Rattanavirotkul, Nattaphong; Ezcurra, Marina; Tullet, Jennifer M A; Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Au, Catherine; Gilliat, Ann F; Hellberg, Josephine; Thornton, Janet M; Gems, David

    2014-02-01

    In C. elegans, increased lifespan in daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants is accompanied by up-regulation of the MDL-1 Mad basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor. Here we describe the role of mdl-1 in C. elegans germline proliferation and aging. The deletion allele mdl-1(tm311) shortened lifespan, and did so significantly more so in long-lived daf-2 mutants implying that mdl-1(+) contributes to effects of daf-2 on lifespan. mdl-1 mutant hermaphrodites also lay increased numbers of unfertilized oocytes. During aging, unfertilized oocytes in the uterus develop into tumors, whose development was accelerated by mdl-1(tm311). Opposite phenotypes were seen in daf-2 mutants, i.e. mdl-1 and daf-2 mutant germlines are hyperplastic and hypoplastic, respectively. Thus, MDL-1, like its mammalian orthologs, is an inhibitor of cell proliferation and growth that slows progression of an age-related pathology in C. elegans (uterine tumors). In addition, intestine-limited rescue of mdl-1 increased lifespan but not to wild type levels. Thus, mdl-1 likely acts both in the intestine and the germline to influence age-related mortality.

  18. Segregating neural and mechanosensory fates in the developing ear: patterning, signaling, and transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Raft, Steven; Groves, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate inner ear is composed of multiple sensory receptor epithelia, each of which is specialized for detection of sound, gravity, or angular acceleration. Each receptor epithelium contains mechanosensitive hair cells, which are connected to the brainstem by bipolar sensory neurons. Hair cells and their associated neurons are derived from the embryonic rudiment of the inner ear epithelium, but the precise spatial and temporal patterns of their generation, as well as the signals that coordinate these events, have only recently begun to be understood. Gene expression, lineage tracing, and mutant analyses suggest that both neurons and hair cells are generated from a common domain of neural and sensory competence in the embryonic inner ear rudiment. Members of the Shh, Wnt, and FGF families, together with retinoic acid signals, regulate transcription factor genes within the inner ear rudiment to establish the axial identity of the ear and regionalize neurogenic activity. Close-range signaling, such as that of the Notch pathway, specifies the fate of sensory regions and individual cell types. We also describe positive and negative interactions between basic helix-loop-helix and SoxB family transcription factors that specify either neuronal or sensory fates in a context-dependent manner. Finally, we review recent work on inner ear development in zebrafish, which demonstrates that the relative timing of neurogenesis and sensory epithelial formation is not phylogenetically constrained.

  19. Identification of Candidate Genes Underlying an Iron Efficiency Quantitative Trait Locus in Soybean1

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Gregory A.; King, Keith E.; Severin, Andrew J.; May, Gregory D.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Lin, Shun Fu; Lauter, Nicholas C.; Shoemaker, Randy C.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalent on calcareous soils in the United States and abroad, iron deficiency is among the most common and severe nutritional stresses in plants. In soybean (Glycine max) commercial plantings, the identification and use of iron-efficient genotypes has proven to be the best form of managing this soil-related plant stress. Previous studies conducted in soybean identified a significant iron efficiency quantitative trait locus (QTL) explaining more than 70% of the phenotypic variation for the trait. In this research, we identified candidate genes underlying this QTL through molecular breeding, mapping, and transcriptome sequencing. Introgression mapping was performed using two related near-isogenic lines in which a region located on soybean chromosome 3 required for iron efficiency was identified. The region corresponds to the previously reported iron efficiency QTL. The location was further confirmed through QTL mapping conducted in this study. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction identified two genes encoding transcription factors within the region that were significantly induced in soybean roots under iron stress. The two induced transcription factors were identified as homologs of the subgroup lb basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes that are known to regulate the strategy I response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Resequencing of these differentially expressed genes unveiled a significant deletion within a predicted dimerization domain. We hypothesize that this deletion disrupts the Fe-DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT)/bHLH heterodimer that has been shown to induce known iron acquisition genes. PMID:22319075

  20. The mammalian single-minded (SIM) gene: Mouse cDNA structure and diencephalic expression indicate a candidate gene for Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Akiko |; Kudoh, Jun; Shindoh, Nobuaki

    1996-07-01

    We have recently isolated a human homolog (hSIM) of the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene from the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21 using the exon trapping method. The Drosophila sim gene encodes a transcription factor that regulates the development of the central nervous system midline cell lineage. To elucidate the structure of the mammalian SIM protein, we have isolated cDNA clones from a mouse embryo cDNA library. The cDNA clones encode a polypeptide of 657 amino acids with a bHLH (basic-helix-loop-helix) domain, characteristic of a large family of transcription factors, and a PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain in the amino-terminal half region. Both of these domains have striking sequence homology with human SIM and Drosophila SIM proteins. In contrast, the carboxy-terminal half of the mouse SIM protein consists of a proline-rich region with no sequence homology to the Drosophila SIM provator domain of a number of transcription factors. Whole-mount embryo in situ hybridization experiments revealed that the SIM mRNA is expressed prominently in the diencephalon during embryogenesis strongly suggest that the newly isolated mammalian SIM homolog may play a critical role in the development of the mammalian central nervous system. We propose that the human SIM gene may be one of the pathogenic genes of Down syndrome. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Disruption of neurogenesis and cortical development in transgenic mice misexpressing Olig2, a gene in the Down syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Chuntao; Deng, Yaqi; Chen, Lina; Wu, Laiman; Mandrycky, Nicole; McNabb, Christopher T; Peng, Yuanbo; Fuchs, Perry N; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney; Qiu, Mengsheng; Mao, Meng; Lu, Q Richard

    2015-05-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig2 is crucial for mammalian central nervous system development. Human ortholog OLIG2 is located in the Down syndrome critical region in trisomy 21. To investigate the effect of Olig2 misexpression on brain development, we generated a developmentally regulated Olig2-overexpressing transgenic line with a Cre/loxP system. The transgenic mice with Olig2 misexpression in cortical neural stem/progenitor cells exhibited microcephaly, cortical dyslamination, hippocampus malformation, and profound motor deficits. Ectopic misexpression of Olig2 impaired cortical progenitor proliferation and caused precocious cell cycle exit. Massive neuronal cell death was detected in the developing cortex of Olig2-misexpressing mice. In addition, Olig2 misexpression led to a significant downregulation of neuronal specification factors including Ngn1, Ngn2 and Pax6, and a defect in cortical neurogenesis. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) analysis indicates that Olig2 directly targets the promoter and/or enhancer regions of Nfatc4, Dscr1/Rcan1 and Dyrk1a, the critical neurogenic genes that contribute to Down syndrome phenotypes, and inhibits their expression. Together, our study suggests that Olig2 misexpression in neural stem cells elicits neurogenesis defects and neuronal cell death, which may contribute to developmental disorders including Down syndrome, where OLIG2 is triplicated on chromosomal 21. PMID:25747816

  2. A WNT/beta-catenin signaling activator, R-spondin, plays positive regulatory roles during skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Hua; Jin, Yong-Ri; Seto, Marianne; Yoon, Jeong Kyo

    2011-03-25

    R-spondins (RSPOs) are a recently characterized family of secreted proteins that activate WNT/β-catenin signaling. In this study, we investigated the potential roles of the RSPO proteins during myogenic differentiation. Overexpression of the Rspo1 gene or administration of recombinant RSPO2 protein enhanced mRNA and protein expression of a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class myogenic determination factor, MYF5, in both C2C12 myoblasts and primary satellite cells, whereas MYOD or PAX7 expression was not affected. RSPOs also promoted myogenic differentiation and induced hypertrophic myotube formation in C2C12 cells. In addition, Rspo2 and Rspo3 gene knockdown by RNA interference significantly compromised MYF5 expression, myogenic differentiation, and myotube formation. Furthermore, Myf5 expression was reduced in the developing limbs of mouse embryos lacking the Rspo2 gene. Finally, we demonstrated that blocking of WNT/β-catenin signaling by DKK1 or a dominant-negative form of TCF4 reversed MYF5 expression, myogenic differentiation, and hypertrophic myotube formation induced by RSPO2, indicating that RSPO2 exerts its activity through the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our results provide strong evidence that RSPOs are key positive regulators of skeletal myogenesis acting through the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Identification of soybean MYC2-like transcription factors and overexpression of GmMYC1 could stimulate defense mechanism against common cutworm in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ding, Changwen; Du, Haiping; Liu, Hailun; Wang, Yongli; Yu, Deyue

    2014-09-01

    MYC2 is a basic helix-loop-helix Leu zipper transcription factor (TF). Here, 22 putative soybean MYC-like TFs were identified bioinformatically. Of these TFs, seven MYC2-like genes without introns were isolated and characterized. All seven GmMYCs displayed transactivation activity in yeast cells. Six genes (excepting GmMYC3) were expressed in the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seed wall but not in the developing seeds and up-regulated after insect feeding. The GmMYC1 transgenic tobacco rejected common cutworm (CCW, Spodoptera litura Fabricius) more strongly and lost less leaf area than the control (2.94 ± 2.36 vs 7.84 ± 4.63 cm(2)). The average relative growth rate of CCW feeding on transgenic tobacco leaves was lower than on control tobacco leaves (136 ± 60 vs 271 ± 76 %). These results indicated that GmMYC could stimulate the defense mechanism against insects in plants.

  4. Disruption of neurogenesis and cortical development in transgenic mice misexpressing Olig2, a gene in the Down syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Chuntao; Deng, Yaqi; Chen, Lina; Wu, Laiman; Mandrycky, Nicole; McNabb, Christopher T; Peng, Yuanbo; Fuchs, Perry N; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney; Qiu, Mengsheng; Mao, Meng; Lu, Q Richard

    2015-05-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig2 is crucial for mammalian central nervous system development. Human ortholog OLIG2 is located in the Down syndrome critical region in trisomy 21. To investigate the effect of Olig2 misexpression on brain development, we generated a developmentally regulated Olig2-overexpressing transgenic line with a Cre/loxP system. The transgenic mice with Olig2 misexpression in cortical neural stem/progenitor cells exhibited microcephaly, cortical dyslamination, hippocampus malformation, and profound motor deficits. Ectopic misexpression of Olig2 impaired cortical progenitor proliferation and caused precocious cell cycle exit. Massive neuronal cell death was detected in the developing cortex of Olig2-misexpressing mice. In addition, Olig2 misexpression led to a significant downregulation of neuronal specification factors including Ngn1, Ngn2 and Pax6, and a defect in cortical neurogenesis. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) analysis indicates that Olig2 directly targets the promoter and/or enhancer regions of Nfatc4, Dscr1/Rcan1 and Dyrk1a, the critical neurogenic genes that contribute to Down syndrome phenotypes, and inhibits their expression. Together, our study suggests that Olig2 misexpression in neural stem cells elicits neurogenesis defects and neuronal cell death, which may contribute to developmental disorders including Down syndrome, where OLIG2 is triplicated on chromosomal 21.

  5. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  6. Lineage-Restricted OLIG2-RTK Signaling Governs the Molecular Subtype of Glioma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Kupp, Robert; Shtayer, Lior; Tien, An-Chi; Szeto, Emily; Sanai, Nader; Rowitch, David H; Mehta, Shwetal

    2016-09-13

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor OLIG2 is a master regulator of oligodendroglial fate decisions and tumorigenic competence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dysregulation of OLIG2 function during gliomagenesis remains poorly understood. Here, we show that OLIG2 modulates growth factor signaling in two distinct populations of GSCs, characterized by expression of either the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Biochemical analyses of OLIG2 function in normal and malignant neural progenitors reveal a positive feedforward loop between OLIG2 and EGFR to sustain co-expression. Furthermore, loss of OLIG2 function results in mesenchymal transformation in PDGFRα(HIGH) GSCs, a phenomenon that appears to be circumscribed in EGFR(HIGH) GSCs. Exploitation of OLIG2's dual and antithetical, pro-mitotic (EGFR-driven), and lineage-specifying (PDGFRα-driven) functions by glioma cells appears to be critical for sustaining growth factor signaling and GSC molecular subtype.

  7. Mga is essential for the survival of pluripotent cells during peri-implantation development.

    PubMed

    Washkowitz, Andrew J; Schall, Caroline; Zhang, Kun; Wurst, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas; Mager, Jesse; Papaioannou, Virginia E

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance and control of pluripotency is of great interest in stem cell biology. The dual specificity T-box/basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper transcription factor Mga is expressed in the pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) and epiblast of the peri-implantation mouse embryo, but its function has not been investigated previously. Here, we use a loss-of-function allele and RNA knockdown to demonstrate that Mga depletion leads to the death of proliferating pluripotent ICM cells in vivo and in vitro, and the death of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. Additionally, quiescent pluripotent cells lacking Mga are lost during embryonic diapause. Expression of Odc1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of ornithine into putrescine in the synthesis of polyamines, is reduced in Mga mutant cells, and the survival of mutant ICM cells as well as ESCs is rescued in culture by the addition of exogenous putrescine. These results suggest a mechanism whereby Mga influences pluripotent cell survival through regulation of the polyamine pool in pluripotent cells of the embryo, whether they are in a proliferative or quiescent state.

  8. Essential Roles of Da Transactivation Domains in Neurogenesis and in E(spl)-Mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Zarifi, Ioanna; Kiparaki, Marianthi; Koumbanakis, Konstantinos A.; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Alexiadis, Anastasios; Livadaras, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    E proteins are a special class of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that heterodimerize with many bHLH activators to regulate developmental decisions, such as myogenesis and neurogenesis. Daughterless (Da) is the sole E protein in Drosophila and is ubiquitously expressed. We have characterized two transcription activation domains (TADs) in Da, called activation domain 1 (AD1) and loop-helix (LH), and have evaluated their roles in promoting peripheral neurogenesis. In this context, Da heterodimerizes with proneural proteins, such as Scute (Sc), which is dynamically expressed and also contributes a TAD. We found that either one of the Da TADs in the Da/Sc complex is sufficient to promote neurogenesis, whereas the Sc TAD is incapable of doing so. Besides its transcriptional activation role, the Da AD1 domain serves as an interaction platform for E(spl) proteins, bHLH-Orange family repressors which antagonize Da/Sc function. We show that the E(spl) Orange domain is needed for this interaction and strongly contributes to the antiproneural activity of E(spl) proteins. We present a mechanistic model on the interplay of these bHLH factors in the context of neural fate assignment. PMID:22949507

  9. ICE1 of Poncirus trifoliata functions in cold tolerance by modulating polyamine levels through interacting with arginine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-San; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhu, Dexin; Fu, Xingzheng; Wang, Min; Zhang, Qian; Moriguchi, Takaya; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-06-01

    ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1) encodes a MYC-like basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that acts as a central regulator of cold response. In this study, we elucidated the function and underlying mechanisms of PtrICE1 from trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.]. PtrICE1 was upregulated by cold, dehydration, and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PtrICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind to a MYC-recognizing sequence. Ectopic expression of PtrICE1 in tobacco and lemon conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stresses at either chilling or freezing temperatures. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that 21 proteins belonged to the PtrICE1 interactome, in which PtADC (arginine decarboxylase) was confirmed as a bona fide protein interacting with PtrICE1. Transcript levels of ADC genes in the transgenic lines were slightly elevated under normal growth condition but substantially increased under cold conditions, consistent with changes in free polyamine levels. By contrast, accumulation of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2 and O2 (-), was appreciably alleviated in the transgenic lines under cold stress. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were detected in the transgenic lines under cold conditions. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PtrICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to modulation of polyamine levels through interacting with the ADC gene. PMID:25873670

  10. Identification of mouse itih-4 encoding a glycoprotein with two EF-hand motifs from early embryonic liver.

    PubMed

    Cai, T; Yu, P; Monga, S P; Mishra, B; Mishra, L

    1998-05-29

    An essential feature of cell differentiation is the specificity of signal transduction events from extracellular cues, which are considered to be conferred by scaffold, anchoring and adaptor proteins. Our aim was to identify important scaffolding proteins required for liver development. Utilizing subtraction hybridization of embryonic liver cDNA libraries, here we report the full length cDNA sequence for mouse itih-4 (Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor H4). Itih-4 encodes a 942 amino acid protein containing two EF-hand (helix-loop-helix) motifs with an unique short loop, with a potential calcium-binding function. Itih-4 is expressed as a strong 3.1-kb transcript in liver, to a lesser extent in lung and heart tissue. RT-PCR demonstrates itih-4 mRNAs abundantly in liver, less in heart and brain, during mid-embryonic gestation. These results suggest that itih-4 is a potential regulator for extracellular matrix proteins and plays a role during early embryonic liver development. PMID:9602042

  11. Crystal structure of the human GGA1 GAT domain.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.; Zhai, P.; He, X.; Terzyan, S.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Tang, J.; Zhang, X. C.; Biosciences Division; Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation; Oklahoma Univ. Medical Center

    2003-06-03

    GGAs are a family of vesicle-coating regulatory proteins that function in intracellular protein transport. A GGA molecule contains four domains, each mediating interaction with other proteins in carrying out intracellular transport. The GAT domain of GGAs has been identified as the structural entity that binds membrane-bound ARF, a molecular switch regulating vesicle-coat assembly. It also directly interacts with rabaptin5, an essential component of endosome fusion. A 2.8 A resolution crystal structure of the human GGA1 GAT domain is reported here. The GAT domain contains four helices and has an elongated shape with the longest dimension exceeding 80 A. Its longest helix is involved in two structural motifs: an N-terminal helix-loop-helix motif and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. The N-terminal motif harbors the most conservative amino acid sequence in the GGA GAT domains. Within this conserved region, a cluster of residues previously implicated in ARF binding forms a hydrophobic surface patch, which is likely to be the ARF-binding site. In addition, a structure-based mutagenesis-biochemical analysis demonstrates that the C-terminal three-helix bundle of this GAT domain is responsible for the rabaptin5 binding. These structural characteristics are consistent with a model supporting multiple functional roles for the GAT domain.

  12. Recurrent Mutations in the Basic Domain of TWIST2 Cause Ablepharon Macrostomia and Barber-Say Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marchegiani, Shannon; Davis, Taylor; Tessadori, Federico; van Haaften, Gijs; Brancati, Francesco; Hoischen, Alexander; Huang, Haigen; Valkanas, Elise; Pusey, Barbara; Schanze, Denny; Venselaar, Hanka; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Wolfe, Lynne A; Tifft, Cynthia J; Zerfas, Patricia M; Zambruno, Giovanna; Kariminejad, Ariana; Sabbagh-Kermani, Farahnaz; Lee, Janice; Tsokos, Maria G; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Ferraz, Victor; da Silva, Eduarda Morgana; Stevens, Cathy A; Roche, Nathalie; Bartsch, Oliver; Farndon, Peter; Bermejo-Sanchez, Eva; Brooks, Brian P; Maduro, Valerie; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramos, Feliciano J; Chung, Hon-Yin Brian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Martins, Fabiana; Jacyk, Witold K; Mazzanti, Laura; Brunner, Han G; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lin, Shuo; Malicdan, May Christine V; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; de Vries, Bert B A; van Haelst, Mieke M; Zenker, Martin; Markello, Thomas C

    2015-07-01

    Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome (AMS) and Barber-Say syndrome (BSS) are rare congenital ectodermal dysplasias characterized by similar clinical features. To establish the genetic basis of AMS and BSS, we performed extensive clinical phenotyping, whole exome and candidate gene sequencing, and functional validations. We identified a recurrent de novo mutation in TWIST2 in seven independent AMS-affected families, as well as another recurrent de novo mutation affecting the same amino acid in ten independent BSS-affected families. Moreover, a genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, because the two syndromes differed based solely upon the nature of the substituting amino acid: a lysine at TWIST2 residue 75 resulted in AMS, whereas a glutamine or alanine yielded BSS. TWIST2 encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the development of mesenchymal tissues. All identified mutations fell in the basic domain of TWIST2 and altered the DNA-binding pattern of Flag-TWIST2 in HeLa cells. Comparison of wild-type and mutant TWIST2 expressed in zebrafish identified abnormal developmental phenotypes and widespread transcriptome changes. Our results suggest that autosomal-dominant TWIST2 mutations cause AMS or BSS by inducing protean effects on the transcription factor's DNA binding.

  13. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A.S.; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Summary The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1, 2, 3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions—from nutrient acquisition to reproduction—derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6, 7, 8, 9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10, 11, 12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water. PMID:26725198

  14. Cloning and characterization of DELLA genes in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Shen, Q; Cui, J; Fu, X Q; Yan, T X; Tang, K X

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) are some of the most important phytohormones involved in plant development. DELLA proteins are negative regulators of GA signaling in many plants. In this study, the full-length cDNA sequences of three DELLA genes were cloned from Artemisia annua. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AaDELLA1 and AaDELLA2 were located in the same cluster, but AaDELLA3 was not. Subcellular localization analysis suggested that AaDELLAs can be targeted to the nucleus and/or cytoplasm. Real-time PCR indicated that all three AaDELLA genes exhibited the highest expression in seeds. Expression of all AaDELLA genes was enhanced by exogenous MeJA treatment but inhibited by GA3 treatment. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that AaDELLAs could interact with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor AaMYC2, suggesting that GA and JA signaling may be involved in cross-talk via DELLA and MYC2 interaction in A. annua. PMID:26345940

  15. Mutations in NEUROD1 are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Malecki, M T; Jhala, U S; Antonellis, A; Fields, L; Doria, A; Orban, T; Saad, M; Warram, J H; Montminy, M; Krolewski, A S

    1999-11-01

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein NEUROD1 (also known as BETA2) functions as a regulatory switch for endocrine pancreatic development. In mice homozygous for a targeted disruption of Neurod, pancreatic islet morphogenesis is abnormal and overt diabetes develops due in part to inadequate expression of the insulin gene (Ins2). NEUROD1, following its heterodimerization with the ubiquitous HLH protein E47, regulates insulin gene (INS) expression by binding to a critical E-box motif on the INS promoter. Here we describe two mutations in NEUROD1, which are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes in the heterozygous state. The first, a missense mutation at Arg 111 in the DNA-binding domain, abolishes E-box binding activity of NEUROD1. The second mutation gives rise to a truncated polypeptide lacking the carboxy-terminal trans-activation domain, a region that associates with the co-activators CBP and p300 (refs 3,4). The clinical profile of patients with the truncated NEUROD1 polypeptide is more severe than that of patients with the Arg 111 mutation. Our findings suggest that deficient binding of NEUROD1 or binding of a transcriptionally inactive NEUROD1 polypeptide to target promoters in pancreatic islets leads to the development of type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:10545951

  16. Novel JAZ co-operativity and unexpected JA dynamics underpin Arabidopsis defence responses to Pseudomonas syringae infection.

    PubMed

    de Torres Zabala, Marta; Zhai, Bing; Jayaraman, Siddharth; Eleftheriadou, Garoufalia; Winsbury, Rebecca; Yang, Ron; Truman, William; Tang, Saijung; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Grant, Murray

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens target phytohormone signalling pathways to promote disease. Plants deploy salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defences against biotrophs. Pathogens antagonize SA immunity by activating jasmonate signalling, for example Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 produces coronatine (COR), a jasmonic acid (JA) mimic. This study found unexpected dynamics between SA, JA and COR and co-operation between JAZ jasmonate repressor proteins during DC3000 infection. We used a systems-based approach involving targeted hormone profiling, high-temporal-resolution micro-array analysis, reverse genetics and mRNA-seq. Unexpectedly, foliar JA did not accumulate until late in the infection process and was higher in leaves challenged with COR-deficient P. syringae or in the more resistant JA receptor mutant coi1. JAZ regulation was complex and COR alone was insufficient to sustainably induce JAZs. JAZs contribute to early basal and subsequent secondary plant defence responses. We showed that JAZ5 and JAZ10 specifically co-operate to restrict COR cytotoxicity and pathogen growth through a complex transcriptional reprogramming that does not involve the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors MYC2 and related MYC3 and MYC4 previously shown to restrict pathogen growth. mRNA-seq predicts compromised SA signalling in a jaz5/10 mutant and rapid suppression of JA-related components on bacterial infection. PMID:26428397

  17. Recurrent Mutations in the Basic Domain of TWIST2 Cause Ablepharon Macrostomia and Barber-Say Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Marchegiani, Shannon; Davis, Taylor; Tessadori, Federico; van Haaften, Gijs; Brancati, Francesco; Hoischen, Alexander; Huang, Haigen; Valkanas, Elise; Pusey, Barbara; Schanze, Denny; Venselaar, Hanka; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Zerfas, Patricia M.; Zambruno, Giovanna; Kariminejad, Ariana; Sabbagh-Kermani, Farahnaz; Lee, Janice; Tsokos, Maria G.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Ferraz, Victor; da Silva, Eduarda Morgana; Stevens, Cathy A.; Roche, Nathalie; Bartsch, Oliver; Farndon, Peter; Bermejo-Sanchez, Eva; Brooks, Brian P.; Maduro, Valerie; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Chung, Hon-Yin Brian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Martins, Fabiana; Jacyk, Witold K.; Mazzanti, Laura; Brunner, Han G.; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lin, Shuo; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; van Haelst, Mieke M.; Zenker, Martin; Markello, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome (AMS) and Barber-Say syndrome (BSS) are rare congenital ectodermal dysplasias characterized by similar clinical features. To establish the genetic basis of AMS and BSS, we performed extensive clinical phenotyping, whole exome and candidate gene sequencing, and functional validations. We identified a recurrent de novo mutation in TWIST2 in seven independent AMS-affected families, as well as another recurrent de novo mutation affecting the same amino acid in ten independent BSS-affected families. Moreover, a genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, because the two syndromes differed based solely upon the nature of the substituting amino acid: a lysine at TWIST2 residue 75 resulted in AMS, whereas a glutamine or alanine yielded BSS. TWIST2 encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the development of mesenchymal tissues. All identified mutations fell in the basic domain of TWIST2 and altered the DNA-binding pattern of Flag-TWIST2 in HeLa cells. Comparison of wild-type and mutant TWIST2 expressed in zebrafish identified abnormal developmental phenotypes and widespread transcriptome changes. Our results suggest that autosomal-dominant TWIST2 mutations cause AMS or BSS by inducing protean effects on the transcription factor’s DNA binding. PMID:26119818

  18. The bHLH transcription factor BIS1 controls the iridoid branch of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Steensma, Priscille; Schweizer, Fabian; Pollier, Jacob; Gariboldi, Ivo; Payne, Richard; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Miettinen, Karel; Espoz, Javiera; Purnama, Purin Candra; Kellner, Franziska; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; O'Connor, Sarah E; Rischer, Heiko; Memelink, Johan; Goossens, Alain

    2015-06-30

    Plants make specialized bioactive metabolites to defend themselves against attackers. The conserved control mechanisms are based on transcriptional activation of the respective plant species-specific biosynthetic pathways by the phytohormone jasmonate. Knowledge of the transcription factors involved, particularly in terpenoid biosynthesis, remains fragmentary. By transcriptome analysis and functional screens in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle), the unique source of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA)-type anticancer drugs vincristine and vinblastine, we identified a jasmonate-regulated basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor from clade IVa inducing the monoterpenoid branch of the MIA pathway. The bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) transcription factor transactivated the expression of all of the genes encoding the enzymes that catalyze the sequential conversion of the ubiquitous terpenoid precursor geranyl diphosphate to the iridoid loganic acid. BIS1 acted in a complementary manner to the previously characterized ethylene response factor Octadecanoid derivative-Responsive Catharanthus APETALA2-domain 3 (ORCA3) that transactivates the expression of several genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing the conversion of loganic acid to the downstream MIAs. In contrast to ORCA3, overexpression of BIS1 was sufficient to boost production of high-value iridoids and MIAs in C. roseus suspension cell cultures. Hence, BIS1 might be a metabolic engineering tool to produce sustainably high-value MIAs in C. roseus plants or cultures.

  19. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes.

    PubMed

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn V; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis; Dollfus, Hélène; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Véronique

    2012-05-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hearing loss. Twelve patients with new or recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain from six families were enrolled in this study. We observed a wide range of phenotypes and some unexpected features. All the patients had blue irides and pigmentation abnormalities that ranged from diffuse hypopigmentation to Waardenburg-like patches. In addition, they showed congenital complete hearing loss, diffuse hypopigmentation of the skin, freckling and ocular abnormalities, more frequently than patients with MITF mutations outside the basic domain. In conclusion, the non-truncating mutations of the basic domain do not always lead to Tietz syndrome but rather to a large range of phenotypes. Sun-exposed freckles are interestingly observed more frequently in Asian populations. This variability argues for the possible interaction with modifier loci. PMID:22258527

  20. A bHLH gene from Tamarix hispida improves abiotic stress tolerance by enhancing osmotic potential and decreasing reactive oxygen species accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xianguang; Liu, Yujia; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Bing; Huo, Lin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-02-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) leucine-zipper transcription factors play important roles in abiotic stress responses. However, their specific roles in abiotic stress tolerance are not fully known. Here, we functionally characterized a bHLH gene, ThbHLH1, from Tamarix hispida in abiotic stress tolerance. ThbHLH1 specifically binds to G-box motif with the sequence of 'CACGTG'. Transiently transfected T. hispida plantlets with transiently overexpressed ThbHLH1 and RNAi-silenced ThbHLH1 were generated for gain- and loss-of-function analysis. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing ThbHLH1 were generated to confirm the gain- and loss-of-function analysis. Overexpression of ThbHLH1 significantly elevates glycine betaine and proline levels, increases Ca(2+) concentration and enhances peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities to decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Additionally, ThbHLH1 regulates the expression of the genes including P5CS, BADH, CaM, POD and SOD, to activate the above physiological changes, and also induces the expression of stress tolerance-related genes LEAs and HSPs. These data suggest that ThbHLH1 induces the expression of stress tolerance-related genes to improve abiotic stress tolerance by increasing osmotic potential, improving ROS scavenging capability and enhancing second messenger in stress signaling cascades.

  1. Interallelic complementation at the mouse Mitf locus.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Arnheiter, Heinz; Hallsson, Jón Hallsteinn; Lamoreux, M Lynn; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A

    2003-01-01

    Mutations at the mouse microphthalmia locus (Mitf) affect the development of different cell types, including melanocytes, retinal pigment epithelial cells of the eye, and osteoclasts. The MITF protein is a member of the MYC supergene family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine-zipper (bHLHZip) transcription factors and is known to regulate the expression of cell-specific target genes by binding DNA as homodimer or as heterodimer with related proteins. The many mutations isolated at the locus have different effects on the phenotype and can be arranged in an allelic series in which the phenotypes range from near normal to white microphthalmic animals with osteopetrosis. Previous investigations have shown that certain combinations of Mitf alleles complement each other, resulting in a phenotype more normal than that of each homozygote alone. Here we analyze this interallelic complementation in detail and show that it is limited to one particular allele, Mitf(Mi-white) (Mitf(Mi-wh)), a mutation affecting the DNA-binding domain. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations are complemented, as are other Mitf mutations affecting the DNA-binding domain. Furthermore, this behavior is not restricted to particular cell types: Both eye development and coat color phenotypes are complemented. Our analysis suggests that Mitf(Mi-wh)-associated interallelic complementation is due to the unique biochemical nature of this mutation. PMID:12586714

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Bombyx mori gene encoding the transcription factor Atonal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Feng, Fan; Xia, Hengchuan; Chen, Liang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Keping

    2014-01-01

    The atonal genes are an evolutionarily conserved group of genes encoding regulatory basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. These transcription factors have a critical antioncogenic function in the retina, and are necessary for cell fate determination through the regulation of the cell signal pathway. In this study, the atonal gene was cloned from Bombyx mori, and the transcription factor was named BmAtonal. Sequence analysis showed that the BmAtonal protein shares extensive homology with other invertebrate Atonal proteins with the bHLH motif. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses revealed that BmAtonal was expressed in all developmental stages of B. mori and various larval tissues. The BmAtonal protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and polyclonal antibodies were raised against the purified protein. By immunofluorescence, the BmAtonal protein was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm of BmN cells. After knocking out nuclear localization signals (NLS), the BmAtonal protein was only detected in the cytoplasm. In addition, using the B. mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) baculovirus expression system, the recombinant BmAtonal protein was successfully expressed in the B. mori cell line BmN. This work lays the foundation for exploring the biological functions of the BmAtonal protein, such as identifying its potential binding partners and understanding the molecular control of the formation of sensory organs. PMID:24873037

  3. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-12-02

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar 'NC 95'. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition.

  4. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water.

  5. Bisphenol A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical, and brain development.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical, widely used in various industries and the field of dentistry. The consequent increase in BPA exposure among humans has led us to some concerns regarding the potential deleterious effects on reproduction and brain development. The emphasis of this review is on the effects of prenatal and lactational exposure to low doses of BPA on brain development in mice. We demonstrated that prenatal exposure to BPA affected fetal murine neocortical development by accelerating neuronal differentiation/migration during the early embryonic stage, which was associated with up- and down-regulation of the genes critical for brain development, including the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. In the adult mice brains, both abnormal neocortical architecture and abnormal corticothalamic projections persisted in the group exposed to the BPA. Functionally, BPA exposure disturbed murine behavior, accompanied with a disrupted neurotransmitter system, including monoamines, in the postnatal development period and in adult mice. We also demonstrated that epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CpG islands might underlie some of the effects on brain development after exposure to BPA. PMID:22239237

  6. Genetic basis for glandular trichome formation in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Hu, Yan; Yang, Changqing; Liu, Bingliang; Fang, Lei; Wan, Qun; Liang, Wenhua; Mei, Gaofu; Wang, Lingjian; Wang, Haiping; Ding, Linyun; Dong, Chenguang; Pan, Mengqiao; Chen, Jiedan; Wang, Sen; Chen, Shuqi; Cai, Caiping; Zhu, Xiefei; Guan, Xueying; Zhou, Baoliang; Zhu, Shuijin; Wang, Jiawei; Guo, Wangzhen; Chen, Xiaoya; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-01-01

    Trichomes originate from epidermal cells and can be classified as either glandular or non-glandular. Gossypium species are characterized by the presence of small and darkly pigmented lysigenous glands that contain large amounts of gossypol. Here, using a dominant glandless mutant, we characterize GoPGF, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix domain-containing transcription factor, that we propose is a positive regulator of gland formation. Silencing GoPGF leads to a completely glandless phenotype. A single nucleotide insertion in GoPGF, introducing a premature stop codon is found in the duplicate recessive glandless mutant (gl2gl3). The characterization of GoPGF helps to unravel the regulatory network of glandular structure biogenesis, and has implications for understanding the production of secondary metabolites in glands. It also provides a potential molecular basis to generate glandless seed and glanded cotton to not only supply fibre and oil but also provide a source of protein for human consumption. PMID:26795254

  7. Insertions of a Novel Class of Transposable Elements with a Strong Target Site Preference at the R Locus of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E. L.; Eggleston, W. B.; Demopulos, D.; Kermicle, J.; Dellaporta, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The r locus of maize regulates anthocyanin synthesis in various tissues of maize through the production of helix-loop-helix DNA binding proteins capable of inducing expression of structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. The complex r variant, R-r:standard (R-r), undergoes frequent mutation through a variety of mechanisms including displaced synapsis and crossing over, and intrachromosomal recombination. Here we report a new mechanism for mutation at the R-r complex: insertion of a novel family of transposable elements. Because the elements were first identified in the R-p gene of the R-r complex, they have been named P Instability Factor (PIF). Two different PIF elements were cloned and found to have identical sequences at their termini but divergent internal sequences. In addition, the PIF elements showed a marked specificity of insertion sites. Six out of seven PIF-containing derivatives examined had an element inserted at an identical location. Two different members of the PIF element family were identified at this position. The seventh PIF-containing derivative examined had the element inserted at a distinct position within r. Even at this location, however, the element inserted into a conserved target sequence. The timing of PIF excision is unusual. Germinal excision rates can range up to several percent of progeny. Yet somatic sectors are rare, even in lines exhibiting high germinal reversion rates. PMID:9178016

  8. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y.; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:27357749

  9. Functional profiling identifies genes involved in organ specific branches of the PIF3 regulatory network in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytochrome (phy)-interacting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (PIFs) constitutively sustain the etiolated state of dark-germinated seedlings by actively repressing deetiolation in darkness. This action is rapidly reversed upon light exposure by phy-induced proteolytic degradation of...

  10. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  11. Endurance training increases stimulation of uncoupling of skeletal muscle mitochondria in humans by non-esterified fatty acids: an uncoupling-protein-mediated effect?

    PubMed Central

    Tonkonogi, M; Krook, A; Walsh, B; Sahlin, K

    2000-01-01

    Uncoupled respiration (UCR) is an essential property of muscle mitochondria and has several functions in the cell. We hypothesized that endurance training may alter the magnitude and properties of UCR in human muscle. Isolated mitochondria from muscle biopsies taken before and after 6 weeks of endurance exercise training (n=8) were analysed for UCR. To investigate the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and UCP3 in UCR, the sensitivity of UCR to UCP-regulating ligands (non-esterified fatty acids and purine nucleotides) and UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression in muscle were examined. Oleate increased the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate, an effect that was not attenuated by GDP and/or cyclosporin A. The effect of oleate was significantly greater after compared with before training. Training had no effect on UCP2 or UCP3 mRNA levels, but after training the relative increase in respiration rate induced by oleate was positively correlated with the UCP2 mRNA level. In conclusion, we show that the sensitivity of UCR to non-esterified fatty acids is up-regulated by endurance training. This suggests that endurance training causes intrinsic changes in mitochondrial function, which may enhance the potential for regulation of aerobic energy production, prevent excess free radical generation and contribute to a higher basal metabolic rate. PMID:11042137

  12. A Plasmodesmata-Localized Protein Mediates Crosstalk between Cell-to-Cell Communication and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Youn; Wang, Xu; Cui, Weier; Sager, Ross; Modla, Shannon; Czymmek, Kirk; Zybaliov, Boris; van Wijk, Klaas; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Hua; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are thought to play a fundamental role in almost every aspect of plant life, including normal growth, physiology, and developmental responses. However, how specific signaling pathways integrate PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication is not well understood. Here, we present experimental evidence showing that the Arabidopsis thaliana plasmodesmata-located protein 5 (PDLP5; also known as HOPW1-1-INDUCED GENE1) mediates crosstalk between PD regulation and salicylic acid–dependent defense responses. PDLP5 was found to localize at the central region of PD channels and associate with PD pit fields, acting as an inhibitor to PD trafficking, potentially through its capacity to modulate PD callose deposition. As a regulator of PD, PDLP5 was also essential for conferring enhanced innate immunity against bacterial pathogens in a salicylic acid–dependent manner. Based on these findings, a model is proposed illustrating that the regulation of PD closure mediated by PDLP5 constitutes a crucial part of coordinated control of cell-to-cell communication and defense signaling. PMID:21934146

  13. An Atg13 Protein-mediated Self-association of the Atg1 Protein Kinase Is Important for the Induction of Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Shah, Khyati H.; Herman, Paul K.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy pathways in eukaryotic cells mediate the turnover of a diverse set of cytoplasmic components, including damaged organelles and abnormal protein aggregates. Autophagy-mediated degradation is highly regulated, and defects in these pathways have been linked to a number of human disorders. The Atg1 protein kinase appears to be a key site of this control and is targeted by multiple signaling pathways to ensure the appropriate autophagic response to changing environmental conditions. Despite the importance of this kinase, relatively little is known about the molecular details of Atg1 activation. In this study we show that Atg13, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of Atg1, promotes the formation of a specific Atg1 self-interaction in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The appearance of this Atg1-Atg1 complex is correlated with the induction of autophagy, and conditions that disrupt this complex result in diminished levels of both autophagy and Atg1 kinase activity. Moreover, the addition of a heterologous dimerization domain to Atg1 resulted in elevated kinase activity both in vivo and in vitro. The formation of this complex appears to be an important prerequisite for the subsequent autophosphorylation of Thr-226 in the Atg1 activation loop. Previous work indicates that this modification is necessary and perhaps sufficient for Atg1 kinase activity. Interestingly, this Atg1 self-association does not require Atg17, suggesting that this second conserved regulator might activate Atg1 in a manner mechanistically distinct from that of Atg13. In all, this work suggests a model whereby this self-association stimulates the autophosphorylation of Atg1 within its activation loop. PMID:21712380

  14. Far-Red Light-Mediated Seedling Development in Arabidopsis Involves FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219/JASMONATE RESISTANT 1-Dependent and -Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huai-Ju; Chen, Cheng-Ling; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and development is often regulated by the interaction of environmental factors such as light and various phytohormones. Arabidopsis FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT 1 (JAR1) participates in phytochrome A-mediated far-red (FR) light signaling and interacts with different light signaling regulators. FIN219/JAR1 is a jasmonic acid (JA)-conjugating enzyme responsible for the formation of JA-isoleucine. However, how FIN219/JAR1 integrates FR light and JA signaling remains largely unknown. We used a microarray approach to dissect the effect of fin219 mutation on the interaction of FR light and JA signaling. The fin219-2 mutant was less sensitive than the wild type to various concentrations of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) under low and high FR light. High FR light reduced the sensitivity of Arabidopsis seedlings to MeJA likely through FIN219. Intriguingly, in response to MeJA, FIN219 levels showed a negative feedback regulation. Further microarray assay revealed that FR light could regulate gene expression by FIN219-dependent or -independent pathways. The expression profiles affected in fin219-2 indicated that FIN219/JAR1 plays a critical role in the integration of multiple hormone-related signaling. In particular, FIN219 regulates a number of transcription factors (TFs), including 94 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) TFs, in response to FR light and MeJA. Loss-of-function mutants of some bHLH TFs affected by FIN219 showed altered responses to MeJA in the regulation of hypocotyl and root elongation. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 is tightly regulated in response to exogenous MeJA. It also interacts with multiple plant hormones to modulate hypocotyl and root elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings likely by regulating a group of TFs. PMID:26176841

  15. Far-Red Light-Mediated Seedling Development in Arabidopsis Involves FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219/JASMONATE RESISTANT 1-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai-Ju; Chen, Cheng-Ling; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and development is often regulated by the interaction of environmental factors such as light and various phytohormones. Arabidopsis FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT 1 (JAR1) participates in phytochrome A-mediated far-red (FR) light signaling and interacts with different light signaling regulators. FIN219/JAR1 is a jasmonic acid (JA)-conjugating enzyme responsible for the formation of JA-isoleucine. However, how FIN219/JAR1 integrates FR light and JA signaling remains largely unknown. We used a microarray approach to dissect the effect of fin219 mutation on the interaction of FR light and JA signaling. The fin219-2 mutant was less sensitive than the wild type to various concentrations of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) under low and high FR light. High FR light reduced the sensitivity of Arabidopsis seedlings to MeJA likely through FIN219. Intriguingly, in response to MeJA, FIN219 levels showed a negative feedback regulation. Further microarray assay revealed that FR light could regulate gene expression by FIN219-dependent or -independent pathways. The expression profiles affected in fin219-2 indicated that FIN219/JAR1 plays a critical role in the integration of multiple hormone-related signaling. In particular, FIN219 regulates a number of transcription factors (TFs), including 94 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) TFs, in response to FR light and MeJA. Loss-of-function mutants of some bHLH TFs affected by FIN219 showed altered responses to MeJA in the regulation of hypocotyl and root elongation. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 is tightly regulated in response to exogenous MeJA. It also interacts with multiple plant hormones to modulate hypocotyl and root elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings likely by regulating a group of TFs. PMID:26176841

  16. The Arabidopsis thaliana ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE8 encodes a novel protein mediating abscisic acid and sugar responses essential for growth.

    PubMed

    Brocard-Gifford, Inès; Lynch, Tim J; Garcia, M Emily; Malhotra, Bhupinder; Finkelstein, Ruth R

    2004-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many aspects of plant growth and development, yet many ABA response mutants present only subtle phenotypic defects, especially in the absence of stress. By contrast, the ABA-insensitive8 (abi8) mutant, isolated on the basis of ABA-resistant germination, also displays severely stunted growth, defective stomatal regulation, altered ABA-responsive gene expression, delayed flowering, and male sterility. The stunted growth of the mutant is not rescued by gibberellin, brassinosteroid, or indoleacetic acid application and is not attributable to excessive ethylene response, but supplementing the medium with Glc improves viability and root growth. In addition to exhibiting Glc-dependent growth, reflecting decreased expression of sugar-mobilizing enzymes, abi8 mutants are resistant to Glc levels that induce developmental arrest of wild-type seedlings. Studies of genetic interactions demonstrate that ABA hypersensitivity conferred by the ABA-hypersensitive1 mutation or overexpression of ABI3 or ABI5 does not suppress the dwarfing and Glc dependence caused by abi8 but partially suppresses ABA-resistant germination. By contrast, the ABA-resistant germination of abi8 is epistatic to the hypersensitivity caused by ethylene-insensitive2 (ein2) and ein3 mutations, yet ABI8 appears to act in a distinct Glc response pathway from these EIN loci. ABI8 encodes a protein with no domains of known function but belongs to a small plant-specific protein family. Database searches indicate that it is allelic to two dwarf mutants, elongation defective1 and kobito1, previously shown to disrupt cell elongation, cellulose synthesis, vascular differentiation, and root meristem maintenance. The cell wall defects appear to be a secondary effect of the mutations because Glc treatment restores root growth and vascular differentiation but not cell elongation. Although the ABI8 transcript accumulates in all tested plant organs in both wild-type and ABA response mutants, an

  17. Human T cell leukaemia virus type 2 tax protein mediates CC-chemokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells via the nuclear factor kappa B canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Barrios, C S; Castillo, L; Zhi, H; Giam, C-Z; Beilke, M A

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukaemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) or type 2 (HTLV-2) are prevalent in many areas worldwide. It has been observed that HIV-1/HTLV-2 co-infections are associated with slower rates of CD4(+) T cell decline and delayed progression to AIDS. This immunological benefit has been linked to the ability of Tax2, the transcriptional activating protein of HTLV-2, to induce the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4 and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5 and to down-regulate the expression of the CCR5 co-receptor in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This study aimed to assess the role of Tax2-mediated activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway on the production of the anti-viral CC-chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES. Recombinant Tax1 and Tax2 proteins, or proteins expressed via adenoviral vectors used to infect cells, were tested for their ability to activate the NF-κB pathway in cultured PBMCs in the presence or absence of NF-κB pathway inhibitors. Results showed a significant release of MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES by PBMCs after the activation of p65/RelA and p50. The secretion of these CC-chemokines was significantly reduced (P < 0·05) by canonical NF-κB signalling inhibitors. In conclusion, Tax2 protein may promote innate anti-viral immune responses through the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway.

  18. Fluorescent protein-mediated colour polymorphism in reef corals: multicopy genes extend the adaptation/acclimatization potential to variable light environments.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John R; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Oswald, Franz; Edwards, Richard J; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The genomic framework that enables corals to adjust to unfavourable conditions is crucial for coral reef survival in a rapidly changing climate. We have explored the striking intraspecific variability in the expression of coral pigments from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family to elucidate the genomic basis for the plasticity of stress responses among reef corals. We show that multicopy genes can greatly increase the dynamic range over which corals can modulate transcript levels in response to the light environment. Using the red fluorescent protein amilFP597 in the coral Acropora millepora as a model, we demonstrate that its expression increases with light intensity, but both the minimal and maximal gene transcript levels vary markedly among colour morphs. The pigment concentration in the tissue of different morphs is strongly correlated with the number of gene copies with a particular promoter type. These findings indicate that colour polymorphism in reef corals can be caused by the environmentally regulated expression of multicopy genes. High-level expression of amilFP597 is correlated with reduced photodamage of zooxanthellae under acute light stress, supporting a photoprotective function of this pigment. The cluster of light-regulated pigment genes can enable corals to invest either in expensive high-level pigmentation, offering benefits under light stress, or to rely on low tissue pigment concentrations and use the conserved resources for other purposes, which is preferable in less light-exposed environments. The genomic framework described here allows corals to pursue different strategies to succeed in habitats with highly variable light stress levels. In summary, our results suggest that the intraspecific plasticity of reef corals' stress responses is larger than previously thought.

  19. G-protein-mediated activation of turkey erythrocyte phospholipase C by beta-adrenergic and P2y-purinergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, C; Downes, C P

    1992-01-01

    Isoprenaline, previously known only to stimulate adenylate cyclase via the stimulatory G-protein, Gs, activates turkey erythrocyte ghost phospholipase C (PLC) in a dose-dependent manner when GTP or guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) is present. The effect is specific in that it is abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor antagonists. Stimulation of adenosine receptors, which also couple to adenylate cyclase via Gs in turkey erythrocytes, does not activate PLC, indicating that the stimulation observed in the presence of isoprenaline is not due to Gs activation. Furthermore, the stimulation seen is independent of cyclic AMP production. Purified turkey erythrocyte PLC is activated in an adenosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (ADP[S]; a P2y-purinergic-receptor agonist)- or isoprenaline-regulated manner when reconstituted with turkey erythrocyte ghosts, demonstrating that a single species of PLC effector enzyme can be regulated by both the purinergic and the beta-adrenergic receptor populations present in turkey erythrocyte membranes. Pretreatment of intact turkey erythrocytes with the P2y agonist ADP[S] causes decreased PLC responsiveness of subsequent ghost preparations to ADP[S] stimulation, although responses to isoprenaline are unaffected (homologous desensitization). In contrast, pretreatment of intact erythrocytes with isoprenaline results in heterologous desensitization of both the P2y and the beta-adrenergic receptors. These effects occur at the level of receptor-G-protein coupling, since PLC stimulation by GTP[S] (which directly activates G-proteins) in the absence of agonists is unaffected. PMID:1352448

  20. Fluorescent protein-mediated colour polymorphism in reef corals: multicopy genes extend the adaptation/acclimatization potential to variable light environments.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John R; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Oswald, Franz; Edwards, Richard J; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The genomic framework that enables corals to adjust to unfavourable conditions is crucial for coral reef survival in a rapidly changing climate. We have explored the striking intraspecific variability in the expression of coral pigments from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family to elucidate the genomic basis for the plasticity of stress responses among reef corals. We show that multicopy genes can greatly increase the dynamic range over which corals can modulate transcript levels in response to the light environment. Using the red fluorescent protein amilFP597 in the coral Acropora millepora as a model, we demonstrate that its expression increases with light intensity, but both the minimal and maximal gene transcript levels vary markedly among colour morphs. The pigment concentration in the tissue of different morphs is strongly correlated with the number of gene copies with a particular promoter type. These findings indicate that colour polymorphism in reef corals can be caused by the environmentally regulated expression of multicopy genes. High-level expression of amilFP597 is correlated with reduced photodamage of zooxanthellae under acute light stress, supporting a photoprotective function of this pigment. The cluster of light-regulated pigment genes can enable corals to invest either in expensive high-level pigmentation, offering benefits under light stress, or to rely on low tissue pigment concentrations and use the conserved resources for other purposes, which is preferable in less light-exposed environments. The genomic framework described here allows corals to pursue different strategies to succeed in habitats with highly variable light stress levels. In summary, our results suggest that the intraspecific plasticity of reef corals' stress responses is larger than previously thought. PMID:25496144

  1. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion through a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Haiqiao, Wu; Xie, Wenyao; Huaping, Huang; Zhong, Han; Xiangdong, Zhou; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2016-09-01

    Acute or chronic cold exposure exacerbates chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a cold-shock protein and is induced by various environmental stressors, such as hypothermia and hypoxia. In this study, we showed that CIRP gene and protein levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD and in rats with chronic airway inflammation compared with healthy subjects. Similarly, inflammatory cytokine production and MUC5AC secretion were up-regulated in rats following cigarette smoke inhalation. Cold temperature-induced CIRP overexpression and translocation were shown to be dependent on arginine methylation in vitro. CIRP overexpression promoted stress granule (SG) assembly. In the cytoplasm, the stability of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs was increased through specific interactions between CIRP and mediator mRNA 3'-UTRs; these interactions increased the mRNA translation, resulting in MUC5AC overproduction in response to cold stress. Conversely, CIRP silencing and a methyltransferase inhibitor (adenosine dialdehyde) promoted cytokine mRNA degradation and inhibited the inflammatory response and mucus hypersecretion. These findings indicate that cold temperature can induce an airway inflammatory response and excess mucus production via a CIRP-mediated increase in mRNA stability and protein translation. PMID:27477308

  2. Arabidopsis snc2-1D Activates Receptor-Like Protein-Mediated Immunity Transduced through WRKY70[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaxi; Yang, Yuanai; Fang, Bin; Gannon, Patrick; Ding, Pingtao; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-01-01

    Plant immune receptors belonging to the receptor-like protein (RLP) family contain extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a short cytoplasmic tail linked by a single transmembrane motif. Here, we report the identification of snc2-1D (for suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 2), a semidominant Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with constitutively activated defense responses. Map-based cloning of snc2-1D showed that it encodes an RLP. The point mutation in snc2-1D leads to substitution of the second Gly for Arg in the conserved GXXXG motif of the transmembrane helix, suggesting that this residue is important for negative regulation of the protein. Epistasis analysis revealed that the snc2-1D mutant phenotype is not affected by mutations in genes known to be required for the nucleotide binding (NB)-LRR Resistance (R) protein signaling. A suppressor screen of snc2-1D was performed, and map-based cloning of one suppressor revealed that mutations in WRKY70 suppress the constitutive defense responses in snc2-1D, suggesting that WRKY70 functions downstream of snc2-1D. The identification of snc2-1D provides us with a unique system for genetic analysis of resistance pathways downstream of RLPs, which may be distinct from those downstream of NB-LRR type R proteins. PMID:20841424

  3. Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcriptional activator FIT is required for plant iron-deficiency responses.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia; Grinvalds, Claudia; Barberon, Marie; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    Plants display a number of responses to low iron availability in order to increase iron uptake from the soil. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and the ferrous iron transporter IRT1 control iron entry from the soil into the root epidermis. To maintain iron homeostasis, the expression of FRO2 and IRT1 is tightly controlled by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT represents the most upstream actor known in the iron-deficiency signaling pathway, and directly regulates the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. However, how FIT is controlled by iron and acts to activate transcription of its targets remains obscure. Here we show that FIT mRNA and endogenous FIT protein accumulate in Arabidopsis roots upon iron deficiency. However, using plants constitutively expressing FIT, we observed that FIT protein accumulation is reduced in iron-limited conditions. This post-transcriptional regulation of FIT is perfectly synchronized with the accumulation of endogenous FIT and IRT1 proteins, and therefore is part of the early responses to low iron. We demonstrated that such regulation affects FIT protein stability under iron deficiency as a result of 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. In addition, we showed that FIT post-translational regulation by iron is required for FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. Taken together our results indicate that FIT transcriptional and post-translational regulations are integrated in plant roots to ensure that the positive regulator FIT accumulates as a short-lived protein following iron shortage, and to allow proper iron-deficiency responses.

  4. Gene expression profiling of the hyperplastic growth zones of the late trout embryo myotome using laser capture microdissection and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A unique feature of fish is that new muscle fibres continue to be produced throughout much of the life cycle; a process termed muscle hyperplasia. In trout, this process begins in the late embryo stage and occurs in both a discrete, continuous layer at the surface of the primary myotome (stratified hyperplasia) and between existing muscle fibres throughout the myotome (mosaic hyperplasia). In post-larval stages, muscle hyperplasia is only of the mosaic type and persists until 40% of the maximum body length is reached. To characterise the genetic basis of myotube neoformation in trout, we combined laser capture microdissection and microarray analysis to compare the transcriptome of hyperplastic regions of the late embryo myotome with that of adult myotomal muscle, which displays only limited hyperplasia. Results Gene expression was analysed using Agilent trout oligo microarrays. Our analysis identified more than 6800 transcripts that were significantly up-regulated in the superficial hyperplastic zones of the late embryonic myotome compared to adult myotomal muscle. In addition to Pax3, Pax7 and the fundamental myogenic basic helix-loop-helix regulators, we identified a large set of up-regulated transcriptional factors, including Myc paralogs, members of Hes family and many homeobox-containing transcriptional regulators. Other cell-autonomous regulators overexpressed in hyperplastic zones included a large set of cell surface proteins belonging to the Ig superfamily. Among the secreted molecules found to be overexpressed in hyperplastic areas, we noted growth factors as well as signalling molecules. A novel finding in our study is that many genes that regulate planar cell polarity (PCP) were overexpressed in superficial hyperplastic zones, suggesting that the PCP pathway is involved in the oriented elongation of the neofibres. Conclusion The results obtained in this study provide a valuable resource for further analysis of novel genes potentially involved

  5. Rearrangements in the Relative Orientation of Cytoplasmic Domains Induced by a Membrane-anchored Protein Mediate Modulations in Kv Channel Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Lvov, Anatoli; Greitzer, Dafna; Berlin, Shai; Chikvashvili, Dodo; Tsuk, Sharon; Lotan, Ilana; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2009-01-01

    Interdomain interactions between intracellular N and C termini have been described for various K+ channels, including the voltage-gated Kv2.1, and suggested to affect channel gating. However, no channel regulatory protein directly affecting N/C interactions has been demonstrated. Most Kv2.1 channel interactions with regulatory factors occur at its C terminus. The vesicular SNARE that is also present at a high concentration in the neuronal plasma membrane, VAMP2, is the only protein documented to affect Kv2.1 gating by binding to its N terminus. As its binding target has been mapped near a site implicated in Kv2.1 N/C interactions, we hypothesized that VAMP2 binding to the N terminus requires concomitant conformational changes in the C terminus, which wraps around the N terminus from the outside, to give VAMP2 access. Here, we first determined that the Kv2.1 N terminus, although crucial, is not sufficient to convey functional interaction with VAMP2, and that, concomitant to its binding to the “docking loop” at the Kv2.1 N terminus, VAMP2 binds to the proximal part of the Kv2.1 C terminus, C1a. Next, using computational biology approaches (ab initio modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations) supported by molecular biology, biochemical, electrophysiological, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses, we mapped the interaction sites on both VAMP2 and Kv2.1 and found that this interaction is accompanied by rearrangements in the relative orientation of Kv2.1 cytoplasmic domains. We propose that VAMP2 modulates Kv2.1 inactivation by interfering with the interaction between the docking loop and C1a, a mechanism for gating regulation that may pertain also to other Kv channels. PMID:19690160

  6. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Weber, Eva; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:26556796

  7. Arabidopsis bHLH100 and bHLH101 control iron homeostasis via a FIT-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia B; Hermand, Victor; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency induces a complex set of responses in plants, including developmental and physiological changes, to increase iron uptake from soil. In Arabidopsis, many transporters involved in the absorption and distribution of iron have been identified over the past decade. However, little is known about the signaling pathways and networks driving the various responses to low iron. Only the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT has been shown to control the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. Here, we characterize the biological role of two other iron-regulated transcription factors, bHLH100 and bHLH101, in iron homeostasis. First direct transcriptional targets of FIT were determined in vivo. We show that bHLH100 and bHLH101 do not regulate FIT target genes, suggesting that they play a non-redundant role with the two closely related bHLH factors bHLH038 and bHLH039 that have been suggested to act in concert with FIT. bHLH100 and bHLH101 play a crucial role in iron-deficiency responses, as attested by their severe growth defects and iron homeostasis related phenotypes on low-iron media. To gain further insight into the biological role of bHLH100 and bHLH101, we performed microarray analysis using the corresponding double mutant and showed that bHLH100 and bHLH101 likely regulate genes involved in the distribution of iron within the plant. Altogether, this work establishes bHLH100 and bHLH101 as key regulators of iron-deficiency responses independent of the master regulator FIT and sheds light on new regulatory networks important for proper growth and development under low iron conditions.

  8. A scarlet pimpernel for the resolution of inflammation? The role of supra-therapeutic doses of cobalamin, in the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic or traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin carrier proteins,the Transcobalamins (TCS), are elevated during trauma, infections and chronic inflammatory conditions. This remains un-explained. It is proposed that such TC elevations signal a need for cobalamin central to the resolution of inflammation. Thus Cobalamin may regulate the transcription factor, NFkappaB, activation or suppression of which determines the inflammatory response and its resolution. Such regulation may involve at least 5 separate mechanisms: (i) hormone-like regulation of TNFalpha, through reduction of excess NO by cobalamin, as well as through the selective inhibition, in tandem with glutathione, of inducible nitric oxide synthase; (ii) quenching of nitric oxide radicals and reactive oxygen species, enhanced by cobalamin's glutathione sparing effect; (iii) the promotion of acetylcholine synthesis, central to the neuro-immune cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway; (iv) the promotion of oxidative phosphorylation; (v) and a bacteriostatic role of the TCS released by neutrophil secondary granules during phagocytosis, which also appears to modulate the inflammatory response. TC elevations are dependent on NFkappaB activation, through crosstalk between NFkappaB and Sp1, another member of the helix-loop-helix protein family, which directly mediates transcription of the TCII gene. Sp1 also has binding sites on the TNFalpha and EGF gene promoters. NFkappaB may thus ensure sufficient cobalamin to determine its own eventual suppression. Cobalamin's established regulation of EGF may additionally preserve normal function of macrophages and the coagulation cascade in wound healing. By regulating NFkappaB, Cobalamin may also be the as yet unidentified mediator needed to potentiate the anti-inflammatory action of eicosanoids derived from omega-3 essential fatty acids. Moreover, animal and human clinical data suggests that high dose cobalamin may prove a promising approach to SIRS/sepsis/septic and traumatic shock. PMID:16545917

  9. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Weber, Eva; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions.

  10. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:26556796

  11. Two IIIf Clade-bHLHs from Freesia hybrida Play Divergent Roles in Flavonoid Biosynthesis and Trichome Formation when Ectopically Expressed in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueqing; Shan, Xiaotong; Gao, Ruifang; Yang, Song; Wang, Shucai; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The MBW complex, comprised by R2R3-MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and WD40, is a single regulatory protein complex that drives the evolution of multiple traits such as flavonoid biosynthesis and epidermal cell differentiation in plants. In this study, two IIIf Clade-bHLH regulator genes, FhGL3L and FhTT8L, were isolated and functionally characterized from Freesia hybrida. Different spatio-temporal transcription patterns were observed showing diverse correlation with anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin accumulation. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, FhGL3L could enhance the anthocyanin accumulation through up-regulating endogenous regulators and late structural genes. Unexpectedly, trichome formation was inhibited associating with the down-regulation of AtGL2. Comparably, only the accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins was strengthened in FhTT8L transgenic lines. Furthermore, transient expression assays demonstrated that FhGL3L interacted with AtPAP1, AtTT2 and AtGL1, while FhTT8L only showed interaction with AtPAP1 and AtTT2. In addition, similar activation of the AtDFR promoter was found between AtPAP1-FhGL3L/FhTT8L and AtPAP1- AtGL3/AtTT8 combinations. When FhGL3L was fused with a strong activation domain VP16, it could activate the AtGL2 promoter when co-transfected with AtGL1. Therefore, it can be concluded that the functionality of bHLH factors may have diverged, and a sophisticated interaction and hierarchical network might exist in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis and trichome formation. PMID:27465838

  12. Two IIIf Clade-bHLHs from Freesia hybrida Play Divergent Roles in Flavonoid Biosynthesis and Trichome Formation when Ectopically Expressed in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueqing; Shan, Xiaotong; Gao, Ruifang; Yang, Song; Wang, Shucai; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The MBW complex, comprised by R2R3-MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and WD40, is a single regulatory protein complex that drives the evolution of multiple traits such as flavonoid biosynthesis and epidermal cell differentiation in plants. In this study, two IIIf Clade-bHLH regulator genes, FhGL3L and FhTT8L, were isolated and functionally characterized from Freesia hybrida. Different spatio-temporal transcription patterns were observed showing diverse correlation with anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin accumulation. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, FhGL3L could enhance the anthocyanin accumulation through up-regulating endogenous regulators and late structural genes. Unexpectedly, trichome formation was inhibited associating with the down-regulation of AtGL2. Comparably, only the accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins was strengthened in FhTT8L transgenic lines. Furthermore, transient expression assays demonstrated that FhGL3L interacted with AtPAP1, AtTT2 and AtGL1, while FhTT8L only showed interaction with AtPAP1 and AtTT2. In addition, similar activation of the AtDFR promoter was found between AtPAP1-FhGL3L/FhTT8L and AtPAP1- AtGL3/AtTT8 combinations. When FhGL3L was fused with a strong activation domain VP16, it could activate the AtGL2 promoter when co-transfected with AtGL1. Therefore, it can be concluded that the functionality of bHLH factors may have diverged, and a sophisticated interaction and hierarchical network might exist in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis and trichome formation. PMID:27465838

  13. Circadian clock- and PIF4-controlled plant growth: a coincidence mechanism directly integrates a hormone signaling network into the photoperiodic control of plant architectures in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Yuji; Nomoto, Yuichi; Kubozono, Saori; Yamashino, Takafumi; Nakamichi, Norihito; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    The plant circadian clock generates rhythms with a period close to 24 h, and it controls a wide variety of physiological and developmental events, enabling plants to adapt to ever-changing environmental light conditions. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the clock regulates the diurnal and photoperiodic plant growth including the elongation of hypocotyls and petioles in a time-of-day-specific and short-day (SD)-specific manner. In this mechanism, the clock-regulated PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 gene encoding a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, together with phytochromes (mainly phyB), plays crucial roles. This diurnal and photoperiodic control of plant growth is best explained by the accumulation of the PIF4 protein at the end of the night-time specifically under SDs, due to coincidence between the internal (circadian rhythm) and external (photoperiod) cues. In this model, however, the PIF4-controlled downstream factors are not fully identified, although it has been generally proposed that the auxin-mediated signal transduction is crucially implicated. Here, we identified a set of hormone-associated genes as the specific PIF4 targets implicated in the photoperiodic control of plant growth. They include not only auxin-associated genes (GH3.5, IAA19 and IAA29), but also genes associated with other growth-regulating hormones such as brassinosteroids (BR6ox2), gibberellic acids (GAI), ethylene (ACS8) and cytokinin (CKX5). The dawn- and SD-specific expression profiles of these genes are modified in a set of phyB and clock mutants, both of which compromise the coincidence mechanism. The results of this study suggest that the circadian clock orchestrates a variety of hormone signaling pathways to regulate the photoperiod-dependent morphogenesis in A. thaliana.

  14. The bHLH Transcription Factor bHLH104 Interacts with IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 and Modulates Iron Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Li, Mengshu; Feng, Dongru; Jin, Honglei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an indispensable micronutrient for plant growth and development. The regulation of Fe homeostasis in plants is complex and involves a number of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, bHLH104, belonging to the IVc subgroup of bHLH family, acts as a key component positively regulating Fe deficiency responses. Knockout of bHLH104 in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly reduced tolerance to Fe deficiency, whereas overexpression of bHLH104 had the opposite effect and led to accumulation of excess Fe in soil-grown conditions. The activation of Fe deficiency-inducible genes was substantially suppressed by loss of bHLH104. Further investigation showed that bHLH104 interacted with another IVc subgroup bHLH protein, IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 (ILR3), which also plays an important role in Fe homeostasis. Moreover, bHLH104 and ILR3 could bind directly to the promoters of Ib subgroup bHLH genes and POPEYE (PYE) functioning in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses. Interestingly, genetic analysis showed that loss of bHLH104 could decrease the tolerance to Fe deficiency conferred by the lesion of BRUTUS, which encodes an E3 ligase and interacts with bHLH104. Collectively, our data support that bHLH104 and ILR3 play pivotal roles in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses via targeting Ib subgroup bHLH genes and PYE expression. PMID:25794933

  15. The study of a SPATULA-like bHLH transcription factor expressed during peach (Prunus persica) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Tani, Eleni; Tsaballa, Aphrodite; Stedel, Catalina; Kalloniati, Chrissanthi; Papaefthimiou, Dimitra; Polidoros, Alexios; Darzentas, Nikos; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2011-06-01

    Extensive studies on the dry fruits of the model plant arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have revealed various gene regulators of the development and dehiscence of the siliques. Peach pericarp is analogous to the valve tissues of the arabidopsis siliques. The stone (otherwise called pit) in drupes is formed through lignification of the fruit endocarp. The lignified endocarp in peach can be susceptible to split-pit formation under certain genetic as well as environmental factors. This phenomenon delays processing of the clingstone varieties of peach and causes economical losses for the peach fruit canning industry. The fruitfull (FUL) and shatterproof (SHP) genes are key MADS-box transcription protein coding factors that control fruit development and dehiscence in arabidopsis by promoting the expression of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors like Spatula (SPT) and Alcatraz (ALC). Results from our previous studies on peach suggested that temporal regulation of PPERFUL and PPERSHP gene expression may be involved in the regulation of endocarp margin development. In the present study a PPERSPATULA-like (PPERSPT) gene was cloned and characterized. Comparative analysis of temporal regulation of PPERSPT gene expression during pit hardening in a resistant and a susceptible to split-pit variety, suggests that this gene adds one more component to the genes network that controls endocarp margins development in peach. Taking into consideration that no ALC-like genes have been identified in any dicot plant species outside the Brassicaceae family, where arabidopsis belongs, PPERSPT may have additional role(s) in peach that are fulfilled in arabidopsis by ALC. PMID:21324706

  16. Id-1 expression induces androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R).

    PubMed

    Ling, Ming-Tat; Wang, Xianghong; Lee, Davy T; Tam, P C; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Wong, Yong-Chuan

    2004-04-01

    The failure of prostate cancer treatment is largely due to the development of androgen independence, since the androgen depletion therapy remains the front-line option for this cancer. Previously, we reported that over-expression of the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1 was associated with progression of prostate cancer and ectopic expression of Id-1 induced serum-independent proliferation in prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated if exogenous Id-1 expression in the androgen sensitive LNCaP cells had any effect on androgen-dependent cell growth and studied the molecular mechanisms involved. Using stable Id-1 transfectants, we found that expression of Id-1 was able to reduce androgen-stimulated growth and S phase fraction of the cell cycle in LNCaP cells, indicating that Id-1 may be involved in the development of androgen independence in these cells. The Id-1-induced androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth was correlated with up-regulation of EGF-R (epidermal growth factor-receptor) and PSA (prostate specific antigen) expression, as confirmed by western blotting analysis and luciferase assays. In contrast, down-regulation of Id-1 in androgen-independent DU145 cells by its antisense oligonucleotides resulted in suppression of EGF-R expression at both transcriptional and protein levels. In addition, the results from immunohistochemistry study showed that Id-1 expression was significantly elevated in hormone refractory prostate cancer tissues when compared with the hormone-dependent tumours. Our results suggest that up-regulation of Id-1 in prostate cancer cells may be one of the mechanisms responsible for developing androgen independence and this process may be regulated through induction of EGF-R expression. Inactivation of Id-1 may provide a potential therapeutic strategy leading to inhibition of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

  17. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway Is Controlled at Different Branches by a Set of R2R3-MYB C2 Repressors in Grapevine1

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  18. The phenylpropanoid pathway is controlled at different branches by a set of R2R3-MYB C2 repressors in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista

    2015-04-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  19. Twist induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell motility in breast cancer via ITGB1-FAK/ILK signaling axis and its associated downstream network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiajia; Hou, Yixuan; Zhou, Mingli; Wen, Siyang; Zhou, Jian; Xu, Liyun; Tang, Xi; Du, Yan-e; Hu, Ping; Liu, Manran

    2016-02-01

    Twist, a highly conserved basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factor, functions as a major regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor metastasis. In different cell models, signaling pathways such as TGF-β, MAPK/ERK, WNT, AKT, JAK/STAT, Notch, and P53 have also been shown to play key roles in the EMT process, yet little is known about the signaling pathways regulated by Twist in tumor cells. Using iTRAQ-labeling combined with 2D LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 194 proteins with significant changes of expression in MCF10A-Twist cells. These proteins reportedly play roles in EMT, cell junction organization, cell adhesion, and cell migration and invasion. ECM-receptor interaction, MAPK, PI3K/AKT, P53 and WNT signaling were found to be aberrantly activated in MCF10A-Twist cells. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis showed that integrin β1 (ITGB1) acts as a core regulator in linking integrin-linked kinase (ILK), Focal-adhesion kinase (FAK), MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and WNT signaling. Increased Twist and ITGB1 are associated with breast tumor progression. Twist transcriptionally regulates ITGB1 expression. Over-expression of ITGB1 or Twist in MCF10A led to EMT, activation of FAK/ILK, MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and WNT signaling. Knockdown of Twist or ITGB1 in BT549 and Hs578T cells decreased activity of FAK, ILK, and their downstream signaling, thus specifically impeding EMT and cell invasion. Knocking down ILK or inhibiting FAK, MAPK/ERK, or PI3K/AKT signaling also suppressed Twist-driven EMT and cell invasion. Thus, the Twist-ITGB1-FAK/ILK pathway and their downstream signaling network dictate the Twist-induced EMT process in human mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. PMID:26693891

  20. The study of a SPATULA-like bHLH transcription factor expressed during peach (Prunus persica) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Tani, Eleni; Tsaballa, Aphrodite; Stedel, Catalina; Kalloniati, Chrissanthi; Papaefthimiou, Dimitra; Polidoros, Alexios; Darzentas, Nikos; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2011-06-01

    Extensive studies on the dry fruits of the model plant arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have revealed various gene regulators of the development and dehiscence of the siliques. Peach pericarp is analogous to the valve tissues of the arabidopsis siliques. The stone (otherwise called pit) in drupes is formed through lignification of the fruit endocarp. The lignified endocarp in peach can be susceptible to split-pit formation under certain genetic as well as environmental factors. This phenomenon delays processing of the clingstone varieties of peach and causes economical losses for the peach fruit canning industry. The fruitfull (FUL) and shatterproof (SHP) genes are key MADS-box transcription protein coding factors that control fruit development and dehiscence in arabidopsis by promoting the expression of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors like Spatula (SPT) and Alcatraz (ALC). Results from our previous studies on peach suggested that temporal regulation of PPERFUL and PPERSHP gene expression may be involved in the regulation of endocarp margin development. In the present study a PPERSPATULA-like (PPERSPT) gene was cloned and characterized. Comparative analysis of temporal regulation of PPERSPT gene expression during pit hardening in a resistant and a susceptible to split-pit variety, suggests that this gene adds one more component to the genes network that controls endocarp margins development in peach. Taking into consideration that no ALC-like genes have been identified in any dicot plant species outside the Brassicaceae family, where arabidopsis belongs, PPERSPT may have additional role(s) in peach that are fulfilled in arabidopsis by ALC.

  1. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T.; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4′OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4′OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  2. Expression of steroidogenic factor 1 in the testis requires an E box and CCAAT box in its promoter proximal region.

    PubMed

    Daggett, M A; Rice, D A; Heckert, L L

    2000-03-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), also known as adrenal 4-binding protein, is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family that regulates transcription of genes encoding hormones and steroidogenic enzymes important to the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The mammalian Ftz-F1 gene encodes SF-1 and is required for development of adrenal glands and gonads. To better understand the mechanisms regulating this gene in the gonads, we have examined its expression in the testis and characterized the promoter region for SF-1 in two testicular cell types. SF-1 promoter activity was examined in primary cultures of Sertoli cells and cell lines representative of Sertoli and Leydig cells. Deletion mutagenesis of the promoter identified several regions: both 5' and 3' to the transcriptional start sites that are important for transcriptional activity. Two elements, an E box and a CCAAT box, were found to be important for SF-1 transcription in the testis. An oligodeoxynucleotide containing both of these elements bound three specific protein complexes. The binding of one complex required only sequences within the E box and cross-reacted with antibodies against the basic helix-loop-helix ZIP proteins USF1 and USF2. A second specific complex required sequences within both the E box and CCAAT box for efficient binding, while a third complex predominantly interacted with sequences within the CCAAT motif. The presence of multiple protein complexes binding these sites suggests that regulation through these elements may involve interactions with different factors that depend on the state of the cell and its environment.

  3. Cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) by CPP32 during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zelenski, N G; Yang, J; Sakai, J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by sterol-regulated proteolysis of membrane-bound transcription factors called sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). CPP32, a cysteine protease, was shown previously to cleave SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 in vitro at an aspartic acid between the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and the first trans-membrane domain, liberating a transcriptionally active fragment. Here, we show that CPP32 exists in an inactive 32 kDa form in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When apoptosis was induced with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, CPP32 was cleaved to subunits of 20 and 10 kDa to form the active protease. Under these conditions membrane-bound SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 were both cleaved, and the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragments were found in nuclear extracts. Similar results were obtained in human U937 cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-Fas and etoposide. The apoptosis-induced cleavage of SREBPs was not suppressed by sterols, indicating that apoptosis-induced cleavage and sterol-regulated cleavage are mediated by different proteases. CHO cells expressing a mutant SREBP-2 with an Asp--> Ala mutation at the CPP32 cleavage site showed sterol-regulated cleavage but no apoptosis-induced cleavage. These data are consistent with the emerging concept that CPP32 is a central mediator in apoptosis. They also indicate that SREBPs, like poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, are cleaved by CPP32 during programmed cell death. Images PMID:8605870

  4. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4'OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4'OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  5. Expression of Steroidogenic Factor 1 in the Testis Requires an E Box and CCAAT Box in its Promoter Proximal Region1

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, Melissa A.F.; Rice, Daren A.; Heckert, Leslie L.

    2006-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), also known as adrenal 4-binding protein, is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family that regulates transcription of genes encoding hormones and steroidogenic enzymes important to the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The mammalian Ftz-F1 gene encodes SF-1 and is required for development of adrenal glands and gonads. To better understand the mechanisms regulating this gene in the gonads, we have examined its expression in the testis and characterized the promoter region for SF-1 in two testicular cell types. SF-1 promoter activity was examined in primary cultures of Sertoli cells and cell lines representative of Sertoli and Leydig cells. Deletion mutagenesis of the promoter identified several regions: both 5′ and 3′ to the transcriptional start sites that are important for transcriptional activity. Two elements, an E box and a CCAAT box, were found to be important for SF-1 transcription in the testis. An oligodeoxynucleotide containing both of these elements bound three specific protein complexes. The binding of one complex required only sequences within the E box and cross-reacted with antibodies against the basic helix-loop-helix ZIP proteins USF1 and USF2. A second specific complex required sequences within both the E box and CCAAT box for efficient binding, while a third complex predominantly interacted with sequences within the CCAAT motif. The presence of multiple protein complexes binding these sites suggests that regulation through these elements may involve interactions with different factors that depend on the state of the cell and its environment. PMID:10684809

  6. Identification and Comparative Analysis of Differential Gene Expression in Soybean Leaf Tissue under Drought and Flooding Stress Revealed by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yao, Qiuming; Patil, Gunvant B; Agarwal, Gaurav; Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Lin, Li; Wang, Biao; Wang, Yongqin; Prince, Silvas J; Song, Li; Xu, Dong; An, Yongqiang C; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K; Nguyen, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    Drought and flooding are two major causes of severe yield loss in soybean worldwide. A lack of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in drought and flood stress has been a limiting factor for the effective management of soybeans; therefore, it is imperative to assess the expression of genes involved in response to flood and drought stress. In this study, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under drought and flooding conditions were investigated using Illumina RNA-Seq transcriptome profiling. A total of 2724 and 3498 DEGs were identified under drought and flooding treatments, respectively. These genes comprise 289 Transcription Factors (TFs) representing Basic Helix-loop Helix (bHLH), Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), myeloblastosis (MYB), No apical meristem (NAC), and WRKY amino acid motif (WRKY) type major families known to be involved in the mechanism of stress tolerance. The expression of photosynthesis and chlorophyll synthesis related genes were significantly reduced under both types of stresses, which limit the metabolic processes and thus help prolong survival under extreme conditions. However, cell wall synthesis related genes were up-regulated under drought stress and down-regulated under flooding stress. Transcript profiles involved in the starch and sugar metabolism pathways were also affected under both stress conditions. The changes in expression of genes involved in regulating the flux of cell wall precursors and starch/sugar content can serve as an adaptive mechanism for soybean survival under stress conditions. This study has revealed the involvement of TFs, transporters, and photosynthetic genes, and has also given a glimpse of hormonal cross talk under the extreme water regimes, which will aid as an important resource for soybean crop improvement. PMID:27486466

  7. Molecular characterization of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) from Taiwan voles (Microtus kikuchii).