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Sample records for helper-dependent adenoviruses mediate

  1. Sustained Phenotypic Correction in a Mouse Model of Hypoalphalipoproteinemia with a Helper-Dependent Adenovirus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Belalcazar, L. Maria; Dieker, Carrie; Nour, Elie A.; Nuno-Gonzalez, Patricia; Paul, Antoni; Cormier, Shelley; Shin, Jae-Kyung; Finegold, Milton; Chan, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    We examined the efficacy and host response to the adenovirus (Ad)-mediated delivery of human apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) gene to the liver of APOA1−/− mice. Administration of a first generation vector (FGAd-AI) resulted in a transient appearance of APOA1 in plasma and induced an anti-APOA1 antibody titer while treatment with a helper-dependent vector (HDAd-AI) resulted in sustained APOA1 expression without inducing an antibody titer. With these results, we studied the effects of FGAd vectors on APOAI expression by HDAd-AI vector. Co-treatment with a FGAd vector inhibited HDAd-AI-mediated APOA1 expression independent of transgene cassettes, but only FGAd-AI induced a humoral response. Furthermore, APOA1 mRNA levels in mice co-treated with FGAd vectors were much lower than those expected from the vector copy number, suggesting that DNA of FGAd vectors interferes with the HDAd-AI vector's APOA1 promoter. A single treatment with an HDAd-AI vector produced a supraphysiological plasma APOA1 level that gradually declined to about half the normal human level over the course of 2 years, associated with a plasma cholesterol level that is persistently higher than that in controls. This investigation provides the proof of principle that liver-directed HDAd gene delivery is effective for the long-term phenotypic correction of monogenic hypoalphalipoproteinemia. PMID:16957769

  2. Comparison of Systemic and Mucosal Immunization with Helper-Dependent Adenoviruses for Vaccination against Mucosal Challenge with SHIV

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination. PMID:23844034

  3. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, Sean D; Berk, Arnold J

    2013-09-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called "infectious genome titration" in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity.

  4. Evaluation of helper-dependent canine adenovirus vectors in a 3D human CNS model.

    PubMed

    Simão, D; Pinto, C; Fernandes, P; Peddie, C J; Piersanti, S; Collinson, L M; Salinas, S; Saggio, I; Schiavo, G; Kremer, E J; Brito, C; Alves, P M

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach with enormous potential for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Viral vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) present attractive features for gene delivery strategies in the human brain, by preferentially transducing neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent brain structures, have a 30-kb cloning capacity and have low innate and induced immunogenicity in preclinical tests. For clinical translation, in-depth preclinical evaluation of efficacy and safety in a human setting is primordial. Stem cell-derived human neural cells have a great potential as complementary tools by bridging the gap between animal models, which often diverge considerably from human phenotype, and clinical trials. Herein, we explore helper-dependent CAV-2 (hd-CAV-2) efficacy and safety for gene delivery in a human stem cell-derived 3D neural in vitro model. Assessment of hd-CAV-2 vector efficacy was performed at different multiplicities of infection, by evaluating transgene expression and impact on cell viability, ultrastructural cellular organization and neuronal gene expression. Under optimized conditions, hd-CAV-2 transduction led to stable long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity. hd-CAV-2 preferentially transduced neurons, whereas human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) showed increased tropism toward glial cells. This work demonstrates, in a physiologically relevant 3D model, that hd-CAV-2 vectors are efficient tools for gene delivery to human neurons, with stable long-term transgene expression and minimal cytotoxicity.

  5. Impact of adenovirus life cycle progression on the generation of canine helper-dependent vectors.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Simão, D; Guerreiro, M R; Kremer, E J; Coroadinha, A S; Alves, P M

    2015-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenovirus vectors (HDVs) are safe and efficient tools for gene transfer with high cloning capacity. However, the multiple amplification steps needed to produce HDVs hamper a robust production process and in turn the availability of high-quality vectors. To understand the factors behind the low productivity, we analyzed the progression of HDV life cycle. Canine adenovirus (Ad) type 2 vectors, holding attractive features to overcome immunogenic concerns and treat neurobiological disorders, were the focus of this work. When compared with E1-deleted (ΔE1) vectors, we found a faster helper genome replication during HDV production. This was consistent with an upregulation of the Ad polymerase and pre-terminal protein and led to higher and earlier expression of structural proteins. Although genome packaging occurred similarly to ΔE1 vectors, more immature capsids were obtained during HDV production, which led to a ~4-fold increase in physical-to-infectious particles ratio. The higher viral protein content in HDV-producing cells was also consistent with an increased activation of autophagy and cell death, in which earlier cell death compromised volumetric productivity. The increased empty capsids and earlier cell death found in HDV production may partially contribute to the lower vector infectivity. However, an HDV-specific factor responsible for a defective maturation process should be also involved to fully explain the low infectious titers. This study showed how a deregulated Ad cycle progression affected cell line homeostasis and HDV propagation, highlighting the impact of vector genome design on virus-cell interaction.

  6. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Racel G.; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential “cure.” Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained. PMID:21245323

  7. Canine Adenovirus Vectors for Lung-Directed Gene Transfer: Efficacy, Immune Response, and Duration of Transgene Expression Using Helper-Dependent Vectors†

    PubMed Central

    Keriel, Anne; René, Céline; Galer, Chad; Zabner, Joseph; Kremer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    A major hurdle to the successful clinical use of some viral vectors relates to the innate, adaptive, and memory immune responses that limit the efficiency and duration of transgene expression. Some of these drawbacks may be circumvented by using vectors derived from nonhuman viruses such as canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2). Here, we evaluated the potential of CAV-2 vectors for gene transfer to the respiratory tract. We found that CAV-2 transduction was efficient in vivo in the mouse respiratory tract, and ex vivo in well-differentiated human pulmonary epithelia. Notably, the in vivo and ex vivo efficiency was poorly inhibited by sera from mice immunized with a human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5, a ubiquitous human pathogen) vector or by human sera containing HAd5 neutralizing antibodies. Following intranasal instillation in mice, CAV-2 vectors also led to a lower level of inflammatory cytokine secretion and cellular infiltration compared to HAd5 vectors. Moreover, CAV-2 transduction efficiency was increased in vitro in human pulmonary cells and in vivo in the mouse respiratory tract by FK228, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Finally, by using a helper-dependent CAV-2 vector, we increased the in vivo duration of transgene expression to at least 3 months in immunocompetent mice without immunosuppression. Our data suggest that CAV-2 vectors may be efficient and safe tools for long-term clinical gene transfer to the respiratory tract. PMID:16415025

  8. Overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in arteries infused with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Zhang, Jingwan; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David

    2012-11-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ad) are useful tools for in vivo gene transfer into endothelial cells. However, endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired after Ad infusion, and this impairment is not prevented by use of advanced-generation "helper-dependent" (HD) Ad that lack all viral genes. We hypothesized that endothelium-dependent vasodilation could be improved in Ad-infused arteries by overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We tested this hypothesis in hyperlipidemic, atherosclerosis-prone rabbits because HDAd will likely be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. Moreover, the consequences of eNOS overexpression might differ in normal and atherosclerosis-prone arteries and could include atherogenic effects, as reported in transgenic mice. We cloned rabbit eNOS and constructed an HDAd that expresses it. HDAdeNOS increased NO production by cultured endothelial cells and increased arterial eNOS mRNA in vivo by ∼10-fold. Compared to arteries infused with a control HDAd, HDAdeNOS-infused arteries of hyperlipidemic rabbits had significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and similar responses to phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Moreover, infusion of HDAdeNOS had local atheroprotective effects including large, significant decreases in intimal lipid accumulation and arterial tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression (p≤0.04 for both). HDAdeNOS infusion yields a durable (≥2 weeks) increase in arterial eNOS expression, improves vasomotor function, and reduces artery wall inflammation and lipid accumulation. Addition of an eNOS expression cassette improves the performance of HDAd, has no harmful effects, and may reduce atherosclerotic lesion growth.

  9. MyD88-Dependent Silencing of Transgene Expression During the Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Bertin, Terry K.; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Christian; Guenther, Margaretha; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Activation of the host innate immune response after systemic administration of adenoviral vectors constitutes a principal impediment to successful clinical gene replacement therapies. Although helper-dependent adenoviruses (HDAds) lack all viral functional genes, systemic administration of a high dose of HDAd still elicits a potent innate immune response in host animals. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate receptors that sense microbial products and trigger the maturation of antigen-presenting cells and cytokine production via MyD88-dependent signaling (except TLR3). Here we show that mice lacking MyD88 exhibit a dramatic reduction in proinflammatory cytokines after intravenous injection of a high dose of HDAd, and show significantly reduced induction of the adaptive immune response when compared with wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice. Importantly, MyD88–/– mice also show significantly higher and longer sustained transgene expression than do wild-type mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using wild-type and MyD88-deficient primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed significant MyD88-dependent transcriptional silencing of the HDAd-encoded transgenes. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 signaling, activated by systemic delivery of HDAd, initiates an innate immune response that suppresses transgene expression at the transcriptional level before initiation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:19824822

  10. Neo-islet formation in liver of diabetic mice by helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongying; Oka, Kazuhiro; Yechoor, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Until now insulin replacement is still the major therapy, because islet transplantation has been limited by donor availability and by the need for long-term immunosuppression. Induced islet neogenesis by gene transfer of Neuogenin3 (Ngn3), the islet lineage-defining specific transcription factor and Betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are highly efficient gene transfer vector; however, early generation Ads have several disadvantages for in vivo use. Helper-dependent Ads (HDAds) are the most advanced Ads that were developed to improve the safety profile of early generation of Ads and to prolong transgene expression(1). They lack chronic toxicity because they lack viral coding sequences(2-5) and retain only Ad cis elements necessary for vector replication and packaging. This allows cloning of up to 36 kb genes. In this protocol, we describe the method to generate HDAd-Ngn3 and HDAd-Btc and to deliver these vectors into STZ-induced diabetic mice. Our results show that co-injection of HDAd-Ngn3 and HDAd-Btc induces 'neo islets' in the liver and reverses hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. PMID:23093064

  11. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Amanda; Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are devoid of all viral coding sequences, possess a large cloning capacity, and can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle to mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. These non-integrating vectors hold tremendous potential for a variety of gene transfer and gene therapy applications. Here, we review the production technologies, applications, obstacles to clinical translation and their potential resolutions, and the future challenges and unanswered questions regarding this promising gene transfer technology. PMID:24533227

  12. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  13. NOD2 Signaling Contributes to the Innate Immune Response Against Helper-Dependent Adenovirus Vectors Independently of MyD88 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cela, Racel; Bertin, Terry K.; Sule, Gautam; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Rodgers, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We previously demonstrated that Toll-like receptor/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) signaling is required for maximal innate and acquired [T helper cell type 1 (Th1)] immune responses following systemic administration of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds). However, MyD88-deficient mice injected with HDAdLacZ exhibited only partial reduction of innate immune cytokine expression compared with wild-type mice, suggesting MyD88-independent pathways also respond to HDAds. We now show that NOD2, a nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)–like receptor known to detect muramyl dipeptides in bacterial peptidoglycans, also contributes to innate responses to HDAds, but not to humoral or Th1 immune responses. We established NOD2/MyD88 double-deficient mice that, when challenged with HDAds, showed a significant reduction of the innate response compared with mice deficient for either gene singly, suggesting that NOD2 signaling contributes to the innate response independently of MyD88 signaling following systemic administration of HDAds. In addition, NOD2-deficient mice exhibited significantly higher transgene expression than did wild-type mice at an early time point (before development of an acquired response), but not at a later time point (after development of an acquired response). These results indicate that the intracellular sensor NOD2 is required for innate responses to HDAds and can limit transgene expression during early phases of infection. PMID:21561248

  14. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd) vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application. PMID:21994713

  15. Adenovirus serotype 5 hexon mediates liver gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Simon N; McVey, John H; Bhella, David; Parker, Alan L; Barker, Kristeen; Atoda, Hideko; Pink, Rebecca; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Greig, Jenny A; Denby, Laura; Custers, Jerome; Morita, Takashi; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Monteiro, Robson Q; Barouch, Dan H; van Rooijen, Nico; Napoli, Claudio; Havenga, Menzo J E; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2008-02-01

    Adenoviruses are used extensively as gene transfer agents, both experimentally and clinically. However, targeting of liver cells by adenoviruses compromises their potential efficacy. In cell culture, the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber protein engages the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) to bind cells. Paradoxically, following intravascular delivery, CAR is not used for liver transduction, implicating alternate pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that coagulation factor (F)X directly binds adenovirus leading to liver infection. Here, we show that FX binds to the Ad5 hexon, not fiber, via an interaction between the FX Gla domain and hypervariable regions of the hexon surface. Binding occurs in multiple human adenovirus serotypes. Liver infection by the FX-Ad5 complex is mediated through a heparin-binding exosite in the FX serine protease domain. This study reveals an unanticipated function for hexon in mediating liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:18267072

  16. Generation of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Pastore, Lucio; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Finegold, Milton; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2002-02-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD-Ad) represent a potentially valuable tool for safe and prolonged gene expression in vivo. The current approach for generating these vectors is based on ligation of the expression cassette into large plasmids containing the viral inverted terminal repeats flanking "stuffer" DNA to maintain a final size above the lower limit for efficient packaging into the adenovirus capsid (approximately 28 kb). The ligation to produce the viral plasmid is generally very inefficient. Similar problems in producing first-generation adenoviral (FG-Ad) vectors were circumvented with the development of a system taking advantage of efficient homologous recombination between a shuttle plasmid containing the expression cassette and a FG-Ad vector backbone in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183. Here we describe a method for fast and efficient generation of HD-Ad vector plasmids that can accommodate expression cassettes of any size up to 35 kb. To validate the system, we generated a HD-Ad vector expressing the fusion protein between beta-galactosidase and neomycin resistance genes under the control of the SR alpha promoter, and one expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The viruses were rescued and tested in vitro and for in vivo expression in mice. The data collected indicate the possibility for achieving a high level of hepatocyte transduction using HD-Ad vectors derived from plasmids obtained by homologous recombination in E. coli, with no significant alteration of liver enzymes and a less severe, transient thrombocytopenia in comparison with previous reports with similar doses of a FG-Ad vector. PMID:11829528

  17. Adenovirus serotype 30 fiber does not mediate transduction via the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Law, Lane K; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-01-01

    Prior work by members of our laboratory and others demonstrated that adenovirus serotype 30 (Ad30), a group D adenovirus, exhibited novel transduction characteristics compared to those of serotype 5 (Ad5, belonging to group C). While some serotype D adenoviruses bind to the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), the ability of Ad30 fiber to bind CAR is unknown. We amplified and purified Ad30 and cloned the Ad30 fiber by overlap PCR. Alignment of Ad30 fiber with Ad3, Ad35, Ad5, Ad9, and Ad17 revealed that Ad30, like Ad9 and Ad17, has a shortened fiber sequence relative to that of Ad5. The knob region of fiber was 45% identical to that of the Ad5 knob regions. We made a chimeric recombinant virus (Ad5GFPf30) in which the Ad5 fiber (amino acids [aa]47 to 582) was replaced with Ad30 fiber sequences (aa 46 to 372), and CAR-mediated viral entry was determined on CAR-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. While CAR expression significantly increased Ad5GFP-mediated transduction in CHO cells (from 1 to 36%), it did not enhance Ad5GFPf30 gene transfer. Binding of radiolabeled Ad5GFPf30 or Ad30 wild-type virus was also not improved by the expression of CAR. These results suggest that Ad30 fiber is distinct from Ad5, Ad9, and Ad17 fibers in its inability to direct transduction via CAR. PMID:11752156

  18. Modulation of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Haddad, I Y; Sorscher, E J; Garver, R I; Hong, J; Tzeng, E; Matalon, S

    1997-05-01

    We assessed the role of .NO in recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo. NIH3T3 fibroblasts, stably transfected with the human inducible nitric oxide synthase, but lacking tetrahydrobiopterin (NIH3T3/iNOS [inducibile nitric oxide synthase]), were infected with replication-deficient adenovirus (E1-deleted), containing either the luciferase or the Lac Z reporter genes (AdCMV-Luc and AdCMV-Lac Z; 1-10 plaque forming units [pfu]/cell). Incubation of infected cells with sepiapterin (50 microM), a precursor of tetrahydrobiopterin, progressively increased nitrate/nitrite levels in the medium and decreased both luciferase and beta-galactosidase protein expression to approximately 60% of their corresponding control values, 24 h later. NIH3T3/iNOS cells had normal ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) levels and did not release LDH(lactic dehydrogenase) into the medium. Pretreatment of these cells with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 1 mM), an inhibitor of iNOS, prevented the sepiapterin-mediated induction of .NO and restored gene transfer to baseline values. Incubation of NIH3T3/iNOS with 8-bromo-cGMP (400 microM) in the absence of sepiapterin, or exposure of AdCMV-Luc to large concentrations of .NO, did not alter the efficacy of gene transfer. .NO produced by NIH3T3/iNOS cells also suppressed beta-galactosidase expression in NIH3T3 cocultured cells stably transfected with beta-galactosidase gene, suggesting .NO inhibited gene expression at either the transriptional or posttranscriptional levels. To investigate the effects of inhaled .NO on gene transfer in vivo, CD1 mice received an intratracheal instillation of AdCMV-Luc (4 x 10(9) pfu in 80 microl of saline) and exposed to .NO (25 ppm in room air) for 72 h. At that time, no significant degree of lung inflammation was detected by histological examination. However, lung luciferase activity decreased by 53% as compared with air breathing controls (P < 0.05; n > or = 8). We concluded that

  19. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  20. Comparison of Replication-Competent, First Generation, and Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Eric A.; Nehete, Pramod N.; Buchl, Stephanie S.; Senac, Julien S.; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    All studies using human serotype 5 Adenovirus (Ad) vectors must address two major obstacles: safety and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies. Helper-Dependent (HD) Ads have been proposed as alternative vectors for gene therapy and vaccine development because they have an improved safety profile. To evaluate the potential of HD-Ad vaccines, we compared replication-competent (RC), first-generation (FG) and HD vectors for their ability to induce immune responses in mice. We show that RC-Ad5 and HD-Ad5 vectors generate stronger immune responses than FG-Ad5 vectors. HD-Ad5 vectors gave lower side effects than RC or FG-Ad, producing lower levels of tissue damage and anti-Ad T cell responses. Also, HD vectors have the benefit of being packaged by all subgroup C serotype helper viruses. We found that HD serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6 induce anti-HIV responses equivalently. By using these HD serotypes in heterologous succession we showed that HD vectors can be used to significantly boost anti-HIV immune responses in mice and in FG-Ad5-immune macaques. Since HD vectors have been show to have an increased safety profile, do not possess any Ad genes, can be packaged by multiple serotype helper viruses, and elicit strong anti-HIV immune responses, they warrant further investigation as alternatives to FG vectors as gene-based vaccines. PMID:19333387

  1. Hepatic Delivery of Artificial Micro RNAs Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Carol; Mowa, Betty; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The potential of RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy has been demonstrated in many studies. However, clinical application of this technology has been hampered by a paucity of efficient and safe methods of delivering the RNAi activators. Prolonged transgene expression and improved safety of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD AdVs) makes them well suited to delivery of engineered artificial intermediates of the RNAi pathway. Also, AdVs' natural hepatotropism makes them potentially useful for liver-targeted gene delivery. HD AdVs may be used for efficient delivery of cassettes encoding short hairpin RNAs and artificial primary microRNAs to the mouse liver. Methods for the characterization of HD AdV-mediated delivery of hepatitis B virus-targeting RNAi activators are described here.

  2. Adenovirus-Mediated Efficient Gene Transfer into Cultured Three-Dimensional Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell–based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured “mini-gut” organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D “mini-gut” organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids. PMID:24695466

  3. Pancreatic Transduction by Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors via Intraductal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morró, Meritxell; Teichenne, Joan; Jimenez, Veronica; Kratzer, Ramona; Marletta, Serena; Maggioni, Luca; Mallol, Cristina; Ruberte, Jesus; Kochanek, Stefan; Bosch, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic gene transfer could be useful to treat several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic cancer. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are promising tools for gene therapy because of their large cloning capacity, high levels of transgene expression, and long-term persistence in immunocompetent animals. Nevertheless, the ability of HDAds to transduce the pancreas in vivo has not been investigated yet. Here, we have generated HDAds carrying pancreas-specific expression cassettes, that is, driven either by the elastase or insulin promoter, using a novel and convenient plasmid family and homologous recombination in bacteria. These HDAds were delivered to the pancreas of immunocompetent mice via intrapancreatic duct injection. HDAds, encoding a CMV-GFP reporter cassette, were able to transduce acinar and islet cells, but transgene expression was lost 15 days postinjection in correlation with severe lymphocytic infiltration. When HDAds encoding GFP under the control of the specific elastase promoter were used, expression was detected in acinar cells, but similarly, the expression almost disappeared 30 days postinjection and lymphocytic infiltration was also observed. In contrast, long-term transgene expression (>8 months) was achieved with HDAds carrying the insulin promoter and the secretable alkaline phosphatase as the reporter gene. Notably, transduction of the liver, the preferred target for adenovirus, was minimal by this route of delivery. These data indicate that HDAds could be used for pancreatic gene therapy but that selection of the expression cassette is of critical importance to achieve long-term expression of the transgene in this tissue. PMID:25046147

  4. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  5. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  6. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field. In briefProgressHDAds provide stable, long-term transgene expression in small and large animal models without chronic toxicity for liver-directed gene therapy.High vector doses are required for efficient hepatocyte transduction by systemic administration.Strategies to improve the therapeutic index of HDAd are available or currently under investigation for liver-directed gene therapy.High-efficiency pulmonary transduction and clinically relevant end points can be achieved delivering HDAd in conjunction with tight junction opening agents for CF gene therapy.HDAd delivered with an intracorporeal nebulizing catheter results in high-efficiency transduction of the respiratory epithelium in large animals.Encouraging results have been obtained with HDAd for brain- and muscle-directed gene therapy in animal models.ProspectsA better understanding of the acute innate response will provide new targets for pharmacological blockade to improve the therapeutic index of the vector.Further optimization of preferential liver targeting by HDAd through balloon catheter delivery has the potential of providing a clinically attractive method of vector delivery.Further assessment of Ad PEGylation and modulation of the liver fenestrations may provide attractive strategies to increase the therapeutic index of the vector.Capsid modification to increase the affinity of Ad for hepatocytes has the potential to improve

  7. Administration of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors and sequential delivery of different vector serotype for long-term liver-directed gene transfer in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Morral, Núria; O’Neal, Wanda; Rice, Karen; Leland, Michele; Kaplan, Johanne; Piedra, Pedro A.; Zhou, Heshan; Parks, Robin J.; Velji, Rizwan; Aguilar-Córdova, Estuardo; Wadsworth, Samuel; Graham, Frank L.; Kochanek, Stefan; Carey, K. Dee; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of first-generation adenoviral vectors as gene delivery tools is often limited by the short duration of transgene expression, which can be related to immune responses and to toxic effects of viral proteins. In addition, readministration is usually ineffective unless the animals are immunocompromised or a different adenovirus serotype is used. Recently, adenoviral vectors devoid of all viral coding sequences (helper-dependent or gutless vectors) have been developed to avoid expression of viral proteins. In mice, liver-directed gene transfer with AdSTK109, a helper-dependent adenoviral (Ad) vector containing the human α1-antitrypsin (hAAT) gene, resulted in sustained expression for longer than 10 months with negligible toxicity to the liver. In the present report, we have examined the duration of expression of AdSTK109 in the liver of baboons and compared it to first-generation vectors expressing hAAT. Transgene expression was limited to approximately 3–5 months with the first-generation vectors. In contrast, administration of AdSTK109 resulted in transgene expression for longer than a year in two of three baboons. We have also investigated the feasibility of circumventing the humoral response to the virus by sequential administration of vectors of different serotypes. We found that the ineffectiveness of readministration due to the humoral response to an Ad5 first-generation vector was overcome by use of an Ad2-based vector expressing hAAT. These data suggest that long-term expression of transgenes should be possible by combining the reduced immunogenicity and toxicity of helper-dependent vectors with sequential delivery of vectors of different serotypes. PMID:10536005

  8. "Stealth" adenoviruses blunt cell-mediated and humoral immune responses against the virus and allow for significant gene expression upon readministration in the lung.

    PubMed

    Croyle, M A; Chirmule, N; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J M

    2001-05-01

    Most of the early gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis have been with adenovirus vectors. First-generation viruses with E1a and E1b deleted are limited by transient expression of the transgene and substantial inflammatory responses. Gene transfer is also significantly curtailed following a second dose of virus. In an effort to reduce adenovirus-associated inflammation, capsids of first-generation vectors were modified with various activated monomethoxypolyethylene glycols. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte production was significantly reduced in C57BL/6 mice after a single intratracheal administration of modified vectors, and length of gene expression was extended from 4 to 42 days. T-cell subsets from mice exposed to the conjugated vectors demonstrated a marked decrease in Th1 responses and slight enhancement of Th2 responses compared to animals dosed with native virus. Neutralizing antibodies (NAB) against adenovirus capsid proteins were reduced in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of animals after a single dose of modified virus, allowing significant levels of gene expression upon rechallenge with native adenovirus. Modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) also allowed substantial gene expression from the new vectors in animals previously immunized with unmodified virus. However, gene expression was significantly reduced after two doses of the same PEG-conjugated vector. Alternating the activation group of PEG between doses did produce significant gene expression upon readministration. This technology in combination with second-generation or helper-dependent adenovirus could produce dosing strategies which promote successful readministration of vector in clinical trials and marked expression in patients with significant anti-adenovirus NAB levels and reduce the possibility of immune reactions against viral vectors for gene therapy.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 promotes the extracellular matrix expression in degenerative nucleus pulposus cells*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu-wei; Liu, Kang; Chen, Zhu; Zhao, Ming; Han, Xiao-wei; Bai, Yi-guang; Feng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector-carrying human growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) gene, investigate the biological effects of adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 (Ad-GDF-5) on extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in human degenerative disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and explore a candidate gene therapy method for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Methods: Human NP cells of a degenerative disc were isolated, cultured, and infected with Ad-GDF-5 using the AdEasy-1 adenovirus vector system. On Days 3, 7, 14, and 21, the contents of the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and hydroxyproline (Hyp), synthesis of proteoglycan and collagen II, gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan, and NP cell proliferation were assessed. Results: The adenovirus was an effective vehicle for gene delivery with prolonged expression of GDF-5. Biochemical analysis revealed increased sGAG and Hyp contents in human NP cells infected by Ad-GDF-5 whereas there was no conspicuous change in basal medium (BM) or Ad-green fluorescent protein (GFP) groups. Only cells in the Ad-GDF-5 group promoted the production of ECM, as demonstrated by the secretion of proteoglycan and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at both protein and mRNA levels. The NP cell proliferation was significantly promoted. Conclusions: The data suggest that Ad-GDF-5 gene therapy is a potential treatment for IDD, which restores the functions of degenerative intervertebral disc through enhancing the ECM production of human NP cells. PMID:26739524

  10. Effects of bronchopulmonary inflammation induced by pseudomonas aeruginosa on adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells in mice.

    PubMed

    van Heeckeren, A; Ferkol, T; Tosi, M

    1998-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have endobronchial inflammation caused by infection with mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since adenovirus vectors are being studied for gene therapy for CF, we sought to determine whether bronchopulmonary inflammation would influence adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. We hypothesized that bronchopulmonary inflammation in mice inoculated with mucoid P. aeruginosa would be associated with a decrease in the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Agarose beads embedded with mucoid P. aeruginosa (6 x 10(4) c.f.u. per mouse) were inoculated transtracheally into C57BL/6 mice. Control mice received sterile agarose beads. Ten days after inoculation with agarose beads, recombinant adenovirus containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene (Ad2/beta Gal-2) was administered intranasally (1.1 x 10(9) IU per mouse), and mice were killed 3 days later. The extent of inflammation, determined by neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and by areal lung inflammation, was significantly greater in mice inoculated with P. aeruginosa-laden agarose beads and Ad2/beta Gal-2 compared with controls. Mice that had received Pseudomonas-laden agarose beads and Ad2/beta Gal-2 had significantly fewer (P < 0.015) airway epithelial cells transduced (4.1 +/- 0.9%) compared with mice that received sterile agarose beads and Ad2/beta Gal-2 (9.4 +/- 1.4%). These results indicate that the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is reduced in Pseudomonas-induced bronchopulmonary inflammation.

  11. Incorporation of porcine adenovirus 4 fiber protein enhances infectivity of adenovirus vector on dendritic cells: implications for immune-mediated cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-Ryan, Ivy; Kim, Julius; Kim, Sojung; Ak, Ferhat; Dodson, Lindzy; Colonna, Marco; Powell, Matthew; Mutch, David; Spitzer, Dirk; Hansen, Ted; Goedegebuure, Simon P; Curiel, David; Hawkins, William

    2015-01-01

    One strategy in cancer immunotherapy is to capitalize on the key immunoregulatory and antigen presenting capabilities of dendritic cells (DCs). This approach is dependent on efficient delivery of tumor specific antigens to DCs, which subsequently induce an anti-tumor T-cell mediated immune response. Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5) has been used in human studies for gene delivery, but has limited infection in DCs, which lack the proper receptors. Addition of the porcine fiber knob (PK) from porcine adenovirus type 4 to HAdV5 allows the virus to deliver genetic material via binding to glycosylated surface proteins and bypasses the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor required by wild-type HAdV5. In this study we explored the potential therapeutic applications of an adenovirus with PK-based tropism against cancers expressing mesothelin. Infectivity and gene transfer assays were used to compare Ad5-PK to wild-type HAdV5. Mouse models were used to demonstrate peptide specificity and T-cell responses. We show that the PK modification highly augmented infection of DCs, including the CD141+ DC subset, a key subset for activation of naïve CD8+ T-cells. We also show that Ad5-PK increases DC infectivity and tumor specific antigen expression. Finally, vaccination of mice with the Ad5-PK vector resulted in enhanced T-cell-mediated interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release in response to both mesothelin peptide and a tumor line expressing mesothelin. Ad5-PK is a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy as it improves infectivity, gene transfer, protein expression, and subsequent T-cell activation in DCs compared to wild-type HAdV5 viruses.

  12. Transgene Expression up to 7 Years in Nonhuman Primates Following Hepatic Transduction with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Thomas; Iannitti, David; Cioffi, William; Stapleton, Gary; Law, Mark; Breinholt, John; Palmer, Donna; Grove, Nathan; Rice, Karen; Bauer, Cassondra; Finegold, Milton; Beaudet, Arthur; Mullins, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) have been shown to mediate a considerably longer duration of transgene expression than first-generation adenoviral vectors. We have previously shown that transgene expression from HDAd-transduced hepatocytes can persist at high levels for up to 2.6 years in nonhuman primates following a single-vector administration. Because duration of transgene expression and long-term toxicity are critical for risk:benefit assessment, we have continued to monitor these animals. We report here that transgene expression has persisted for the entire observation period of up to 7 years for all animals without long-term adverse effects. However, in all cases, transgene expression level slowly declined over time to less than 10% of peak values by the end of the observation period but remained 2.3–111-fold above baseline values. These results will provide important information for a more informed risk:benefit assessment before clinical application of HDAd. PMID:23902403

  13. Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Can Be Significantly Enhanced by the Cationic Polymer Polybrene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Wu, Ningning; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Wenwen; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Yin, Liangjun; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Zhonglin; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Liu, Wei; Wu, Di; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhou, Guolin; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Si, Weike; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitors, which can undergo self-renewal and give rise to multi-lineages. A great deal of attentions have been paid to their potential use in regenerative medicine as potential therapeutic genes can be introduced into MSCs. Genetic manipulations in MSCs requires effective gene deliveries. Recombinant adenoviruses are widely used gene transfer vectors. We have found that although MSCs can be infected in vitro by adenoviruses, high virus titers are needed to achieve high efficiency. Here, we investigate if the commonly-used cationic polymer Polybrene can potentiate adenovirus-mediated transgene delivery into MSCs, such as C2C12 cells and iMEFs. Using the AdRFP adenovirus, we find that AdRFP transduction efficiency is significantly increased by Polybrene in a dose-dependent fashion peaking at 8 μg/ml in C2C12 and iMEFs cells. Quantitative luciferase assay reveals that Polybrene significantly enhances AdFLuc-mediated luciferase activity in C2C12 and iMEFs at as low as 4 μg/ml and 2 μg/ml, respectively. FACS analysis indicates that Polybrene (at 4 μg/ml) increases the percentage of RFP-positive cells by approximately 430 folds in AdRFP-transduced iMEFs, suggesting Polybrene may increase adenovirus infection efficiency. Furthermore, Polybrene can enhance AdBMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs as early osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase activity can be increased more than 73 folds by Polybrene (4 μg/ml) in AdBMP9-transduced iMEFs. No cytotoxicity was observed in C2C12 and iMEFs at Polybrene up to 40 μg/ml, which is about 10-fold higher than the effective concentration required to enhance adenovirus transduction in MSCs. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Polybrene should be routinely used as a safe, effective and inexpensive augmenting agent for adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in MSCs, as well as other types of mammalian cells. PMID:24658746

  14. Ectodomain of Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Genetically Fused to Epidermal Growth Factor Mediates Adenovirus Targeting to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Igor; Kashentseva, Elena; Rogers, Buck E.; Krasnykh, Victor; Curiel, David T.

    2000-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) is extensively used for a variety of gene therapy applications. However, the utility of Ad vectors is limited due to the low efficiency of Ad-mediated gene transfer to target cells expressing marginal levels of the Ad fiber receptor. Therefore, the present generation of Ad vectors could potentially be improved by modification of Ad tropism to target the virus to specific organs and tissues. The fact that coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) does not play any role in virus internalization, but functions merely as the virus attachment site, suggests that the extracellular part of CAR might be utilized to block the receptor recognition site on the Ad fiber knob domain. We proposed to design bispecific fusion proteins formed by a recombinant soluble form of truncated CAR (sCAR) and a targeting ligand. In this study, we derived sCAR genetically fused with human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and investigated its ability to target Ad infection to the EGF receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on cancer cell lines. We have demonstrated that sCAR-EGF protein is capable of binding to Ad virions and directing them to EGFR, thereby achieving targeted delivery of reporter gene. These results show that sCAR-EGF protein possesses the ability to effectively retarget Ad via a non-CAR pathway, with enhancement of gene transfer efficiency. PMID:10888627

  15. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors and Their Use for Neuroscience Applications.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Mónica S; Satterfield, Rachel; Young, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience research has been revolutionized by the use of recombinant viral vector technology from the basic, preclinical and clinical levels. Currently, multiple recombinant viral vector types are employed with each having its strengths and weaknesses depending on the proposed application. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HdAd) are emerging as ideal viral vectors that solve a major need in the neuroscience field: (1) expression of transgenes that are too large to be packaged by other viral vectors and (2) rapid onset of transgene expression in the absence of cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the methods for large-scale production of HdAd viral vectors for in vivo use with neurospecific transgene expression. PMID:27515075

  16. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Licursi, Valerio; Brito, Catarina; La Torre, Mattia; Alves, Paula M.; Simao, Daniel; Mottini, Carla; Salinas, Sara; Negri, Rodolfo; Tagliafico, Enrico; Kremer, Eric J.; Saggio, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD) canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2) are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR. PMID:26207738

  17. Single-step concentration and purification of adenoviruses by coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor-binding capture and elastin-like polypeptide-mediated precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Liu, Wenjun; Xu, Bi; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2016-02-01

    A single-step method for quick concentration and purification of adenoviruses (Ads) was established by combining coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-binding capture with elastin-like polypeptide (ELP)-mediated precipitation. The soluble ELP-CAR fusion protein was expressed in vector-transformed E. coli and purified to high purity by two rounds of inverse transition cycling (ITC). After demonstration of the specific binding of fusion protein, a recombinant Ad (rAd), namely rAd/GFP, was pulled down from the culture medium and extract of rAd-transduced cells using ELP-CAR protein, with recovery of 76.2 % and 73.3 %, respectively. The rAd was eluted from the ELP-CAR protein and harvested by one round of ITC, with recoveries ranging from 30.6 % to 34.5 % (virus titration assay). Both ELP-CAR-bound and eluted rAds were able to transduce CAR-positive cells, but not CAR-negative cells (fluorescent microscopy). A further viral titration assay showed that the ELP-CAR-bound rAd/GFP had significantly lower transduction efficiency than the eluted rAd, and there was less of a decrease when tested in the presence of fetal bovine serum. In addition, rAd/GFP was efficiently recovered from the "spiked" PBS and tap water with recovery of ~74 % or ~60 %. This work demonstrates the usefulness of the ELP-CAR-binding capture method for concentration and/or purification of Ads in cellular and environmental samples.

  18. Adenovirus fiber disrupts CAR-mediated intercellular adhesion allowing virus escape.

    PubMed

    Walters, Robert W; Freimuth, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Ganske, Ingrid; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    Adenovirus binds its receptor (CAR), enters cells, and replicates. It must then escape to the environment to infect a new host. We found that following infection, human airway epithelia first released adenovirus to the basolateral surface. Virus then traveled between epithelial cells to emerge on the apical surface. Adenovirus fiber protein, which is produced during viral replication, facilitated apical escape. Fiber binds CAR, which sits on the basolateral membrane where it maintains tight junction integrity. When fiber bound CAR, it disrupted junctional integrity, allowing virus to filter between the cells and emerge apically. Thus, adenovirus exploits its receptor for two important but distinct steps in its life cycle: entry into host cells and escape across epithelial barriers to the environment.

  19. Human Papillomavirus E6 Knockdown Restores Adenovirus Mediated-estrogen Response Element Linked p53 Gene Transfer in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Koji; Honda, Ken-Ichi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Ishiko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The p53 gene is inactivated by the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein in the majority of cervical cancers. Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with siRNA for HPV E6 permitted adenovirus-mediated transduction of a p53 gene linked to an upstream estrogen response element (ERE). Our previous study in non-siRNA treated HHUA cells, which are derived from an endometrial cancer and express estrogen receptor β, showed enhancing effects of an upstream ERE on adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction. In HeLa S3 cells treated with siRNA for HPV E6, adenovirus-mediated transduction was enhanced by an upstream ERE linked to a p53 gene carrying a proline variant at codon 72, but not for a p53 gene with arginine variant at codon 72. Expression levels of p53 mRNA and Coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR) mRNA after adenovirus-mediated transfer of an ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) were higher compared with those after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells. Western blot analysis showed lower β-tubulin levels and comparatively higher p53/β-tubulin or CAR /β-tubulin ratios in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with those in non-siRNA-treated cells. Apoptosis, as measured by annexin V binding, was higher after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with that after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated cells.

  20. Accurate single-day titration of adenovirus vectors based on equivalence of protein VII nuclear dots and infectious particles.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Marcin P; Morral, Nuria; Engel, Daniel A

    2009-08-01

    Protein VII is an abundant component of adenovirus particles and is tightly associated with the viral DNA. It enters the nucleus along with the infecting viral genome and remains bound throughout early phase. Protein VII can be visualized by immunofluorescent staining as discrete dots in the infected cell nucleus. Comparison between protein VII staining and expression of the 72kDa DNA-binding protein revealed a one-to-one correspondence between protein VII dots and infectious viral genomes. A similar relationship was observed for a helper-dependent adenovirus vector expressing green fluorescent protein. This relationship allowed accurate titration of adenovirus preparations, including wild-type and helper-dependent vectors, using a 1-day immunofluorescence method. The method can be applied to any adenovirus vector and gives results equivalent to the standard plaque assay.

  1. Accurate single-day titration of adenovirus vectors based on equivalence of protein VII nuclear dots and infectious particles.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Marcin P; Morral, Nuria; Engel, Daniel A

    2009-08-01

    Protein VII is an abundant component of adenovirus particles and is tightly associated with the viral DNA. It enters the nucleus along with the infecting viral genome and remains bound throughout early phase. Protein VII can be visualized by immunofluorescent staining as discrete dots in the infected cell nucleus. Comparison between protein VII staining and expression of the 72kDa DNA-binding protein revealed a one-to-one correspondence between protein VII dots and infectious viral genomes. A similar relationship was observed for a helper-dependent adenovirus vector expressing green fluorescent protein. This relationship allowed accurate titration of adenovirus preparations, including wild-type and helper-dependent vectors, using a 1-day immunofluorescence method. The method can be applied to any adenovirus vector and gives results equivalent to the standard plaque assay. PMID:19406166

  2. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Zc; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan Hl

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  3. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  4. Robust Hepatic Gene Silencing for Functional Studies Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Rafaela; Witting, Scott R.; Saxena, Romil

    2009-01-01

    Abstract RNA interference is currently envisioned as the basis of gene function and drug target validation studies. This novel technology has the advantage of providing a remarkably faster tool for gene silencing than traditional transgenic animal methodologies. In vivo administration of short interfering RNA (siRNA) typically results in reduced target gene expression for approximately 1 week. Viral vectors offer the possibility to express constitutive levels of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) so that the effects of knocking down the target gene can be studied for a few weeks, rather than a few days. Helper-dependent vectors have a significant advantage over previous generations of adenoviral vectors because of their much higher cloning capacity, potential for long-term transgene expression, and enhanced safety profiles on administration in vivo. Therefore, this advanced type of vector is an excellent tool to carry out in vivo studies directed at constitutive expression of shRNA. Here we show it is possible to obtain more than 90% target gene knockdown in an animal model of type 2 diabetes for several weeks, thereby consolidating this technology as an alternative to generating liver-specific knockout animals. PMID:18828727

  5. PEGylated helper-dependent adenoviral vectors: highly efficient vectors with an enhanced safety profile.

    PubMed

    Croyle, M A; Le, H T; Linse, K D; Cerullo, V; Toietta, G; Beaudet, A; Pastore, L

    2005-04-01

    Transgene expression from helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors is effective and long lasting, but not permanent. Their use is also limited by the host response against capsid proteins that precludes successful gene expression upon readministration. In this report, we test the hypothesis that PEGylation of HD-Ad reduces its toxicity and promotes transgene expression upon readministration. PEGylation did not compromise transduction efficiency in vitro and in vivo and reduced peak serum IL-6 levels two-fold. IL-12 and TNF-alpha levels were reduced three- and seven-fold, respectively. Thrombocytopenia was not detected in mice treated with the PEGylated vector. Serum transaminases were not significantly elevated in mice treated with either vector. Mice immunized with 1 x 10(11) particles of unmodified HD-Ad expressing human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hA1AT) were rechallenged 28 days later with 8 x 10(10) particles of unmodified or PEG-conjugated vector expressing beta-galactosidase. Trace levels of beta-galactosidase (52.23+/-19.2 pg/mg protein) were detected in liver homogenates of mice that received two doses of unmodified HD-Ad. Mice rechallenged with PEGylated HD-Ad produced significant levels of beta-galactosidase (5.1+/-0.4 x 10(5) pg/mg protein, P=0.0001). This suggests that PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors may be appropriate for their safe and efficient use in the clinic. PMID:15647765

  6. Adenovirus-Associated Virus Vector–Mediated Gene Transfer in Hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Nathwani, Amit C.; Tuddenham, Edward G.D.; Rangarajan, Savita; Rosales, Cecilia; McIntosh, Jenny; Linch, David C.; Chowdary, Pratima; Riddell, Anne; Pie, Arnulfo Jaquilmac; Harrington, Chris; O’Beirne, James; Smith, Keith; Pasi, John; Glader, Bertil; Rustagi, Pradip; Ng, Catherine Y.C.; Kay, Mark A.; Zhou, Junfang; Spence, Yunyu; Morton, Christopher L.; Allay, James; Coleman, John; Sleep, Susan; Cunningham, John M.; Srivastava, Deokumar; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A.; Gray, John T.; Reiss, Ulrike M.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.; Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hemophilia B, an X-linked disorder, is ideally suited for gene therapy. We investigated the use of a new gene therapy in patients with the disorder. METHODS We infused a single dose of a serotype-8–pseudotyped, self-complementary adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a codon-optimized human factor IX (FIX) transgene (scAAV2/8-LP1-hFIXco) in a peripheral vein in six patients with severe hemophilia B (FIX activity, <1% of normal values). Study participants were enrolled sequentially in one of three cohorts (given a high, intermediate, or low dose of vector), with two participants in each group. Vector was administered without immunosuppressive therapy, and participants were followed for 6 to 16 months. RESULTS AAV-mediated expression of FIX at 2 to 11% of normal levels was observed in all participants. Four of the six discontinued FIX prophylaxis and remained free of spontaneous hemorrhage; in the other two, the interval between prophylactic injections was increased. Of the two participants who received the high dose of vector, one had a transient, asymptomatic elevation of serum aminotransferase levels, which was associated with the detection of AAV8-capsid–specific T cells in the peripheral blood; the other had a slight increase in liver-enzyme levels, the cause of which was less clear. Each of these two participants received a short course of glucocorticoid therapy, which rapidly normalized aminotransferase levels and maintained FIX levels in the range of 3 to 11% of normal values. CONCLUSIONS Peripheral-vein infusion of scAAV2/8-LP1-hFIXco resulted in FIX transgene expression at levels sufficient to improve the bleeding phenotype, with few side effects. Although immune-mediated clearance of AAV-transduced hepatocytes remains a concern, this process may be controlled with a short course of glucocorticoids without loss of transgene expression. (Funded by the Medical Research Council and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00979238

  7. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  8. Expression of the primary coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is downregulated during skeletal muscle maturation and limits the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, J; Pari, G; Karpati, G; Holland, P C

    1999-04-10

    Skeletal muscle fibers are infected efficiently by adenoviral vectors only in neonatal animals. This lack of tropism for mature skeletal muscle may be partly due to inefficient binding of adenoviral particles to the cell surface. We evaluated in developing mouse muscle the expression levels of two high-affinity receptors for adenovirus, MHC class I and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The moderate levels of MHC class I transcripts that were detected in quadriceps, gastrocnemius, and heart muscle did not vary between postnatal day 3 and day 60 adult tissue. A low level of CAR expression was detected on postnatal day 3 in quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles, but CAR expression was barely detectable in adult skeletal muscle even by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, CAR transcripts were moderately abundant at all stages of heart muscle development. Ectopic expression of CAR in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells increased their transducibility by adenovirus at all multiplicities of infection (MOIs) tested as measured by lacZ reporter gene activity following AVCMVlacZ infection, with an 80-fold difference between CAR-expressing cells and control C2C12 cells at an MOI of 50. Primary myoblasts ectopically expressing CAR were injected into muscles of syngeneic hosts; following incorporation of the exogenous myoblasts into host myofibers, an increased transducibility of adult muscle fibers by AVCMVlacZ was observed in the host. Expression of the lacZ reporter gene in host myofibers coincided with CAR immunoreactivity. Furthermore, sarcolemmal CAR expression was markedly increased in regenerating muscle fibers of the dystrophic mdx mouse, fibers that are susceptible to adenovirus transduction. These analyses show that CAR expression by skeletal muscle correlates with its susceptibility to adenovirus transduction, and that forced CAR expression in mature myofibers dramatically increases their susceptibility to adenovirus transduction.

  9. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  10. Tamoxifen improves cytopathic effect of oncolytic adenovirus in primary glioblastoma cells mediated through autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, Ilya V.; Shah, Nameeta; Kaverina, Natalya V.; Lee, Hwahyang; Lin, Biaoyang; Lieber, Andre; Kadagidze, Zaira G.; Yoon, Jae-Guen; Schroeder, Brett; Hothi, Parvinder; Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Baryshnikov, Anatoly Y.; Cobbs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic gene therapy using viral vectors may provide an attractive therapeutic option for malignant gliomas. These viral vectors are designed in a way to selectively target tumor cells and spare healthy cells. To determine the translational impact, it is imperative to assess the factors that interfere with the anti-glioma effects of the oncolytic adenoviral vectors. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of survivin-driven oncolytic adenoviruses pseudotyping with adenoviral fiber knob belonging to the adenoviral serotype 3, 11 and 35 in their ability to kill glioblastoma (GBM) cells selectively without affecting normal cells. Our results indicate that all recombinant vectors used in the study can effectively target GBM in vitro with high specificity, especially the 3 knob-modified vector. Using intracranial U87 and U251 GBM xenograft models we have also demonstrated that treatment with Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd-S-5/3) vectors can effectively regress tumor. However, in several patient-derived GBM cell lines, cells exhibited resistance to the CRAd infection as evident from the diminishing effects of autophagy. To improve therapeutic response, tumor cells were pretreated with tamoxifen. Our preliminary data suggest that tamoxifen sensitizes glioblastoma cells towards oncolytic treatment with CRAd-S-5/3, which may prove useful for GBM in future experimental therapy. PMID:25738357

  11. Adenovirus-Mediated FKHRL1/TM Sensitizes Melanoma Cells to Apoptosis Induced by Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Michael E.; McNally, Lacey R.; Nitz, Jonathan; McMasters, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Melanoma exhibits variable resistance to the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ). We evaluated the potential of adenovirus expressing forkhead human transcription factor like 1 triple mutant (Ad-FKHRL1/TM) to sensitize melanoma cells to TMZ. Four melanoma cell lines were treated with Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ, alone or in combination. Apoptosis was assessed by activation and inhibition of caspase pathway, nuclei fragmentation, and annexin V staining. The potential therapeutic efficacy of Ad-FKHRL1/TM with TMZ was also assessed in a mouse melanoma xenograft model. Combination therapy of Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ resulted in greater cell killing (<20% cell viability) compared with single therapy and controls (p<0.05). Combination indices of Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ therapy indicated significant (p<0.05) synergistic killing effect. Greater apoptosis induction was found in cells treated with Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ than with Ad-FKHRL1/TM or TMZ-treated cells alone. Treatment with TMZ enhanced adenovirus transgene expression in a cell type-dependent manner. In an in vivo model, combination therapy of Ad-FKHRL1/TM with TMZ results in greater tumor growth reduction in comparison with single treatments. We suggest that Ad-FKHRL1/TM is a promising vector to sensitize melanoma cells to TMZ, and that a combination of both approaches would be effective in the clinical setting. PMID:25238278

  12. The adenovirus E3-10.4K/14.5K complex mediates loss of cell surface Fas (CD95) and resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shisler, J; Yang, C; Walter, B; Ware, C F; Gooding, L R

    1997-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells use Fas (CD95), a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, to eliminate virus-infected cells by activation of the apoptotic pathway for cell death. The adenovirus E3 region encodes several proteins that modify immune defenses, including TNF-dependent cell death, which may allow this virus to establish a persistent infection. Here we show that, as an early event during infection, the adenovirus E3-10.4K/14.5K complex selectively induces loss of Fas surface expression and blocks Fas-induced apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Loss of surface Fas occurs within the first 4 h postinfection and is not due to decreased production of Fas protein. The decrease in surface Fas is distinct from the 10.4K/14.5K-mediated loss of the epidermal growth factor receptor on the same cells, because intracellular stores of Fas are not affected. Further, 10.4K/14.5K, which was previously shown to protect against TNF cytolysis, does not induce a loss of TNF receptor, indicating that this complex mediates more than one function to block host defense mechanisms. These results suggest yet another mechanism by which adenovirus modulates host cytotoxic responses that may contribute to persistent infection by human adenoviruses. PMID:9343182

  13. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  14. Reduced inflammation and improved airway expression using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with a K18 promoter.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Koehler, David R; Finegold, Milton J; Lee, Brendan; Hu, Jim; Beaudet, Arthur L

    2003-05-01

    Efforts have been made to deliver transgenes to the airway epithelia of laboratory animals and humans to develop gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. These investigations have been disappointing due to combinations of transient and low-level gene expression, acute toxicity, and inflammation. We have developed new helper-dependent adenoviral vectors to deliver an epithelial cell-specific keratin 18 expression cassette driving the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) or human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) reporter genes. Following intranasal administration to mice, we found that the reporter genes were widely expressed in airway epithelial and submucosal cells, and secreted human AFP was also detectable in serum. In contrast to a first-generation adenoviral vector, inflammation was negligible at doses providing efficient transduction, and expression lasted longer than typically reported-up to 28 days with beta-gal and up to 15 weeks with human AFP. These results suggest that delivery to the airway of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors utilizing a tissue-specific promoter could be a significant advance in the development of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. PMID:12718908

  15. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  16. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  17. Downregulation of PI3Kcb utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of siRNA attenuates bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan-Jun; Zhang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling plays a pivotal role in intracellular signal transduction pathways involved in chronic pain states. PI3K is implicated in pathomechanisms of enhanced synaptic strength, such as wind-up and central sensitization in the spinal dorsal horn. The PI3Kcb gene encoding the class 1A PI3K catalytic subunit p110beta is one of the most important molecular of the P13K signaling pathway. Here, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to PI3Kcb by adenovirus-mediated transfer, to determine whether inhibition of PI3Kcb was a potential therapeutic target for bone cancer pain (BCP). In this study, treatment of BCP model in rats with PI3Kcb-specific siRNA resulted in inhibited pain-related behavior. Depletion of PI3Kcb decreased the protein levels of spinal PI3Kcb and phospho-Akt (P-Akt)-downstream targets of PI3K. Knockdown of PI3Kcb by siRNA also induced decreased expression of GFAP and OX42, suggesting that the upregulation of spinal PI3Kcb may increase glia excitability, at least in part by regulating glia message. Our findings suggest that siRNA-mediated gene silencing of PI3Kcb may be a useful therapeutic strategy for BCP. PMID:25550861

  18. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of an anti-V antigen monoclonal antibody protects mice against a lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonic plague, caused by inhalation of Yersinia pestis, represents a major bioterrorism threat for which no vaccine is available. Based on the knowledge that genetic delivery of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors results in rapid, high-level antibody expression, we evaluated the hypothesis that Ad-mediated delivery of a neutralizing antibody directed against the Y. pestis V antigen would protect mice against a Y. pestis challenge. MAbs specific for the Y. pestis V antigen were generated, and the most effective in protecting mice against a lethal intranasal Y. pestis challenge was chosen for further study. The coding sequences for the heavy and light chains were isolated from the corresponding hybridoma and inserted into a replication-defective serotype 5 human Ad gene transfer vector (AdalphaV). Western analysis of AdalphaV-infected cell supernatants demonstrated completely assembled antibodies reactive with V antigen. Following AdalphaV administration to mice, high levels of anti-V antigen antibody titers were detectable as early as 1 day postadministration, peaked by day 3, and remained detectable through a 12-week time course. When animals that received AdalphaV were challenged with Y. pestis at day 4 post-AdalphaV administration, 80% of the animals were protected, while 0% of control animals survived (P < 0.01). Ad-mediated delivery of a V antigen-neutralizing antibody is an effective therapy against plague in experimental animals and could be developed as a rapidly acting antiplague therapeutic.

  19. Downregulation of PI3Kcb utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of siRNA attenuates bone cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huan-Jun; Zhang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling plays a pivotal role in intracellular signal transduction pathways involved in chronic pain states. PI3K is implicated in pathomechanisms of enhanced synaptic strength, such as wind-up and central sensitization in the spinal dorsal horn. The PI3Kcb gene encoding the class 1A PI3K catalytic subunit p110beta is one of the most important molecular of the P13K signaling pathway. Here, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to PI3Kcb by adenovirus-mediated transfer, to determine whether inhibition of PI3Kcb was a potential therapeutic target for bone cancer pain (BCP). In this study, treatment of BCP model in rats with PI3Kcb-specific siRNA resulted in inhibited pain-related behavior. Depletion of PI3Kcb decreased the protein levels of spinal PI3Kcb and phospho-Akt (P-Akt)-downstream targets of PI3K. Knockdown of PI3Kcb by siRNA also induced decreased expression of GFAP and OX42, suggesting that the upregulation of spinal PI3Kcb may increase glia excitability, at least in part by regulating glia message. Our findings suggest that siRNA-mediated gene silencing of PI3Kcb may be a useful therapeutic strategy for BCP. PMID:25550861

  20. Gene therapy for colorectal cancer using adenovirus-mediated full-length antibody, cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Man; Wang, Xiang; Chi, Yudan; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody, approved to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for years. It functions by blocking the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from receiving signals or interacting with other proteins. Although the demand for cetuximab for the treatment of cancer patients in clinics is increasing, the complicated techniques involved and its high cost limit its wide applications. Here, a new, cheaper form of cetuximab was generated for cancer gene therapy. This was achieved by cloning the full-length cetuximab antibody into two serotypes of adenoviral vectors, termed as AdC68-CTB and Hu5-CTB. In vivo studies showed that a single dose of AdC68-CTB or Hu5-CTB induced sustained cetuximab expression and dramatically suppressed tumor growth in NCI-H508– or DiFi-inoculated nude mice. In conclusion, gene therapy using adenovirus expressing full-length cetuximab could be a novel alternative method for the effective treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27058423

  1. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of antiangiogenic genes as an antitumor approach.

    PubMed

    Régulier, E; Paul, S; Marigliano, M; Kintz, J; Poitevin, Y; Ledoux, C; Roecklin, D; Cauet, G; Calenda, V; Homann, H E

    2001-01-01

    Based on the observation that the growth of solid tumors is dependent on the formation of new blood vessels, therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting angiogenesis have been proposed. A number of proteins with angiostatic activity have been described, but their development as therapeutic agents has been hampered by difficulties in their production and their poor pharmacokinetics. These limitations may be resolved using a gene therapy approach whereby the genes are delivered and expressed in vivo. Here we compared adenoviral delivery of endostatin, proliferin-related protein (PRP), and interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP10) genes. Recombinant adenoviruses carrying the three angiostatic genes express biologically active gene products as determined in vitro in endothelial cell proliferation and migration assays, and in vivo by inhibition of neoangiogenesis in rat chambers. Eradication of established tumors in vivo, in the murine B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice, was not achieved by intratumoral injection of the different vectors. However, the combination of intravenous plus intratumoral injections allowed rejection of tumors. Ad-PRP or Ad-IP10 were significantly more efficient than Ad-endostatin, leading to complete tumor rejection and prolonged survival in a high proportion of treated animals. These data support the use of in vivo gene delivery approaches to produce high-circulating and local levels of antiangiogenic agents for the therapy of local and metastatic human tumors. PMID:11219493

  2. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of pathogen-associated molecular patterns for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tosch, C; Geist, M; Ledoux, C; Ziller-Remi, C; Paul, S; Erbs, P; Corvaia, N; Von Hoegen, P; Balloul, J-M; Haegel, H

    2009-04-01

    The delivery of stimulatory signals to dendritic cells (DCs) in the tumor microenvironment could be an effective means to break tumor-induced tolerance. The work presented here evaluates the immunostimulatory properties of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), microbial molecules which bind Toll-like receptors and deliver activating signals to immune cells, when expressed in tumor cells using adenoviral (Ad) vectors. In vitro, transduction of A549 tumor cells with Ad vectors expressing either flagellin from Listeria monocytogenes or P40 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae induced the maturation of human monocyte-derived DCs in co-cultures. In mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), Ad-flagellin and Ad-P40 transduction of tumor cells stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and the secretion of IFN-gamma. In vivo, these vectors were used either as stand-alone immunoadjuvants injected intratumorally or as vaccine adjuvants combined with a tumor antigen-expressing vector. When Ad-PAMPs were administered intratumorally to mice bearing subcutaneous syngeneic B16F0-CAR (cocksackie-adenovirus receptor) melanomas, tumor progression was transiently inhibited by Ad-P40. In a therapeutic vaccine setting, the combination of Ad-MUC1 and Ad-PAMP vectors injected subcutaneously delayed the growth of implanted RenCa-MUC1 tumors and improved tumor rejection when compared with vaccination with Ad-MUC1 alone. These results suggest that Ad-PAMPs could be effective immunoadjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18949016

  3. Ex vivo adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and immunomodulatory protein production in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Oral, H B; Larkin, D F; Fehervari, Z; Byrnes, A P; Rankin, A M; Haskard, D O; Wood, M J; Dallman, M J; George, A J

    1997-07-01

    One attractive strategy to prevent or control allograft rejection is to genetically modify the donor tissue before transplantation. In this study, we have examined the feasibility of gene transfer to human corneal endothelium, using a number of recombinant adenovirus constructs. Ex vivo infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors containing lacZ, under transcriptional control of either cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoters, provided high-level gene expression, which was largely restricted to endothelium. Expression of the reporter gene persisted at relatively high levels for up to 7 days, followed by a decline to indetectable levels by 28 days. RT-PCR analysis of lacZ transcription showed a similar picture with a short period (3-7 days) of RNA transcription after infection. In contrast, adenoviral DNA persisted for at least 56 days. Subsequently, we examined the expression of a potential therapeutic gene, CTLA-4 Ig fusion protein. Following infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors encoding CTLA-4 Ig protein, high levels of the fusion protein were detected in corneal culture supernatants for up to 28 days. This protein was functionally active, as determined by binding to B7.1 (CD80)-expressing transfectants. This study suggests that genetic alteration of donor cornea before transplantation is a feasible approach for preventing or controlling allograft rejection. Similar gene-based strategies might also be feasible to prevent rejection of other transplanted tissues or organs. PMID:9282165

  4. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization by recombinant adenovirus-mediated sFlk-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hui; Wu Jihong; Li Huiming; Wang Zhanli; Chen Xiafang; Tian Yuhua; Yi Miaoying; Ji Xunda; Ma Jialie; Huang Qian

    2007-10-05

    The interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (Flt-1, Flk-1/KDR) is correlated with neovascularization in the eyes. Therefore, blocking the binding of VEGF and the corresponding receptor has become critical for inhibiting corneal neovascularization. In this study, we have expressed the cDNA for sFlk-1 under the control of cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (CMV) from an E1/partial E3 deleted replication defective recombinant adenovirus, and Ad.sflk-1 expression was determined by Western blotting. We have shown that conditioned media from Ad.sflk-1-infected ARPE-19 cells significantly reduced VEGF-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine endothelial cells (SVEC) proliferation in vitro compared with the control vector. In vivo, adenoviral vectors expressing green fluorescent protein alone (Ad.GFP) were utilized to monitor gene transfer to the cornea. Moreover, in the models of corneal neovascularization, the injection of Ad.sflk-1 (10{sup 8} PFU) into the anterior chamber could significantly inhibit angiogenic changes compared with Ad.null-injected and vehicle-injected models. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that corneal endothelial cells and corneal stroma of cauterized rat eyes were efficiently transduced and expressed sFlk-1. These results not only support that adenoviral vectors are capable of high-level transgene expression but also demonstrate that Ad.sflk-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting the development of corneal neovascularization.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into normal rabbit arteries results in prolonged vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, K D; Dunn, P F; Owens, J W; Schulick, A H; Virmani, R; Sukhova, G; Libby, P; Dichek, D A

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are capable of high efficiency in vivo arterial gene transfer, and are currently in use as therapeutic agents in animal models of vascular disease. However, despite substantial data on the ability of viruses to cause vascular inflammation and proliferation, and the presence in current adenovirus vectors of viral open reading frames that are translated in vivo, no study has examined the effect of adenovirus vectors alone on the arterial phenotype. In a rabbit model of gene transfer into a normal artery, we examined potential vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal proliferation resulting from exposure to replication-defective adenovirus. Exposure of normal arteries to adenovirus vectors resulted in: (a) pronounced infiltration of T cells throughout the artery wall; (b) upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in arterial smooth muscle cells; (c) neointimal hyperplasia. These findings were present both 10 and 30 d after gene transfer, with no evidence of a decline in severity over time. Adenovirus vectors have pleiotropic effects on the arterial wall and cause significant pathology. Interpretation of experimental protocols that use adenovirus vectors to address either biological or therapeutic issues should take these observations into account. These observations should also prompt the design of more inert gene transfer vectors. Images PMID:8675667

  6. Cell-mediated immunity in F 344 rats bearing intraocular tumors derived from human adenovirus 12-induced retinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Sawada, T; Pomeroy, M E

    1983-10-01

    The eyes of 10 F344 rats were inoculated with retinal tumor cells (EXP-5 cell line) induced by human adenovirus 12. The animals were killed at 4 weeks thereafter, and the cytotoxicity of their lymphocytes was investigated by using 51Cr-releasing assay. The percentage of EXP-5 cells killed in vitro by lymphocytes was higher in 10 rats with ocular tumors (24.6% +/- 6.1%, mean +/- SD) than in 10 control rats (6.2% +/- 1.8%). Morphologic investigation using syngeneic spleen cells confirmed the presence of lymphoid cells, resembling T-lymphocytes, adhering to EXP-5 cells. The influence of subcutaneous injection of EXP-5 cells on the growth of intravitreously injected tumor cells was investigated. Cells injected subcutaneously prior to intravitreous injection elicited an immune response that was capable of controlling vitreous tumor growth. These findings suggest that the rats with transplanted retinal tumors develop a cell-mediated immune response in the early stage of tumor bearing, and that a state of pre-existing specific immunity can overcome so-called "immunologic privilege" of the vitreous body.

  7. De-repression of RaRF-mediated RAR repression by adenovirus E1A in the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Um, Soo-Jong; Youn, Hye Sook; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2014-02-21

    Transcriptional activity of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is regulated by diverse binding partners, including classical corepressors and coactivators, in response to its ligand retinoic acid (RA). Recently, we identified a novel corepressor of RAR called the retinoic acid resistance factor (RaRF) (manuscript submitted). Here, we report how adenovirus E1A stimulates RAR activity by associating with RaRF. Based on immunoprecipitation (IP) assays, E1A interacts with RaRF through the conserved region 2 (CR2), which is also responsible for pRb binding. The first coiled-coil domain of RaRF was sufficient for this interaction. An in vitro glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay was used to confirm the direct interaction between E1A and RaRF. Further fluorescence microscopy indicated that E1A and RaRF were located in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, respectively. However, RaRF overexpression promoted nucleolar translocation of E1A from the nucleoplasm. Both the RA-dependent interaction of RAR with RaRF and RAR translocation to the nucleolus were disrupted by E1A. RaRF-mediated RAR repression was impaired by wild-type E1A, but not by the RaRF binding-defective E1A mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that E1A is sequestered to the nucleolus by RaRF through a specific interaction, thereby leaving RAR in the nucleoplasm for transcriptional activation.

  8. Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) Mediates Trafficking of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 (ASIC3) via PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Excoffon, Katherine J.D.A.; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Kusama, Nobuyoshi; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Sharma, Priyanka; Hruska-Hageman, Alesia M.; Petroff, Elena; Benson, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) can interact with post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95) and localize PSD-95 to cell-cell junctions. We have also shown that activity of the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC3), a H+-gated cation channel that plays a role in mechanosensation and pain signaling, is negatively modulated by PSD-95 through a PDZ-based interaction. We asked whether CAR and ASIC3 simultaneously interact with PSD-95, and if so, whether co-expression of these proteins alters their cellular distribution and localization. Results indicate that CAR and ASIC3 co-immunoprecipitate only when co-expressed with PSD-95. CAR also brings both PSD-95 and ASIC3 to the junctions of heterologous cells. Moreover, CAR rescues PSD-95-mediated inhibition of ASIC3 currents. These data suggest that, in addition to activity as a viral receptor and adhesion molecule, CAR can play a role in trafficking proteins, including ion channels, in a PDZ-based scaffolding complex. PMID:22809504

  9. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. RESULTS Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. CONCLUSIONS CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  10. Adenovirus-Mediated siRNA Targeting CXCR2 Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Osteolysis by Suppressing Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. Material/Methods Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. Results Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. Conclusions CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  11. Synergistic tumor suppression by adenovirus-mediated ING4/PTEN double gene therapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Zhou, X; Xu, C; Yang, J; Xiang, J; Tao, M; Xie, Y

    2016-01-01

    Both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) have been shown to be strong candidate tumor suppressors. However, the combined efficacy of ING4 and PTEN for human gastric cancer remains to be determined. In this report, we constructed a multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus coexpressing ING4 and PTEN (AdVING4/PTEN), assessed the combined effects of AdVING4/PTEN on gastric cancer using wild-type p53 AGS and SNU-1 human gastric cancer cell lines, and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. We found that AdVING4/PTEN-induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro AGS or SNU-1 tumor cells and in vivo AGS xenografted tumors subcutaneously inoculated in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, AdVING4/PTEN exhibited an enhanced effect on upregulation of p53, Ac-p53 (K382), P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved Caspase-9, cleaved Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in vitro and in vivo. In addition, AdVING4/PTEN synergistically downregulated tumor vessel CD34 expression and reduced microvessel density, and additively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo. The synergistic tumor suppression elicited by AdVING4/PTEN was closely associated with the synergistic induction of apoptosis possibly via enhancement of endogenous p53 responses through cooperatively facilitating p53's stability and acetylation, and the synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis probably via overlapping reduction of VEGF through cooperatively downregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α's level and transcription activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining ING4 and PTEN may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human gastric cancer and other cancers.

  12. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  13. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Welles, Hugh; Mennechet, Franck J D; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu; Kremer, Eric J

    2016-09-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  15. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Vasopressin is synthesized by magnocellular neurons in supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei and released by their axon terminals in the neurohypophysis (NH). With its actions as an antidiuretic hormone and vasoactive agent, vasopressin plays a pivotal role in the control of body fluids and cardiovascular homeostasis. Because of its well-defined neurobiology and functional importance, the SON/PVN-NH system is ideal to establish methods for gene transfer of genetic material into specific pathways in the mouse central nervous system. In these studies, we compared the efficiency of transferring the gene lacZ, encoding for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), versus a gene encoding for green fluorescent protein by using replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors in adult mice. Transfection with viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units per coverslip of NH, PVN, and SON in dissociated, cultured cells caused efficient transfection without cytotoxicity. However, over an extended period of time, higher levels (50% to 75% of the cells) of beta-gal expression were detected in comparison with green fluorescent protein (5% to 50% of the cells). With the use of a stereotaxic approach, the pituitary glands of mice were injected with Ad (4 x 10(6) plaque-forming units). In material from these animals, we were able to visualize the expression of the beta-gal gene in the NH and in magnocellular neurons of both the PVN and SON. The results of these experiments indicate that Ad-Rous sarcoma virus promoter-beta-gal is taken up by nerve terminals at the injection site (NH) and retrogradely transported to the soma of the neurons projecting to the NH. We conclude that the application of these experimental approaches will provide powerful tools for physiological studies and potential approaches to deliver therapeutic genes to treat diseases.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated expression of growth and differentiation factor-5 promotes chondrogenesis of adipose stem cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Gang; Wan, Yuqing; Balian, Gary; Laurencin, Cato T; Li, Xudong

    2008-06-01

    The repair of articular cartilage injuries is impeded by the avascular and non-innervated nature of cartilage. Transplantation of autologous chondrocytes has a limited ability to augment the repair process due to the highly differentiated state of chondrocytes and the risks of donor-site morbidity. Mesenchymal stem cells can undergo chondrogenesis in the presence of growth factors for cartilage defect repair. Growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) plays an important role in chondrogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of GDF5 on chondrogenesis of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and evaluate the chondrogenic potentials of GDF5 genetically engineered ADSCs using an in vitro pellet culture model. Rat ADSCs were grown as pellet cultures and treated with chondrogenic media (CM). Induction of GDF5 by an adenovirus (Ad-GDF5) was compared with exogenous supplementation of GDF5 (100 ng/ml) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1; 10 ng/ml). The ADSCs underwent chondrogenic differentiation in response to GDF5 exposure as demonstrated by production of proteoglycan, and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at the protein and mRNA level. The chondrogenic potential of a one-time infection with Ad-GDF5 was weaker than exogenous GDF5, but equal to that of TGF-beta1. Stimulation with growth factors or CM alone induced transient expression of the mRNA for collagen X, indicating a need for optimization of the CM. Our findings indicate that GDF5 is a potent inducer of chondrogenesis in ADSCs, and that ADSCs genetically engineered to express prochondrogenic growth factors, such as GDF5, may be a promising therapeutic cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:18569021

  17. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA targeting MYCN gene induces apoptosis by upregulating RKIP in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Feng, Dongchuan; Zhang, Deyong; Zhuo, Baobiao; Zheng, Junnian

    2015-08-01

    The amplification of MYCN is a typical characteristic of aggressive neuroblastomas, whereas acquired mutations of p53 lead to refractory and relapsed cases. We had previously examined the applicability of the replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus, ZD55-shMYCN, to deliver a short hairpin RNA targeting MYCN gene for p53-null and MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line LA1-55N. Our data have shown that ZD55-shMYCN has an additive tumor growth inhibitory response through shRNA-mediated MYCN knockdown and ZD55-mediated cancer cell lysis. In this regard, ZD55-shMYCN can downregulate MYCN and perform anticancer effects, thereby acquiring significance in the administration of MYCN-amplified and p53-null neuroblastomas. Hence, we further investigated the anticancer properties of ZD55-shMYCN in neuroblastomas. Our data showed that ZD55-shMYCN induced G2/M arrest via decreasing the levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 irrespective of p53 status. ZD55-shMYCN effectively induced apoptosis in neuroblastomas through activation of caspase-3 and enhancing PARP cleavage. Furthermore, ZD55-shMYCN could downregulate phosphoinositide 3-kinase and pAkt and upregulate RKIP levels. Similarly, pro-apoptosis was revealed by the histopathologic examination of paraffin-embedded section of resected tumors of mice xenograft. In vitro and in vivo studies, we elucidate the apoptosis properties and mechanisms of action of ZD55-shMYCN, which provide a promising approach for further clinical development.

  18. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  19. pRB-E2F1 complexes are resistant to adenovirus E1A-mediated disruption.

    PubMed

    Seifried, L A; Talluri, S; Cecchini, M; Julian, L M; Mymryk, J S; Dick, F A

    2008-05-01

    Disruption of pRB-E2F interactions by E1A is a key event in the adenoviral life cycle that drives expression of early viral transcription and induces cell cycle progression. This function of E1A is complicated by E2F1, an E2F family member that controls multiple processes besides proliferation, including apoptosis and DNA repair. Recently, a second interaction site in pRB that only contacts E2F1 has been discovered, allowing pRB to control proliferation separately from other E2F1-dependent activities. Based on this new insight into pRB-E2F1 regulation, we investigated how E1A affects control of E2F1 by pRB. Our data reveal that pRB-E2F1 interactions are resistant to E1A-mediated disruption. Using mutant forms of pRB that selectively force E2F1 to bind through only one of the two binding sites on pRB, we determined that E1A is unable to disrupt E2F1's unique interaction with pRB. Furthermore, analysis of pRB-E2F complexes during adenoviral infection reveals the selective maintenance of pRB-E2F1 interactions despite the presence of E1A. Our experiments also demonstrate that E2F1 functions to maintain cell viability in response to E1A expression. This suggests that adenovirus E1A's seemingly complex mechanism of disrupting pRB-E2F interactions provides selectivity in promoting viral transcription and cell cycle advancement, while maintaining cell viability.

  20. Development of a competitive PCR method for physical titration of recombinant EBV vector in a helper-dependent packaging system.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Vos, J M

    2001-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gamma-herpesvirus with B lymphotropism and a double-stranded DNA genome of 172 kb that is episomally maintained in permissive cells during latency. EBV-based vectors containing minimal cis elements for replication, amplification, and helper-dependent packaging in a producer cell line HH514 have been developed to deliver therapeutic/suicide transgenes as infectious viral particles (miniEBV) to EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cells or B lymphoma cells. A quantitative, competitive PCR-based assay was developed to determine the relative packaging efficiencies of miniEBV and helper P3HR1 coproduced in HH514 cells. This provides a rapid and accurate quantitation of the physical titer of the virus preparation, which helps preserve the biological titer of the virus preparation and increase the efficiency of transgene delivery by miniEBV infection. In addition, it provides a sensitive and accurate way to evaluate future development of a helper-free packaging system by detecting any possible helper virus contamination.

  1. Short-term Correction of Arginase Deficiency in a Neonatal Murine Model With a Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Chia-Ling; Rosenblatt, Robin A; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lay, Fides D; Dow, Adrienne C; Livesay, Justin; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Grody, Wayne W; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy has the potential to ameliorate abnormalities before disease onset. Our gene knockout of arginase I (AI) deficiency is characterized by increasing hyperammonemia, neurological deterioration, and early death. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDV) carrying AI and examined for correction of this defect. Neonates were administered 5 × 109 viral particles/g and analyzed for survival, arginase activity, and ammonia and amino acids levels. The life expectancy of arg−/− mice increased to 27 days while controls died at 14 days with hyperammonemia and in extremis. Death correlated with a decrease in viral DNA/RNA per cell as liver mass increased. Arginase assays demonstrated that vector-injected hepatocytes had ~20% activity of heterozygotes at 2 weeks of age. Hepatic arginine and ornithine in treated mice were similar to those of saline-injected heterozygotes at 2 weeks, whereas ammonia was normal. By 26 days, arginase activity in the treated arg−/− livers declined to <10%, and arginine and ornithine increased. Ammonia levels began increasing by day 25, suggesting the cause of death to be similar to that of uninjected arg−/− mice, albeit at a later time. These studies demonstrate that the AI deficient newborn mouse can be temporarily corrected and rescued using a HDV. PMID:19367256

  2. Quantitative determination of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to rat cardiac myocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kass-Eisler, A; Falck-Pedersen, E; Alvira, M; Rivera, J; Buttrick, P M; Wittenberg, B A; Cipriani, L; Leinwand, L A

    1993-01-01

    To optimize the use of modified adenoviruses as vectors for gene delivery to the myocardium, we have characterized infection of cultured fetal and adult rat cardiac myocytes in vitro and of adult cardiac myocytes in vivo by using a replication-defective adenovirus carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter (AdCMVCATgD). In vitro, virtually all fetal or adult cardiocytes express the CAT gene when infected with 1 plaque-forming unit of virus per cell. CAT enzymatic activity can be detected in these cells as early as 4 hr after infection, reaching near-maximal levels at 48 hr. In fetal cells, CAT expression was maintained without a loss in activity for at least 1 week. Using in vitro studies as a guide, we introduced the AdCMVCATgD virus directly into adult rat myocardium and compared the expression results obtained from virus injection with those obtained by direct injection of pAdCMVCATgD plasmid DNA. The amount of CAT activity resulting from adenovirus infection of the myocardium was orders of magnitude higher than that seen from DNA injection and was proportional to the amount of input virus. Immunostaining for CAT protein in cardiac tissue sections following adenovirus injection demonstrated large numbers of positive cells, reaching nearly 100% of the myocytes in many regions of the heart. Expression of genes introduced by adenovirus peaked at 5 days but was still detectable 55 days following infection. Adenoviruses are therefore a very useful tool for high-efficiency gene transfer into the cardiovascular system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8265580

  3. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P.; Norona, Wilma S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lee, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    Crigler–Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to «1.4 mg/dl for >2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 × 1012 viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIα and XIIIα in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 × 1011 viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler–Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  4. Correction of Hyperbilirubinemia in Gunn Rats Using Clinically Relevant Low Doses of Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, David; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Palmer, Donna J.; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Crigler–Najjar syndrome type I is a severe inborn error of bilirubin metabolism caused by a complete deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) and results in life-threatening unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Lifelong correction of hyperbilirubinemia by liver-directed gene therapy using a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector has been previously reported in the Gunn rat, a model of Crigler–Najjar syndrome, but was only achieved using high doses (≥3 × 1012 viral particles [vp]/kg), which are likely to elicit a severe toxic response in humans. Therefore, in this study, we investigate strategies to achieve correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat using clinically relevant low HDAd doses. We have found that correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat can be achieved with a low dose of 5 × 1011 vp/kg by using an HDAd vector bearing a more potent UGT1A1 expression cassette. Furthermore, by using hydrodynamic injection of the improved HDAd vector, correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat can be achieved using an even lower dose of 5 × 1010 vp/kg. Although hydrodynamic injection as performed in rats is not acceptable in humans, clinically attractive, minimally invasive methods have been successfully developed to mimic hydrodynamic injection of HDAd vector in non-human primates. Therefore, using an improved expression cassette combined with a more efficient method of vector delivery permits correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat using clinically relevant low HDAd doses and may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd vectors for Crigler–Najjar syndrome gene therapy. PMID:20973621

  5. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P; Norona, Wilma S; Finegold, Milton J; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2005-03-15

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to <1.4 mg/dl for >2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 x 10(12) viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIalpha and XIIIalpha in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 x 10(11) viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  6. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon-catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Mullins, Charles E.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Leen, Ann M; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/−) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery, or by catheter-based intra-hepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ≤1.1×1012 viral particles (vp)/kg failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5×1012 vp/kg led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pretreatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4×1012 vp/kg resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1×1012 vp/kg that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pretreatment level on days 20 to 48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upwards on day 72 and returned to pretreatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78% and 50%, respectively, in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR gene delivery to

  7. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  8. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  9. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  10. Inhibition of hepatocellular carcinoma growth by adenovirus-mediated expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase COOH-27 terminal polypeptide in mice

    PubMed Central

    HE, LEI; GONG, HAN-XIAN; LI, XIANG-PEN; WANG, YI-DONG; LI, YI; HUANG, JUN-JIAN; XIE, DAN; KUNG, HSIANG-FU; PENG, YING

    2013-01-01

    A 27-kDa C-terminal fragment of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, hTERTC27, has previously been reported to inhibit the growth and tumorigenicity of HeLa human cervical cancer cells and U87-MG human glioblastoma multiforme cells. However, the antitumor effects of hTERTC27 in hepatoma and its underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the current study, the therapeutic effect of hTERTC27, mediated by recombinant adenovirus, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was explored in vitro and in vivo to investigate the possible mechanisms. The results indicated that recombinant adenovirus carrying hTERTC27 (rAdv-hTERTC27) effectively inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis of the Hepa 1–6 HCC cells. Dendritic cells transduced with rAdv-hTERTC27 were highly effective at inducing antigen-specific T cell proliferation and increasing the activated cytotoxicity of T cells against Hepa 1–6 cells. HCC was inhibited significantly when a single dose of 5×107 pfu rAdv-hTERTC27 was administered intravenously. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated that rAdv-hTERTC27 may serve as a reagent for intravenous administration when combined with telomerase-based gene therapy and immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:24137404

  11. Adenovirus-mediated bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene transfection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells combined with nano-hydroxyapatite to construct bone graft material in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, W C; Wang, D P; Li, L J; Zhu, W M; Zeng, Y J

    2013-04-01

    To study the adhesion, proliferation and expression of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on nano-hydroxyapatite (Nano-HA) bone graft material after transfection of adenovirus-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein-2 expression vector (Ad-BMP-2). BMSCs were transfected using Ad-BMP-2. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect BMP-2 expression in transfected cells. After transfection, BMP-2 protein was highly expressed in BMSCs; MTT test assay showed that the Nano-HA bone graft material could not inhibit in vitro proliferation of BMSCs. Ad-BMP-2-transfected BMSCs are well biocompatible with Nano-HA bone graft material, the transfected cells in material can secrete BMP-2 stably for a long time.

  12. Adenovirus-mediated RNA interference against foot-and-mouth disease virus infection both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizao; Liu, Mingqiu; Jiao, Ye; Yan, Weiyao; Wei, Xuefeng; Chen, Jiulian; Fei, Liang; Liu, Yang; Zuo, Xiaoping; Yang, Fugui; Lu, Yonggan; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2006-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection is responsible for the heavy economic losses in stockbreeding each year. Because of the limited effectiveness of existing vaccines and antiviral drugs, the development of new strategies is needed. RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective means of suppressing virus replication in vitro. Here we demonstrate that treatment with recombinant, replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) expressing short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) directed against either structural protein 1D (Ad5-NT21) or polymerase 3D (Ad5-POL) of FMDV totally protects swine IBRS-2 cells from homologous FMDV infection, whereas only Ad5-POL inhibits heterologous FMDV replication. Moreover, delivery of these shRNAs significantly reduces the susceptibility of guinea pigs and swine to FMDV infection. Three of five guinea pigs inoculated with 10(6) PFU of Ad5-POL and challenged 24 h later with 50 50% infectious doses (ID50) of homologous virus were protected from the major clinical manifestation of disease: the appearance of vesicles on the feet. Two of three swine inoculated with an Ad5-NT21-Ad5-POL mixture containing 2 x 10(9) PFU each and challenged 24 h later with 100 ID50 of homologous virus were protected from the major clinical disease, but treatment with a higher dose of adenovirus mixture cannot promote protection of animals. The inhibition was rapid and specific because treatment with a control adenovirus construct (Ad5-LacZ) expressing Escherichia coli galactosidase-specific shRNA showed no marked antiviral activity. Our data highlight the in vivo potential of RNAi technology in the case of FMD. PMID:16537624

  13. Highly specific transgene expression mediated by a complex adenovirus vector incorporating a prostate-specific amplification feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Woraratanadharm, Jan; Rubinchik, Semyon; Yu, Hong; Fan, Fan; Morrow, Scotty M.; Dong., John Y.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Development of novel therapeutic agents is needed to address the problems of locally recurrent, metastatic, and advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer. We have constructed a novel complex adenovirus (Ad) vector regulation system that incorporates both the prostate-specific ARR2PB promoter and a positive feedback loop using the TRE promoter to enhance gene expression. This regulation strategy involves the incorporation of the TRE upstream of the prostate-specific ARR2PB promoter to enhance its activity with Tet-regulation. The expressions of both GFP and tTA were placed under the control of these TRE-ARR2PB promoters, so that in the cells of prostate origin, a positive feedback loop would be generated. This design greatly enhanced GFP reporter expression in prostate cancer cells, while retaining tight control of expression in non-prostate cancer cells, even at MOI as high as 1000. This novel positive feedback loop with prostate specificity (PFLPS) regulation system we have developed may have broad applications for expressing not only high levels of toxic proteins in cancer cells but alternatively could be manipulated to regulate essential genes in a highly efficient conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vector specifically directed to prostate cancer cells. The PFLPS regulation system, therefore, serves as a promising new approach in the development of both a specific and effective vector for cancer gene therapy. PMID:15229631

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of the antisense chk2 selectively inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Zhou, J; Gao, Q; Huang, X; Li, K; Zhuang, L; Huang, M; Xu, G; Wang, S; Lu, Y; Ma, D

    2006-10-01

    Screening and identifying molecules target to checkpoint pathways has fostered the development of checkpoint-based anticancer strategies. Among these targets, inhibition of chk2 may induce cell death for tumors whose growth depends on enhanced chk2 activity. However, improvement of the potency and specificity of such therapeutics remains a major challenge. To resolve this problem, we constructed M3, a novel recombinant adenovirus with a 27-bp deletion in E1A CR2 region by which to realize tumor-specific replication, and an 829-bp of antisense chk2 fragment inserted into the E3 coding region. In this design, M3 exploited the native adenovirus E3 promoters to express antisense chk2 cDNA in a viral replication-dependent fashion, and preferentially silenced the chk2 gene in tumor cells. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed that downregulated chk2 expression induced by M3 infection was tumor-specific and virus replication-dependent. Furthermore, systemic administration of M3 combined with a low dose of cisplatin cured 75% (9/12) of orthotopic hepatic carcinoma mouse models that were otherwise resistant to cisplatin. Our results indicated that the upcoming development in this field would improve the antitumor efficacy and maximize the synergistic effect of oncolytic viruses administered with traditional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:16741520

  15. Retrograde Ductal Administration of the Adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 Gene Leads to Improved Sialaden Hypofunction in Estrogen-deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Changhao; Hou, Wugang; Li, Yang; Ma, Ji; Lin, Kaifeng; Situ, Zhenqiang; Xiong, Lize; Li, Shaoqing; Yao, Libo

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common oral manifestations of menopause is xerostomia. Oral dryness can profoundly affect quality of life and interfere with basic daily functions, such as chewing, deglutition, and speaking. Although the feeling of oral dryness can be ameliorated after estrogen supplementation, the side effects of estrogen greatly restrict its application. We previously found that N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is involved in estrogen-mediated ion and fluid transport in a cell-based model. In the present study, we used an ovariectomized rat model to mimic xerostomia in menopausal women and constructed two adenovirus vectors bearing NDRG2 to validate their therapeutic potential. Ovariectomized rats exhibited severe sialaden hypofunction, including decreased saliva secretion and ion reabsorption as well as increased water intake. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of NDRG2 and Na+ reabsorption-related Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channels (EnaC) decreased in ovariectomized rat salivary glands. We further showed that the localized delivery of NDRG2 improved the dysfunction of Na+ and Cl− reabsorption. In addition, the saliva flow rate and water drinking recovered to normal. This study elucidates the mechanism of estrogen deficiency-mediated xerostomia or sialaden hypofunction and provides a promising strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24343104

  16. NAC1, a POZ/BTB protein present in the adult mammalian brain, triggers apoptosis after adenovirus-mediated overexpression in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Korutla, Laxminarayana; Neustadter, Jason H; Fournier, Keith M; Mackler, Scott A

    2003-05-01

    POZ/BTB proteins influence cellular development and in some examples act as oncoproteins. However, several POZ/BTB transcription factors have been found in terminally differentiated neurons, where their functions remain unknown. One example is NAC1, a constitutively-expressed protein that can regulate behaviors associated with cocaine use. The present study represents an initial attempt to understand the actions of NAC1 within neurons by using adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell survival in PC-12 cells overexpressing NAC1 was greatly reduced compared with cells infected by a control Ad-GFP. The morphological appearance of the dying cells was consistent with programmed cell death. Fragmentation of genomic DNA occurred in PC-12 cells infected with adenoviruses encoding NAC1 but not control viruses. NAC1 over expression was followed by the down regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-2-xl. Concurrently, levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 increased following NAC1 overexpression. These observations suggest that NAC1expression in PC-12 cells induces apoptosis by altering the expression of these upstream mediators of the execution phase of programmed cell death. These findings raise the possibility that aberrantly regulated NAC1 expression in the mammalian brain may contribute to programmed cell death.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of soluble ST2 provides a protective effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yin, H; Li, X Y; Yuan, B H; Zhang, B B; Hu, S L; Gu, H B; Jin, X B; Zhu, J Y

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by a diffuse inflammatory parenchymal process, implicated in the context of significant morbidity and mortality. Previously, we have reported that soluble ST2 (sST2), a member of the Toll-interleukin (IL)-1 receptor (TIR) superfamily, represses proinflammatory cytokine production of macrophage exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, we examined the possibility of modulating LPS-induced murine inflammatory pulmonary damage by recombinant adenovirus-mediated sST2-Fc (Ad-sST2-Fc) gene transfer. Single intranasal administration of Ad-sST2-Fc led to a profound decrease in LPS-induced bronchoalveolar lavage leucocyte exudation and lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity (reflecting phagocyte infiltration). Histological examination revealed alveolitis with inflammatory cell infiltration and alveolar haemorrhage in the alveolar airspace was less severe in Ad-sST2-Fc-treated mice when compared with control groups. In addition, high levels of sST2-Fc in vivo reduced the transcription of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-6 and Toll-like receptor-4 gene remarkably, and suppressed the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB in lung tissues in response to LPS challenge. Taken together, these results suggested that administration of Ad-sST2-Fc gene transfer may have therapeutic potential for the immunomodulatory treatment of LPS-mediated inflammatory lung injury. PMID:21352201

  18. Infectious entry pathway of adenovirus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, M J; Weibull, C; Everitt, E

    1991-01-01

    Internalization of the infectious fraction of human adenovirus type 2 into HeLa cells was followed by a quantitative internalization assay. Treatments known to selectively block receptor-mediated endocytosis reduced the internalization of infectious virus to an extent close to the reduction of endocytosis of transferrin. This suggests that one of the first steps in the infectious cycle of adenovirus type 2 is internalization by the coated-pit and -vesicle pathway. Images PMID:1920625

  19. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates atrioventricular-node function and connexin 45 localization in the murine heart.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung-Kwan; Xiong, Dingding; Dorner, Andrea; Youn, Tae-Jin; Yung, Aaron; Liu, Taylor I; Gu, Yusu; Dalton, Nancy D; Wright, Adam T; Evans, Sylvia M; Chen, Ju; Peterson, Kirk L; McCulloch, Andrew D; Yajima, Toshitaka; Knowlton, Kirk U

    2008-08-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a transmembrane protein that belongs to the family of adhesion molecules. In the postnatal heart, it is localized predominantly at the intercalated disc, where its function is not known. Here, we demonstrate that a first degree or complete block of atrioventricular (AV) conduction developed in the absence of CAR in the adult mouse heart and that prolongation of AV conduction occurred in the embryonic heart of the global CAR-KO mouse. In the cardiac-specific CAR-KO (CAR-cKO) mouse, we observed the loss of connexin 45 localization to the cell-cell junctions of the AV node but preservation of connexin 40 and 43 in contracting myocardial cells and connexin 30.2 in the AV node. There was also a marked decrease in beta-catenin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization to the intercalated discs of CAR-cKO mouse hearts at 8 weeks before the mice developed cardiomyopathy at 21 weeks of age. We also found that CAR formed a complex with connexin 45 via its PSD-95/DigA/ZO-1-binding (PDZ-binding) motifs. We conclude that CAR expression is required for normal AV-node conduction and cardiac function. Furthermore, localization of connexin 45 at the AV-node cell-cell junction and of beta-catenin and ZO-1 at the ventricular intercalated disc are dependent on CAR.

  20. Adenovirus-Mediated Over-Expression of Nrf2 Within Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Protected Rats Against Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in the field of cell therapy have led to a renewed interest in treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the early death of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in stressful microenvironment of a recipient tissue is a major problem with this kind of treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of a cytoprotective factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), in MSCs could protect rats against AKI. Methods: The Nrf2 was overexpressed in MSCs by recombinant adenoviruses, and the MSCs were implanted to rats suffering from cisplatin-induced AKI. Results: The obtained results showed that transplantation with the engineered MSCs ameliorates cisplatin-induced AKI. Morphologic features of the investigated kidneys showed that transplantation with the MSCs in which Nrf2 had been overexpressed significantly improved the complications of AKI. Conclusion: These findings suggested that the engineered MSCs might be a good candidate to be further evaluated in clinical trials. However, detailed studies must be performed to investigate the possible carcinogenic effect of Nrf2 overexpression. PMID:26236658

  1. Passive immunotherapy for anthrax toxin mediated by an adenovirus expressing an anti-protective antigen single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Boyer, Julie L; Tan, Yadi; Alipui, D Olivier; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    In the 2001 U.S. bioterror attacks, 33,000 individuals required postexposure prophylaxis, 18 subjects contracted anthrax (11 inhalation, 7 cutaneous), and despite optimal medical therapy, 5 deaths resulted. Rapid protection against anthrax is required in a bioterrorism scenario; this study describes an in vivo gene transfer-based therapy that uses a human adenovirus (Ad)-based vector (AdalphaPAscAb) encoding a single-chain antibody directed against protective antigen (PA), a critical component of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Following AdalphaPAscAb administration to mice, anti-PA single-chain antibody and anti-PA neutralizing activity were detected in serum over a 2-week period. Substantial survival advantage from anthrax lethal toxin was conferred by AdalphaPAscAb following administration from 1 to 14 days prior to toxin challenge, compared to no survival associated with an Ad vector expressing a control single-chain antibody. Passive immunotherapy with an Ad-based vector may be a rapid, convenient approach for protecting a susceptible population against anthrax, including use as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  2. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  3. CBF mediates adenovirus Ela trans-activation by interaction at the C-terminal promoter targeting domain of conserved region 3.

    PubMed

    Agoff, S N; Wu, B

    1994-12-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that conserved region 3 (CR3) of the adenovirus Ela polypeptide can provide two distinct and separable functions: an N-terminal transcriptional activation region and a C-terminal promoter targeting region. It is thought that the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 interacts with promoter-specific transcription factors, thereby bringing the activation region of Ela CR3 in proximity of the promoter. Here we report that CBF, a CCAAT-box-binding factor that regulates hsp70 gene expression and mediates Ela trans-activation in vivo, interacts with the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 in vitro. Point mutations in Ela CR3 that are defective in stimulating transcription from the hsp70 promoter are also defective in stimulating transcription directed by a synthetic activator, GAL-CBF, composed of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 fused to CBF. These mutations fall into two classes with respect to their abilities to interact with CBF in vitro. Mutations in the transcriptional activation region of Ela CR3 do not affect binding to CBF, but mutation of the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 prevents association with CBF in vitro.

  4. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion does not require activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase: impact of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDH kinase and PDH phosphate phosphatase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Linda I; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-03-01

    Glucose-stimulated increases in mitochondrial metabolism are generally thought to be important for the activation of insulin secretion. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key regulatory enzyme, believed to govern the rate of pyruvate entry into the citrate cycle. We show here that elevated glucose concentrations (16 or 30 vs 3 mM) cause an increase in PDH activity in both isolated rat islets, and in a clonal beta-cell line (MIN6). However, increases in PDH activity elicited with either dichloroacetate, or by adenoviral expression of the catalytic subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase, were without effect on glucose-induced increases in mitochondrial pyridine nucleotide levels, or cytosolic ATP concentration, in MIN6 cells, and insulin secretion from isolated rat islets. Similarly, the above parameters were unaffected by blockade of the glucose-induced increase in PDH activity by adenovirus-mediated over-expression of PDH kinase (PDK). Thus, activation of the PDH complex plays an unexpectedly minor role in stimulating glucose metabolism and in triggering insulin release.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  6. Adenovirus-Mediated Somatic Genome Editing of Pten by CRISPR/Cas9 in Mouse Liver in Spite of Cas9-Specific Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Mou, Haiwei; Li, Shaoyong; Li, Yingxiang; Hough, Soren; Tran, Karen; Li, Jia; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Sontheimer, Erik J; Weng, Zhiping; Gao, Guangping; Xue, Wen

    2015-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 derived from the bacterial adaptive immunity pathway is a powerful tool for genome editing, but the safety profiles of in vivo delivered Cas9 (including host immune responses to the bacterial Cas9 protein) have not been comprehensively investigated in model organisms. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a prevalent human liver disease characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver. In this study, we used adenovirus (Ad) vector to deliver a Streptococcus pyogenes-derived Cas9 system (SpCas9) targeting Pten, a gene involved in NASH and a negative regulator of the PI3K-AKT pathway, in mouse liver. We found that the Ad vector mediated efficient Pten gene editing even in the presence of typical Ad vector-associated immunotoxicity in the liver. Four months after vector infusion, mice receiving the Pten gene-editing Ad vector showed massive hepatomegaly and features of NASH, consistent with the phenotypes following Cre-loxP-induced Pten deficiency in mouse liver. We also detected induction of humoral immunity against SpCas9 and the potential presence of an SpCas9-specific cellular immune response. Our findings provide a strategy to model human liver diseases in mice and highlight the importance considering Cas9-specific immune responses in future translational studies involving in vivo delivery of CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:26086867

  7. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  8. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tomono, Takumi; Kajita, Masahiro; Yano, Kentaro; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment.

  9. Chimeric Adenoviral Vectors Incorporating a Fiber of Human Adenovirus 3 Efficiently Mediate Gene Transfer into Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Miho; Ugai, Hideyo; Belousova, Natalya; Pereboev, Alexander; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Paul B.; Everts, Maaike; Curiel, David T.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have developed a range of adenoviral (Ad) vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) displaying the fiber shaft and knob domains of species B viruses (HAdV-3, HAdV-11, or HAdV-35). These species B Ads utilize different cellular receptors than HAdV-5 for infection. We evaluated whether Ad vectors displaying species B fiber shaft and knob domains (Ad5F3Luc1, Ad5F11Luc1, and Ad5F35Luc1) would efficiently infect cancer cells of distinct origins, including prostate cancer. METHODS The fiber chimeric Ad vectors were genetically generated and compared with the original Ad vector (Ad5Luc1) for transductional efficiency in a variety of cancer cell lines, including prostate cancer cells and primary prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), using luciferase as a reporter gene. RESULTS Prostate cancer cell lines infected with Ad5F3Luc1 expressed higher levels of luciferase than Ad5Luc1, as well as the other chimeric Ad vectors. We also analyzed the transductional efficiency via monitoring of luciferase activity in prostate cancer cells when expressed as a fraction of the gene transfer in PrEC cells. In the PC-3 and DU145 cell lines, the gene transfer ratio of cancer cells versus PrEC was once again highest for Ad5F3Luc1. CONCLUSION Of the investigated chimeric HAdV-5/species B vectors, Ad5F3Luc1 was judged to be the most suitable for targeting prostate cancer cells as it showed the highest transductional efficiency in these cells. It is foreseeable that an Ad vector incorporating the HAdV-3 fiber could potentially be used for prostate cancer gene therapy. PMID:19902467

  10. Effect of adenovirus mediated β2-AR overexpression on IL-10 level secreted by cardiomyocytes of heart failure rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Zheng, Cheng; Liu, Ying; Wang, Lei; Gong, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    The effect of β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) overexpression on interleukin (IL)-10 content secreted by cardiomyocytes of heart failure (HF) rats was investigated. A rat model of chronic HF was established by partially banding abdominal aorta and the cardiomyocytes were isolated with collagenase II. The cardiomyocytes were then transfected with adenovirus type 5-ADRβ2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) for 48 h to observe the changes of β2-AR protein expression using western blot analysis. The IL-10 level was detected by ELISA. The experiment was divided into seven groups: Control, HF, HF+EGFP, HF+β2, sham, sham+EGFP and sham+β2 groups. Compared with the sham-operated group, left ventricular diastolic dimension, and left ventricular systolic dimension were increased (P<0.05), whereas ejection fraction and fractional shortening were decreased (P<0.05) in the HF group. Compared with the sham group, the cardiomyocyte survival rate of the HF group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). Compared with the control or sham group, the β2-AR protein level of the HF group showed no significant differences (P>0.05). Compared with the HF and HF+EGFP groups, the expression of β2-AR protein of cardiomyocytes was increased in the HF+β2 group (P<0.05). Compared with the sham group, IL-10 content secreted by cardiomyocytes in the HF group was increased (P<0.05). Compared with the HF and HF+EGFP groups, IL-10 content in the HF+β2 group was increased significantly (P<0.05). In conclusion, the concentration of IL-10 secreted by cardiomyocytes of HF rats was increased. The overexpression of β2-AR in the cardiomyocytes of HF rats was able to enhance the secretion of IL-10.

  11. Adenovirus-mediated interference of FABP4 regulates mRNA expression of ADIPOQ, LEP and LEPR in bovine adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, S; Zan, L S; Wang, H B; Cheng, G; Du, M; Jiang, Z; Hausman, G J; McFarland, D C; Dodson, M V

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is an important adipocyte gene, with roles in fatty acid transport and fat deposition in animals as well as human metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about the functional regulation of FABP4 at the cellular level in bovine. We designed and selected an effective shRNA (small hairpin RNA) against bovine FABP4, constructed a corresponding adenovirus (AD-FABP4), and then detected its influence on mRNA expression of four differentiation-related genes (PPAR(y), CEBPA, CEBPB, and SREBF1) and three lipid metabolism-related genes (ADIPOQ, LEP and LEPR) of adipocytes. The FABP4 mRNA content, derived from bovine adipocytes, decreased by 41% (P < 0.01) after 24 h and 66% (P < 0.01) after 72 h of AD-FABP4 infection. However, lower mRNA content of FABP4 did not significantly alter levels of differentiation-related gene expression at 24 h following AD-FABP4 treatment of bovine-derived preadipocytes (P = 0.54, 0.78, 0.89, and 0.94, respectively). Meanwhile, knocking down (partially silencing) FABP4 significantly decreased ADIPOQ (P < 0.05) and LEP (P < 0.01) gene expression after 24 h of AD-FABP4 treatment, decreased ADIPOQ (P < 0.01) and LEP (P < 0.01) gene expression, but increased LEPR mRNA expression (P < 0.01) after a 72-h treatment of bovine preadipocytes. We conclude that FABP4 plays a role in fat deposition and metabolic syndrome by regulating lipid metabolism-related genes (such as ADIPOQ, LEP and LEPR), without affecting the ability of preadipocytes to differentiate into adipocytes.

  12. Effect of adenovirus mediated β2-AR overexpression on IL-10 level secreted by cardiomyocytes of heart failure rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Zheng, Cheng; Liu, Ying; Wang, Lei; Gong, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    The effect of β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) overexpression on interleukin (IL)-10 content secreted by cardiomyocytes of heart failure (HF) rats was investigated. A rat model of chronic HF was established by partially banding abdominal aorta and the cardiomyocytes were isolated with collagenase II. The cardiomyocytes were then transfected with adenovirus type 5-ADRβ2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) for 48 h to observe the changes of β2-AR protein expression using western blot analysis. The IL-10 level was detected by ELISA. The experiment was divided into seven groups: Control, HF, HF+EGFP, HF+β2, sham, sham+EGFP and sham+β2 groups. Compared with the sham-operated group, left ventricular diastolic dimension, and left ventricular systolic dimension were increased (P<0.05), whereas ejection fraction and fractional shortening were decreased (P<0.05) in the HF group. Compared with the sham group, the cardiomyocyte survival rate of the HF group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). Compared with the control or sham group, the β2-AR protein level of the HF group showed no significant differences (P>0.05). Compared with the HF and HF+EGFP groups, the expression of β2-AR protein of cardiomyocytes was increased in the HF+β2 group (P<0.05). Compared with the sham group, IL-10 content secreted by cardiomyocytes in the HF group was increased (P<0.05). Compared with the HF and HF+EGFP groups, IL-10 content in the HF+β2 group was increased significantly (P<0.05). In conclusion, the concentration of IL-10 secreted by cardiomyocytes of HF rats was increased. The overexpression of β2-AR in the cardiomyocytes of HF rats was able to enhance the secretion of IL-10. PMID:27602066

  13. The Adenovirus Type 5 E1B-55K Oncoprotein Actively Shuttles in Virus-Infected Cells, Whereas Transport of E4orf6 Is Mediated by a CRM1-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dosch, Tanja; Horn, Florian; Schneider, Grit; Krätzer, Friedrich; Dobner, Thomas; Hauber, Joachim; Stauber, Roland H.

    2001-01-01

    The E1B-55K and E4orf6 proteins of adenovirus type 5 are involved in viral mRNA export. Here we demonstrate that adenovirus infection does not inhibit the function of the E1B-55K nuclear export signal and that E1B-55K also shuttles in infected cells. Even during virus infection, E1B-55K was exported by the leptomycin B-sensitive CRM1 pathway, whereas E4orf6 transport appeared to be mediated by an alternative mechanism. Our results strengthen the potential role of E1B-55K as the “driving force” for adenoviral late mRNA export. PMID:11356976

  14. Adenovirus-mediated p53 and ING4 gene co-transfer elicits synergistic antitumor effects through enhancement of p53 acetylation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Zhu, Yanbo; Xu, Chun; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Xiumin; Yang, Jicheng; Xie, Yufeng; Tao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Multigene-based combination therapy may be an effective practice in cancer gene therapy. Substantial studies have demonstrated that tumor suppressor p53 acetylation is indispensable for p53 activation. Inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), as a novel tumor suppressor, is capable of remarkably enhancing p53 acetylation and its transcriptional activity. Hence, we assumed that combined treatment of p53 and ING4 double tumor suppressors would exhibit enhanced antitumor effects. The combined therapeutic efficacy of p53 and ING4 for human cancers has not been previously reported. We thus generated multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus-co-expressing ING4 and p53 double tumor suppressor genes (AdVING4/p53), evaluated the combined effects of AdVING4/p53 on breast cancer using the MDA-MB-231 (mutant p53) human breast cancer cell line, and also elucidated its underlying molecular mechanisms. We demonstrated that AdVING4/p53-mediated p53 and ING4 co-expression induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis as well as enhanced effects on upregulation of acetylated p53, P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, and downregulation of Bcl-2, CD31 and microvessel density (MVD) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer in vitro and/or in vivo subcutaneous (s.c.) xenografted tumors. The synergistic antitumor activity elicited by AdVING4/p53 was closely associated with the enhanced activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, very possibly via ING4-mediated enhancement of p53 acetylation and activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining two or more tumor suppressors such as p53 and ING4 may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human breast cancer and other cancers.

  15. Downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a novel spinal metastatic melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Andrew J; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Chetty, Chandramu; Lakka, Sajani S; Gujrati, Meena; Spomar, Daniel G; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a class of secreted zinc-dependent endopeptidases implicated in the metastatic potential of tumor cells due to their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been detected in high levels and correlates with invasiveness in human melanoma. We have studied the effect of adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MMP-2 in the human melanoma cell line A2058. The delivery of these double-stranded RNA molecules represents an efficient technology in silencing disease-causing genes with known sequences at the post-transcriptional level. siRNA against MMP-2 mRNA (Ad-MMP-2) was found to decrease MMP-2 protein expression and activity in melanoma cells as demonstrated by western blotting and gelatin zymography. Furthermore, infection of cells with Ad-MMP-2 inhibited cellular migration and invasion as indicated by spheroid and matrigel assays. We also observed dose-dependent suppression of vascular network formation in an angiogenesis assay. Finally, we developed a nude mouse spinal metastatic model to investigate the local effects of tumor metastasis. Intravenous tail vein injection with Ad-MMP-2 on days 5, 9 and 11 after tumor implantation resulted in complete retention of neurological function as compared to control and scrambled vector (Ad-SV)-treated groups that showed complete paraplegia by day 14+/-2 days. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed decreased tumor size in the Ad-MMP-2-treated animals. This novel experimental model revealed that adenoviral-mediated transfer of RNA interference against MMP-2 results in the retention of neurological function and significantly inhibited tumor growth.

  16. Silk-Elastinlike Hydrogel Improves the Safety of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene-Directed Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Joshua A.; Price, Robert A.; Greish, Khaled; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein polymers (SELPs) are well-known for their highly tunable properties on both the molecular and macroscopic hydrogel level. One specific structure of these polymers, SELP-815K, has been investigated as an injectable controlled delivery system for the treatment of head and neck cancer via a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Due to its pore size and gelation properties in vivo, SELP restricts the distribution and controls the release of therapeutic viruses for up to one month. It has been shown that SELP-mediated delivery significantly improves therapeutic outcome of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system in xenograft models of human head and neck cancer. However little is known about potential benefits of this approach with regard to toxicity in the presence of a fully intact immune system. The studies presented here were designed to assess the change in toxicity of the SELP mediated viral delivery compared to free viral injection in a non-tumor bearing immune competent mouse model. Toxicity was assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks via body weight monitoring, complete blood count (CBC), and blood chemistry. It was found that in the acute and subacute phases (weeks 1-4) there is significant toxicity in groups combining the virus and the prodrug, and matrix-mediated gene delivery with SELP demonstrates a reduction in toxicity from the 2 week time point through the 4 week time point. At the end of the subchronic phase (12 weeks), signs of toxicity had subsided in both groups. Based on these results, recombinant SELPs offer a significant reduction in toxicity of virus-mediated GDEPT treatment compared to free virus injection in the acute and subacute phases. PMID:20586469

  17. Adenovirus-mediated ING4 Gene Transfer in Osteosarcoma Suppresses Tumor Growth via Induction of Apoptosis and Inhibition of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xie, Yufeng; Sheng, Weihua; Miao, Jingcheng; Yang, Jicheng

    2015-08-01

    The inhibitor of growth (ING) family proteins have been defined as candidate tumor suppressors. ING4 as a novel member of ING family has potential tumor-suppressive effects via multiple pathways. However, the therapeutic effect of adenovirus-mediated ING4 (Ad-ING4) gene transfer in human osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we explored the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of Ad-ING4 in human osteosarcoma and its potential mechanism using a MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line. We demonstrated that Ad-ING4 induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis, upregulated the expression of P21, P27 and Bax, downregulated the Bcl-2 expression and activated Caspase-3 in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, intratumoral injections of Ad-ING4 in athymic nude mice bearing MG-63 human osteosarcoma tumors significantly suppressed osteosarcoma xenografted tumor growth, increased the expression of P21, P27 and Bax, reduced the Bcl-2 and CD34 expression and microvessel density (MVD) in tumors. This retarded MG-63 osteosarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo in an athymic nude mouse model elicited by Ad-ING4 was closely associated with the increase in the expression of cell cycle-related molecules P21 and P27, decrease in the ratio of anti- to pro-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2/Bax followed by the activation of Caspase-3 leading to apoptosis via intrinsic apoptotic pathways, and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, our results indicate that Ad-ING4 is a potential candidate for human osteosarcoma gene therapy.

  18. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  19. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  20. Sensitive and selective amplification of methylated DNA sequences using helper-dependent chain reaction in combination with a methylation-dependent restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rand, Keith N; Young, Graeme P; Ho, Thu; Molloy, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for specific amplification of rare methylated DNA fragments in a high background of unmethylated sequences that avoids the need of bisulphite conversion. The methylation-dependent restriction enzyme GlaI is used to selectively cut methylated DNA. Then targeted fragments are tagged using specially designed 'helper' oligonucleotides that are also used to maintain selection in subsequent amplification cycles in a process called 'helper-dependent chain reaction'. The process uses disabled primers called 'drivers' that can only prime on each cycle if the helpers recognize specific sequences within the target amplicon. In this way, selection for the sequence of interest is maintained throughout the amplification, preventing amplification of unwanted sequences. Here we show how the method can be applied to methylated Septin 9, a promising biomarker for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. The GlaI digestion and subsequent amplification can all be done in a single tube. A detection sensitivity of 0.1% methylated DNA in a background of unmethylated DNA was achieved, which was similar to the well-established Heavy Methyl method that requires bisulphite-treated DNA.

  1. Modulation of TNFalpha, a determinant of acute toxicity associated with systemic delivery of first-generation and helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Mane, V P; Toietta, G; McCormack, W M; Conde, I; Clarke, C; Palmer, D; Finegold, M J; Pastore, L; Ng, P; Lopez, J; Lee, B

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the determinants of the host innate immune response to systemic administration of adenoviral (Ad) vectors is critical for clinical gene therapy. Acute toxicity occurs within minutes to hours after vector administration and is characterized by activation of innate immune responses. Our data indicate that in mice, indicators of vector toxicity include elevations of cytokine levels, liver transaminase levels and thrombocytopenia. To discern potential targets for blunting this host response, we evaluated genetic factors in the host response to systemically administered first-generation Ad vectors (FGV) and helper-dependent Ad vectors (HDV) containing beta-galactosidase expression cassettes. A preliminary screen for modulation of vector-induced thrombocytopenia revealed no role for interferon-gamma, mast cells or perforin. However, vector-induced thrombocytopenia and interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression are less evident in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-deficient mice. Moreover, we also demonstrated that TNFalpha blockade via antibody or huTNFR:Fc pretreatment attenuates both thrombocytopenia (>40% increase in platelet count) and IL-6 expression (>80% reduction) without affecting interleukin 12 , liver enzymes, hematological indices or vector transduction in a murine model. Our data indicate that the use of HDV, in combination with clinically approved TNFalpha immunomodulation, may represent an approach for improving the therapeutic index of Ad gene therapy for human clinical trials. PMID:16708078

  2. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) increases apoptosis, represses growth of cancer cells, and enhances adenovirus-mediated oncolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Rao, Xiao-Mei; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that high intake of cruciferous vegetables is associated with a lower risk of cancer. Experiments have shown that indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a naturally occurring compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, exhibits potent anticarcinogenic properties in a wide range of cancers. In this study, we showed that higher doses of I3C (≥400 μM) induced apoptotic cancer cell death and lower doses of I3C (≤200 μM) repressed cancer cell growth concurrently with suppressed expression of cyclin E and its partner CDK2. Notably, we found that pretreatment with low doses of I3C enhanced Ad-mediated oncolysis and cytotoxicity of human carcinoma cells by synergistic upregulation of apoptosis. Thus, the vegetable compound I3C as a dietary supplement may benefit cancer prevention and improve Ad oncolytic therapies.

  3. Normalization of raised sodium absorption and raised calcium-mediated chloride secretion by adenovirus-mediated expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in primary human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L G; Boyles, S E; Wilson, J; Boucher, R C

    1995-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis airway epithelia exhibit a spectrum of ion transport properties that differ from normal, including not only defective cAMP-mediated Cl- secretion, but also increased Na+ absorption and increased Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion. In the present study, we examined whether adenovirus-mediated (Ad5) transduction of CFTR can correct all of these CF ion transport abnormalities. Polarized primary cultures of human CF and normal nasal epithelial cells were infected with Ad5-CBCFTR at an moi (10(4)) which transduced virtually all cells or Ad5-CMV lacZ as a control. Consistent with previous reports, Ad5-CBCFTR, but not Ad5-CMV lacZ, corrected defective CF cAMP-mediated Cl- secretion. Basal Na+ transport rates (basal Ieq) in CF airway epithelial sheets (-78.5 +/- 9.8 microA/cm2) were reduced to levels measured in normal epithelial sheets (-30.0 +/- 2.0 microA/cm2) by Ad5-CBCFTR (-36.9 +/- 4.8 microA/cm2), but not Ad5-CMV lacZ (-65.8 +/- 6.1 microA/cm2). Surprisingly, a significant reduction in delta Ieq in response to ionomycin, a measure of Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion, was observed in CFTR-expressing (corrected) CF epithelial sheets (-6.9 +/- 11.8 microA/cm2) when compared to uninfected CF epithelial sheets (-76.2 +/- 15.1 microA/cm2). Dose response effects of Ad5-CBCFTR on basal Na+ transport rates and Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion suggest that the mechanism of regulation of these two ion transport functions by CFTR may be different. In conclusion, efficient transduction of CFTR corrects hyperabsorption of Na+ in primary CF airway epithelial cells and restores Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion to levels observed in normal airway epithelial cells. Moreover, assessment of these ion transport abnormalities may represent important endpoints for testing the efficacy of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7533790

  4. ADENO-ASSOCIATED SATELLITE VIRUS INTERFERENCE WITH THE REPLICATION OF ITS HELPER ADENOVIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Wade P.; Casazza, Anna M.; Alcott, Judith; Melnick, Joseph L.

    1968-01-01

    Adeno-associated satellite virus type 4 interferes with the replication of its helper adenovirus. No interferon-like soluble substance could be detected in satellite-infected cultures and other DNA- and RNA-containing viruses were not inhibited by coinfection with satellite virus under conditions which reduced adenovirus yields by more than 90% in monkey cells. Altering the concentration of adenovirus in the presence of constant amounts of satellite resulted in a constant degree of interference over a wide range of adenovirus inocula and suggested that adenovirus concentration was not a significant factor in the observed interference. The interference with adenovirus replication was abolished by pretreating satellite preparations with specific antiserum, ultraviolet light or heating at 80°C for 30 min. This suggested that infectious satellite virus mediated the interference. Satellite virus concentration was found to be a determinant of interference and studies indicated that the amount of interference with adenovirus was directly proportional to the concentration of satellite virus. 8 hr after adenovirus infection, the replication of adenovirus was no longer sensitive to satellite interference. This was true even though the satellite virus was enhanced as effectively as if the cells were infected simultaneously with both viruses. Interference with adenovirus infectivity was accompanied by reduced yields of complement-fixing antigen and of virus particles which suggested that satellite virus interfered with the formation and not the function of adenovirus products. When cells were infected either with adenovirus alone or with adenovirus plus satellite, the same proportion of cells plated as adenovirus infectious centers. However, the number of plaque-forming units of adenovirus formed per cell in the satellite-infected cultures was reduced by approximately 90%, the same magnitude of reduction noted in whole cultures coinfected with satellite and adenovirus. This

  5. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers. PMID:14528320

  6. Protective role of adenovirus vector-mediated interleukin-10 gene therapy on endogenous islet β-cells in recent-onset type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    LI, CHENG; ZHANG, LIJUAN; CHEN, YANYAN; LIN, XIAOJIE; LI, TANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide an animal experimental basis for the protective effect of the adenoviral vector-mediated interleukin-10 (Ad-mIL-10) gene on islet β-cells during the early stages of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. A total of 24 female NOD mice at the onset of diabetes were allocated at random into three groups (n=8 per group): Group 1, intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml Ad-mIL-10; group 2, intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml adenovirus vector; and group 3, was a diabetic control. In addition to groups 1, 2 and 3, 8 age- and gender-matched NOD mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml PBS and assigned to group 4 as a normal control. All mice were examined weekly for body weight, urine glucose and blood glucose values prior to onset of diabetes, and at 1, 2 and 3 weeks after that, and all mice were sacrificed 3 weeks after injection. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, insulin and C-peptide were evaluated, and in addition the degree of insulitis and the local expression of IL-10 gene in the pancreas were detected. The apoptosis rate of pancreatic β-cells was determined using a TUNEL assay. Compared with groups 2 and 3, IL-10 levels in the serum and pancreas were elevated in group 1. Serum IFN-γ levels were decreased while serum IL-4 levels and IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio were significantly increased in group 1 (P<0.01). C-peptide and insulin levels were higher in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3, (P<0.01). Furthermore, compared with groups 2 and 3, the degree of insulitis, islet β-cell apoptosis rate and blood glucose values did not change significantly (P>0.05). The administration of the Ad-mIL-10 gene induced limited immune regulatory and protective effects on islet β-cell function in NOD mice with early T1D, while no significant reduction in insulitis, islet β-cell apoptosis rate and blood glucose was observed. PMID:27168782

  7. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  8. Killing effect of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus in combination with hematoporphrphyrin derivative-mediated photodynamic therapy on human nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Guan, Wei; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yun-Song; Zeng, Lin-Li; Li, Zeng-Peng; Wang, Ge; Yang, Zhen-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to investigate the killing effects and molecular mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated by the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus in combination with a hematoporphrphyrin derivative (HpD) in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line in vitro to provide a theoretical reference for treating lung cancer by HpD-PDT. By using the technologies of MTT, flow cytometry, ELISA, and western blot, we observed that the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of the A549 cells were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05) after HpD-PDT was performed. The inhibitory efficiency is dependent on the HpD concentration and laser intensity dose. The inhibitory effect on the proliferation of A549 cells of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA is more significant after combining with PDT, as indicated by a significant elevation of the intracellular ROS level and the expression of inflammatory factors (P < 0.05). The HpD-PDT-induced expression of the APE1 protein reached the peak after 24 h in A549 cells. The inhibition of APE1 expression in A549 cells was most significant after 48 hours of infection by Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus (10 MOI). In conclusion, the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus could efficiently inhibit the HpD-PDT-induced APE1 expression hence could significantly enhance the killing effect of HpD-PDT in lung cancer cells.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of dominant negative ras(asn17) in 3T3L1 adipocytes does not alter insulin-stimulated P13-kinase activity or glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Gnudi, L; Frevert, E U; Houseknecht, K L; Erhardt, P; Kahn, B B

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the ras-map kinase and PI3-kinase cascades converge. We sought to determine whether PI3-kinase is downstream of ras in insulin signaling in a classic insulin target cell. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding dominant negative ras by cloning the human H-ras cDNA with a ser to asn substitution at amino acid 17 (ras(asn17)) into the pACCMVpLpA vector and cotransfecting 293 cells with the pJM17 plasmid containing the adenoviral genome. Efficiency of gene transfer was assessed by infecting fully differentiated 3T3L1 adipocytes with a recombinant adenovirus expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-gal); greater than 70% of cells were infected. Infection of adipocytes with ras(asn17) resulted in 10-fold greater expression than endogenous ras. This high efficiency gene transfer allowed biochemical assays. Insulin stimulation of ras-GTP formation was inhibited in ras(asn17)-expressing cells. Map kinase gel mobility shift revealed that insulin (1 UM) or epidermal growth factor (100 ng/ml) resulted in the appearance of a hyperphosphorylated species of p42 map kinase in uninfected cells and those expressing beta-gal but not in cells expressing ras(asn17). In contrast, insulin increased IRS-1-associated PI3-kinase activity approximately 10-fold in control cells and high level overexpression of ras(asn17) did not impair this effect. Similarly, insulin and epidermal growth factor activation of total (no immunoprecipitation) PI3-kinase activity in both cytosol and total cellular membranes and insulin stimulation of glucose transport were not affected by expression of dominant negative ras. Thus, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is effective for studying insulin signaling in fully differentiated insulin target cells. Inhibition of ras activation abolishes insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of map kinase but does not affect insulin stimulation of PI3-kinase activity. In normal cell physiology, PI3-kinase does not appear to be downstream of ras in

  10. E2F/Rb Family Proteins Mediate Interferon Induced Repression of Adenovirus Immediate Early Transcription to Promote Persistent Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yueting; Stamminger, Thomas; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that have pleiotropic effects and play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. IFNs have broad antiviral properties and function by different mechanisms. IFNs fail to inhibit wild-type Adenovirus (Ad) replication in established cancer cell lines. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IFNs on Ad replication in normal human cells. Our data demonstrate that both IFNα and IFNγ blocked wild-type Ad5 replication in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC) and TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDF-TERT). IFNs inhibited the replication of divergent adenoviruses. The inhibition of Ad5 replication by IFNα and IFNγ is the consequence of repression of transcription of the E1A immediate early gene product. Both IFNα and IFNγ impede the association of the transactivator GABP with the E1A enhancer region during the early phase of infection. The repression of E1A expression by IFNs requires a conserved E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer, and IFNs increased the enrichment of the E2F-associated pocket proteins, Rb and p107, at the E1A enhancer in vivo. PD0332991 (Pabociclib), a specific CDK4/6 inhibitor, dephosphoryles pocket proteins to promote their interaction with E2Fs and inhibited wild-type Ad5 replication dependent on the conserved E2F binding site. Consistent with this result, expression of the small E1A oncoprotein, which abrogates E2F/pocket protein interactions, rescued Ad replication in the presence of IFNα or IFNγ. Finally, we established a persistent Ad infection model in vitro and demonstrated that IFNγ suppresses productive Ad replication in a manner dependent on the E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer. This is the first study that probes the molecular basis of persistent adenovirus infection and reveals a novel mechanism by which adenoviruses utilize IFN signaling to suppress lytic virus replication and to promote persistent infection. PMID:26809031

  11. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  12. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  13. Increase in muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) response by adenovirus-mediated Stim1-mKO1 gene transfer to rat submandibular acinar cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takao; Nezu, Akihiro; Tojyo, Yosuke; Tanimura, Akihiko

    2013-10-01

    Adenoviruses have been used for gene transfer to salivary gland cells in vivo. Their use to study the function of salivary acinar cells was limited by a severe inflammatory response and by the destruction of fluid-secreting acinar cells. In the present study, low doses of adenovirus were administered to express Stim1-mKO1 by retrograde ductal injection to submandibular glands. The approach succeeded in increasing muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) responses in acinar cells without inflammation or decreased salivary secretions. This increased Ca(2+) response was notable upon weak muscarinic stimulation and was attributed to increased Ca(2+) release from internal stores and increased Ca(2+) entry. The basal Ca(2+) level was higher in Stim1-mKO1-expressing cells than in mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. Exposure of permeabilized submandibular acinar cells, where Ca(2+) concentration was fixed at 50 nM, to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) produced similar effects on the release of Ca(2+) from stores in Stim1-mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. The low toxicity and relative specificity to acinar cells of the mild gene transfer method described herein are particularly useful for studying the molecular functions of salivary acinar cells in vivo, and may be applied to increase salivary secretions in experimental animals and human in future.

  14. A Genetically Engineered Adenovirus Vector Targeted to CD40 Mediates Transduction of Canine Dendritic Cells and Promotes Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Erin E.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Smith, Bruce F.; Bird, R. Curtis; Muminova, Zhanat; Strong, Theresa; Timares, Laura; Korokhov, Nikolay; O'Neill, Ann Marie; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Tani, Kenzaburo; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting viral vectors encoding tumor-associated antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo is likely to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. We have previously shown that genetic modification of adenovirus (Ad) 5 to incorporate CD40 ligand (CD40L) rather than native fiber allows selective transduction and activation of DCs in vitro. Here, we examine the capacity of this targeted vector to induce immune responses to the tumor antigen CEA in a stringent in vivo canine model. CD40-targeted Ad5 transduced canine DCs via the CD40-CD40L pathway in vitro, and following vaccination of healthy dogs, CD40-targeted Ad5 induced strong anti-CEA cellular and humoral responses. These data validate the canine model for future translational studies and suggest targeting of Ad5 vectors to CD40 for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs is a feasible approach for successful cancer therapy. PMID:19786146

  15. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4(+) or CD8(+) cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3(DTR) mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma. PMID:27633092

  16. Comparison between the interactions of adenovirus-derived peptides with plasmid DNA and their role in gene delivery mediated by liposome-peptide-DNA virus-like nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Monika; Tecle, Miriam; Shah, Imran; Matthews, David A; Miller, Andrew D

    2003-07-21

    Previously we have described the development and applications of an important new platform system for gene delivery known as liposome-mu-DNA (LMD), prepared from cationic liposomes (L), plasmid DNA (D) and the mu(M) peptide derived from the adenovirus core. In an attempt to improve upon mu, an alternative peptide (pepV) derived from the adenovirus peptide/protein-DNA core complex was identified, synthesised and studied alongside mu using a number of biophysical techniques including gel retardation, ethidium bromide exclusion, CD binding titration, DNA melting, and plasmid protection assays. PepV binds to pDNA less efficiently than mu but is able to charge neutralise and condense pDNA into negatively charged pepVD particles comparable in dimension to MD particles. The results of CD studies and plasmid protection assays suggest that peptide-DNA interactions are likely to cause pDNA condensation by a combination of charge neutralisation, base pair tilting, double helix destabilisation and the induction of pDNA superfolding. Data suggest the pepVD particles may be formulated with cationic liposomes to give defined LpepVD particles that appear to transfect HeLa cells with marginally more efficiency than LMD particles suggesting that pepV may have some effect on the pDNA transcription process. Although pepV harbours a nuclear-nucleolar localisation sequence (NLS), transfection data show that this capacity is not being appropriately harnessed by the current LpepVD formulation. Further improvements may be required in terms of optimising LpepVD formulations--for instance, to ensure the integrity of the peptide-DNA complexes following cell entry--in order to fully exploit the full NLS capacity of the peptide, thereby facilitating the transfection of slowly dividing or quiescent cells.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4+ or CD8+ cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3DTR mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma. PMID:27633092

  18. Transductional targeting with recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Valerie; Leissner, Philippe; Winter, Arend; Mehtali, Majid; Lusky, Monika

    2002-09-01

    Replication-deficient adenoviruses are considered as gene delivery vectors for the genetic treatment of a variety of diseases. The ability of such vectors to mediate efficient expression of therapeutic genes in a broad spectrum of dividing and non-dividing cell types constitutes an advantage over alternative gene transfer vectors. However, this broad tissue tropism may also turn disadvantageous when genes encoding potentially harmful proteins (e.g. cytokines, toxic proteins) are expressed in surrounding normal tissues. Therefore, specific restrictions of the viral tropism would represent a significant technological advance towards safer and more efficient gene delivery vectors, in particular for cancer gene therapy applications. In this review, we summarize various strategies used to selectively modify the natural tropism of recombinant adenoviruses. The advantages, limitations and potential impact on gene therapy operations of such modified vectors are discussed. PMID:12189719

  19. Adenovirus-mediated FIR demonstrated TP53-independent cell-killing effect and enhanced antitumor activity of carbon-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Matsushita, K; Rahmutulla, B; Yamada, S; Shimada, H; Kubo, S; Hiwasa, T; Matsubara, H; Nomura, F

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy of carbon-ion beam with the far upstream element-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor, FIR, which interferes with DNA damage repair proteins, was proposed as an approach for esophageal cancer treatment with low side effects regardless of TP53 status. In vivo therapeutic antitumor efficacy of replication-defective adenovirus (E1 and E3 deleted adenovirus serotype 5) encoding human FIR cDNA (Ad-FIR) was demonstrated in the tumor xenograft model of human esophageal squamous cancer cells, TE-2. Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer agent that introduces DNA breaks. The authors reported that Ad-FIR involved in the BLM-induced DNA damage repair response and thus applicable for other DNA damaging agents. To examine the effect of Ad-FIR on DNA damage repair, BLM, X-ray and carbon-ion irradiation were used as DNA damaging agents. The biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy used with carbon-ion irradiation are more expansive than low-LET conventional radiotherapy, such as X-rays or γ rays. High LET radiotherapy is suitable for the local control of tumors because of its high relative biological effectiveness. Ad-FIR enhanced BLM-induced DNA damage indicated by γH2AX in vitro. BLM treatment increased endogenous nuclear FIR expression in TE-2 cells, and P27Kip1 expression was suppressed by TP53 siRNA and BLM treatment. Further, Ad-FIRΔexon2, a dominant-negative form of FIR that lacks exon2 transcriptional repression domain, decreased Ku86 expression. The combination of Ad-FIR and BLM in TP53 siRNA increased DNA damage. Additionally, Ad-FIR showed synergistic cell toxicity with X-ray in vitro and significantly increased the antitumor efficacy of carbon-ion irradiation in the xenograft mouse model of TE-2 cells (P=0.03, Mann-Whitney's U-test) and was synergistic with the sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) value of 1.15. Therefore, Ad-FIR increased the cell-killing activity of the carbon-ion beam that avoids late

  20. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  1. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  2. Quantification of High-Capacity Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vector Genomes In Vitro and In Vivo, Using Quantitative TaqMan Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    PUNTEL, M.; CURTIN, J.F.; ZIRGER, J.M.; MUHAMMAD, A.K.M.; XIONG, W.; LIU, C.; HU, J.; KROEGER, K.M.; CZER, P.; SCIASCIA, S.; MONDKAR, S.; LOWENSTEIN, P.R.; CASTRO, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    First-generation adenoviral (Ad) and high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors are efficient delivery vehicles for transferring therapeutic transgenes in vivo into tissues/organs. The initial successes reported with adenoviral vectors in preclinical trials have been limited by immune-related adverse side effects. This has been, in part, attributed to the use of poorly characterized preparations of adenoviral vectors and also to the untoward immune adverse side effects elicited when high doses of these vectors were used. HC-Ads have several advantages over Ads, including the lack of viral coding sequences, which after infection and uncoating, makes them invisible to the host’s immune system. Another advantage is their large cloning capacity (up to ~35 kb). However, accurate characterization of HC-Ad vectors, and of contaminating replication-competent adenovirus (RCA) or helper virus, is necessary before these preparations can be used safely in clinical trials. Consequently, the development of accurate, simple, and reproducible methods to standardize and validate adenoviral preparations for the presence of contaminant genomes is required. By using a molecular method that allows accurate, reproducible, and simultaneous determination of HC-Ad, contaminating helper virus, and RCA genome copy numbers based on real-time quantitative PCR, we demonstrate accurate detection of these three genomic entities, within CsCl-purified vector stocks, total DNA isolated from cells transduced in vitro, and from brain tissue infected in vivo. This approach will allow accurate assessment of the levels and biodistribution of HC-Ad and improve the safety and efficacy of clinical trials. PMID:16716110

  3. Adenovirus-mediated co-expression of ING4 and PTEN cooperatively enhances their antitumor activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Nargis; Yang, Sijun; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Yi; Deng, Chenghui; Yang, Jiecheng; Yu, Huijun; Wei, Wenxiang

    2016-08-01

    Both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) are well known as tumor suppressors that are closely related to tumor occurrence and progression. It was reported that ING4 and PTEN showed synergistic antitumor activities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The two tumor suppressors demonstrated synergistic effect on growth inhibition and apoptosis activation. In this study, we investigated their therapeutic potential in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Recombinant adenoviruses co-expressing ING4 and PTEN (Ad-ING4-PTEN) were constructed, and the antitumor effect on SMMC-7721 and HepG2 HCC cells was evaluated. Ad-ING4-PTEN cooperatively inhibited cell growth, stimulated apoptosis, and suppressed invasion in both HCC cells, and regulated cell cycle in SMMC-7721. Further studies showed that the combination of ING4 and PTEN by Ad-ING4-PTEN cooperatively enhanced the alteration of the expression of cell cycle-related proteins (p53, p21, and cyclin D1) and apoptotic factors (Bad, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bax), which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle and the activation of apoptotic pathways, leading to the synergistic antitumor effect. These results indicate that the combination of ING4 and PTEN may provide an effective therapeutic strategy for HCC.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated ING4/PTEN double tumor suppressor gene co-transfer modified by RGD enhances antitumor activity in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihong; Yang, Jicheng; Sheng, Weihua; Xie, Yufeng; Liu, Jisheng

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitor of growth-4 (ING4) is a member of the inhibitor of growth (ING) family and acts as a tumor suppressor protein. PTEN is a phosphatase and shows potent and extensive antitumor activity. In this study, we constructed an RGD-modified bicistronic ING4/PTEN adenovirus (Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN) and comprehensively investigated its effects following modification of the CNE human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Furthermore, expression of P21, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 was upregulated, while that of Bcl-2 and survivin was downregulated in CNE cells and CNE xenografted tumors. Moreover, Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN treatment additively downregulated CD34, VEGF and microvessel density in subcutaneously (s.c.) xenografted CNE cell tumors. The enhanced antitumor activity generated by Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN was closely associated with activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways and additive inhibition of tumor angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of this evidence, it is believed that cancer gene therapy combining two tumor suppressors such as ING4 and PTEN can be used to establish an effective and novel therapeutic strategy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and other cancers.

  5. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  6. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  7. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2

    PubMed Central

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S.; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  8. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J; King, Cason R; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  9. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  10. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  11. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  12. In vivo cancer gene therapy by adenovirus-mediated transfer of a bifunctional yeast cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Erbs, P; Regulier, E; Kintz, J; Leroy, P; Poitevin, Y; Exinger, F; Jund, R; Mehtali, M

    2000-07-15

    Direct transfer of prodrug activation systems into tumors was demonstrated to be an attractive method for the selective in vivo elimination of tumor cells. However, most current suicide gene therapy strategies are still handicapped by a poor efficiency of in vivo gene transfer and a limited bystander cell killing effect. In this study, we describe a novel and highly potent suicide gene derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytosine deaminase (FCY1) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase genes (FUR1). This suicide gene, designated FCU1, encodes a bifunctional chimeric protein that combines the enzymatic activities of FCY1 and FUR1 and efficiently catalyzes the direct conversion of 5-FC, a nontoxic antifungal agent, into the toxic metabolites 5-fluorouracil and 5-fluorouridine-5'monophosphate, thus bypassing the natural resistance of certain human tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil. Unexpectedly, although the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase activity of FCU1 was equivalent to that encoded by FUR1, its cytosine deaminase activity was 100-fold higher than the one encoded by FCY1. As a consequence, tumor cells transduced with an adenovirus expressing FCU1 (Ad-FCU1) were sensitive to concentrations of 5-FC 1000-fold lower than the ones used for cells transduced with a vector expressing FCY1 (Ad-FCY1). Furthermore, bystander cell killing was also more effective in cells transduced with Ad-FCU1 than in cultures infected with Ad-FCY1 or Ad-FUR1, alone or in combination. Finally, intratumoral injections of Ad-FCU1 into allo- or xenogeneic tumors implanted s.c. into mice, with concomitant systemic administration of 5-FC, led to substantial delays in tumor growth. These unique properties make of the FCU1/5-FC prodrug activation system a novel and powerful candidate for cancer gene therapy strategies. PMID:10919655

  13. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  14. Adenovirus-mediated expression of p53 or p21 in a papillary serous endometrial carcinoma cell line (SPEC-2) results in both growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death: potential application of gene therapy to endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramondetta, L; Mills, G B; Burke, T W; Wolf, J K

    2000-01-01

    Papillary serous endometrial carcinoma is an aggressive tumor characterized by late-stage presentation, i.p. spread, and poor prognosis. It is histologically similar to serous papillary carcinoma of the ovary. Preclinical studies have shown that adenovirus-mediated expression of p53 in ovarian cancer cell lines causes growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Such studies provide the rationale for Phase I Adp53 gene therapy clinical trials in ovarian cancer. In the present study, we compared the efficacy of adenoviral vectors containing p53 (Adp53) or p21 (Adp21) in a papillary serous endometrial tumor cell line (SPEC-2) that contains mutated p53. Growth assays revealed that both Adp53 and Adp21 were efficacious in decreasing cell proliferation as assessed by anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth assays. However, as compared with Adp53, the effects of Adp21 tended to be more transient and less marked. Strikingly, Adp21, but not Adp53, induced a G1 arrest in SPEC-2 endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, as assessed by induction of hypodiploid peaks, free DNA ends detected by a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-based assay, and annexin V positivity, p53 was more effective than p21 in inducing cell death by apoptosis. Compatible with the more efficient induction of apoptosis, Adp53, but not Adp21, induced a marked increase in expression of the preapoptotic molecule BAX without a concomitant change in expression of the antiapoptotic mediator Bcl-2. The differential effects of Adp53 and Adp21 on cell cycle progression and apoptosis may be related to the reversibility of p21-induced cell cycle arrest and the irreversibility of p53-induced apoptosis. Thus, at least in the papillary serous endometrial carcinoma cell line SPEC-2, Adp53 may be more effective than Adp21 as a gene therapeutic. Nevertheless, these preclinical studies suggest that papillary serous endometrial carcinoma is a potential target for p53- or p21-mediated gene

  15. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen M.; Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A.; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C.; Parks, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  16. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen M; Poulin, Kathy L; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C; Parks, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  17. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-12-29

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene).

  18. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  19. Biology of E1-Deleted Adenovirus Vectors in Nonhuman Primate Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zoltick, Philip W.; Chirmule, Narendra; Schnell, Michael A.; Gao, Guang-ping; Hughes, Joseph V.; Wilson, James M.

    2001-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors have been studied as vehicles for gene transfer to skeletal muscle, an attractive target for gene therapies for inherited and acquired diseases. In this setting, immune responses to viral proteins and/or transgene products cause inflammation and lead to loss of transgene expression. A few studies in murine models have suggested that the destructive cell-mediated immune response to virally encoded proteins of E1-deleted adenovirus may not contribute to the elimination of transgene-expressing cells. However, the impact of immune responses following intramuscular administration of adenovirus vectors on transgene stability has not been elucidated in larger animal models such as nonhuman primates. Here we demonstrate that intramuscular administration of E1-deleted adenovirus vector expressing rhesus monkey erythropoietin or growth hormone to rhesus monkeys results in generation of a Th1-dependent cytotoxic T-cell response to adenovirus proteins. Transgene expression dropped significantly over time but was still detectable in some animals after 6 months. Systemic levels of adenovirus-specific neutralizing antibodies were generated, which blocked vector readministration. These studies indicate that the cellular and humoral immune response generated to adenovirus proteins, in the context of transgenes encoding self-proteins, hinders long-term transgene expression and readministration with first-generation vectors. PMID:11333904

  20. Targeting species D adenoviruses replication to counteract the epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, Natalia A; Speiseder, Thomas; Groitl, Peter; Spirin, Pavel V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Lebedev, Timofey D; Rubtsov, Petr M; Lam, Elena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Dobner, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses causing various infections; their pathogenicity varies dependent on virus species and type. Although acute infections can sometimes take severe courses, they are rarely fatal in immune-competent individuals. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are hyperacute and highly contagious infections of the eye caused by human adenovirus types within species D. Currently there is no causal treatment available to counteract these diseases effectively. The E2B region of the adenovirus genome encodes for the viral DNA polymerase, which is required for adenoviral DNA replication. Here we propose novel model systems to test this viral key factor, DNA polymerase, as a putative target for the development of efficient antiviral therapy based on RNA interference. Using our model cell lines we found that different small interfering RNAs mediate significant suppression (up to 90%) of expression levels of viral DNA polymerase upon transfection. Moreover, permanent expression of short hairpin RNA based on the most effective small interfering RNA led to a highly significant, more than tenfold reduction in replication for different human group D adenoviruses involved in ocular infections.

  1. [Downregulation of Human Adenovirus DNA Polymerase Gene by Modified siRNAs].

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Chernolovskaya, E L; Zenkova, M A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses, in particular D8, D19, and D37, cause ocular infections. Currently, there is no available causally directed treatment, which efficiently counteracts adenoviral infectious diseases. In our previous work, we showed that gene silencing by means of RNA interference is an effective approach for downregulation of human species D adenoviruses replication. In this study, we compared the biological activity of siRNAs and their modified analogs targeting human species D adenoviruses DNA polymerase. We found that one of selectively 2'-O-methyl modified siRNAs mediates stable and long-lasting suppression of the target gene (12 days post transfection). We suppose that this siRNA can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against human species D adenoviruses.

  2. Human adenoviruses: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Green, Maurice; Loewenstein, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    Detailed protocols are described for the propagation of adenoviruses (Ads) and adenovirus (Ad) vectors and their purification by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. A discussion of monolayer and spinner cell culture techniques suitable, respectively, for small- and large-scale growth of adenoviruses is provided. Protocols for cloning into and growth of Ad replication-deficient vectors using a convenient commercially available system are described. Lastly, time-tested plaque titration protocols for the accurate and convenient measurement of the infectivity of adenoviruses and adenovirus vectors are provided in detail.

  3. CEACAM6 attenuates adenovirus infection by antagonizing viral trafficking in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaohe; Gangeswaran, Rathi; Zhao, Xingbo; Wang, Pengju; Tysome, James; Bhakta, Vipul; Yuan, Ming; Chikkanna-Gowda, C.P.; Jiang, Guozhong; Gao, Dongling; Cao, Fengyu; Francis, Jennelle; Yu, Jinxia; Liu, Kangdong; Yang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yunhan; Zang, Weidong; Chelala, Claude; Dong, Ziming; Lemoine, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The changes in cancer cell surface molecules and intracellular signaling pathways during tumorigenesis make delivery of adenovirus-based cancer therapies inefficient. Here we have identified carcinoembryonic antigen–related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) as a cellular protein that restricts the ability of adenoviral vectors to infect cancer cells. We have demonstrated that CEACAM6 can antagonize the Src signaling pathway, downregulate cancer cell cytoskeleton proteins, and block adenovirus trafficking to the nucleus of human pancreatic cancer cells. Similar to CEACAM6 overexpression, treatment with a Src-selective inhibitor significantly reduced adenovirus replication in these cancer cells and normal human epithelial cells. In a mouse xenograft tumor model, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CEACAM6 also significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of an oncolytic adenovirus. We propose that CEACAM6-associated signaling pathways could be potential targets for the development of biomarkers to predict the response of patients to adenovirus-based therapies, as well as for the development of more potent adenovirus-based therapeutics. PMID:19411761

  4. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  5. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sook-Young; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  6. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  7. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  8. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  9. Requirements for Receptor Engagement during Infection by Adenovirus Complexed with Blood Coagulation Factor X

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Angela C.; Parker, Alan L.; Duffy, Margaret R.; Coughlan, Lynda; van Rooijen, Nico; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Human adenoviruses from multiple species bind to coagulation factor X (FX), yet the importance of this interaction in adenovirus dissemination is unknown. Upon contact with blood, vectors based on adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) binds to FX via the hexon protein with nanomolar affinity, leading to selective uptake of the complex into the liver and spleen. The Ad5:FX complex putatively targets heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). The aim of this study was to elucidate the specific requirements for Ad5:FX-mediated cellular uptake in this high-affinity pathway, specifically the HSPG receptor requirements as well as the role of penton base-mediated integrin engagement in subsequent internalisation. Removal of HS sidechains by enzymatic digestion or competition with highly-sulfated heparins/heparan sulfates significantly decreased FX-mediated Ad5 cell binding in vitro and ex vivo. Removal of N-linked and, in particular, O-linked sulfate groups significantly attenuated the inhibitory capabilities of heparin, while the chemical inhibition of endogenous HSPG sulfation dose-dependently reduced FX-mediated Ad5 cellular uptake. Unlike native heparin, modified heparins lacking O- or N-linked sulfate groups were unable to inhibit Ad5 accumulation in the liver 1h after intravascular administration of adenovirus. Similar results were observed in vitro using Ad5 vectors possessing mutations ablating CAR- and/or αv integrin binding, demonstrating that attachment of the Ad5:FX complex to the cell surface involves HSPG sulfation. Interestingly, Ad5 vectors ablated for αv integrin binding showed markedly delayed cell entry, highlighting the need for an efficient post-attachment internalisation signal for optimal Ad5 uptake and transport following surface binding mediated through FX. This study therefore integrates the established model of αv integrin-dependent adenoviral infection with the high-affinity FX-mediated pathway. This has important implications for mechanisms that define

  10. Acid-Soluble Material of Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P. A.; Jaume, F.; Flamencourt, P.; Biserte, G.

    1970-01-01

    Two methods are described for adenovirus capsid disruption and extraction of acid-soluble proteins from the viral core. The acid-soluble material of adenovirus consisted of three major proteins, one of them being selectively extracted after mild disruption of the virus particle. Some chemical properties of these proteins are reported. Images PMID:4986288

  11. Application of a Fas Ligand Encoding a Recombinant Adenovirus Vector for Prolongation of Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huang-Ge; Bilbao, Guadalupe; Zhou, Tong; Contreras, Juan Luis; Gómez-Navarro, Jesús; Feng, Meizhen; Saito, Izumu; Mountz, John D.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    An adenovirus vector encoding murine Fas ligand (mFasL) under an inducible control was derived. In vivo ectopic expression of mFasL in murine livers induced an inflammatory cellular infiltration. Furthermore, ectopic expression of mFasL by myocytes did not allow prolonged vector-mediated transgene expression. Thus, ectopic expression of functional mFasL in vector-transduced cells does not appear to confer, by itself, an immunoprivileged site sufficient to mitigate adenovirus vector immunogenicity. PMID:9499110

  12. Sequence-independent autoregulation of the adenovirus type 5 E1A transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, P; Shenk, T

    1985-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene is known to be autoregulated at the level of transcription. Autoregulation was found to be mediated by products of the E1A 13S mRNA, which induced a fivefold increase in E1A transcription rate. Deletion analysis suggested that the autoregulation did not require any specific sequence in the E1A transcriptional control region. This conclusion was reinforced by the demonstration that a cellular alpha-globin gene substituted for the E1A gene on the adenovirus chromosome was also positively regulated by E1A gene products. Images PMID:2943984

  13. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; et al

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  14. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  15. Clinical and Virologic Characteristics May Aid Distinction of Acute Adenovirus Disease from Kawasaki Disease with Incidental Adenovirus Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunkyung; Kajon, Adriana E; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Texter, Karen; Ramilo, Octavio; Leber, Amy; Jaggi, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Incidental adenovirus detection in Kawasaki disease (KD) is important to differentiate from acute adenovirus disease. Twenty-four of 25 children with adenovirus disease and mimicking features of KD had <4 KD-like features, predominance of species B or E, and higher viral burden compared with those with KD and incidental adenovirus detection. PMID:26707621

  16. Adenovirus 36 and Obesity: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Gnessi, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity starting about 1980 in both developed and undeveloped countries definitely associated with multiple etiologies. About 670 million people worldwide are obese. The incidence of obesity has increased in all age groups, including children. Obesity causes numerous diseases and the interaction between genetic, metabolic, social, cultural and environmental factors are possible cofactors for the development of obesity. Evidence emerging over the last 20 years supports the hypothesis that viral infections may be associated with obesity in animals and humans. The most widely studied infectious agent possibly linked to obesity is adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Adv36 causes obesity in animals. In humans, Adv36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of Adv36 increases in relation to the body mass index. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the viral E4orf1 protein (early region 4 open reading frame 1, Adv) mediates the Adv36 effect including its adipogenic potential. The Adv36 infection should therefore be considered as a possible risk factor for obesity and could be a potential new therapeutic target in addition to an original way to understand the worldwide rise of the epidemic of obesity. Here, the data indicating a possible link between viral infection and obesity with a particular emphasis to the Adv36 will be reviewed. PMID:26184280

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided. PMID:17656792

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  19. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy. PMID:27195521

  20. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  1. Adenovirus Replaces Mitotic Checkpoint Controls

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Roberta L.; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with adenovirus triggers the cellular DNA damage response, elements of which include cell death and cell cycle arrest. Early adenoviral proteins, including the E1B-55K and E4orf3 proteins, inhibit signaling in response to DNA damage. A fraction of cells infected with an adenovirus mutant unable to express the E1B-55K and E4orf3 genes appeared to arrest in a mitotic-like state. Cells infected early in G1 of the cell cycle were predisposed to arrest in this state at late times of infection. This arrested state, which displays hallmarks of mitotic catastrophe, was prevented by expression of either the E1B-55K or the E4orf3 genes. However, E1B-55K mutant virus-infected cells became trapped in a mitotic-like state in the presence of the microtubule poison colcemid, suggesting that the two viral proteins restrict entry into mitosis or facilitate exit from mitosis in order to prevent infected cells from arresting in mitosis. The E1B-55K protein appeared to prevent inappropriate entry into mitosis through its interaction with the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53. The E4orf3 protein facilitated exit from mitosis by possibly mislocalizing and functionally inactivating cyclin B1. When expressed in noninfected cells, E4orf3 overcame the mitotic arrest caused by the degradation-resistant R42A cyclin B1 variant. IMPORTANCE Cells that are infected with adenovirus type 5 early in G1 of the cell cycle are predisposed to arrest in a mitotic-like state in a p53-dependent manner. The adenoviral E1B-55K protein prevents entry into mitosis. This newly described activity for the E1B-55K protein appears to depend on the interaction between the E1B-55K protein and the tumor suppressor p53. The adenoviral E4orf3 protein facilitates exit from mitosis, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of cyclin B1. By preventing entry into mitosis and by promoting exit from mitosis, these adenoviral proteins act to prevent the infected cell from arresting in a

  2. Adenovirus-vectored Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa has highlighted the need for the availability of effective vaccines against outbreak pathogens that are suitable for use in frontline workers who risk their own health in the course of caring for those with the disease, and also for members of the community in the affected area. Along with effective contact tracing and quarantine, use of a vaccine as soon as an outbreak is identified could greatly facilitate rapid control and prevent the outbreak from spreading. This review describes the progress that has been made in producing and testing adenovirus-based Ebola vaccines in both pre-clinical and clinical studies, and considers the likely future use of these vaccines.

  3. Adenovirus Virus-Associated RNA Is Processed to Functional Interfering RNAs Involved in Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Oscar; Razquin, Nerea; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Fortes, Puri

    2006-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing allows sequence-specific control of gene expression. Specificity is guaranteed by small antisense RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Functional miRNAs derive from longer double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules that are cleaved to pre-miRNAs in the nucleus and are transported by exportin 5 (Exp 5) to the cytoplasm. Adenovirus-infected cells express virus-associated (VA) RNAs, which are dsRNA molecules similar in structure to pre-miRNAs. VA RNAs are also transported by Exp 5 to the cytoplasm, where they accumulate. Here we show that small RNAs derived from VA RNAs (svaRNAs), similar to miRNAs, can be found in adenovirus-infected cells. VA RNA processing to svaRNAs requires neither viral replication nor viral protein expression, as evidenced by the fact that svaRNA accumulation can be detected in cells transfected with VA sequences. svaRNAs are efficiently bound by Argonaute 2, the endonuclease of the RNA-induced silencing complex, and behave as functional siRNAs, in that they inhibit the expression of reporter genes with complementary sequences. Blocking svaRNA-mediated inhibition affects efficient adenovirus production, indicating that svaRNAs are required for virus viability. Thus, svaRNA-mediated silencing could represent a novel mechanism used by adenoviruses to control cellular or viral gene expression. PMID:16415015

  4. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  5. human adenoviruses role in ophthalmic pterygium formation

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Mishar; Kelishadi, Mandana; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Javid, Naeme; Bazouri, Masoud; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmic pterygium is a common benign lesion of unknown origin and the pathogenesis might be vision-threatening. This problem is often associated with exposure to solar light. Recent evidence suggests that potentially oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of pterygia. Expression of specific adenovirus genes such as E1A and E1B, which potentially have many functions, may contribute to their oncogenic activity as well as relevance to cellular immortalization. Objectives: For the first time, we aimed to investigate involvement of adenoviruses in pterygium formation. Patients and Methods: Fifty tissue specimens of pterygium from patients undergoing pterygium surgery (as cases), 50 conjunctival swab samples from the same patients and 10 conjunctival biopsy specimens from individuals without pterygium such as patients undergoing cataract surgery (as controls) were analyzed for evidence of adenovirus infection with polymerase chain reaction using specific primers chosen from the moderately conserved region of the hexon gene. Furthermore, β-globin primers were used to access the quality of extracted DNA. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16) software. Results: Of 50 patients, 20 were men and 30 women with mean age of 61.1 ± 16.9 years ranged between 22 and 85 years. All samples of pterygia had positive results for adenoviruses DNA with polymerase chain reaction, but none of the negative control groups displayed adenoviruses. The pterygium group and the control groups were β-globin positive. Direct sequencing of PCR products confirmed Adenovirus infection. Conclusions: Adenoviruses might act as a possible cause of pterygium formation and other factors could play a synergistic role in the development. However, further larger studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26034543

  6. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer in combination with bronchial arterial infusion for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-song; Liu, Yuan; Zou, Qing; He, Qing; La, Zi; Yang, Lin; Hu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we have examined the safety and efficacy of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) injection in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the combination with the therapy of bronchial arterial infusion (BAI). Methods: A total of 58 patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in a non-randomized, two-armed clinical trial. Of which, 19 received a combination treatment of BAI and rAd-p53 (the combo group), while the remaining 39 were treated with only BAI (the control group). Patients were followed up for 12 months, with safety and local response evaluated by the National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria and response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST), respectively. Time to progression (TTP) and survival rates were also analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In the combo group, 19 patients received a total of 49 injections of rAd-p53 and 46 times of BAI, respectively, while 39 patients in the control group received a total of 113 times of BAI. The combination treatment was found to have less adverse events such as anorexia, nausea and emesis, pain, and leucopenia (P<0.05) but more arthralgia, fever, influenza-like symptom, and myalgia (P<0.05), compared with the control group. The overall response rates (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) were 47.3% and 38.4% for the combo group and the control group, respectively (P>0.05). Patients in the combo group had a longer TTP than those in the control group (a median 7.75 vs 5.5 months, P=0.018). However, the combination treatment did not lead to better survival, with survival rates at 3, 6, and 12 months in the combo group being 94.74%, 89.47%, and 52.63%, respectively, compared with 92.31%, 69.23%, and 38.83% in the control group (P=0.224). Conclusion: Our results show that the combination of rAd-p53 and BAI was well tolerated in patients with NSCLC and may have improved the quality of life and delayed

  8. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  9. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sarah R.; Jiang, Hong; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Fan, Xuejun; Gumin, Joy; Dong, Andrew; Alonso, Marta M.; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins. PMID:27093696

  10. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sarah R; Jiang, Hong; Hossain, Mohammad B; Fan, Xuejun; Gumin, Joy; Dong, Andrew; Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins. PMID:27093696

  11. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models.

  12. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Tollefson, Ann E.; Sagartz, John E.; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models. PMID

  13. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  14. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 10(4) level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  15. The adenovirus that causes hemorrhagic disease of black-tailed deer is closely related to bovine adenovirus-3.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J M; Hedges, J F; Woods, L W; Reubel, G H; MacLachlan, N J

    1999-01-01

    DNA sequence data was obtained from an adenovirus previously shown to be the cause of a distinctive, fatal hemorrhagic disease of black-tailed deer in California. A 256 base fragment of the viral hexon gene was amplified by PCR from purified adenovirus preparations. The amplicon then was cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic relationships with other mammalian adenoviruses were also determined. Although sequence analysis of this portion of the hexon gene indicates that the black-tailed deer adenovirus is closely related to bovine adenovirus-3, the biologic properties of the two viruses are clearly distinct.

  16. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  17. Rapid generation of fowl adenovirus 9 vectors.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Griffin, Bryan; de Jong, Jondavid; Krell, Peter J; Nagy, Éva

    2015-10-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) have the largest genomes of any fully sequenced adenovirus genome, and are widely considered as excellent platforms for vaccine development and gene therapy. As such, there is a strong need for stream-lined protocols/strategies for the generation of recombinant adenovirus genomes. Current genome engineering strategies rely upon plasmid based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli BJ5183. This process is time-consuming, involves multiple cloning steps, and low efficiency recombination. This report describes a novel system for the more rapid generation of recombinant fowl adenovirus genomes using the lambda Red recombinase system in E. coli DH10B. In this strategy, PCR based amplicons with around 50 nt long homologous arms, a unique SwaI site and a chloramphenicol resistance gene fragment (CAT cassette), are introduced into the FAdV-9 genome in a highly efficient and site-specific manner. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system we generated FAdV-9 ORF2, and FAdV-9 ORF11 deleted, CAT marked and unmarked FAdV-9 infectious clones (FAdmids), and replaced either ORF2 or ORF11, with an EGFP expression cassette or replaced ORF2 with an EGFP coding sequence via the unique SwaI sites, in approximately one month. All recombinant FAdmids expressed EGFP and were fully infectious in CH-SAH cells. PMID:26238923

  18. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  19. Localization of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in normal and regenerating human muscle.

    PubMed

    Sinnreich, M; Shaw, C A; Pari, G; Nalbantoglu, J; Holland, P C; Karpati, G

    2005-08-01

    The primary receptor for Adenovirus and Coxsackie virus (CAR) serves as main port of entry of the adenovirus vector mediating gene transfer into skeletal muscle. Information about CAR expression in normal and diseased human skeletal muscle is lacking. C'- or N'-terminally directed polyclonal antibodies against CAR were generated and immunohistochemical analysis of CAR on morphologically normal and regenerating human skeletal muscle of children and adults was performed. In morphologically normal human muscle fibers, CAR immunoreactivity was limited to the neuromuscular junction. In regenerating muscle fibers, CAR was abundantly co-expressed with markers of regeneration. The function of CAR at the neuromuscular junction is currently unknown. Co-expression of CAR with markers of regeneration suggests that CAR is developmentally regulated, and may serve as a marker of skeletal muscle fiber regeneration.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of an Equine Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ardans, Alexander A.; Pritchett, Randall F.; Zee, Yuan Chung

    1973-01-01

    A viral agent was isolated from lung tissue obtained upon necropsy of an Arabian foal which had exhibited clinical signs of pneumonia. The virus is 75 nm in diameter, cubic in symmetry, and resistant to chloroform and low pH (3.0). It contains deoxyribonucleic acid and has a buoyant density of 1.31 g/cm3 in cesium chloride. These findings indicate that the virus is a member of the adenovirus group. Images PMID:16558078

  1. Coacervate microspheres as carriers of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kalyanasundaram, S; Feinstein, S; Nicholson, J P; Leong, K W; Garver, R I

    1999-01-01

    The therapeutic utility of recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) is limited in part by difficulties in directing the viruses to specific sites and by the requirement for bolus administration, both of which limit the efficiency of target tissue infection. As a first step toward overcoming these limitations, rAds were encapsulated in coacervate microspheres comprised of gelatin and alginate followed by stabilization with calcium ions. Ultrastructural evaluation showed that the microspheres formed in this manner were 0.8-10 microM in diameter, with viruses evenly distributed. The microspheres achieved a sustained release of adenovirus with a nominal loss of bioactivity. The pattern of release and the total amount of virus released was modified by changes in microsphere formulation. Administration of the adenovirus-containing microspheres to human tumor nodules engrafted in mice showed that the viral transgene was transferred to the tumor cells. It is concluded that coacervate microspheres can be used to encapsulate bioactive rAd and release it in a time-dependent manner.

  2. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  3. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  4. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  5. Application of conditionally replicating adenoviruses in tumor early diagnosis technology, gene-radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Ou, Mengting; Wang, Guixue; Tang, Liling

    2016-10-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds), or known as replication-selective adenoviruses, were discovered as oncolytic gene vectors several years ago. They have a strong ability of scavenging tumor and lesser toxicity to normal tissue. CRAds not only have a tumor-killing ability but also can combine with gene therapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy to induce tumor cell apoptosis. In this paper, we review the structure of CRAds and CRAd vectors and summarize the current application of CRAds in tumor detection as well as in radiotherapy and suicide gene-mediating chemotherapy. We also propose further research strategies that can improve the application value of CRAds, including enhancing tumor destruction effect, further reducing toxic effect, reducing immunogenicity, constructing CRAds that can target tumor stem cells, and trying to use mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as the carriers for oncolytic adenoviruses. As their importance to cancer diagnosis, gene-radiation, and chemotherapy, CRAds may play a considerable role in clinical diagnosis and various cancer treatments in the future. PMID:27557721

  6. Targeting eradication of chronic myeloid leukemia using chimeric oncolytic adenovirus to drive IL-24 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xubin; liu, Li; Wang, Gang; Li, Wei; Xu, Ke; Hu, Xupang; Qian, Cheng; Shao, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal disorder in which cells of the myeloid lineage undergo massive clonal expansion as well as resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Gene therapy hold a great promise for treatment of malignancies based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. In this study, we explore whether chimeric oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of human interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene induce the enhanced antitumor potency. Our results showed that chimeric oncolytic adenovirus carrying hIL-24 (AdCN205-11-IL-24) could produce high levels of hIL-24 in CML cancer cells, as compared with constructed double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus expressing hIL-24 (AdCN205-IL-24). AdCN205-11-IL-24 could specifically induce cytotoxocity to CML cancer cells, but little or no effect on normal cell lines. AdCN205-11-IL-24 exhibited remarkable anti-tumor activities and induce higher antitumor activity to CML cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vitro. Our study may provides a potent and safe tool for CML gene therapy. PMID:26097559

  7. Calcium Gluconate in Phosphate Buffered Saline Increases Gene Delivery with Adenovirus Type 5

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. Methods/Results We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. Conclusion In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline. PMID:20927353

  8. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples.

  9. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  10. A Novel Adenovirus in Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins. PMID:24811321

  11. A novel adenovirus in Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-05-07

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  12. Experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in yearling black-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Burd, M; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1997-10-01

    An apparently novel adenovirus was associated with an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California (USA) during 1993-1994. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. Six black-tailed yearling deer (O. hemionus columbianus) were inoculated with purified adenovirus isolated from a black-tailed fawn that died of acute adenovirus hemorrhagic disease during the epizootic. Three of six inoculated deer also received intramuscular injections of dexamethasone sodium phosphate every 3 days during the study. Eight days post-inoculation, one deer (without dexamethasone) developed bloody diarrhea and died. Necropsy and histopathologic findings were identical to lesions in free-ranging animals that died of the natural disease. Hemorrhagic enteropathy and pulmonary edema were the significant necropsy findings and there was microscopic vascular damage and endothelial intranuclear inclusion bodies in the vessels of the intestines and lungs. Adenovirus was identified in necrotic endothelial cells in the lungs by fluorescent antibody staining, immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. Adenovirus was reisolated from tissues of the animal that died of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease. Similar gross and microscopic lesions were absent in four of six adenovirus-inoculated deer and in the negative control animal which were necropsied at variable intervals during the 14 wk study. One deer was inoculated with purified adenovirus a second time, 12 wk after the first inoculation. Fifteen days after the second inoculation, this deer developed severe ulceration of the tongue, pharynx and rumen and necrotizing osteomyelitis of the mandible which was associated with

  13. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing P12A and 3C Protein of the Type O Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Stimulates Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yinli; Gao, Peng; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of cloven-hoofed animals which causes severe economic losses. The replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine has been proven effective against FMD. However, the role of T-cell-mediated antiviral responses and the mucosae-mediated antiviral responses induced by the adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine was rarely examined. Here, the capsid protein precursor P1-2A and viral protease 3C of the type O FMDV were expressed in replicative-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. BALB/c mice immunized intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C elicited higher FMDV-specific IgG antibodies, IFN-γ, and IL-4 cytokines than those in mice immunized with inactivated FMDV vaccine. Moreover, BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C by oral and intraocular-nasal immunization induced high FMDV-specific IgA antibodies. These results show that the recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C could resist FMDV comprehensively. This study highlights the potential of rAdv-P12A3C to serve as a type O FMDV vaccine. PMID:27478836

  14. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing P12A and 3C Protein of the Type O Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Stimulates Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of cloven-hoofed animals which causes severe economic losses. The replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine has been proven effective against FMD. However, the role of T-cell-mediated antiviral responses and the mucosae-mediated antiviral responses induced by the adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine was rarely examined. Here, the capsid protein precursor P1-2A and viral protease 3C of the type O FMDV were expressed in replicative-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. BALB/c mice immunized intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C elicited higher FMDV-specific IgG antibodies, IFN-γ, and IL-4 cytokines than those in mice immunized with inactivated FMDV vaccine. Moreover, BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C by oral and intraocular-nasal immunization induced high FMDV-specific IgA antibodies. These results show that the recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C could resist FMDV comprehensively. This study highlights the potential of rAdv-P12A3C to serve as a type O FMDV vaccine. PMID:27478836

  15. Neutralization of adenoviruses: kinetics, stoichiometry, and mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic curves for neutralization of adenovirus type 2 with anti-hexon serum revealed no lag periods even when the serum was highly diluted or when the temperature was lowered to 4 degrees C, thus indicating a single-hit mechanism. Multiplicity curves determined with anti-hexon serum displayed a linear correlation between the degree of neutralization and dilution of antiserum. Neutralization values experimentally obtained under steady-state conditions fully fitted a single-hit model based on Poisson calculations. Quantitation of the amount of 125I-labeled type-specific anti-hexon antibodies needed for full neutralization of adenovirus showed that 1.4 antibodies were attached per virion under such conditions. Virions already attached to HeLa cells at 4 degrees C were, to a large extent, neutralizable by anti-hexon serum, whereas anti-fiber and anti-penton base antisera were negative. It is suggested that adenovirus may be neutralized by two pathways: aggregation of the virions (extracellular neutralization) as performed by anti-fiber antibodies and blocking of virion entrance from the acidic endosomes into the cytoplasm (intracellular neutralization). The latter effect could be obtained by (i) covering of the penton bases, as performed by anti-penton base antibodies, thereby preventing interaction between the penton bases and the endosomal membrane, which results in trapping of virions within endosomes, and (ii) inhibition of the low-pH-induced conformational change of the viral capsid, which seems to occur in the endosomes and is necessary for proper exposure of the penton bases, as performed by anti-hexon antibodies. Images PMID:3373570

  16. Adenovirus-based genetic vaccines for biodefense.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Julie L; Kobinger, Gary; Wilson, James M; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    The robust host responses elicited against transgenes encoded by (E1-)(E3-) adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to develop Ad-based vectors as platform technologies for vaccines against potential bioterror pathogens. This review focuses on pathogens of major concern as bioterror agents and why Ad vectors are ideal as anti-bioterror vaccine platforms, providing examples from our laboratories of using Ad vectors as vaccines against potential bioterror pathogens and how Ad vectors can be developed to enhance vaccine efficacy in the bioterror war.

  17. PEGylated Adenoviruses: From Mice to Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wonganan, Piyanuch; Croyle, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Covalent modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a non-toxic polymer used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for over 60 years, can profoundly influence the pharmacokinetic, pharmacologic and toxciologic profile of protein and peptide-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the history of PEGylation and PEG chemistry and highlights the value of this technology in the context of the design and development of recombinant viruses for gene transfer, vaccination and diagnostic purposes. Specific emphasis is placed on the application of this technology to the adenovirus, the most potent viral vector with the most highly characterized toxicity profile to date, in several animal models. PMID:21994645

  18. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  19. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  20. Gene transfer by adenovirus in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, M F; Ewaskiewicz, J I; Adda, S; Bailey, K; Harris, V; Sosnoski, D; Tomasic, M; Wilson, J; Kotlikoff, M I

    1996-08-01

    We report adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into airway smooth muscle cells in cultured cells and organ-cultured tracheal segments. Incubation of cultured rat tracheal myocytes with virus (5 x 10(8) pfu/ml) for 6 h resulted in beta-galactosidase expression in 94.8 +/- 2.5% of cells (n = 4). Following incubation of thin (less than 200 microns diameter) equine trachealis muscle segments with virus in organ culture (5 x 10(8)-5 x 10(10) pfu/ml) the average expression of the Lac Z gene was approximately 19 +/- 10% (n = 9). Expression was markedly improved, however, in segments from neonatal rats (13-21 days). In two experiments in which the mucosa and serosa were removed, nearly all cells expressed beta-galactosidase, whereas in a third experiment in which the tissue was not dissected, about 40% of cells were stained. Viral infection had no effect on tension development of strips following organ culture. In vitro gene transfer may provide a useful method to alter protein expression and examine the effect of this alteration on excitation/contraction coupling in smooth muscle.

  1. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2005). In this study, the virus was successfully isolated and propagated in peregrine falcon embryo fibroblasts, in which it caused visible and reproducible cytopathology. Testing for serum neutralizing antibodies found that infection with this virus was limited almost exclusively to falcons. Serology also found that wild and captive peregrine falcons had high seropositivity rates of 80% and 100%, respectively, although clinical disease was rarely reported in this species. These data implicate peregrine falcons as the natural host and primary reservoir for the virus. Other species of North American falcons, including aplomado falcons, had lower seropositivity rates of 43 to 57%. Falcon species of tropical and/or island origin were uniformly seronegative, although deaths among adults of these species have been described, suggesting they are highly susceptible. Chickens and quail were uniformly seronegative and not susceptible to infection, indicating that fowl were not the source of infection. Based on the information from this study, the primary control of falcon adenovirus infections should be based on segregation of carrier and susceptible falcon species. PMID:16000467

  2. Systemic Delivery of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Decorin for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuefeng; Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Guise, Theresa; Yun, Chae-Ok; Brendler, Charles B; Iozzo, Renato V; Seth, Prem

    2015-12-01

    The development of novel therapies for breast cancer bone metastasis is a major unmet medical need. Toward that end, we have constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad.dcn, and a nonreplicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).dcn, both containing the human decorin gene. Our in vitro studies showed that Ad.dcn produced high levels of viral replication and the decorin protein in the breast tumor cells. Ad(E1-).dcn-mediated decorin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells downregulated the expression of Met, β-catenin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A, all of which are recognized decorin targets and play pivotal roles in the progression of breast tumor growth and metastasis. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited cell migration and induced mitochondrial autophagy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mice bearing MDA-MB-231-luc skeletal metastases were systemically administered with the viral vectors, and skeletal tumor growth was monitored over time. The results of bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography indicated that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn significantly inhibited the progression of bone metastases. At the terminal time point, histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, and bone destruction biomarkers showed that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn reduced tumor burden and inhibited bone destruction. A nonreplicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).luc expressing the luciferase 2 gene had no significant effect on inhibiting bone metastases, and in several assays, Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn were better than Ad.luc, a replicating virus expressing the luciferase 2 gene. Our data suggest that adenoviral replication coupled with decorin expression could produce effective antitumor responses in a MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis model of breast cancer. Thus, Ad.dcn could potentially be developed as a candidate gene therapy vector for treating breast cancer bone metastases.

  3. The Dual Nature of Nek9 in Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Richard; Radko, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To successfully replicate in an infected host cell, a virus must overcome sophisticated host defense mechanisms. Viruses, therefore, have evolved a multitude of devices designed to circumvent cellular defenses that would lead to abortive infection. Previous studies have identified Nek9, a cellular kinase, as a binding partner of adenovirus E1A, but the biology behind this association remains a mystery. Here we show that Nek9 is a transcriptional repressor that functions together with E1A to silence the expression of p53-inducible GADD45A gene in the infected cell. Depletion of Nek9 in infected cells reduces virus growth but unexpectedly enhances viral gene expression from the E2 transcription unit, whereas the opposite occurs when Nek9 is overexpressed. Nek9 localizes with viral replication centers, and its depletion reduces viral genome replication, while overexpression enhances viral genome numbers in infected cells. Additionally, Nek9 was found to colocalize with the viral E4 orf3 protein, a repressor of cellular stress response. Significantly, Nek9 was also shown to associate with viral and cellular promoters and appears to function as a transcriptional repressor, representing the first instance of Nek9 playing a role in gene regulation. Overall, these results highlight the complexity of virus-host interactions and identify a new role for the cellular protein Nek9 during infection, suggesting a role for Nek9 in regulating p53 target gene expression. IMPORTANCE In the arms race that exists between a pathogen and its host, each has continually evolved mechanisms to either promote or prevent infection. In order to successfully replicate and spread, a virus must overcome every mechanism that a cell can assemble to block infection. On the other hand, to counter viral spread, cells must have multiple mechanisms to stifle viral replication. In the present study, we add to our understanding of how the human adenovirus is able to circumvent cellular roadblocks

  4. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  5. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  6. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  7. Selective induction of toxicity to human cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat by a conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, L K; Arens, M Q; Subramanian, T; Chinnadurai, G

    1990-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) primarily infect CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading eventually to the development of a systemic immune dysfunction termed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An attractive strategy to combat HIV-mediated pathogenesis would be to eliminate the initial pool of infected cells and thus prevent disease progression. We have engineered a replication-defective, conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector, Ad-tk, whose action is dependent on the targeted expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (tk), cloned downstream of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, in human cells expressing the HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat. Infection of Tat-expressing human HeLa or Jurkat cells with Ad-tk resulted in high-level tk expression, which was not deleterious to the viability of these cells. However, in the presence of the antiherpetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir, Ad-tk infection resulted in a massive reduction in the viability of these Tat-expressing cell lines. As adenoviruses are natural passengers of the human lymphoid system, our results suggest adenovirus vector-based strategies for the targeted expression, under the control of cis-responsive HIV regulatory elements, of cytotoxic agents in HIV-infected cells for the therapy of HIV-mediated pathogenesis. Images PMID:2247444

  8. Predicting the Next Eye Pathogen: Analysis of a Novel Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Zhou, Xiaohong; Rajaiya, Jaya; Yousuf, Mohammad A.; Singh, Gurdeep; DeSerres, Joshua J.; Walsh, Michael P.; Wong, Sallene; Seto, Donald; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James; Jones, Morris S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT For DNA viruses, genetic recombination, addition, and deletion represent important evolutionary mechanisms. Since these genetic alterations can lead to new, possibly severe pathogens, we applied a systems biology approach to study the pathogenicity of a novel human adenovirus with a naturally occurring deletion of the canonical penton base Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) loop, thought to be critical to cellular entry by adenoviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a new highly recombinant species D human adenovirus (HAdV-D60). A synthesis of in silico and laboratory approaches revealed a potential ocular tropism for the new virus. In vivo, inflammation induced by the virus was dramatically greater than that by adenovirus type 37, a major eye pathogen, possibly due to a novel alternate ligand, Tyr-Gly-Asp (YGD), on the penton base protein. The combination of bioinformatics and laboratory simulation may have important applications in the prediction of tissue tropism for newly discovered and emerging viruses. PMID:23572555

  9. Directed evolution of mutator adenoviruses resistant to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Myers, Nicolle D; Skorohodova, Ksenia V; Gounder, Anshu P; Smith, Jason G

    2013-05-01

    We incorporated a previously identified mutation that reduces the fidelity of the DNA polymerase into a human adenovirus vector. Using this mutator vector, we demonstrate rapid selection of resistance to a neutralizing anti-hexon monoclonal antibody due to a G434D mutation in hexon that precludes antibody binding. Since mutator adenoviruses can accumulate compound mutations that are unattainable using traditional random mutagenesis techniques, this approach will be valuable to the study of antivirals and host factor interactions.

  10. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Matoq, Amr; Salahuddin, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection. PMID:27340581

  11. Adenovirus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are an important cause of infections in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, and they continue to provide clinical challenges pertaining to diagnostics and treatment. The growing number of HAdV types identified by genomic analysis, as well as the improved understanding of the sites of viral persistence and reactivation, requires continuous adaptions of diagnostic approaches to facilitate timely detection and monitoring of HAdV infections. In view of the clinical relevance of life-threatening HAdV diseases in the immunocompromised setting, there is an urgent need for highly effective treatment modalities lacking major side effects. The present review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding and management of HAdV infections. PMID:24982316

  12. Polymeric oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors present a promising modality to treat cancer. Many clinical trials have been done with either naked oncolytic Ad or combination with chemotherapies. However, the systemic injection of oncolytic Ad in clinical applications is restricted due to significant liver toxicity and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, Ad has been engineered physically or chemically with numerous polymers for shielding the Ad surface, accomplishing extended blood circulation time and reduced immunogenicity as well as hepatotoxicity. In this review, we describe and classify the characteristics of polymer modified oncolytic Ad following each strategy for cancer treatment. Furthermore, this review concludes with the highlights of various polymer-coated Ads and their prospects, and directions for future research. PMID:26453806

  13. Immune-mediated canine and feline keratitis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Stacy E

    2008-03-01

    Although the normal cornea is devoid of vasculature and lymphatics, there are still several immune-mediated corneal conditions that can occur in dogs and cats. An overview of corneal immunology is presented. Diseases of dogs, including chronic superficial keratitis, superficial punctate keratitis, and canine adenovirus endotheliitis, as well as feline diseases, including eosinophilic keratitis and herpesvirus-related conditions, are discussed.

  14. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  15. Adenovirus tumor targeting and hepatic untargeting by a coxsackie/adenovirus receptor ectodomain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen bispecific adapter.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Jung; Everts, Maaike; Pereboeva, Larisa; Komarova, Svetlana; Idan, Anat; Curiel, David T; Herschman, Harvey R

    2007-06-01

    Adenovirus vectors have a number of advantages for gene therapy. However, because of their lack of tumor tropism and their preference for liver infection following systemic administration, they cannot be used for systemic attack on metastatic disease. Many epithelial tumors (e.g., colon, lung, and breast) express carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). To block the natural hepatic tropism of adenovirus and to "retarget" the virus to CEA-expressing tumors, we used a bispecific adapter protein (sCAR-MFE), which fuses the ectodomain of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (sCAR) with a single-chain anti-CEA antibody (MFE-23). sCAR-MFE untargets adenovirus-directed luciferase transgene expression in the liver by >90% following systemic vector administration. Moreover, sCAR-MFE can "retarget" adenovirus to CEA-positive epithelial tumor cells in cell culture, in s.c. tumor grafts, and in hepatic tumor grafts. The sCAR-MFE bispecific adapter should, therefore, be a powerful agent to retarget adenovirus vectors to epithelial tumor metastases.

  16. Human Adenovirus 52 Uses Sialic Acid-containing Glycoproteins and the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor for Binding to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A. Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S.; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25674795

  17. A New Type of Adenovirus Vector That Utilizes Homologous Recombination To Achieve Tumor-Specific Replication

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin; Liang, Min; Ye, Xun; Ni, Shaoheng; Li, Zong-Yi; Ye, Sheng Long; Hu, Fang; Lieber, André

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new class of adenovirus vectors that selectively replicate in tumor cells. The vector design is based on our recent observation that a variety of human tumor cell lines support DNA replication of adenovirus vectors with deletions of the E1A and E1B genes, whereas primary human cells or mouse liver cells in vivo do not. On the basis of this tumor-selective replication, we developed an adenovirus system that utilizes homologous recombination between inverted repeats to mediate precise rearrangements within the viral genome resulting in replication-dependent activation of transgene expression in tumors (Ad.IR vectors). Here, we used this system to achieve tumor-specific expression of adenoviral wild-type E1A in order to enhance viral DNA replication and spread within tumor metastases. In vitro DNA replication and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the mechanism of E1A-enhanced replication of Ad.IR-E1A vectors is efficiently and specifically activated in tumor cells, but not in nontransformed human cells. Systemic application of the Ad.IR-E1A vector into animals with liver metastases achieved transgene expression exclusively in tumors. The number of transgene-expressing tumor cells within metastases increased over time, indicating viral spread. Furthermore, the Ad.IR-E1A vector demonstrated antitumor efficacy in subcutaneous and metastatic models. These new Ad.IR-E1A vectors combine elements that allow for tumor-specific transgene expression, efficient viral replication, and spread in liver metastases after systemic vector application. PMID:12368342

  18. Crystal Structure of Species D Adenovirus Fiber Knobs and Their Sialic Acid Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Burmeister, Wim P.; Guilligay, Delphine; Cusack, Stephen; Wadell, Göran; Arnberg, Niklas

    2004-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 37 (Ad37) belongs to species D and can cause epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, whereas the closely related Ad19p does not. Primary cell attachment by adenoviruses is mediated through receptor binding of the knob domain of the fiber protein. The knobs of Ad37 and Ad19p differ at only two positions, Lys240Glu and Asn340Asp. We report the high-resolution crystal structures of the Ad37 and Ad19p knobs, both native and in complex with sialic acid, which has been proposed as a receptor for Ad37. Overall, the Ad37 and Ad19p knobs are very similar to previously reported knob structures, especially to that of Ad5, which binds the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Ad37 and Ad19p knobs are structurally identical with the exception of the changed side chains and are structurally most similar to CAR-binding knobs (e.g., that of Ad5) rather than non-CAR-binding knobs (e.g., that of Ad3). The two mutations in Ad19p result in a partial loss of the exceptionally high positive surface charge of the Ad37 knob but do not affect sialic acid binding. This site is located on the top of the trimer and binds both α(2,3) and α(2,6)-linked sialyl-lactose, although only the sialic acid residue makes direct contact. Amino acid alignment suggests that the sialic acid binding site is conserved in several species D serotypes. Our results show that the altered viral tropism and cell binding of Ad19p relative to those of Ad37 are not explained by a different binding ability toward sialyl-lactose. PMID:15220447

  19. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  20. Identification of sites in adenovirus hexon for foreign peptide incorporation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongju; Han, Tie; Belousova, Natalya; Krasnykh, Victor; Kashentseva, Elena; Dmitriev, Igor; Kataram, Manjula; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J; Curiel, David T

    2005-03-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) is one of the most promising vectors for gene therapy applications. Genetic engineering of Ad5 capsid proteins has been employed to redirect vector tropism, to enhance infectivity, or to circumvent preexisting host immunity. As the most abundant capsid protein, hexon modification is particularly attractive. However, genetic modification of hexon often results in failure of rescuing viable viruses. Since hypervariable regions (HVRs) are nonconserved among hexons of different serotypes, we investigated whether the HVRs could be used for genetic modification of hexon by incorporating oligonucleotides encoding six histidine residues (His6) into different HVRs in the Ad5 genome. The modified viruses were successfully rescued, and the yields of viral production were similar to that of unmodified Ad5. A thermostability assay suggested the modified viruses were stable. The His6 epitopes were expressed in all modified hexon proteins as assessed by Western blotting assay, although the intensity of the reactive bands varied. In addition, we examined the binding activity of anti-His tag antibody to the intact virions with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found the His6 epitopes incorporated in HVR2 and HVR5 could bind to anti-His tag antibody. This suggested the His6 epitopes in HVR2 and HVR5 were exposed on virion surfaces. Finally, we examined the infectivities of the modified Ad vectors. The His6 epitopes did not affect the native infectivity of Ad5 vectors. In addition, the His6 epitopes did not appear to mediate His6-dependent viral infection, as assessed in two His6 artificial receptor systems. Our study provided valuable information for studies involving hexon modification. PMID:15731232

  1. Efficient infection of primitive hematopoietic stem cells by modified adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Yotnda, P; Onishi, H; Heslop, H E; Shayakhmetov, D; Lieber, A; Brenner, M; Davis, A

    2001-06-01

    Almost all studies of adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer have made use of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Unfortunately, Ad5 has been ineffective at infecting hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC). Chimeric Ad5/F35 vectors that have been engineered to substitute the shorter-shafted fiber protein from Ad35 can efficiently infect committed hematopoietic cells and we now show highly effective gene transfer to primitive progenitor subsets. An Ad5GFP and Ad5/F35GFP vector was added to CD34(+) and CD34(-)lineage(-) (lin(-)) HPC. Only 5-20% of CD34(+) and CD34(-)lin(-) cells expressed GFP after Ad5 exposure. In contrast, with the Ad5/F35 vector, 30-70% of the CD34(+), 50-70% of the CD34(-)lin(-) and up to 60% of the CD38(-) HPC expressed GFP and there was little evident cellular toxicity. Because of these improved results, we also analyzed the ability of Ad5/F35 virus to infect the hoechst negative 'side population' (SP) of marrow cells, which appear to be among the very earliest multipotent HPC. Between 51% and 80% of marrow SP cells expressed GFP. The infected populations retained their ability to form colonies in two short-term culture systems, with no loss of viability. We also studied the transfer and expression of immunomodulatory genes, CD40L (cell surface expression) and interleukin-2 (secreted). Both were expressed at immunomodulatory levels for >5 days. The ability of Ad5/F35 to deliver transgenes to primitive HPC with high efficiency and low toxicity in the absence of growth factors provides an improved means of studying the consequences of transient gene expression in these cells.

  2. Effects of capsid-modified oncolytic adenoviruses and their combinations with gemcitabine or silica gel on pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kangasniemi, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Pisto, Tommi; Koskinen, Mika; Jokinen, Mika; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Jalonen, Harry; Koski, Anniina; Kangasniemi, Anna; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-07-01

    Conventional cancer treatments often have little impact on the course of advanced pancreatic cancer. Although cancer gene therapy with adenoviruses is a promising developmental approach, the primary receptor is poorly expressed in pancreatic cancers which might compromise efficacy and thus targeting to other receptors could be beneficial. Extended stealth delivery, combination with standard chemotherapy or circumvention of host antiadenoviral immune response might improve efficacy further. In this work, capsid-modified adenoviruses were studied for transduction of cell lines and clinical normal and tumor tissue samples. The respective oncolytic viruses were tested for oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo. Survival was studied in a peritoneally disseminated pancreas cancer model, with or without concurrent gemcitabine while silica implants were utilized for extended intraperitoneal virus delivery. Immunocompetent mice and Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of silica mediated delivery on antiviral immune responses and subsequent in vivo gene delivery. Capsid modifications selectively enhanced gene transfer to malignant pancreatic cancer cell lines and clinical samples. The respective oncolytic viruses resulted in increased cell killing in vitro, which translated into a survival benefit in mice. Early proinfammatory cytokine responses and formation of antiviral neutralizing antibodies was partially avoided with silica implants. The implant also shielded the virus from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, while increasing the pancreas/liver gene delivery ratio six-fold. In conclusion, capsid modified adenoviruses would be useful for testing in pancreatic cancer trials. Silica implants might increase the safety and efficacy of the approach.

  3. Cell-specific promoter in adenovirus vector for transgenic expression of SERCA1 ATPase in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Inesi, G; Lewis, D; Sumbilla, C; Nandi, A; Strock, C; Huff, K W; Rogers, T B; Johns, D C; Kessler, P D; Ordahl, C P

    1998-03-01

    Adenovirus-mediated transfer of cDNA encoding the chicken skeletal muscle sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1) yielded selective expression in cultured chick embryo cardiac myocytes under control of a segment (-268 base pair) of the cell-specific cardiac troponin T (cTnT) promoter or nonselective expression in myocytes and fibroblasts under control of a constitutive viral [cytomegalovirus (CMV)] promoter. Under optimal conditions nearly all cardiac myocytes in culture were shown to express transgenic SERCA1 ATPase. Expression was targeted to intracellular membranes and was recovered in subcellular fractions with a pattern identical to that of the endogenous SERCA2a ATPase. Relative to control myocytes, transgenic SERCA1 expression increased up to four times the rates of ATP-dependent (and thapsigargin-sensitive) Ca2+ transport activity of cell homogenates. Although the CMV promoter was more active than the cTnT promoter, an upper limit for transgenic expression of functional enzyme was reached under control of either promoter by adjustment of the adenovirus plaque-forming unit titer of infection media. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentration transients and tension development of whole myocytes were also influenced to a similar limit by transgenic expression of SERCA1 under control of either promoter. Our experiments demonstrate that a cell-specific protein promoter in recombinant adenovirus vectors yields highly efficient and selective transgene expression of a membrane-bound and functional enzyme in cardiac myocytes.

  4. Efficiency of Membrane Protein Expression Following Infection with Recombinant Adenovirus of Polarized Non-Transformed Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Stern, Jeffrey H; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of exogenous proteins facilitates studies of molecular mechanisms and utility for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Here, we compared expression of the membrane protein β5 integrin-GFP (β5-GFP) in two recently established models of differentiated human RPE, adult RPE stem cell-derived RPE and primary fetal RPE, upon infection with recombinant adenovirus or transfection with DNA in liposomes. We varied viral titer and duration of virus incubation and examined β5-GFP and the tight junction marker ZO-1 in manipulated cells by confocal microscopy. Fewer than 5 % of cells expressed β5-GFP after liposome-mediated transfection. The percentage of cells with detectable β5-GFP exceeded 90 % after adenovirus infection for as little as 1 h. Decreasing virus titer two-fold did not alter the fraction of cells expressing β5-GFP but increased variability of β5-GFP level among cells. In cells with low expression levels, β5-GFP localized mostly to the apical plasma membrane like endogenous αvβ5 integrin. In cells with high expression levels, β5-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in addition to the apical surface suggesting accumulation in trafficking compartments. Altogether, adenovirus delivery yields efficient exogenous membrane protein expression of correct polarity in differentiated human RPE cells in culture. PMID:26427482

  5. Interaction of cellular proteins with BCL-xL targeted to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in adenovirus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, T; Vijayalingam, S; Kuppuswamy, M; Chinnadurai, G

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus-mediated apoptosis was suppressed when cellular anti-apoptosis proteins (BCL-2 and BCL-xL) were substituted for the viral E1B-19K. For unbiased proteomic analysis of proteins targeted by BCL-xL in adenovirus-infected cells and to visualize the interactions with target proteins, BCL-xL was targeted to cytosolic inclusion bodies utilizing the orthoreovirus µNS protein sequences. The chimeric protein was localized in non-canonical cytosolic factory-like sites and promoted survival of virus-infected cells. The BCL-xL-associated proteins were isolated from the cytosolic inclusion bodies in adenovirus-infected cells and analyzed by LC-MS. These proteins included BAX, BAK, BID, BIK and BIM as well as mitochondrial proteins such as prohibitin 2, ATP synthase and DNA-PKcs. Our studies suggested that in addition to the interaction with various pro-apoptotic proteins, the association with certain mitochondrial proteins such as DNA-PKcs and prohibitins might augment the survival function of BCL-xL in virus infected cells.

  6. Adenovirus-expressed human hyperplasia suppressor gene induces apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Li, Zhixin; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Xiaohui; Huang, Jing; Ma, Teng; Lu, Tian; Song, Quansheng; Li, Qian; Guo, Yanhong; Tang, Jian; Ma, Dalong; Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2008-01-01

    Hyperplasia suppressor gene (HSG), also called human mitofusin 2, is a novel gene that markedly suppresses the cell proliferation of hyperproliferative vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rat arteries. This gene encodes a mitochondrial membrane protein that participates in mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. In this report, we showed that an adenovirus vector encoding human HSG (Ad5-hHSG) had an antitumor activity in a wide range of cancer cell lines. We further focused on the lung cancer cell line A549 and the colon cancer cell line HT-29 and then observed that Ad5-hHSG induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy revealed that cells infected with Ad5-hHSG formed dose-dependent perinuclear clusters of fused mitochondria. Adenovirus-mediated hHSG overexpression induced apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) reduction and release of cytochrome c, caspase-3 activation, and cleavage of PARP in vitro. Overexpression of hHSG also significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, Ad5-hHSG increased the sensitivity of these cell lines to two chemotherapeutic agents, VP16 and CHX, and radiation. These results suggest that Ad5-hHSG may serve as an effective therapeutic drug against tumors.

  7. Members of adenovirus species B utilize CD80 and CD86 as cellular attachment receptors

    PubMed Central

    Short, Joshua J.; Vasu, Chenthamarakshan; Holterman, Mark J.; Curiel, David T.; Pereboev, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Alternate serotypes of adenovirus (Ad), including Ads of species B, are being explored to circumvent the disadvantages of Ad serotype 5 gene delivery vectors. Whereas the majority of human Ads utilize the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), none of the Ad species B use CAR. Ad species B is further divided into two subspecies, B1 and B2, and utilizes at least two classes of receptors: common Ad species B receptors and B2 specific receptors. CD46 has been implicated as a B2-specific receptor. Ad serotype 3 (Ad3), a member of B1, utilizes CD80 and CD86 as cellular attachment receptors. The receptor-interacting Ad fiber-knob domain is highly homologous among species B Ads. We hypothesized that other members of Ad species B may utilize CD80 and CD86 as cellular attachment receptors. All tested species B members showed specific binding to cells expressing CD80 and CD86, and the Ad fiber-knob domain from both B1 and B2 Ad efficiently blocked CD80- and CD86-mediated infection of Ad3 vectors. Members of both B1 and B2 demonstrated CD80- and CD86-specific infection of CHO cells expressing CD80 and CD86. Therefore, all of the members of Ad species B utilize CD80 and CD86 for infection of cells. PMID:16920215

  8. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. Methodology/Principal Findings As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4). This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers. PMID:23383334

  9. Positive and negative regulation of adenovirus infection by CAR-like soluble protein, CLSP.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, K; Tashiro, K; Sakurai, F; Osada, N; Kusuda, J; Hayakawa, T; Yamanishi, K; Mizuguchi, H

    2007-08-01

    Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and a component of epithelial tight junction. CAR also functions as a primary receptor for coxsackievirus B and adenovirus (Ad) infection. In this study, we report the identification of a novel protein, CAR-like soluble protein (CLSP), which is closely related to CAR. Mouse CLSP (mCLSP) was composed of 390 amino acids, including three Ig domains, and showed strong homology to the IgV domain of CAR. Interestingly, mCLSP lacks a transmembrane domain, indicating that this is a soluble protein. mCLSP mRNA was detected primarily in the brain and ovary. When mCLSP cDNA was introduced into SK HEP-1 cells, which were known to be CAR positive and easily infected with Ad vector, the infection with Ad vector was severely inhibited. On the other hand, mCLSP promoted the infection with Ad vector in CAR-negative NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, recombinant CLSP directly bound to Ad and inhibited the Ad vector-mediated transduction in SK HEP-1 cells. Computational analysis for a genome database showed that the CLSP gene is rodent-specific, and that human and bovine lack this gene. These results suggest that CLSP may play a role in the antiviral defense of the host in rodent animals.

  10. Alpha interferon-induced antiviral response noncytolytically reduces replication defective adenovirus DNA in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Tianlun; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M

    2007-12-01

    Although alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) is of benefit in the treatment of viral hepatitis B, HBV replication has been refractory to the cytokine in commonly used hepatocyte-derived cell lines. In search for a cell culture system to study the mechanism by which IFN-alpha inhibits HBV replication, we infected a variety of cell lines with an adenoviral vector containing a replication competent 1.3-fold genome length HBV DNA (AdHBV) and followed by incubation with IFN-alpha. We found that IFN-alpha efficiently decreased the level of HBV DNA replicative intermediates in AdHBV infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Further analysis revealed, surprisingly, that IFN-alpha did not directly inhibit HBV replication, rather the amount of adenovirus DNA in the nuclei of MDBK cells was reduced. As a consequence, HBV RNA transcription and DNA replication were inhibited. Experiments with adenoviral vector expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) further supported the notion that IFN-alpha treatment noncytolytically eliminated adenovirus DNA, but did not kill the vector infected MDBK cells. Our data suggest that IFN-alpha-induced antiviral program is able to discriminate host cellular DNA from episomal viral DNA and might represent a novel pathway of interferon mediate innate defense against DNA virus infections.

  11. Adenovirus-associated deaths in US military during postvaccination period, 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Potter, Robert N; Cantrell, Joyce A; Mallak, Craig T; Gaydos, Joel C

    2012-03-01

    Adenoviruses are frequent causes of respiratory disease in the US military population. A successful immunization program against adenovirus types 4 and 7 was terminated in 1999. Review of records in the Mortality Surveillance Division, Armed Forces Medical Examiner System, identified 8 deaths attributed to adenovirus infections in service members during 1999-2010.

  12. Characterization of a new adenovirus isolated from black-tailed deer in California.

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, H D; Hobbs, L A; Woods, L W

    2001-01-01

    An adenovirus associated with systemic and localized vascular damage was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry in a newly recognized epizootic hemorrhagic disease in California black-tailed deer. In this study, we describe the cultural, physicochemical and serological characteristics of a virus isolated from lung using neonatal white-tail deer lung and turbinate cell cultures. The virus had the cultural, morphological and physicochemical characteristics of members of the Adenoviridae family. The virus would not replicate in low passage fetal bovine, caprine or ovine cells. Antiserum to the deer adenovirus, strain D94-2569, neutralized bovine adenovirus type-6 (BAdV-6), BAdV-7, and caprine adenovirus type-1 (GAdV-1). Antiserum to BAdV-6 did not neutralize the deer adenovirus but antiserum to BAdV-7 and GAdV-1 neutralized the deer adenovirus. Cross-neutralization with the other bovine, caprine and ovine adenovirus species was not observed. Restriction endonuclease patterns generated for the deer adenovirus were unique compared to those for the currently recognized bovine, caprine and ovine adenovirus types. Amino acid sequence alignments of the hexon gene from the deer adenovirus strain D94-2569 indicate that it is a member of the proposed new genus (Atadenovirus) of the Adenoviridae family. While closely related antigenically to BAdV-7 and GAdV-1, the deer adenovirus appears sufficiently distinct culturally and molecularly to justify consideration as a new adenovirus type.

  13. Enhanced UV inactivation of adenoviruses under polychromatic UV lamps.

    PubMed

    Linden, Karl G; Thurston, Jeanette; Schaefer, Raymond; Malley, James P

    2007-12-01

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most UV-resistant waterborne pathogen of concern to public health microbiologists. The U.S. EPA has stipulated that a UV fluence (dose) of 186 mJ cm(-2) is required for 4-log inactivation credit in water treatment. However, all adenovirus inactivation data to date published in the peer-reviewed literature have been based on UV disinfection experiments using UV irradiation at 253.7 nm produced from a conventional low-pressure UV source. The work reported here presents inactivation data for adenovirus based on polychromatic UV sources and details the significant enhancement in inactivation achieved using these polychromatic sources. When full-spectrum, medium-pressure UV lamps were used, 4-log inactivation of adenovirus type 40 is achieved at a UV fluence of less than 60 mJ cm(-2) and a surface discharge pulsed UV source required a UV fluence of less than 40 mJ cm(-2). The action spectrum for adenovirus type 2 was also developed and partially explains the improved inactivation based on enhancements at wavelengths below 230 nm. Implications for water treatment, public health, and the future of UV regulations for virus disinfection are discussed. PMID:17933932

  14. Bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Ayalew, Lisanework E; Kumar, Pankaj; Gaba, Amit; Makadiya, Niraj; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-01-15

    The use of vaccines is an effective and relatively inexpensive means of controlling infectious diseases, which cause heavy economic losses to the livestock industry through animal loss, decreased productivity, treatment expenses and decreased carcass quality. However, some vaccines produced by conventional means are imperfect in many respects including virulence, safety and efficacy. Moreover, there are no vaccines for some animal diseases. Although genetic engineering has provided new ways of producing effective vaccines, the cost of production for veterinary use is a critical criterion for selecting the method of production and delivery of vaccines. The cost effective production and intrinsic ability to enter cells has made adenovirus vectors a highly efficient tool for delivery of vaccine antigens. Moreover, adenoviruses induce both humoral and cellular immune responses to expressed vaccine antigens. Since nonhuman adenoviruses are species specific, the development of animal specific adenoviruses as vaccine delivery vectors is being evaluated. This review summarizes the work related to the development of bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle in animals, particularly cattle.

  15. [Adenovirus-delivered BMI-1 shRNA].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Li; Zhen, Jie

    2009-10-01

    Recently, some plasmid vectors that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs have been developed, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors possess certain advantages over synthesized siRNA, many disadvantages exist, including low and variable transfection efficiency. This study was aimed to establish an adenoviral siRNA delivery system without above-mentioned disadvantages on the basis of commercially available vectors. A vector was designed to target the human polycomb gene BMI-1. The pAd-BMI-1shRNA-CMV-GFP vector was produced by cloning a 300 bp U6-BMI-1 cassette from the pGE1BMI-1shRNA plasmid and a CMV-GFP cassette from pAdTrack CMV in pShutter vector. The adenovirus was produced from the 293A packaging cell line and then infected K562 cells. The mRNA and protein levels of Bmi-1 were detected by real time-PCR and Western blot respectively. The results showed that the adenovirus carrying the BMI-1shRNA was successfully produced. After being transfected with the adenovirus, the K562 cells dramatically down-regulated BMI-1 expression, whereas the adenoviruses carrying control shRNA had no effect on BMI-1 expression. It is concluded that the adenoviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells and may become a candidate vector carrying siRNA drugs for gene therapy. PMID:19840467

  16. Adenovirus Pneumonia Complicated With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Lung-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill. We report on a 9-month-old boy who had adenovirus pneumonia with rapid progression to ARDS. Real-time polymerase chain reaction tests of sputum and pleural effusion samples confirmed adenovirus serotype 7. Chest x-rays showed progressively increasing infiltrations and pleural effusions in both lung fields within 11 days. Because conventional ARDS therapies failed, we initiated ECMO with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for 9 days. Chest x-rays showed gradual improvements in lung expansion. This patient was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department. Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO. PMID:25997046

  17. Adenovirus type 5 early region 4 is responsible for E1A-induced p53-independent apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Marcellus, R C; Teodoro, J G; Wu, T; Brough, D E; Ketner, G; Shore, G C; Branton, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the absence of E1B, the 289- and 243-residue E1A products of human adenovirus type 5 induce p53-dependent apoptosis. However, our group has shown recently that the 289-residue E1A protein is also able to induce apoptosis by a p53-independent mechanism (J. G. Teodoro, G. C. Shore, and P. E. Branton, Oncogene 11:467-474, 1995). Preliminary results suggested that p53-independent cell death required expression of one or more additional adenovirus early gene products. Here we show that both the E1B 19-kDa protein and cellular Bcl-2 inhibit or significantly delay p53-independent apoptosis. Neither early region E2 or E3 appeared to be necessary for such cell death. Analysis of a series of E1A mutants indicated that mutations in the transactivation domain and other regions of E1A correlated with E1A-mediated transactivation of E4 gene expression. Furthermore, p53-deficient human SAOS-2 cells infected with a mutant which expresses E1B but none of the E4 gene products remained viable for considerably longer times than those infected with wild-type adenovirus type 5. In addition, an adenovirus vector lacking both E1 and E4 was unable to induce DNA degradation and cell killing in E1A-expressing cell lines. These data showed that an E4 product is essential for E1A-induced p53-independent apoptosis. PMID:8709247

  18. Targeting of adenovirus vectors carrying a tumor cell-specific peptide: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Rittner, K; Schreiber, V; Erbs, P; Lusky, M

    2007-05-01

    Previously, we have identified a tumor cell-specific peptide, HEW, by panning of phage display libraries on the human colorectal cancer cell line WiDr. In this report we demonstrate that this peptide can modify the infection properties of adenovirus vectors. Increased infectivity of replication-deficient adenovirus 5 vectors in WiDr cells was observed upon genetic insertion of the HEW peptide in the HI loop of the fiber knob. Moreover, whereas the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-ablating fiber mutation S408E abolished apparent infection in CAR-positive WiDr cells, the insertion of HEW completely restored infectivity toward these cells in vitro. To assess whether the de- and re-targeted infection profile was maintained in vivo, the fiber-modified adenovirus vectors were injected intratumorally or intravenously in WiDr tumor-bearing Swiss nu/nu mice. No significant differences in efficiency of infection could be observed suggesting alternative viral uptake mechanisms in vivo. Next, we have included the fiber shaft mutation S(*) in our studies, which was described to confer a de-targeted phenotype in vivo. Reduced gene transfer due to the S(*) mutation both in vitro and in vivo could be confirmed. Insertion of HEW in the HI knob loop of shaft-mutated fiber, however, did not rescue infectivity in target cells neither in vitro nor in vivo. We demonstrate the efficient ligand-mediated re-targeting of adenoviral vector infection to the human cancer cell line WiDr. The lack of apparent re-targeting in the in vivo situation is described. PMID:17318198

  19. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 decreases humoral and cellular immunity by adenovirus to enhance target GFP gene transfer in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dou; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Long, Ling; Zhu, Naishuo

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are once potential and promising vectors for gene delivery, but the immunogenicity attenuates its transfer efficiency. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) can inhibit T cell immunity. Thus, we aimed to study the effect of CTLA-4 in the process of Ad-mediated gene transfer. The C57BL/6 mice were injected by Ad vectors at twice, and CTLA-4 was administrated after the first Ad injection. Then, the CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells and circulating levels of IL-2, IL-4, and anti-Ad IgG were decreased by CTLA-4, while Ad generated immune responses. The green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressions of tissues were enhanced by CTLA-4 till injection of Ad at twice. Our results indicate that CTLA-4 can inhibit humoral and cellular immunity by adenovirus generation to enhance GFP delivery, and provide a potential way to assist in Ad-mediated gene transfer.

  20. New Insights on Adenovirus as Vaccine Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lasaro, Marcio O; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for treatment of genetic diseases. Their usefulness for permanent gene replacement was limited by their high immunogenicity, which resulted in rapid elimination of transduced cells through induction of T and B cells to antigens of Ad and the transgene product. The very trait that excluded their use for sustained treatment of genetic diseases made them highly attractive as vaccine carriers. Recently though results showed that Ad vectors based on common human serotypes, such as serotype 5, may not be ideal as vaccine carriers. A recently conducted phase 2b trial, termed STEP trial, with an AdHu5-based vaccine expressing antigens of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) not only showed lack of efficacy in spite of the vaccine's immunogenicity, but also suggested an increased trend for HIV acquisition in individuals that had circulating AdHu5 neutralizing antibodies prior to vaccination. Alternative serotypes from humans or nonhuman primates (NHPs), to which most humans lack pre-existing immunity, have been vectored and may circumvent the problems encountered with the use of AdHu5 vectors in humans. In summary, although Ad vectors have seen their share of setbacks in recent years, they remain viable tools for prevention or treatment of a multitude of diseases. PMID:19513019

  1. Viability of human adenovirus from hospital fomites.

    PubMed

    Ganime, Ana Carolina; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Santos, Marisa; Costa Filho, Rubens; Leite, José Paulo G; Miagostovich, Marize P

    2014-12-01

    The monitoring of environmental microbial contamination in healthcare facilities may be a valuable tool to determine pathogens transmission in those settings; however, such procedure is limited to bacterial indicators. Viruses are found commonly in those environments and are rarely used for these procedures. The aim of this study was to assess distribution and viability of a human DNA virus on fomites in an Adult Intensive Care Unit of a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Human adenoviruses (HAdV) were investigated in 141 fomites by scraping the surface area and screening by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using TaqMan® System (Carlsbad, CA). Ten positive samples were selected for virus isolation in A549 and/or HEp2c cell lines. A total of 63 samples (44.7%) were positive and presented viral load ranging from 2.48 × 10(1) to 2.1 × 10(3) genomic copies per millilitre (gc/ml). The viability was demonstrated by integrated cell culture/nested-PCR in 5 out of 10 samples. Nucleotide sequencing confirmed all samples as HAdV and characterized one of them as specie B, serotype 3 (HAdV-3). The results indicate the risk of nosocomial transmission via contaminated fomites and point out the use of HAdV as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

  2. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  3. Selection of nonfastidious adenovirus species in 293 cells inoculated with stool specimens containing adenovirus 40.

    PubMed

    Brown, M

    1985-08-01

    Of 35 stool specimens isolated and examined in 293 cells, 15 isolates contained adenovirus species 40 (Ad40), and 4 of these 15 isolates also contained a nonfastidious adenovirus species (Ad1 in two cases, Ad18 or Ad31) which was selected over Ad40 during serial passage in the 293 cells. The selection of Ad1 over Ad40 was examined in detail. Restriction analysis of intracellular DNA and the relative infectivity titers of Ad40 and Ad1 at each passage level after the inoculation of 293 cells with a particular stool specimen demonstrated that although the amount of Ad40 DNA synthesized far exceeded that of Ad1, the relative infectivity titer of Ad40 was low. The growth characteristics of Ad40 were then compared with those of Ad1, Ad18, and Ad41 in singly infected 293 cell cultures. One-step growth curves showed the same growth rate in each case, with a latent period of 12 h and a maximum titer at 24 to 36 h postinfection. Yields of infectious Ad40 virus were consistently 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those of Ad1. This difference was reflected by a reduced yield of total AD40 virions (p1.34) as determined by 35S labeling experiments. However, the 3- to 10-fold reduction in total yield of Ad40 virions did not account for the 100- to 1,000-fold reduction in the yield of infectious virus. PMID:2993350

  4. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26519158

  5. Complete genome sequences of pigeon adenovirus 1 and duck adenovirus 2 extend the number of species within the genus Aviadenovirus.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ana; Kaján, Győző L; Kosiol, Carolin; Harrach, Balázs; Schlötterer, Christian; Hess, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Complete genomes of the first isolates of pigeon adenovirus 1 (PiAdV-1) and Muscovy duck adenovirus (duck adenovirus 2, DAdV-2) were sequenced. The PiAdV-1 genome is 45,480bp long, and has a gene organization most similar to turkey adenovirus 1. Near the left end of the genome, it lacks ORF0, ORF1A, ORF1B and ORF1C, and possesses ORF52, whereas six novel genes were found near the right end. The DAdV-2 genome is 43,734bp long, and has a gene organization similar to that of goose adenovirus 4 (GoAdV-4). It lacks ORF51, ORF1C and ORF54, and possesses ORF55A and five other novel genes. PiAdV-1 and DAdV-2 genomes contain two and one fiber genes, respectively. Genome organization, G+C content, molecular phylogeny and host type confirm the need to establish two novel species (Pigeon aviadenovirus A and Duck aviadenovirus B) within the genus Aviadenovirus. Phylogenetic data show that DAdV-2 is most closely related to GoAdV-4.

  6. Development of a generic adenovirus delivery system based on structure-guided design of bispecific trimeric DARPin adapters.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Birgit; Honegger, Annemarie; Hess, Christian; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Mittl, Peer R E; Grütter, Markus G; Belousova, Natalya; Mikheeva, Galina; Krasnykh, Victor; Plückthun, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have shown promise as vectors for gene delivery in clinical trials. Efficient viral targeting to a tissue of choice requires both ablation of the virus' original tropism and engineering of an efficient receptor-mediated uptake by a specific cell population. We have developed a series of adapters binding to the virus with such high affinity that they remain fully bound for >10 d, block its natural receptor binding site and mediate interaction with a surface receptor of choice. The adapter contains two fused modules, both consisting of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), one binding to the fiber knob of adenovirus serotype 5 and the other binding to various tumor markers. By solving the crystal structure of the complex of the trimeric knob with three bound DARPins at 1.95-Å resolution, we could use computer modeling to design a link to a trimeric protein of extraordinary kinetic stability, the capsid protein SHP from the lambdoid phage 21. We arrived at a module which binds the knob like a trimeric clamp. When this clamp was fused with DARPins of varying specificities, it enabled adenovirus serotype 5-mediated delivery of a transgene in a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, epidermal growth factor receptor-, or epithelial cell adhesion molecule-dependent manner with transduction efficiencies comparable to or even exceeding those of Ad itself. With these adapters, efficiently produced in Escherichia coli, Ad can be converted rapidly to new receptor specificities using any ligand as the receptor-binding moiety. Prefabricated Ads with different payloads thus can be retargeted readily to many cell types of choice.

  7. Crystal Structure of Enteric Adenovirus Serotype 41 Short Fiber Head

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Human enteric adenoviruses of species F contain two fibers in the same virion, a long fiber which binds to coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and a short fiber of unknown function. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the short fiber head of human adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41). The short fiber head has the characteristic fold of other known fiber heads but has three unusual features. First, it has much shorter loops between the beta-strands. Second, one of the usually well-ordered beta-strands on the distal face of the fiber head is highly disordered and this same region is sensitive to digestion with pepsin, an enzyme occurring naturally in the intestinal tract, the physiological environment of Ad41. Third, the AB loop has a deletion giving it a distinct conformation incompatible with CAR binding. PMID:16254343

  8. Disseminated adenovirus infection in an immunocompromised host. Pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Landry, M L; Fong, C K; Neddermann, K; Solomon, L; Hsiung, G D

    1987-09-01

    In this report, a bone marrow transplant recipient with rapidly fatal gastroenteritis is presented. The presence of intranuclear inclusions on postmortem light microscopic examination of liver, lung, and small bowel tissue was considered diagnostic of cytomegalovirus infection. However, electron microscopic examination of liver tissue demonstrated adenovirus infection. This was confirmed by isolation of an adenovirus type 2 with unusual laboratory features from liver, lung, colon contents, serum, esophageal swab, and oral ulcerations. Results of a complement fixation test for antibodies to adenovirus performed on postmortem serum samples were negative, and a titer of 1:4 was noted for antibody against cytomegalovirus. This case illustrates the diagnostic pitfalls that may be encountered in establishing a specific viral diagnosis in severely ill patients. PMID:2821806

  9. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus. PMID:26189043

  10. Species-Specific Identification of Human Adenoviruses in Sewage.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Magdalena; Krzysztoszek, Arleta; Witek, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) diversity in sewage was assessed by species-specific molecular methods. Samples of raw sewage were collected in 14 sewage disposal systems from January to December 2011, in Poland. HAdVs were detected in 92.1% of the analysed sewage samples and was significantly higher at cities of over 100 000 inhabitants. HAdV DNA was detected in sewage during all seasons. The most abundant species identified were HAdV-F (average 89.6%) and -A (average 19.6%), which are associated with intestine infections. Adenoviruses from B species were not detected. The result of the present study demonstrate that human adenoviruses are consistently present in sewage in Poland, demonstrating the importance of an adequate treatment before the disposal in the environment. Multiple HAdV species identified in raw sewage provide new information about HAdV circulation in the Polish population. PMID:26094312

  11. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,F.; Burnett, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid.

  12. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus.

  13. The Prevalence of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in the Childhood Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Bora, Gulhan; Kaya, Bulent; Yakut, Kahraman

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis stemming from viral causes is very common during the childhood period. Rotavirus and enteric adenovirus are the most common factors of acute gastroenteritis encountered in infants and children. However, the epidemiology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in the east Anatolia region is not well-known. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the distribution of antigen positivity in rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigen tests required cases and demographic data retrospectively in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital. Patients and Methods The records of stool sample analyses for 1154 patients admitted to our hospital from June 2011 to December 2011 with complaints of diarrhea were retrospectively examined. The presence of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigens in stool specimens was investigated by means of an immunochromatographic test. Results Viral antigens were detected in 327 (28.3%) stool specimens out of 1154. Among the positive results, the frequency was 73.7% for rotavirus and 26.2% for adenovirus. While the detected rotavirus antigen rate was high for all age groups, it was highest for children under the age of 2, with a rate of 57.1%. Moreover, the rotavirus infections were observed at a rate of 44.3% in winter and of 24.6% in autumn. Conclusions The most important factor in childhood acute gastroenteritis in east Anatolia is the rotavirus. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens should be routinely investigated as a factor in fresh stool samples for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteritis in children in the winter and autumn months. PMID:27635215

  14. Functional prediction of hypothetical proteins in human adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dorden, Shane; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Assigning functional information to hypothetical proteins in virus genomes is crucial for gaining insight into their proteomes. Human adenoviruses are medium sized viruses that cause a range of diseases. Their genomes possess proteins with uncharacterized function known as hypothetical proteins. Using a wide range of protein function prediction servers, functional information was obtained about these hypothetical proteins. A comparison of functional information obtained from these servers revealed that some of them produced functional information, while others provided little functional information about these human adenovirus hypothetical proteins. The PFP, ESG, PSIPRED, 3d2GO, and ProtFun servers produced the most functional information regarding these hypothetical proteins. PMID:26664031

  15. Effects of cold atmospheric plasmas on adenoviruses in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. L.; Dumler, K.; Shimizu, T.; Morfill, G. E.; Wolf, A.; Boxhammer, V.; Schlegel, J.; Gansbacher, B.; Anton, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were performed with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) to inactivate adenovirus, a non-enveloped double stranded DNA virus, in solution. The plasma source used was a surface micro-discharge technology operating in air. Various plasma diagnostic measurements and tests were performed in order to determine the efficacy of CAPs and to understand the inactivation mechanism(s). Different stages of the adenovirus ‘life cycle’ were investigated—infectivity and gene expression as well as viral replication and spread. Within 240 s of CAP treatment, inactivation of up to 6 decimal log levels can be achieved.

  16. Human Adenovirus Type 2 but Not Adenovirus Type 12 Is Mutagenic at the Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase Locus of Cloned Rat Liver Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paraskeva, Christos; Roberts, Carl; Biggs, Paul; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    1983-01-01

    Using resistance to the base analog 8-azaguanine as a genetic marker, we showed that adenovirus type 2, but not adenovirus type 12, is mutagenic at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of cloned diploid rat liver epithelial cells. Adenovirus type 2 increased the frequency of 8-azaguanine-resistant colonies by up to ninefold over the spontaneous frequency, depending on expression time and virus dose. PMID:6572280

  17. Bovine adenovirus type 10 identified in fatal cases of adenovirus-associated enteric disease in cattle by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, J A; Benkö, M; Moffett, D A; Harrach, B

    1996-01-01

    A severe, naturally occurring enteric disease of cattle in which adenovirus inclusions are present in the intestinal vascular endothelium has been recognized in several countries; three different adenovirus serotypes have been isolated from affected animals. An in situ hybridization technique for the detection of bovine adenoviral DNA was developed and applied to tissue from 13 cattle in Northern Ireland diagnosed to have the disease. Bovine adenovirus serotype 10 (BAV-10) was identified in the vascular inclusions of all cattle, providing strong evidence that adenoviral enteric vascular disease in cattle is associated with this serotype. The existence of BAV-10 has only recently been recognized. The first molecular biology-based technique for the diagnosis of BAV-10 infection is described. The animals in the present study are the first in which BAV-10 has had a confirmed role in a pathologic process. PMID:8727916

  18. CD46 Is a Cellular Receptor for All Species B Adenoviruses except Types 3 and 7

    PubMed Central

    Marttila, Marko; Persson, David; Gustafsson, Dan; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Wadell, Göran; Arnberg, Niklas

    2005-01-01

    The 51 human adenovirus serotypes are divided into six species (A to F). Adenovirus serotypes from all species except species B utilize the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor for attachment to host cells in vitro. Species B adenoviruses primarily cause ocular and respiratory tract infections, but certain serotypes are also associated with renal disease. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus type 11 (species B) uses CD46 (membrane cofactor protein) as a cellular receptor instead of the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (A. Segerman et al., J. Virol. 77:9183-9191, 2003). In the present study, we found that transfection with human CD46 cDNA rendered poorly permissive Chinese hamster ovary cells more permissive to infection by all species B adenovirus serotypes except adenovirus types 3 and 7. Moreover, rabbit antiserum against human CD46 blocked or efficiently inhibited all species B serotypes except adenovirus types 3 and 7 from infecting human A549 cells. We also sequenced the gene encoding the fiber protein of adenovirus type 50 (species B) and compared it with the corresponding amino acid sequences from selected serotypes, including all other serotypes of species B. From the results obtained, we conclude that CD46 is a major cellular receptor on A549 cells for all species B adenoviruses except types 3 and 7. PMID:16254377

  19. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    SciTech Connect

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls.

  20. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  1. Delivery of avian cytokines by adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M A; Pooley, C; Lowenthal, J W

    2000-01-01

    A fowl adenovirus serotype 8 (FAV-8) recombinant was constructed by inserting an expression cassette consisting of the FAV major late promoter/splice leader sequences (MLP/SL), the chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) gene and SV40 polyA into sites in the right hand end of the FAV-8 genome. One recombinant (A3-13) was constructed by an insertion of ChIFN-gamma into a 1.3 kilobase pair (kbp) deletion which removed a putative open reading frame (ORF) with identity to the CELO (FAV serotype 1) 36 kDa homologue. A second recombinant (S4) removed a further 0.9 kbp and a third recombinant (AA1) was constructed in a small 50 base pair (bp) SpeI deletion. The recombinants displayed differing growth characteristics in CK monolayers. A3-13 grew slowly and only attained a titre of 10(5) pfu/ml, S4 had intermediate growth and AA1 showed wild type growth kinetics. These differing growth properties indicated that removal of the 36 kDa homologue had an effect on growth in vitro. Supernatants from CK monolayers infected with the recombinant virus were assayed for the production of ChIFN-gamma. Detectable levels of ChIFN-gamma were observed in supernatants as early as 24 h post infection (p.i.), peaked at 48 h p.i. and this level was maintained for at least 10 days. The level of production of ChIFN-gamma correlated with each recombinant's growth characteristics in vitro. Chickens treated with rFAV-ChIFN-gamma showed increased weight gains compared to controls and suffered reduced weight loss when challenged with the coccidial parasite Eimeria acervulina. PMID:10717297

  2. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  3. Adenovirus Dodecahedron, as a Drug Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Zochowska, Monika; Paca, Agnieszka; Schoehn, Guy; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Dublet, Bernard; Szolajska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer antibiotic used in many cancer regimens. Its utility is limited by systemic toxicity and dose-dependent pneumonitis able to progress to lung fibrosis. The latter can affect up to nearly 50% of the total patient population, out of which 3% will die. We propose to improve BLM delivery by tethering it to an efficient delivery vector. Adenovirus (Ad) dodecahedron base (DB) is a particulate vector composed of 12 copies of a pentameric viral protein responsible for virus penetration. The vector efficiently penetrates the plasma membrane, is liberated in the cytoplasm and has a propensity to concentrate around the nucleus; up to 300000 particles can be observed in one cell in vitro. Principal Findings Dodecahedron (Dd) structure is preserved at up to about 50°C at pH 7–8 and during dialysis, freezing and drying in the speed-vac in the presence of 150 mM ammonium sulfate, as well as during lyophilization in the presence of cryoprotectants. The vector is also stable in human serum for 2 h at 37°C. We prepared a Dd-BLM conjugate which upon penetration induced death of transformed cells. Similarly to free bleomycin, Dd-BLM caused dsDNA breaks. Significantly, effective cytotoxic concentration of BLM delivered with Dd was 100 times lower than that of free bleomycin. Conclusions/Significance Stability studies show that Dds can be conveniently stored and transported, and can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes under various climates. Successful BLM delivery by Ad Dds demonstrates that the use of virus like particle (VLP) results in significantly improved drug bioavailability. These experiments open new vistas for delivery of non-permeant labile drugs. PMID:19440379

  4. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, R; van de Bildt, M W G; Schapendonk, C M E; van Leeuwen, M; van Boheemen, S; de Jong, A A W; Osterhaus, A D M E; Smits, S L; Kuiken, T

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species.

  6. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections. PMID:26342465

  7. Vector systems for prenatal gene therapy: principles of adenovirus design and production.

    PubMed

    Alba, Raul; Baker, Andrew H; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviruses have many attributes, which have made them one of the most widely investigated vectors for gene therapy applications. These include ease of genetic manipulation to produce replication-deficient vectors, ability to readily generate high titer stocks, efficiency of gene delivery into many cell types, and ability to encode large genetic inserts. Recent advances in adenoviral vector engineering have included the ability to genetically manipulate the tropism of the vector by engineering of the major capsid proteins, particularly fiber and hexon. Furthermore, simple replication-deficient adenoviral vectors deleted for expression of a single gene have been complemented by the development of systems in which the majority of adenoviral genes are deleted, generating sophisticated Ad vectors which can mediate sustained transgene expression following a single delivery. This chapter outlines methods for developing simple transgene over expressing Ad vectors and detailed strategies to engineer mutations into the major capsid proteins.

  8. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  9. Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Monoclonal Antibody Trastuzumab for Treatment of HER2-Positive Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Tähtinen, Siri; Guse, Kilian; Gutmann, Theresia; Savola, Paula; Oksanen, Minna; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab has significantly improved the survival of patients with HER2-overexpressing tumors. Nevertheless, systemic antibody therapy is expensive, limited in efficacy due to physical tumor barriers, and carries the risk of severe side effects such as cardiomyopathy. Oncolytic viruses mediate cancer-selective transgene expression, kill infected cancer cells while mounting antitumor immune responses, and have recently demonstrated promising efficacy in combination treatments. Here, we armed an oncolytic adenovirus with full-length trastuzumab to achieve effective in situ antibody production coupled with progressive oncolytic cancer cell killing. We constructed an infectivity-enhanced serotype 5 oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-Δ24-tras, coding for human trastuzumab antibody heavy- and light-chain genes, connected by an internal ribosome entry site. Infected cancer cells were able to assemble full-length functional antibody, as confirmed by Western blot, ELISA, and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Importantly, oncolysis was required for release of the antibody into tumors, providing additional spatial selectivity. Ad5/3-Δ24-tras showed potent in vitro cytotoxicity and enhanced antitumor efficacy over oncolytic control virus Ad5/3-Δ24 or commercial trastuzumab in HER2-positive cancer models in vivo (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, Ad5/3-Δ24-tras resulted in significantly higher tumor-to-systemic antibody concentrations (P < 0.001) over conventional delivery. Immunological analyses revealed dendritic cell activation and natural killer cell accumulation in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Thus, Ad5/3-Δ24-tras is an attractive anticancer approach combining oncolytic immunotherapy with local trastuzumab production, resulting in improved in vivo efficacy and immune cell activation in HER2-positive cancer. Moreover, the finding that tumor cells can produce functional antibody as directed by oncolytic virus could lead to many

  10. Biodistribution and inflammatory profiles of novel penton and hexon double-mutant serotype 5 adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Angela C.; Coughlan, Lynda; Miller, Ashley M.; Alba, Raul; van Rooijen, Nico; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The use of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors in the clinical setting is severely hampered by the profound liver tropism observed after intravascular delivery coupled with the pronounced inflammatory and innate immune response elicited by these vectors. Liver transduction by circulating Ad5 virions is mediated by a high-affinity interaction between the capsid hexon protein and blood coagulation factor X (FX), whilst penton–αvintegrin interactions are thought to contribute to the induction of anti-Ad5 inflammatory and innate immune responses. To overcome these limitations, we sought to develop and characterise for the first time novel Ad5 vectors possessing mutations ablating both hexon:FX and penton:integrin interactions. As expected, intravascular administration of the FX binding-ablated Ad5HVR5*HVR7*E451Q vector (AdT*) resulted in significantly reduced liver transduction in vivo compared to Ad5. In macrophage-depleted mice, increased spleen uptake of AdT* was accompanied by an elevation in the levels of several inflammatory mediators. However ablation of the penton RGD motif in the AdT* vector background (AdT*RGE) resulted in a significant 5-fold reduction in spleen uptake and attenuated the antiviral inflammatory response. A reduction in spleen uptake and inflammatory activation was also observed in animals after intravascular administration of Ad5RGE compared to the parental Ad5 vector, with reduced co-localisation of the viral beta-galactosidase transgene with MAdCAM-1 + sinus-lining endothelial cells. Our detailed assessment of these novel adenoviruses indicates that penton base RGE mutation in combination with FX binding-ablation may be a viable strategy to attenuate the undesired liver uptake and pro-inflammatory responses to Ad5 vectors after intravascular delivery. PMID:22626939

  11. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  12. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  13. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  18. Serologic and hexon phylogenetic analysis of ruminant adenoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the antigenic relationship among ruminant adenoviruses and determine their phylogenetic relationship based on the deduced hexon gene amino acid sequence. Results of reciprocal cross-neutralization tests demonstrated antigenic relationships in either on...

  19. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-01

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  20. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  1. Isolation of adenovirus from lambs with upper respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pommer, J; Schamber, G

    1991-07-01

    The role of viruses in the etiology of recurrent upper respiratory disease in newly weaned lambs was studied during 1984-1985 at the North Dakota Sheep Experiment Station. Serum samples collected from lambs at weaning, from lambs with signs of respiratory disease, and 3 weeks following the onset of clinical signs were tested for antibodies to ovine adenovirus (OAV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza type-3 virus (PI-3). Virus isolation studies were performed on nasal secretions samples taken at the same time. Parainfluenza type-3 was isolated from 1 of 275 lambs tested, and there was 2.5% overall 4-fold increase in antibody titer to PI-3 during the 2-year study. An adenovirus with a different restriction endonuclease digestion pattern from that previously reported adenovirus strains in the United States was isolated from 13 of 275 nasal secretions collected from lambs at the time of weaning. There was a 17.6% overall 4-fold increase in seroconversion to the adenovirus isolated from the lambs with clinical disease.

  2. Immune response is an important aspect of the antitumor effect produced by a CD40L-encoding oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hirvinen, Mari L M; Escutenaire, Sophie; Ugolini, Matteo; Pesonen, Saila K; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Kanerva, Anna; Loskog, Angelica S I; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy because virus replication is highly immunogenic and not subject to tolerance. Although oncolysis releases tumor epitopes and provides costimulatory danger signals, arming the virus with immunostimulatory molecules can further improve efficacy. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) induces apoptosis of tumor cells and triggers several immune mechanisms, including a T-helper type 1 (T(H)1) response, which leads to activation of cytotoxic T cells and reduction of immunosuppression. In this study, we constructed a novel oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L, which features a chimeric Ad5/3 capsid for enhanced tumor transduction, a human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter for tumor selectivity, and human CD40L for increased efficacy. Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo via oncolytic and apoptotic effects, and (Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L)-mediated oncolysis resulted in enhanced calreticulin exposure and HMGB1 and ATP release, which were suggestive of immunogenicity. In two syngeneic mouse models, murine CD40L induced recruitment and activation of antigen-presenting cells, leading to increased interleukin-12 production in splenocytes. This effect was associated with induction of the T(H)1 cytokines IFN-γ, RANTES, and TNF-α. Tumors treated with Ad5/3-CMV-mCD40L also displayed an enhanced presence of macrophages and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells but not B cells. Together, our findings show that adenoviruses coding for CD40L mediate multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis, induction of T-cell responses, and upregulation of T(H)1 cytokines.

  3. [Preparation of Recombinant Human Adenoviruses Labeled with miniSOG].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Xiao, Rong; Guo, Xiaojuan; Qu, Jianguo; Lu, Zhuozhuang; Hong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We wished to study the intracellular transport of adenoviruses. We constructed a novel recombinant adenovirus in which the structural protein IX was labeled with a mini-singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG). The miniSOG gene was synthesized by overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned to the pcDNA3 vector, and expressed in 293 cells. Activation of miniSOG generated sufficient numbers of singlet oxygen molecules to catalyze polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product resolvable by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To construct miniSOG-labelled recombinant adenoviruses, the miniSOG gene was subcloned downstream of the IX gene in a pShuttle plasmid. Adenoviral plasmid pAd5-IXSOG was generated by homologous recombination of the modified shuttle plasmid (pShuttle-IXSOG) with the backbone plasmid (pAdeasy-1) in the BJ5183 strain of Eschericia coli. Adenovirus HAdV-5-IXSOG was rescued by transfection of 293 cells with the linearized pAd5-IXSOG. After propagation, virions were purified using the CsC1 ultracentrifugation method. Finally, HAdV-5-IXSOG in 2.0 mL with a particle titer of 6 x 1011 vp/mL was obtained. Morphology of HAdV-5-IXSOG was verified by TEM. Fusion of IX with the miniSOG gene was confirmed by PCR. In conclusion, miniSOG-labeled recombinant adenoviruses were constructed, which could be valuable tools for virus tracking by TEM. PMID:27295881

  4. Hepatic gene therapy: efficient gene delivery and expression in primary hepatocytes utilizing a conjugated adenovirus-DNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Cristiano, R J; Smith, L C; Kay, M A; Brinkley, B R; Woo, S L

    1993-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for gene delivery into target cells. We have previously shown that DNA molecules complexed with asialoglycoprotein can be efficiently endocytosed by primary hepatocytes and the internalized DNA can be released from endosomes by the use of a replication-defective adenovirus. Because the DNA and virus enter target cells independently, activity enhancement requires high concentrations of adenoviral particles. In this study, adenoviral particles were chemically conjugated to poly(L-lysine) and bound ionically to DNA molecules. Quantitative delivery to primary hepatocytes was achieved with significantly reduced viral titer when the asialoorosomucoid-poly(L-lysine) conjugate was included in the complex. The conjugated adenovirus was used to deliver a DNA vector containing canine factor IX to mouse hepatocytes, resulting in the expression of significant concentrations of canine factor IX in the culture medium. The results suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis coupled with an efficient endosomal lysis vector should permit the application of targeted and efficient gene delivery into the liver for gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8265587

  5. Role of Cellular Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Infection of Human Adenovirus Serotype 3 and 35

    PubMed Central

    Tuve, Sebastian; Wang, Hongjie; Jacobs, Jeffrey D.; Yumul, Roma C.; Smith, David F.; Lieber, André

    2008-01-01

    Species B human adenoviruses (Ads) are increasingly associated with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease in U.S. military personnel and civil population. The initial interaction of Ads with cellular attachment receptors on host cells is via Ad fiber knob protein. Our previous studies showed that one species B Ad receptor is the complement receptor CD46 that is used by serotypes 11, 16, 21, 35, and 50 but not by serotypes 3, 7, and 14. In this study, we attempted to identify yet-unknown species B cellular receptors. For this purpose we used recombinant Ad3 and Ad35 fiber knobs in high-throughput receptor screening methods including mass spectrometry analysis and glycan arrays. Surprisingly, we found that the main interacting surface molecules of Ad3 fiber knob are cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). We subsequently found that HSPGs acted as low-affinity co-receptors for Ad3 but did not represent the main receptor of this serotype. Our study also revealed a new CD46-independent infection pathway of Ad35. This Ad35 infection mechanism is mediated by cellular HSPGs. The interaction of Ad35 with HSPGs is not via fiber knob, whereas Ad3 interacts with HSPGs via fiber knob. Both Ad3 and Ad35 interacted specifically with the sulfated regions within HSPGs that have also been implicated in binding physiologic ligands. In conclusion, our findings show that Ad3 and Ad35 directly utilize HSPGs as co-receptors for infection. Our data suggest that adenoviruses evolved to simulate the presence of physiologic HSPG ligands in order to increase infection. PMID:18974862

  6. Dual tumor targeting with pH-sensitive and bioreducible polymer-complexed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Choi, Joung-Woo; Kasala, Dayananda; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) have shown great promise in cancer gene therapy but their efficacy has been compromised by potent immunological, biochemical, and specific tumor-targeting limitations. To take full advantage of the innate cancer-specific killing potency of oncolytic Ads but also exploit the subtleties of the tumor microenvironment, we have generated a pH-sensitive and bio-reducible polymer (PPCBA)-coated oncolytic Ad. Ad-PPCBA complexes showed higher cellular uptake at pH 6.0 than pH 7.4 in both high and low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor-(CAR)-expressing cells, thereby demonstrating Ad-PPCBA's ability to target the low pH hypoxic tumor microenvironment and overcome CAR dependence for target cell uptake. Endocytic mechanism studies indicated that Ad-PPCBA internalization is mediated by macropinocytosis instead of the CAR-dependent endocytic pathway that internalizes naked Ad. VEGF-specific shRNA-expressing oncolytic Ad complexed with PPCBA (RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA) elicited much more potent suppression of U87 human brain cancer cell VEGF gene expression in vitro, and human breast cancer MCF7 cell/Matrigel plug vascularization in a mouse model, when cancer cells had been previously infected at pH 6.0 versus pH 7.4. Moreover, intratumorally and intravenously injected RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA nanocomplexes elicited significantly higher therapeutic efficacy than naked virus in U87-tumor mouse xenograft models, reducing IL-6, ALT, and AST serum levels. These data demonstrated PPCBA's biocompatibility and capability to shield the Ad surface to prevent innate immune response against Ad after both intratumoral and systemic administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that smart, tumor-specific, oncolytic Ad-PPCBA complexes can be exploited to treat both primary and metastatic tumors.

  7. Adenovirus urethritis and concurrent conjunctivitis: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Olivia Louise; Samuel, Mannampallil Itty; Sudhanva, Malur; Ellis, Joanna; Taylor, Chris

    2015-03-01

    We present eight cases and review the literature of concurrent urethritis and conjunctivitis where adenovirus was identified as the causative pathogen. The focus of this review concerns the identification of specific sexual practices, symptoms, signs and any serotypes that seem more commonly associated with such adenovirus infections. We discuss the seasonality of adenovirus infection and provide practical advice for clinicians to give to the patient.

  8. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses.

  9. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses. PMID:23828618

  10. Phylogenetic Analyses of Novel Squamate Adenovirus Sequences in Wild-Caught Anolis Lizards

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, Jill M.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Ng, Julienne; Wyatt, Jeffrey D.; Glor, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has emerged as a serious threat to the health of captive snakes and lizards (i.e., squamates), but we know relatively little about this virus' range of possible hosts, pathogenicity, modes of transmission, and sources from nature. We report the first case of adenovirus infection in the Iguanidae, a diverse family of lizards that is widely-studied and popular in captivity. We report adenovirus infections from two closely-related species of Anolis lizards (anoles) that were recently imported from wild populations in the Dominican Republic to a laboratory colony in the United States. We investigate the evolution of adenoviruses in anoles and other squamates using phylogenetic analyses of adenovirus polymerase gene sequences sampled from Anolis and a range of other vertebrate taxa. These phylogenetic analyses reveal that (1) the sequences detected from each species of Anolis are novel, and (2) adenoviruses are not necessarily host-specific and do not always follow a co-speciation model under which host and virus phylogenies are perfectly concordant. Together with the fact that the Anolis adenovirus sequences reported in our study were detected in animals that became ill and subsequently died shortly after importation while exhibiting clinical signs consistent with acute adenovirus infection, our discoveries suggest the need for renewed attention to biosecurity measures intended to prevent the spread of adenovirus both within and among species of snakes and lizards housed in captivity. PMID:23593364

  11. Critical Role for Arginine Methylation in Adenovirus-Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Iacovides, Demetris C.; O'Shea, Clodagh C.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Burlingame, Alma; McCormick, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During the late stages of adenovirus infection, the 100K protein (100K) inhibits the translation of cellular messages in the cytoplasm and regulates hexon trimerization and assembly in the nucleus. However, it is not known how it switches between these two functions. Here we show that 100K is methylated on arginine residues at its C terminus during infection and that this region is necessary for binding PRMT1 methylase. Methylated 100K is exclusively nuclear. Mutation of the third RGG motif (amino acids 741 to 743) prevents localization to the nucleus during infection, suggesting that methylation of that sequence is important for 100K shuttling. Treatment of infected cells with methylation inhibitors inhibits expression of late structural proteins. These data suggest that arginine methylation of 100K is necessary for its localization to the nucleus and is a critical cellular function necessary for productive adenovirus infection. PMID:17686851

  12. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  13. Novel bat adenoviruses with an extremely large E3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Yang, Xing-Lou; Ge, Xing-Yi; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Li-Biao; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Bats carry diverse RNA viruses, some of which are responsible for human diseases. Compared to bat-borne RNA viruses, relatively little information is known regarding bat-borne DNA viruses. In this study, we isolated and characterized three novel bat adenoviruses (BtAdV WIV9-11) from Rhinolophus sinicus. Their genomes, which are highly similar to each other but distinct from those of previously sequenced adenoviruses (AdVs), are 37 545, 37 566 and 38 073 bp in size, respectively. An unusually large E3 gene was identified in their genomes. Phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses suggested that these isolates represent a distinct species of the genus Mastadenovirus. Cell susceptibility assays revealed a broad cell tropism for these isolates, indicating that they have a potentially wide host range. Our results expand the understanding of genetic diversity of bat AdVs. PMID:27032099

  14. The PDZ3 domain of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1 interacts with the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ran; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Martin, Sterling C. T.; Readler, James M.; Kotha, Poornima L.N.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Excoffon, Katherine J.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is an essential cellular protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion, protein trafficking, and viral infection. The major isoform of CAR is selectively sorted to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells where it co-localizes with the cellular scaffolding protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain structure-1 (MAGI-1). Previously, we demonstrated CAR interacts with MAGI-1 through a PDZ–domain dependent interaction. Here, we show that the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 is exclusively responsible for the high affinity interaction between the seven exon isoform of CAR and MAGI-1 using yeast-two-hybrid analysis and confirming this interaction biochemically and in cellular lysates by in vitro pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. The high affinity interaction between the PDZ3 domain and CAR C-terminus was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Further, we investigated the biological relevance of this high affinity interaction between CAR and the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 and found that it does not alter CAR-mediated adenovirus infection. By contrast, interruption of this high affinity interaction altered the localization of MAGI-1 indicating that CAR is able to traffic MAGI-1 to cell junctions. These data deepen the molecular understanding of the interaction between CAR and MAGI-1 and indicate that although CAR plays a role in trafficking PDZ-based scaffolding proteins to cellular junctions, association with a high affinity intracellular binding partner does not significantly alter adenovirus binding and entry via CAR. PMID:25622559

  15. Reassessing culture media and critical metabolites that affect adenovirus production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun Fang; Voyer, Robert; Tom, Roseanne; Kamen, Amine

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus production is currently operated at low cell density because infection at high cell densities still results in reduced cell-specific productivity. To better understand nutrient limitation and inhibitory metabolites causing the reduction of specific yields at high cell densities, adenovirus production in HEK 293 cultures using NSFM 13 and CD 293 media were evaluated. For cultures using NSFM 13 medium, the cell-specific productivity decreased from 3,400 to 150 vp/cell (or 96% reduction) when the cell density at infection was increased from 1 to 3 x 10(6) cells/mL. In comparison, only 50% of reduction in the cell-specific productivity was observed under the same conditions for cultures using CD 293 medium. The effect of medium osmolality was found critical on viral production. Media were adjusted to an optimal osmolality of 290 mOsm/kg to facilitate comparison. Amino acids were not critical limiting factors. Potential limiting nutrients including vitamins, energy metabolites, bases and nucleotides, or inhibitory metabolites (lactate and ammonia) were supplemented to infected cultures to further investigate their effect on the adenovirus production. Accumulation of lactate and ammonia in a culture infected at 3 x 10(6) cells/mL contributed to about 20% reduction of the adenovirus production yield, whereas nutrient limitation appeared primarily responsible for the decline in the viral production when NSFM 13 medium was used. Overall, the results indicate that multiple factors contribute to limiting the specific production yield at cell densities beyond 1 x 10(6) cells/mL and underline the need to further investigate and develop media for better adenoviral vector productions.

  16. Cis and trans activation of adenovirus IVa2 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, V; Salzman, N P

    1985-01-01

    The transcriptional control region of the adenovirus IVa2 promoter was analyzed by cloning this promoter in front of a gene coding for bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CATase) and estimating levels of CATase and IVa2 promoter specific RNA synthesized after transfection. To produce detectable amounts of CATase with the IVa2 promoter, an enhancer has to be present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, the adenovirus E1A gene can not stimulate CATase synthesis. When cells were transfected with plasmids containing enhancer sequences and various IVa2 mutant promoters upstream of the CAT gene, we observed that CATase activity was not reduced significantly even after deletion of all sequences upstream of the RNA initiation site. Synthesis of IVa2 specific RNA was dependent on plasmids containing an enhancer (SV40 72 bp repeat) that was present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, co-transfection to provide the adenovirus E1A gene in trans also stimulated IVa2 RNA synthesis. When HeLa cells were transfected with various deletion mutants with an enhancer in cis it was seen that sequences -38 to -64 base pairs upstream of the RNA initiation site are necessary for efficient transcription. The E1A gene in trans and an enhancer in cis have an additive effect on RNA synthesis from both IVa2 and major late promoters. The basis for the conflicting results between transcription and CATase synthesis is discussed. Images PMID:2989786

  17. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. PMID:23643878

  18. A novel and simple method for construction of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rong; Li, Chunhua; Jiang, Sijing; Ma, Lixin

    2006-07-19

    Recombinant adenoviruses have been widely used for various applications, including protein expression and gene therapy. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach to an efficient and robust construction of recombinant adenoviral genomes based on the mating-assisted genetically integrated cloning (MAGIC) strategy. The production of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based vectors was greatly facilitated by the use of the MAGIC procedure and the development of the Adeasy adenoviral vector system. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid can be generated by a direct and seamless substitution, which replaces the stuff fragment in a full-length adenoviral genome with the gene of interest in a small plasmid in Escherichia coli. Recombinant adenoviral plasmids can be rapidly constructed in vivo by using the new method, without manipulations of the large adenoviral genome. In contrast to other traditional systems, it reduces the need for multiple in vitro manipulations, such as endonuclease cleavage, ligation and transformation, thus achieving a higher efficiency with negligible background. This strategy has been proven to be suitable for constructing an adenoviral cDNA expression library. In summary, the new method is highly efficient, technically less demanding and less labor-intensive for constructing recombinant adenoviruses, which will be beneficial for functional genomic and proteomic researches in mammalian cells.

  19. History of the restoration of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine, live oral (Adenovirus Vaccine) in the context of the Department of Defense acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Charles H; Snyder, Clifford E

    2013-03-15

    Respiratory pathogens cause morbidity and mortality in US military basic trainees. Following the influenza pandemic of 1918, and stimulated by WWII, the need to protect military personnel against epidemic respiratory disease was evident. Over several decades, the US military elucidated etiologies of acute respiratory diseases and invented and deployed vaccines to prevent disease caused by influenza, meningococcus, and adenoviruses. In 1994, the Adenovirus Vaccine manufacturer stopped its production. By 1999, supplies were exhausted and adenovirus-associated disease, especially serotype 4-associated febrile respiratory illness, returned to basic training installations. Advisory bodies persuaded Department of Defense leaders to initiate restoration of Adenovirus Vaccine. In 2011, after 10 years of effort by government and contractor personnel and at a cost of about $100 million, the Adenovirus Vaccine was restored to use at all military basic training installations. Disease and adenovirus serotype 4 isolation rates have fallen dramatically since vaccinations resumed in October 2011 and remain very low. Mindful of the adage that "The more successful a vaccine is, the more quickly the need for it will be forgotten.", sustainment of the supply of the Adenovirus Vaccine may be a challenge, and careful management will be required for such sustainment. PMID:23291475

  20. p202, an interferon-inducible negative regulator of cell growth, is a target of the adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed

    Xin, H; D'Souza, S; Fang, L; Lengyel, P; Choubey, D

    2001-10-18

    Studies have revealed that human adenovirus-encoded E1A protein promotes cell proliferation through the targeted interaction with cellular proteins that act as key negative regulators of cell growth. The targets of E1A protein include the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb). Because p202, an interferon (IFN)-inducible murine protein (52-kDa), negatively regulates cell growth in part through the pRb/E2F pathway, we tested whether the p202 is a target of the adenovirus-encoded E1A protein for functional inactivation. Here we report that the expression of E1A protein overcame p202-mediated inhibition of cell growth and this correlated with an alleviation of p202-mediated inhibition of the transcriptional activity of E2F. Furthermore, E1A protein relieved p202-mediated inhibition of the specific DNA-binding activity of E2F complexes, including those containing the pocket proteins. Additionally, the E1A protein bound to p202 both in vitro and in vivo and a deletion of four amino acids in the conserved region 2 (CR2) of E1A protein significantly reduced the binding of E1A to p202. Interestingly, ectopic expression of p202 under reduced serum conditions significantly reduced E1A-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our observations provide support to the idea that the p202 and adenovirus E1A protein functionally counteract each other and E1A protein targets p202 to promote cell proliferation. PMID:11687962

  1. The E1B19K-deleted oncolytic adenovirus mutant AdΔ19K sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to drug-induced DNA-damage by down-regulating Claspin and Mre11

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidou, Constantia; Cherubini, Gioia; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs depends on simultaneous interactions of early viral genes with cell death and survival pathways. It is unclear what cellular factors mediate these interactions in the presence of DNA-damaging drugs. We found that adenovirus prevents Chk1-mediated checkpoint activation through inactivation of Mre11 and downregulation of the pChk1 adaptor-protein, Claspin, in cells with high levels of DNA-damage induced by the cytotoxic drugs gemcitabine and irinotecan. The mechanisms for Claspin downregulation involve decreased transcription and increased degradation, further attenuating pChk1-mediated signalling. Live cell imaging demonstrated that low doses of gemcitabine caused multiple mitotic aberrations including multipolar spindles, micro- and multi-nucleation and cytokinesis failure. A mutant virus with the anti-apoptotic E1B19K-gene deleted (AdΔ19K) further enhanced cell killing, Claspin downregulation, and potentiated drug-induced DNA damage and mitotic aberrations. Decreased Claspin expression and inactivation of Mre11 contributed to the enhanced cell killing in combination with DNA-damaging drugs. These results reveal novel mechanisms that are utilised by adenovirus to ensure completion of its life cycle in the presence of cellular DNA damage. Taken together, our findings reveal novel cellular targets that may be exploited when developing improved anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26872382

  2. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  3. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A.

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  4. Adenovirus Type 37 Uses Sialic Acid as a Cellular Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnberg, Niklas; Edlund, Karin; Kidd, Alistair H.; Wadell, Göran

    2000-01-01

    Two cellular receptors for adenovirus, coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) α2, have recently been identified. In the absence of CAR, MHC-I α2 has been suggested to serve as a cellular attachment protein for subgenus C adenoviruses, while members from all subgenera except subgenus B have been shown to interact with CAR. We have found that adenovirus type 37 (Ad37) attachment to CAR-expressing CHO cells was no better than that to CHO cells lacking CAR expression, suggesting that CAR is not used by Ad37 during attachment. Instead, we have identified sialic acid as a third adenovirus receptor moiety. First, Ad37 attachment to both CAR-expresing CHO cells and MHC-I α2-expressing Daudi cells was sensitive to neuraminidase treatment, which eliminates sialic acid on the cell surface. Second, Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was more than 10-fold stronger than that to the Pro-5 subline Lec2, which is deficient in sialic acid expression. Third, neuraminidase treatment of A549 cells caused a 60% decrease in Ad37 replication in a fluorescent-focus assay. Moreover, the receptor sialoconjugate is most probably a glycoprotein rather than a ganglioside, since Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was sensitive to protease treatment. Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells occurs via α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides rather than α(2→6)-linked ones, since (i) α(2→3)-specific but not α(2→6)-specific lectins blocked Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells and (ii) pretreatment of Pro-5 cells with α(2→3)-specific neuraminidase resulted in decreased Ad37 binding. Taken together, these results suggest that, unlike Ad5, Ad37 makes use of α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides on glycoproteins for entry instead of using CAR or MHC-I α2. PMID:10590089

  5. Adenovirus type 2 terminal protein: purification and comparison of tryptic peptides with known adenovirus-coded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, M L; Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1979-01-01

    The protein covalently bound to the 5' termini of adenovirus type 2 DNA has been purified from virus labeled with [35S]methionine, using exclusion chromatography of disrupted virions to isolate the DNA-protein complex, which is then digested with DNase. The terminal protein isolated from mature virus is most effectively labeled if the cells are exposed to [35S]methionine during the "intermediate" period of 13 to 21 h postinfection, suggesting that the protein is synthesized during this interval. The tryptic peptides of the terminal protein were compared with those of several known adenovirus-coded proteins and found to be unrelated. In particular, the terminal protein is not related to the 38-50K early proteins encoded by the leftmost 4.4% of the adenovirus genome, one region essential for the transforming activity of the virus. Neither is it related to the 72K single-strand-specific DNA binding protein, the minor virion component IVa2, or the major capsid component hexon. Images PMID:513195

  6. Recombinant Adenovirus Delivery of Calreticulin–ESAT-6 Produces an Antigen-Specific Immune Response but no Protection Against a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-González, S. C.; Troy, A.; Troudt, J.; Loera-Arias, M. J.; Villatoro-Hernández, J.; Torres-López, E.; Ancer-Rodríguez, J.; Gutiérrez-Puente, Y.; Muñoz-Maldonado, G.; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.; Izzo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) has failed to efficaciously control the worldwide spread of the disease. New vaccine development targets virulence antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Immunization with ESAT-6 and CFP10 provides protection against M. tuberculosis in a murine infection model. Further, previous studies have shown that calreticulin increases the cell-mediated immune responses to antigens. Therefore, to test whether calreticulin enhances the immune response against M. tuberculosis antigens, we fused ESAT-6 to calreticulin and constructed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus to express the resulting fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6). The adjuvant effect of calreticulin was assayed by measuring cytokine responses specific to ESAT-6. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the fusion protein produced higher levels of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α in response to ESAT-6. This immune response was not improved by the addition of CFP-10 to the CRT-ESAT-6 fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6–CFP10). Mice immunized with these recombinant adenoviruses did not decrease the mycobacterial burden after low-dose aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. We conclude that calreticulin can be used as an adjuvant to enhance the immune response against mycobacterial antigens, but it is not enough to protect against tuberculosis. PMID:22010821

  7. Pseudotyping the adenovirus serotype 5 capsid with both the fibre and penton of serotype 35 enhances vascular smooth muscle cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Parker, A L; White, K M; Lavery, C A; Custers, J; Waddington, S N; Baker, A H

    2013-12-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) holds great potential to prevent excessive smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, neointima formation and graft failure. The most successful preclinical strategies to date have utilised vectors based on the species C adenovirus, Ad5, which engages the Coxsackie and Adenovirus receptor (CAR) as its primary attachment receptor. Profiling receptors on human SMCs demonstrated the absence of CAR but substantial expression of the species B receptor CD46. We performed transduction experiments using Ad5 and the CD46-utilising adenovirus Ad35, and found Ad35 significantly more efficient at transducing SMCs. To evaluate whether transduction could be further augmented, we evaluated chimeric CD46-utilising Ad5/Ad35 vectors comprising the Ad5 capsid pseudotyped with the Ad35 fibre alone (Ad5/F35) or in combination with the Ad35 penton (Ad5/F35/P35). In human smooth muscle cells (hSMCs), Ad5/F35/P35 mediated significantly higher levels of transduction than either parental vector or Ad5/F35. Ex vivo transduction experiments using mouse aortas from CD46 transgenics demonstrated that Ad5/F35/P35 was significantly more efficient at transducing SMCs than the other vectors tested. Finally, ex vivo transduction and immunofluorescent colocalisation experiments using human tissue from CABG procedures confirmed the preclinical potential of Ad5/F35/P35 as an efficient vector for vascular transduction during CABG.

  8. A heparan sulfate-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus, Ad5.pk7-Δ24, for the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ranki, T; Kanerva, A; Ristimäki, A; Hakkarainen, T; Särkioja, M; Kangasniemi, L; Raki, M; Laakkonen, P; Goodison, S; Hemminki, A

    2012-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) that replicate in tumor but less in normal cells are promising anticancer agents. A major determinant of their potency is their capacity for infecting target cells. The primary receptor for serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5), the most widely used serotype in gene therapy, is the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). CAR is expressed variably and often at low levels in various tumor types including advanced breast cancer. We generated a novel p16/retinoblastoma pathway-dependent CRAd, Ad5.pK7-Δ24, with a polylysine motif in the fiber C-terminus, enabling CAR-independent binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Ad5.pK7-Δ24 mediated effective oncolysis of all breast cancer cell lines tested. Further, we utilized noninvasive, fluorescent imaging for analysis of antitumor efficacy in an orthotopic model of advanced hormone refractory breast cancer. A therapeutic benefit was seen following both intratumoral and intravenous delivery. Murine biodistribution similar to Ad5, proven safe in trials, suggests feasibility of clinical safety testing. Interestingly, upregulation of CAR was seen in low-CAR M4A4-LM3 breast cancer cells in vivo, which resulted in better than expected efficacy also with an isogenic CRAd with an unmodified capsid. These results suggest utility of Ad5.pK7-Δ24 and the orthotopic model for further translational studies. PMID:16900223

  9. The Cell Adhesion Molecule “CAR” and Sialic Acid on Human Erythrocytes Influence Adenovirus In Vivo Biodistribution

    PubMed Central

    Wodrich, Harald; Billet, Olivier; Perreau, Matthieu; Hippert, Claire; Mennechet, Franck; Schoehn, Guy; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Dreja, Hanna; Ibanes, Sandy; Kalatzis, Vasiliki; Wang, Jennifer P.; Finberg, Robert W.; Cusack, Stephen; Kremer, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been known for 50 years that adenoviruses (Ads) interact with erythrocytes ex vivo, the molecular and structural basis for this interaction, which has been serendipitously exploited for diagnostic tests, is unknown. In this study, we characterized the interaction between erythrocytes and unrelated Ad serotypes, human 5 (HAd5) and 37 (HAd37), and canine 2 (CAV-2). While these serotypes agglutinate human erythrocytes, they use different receptors, have different tropisms and/or infect different species. Using molecular, biochemical, structural and transgenic animal-based analyses, we found that the primary erythrocyte interaction domain for HAd37 is its sialic acid binding site, while CAV-2 binding depends on at least three factors: electrostatic interactions, sialic acid binding and, unexpectedly, binding to the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on human erythrocytes. We show that the presence of CAR on erythrocytes leads to prolonged in vivo blood half-life and significantly reduced liver infection when a CAR-tropic Ad is injected intravenously. This study provides i) a molecular and structural rationale for Ad–erythrocyte interactions, ii) a basis to improve vector-mediated gene transfer and iii) a mechanism that may explain the biodistribution and pathogenic inconsistencies found between human and animal models. PMID:19119424

  10. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  11. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; et al

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  12. Immune responses of recombinant adenovirus co-expressing VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus and porcine interferon alpha in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Dai, Jianjun; Li, Yufeng; Li, Congzhi; Qi, Jing; Duan, Shuyi; Jiang, Ping

    2008-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In this study, we constructed and characterized the immune responses and vaccine efficacy conferred by the recombinant adenovirus co-expressing VP1 of FMDV and porcine interferon alpha as fusion protein (rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1). Six groups of female BALB/c mice each with 18 were inoculated subcutaneously twice 2-week intervals with the recombinant adenoviruses. The results showed that the levels of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the group inoculated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 were significantly higher than those in the group inoculated with rAd-VP1+rAd-pIFNalpha (P<0.05). Then four groups of guinea pigs each with six were inoculated two times at 2-week intervals intramuscularly with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1, commercial inactivated FMD vaccine, wild-type adenovirus (wtAd) or PBS, and the protective efficacy of rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 was determined. The results indicated that all the guinea pigs vaccinated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 as well as inactivated FMD vaccine were protected from FMDV challenge, even though the levels of neutralizing antibodies (1:32-1:40) of the animals vaccinated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 was lower than that in the group inoculated with inactivated FMD vaccine (1:64-1:128). It demonstrated that the newly recombinant adenovirus rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 might further be an attractive candidate vaccine for preventing FMDV infection in swine. PMID:18511133

  13. The dual effect of adenovirus type 5 E1A 13S protein on NF-kappaB activation is antagonized by E1B 19K.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, M L; Indorf, A; Limbourg, F P; Städtler, H; Traenckner, E B; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of human adenoviruses encode several regulatory proteins, including the two differentially spliced gene products E1A and E1B. Here, we show that the 13S but not the 12S splice variant of E1A of adenovirus type 5 can activate the human transcription factor NF-kappaB in a bimodal fashion. One mode is the activation of NF-kappaB containing the p65 subunit from the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB-IkappaB complex. This activation required reactive oxygen intermediates and the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at serines 32 and 36, followed by IkappaBalpha degradation and the nuclear uptake of NF-kappaB. In addition, 13S E1A stimulated the transcriptional activity of the C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 at a core promoter with either a TATA box or an initiator (INR) element. The C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 were found to associate with E1A in vitro. The activation of NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene transcription by E1A was potently suppressed upon coexpression of the E1B 19-kDa protein (19K). E1B 19K prevented both the activation of NF-kappaB and the E1A-mediated transcriptional enhancement of p65. These inhibitory effects were not found for the 55-kDa splice variant of the E1B protein. We suggest that the inductive effect of E1A 13S on the host factor NF-kappaB, whose activation is important for the transcription of various adenovirus genes, must be counteracted by the suppressive effect of E1B 19K so that the adenovirus-infected cell can escape the immune-stimulatory and apoptotic effects of NF-kappaB. PMID:8754803

  14. The early region 1B 55-kilodalton oncoprotein of adenovirus relieves growth restrictions imposed on viral replication by the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrum, F D; Ornelles, D A

    1997-01-01

    The E1B 55-kDa oncoprotein of adenovirus enables the virus to overcome restrictions imposed on viral replication by the cell cycle. Approximately 20% of HeLa cells infected with an E1B 55-kDa mutant adenovirus produced virus when evaluated by electron microscopy or by assays for infectious centers. By contrast, all HeLa cells infected with a wild-type adenovirus produced virus. The yield of E1B mutant virus from randomly cycling HeLa cells correlated with the fraction of cells in S phase at the time of infection. In synchronously growing HeLa cells, approximately 75% of the cells infected during S phase with the E1B mutant virus produced virus, whereas only 10% of the cells infected during G1 produced virus. The yield of E1B mutant virus from HeLa cells infected during S phase was sevenfold greater than that of cells infected during G1 and threefold greater than that of cells infected during asynchronous growth. Cells infected during S phase with the E1B mutant virus exhibited severe cytopathic effects, whereas cells infected with the E1B mutant virus during G1 exhibited a mild cytopathic effect. Viral DNA synthesis appeared independent of the cell cycle because equivalent amounts of viral DNA were synthesized in cells infected with either wild-type or E1B mutant virus. The inability of the E1B mutant virus to replicate was not mediated by the status of p53. These results define a novel property of the large tumor antigen of adenovirus in relieving growth restrictions imposed on viral replication by the cell cycle. PMID:8985383

  15. Crystal Structure of the Fibre Head Domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; San Martín, Carmen; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1) fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest. PMID:25486282

  16. Hemorrhagic enteritis by adenovirus-like particles in turkeys: a possible pathogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Carranza, J; Sierra, M A; Carrasco, L; Hervás, J; Blanco, A; Fernández, A

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an outbreak of hemorrhagic enteritis due to adenovirus in turkeys in Spain. Diagnosis of the disease was confirmed by histopathological examination and the observation of adenovirus in spleen mononuclear cells and intestinal infiltrate. Evidence was also found of intravascular coagulation, which may give rise to the bleeding considered characteristic of this disease.

  17. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  18. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines.

  19. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji; Nakajima, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles. PMID:26926035

  20. Comparison of throat swab and nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens for rapid detection of adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie

    2015-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and throat swab (TS) specimens from individual patients were compared with regard to usefulness for adenovirus detection. In 153 adenovirus-infected patients, rapid test sensitivities with NPAs (90.8%) were nearly equivalent to those with TSs (91.5%) based on real-time polymerase chain reaction standards, indicating that NPAs are equally useful.

  1. Modeling adenovirus latency in human lymphocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R

    2010-09-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then declined in BJAB cells below one genome per cell at 130 to 150 days postinfection. Ramos and KE37 cells maintained the virus genome at over 100 copies per cell over a comparable period of time. BJAB cells maintained the viral DNA as a monomeric episome. All three persistently infected cells lost expression of the cell surface coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) within 24 h postinfection, and CAR expression remained low for at least 340 days postinfection. CAR loss proceeded via a two-stage process. First, an initial loss of cell surface staining for CAR required virus late gene expression and a CAR-binding fiber protein even while CAR protein and mRNA levels remained high. Second, CAR mRNA disappeared at around 30 days postinfection and remained low even after virus DNA was lost from the cells. At late times postinfection (day 180), BJAB cells could not be reinfected with adenovirus, even when CAR was reintroduced to the cells via retroviral transduction, suggesting that the expression of multiple genes had been stably altered in these cells following infection. PMID:20573817

  2. Characterization of a New Species of Adenovirus in Falcons

    PubMed Central

    Schrenzel, Mark; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Rotstein, Dave; Maalouf, Gabriel; Snook, Eric; Sandfort, Cal; Rideout, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    In 1996, a disease outbreak occurred at a captive breeding facility in Idaho, causing anorexia, dehydration, and diarrhea or sudden death in 72 of 110 Northern aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) from 9 to 35 days of age and in 6 of 102 peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) from 14 to 25 days of age. Sixty-two Northern aplomado and six peregrine falcons died. Epidemiologic analyses indicated a point source epizootic, horizontal transmission, and increased relative risk associated with cross-species brooding of eggs. Primary lesions in affected birds were inclusion body hepatitis, splenomegaly, and enteritis. The etiology in all mortalities was determined by molecular analyses to be a new species of adenovirus distantly related to the group I avian viruses, serotypes 1 and 4, Aviadenovirus. In situ hybridization and PCR demonstrated that the virus was epitheliotropic and lymphotropic and that infection was systemic in the majority of animals. Adeno-associated virus was also detected by PCR in most affected falcons, but no other infectious agents or predisposing factors were found in any birds. Subsequent to the 1996 epizootic, a similar disease caused by the same adenovirus was found over a 5-year period in orange-breasted falcons (Falco deiroleucus), teita falcons (Falco fasciinucha), a merlin (Falco columbarius), a Vanuatu peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus nesiotes), and gyrfalcon × peregrine falcon hybrids (Falco rusticolus/peregrinus) that died in Wyoming, Oklahoma, Minnesota, and California. These findings indicate that this newly recognized adenovirus is widespread in western and midwestern North America and can be a primary pathogen in different falcon species. PMID:16000466

  3. Interactions of human lacrimal and salivary cystatins with adenovirus endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Ruzindana-Umunyana, A; Weber, J M

    2001-09-01

    Over 100 serotypes of adenoviruses have been implicated in a variety of human and domesticated animal pathologies and some serotypes are widely used as gene transfer vectors. Aside from the limited use of vaccines for specific serotypes, little effort has been expended in the development of antivirals. The objective here was to study the effect of cystatins from human saliva (CS) and tears (CT), two points of viral entry, on adenain, the adenovirus type 2 encoded proteinase, which is absolutely required for infectivity. Two molecular weight species (13 and 14.5 kDa) were purified from both fluids at a yield of 5 mg/l. In vitro adenain activity was inhibited to 50% at a molar ratio of 5 CS:1 adenain and 3 CT:1 adenain. By comparison, papain was inhibited to 50% at a molar ratio of 2 CS:1 papain and 1.5 CT:1 papain. Adenain differed from papain in response to CS and chicken egg white (CEW) cystatin in being stimulated at low concentrations, and in being inhibited only at very high concentrations of cystatins. The presence of cleavage consensus sites specific to adenain in the human cystatins could drive the adenain-cystatin interaction predominantly in the substrate pathway direction. However, we found that the cystatins could only be digested after denaturation and by highly active fresh enzyme preparations. Our experiments designed to test the nature of the interaction between adenain and cystatins suggest a docking model for the adenain-human cystatin interaction, similar to that proposed for papain and CEW. At equilibrium the dissociation constant, K(d), between adenain and CT was 1.2 nM. The kinetic parameters determined here suggest a simple reversible mechanism for the inhibition of adenain by human cystatins. We conclude that the cystatins present in tears and saliva are unlikely to play a significant role in inhibiting adenovirus infections.

  4. Characterization of a new species of adenovirus in falcons.

    PubMed

    Schrenzel, Mark; Oaks, J Lindsay; Rotstein, Dave; Maalouf, Gabriel; Snook, Eric; Sandfort, Cal; Rideout, Bruce

    2005-07-01

    In 1996, a disease outbreak occurred at a captive breeding facility in Idaho, causing anorexia, dehydration, and diarrhea or sudden death in 72 of 110 Northern aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) from 9 to 35 days of age and in 6 of 102 peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) from 14 to 25 days of age. Sixty-two Northern aplomado and six peregrine falcons died. Epidemiologic analyses indicated a point source epizootic, horizontal transmission, and increased relative risk associated with cross-species brooding of eggs. Primary lesions in affected birds were inclusion body hepatitis, splenomegaly, and enteritis. The etiology in all mortalities was determined by molecular analyses to be a new species of adenovirus distantly related to the group I avian viruses, serotypes 1 and 4, Aviadenovirus. In situ hybridization and PCR demonstrated that the virus was epitheliotropic and lymphotropic and that infection was systemic in the majority of animals. Adeno-associated virus was also detected by PCR in most affected falcons, but no other infectious agents or predisposing factors were found in any birds. Subsequent to the 1996 epizootic, a similar disease caused by the same adenovirus was found over a 5-year period in orange-breasted falcons (Falco deiroleucus), teita falcons (Falco fasciinucha), a merlin (Falco columbarius), a Vanuatu peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus nesiotes), and gyrfalcon x peregrine falcon hybrids (Falco rusticolus/peregrinus) that died in Wyoming, Oklahoma, Minnesota, and California. These findings indicate that this newly recognized adenovirus is widespread in western and midwestern North America and can be a primary pathogen in different falcon species.

  5. Transductional targeting of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JN; Everts, M; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy approaches will derive considerable benefit from adenovirus (Ad) vectors capable of self-directed localization to neoplastic disease or immunomodulatory targets in vivo. The ablation of native Ad tropism coupled with active targeting modalities has demonstrated that innate gene delivery efficiency may be retained while circumventing Ad dependence on its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and Ad receptor. Herein, we describe advances in Ad targeting that are predicated on a fundamental understanding of vector/cell interplay. Further, we propose strategies by which existing paradigms, such as nanotechnology, may be combined with Ad vectors to form advanced delivery vehicles with multiple functions. PMID:16439993

  6. Enhanced antitumor effect and reduced vector dissemination with fiber-modified adenovirus vectors expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao

    2002-03-01

    There are at least two hurdles confronting the use of the adenovirus (Ad)-mediated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system for the treatment of cancer. One is inefficient Ad vector-mediated gene transfer into tumor cells lacking the primary receptor, i.e., the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The other is hepatotoxicity due to unwanted vector spread into the liver, even when Ad vectors are injected intratumorally. Herein, we present an attractive strategy for overcoming such limitations based on use of a fiber-modified Ad vector containing an RGD peptide motif in the fiber knob. HSVtk-expressing Ad vectors containing mutant fiber (AdRGD-tk) or wild-type fiber (Ad-tk) were injected intratumorally into CAR-negative B16 melanoma cells inoculated into mice, after which GCV was injected intraperitoneally for 10 days. AdRGD-tk showed approximately 25 times more antitumor activity than Ad-tk. Histopathological studies suggested that liver damage in mice injected with AdRGD-tk was significantly lower than that in mice injected with Ad-tk. Intratumoral administration of luciferase-expressing Ad vectors containing the mutant fiber (AdRGD-L2) resulted in nearly 40 times more luciferase production in the tumor, but 8 times less production in the liver than the conventional Ad vectors (Ad-L2). These results indicate that combination of fiber-modified vectors and a HSVtk/GCV system is a potentially useful and safe approach for the treatment of tumors lacking CAR expression, and that fiber-modified vectors could be of great utility for gene therapy and gene transfer experiments. PMID:11896439

  7. Integration Profile and Safety of an Adenovirus Hybrid-Vector Utilizing Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase for Somatic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Muck-Hausl, Martin; Wang, Jichang; Sun, Chuanbo; Gebbing, Maren; Miskey, Csaba; Ivics, Zoltan; Izsvak, Zsuzsanna; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed adenovirus/transposase hybrid-vectors utilizing the previously described hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase HSB5 for somatic integration and we could show stabilized transgene expression in mice and a canine model for hemophilia B. However, the safety profile of these hybrid-vectors with respect to vector dose and genotoxicity remains to be investigated. Herein, we evaluated this hybrid-vector system in C57Bl/6 mice with escalating vector dose settings. We found that in all mice which received the hyperactive SB transposase, transgene expression levels were stabilized in a dose-dependent manner and that the highest vector dose was accompanied by fatalities in mice. To analyze potential genotoxic side-effects due to somatic integration into host chromosomes, we performed a genome-wide integration site analysis using linker-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) and linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR). Analysis of genomic DNA samples obtained from HSB5 treated female and male mice revealed a total of 1327 unique transposition events. Overall the chromosomal distribution pattern was close-to-random and we observed a random integration profile with respect to integration into gene and non-gene areas. Notably, when using the LM-PCR protocol, 27 extra-chromosomal integration events were identified, most likely caused by transposon excision and subsequent transposition into the delivered adenoviral vector genome. In total, this study provides a careful evaluation of the safety profile of adenovirus/Sleeping Beauty transposase hybrid-vectors. The obtained information will be useful when designing future preclinical studies utilizing hybrid-vectors in small and large animal models. PMID:24124483

  8. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counihan, Katrina; Skerratt, Lee; Franson, J. Christian; Hollmen, Tuula E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  9. Cryo-EM visualization of an exposed RGD epitope on adenovirus that escapes antibody neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, P L; Chiu, C Y; Huang, S; Muir, T; Zhao, Y; Chait, B; Mathias, P; Nemerow, G R

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of the adenovirus penton base protein with alpha v integrins promotes virus entry into host cells. The location of the integrin binding sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) on human type 2 adenovirus (Ad2) was visualized by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image reconstruction using a mAb (DAV-1) which recognizes a linear epitope, IRGDTFATR. The sites for DAV-1 binding corresponded to the weak density above each of the five 22 A protrusions on the adenovirus penton base protein. Modeling of a Fab fragment crystal structure into the adenovirus-Fab cryo-EM density indicated a large amplitude of motion for the Fab and the RGD epitope. An unexpected finding was that Fab fragments, but not IgG antibody molecules, inhibited adenovirus infection. Steric hindrance from the adenovirus fiber and a few bound IgG molecules, as well as epitope mobility, most likely prevent binding of IgG antibodies to all five RGD sites on the penton base protein within the intact virus. These studies indicate that the structure of the adenovirus particle facilitates interaction with cell integrins, whilst restricting binding of potentially neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9135136

  10. shRNA-armed conditionally replicative adenoviruses: a promising approach for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ding, Meng; Xu, Kai; Mao, Lijun; Zheng, Junian

    2016-01-01

    The small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been employed to knockdown the expression of cancer-associated genes and shown some promise in cancer therapy. However, synthetic siRNA duplexes or plasmid mediated delivery of siRNAs have several problems, such as short half-life, low transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity associated with transfection. Conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAds) as the delivery vector for short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) could overcome these limitations and have shown augmented anti-tumor effects in experimental studies and preclinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the development of CRAds-shRNA for cancer treatment. Combination of CRAds-shRNA with chemotherapeutics, radiation, dendritic cells, monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors will be necessary to eradicate cancer cells and cancer stem cells and achieve superior outcomes. The use of CRAd platform for efficient delivery of shRNAs and foreign genes will open a new avenue for cancer therapy. PMID:26980708

  11. Structural and functional determinants in adenovirus type 2 penton base recombinant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Karayan, L; Hong, S S; Gay, B; Tournier, J; d'Angeac, A D; Boulanger, P

    1997-01-01

    Discrete domains involved in structural and functional properties of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) penton base were investigated with site-directed mutagenesis of the recombinant protein expressed in baculovirus-infected cells. Seventeen substitution mutants were generated and phenotyped for various functions in insect and human cells as follows. (i) Pentamerization of the penton base protein was found to be dependent on three amino acid side chains, the indole ring of Trp119, the hydroxylic group of Tyr553, and the basic group of Lys556. (ii) Arg254, Cys432, and Trp439, the stretch of basic residues at positions 547 to 556, and Arg340 of the RGD motif played a critical role in stable fiber-penton base interactions in vivo. (iii) Nuclear localization of penton base in Sf9 cells was negatively affected in mutants W119H or W165H, and, to a lesser extent, by substitutions in the consensus polybasic signal at positions 547 to 549. (iv) Penton base mutants were also assayed for HeLa cell binding, cell detachment, plasmid DNA internalization, and Ad-mediated gene delivery. The results obtained suggested that the previously identified integrin-binding motifs RGD340 and LDV287 were functionally and/or topologically related to other discrete regions which include Trp119, Trp165, Cys246, Cys432, and Trp439, all of which were involved in penton base-cell surface recognition, endocytosis, and postendocytotic steps of the virus life cycle. PMID:9343226

  12. Adenovirus carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin induces cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyan; Wu, Liqin; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Luo, Jingjing; Li, Gongchu

    2014-06-30

    Lectins exist widely in marine bioresources such as bacteria, algae, invertebrate animals and fishes. Some purified marine lectins have been found to elicit cytotoxicity to cancer cells. However, there are few reports describing the cytotoxic effect of marine lectins on cancer cells through virus-mediated gene delivery. We show here that a replication-deficient adenovirus-carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (Ad.FLAG-HddSBL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, as compared to the control virus Ad.FLAG. A down-regulated level of anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-2 was suggested to be responsible for the apoptosis induced by Ad.FLAG-HddSBL infection. Further subcellular localization studies revealed that HddSBL distributed in cell membrane, ER, and the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. In contrast, a previously reported mannose-binding lectin Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin entered the nucleus as well, but did not distribute in inner membrane systems, suggesting differed intracellular sialylation and mannosylation, which may provide different targets for lectin binding. Further cancer-specific controlling of HddSBL expression and animal studies may help to provide insights into a novel way of anti-cancer marine lectin gene therapy. Lectins may provide a reservoir of anti-cancer genes.

  13. A novel adenovirus of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Wevers, Diana; Leendertz, Fabian H; Scuda, Nelly; Boesch, Christophe; Robbins, Martha M; Head, Josephine; Ludwig, Carsten; Kühn, Joachim; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2010-11-05

    Adenoviruses (AdV) broadly infect vertebrate hosts including a variety of primates. We identified a novel AdV in the feces of captive gorillas by isolation in cell culture, electron microscopy and PCR. From the supernatants of infected cultures we amplified DNA polymerase (DPOL), preterminal protein (pTP) and hexon gene sequences with generic pan primate AdV PCR assays. The sequences in-between were amplified by long-distance PCRs of 2-10 kb length, resulting in a final sequence of 15.6 kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel gorilla AdV into a cluster of primate AdVs belonging to the species Human adenovirus B (HAdV-B). Depending on the analyzed gene, its position within the cluster was variable. To further elucidate its origin, feces samples of wild gorillas were analyzed. AdV hexon sequences were detected which are indicative for three distinct and novel gorilla HAdV-B viruses, among them a virus nearly identical to the novel AdV isolated from captive gorillas. This shows that the discovered virus is a member of a group of HAdV-B viruses that naturally infect gorillas. The mixed phylogenetic clusters of gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo and human AdVs within the HAdV-B species indicate that host switches may have been a component of the evolution of human and non-human primate HAdV-B viruses.

  14. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  15. Detection of adenovirus using PCR and molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    1999-09-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a molecular beacon probe were used for the detection of Adenovirus. A 307 bp DNA fragment from a conserved region of the hexon gene was amplified. The specific molecular beacon was characterized with respect to its efficiency of quenching, and signal to noise ratio by spectrofluorometric analysis of its hybridization with virus specific complementary single stranded oligonucleotide target. Amplification was carried out in the presence of the molecular beacon probe, and the amplified target was detected by measurement of fluorescence signal in the post PCR sample. Separately, a 32P-labeled linear probe (having the same sequence as that of molecular beacon probe) was liquid-phase hybridized with the product of PCR performed in the absence of the molecular beacon. The virus specific target was then detected by electrophoresis of the hybridized product in a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and subsequent autoradiographic analysis. The detection limit of adenovirus by PCR in the presence of the molecular beacon probe was found to be similar to that obtained by labeled linear probe hybridization following PCR.

  16. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  17. Pseudotyped αvβ6 integrin-targeted adenovirus vectors for ovarian cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Davies, James; Coughlan, Lynda; Hulin-Curtis, Sarah; Jones, Rachel; Hanna, Louise; Chester, John D.; Parker, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Encouraging results from recent clinical trials are revitalizing the field of oncolytic virotherapies. Human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-C5/Ad5) is a common vector for its ease of manipulation, high production titers and capacity to transduce multiple cell types. However, effective clinical applications are hindered by poor tumor-selectivity and vector neutralization. We generated Ad5/kn48 by pseudotyping Ad5 with the fiber knob domain from the less seroprevalent HAdV-D48 (Ad48). The vector was shown to utilize coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) but not CD46 for cell entry. A 20-amino acid peptide NAVPNLRGDLQVLAQKVART (A20) was inserted into the Ad5. Luc HI loop (Ad5.HI.A20) and Ad5/kn48 DG loop (Ad5/kn48.DG.A20) to target a prognostic cancer cell marker, αvβ6 integrin. Relative to the Ad5.Luc parent vector, Ad5.HI.A20, Ad5.KO1.HI.A20 (KO1, ablated CAR-binding) and Ad5/kn48.DG.A20 showed ∼ 160-, 270- and 180-fold increased transduction in BT-20 breast carcinoma cells (αvβ6high). Primary human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cultures derived from clinical ascites provided a useful ex vivo model for intraperitoneal virotherapy. Ad5.HI.A20, Ad5.KO1.HI.A20 and Ad5/kn48.DG.A20 transduction was ∼ 70-, 60- and 16-fold increased relative to Ad5.Luc in EOC cells (αvβ6high), respectively. A20 vectors transduced EOC cells at up to ∼ 950-fold higher efficiency in the presence of neutralizing ovarian ascites, as compared to Ad5.Luc. Efficient transduction and enhanced cancer-selectivity via a non-native αvβ6-mediated route was demonstrated, even in the presence of pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Consequently, αvβ6-targeted Ad vectors may represent a promising platform for local intraperitoneal treatment of ovarian cancer metastases. PMID:27056886

  18. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  19. Modified recombinant adenoviruses increase porcine circovirus 2 capsid protein expression and induce enhanced immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, D L; Huang, Y; Chang, L L; DU, Q; Chen, Y; Wang, T T; Luo, X M; Zhao, X M; Tong, D W

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary viral pathogen of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) and vaccination is an important method to prevent and control the disease. The expression of PCV2 capsid protein (Cap) in adenovirus vector system has been investigated, but the poor immune responses limit its application. In this study, transcriptional enhancer element largest intron of the human cytomegalovirus (Intron A) and woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) were applied to increase the immunogenicity of PCV2 Cap adenovirus-based vaccine. Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) analysis showed that modified adenoviruses with Intron A and WPRE alone or both could significantly increase the expression of Cap compared to the unmodified adenoviruses. Furthermore, the humoral and cellular immune responses of the constructed recombinant adenoviruses were evaluated in mice. Indirect ELISA, virus neutralizing test and western blot showed that modified adenoviruses elicited higher humoral immune responses than unmodified adenovirus, and Intron A-WPRE-modified virus immunized group had better immune response than the others. Besides, the results of lymphocyte proliferation response and cytokines release assay showed that enhanced cellular immune responses were induced by modified adenoviruses. These results demonstrated that Intron A and WPRE significantly improved the expression of the Cap protein in adenovirus vector system and enhanced the immune responses in mice, making the adenovirus vector system more applicable against PCV2. PMID:27640437

  20. Cholesterol Is Required for Endocytosis and Endosomal Escape of Adenovirus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Imelli, Nicola; Meier, Oliver; Boucke, Karin; Hemmi, Silvio; Greber, Urs F.

    2004-01-01

    The species C adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) and Ad5 bind the coxsackievirus B Ad receptor and αv integrin coreceptors and enter epithelial cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This pathway is rapid and efficient. It leads to cell activation and the cholesterol-dependent formation of macropinosomes. Macropinosomes are triggered to release their contents when incoming Ad2 escapes from endosomes. Here, we show that cholesterol extraction of epithelial cells by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) treatment reduced Ad5-mediated luciferase expression ∼4-fold. The addition of cholesterol to normal cells increased gene expression in a dose-dependent manner up to threefold, but it did not restore gene expression in mβCD-treated cells. mβCD had no effect in the presence of excess cholesterol, indicating that the inhibition of gene expression was due specifically to cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol depletion inhibited rapid Ad2 endocytosis, endosomal escape, and nuclear targeting, consistent with the notion that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of Ad2 is cholesterol dependent. In cholesterol-reduced cells, Ad2 internalized at a low rate, suggestive of an alternative, clathrin-independent, low-capacity entry pathway. While exogenous cholesterol completely restored rapid Ad2 endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and macropinosome disruption, it did not, surprisingly, restore viral escape from endosomes. Our results indicate that macropinosome disruption and endosomal escape of Ad2 are independent events in cells depleted of and then refilled with cholesterol, suggesting that viral escape from endosomes requires lipid-controlled membrane homeostasis, trafficking, or signaling. PMID:14990728

  1. Titration of adenovirus by counting cells containing virus-induced inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Weber, J

    1972-05-01

    A new method for the titration of adenovirus types 2 and 12 based on the enumeration of viral inclusions in infected cells was devised and evaluated. The technique gave virus titers comparable to those obtained by the plaque assay procedure.

  2. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  3. Molecular Detection of Adenoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, and Paramyxoviruses in Bats from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F.; Anderson, Larry J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-01-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  4. Fatal pulmonary edema in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sorden, S D; Woods, L W; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-07-01

    Sporadic sudden deaths in adult white-tailed deer occurred from November 1997 through August 1998 on an Iowa game farm. Three of the 4 deer necropsied had severe pulmonary edema, widespread mild lymphocytic vasculitis, and amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in scattered endothelial cells in blood vessels in the lung and abdominal viscera. Immunohistochemistry with bovine adenovirus 5 antisera and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated adenoviral antigen and nucleocapsids, respectively, within endothelial cells. Adenovirus was isolated in cell culture from 1 of the affected deer. The isolate was neutralized by California black-tailed deer adenovirus antiserum. These findings indicate that adenovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of both black-tailed and white-tailed deer with pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhagic enteropathy.

  5. Quantitative detection of human adenoviruses in wastewater and combined sewer overflows influencing a Michigan river.

    PubMed

    Fong, Theng-Theng; Phanikumar, Mantha S; Xagoraraki, Irene; Rose, Joan B

    2010-02-01

    Enteric viruses are important pathogens found in contaminated surface waters and have previously been detected in waters of the Great Lakes. Human adenoviruses were monitored because of their high prevalence and persistence in aquatic environments. In this study, we quantified adenoviruses in wastewater, surface water, and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) by real-time PCR. Between August 2005 and August 2006, adenovirus concentrations in raw sewage, primary-treated effluent, secondary-treated effluent, and chlorinated effluent from a wastewater treatment plant in Michigan were examined. CSO samples (n = 6) were collected from a CSO retention basin in Grand Rapids, MI. Adenoviruses were detected in 100% of wastewater and CSO discharge samples. Average adenovirus DNA concentrations in sewage and CSOs were 1.15 x 10(6) viruses/liter and 5.35 x 10(5) viruses/liter, respectively. Adenovirus removal was <2 log(10) (99%) at the wastewater treatment plant. Adenovirus type 41 (60% of clones), type 12 (29%), type 40 (3%), type 2 (3%), and type 3 (3%) were isolated from raw sewage and primary effluents (n = 28). Six of 20 surface water samples from recreational parks at the lower Grand River showed virus concentrations above the real-time PCR detection limit (average, 7.8 x 10(3) viruses/liter). This research demonstrates that wastewater effluents and wastewater-impacted surface waters in the lower Grand River in Michigan contain high levels of viruses and may not be suitable for full-body recreational activities. High concentrations of adenovirus in these waters may be due to inefficient removal during wastewater treatment and to the high persistence of these viruses in the environment.

  6. Transgene delivery to cultured keratinocytes via replication-deficient adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Vincent P; Aneskievich, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Transient transgene expression can facilitate investigation of that gene-product function or effect on keratinocyte biology. Several chemical and biologic delivery systems are available, and among them adenoviruses offer particular advantages in efficiency and transgene capacity. Here we describe the advantages of bicistronic adenovirus and inclusion of the polycation hexadimethrine bromide to aid in the detection of positively transduced cells and enhance transduction efficiency. PMID:24281865

  7. Mesangial Localization of Immune Complexes in Experimental Canine Adenovirus Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, N. G.; Morrison, W. I.; Thompson, H.; Cornwell, H. J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Each of a group of 14 dogs was infected experimentally by an intravenous dose of canine adenovirus calculated to allow survival until the initial stages of antibody production; the kidneys of infected dogs were examined during the period of 4-14 days after administration of virus. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with localization of IgG, C3 and viral antigen in mesangial regions was demonstrated. With the electron microscope, electron dense deposits were found scattered throughout the mesangium. There was proliferation of mesangial cells, infiltration into the glomerular tuft of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and, in some cases, focal glomerular necrosis with intracapsular and tubular haemorrhage. By means of an indirect immunofluorescence test, anti-viral antibody was detected in kidney eluates; anti-kidney antibody was not present. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-4 PMID:4375485

  8. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R.; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  9. Current issues and future directions of oncolytic adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T

    2010-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent. They are based on the well-studied adenoviral vector system, which lends itself to concept-driven design to generate oncolytic variants. The first oncolytic Ad was approved as a drug in China in 2005, although clinical efficacy observed in human trials has failed to reach the high expectations that were based on studies in animal models. Current obstacles to the full realization of efficacy of this class of anticancer agent include (i) limited efficiency of infection and specific replication in tumor cells, (ii) limited vector spread within the tumor, (iii) imperfect animal models and methods of in vivo imaging, and (iv) an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these agents with the host. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of oncolytic Ads and potential ways to overcome current obstacles to their clinical application and efficacy.

  10. Adenovirus type 2 nuclear RNA accumulating during productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bachenheimer, S L

    1977-01-01

    The viral-specific nuclear RNA which accumulates early and late during productive infection of HeLa cells by adenovirus-type 2 (Ad2) has been characterized with respect to its size and stability after denaturation by Me2SO. Early nuclear transcripts, under nondenaturing conditions, sediment in the range 28 to 45S, but treatment with Me2SO prior to sedimentation results in a shift to about 20S. Later nuclear RNA accumulates as a composite of two populations of molecules: one with a broad size distribution centering on 45S under nondenaturing conditions and less than 32S after denaturation and a second having a narrow size distribution around 35S which is quite stable to Me2SO. Analysis of late RNA by hybridization to Sma fragments of Ad2 DNA suggests that the 35S RNA species is derived from a limited portion of the left half of the viral genome. PMID:864839

  11. Current Issues and Future Directions of Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent. They are based on the well-studied adenoviral vector system, which lends itself to concept-driven design to generate oncolytic variants. The first oncolytic Ad was approved as a drug in China in 2005, although clinical efficacy observed in human trials has failed to reach the high expectations that were based on studies in animal models. Current obstacles to the full realization of efficacy of this class of anticancer agent include (i) limited efficiency of infection and specific replication in tumor cells, (ii) limited vector spread within the tumor, (iii) imperfect animal models and methods of in vivo imaging, and (iv) an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these agents with the host. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of oncolytic Ads and potential ways to overcome current obstacles to their clinical application and efficacy. PMID:19935777

  12. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  13. Adenovirus Membrane Penetration: Tickling the Tail of a Sleeping Dragon

    PubMed Central

    Wiethoff, Christopher M.; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    As is the case for nearly every viral pathogen, non-enveloped viruses (NEV) must maintain their integrity under potentially harsh environmental conditions while retaining the ability to undergo rapid disassembly at the right time and right place inside host cells. NEVs generally exist in this metastable state until they encounter key cellular stimuli such as membrane receptors, decreased intracellular pH, digestion by cellular proteases, or a combination of these factors. These stimuli trigger conformational changes in the viral capsid that exposes a sequestered membrane-perturbing protein. This protein subsequently modifies the cell membrane in such a way as to allow passage of the virion and accompanying nucleic acid payload into the cell cytoplasm. Different NEVs employ variations of this general pathway for cell entry (1), however this review will focus on significant new knowledge obtained on cell entry by human adenovirus(HAdV). PMID:25798531

  14. [Is there a risk of zoonotic disease due to adenoviruses?].

    PubMed

    Loustalot, Fabien; Creyssels, Sophie; Salinas, Sara; Benkõ, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; Mennechet, Franck J D; Kremer, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Every year brings another round of zoonotic viral infections. Usually they fall under the radar, but the occasional lethal epidemic brings another scare to the public and new urgency to the medical community. The types of these viruses (DNA vs. RNA genomes, enveloped vs. proteinaceous) as well as the preceding host(s) vary. Over the last 20 years, bats have been identified as an enigmatic carrier for several pathogens that have jumped the species barrier and infected humans. Factors that favour the emergence of zoonotic pathogens include the increasing overlap of the human and animal habitats, cultural activities, and the host reservoir. In this context, we asked whether bat and/or nonhuman primate adenoviruses are a risk for human health. PMID:26672663

  15. Adenovirus membrane penetration: Tickling the tail of a sleeping dragon.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Christopher M; Nemerow, Glen R

    2015-05-01

    As is the case for nearly every viral pathogen, non-enveloped viruses (NEV) must maintain their integrity under potentially harsh environmental conditions while retaining the ability to undergo rapid disassembly at the right time and right place inside host cells. NEVs generally exist in this metastable state until they encounter key cellular stimuli such as membrane receptors, decreased intracellular pH, digestion by cellular proteases, or a combination of these factors. These stimuli trigger conformational changes in the viral capsid that exposes a sequestered membrane-perturbing protein. This protein subsequently modifies the cell membrane in such a way as to allow passage of the virion and accompanying nucleic acid payload into the cell cytoplasm. Different NEVs employ variations of this general pathway for cell entry (Moyer and Nemerow, 2011, Curr. Opin. Virol., 1, 44-49), however this review will focus on significant new knowledge obtained on cell entry by human adenovirus (HAdV).

  16. Hepatocyte Heparan Sulfate Is Required for Adeno-Associated Virus 2 but Dispensable for Adenovirus 5 Liver Transduction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Foley, Erin M.; Lawrence, Roger; Schneider, Lina S.; Hoveida, Hamidreza; Secrest, Patrick; Catapang, Arthur B.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Alemany, Ramon; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) and adenovirus 5 (Ad5) are promising gene therapy vectors. Both display liver tropism and are currently thought to enter hepatocytes in vivo through cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). To test directly this hypothesis, we created mice that lack Ext1, an enzyme required for heparan sulfate biosynthesis, in hepatocytes. Ext1HEP mutant mice exhibit an 8-fold reduction of heparan sulfate in primary hepatocytes and a 5-fold reduction of heparan sulfate in whole liver tissue. Conditional hepatocyte Ext1 gene deletion greatly reduced AAV2 liver transduction following intravenous injection. Ad5 transduction requires blood coagulation factor X (FX); FX binds to the Ad5 capsid hexon protein and bridges the virus to HSPGs on the cell surface. Ad5.FX transduction was abrogated in primary hepatocytes from Ext1HEP mice. However, in contrast to the case with AAV2, Ad5 transduction was not significantly reduced in the livers of Ext1HEP mice. FX remained essential for Ad5 transduction in vivo in Ext1HEP mice. We conclude that while AAV2 requires HSPGs for entry into mouse hepatocytes, HSPGs are dispensable for Ad5 hepatocyte transduction in vivo. This study reopens the question of how adenovirus enters cells in vivo. IMPORTANCE Our understanding of how viruses enter cells, and how they can be used as therapeutic vectors to manage disease, begins with identification of the cell surface receptors to which viruses bind and which mediate viral entry. Both adeno-associated virus 2 and adenovirus 5 are currently thought to enter hepatocytes in vivo through heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). However, direct evidence for these conclusions is lacking. Experiments presented herein, in which hepatic heparan sulfate synthesis was genetically abolished, demonstrated that HSPGs are not likely to function as hepatocyte Ad5 receptors in vivo. The data also demonstrate that HSPGs are required for hepatocyte transduction by AAV2. These

  17. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-Modified E1A/E1B Double Mutant Adenovirus Enhances Antitumor Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells In Vitro and in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue-Hong; Yang, Fei; Wang, Hua; Cai, Zhi-Jian; Xu, Yi-Peng; Zhao, An; Su, Ying; Zhang, Gu; Zhu, Shao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    CAR is a transmembrane protein that is expressed in various epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR mediates adenoviral infection, as well as adenovirus-mediated oncolysis of AxdAdB-3, an E1A/E1B double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, in prostate cancer cells. This study further assessed the therapeutic efficacy of AxdAdB-3 with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-fiber modification (AxdAdB3-F/RGD), which enables integrin-dependent infection, in prostate cancer. Susceptibility of prostate cancer cells LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 to adenovirus infection was associated with CAR expression. All of the prostate cancer cell lines expressed integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5. AxdAdB-3 was more cytopathic in CAR-positive prostate cancer cells than in CAR-negative cells, whereas AxdAdB3-F/RGD caused potent oncolysis in both CAR-positive and CAR-negative prostate cancer cells. In contrast, AxdAdB3-F/RGD was not cytopathic against normal prostate epithelial cells, RWPE-1. Intratumoral injection of AxdAdB3-F/RGD into CAR-negative prostate cancer cell xenografts in nude mice inhibited tumor growth. The current study demonstrates that E1A/E1B double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus with an RGD-fiber modification enhances infection efficiency and anti-tumor activity in CAR-deficient prostate cancer cells, while sparing normal cells. Future studies will evaluate the therapeutic potential of AxdAdB3-F/RGD in prostate cancer. PMID:26799485

  18. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors.

  19. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 short fibre

    SciTech Connect

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. Schoehn, Guy

    2008-08-15

    There are more than 100 known adenovirus serotypes, including 50 human serotypes. They can infect all 5 major vertebrate classes but only Aviadenovirus infecting birds and Mastadenovirus infecting mammals have been well studied. CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan) adenovirus is responsible for mild respiratory pathologies in birds. Most studies on CELO virus have focussed on its genome sequence and organisation whereas the structural work on CELO proteins has only recently started. Contrary to most adenoviruses, the vertices of CELO virus reveal pentons with two fibres of different lengths. The distal parts (or head) of those fibres are involved in cellular receptor binding. Here we have determined the atomic structure of the short-fibre head of CELO (amino acids 201-410) at 2.0 A resolution. Despite low sequence identity, this structure is conserved compared to the other adenovirus fibre heads. We have used the existing CELO long-fibre head structure and the one we show here for a structure-based alignment of 11 known adenovirus fibre heads which was subsequently used for the construction of an evolutionary tree. Both the fibre head sequence and structural alignments suggest that enteric human group F adenovirus 41 (short fibre) is closer to the CELO fibre heads than the canine CAdV-2 fibre head, that lies closer to the human virus fibre heads.

  20. Comparative investigations for adenovirus recognition and quantification: Plastic or natural antibodies?

    PubMed

    Altintas, Zeynep; Pocock, Jack; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-12-15

    Comparative and comprehensive investigations for adenovirus recognition and detection were conducted using plastic and natural antibodies to compare three different strategies. The implementation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technology for specific and sensitive recognition of viruses with the combination of biosensors was reported. Plastic antibodies (MIPs nanoparticles) were produced for adenovirus by employing a novel solid phase synthesis method. MIP receptors were then characterised using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques prior to immobilisation on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor as affinity receptor for adenovirus detection. Two different templates were also imprinted as control MIPs (vancomycin-MIP and MS2-MIP). The specific recognition of adenovirus was investigated in the concentration range of 0.01-20 pM and the limit of detection was achieved as 0.02 pM. As an alternative to MIP receptors, direct and sandwich assays were developed for adenovirus quantification using natural antibodies. The detection limit of direct and sandwich assays were found as 0.3 pM and 0.008 pM, respectively. The kinetic data analyses were performed for three different adenovirus recognition methods and cross-reactivity studies were also conducted using MS2 phage as control virus and an excellent specificity was achieved with all assays types. This work confirmed the suitability of the MIPs SPR sensor for the detection of viruses. PMID:26264266

  1. Particle Tracking of Intracellular Trafficking of Octaarginine-modified Liposomes: A Comparative Study With Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Hidetaka; Enoto, Kaoru; Masuda, Tomoya; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tani, Tomomi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It is previously reported that octaarginine (R8)-modified liposome (R8-Lip) was taken up via macropinocytosis, and subsequently delivered to the nuclear periphery. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism for the cytoplasmic transport of R8-Lips, comparing with that for adenovirus. Treatment with microtubule-disruption reagent (nocodazole) inhibited the transfection activity of plasmid DNA (pDNA)-encapsulating R8-Lip more extensively than that of adenovirus. The directional transport of R8-Lips along green fluorescent protein (GFP)–tagged microtubules was observed; however, the velocity was slower than those for adenovirus or endosomes that were devoid of R8-Lips. These directional motions were abrogated in R8-Lips by nocodazole treatment, whereas adenovirus continued to undergo random motion. This finding suggests that the nuclear access of R8-Lip predominantly involves microtubule-dependent transport, whereas an apparent diffusive motion is also operative in nuclear access of adenovirus. Furthermore, quantum dot-labeled pDNA underwent directional motion concomitantly with rhodamine-labeled lipid envelopes, indicating that the R8-Lips were subject to microtubule-dependent transport in the intact form. Dual particle tracking of carriers and endosomes revealed that R8-Lip was directionally transported, associated with endosomes, whereas this occurs after endosomal escape in adenovirus. Collectively, the findings reported herein indicate that vesicular transport is a key factor in the cytoplasmic transport of R8-Lips. PMID:20216528

  2. Adenovirus type 5 interactions with human blood cells may compromise systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mark; Onion, David; Green, Nicky K; Aslan, Kriss; Rajaratnam, Ratna; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Phipps, Sue; Hale, Sarah; Mautner, Vivien; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2006-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenovirus vectors requires that the virus is not inactivated in the bloodstream. Serum neutralizing activity is well documented, but we show here that type 5 adenovirus also interacts with human blood cells. Over 90% of a typical virus dose binds to human (but not murine) erythrocytes ex vivo, and samples from a patient administered adenovirus in a clinical trial showed that over 98% of viral DNA in the blood was cell associated. In contrast, nearly all viral genomes in the murine bloodstream are free in the plasma. Adenovirus bound to human blood cells fails to infect A549 lung carcinoma cells, although dilution to below 1.7 x 10(7) blood cells/ml relieves this inhibition. Addition of blood cells can prevent infection by adenovirus that has been prebound to A549 cells. Adenovirus also associates with human neutrophils and monocytes ex vivo, particularly in the presence of autologous plasma, giving dose-dependent transgene expression in CD14-positive monocytes. Finally, although plasma with a high neutralizing titer (defined on A549 cells) inhibits monocyte infection, weakly neutralizing plasma can actually enhance monocyte transduction. This may increase antigen presentation following intravenous injection, while blood cell binding may both decrease access of the virus to extravascular targets and inhibit infection of cells to which the virus does gain access. PMID:16580883

  3. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  4. Translation of adenovirus 2 late mRNAs microinjected into cultured African green monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.D.; Anderson, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    Adenovirus 2-infected monkey cells fail to synthesize fiber, a 62,000 M/sub r/ virion polypeptide expressed at late times in productively infected cells. Yet these cells contain fiber mRNA that, after isolation, can be translated in vitro. The reason for the failure of monkey cells to translate fiber mRNA has been approached by microinjecting adenovirus mRNA into the cytoplasm of cultured monkey cells. Late adenovirus 2 mRNA, isolated from infected HeLa cells, was efficiently expressed when microinjected into the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-C. Expressed viral proteins identified by immunoprecipitation included the adenovirus fiber polypeptide. This result demonstrates that the monkey cell translational apparatus is capable of recognizing and expressing functional adenovirus mRNA. Microinjection of late virus mRNA into cells previously infected with wild-type adenovirus 2 failed to increase significantly the yield of infectious virus. 26 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. [Anti-adenovirus activity of a substance and medical form of ribamydil in cell culture].

    PubMed

    Nosach, L N; Diachenko, N S; Zhovnovataia, V L

    2009-01-01

    The inhibiting effect of ribamydil on adenovirus reproduction was studied under the determination of the number of cells with virus- induced DNA-containing intranucleus inclusion bodies and hexone antigen, the synthesis of adenovirus proteins and the infection virus by t he investigation. EC50 of ribamydil substance is 4-8 microg/ml, but complete suppression of adenovirus genome expression was found when adding ribamydil after the virus adsorption, in concentrations of 125-500 microg/ml. The original effect of ribamydil on the expression of adenovirus genome was found under its effect in concentration of 31 microg/ml. Intranucleus virus-induced inclusion bodies of the early type only were found under these conditions. Synthesis of the structural virus polypeptides, including hexone polypeptide (II) and non-structural polypeptide 100K, taking part in hexone trimerization, proceed intensively but without formation of immunologically active hexone. The inhibiting effect of officinal form of ribamydil was less expressed as compared with the substance (EC50: 62 microg/ml). The work results prove that the therapeutic effect of ribamydil (ribavirin) under treatment of adenovirus infections may be achieved in case when it is used in a dose excluding the expression of the adenovirus genome.

  6. A novel Golgi protein (GOLPH2)-regulated oncolytic adenovirus exhibits potent antitumor efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yigang; Zhao, Hongfang; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Chen, Kan; Huang, Fang; Zhou, Xiumei; Cui, Caixia; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Golgi apparatus is the organelle mainly functioning as protein processing and secretion. GOLPH2 is a resident Golgi glycoprotein, usually called GP73. Recent data displayed that GOLPH2 is a superb hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) marker candidate, and even its specificity is better than liver cancer marker AFP. Oncolytic adenoviruses are broadly used for targeting cancer therapy due to their selective tumor-killing effect. However, it was reported that traditionally oncolytic adenovirus lack the HCC specificity. In this study, a novel dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 targeting HCC was first constructed based on our cancer targeted gene-viral therapeutic strategy. To verify the targeting and effectiveness of GOLPH2-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 in HCC, the anticancer capacity was investigated in HCC cell lines and animal model. The results proved that the novel GOLPH2-regulated GD55 conferred higher adenovirus replication and infectivity for liver cancer cells than oncolytic adenovirus ZD55. The GOLPH2-regulated GD55 exerted a significant grow-suppressing effect on HCC cells in vitro but little damage to normal liver cells. In animal experiment, antitumor effect of GD55 was more effective in HCC xenograft of nude mice than that of ZD55. Thus GOLPH2-regulated GD55 may be a promising oncolytic virus agent for future liver cancer treatment. PMID:25980438

  7. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia.

  8. Dendritic cells serve as a “Trojan horse” for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-cheng; Wang, Zi-ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Methods: Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Results: Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. Conclusion: DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa. PMID:27345628

  9. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Engler, Tatjana; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad) vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf) was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i) covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii) the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii) combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting. PMID:23029348

  10. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis and Structural Predictions of Human Adenovirus Penton Proteins as a Basis for Tissue-Specific Adenovirus Vector Design▿

    PubMed Central

    Madisch, Ijad; Hofmayer, Soeren; Moritz, Christian; Grintzalis, Alexander; Hainmueller, Jens; Pring-Akerblom, Patricia; Heim, Albert

    2007-01-01

    The penton base is a major capsid protein of human adenoviruses (HAdV) which forms the vertices of the capsid and interacts with hexon and fiber protein. Two hypervariable loops of the penton are exposed on the capsid surface. Sequences of these and 300 adjacent amino acid residues of all 51 HAdV and closely related simian adenoviruses were studied. Adjacent sequences and predicted overall secondary structure were conserved. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clustering corresponding to the HAdV species and recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. All HAdV except serotypes 40 and 41 of species F exhibited an integrin binding RGD motif in the second loop. The lengths of the loops (HVR1 and RGD loops) varied significantly between HAdV species with the longest RGD loop observed in species C and the longest HVR1 in species B. Long loops may permit the insertion of motifs that modify tissue tropism. Genetic analysis of HAdV prime strain p17′H30, a neutralization variant of HAdV-D17, indicated the significance of nonhexon neutralization epitopes for HAdV immune escape. Fourteen highly conserved motifs of the penton base were analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis of HAdV-D8 and tested for sustained induction of early cytopathic effects. Thus, three new motifs essential for penton base function were identified additionally to the RGD site, which interacts with a secondary cellular receptor responsible for internalization. Therefore, our penton primary structure data and secondary structure modeling in combination with the recently published fiber knob sequences may permit the rational design of tissue-specific adenoviral vectors. PMID:17522221

  12. Role of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and viral load of adenovirus and enterovirus in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mirnalini; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta; Talwar, Kewal Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) and adenoviruses (AdVs) are two important etiological agents of viral myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Both these viruses share a common receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), for their infection. However, the role of viral load and CAR expression in disease severity has not yet been completely elucidated. The present study aimed to determine viral load of EV and AdV in DCM patients and correlate them with the level of CAR expression in these patients. Sixty-three DCM cases and 30 controls, each of whom died of heart disease other than DCM and non-cardiac disease respectively, were included. Viral load was determined by TaqMan real-time PCR using primers and probes specific for the AdV hexon gene and the 5'UTR region of EV. The CAR mRNA level was semi-quantitated by RT-PCR, and antigen expression was studied by immunohistochemistry. A significantly high AdV load (p < 0.05) and CAR expression (p < 0.05) were observed in DCM cases versus controls, whereas the EV load showed no significant difference. The data suggests a clinical threshold of 128 AdV copies/500 ng of DNA for DCM, with 66.7 % sensitivity and 65 % specificity. A positive correlation between AdV load and CAR expression (p < 0.001) was also observed in DCM cases. The high adenoviral load and increased CAR expression in DCM and their association with adverse disease outcome indicates role of both virus and receptor in disease pathogenesis. Thus, the need for targeting both the virus and the receptor for treatment of viral myocarditis and early DCM requires further confirmation with larger studies.

  13. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity in rats bearing human adenovirus type 12-induced primary retinoblastoma-like tumor in the eye.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P

    1981-01-01

    Using an animal model of retinoblastoma in inbred rats and cultured human adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells (RAO 188), complement-dependent cytotoxicity was determined by measuring release of 3H-uridine labelled RNA. Sera from rats in which tumors did not grow after adenovirus type 12 inoculation had higher cytotoxicity against RAO 188 cells than sera from rats bearing primary adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor. These results showed that the rat which could raise antibodies against adenovirus type 12-induced retinoblastoma-like tumor cells did not allow the tumor growth in the eye after virus inoculation.

  14. Adenovirus early region 4 34-kilodalton protein directs the nuclear localization of the early region 1B 55-kilodalton protein in primate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrum, F D; Shenk, T; Ornelles, D A

    1996-01-01

    The localization of the adenovirus type 5 34-kDa E4 and 55-kDa E1B proteins was determined in the absence of other adenovirus proteins. When expressed by transfection in human, monkey, hamster, rat, and mouse cell lines, the E1B protein was predominantly cytoplasmic and typically was excluded from the nucleus. When expressed by transfection, the E4 protein accumulated in the nucleus. Strikingly, when coexpressed by transfection in human, monkey, or baby hamster kidney cells, the E1B protein colocalized in the nucleus with the E4 protein. A complex of the E4 and E1B proteins was identified by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected HeLa cells. By contrast to the interaction observed in primate and baby hamster kidney cells, the E4 protein failed to direct the E1B protein to the nucleus in rat and mouse cell lines as well as CHO and V79 hamster cell lines. This failure of the E4 protein to direct the nuclear localization of the E1B protein in REF-52 rat cells was overcome by fusion with HeLa cells. Within 4 h of heterokaryon formation and with protein synthesis inhibited, a portion of the E4 protein present in the REF-52 nuclei migrated to the HeLa nuclei. Simultaneously, the previously cytoplasmic E1B protein colocalized with the E4 protein in both human and rat cell nuclei. These results suggest that a primate cell-specific factor mediates the functional interaction of the E1B and E4 proteins of adenovirus. PMID:8709260

  15. Targeted delivery of CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus to malignant melanoma by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jishi; Ma, Dan; Li, Yan; Yang, Yuan; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Qin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) as intermediate carriers on targeting of P450 gene recombinant adenovirus to malignant melanoma in vitro and in vivo. BMSCs were transduced with pAd5-CMV-CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus. BMSC migration was detected by Transwell plates in vitro and by superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in vivo. Growth-inhibitory effect and apoptosis were determined by MTT and immunity fluorescence staining. Anticancer effects were examined by a human melanoma nude mouse model in vivo. BMSCs moved toward A375 cells in Transwell plates. Numerous superparamagnetic MSCs labeled with iron oxide were identified in the peripheral areas of the tumor, but were detected in primary organs by Prussian blue staining. BMSC-CYP2E1 cells mediated a bystander killing effect on CYP2E1-negative A375 cells during coculture (IC50 values for A375 cells cocultured with BMSC-EGFP and BMSC-CYP2E1 were 4.08 and 2.68 mmol/l, respectively). Intravenously injecting CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus-loaded BMSCs in mice with established human melanoma managed to target the tumor site, and BMSCs with forced expression of CYP2E1 inhibited the growth of malignant cells in vivo by activating 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide. BMSCs may serve as a platform of P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy for the delivery of chemotherapeutic prodrugs to tumors.

  16. Targeted delivery of CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus to malignant melanoma by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jishi; Ma, Dan; Li, Yan; Yang, Yuan; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Qin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) as intermediate carriers on targeting of P450 gene recombinant adenovirus to malignant melanoma in vitro and in vivo. BMSCs were transduced with pAd5-CMV-CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus. BMSC migration was detected by Transwell plates in vitro and by superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in vivo. Growth-inhibitory effect and apoptosis were determined by MTT and immunity fluorescence staining. Anticancer effects were examined by a human melanoma nude mouse model in vivo. BMSCs moved toward A375 cells in Transwell plates. Numerous superparamagnetic MSCs labeled with iron oxide were identified in the peripheral areas of the tumor, but were detected in primary organs by Prussian blue staining. BMSC-CYP2E1 cells mediated a bystander killing effect on CYP2E1-negative A375 cells during coculture (IC50 values for A375 cells cocultured with BMSC-EGFP and BMSC-CYP2E1 were 4.08 and 2.68 mmol/l, respectively). Intravenously injecting CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus-loaded BMSCs in mice with established human melanoma managed to target the tumor site, and BMSCs with forced expression of CYP2E1 inhibited the growth of malignant cells in vivo by activating 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide. BMSCs may serve as a platform of P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy for the delivery of chemotherapeutic prodrugs to tumors. PMID:24413391

  17. Early diagnosis of adenovirus infection and treatment with cidofovir after bone marrow transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Berrebi, D; Houhou, N; Freymuth, F; Faye, A; Duval, M; Mougenot, J F; Peuchmaur, M; Vilmer, E

    2001-03-01

    Adenovirus infection remains an important cause of mortality after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Currently no efficient antiviral treatment is known. Thus, testing new modalities of early diagnosis and treatment is a crucial objective. Adenovirus infection is defined by the combination of symptoms and the isolation of virus from the source of clinical symptoms. The involvement of two or more organs and the presence of virus in blood cultures define disseminated disease. Seven children with a median age of 7 years received bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. All received an unrelated graft without T cell depletion. Adenovirus was sought in blood, urine and biopsy specimens using PCR and culture. Analysis of biopsy specimens included systematic immunohistochemistry. Cidofovir treatment was initiated as soon as biopsy revealed the histopathological signs of adenovirus. Cidofovir was given at 5 mg/kg once weekly for 3 weeks then every 2 weeks. Six patients had diarrhoea and one patient had cystitis. Adenovirus infection and disseminated disease were diagnosed in four cases and three cases, respectively. In six cases, serotype A31 was isolated from gastrointestinal biopsy and in two cases serotypes B2 and C6 were detected in blood and urine. Cidofovir treatment was associated with clinical improvement of diarrhoea, cystitis and fever in five patients, in whom the virus became undetectable in cultures and PCR analyses despite the persistence of immunodeficiency. The median follow-up was 360 days after BMT (240-570). One child died of invasive aspergillosis and another of disseminated adenovirus after interruption of cidofovir therapy. Further studies in immunocompromised patients will be needed to extend these promising results concerning the role of cidofovir in adenovirus infection.

  18. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  19. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country.

  20. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, Guadalupe; Videla, Cristina; Misirlian, Alicia; Requeijo, Paula V; Aguilar, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14) and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14). Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24). Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14). Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection. PMID:12184818

  1. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 long fiber.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L; Fox, Gavin C; Langlois, Patrick; van Raaij, Mark J

    2007-09-01

    Avian adenovirus CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan virus, fowl adenovirus type 1) incorporates two different homotrimeric fiber proteins extending from the same penton base: a long fiber (designated fiber 1) and a short fiber (designated fiber 2). The short fibers extend straight outwards from the viral vertices, whilst the long fibers emerge at an angle. In contrast to the short fiber, which binds an unknown avian receptor and has been shown to be essential to the invasiveness of this virus, the long fiber appears to be unnecessary for infection in birds. Both fibers contain a short N-terminal virus-binding peptide, a slender shaft domain and a globular C-terminal head domain; the head domain, by analogy with human adenoviruses, is likely to be involved mainly in receptor binding. This study reports the high-resolution crystal structure of the head domain of the long fiber, solved using single isomorphous replacement (using anomalous signal) and refined against data at 1.6 A (0.16 nm) resolution. The C-terminal globular head domain had an anti-parallel beta-sandwich fold formed by two four-stranded beta-sheets with the same overall topology as human adenovirus fiber heads. The presence in the sequence of characteristic repeats N-terminal to the head domain suggests that the shaft domain contains a triple beta-spiral structure. Implications of the structure for the function and stability of the avian adenovirus long fiber protein are discussed; notably, the structure suggests a different mode of binding to the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor from that proposed for the human adenovirus fiber heads.

  2. Application of cross-priming amplification (CPA) for detection of fowl adenovirus (FAdV) strains.

    PubMed

    Niczyporuk, Jowita Samanta; Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Samorek-Salamonowicz, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) are widely distributed among chickens. Detection of FAdVs is mainly accomplished by virus isolation, serological assays, various polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). To increase the diagnostic capacity of currently applied techniques, cross-priming amplification (CPA) for the detection of the FAdV hexon gene was developed. The single CPA assay was optimised to detect all serotypes 1-8a-8b-11 representing the species Fowl aviadenovirus A-E. The optimal temperature and incubation time were determined to be 68 °C for 2 h. Using different incubation temperatures, it was possible to differentiate some FAdV serotypes. The results were recorded after addition of SYBR Green I(®) dye, which produced a greenish fluorescence under UV light. The CPA products separated by gel electrophoresis showed different "ladder-like" patterns for the different serotypes. The assay was specific for all serotypes of FAdV, and no cross-reactivity was observed with members of the genus Atadenovirus, duck atadenovirus A (egg drop syndrome virus EDS-76 [EDSV]) or control samples containing Marek's disease virus (MDV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) or chicken anaemia virus (CAV). The results of the newly developed FAdV-CPA were compared with those of real-time PCR. The sensitivity of CPA was equal to that of real-time PCR and reached 10(-2.0) TCID50, but the CPA method was more rapid and cheaper than the PCR systems. CPA is a highly specific, sensitive, efficient, and rapid tool for detection of all FAdV serotypes. This is the first report on the application of CPA for detection of FAdV strains. PMID:25655263

  3. Subregions of the adenovirus E1A transactivation domain target multiple components of the TFIID complex.

    PubMed Central

    Geisberg, J V; Chen, J L; Ricciardi, R P

    1995-01-01

    Transcriptional activation by the adenovirus E1A 289R protein requires direct contacts with the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and also displays a critical requirement for TBP-associated factors (TAFs) (T.G. Boyer and A. J. Berk, Genes Dev. 7:1810-1823, 1993; J. V. Geisberg, W. S. Lee, A. J. Berk, and R. P. Ricciardi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:2488-2492, 1994; W. S. Lee, C. C. Kao, G. O. Bryant, X. Liu, and A. J. Berk, Cell 67:365-376, 1991; and Q. Zhou, P. M. Lieberman, T. G. Boyer, and A. J. Berk, Genes Dev. 6:1964-1974, 1992). In this report, we demonstrate that the activation domain of E1A (CR3) specifically binds to two TAFs, human TAFII250 (hTAFII250) and Drosophila TAFII110 (dTAFII110). These interactions can take place both in vivo and in vitro and require the carboxy-terminal region of CR3; the zinc finger region of CR3, which binds TBP, is not needed to bind these TAFs. We mapped the E1A-binding sites on hTAFII250 to an internal region that contains a number of structural motifs, including an HMG box, a bromodomain, and direct repeats. This represents the first demonstration that hTAFII250 may serve as a target of a transcriptional activator. We also mapped the E1A binding on dTAFII110 to its C-terminal region. This is of significance since, by contrast, Sp1-mediated activation requires binding to the N-terminal domain of dTAFII110. Thus, distinct surfaces of dTAFII110 can serve as target sites for different activators. Our results indicate that E1A may activate transcription, in part, through direct contacts of the CR3 subdomains with selected components of the TFIID complex. PMID:7565781

  4. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes: extending the concept of invariant chain linkage.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Schlüter, Dirk; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2013-10-15

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP linked to Ii compared with vaccination with the unlinked vaccine. Studies using knockout mice demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells were largely responsible for this protection, which is mediated through perforin-dependent lysis of infected cells and IFN-γ production. Taking the concept a step further, vaccination of C57BL/6 (L. monocytogenes-resistant) and BALB/c (L. monocytogenes-susceptible) mice with adenoviral vectors encoding natural L. monocytogenes-derived soluble Ags (listeriolysin O and p60) revealed that tethering of these Ags to Ii markedly improved the vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cell response to two of three epitopes studied. More importantly, Ii linkage accelerated and augmented vaccine-induced protection in both mouse strains and prolonged protection, in particular that induced by the weak Ag, p60, in L. monocytogenes-susceptible BALB/c mice.

  5. Impact of preexisting adenovirus vector immunity on immunogenicity and protection conferred with an adenovirus-based H5N1 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Singh, Neetu; Vemula, Sai V; Couëtil, Laurent; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of preexisting immunity to adenoviruses in the majority of the human population might adversely impact the development of adaptive immune responses against adenovirus vector-based vaccines. To address this issue, we primed BALB/c mice either intranasally (i.n.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) with varying doses of wild type (WT) human adenovirus subtype 5 (HAd5). Following the development of immunity against HAd5, we immunized animals via the i.n. or i.m. route of inoculation with a HAd vector (HAd-HA-NP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) influenza virus. The immunogenicity and protection results suggest that low levels of vector immunity (<520 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with up to 10(7) plaque forming units (p.f.u.) of HAd-WT did not adversely impact the protective efficacy of the vaccine. Furthermore, high levels of vector immunity (approximately 1500 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with 10(8) p.f.u. of HAd-WT were overcome by either increasing the vaccine dose or using alternate routes of vaccination. A further increase in the priming dose to 10(9) p.f.u. allowed only partial protection. These results suggest possible strategies to overcome the variable levels of human immunity against adenoviruses, leading to better utilization of HAd vector-based vaccines.

  6. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  7. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  8. Comparison of adenovirus fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres as scaffolds for vector purification and cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A. . E-mail: mab@bcm.edu

    2006-06-05

    The direct genetic modification of adenoviral capsid proteins with new ligands is an attractive means to confer targeted tropism to adenoviral vectors. Although several capsid proteins have been reported to tolerate the genetic fusion of foreign peptides and proteins, direct comparison of cell targeting efficiencies through the different capsomeres has been lacking. Likewise, direct comparison of with one or multiple ligands has not been performed due to a lack of capsid-compatible ligands available for retargeting. Here we utilize a panel of metabolically biotinylated Ad vectors to directly compare targeted transduction through the fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres using a variety of biotinylated ligands including antibodies, transferrin, EGF, and cholera toxin B. These results clearly demonstrate that cell targeting with a variety of high affinity receptor-binding ligands is only effective when transduction is redirected through the fiber protein. In contrast, protein IX and hexon-mediated targeting by the same set of ligands failed to mediate robust vector targeting, perhaps due to aberrant trafficking at the cell surface or inside targeted cells. These data suggest that vector targeting by genetic incorporation of high affinity ligands will likely be most efficient through modification of the adenovirus fiber rather than the protein IX and hexon capsomeres. In contrast, single-step monomeric avidin affinity purification of Ad vectors using the metabolic biotinylation system is most effective through capsomeres like protein IX and hexon.

  9. Induction of Shock After Intravenous Injection of Adenovirus Vectors: A Critical Role for Platelet-activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhili; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Tian, Jie; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Innate immune responses are a major barrier to safe systemic gene therapy with adenovirus (Ad) vectors. We show that intravenous (IV) injection of rats with Ad5 vectors causes a novel rapid shock reaction that involves hypotension, hemoconcentration, tissue edema, and vasocongestion, with notable pathology in the pancreas and the gastrointestinal system. We show for the first time that this reaction is dependent on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid signaling molecule that is a known shock inducer. Ad upregulated PAF within 5 minutes in vivo, and antagonists of the PAF receptor were able to prevent Ad-induced shock. Ad upregulated PAF via the reticuloendothelial system (RES), because splenectomy or depletion of phagocytes blocked the ability of Ad to induce both PAF and shock. Rats were considerably more sensitive to Ad-induced shock than were mice, but PAF mediated shock in both species. Other Ad-induced innate immune responses such as cytokine induction and thrombocytopenia were not mediated by PAF. In summary, systemic IV injection of Ad stimulates the RES to upregulate PAF within a matter of minutes, which results in shock. The identification of this novel pathway suggests strategies to improve the safety of systemic gene therapy with Ad vectors. PMID:19953082

  10. Nbs1-dependent binding of Mre11 to adenovirus E4 mutant viral DNA is important for inhibiting DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2008-04-25

    Adenovirus (Ad) infections stimulate the activation of cellular DNA damage response and repair pathways. Ad early regulatory proteins prevent activation of DNA damage responses by targeting the MRN complex, composed of the Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 proteins, for relocalization and degradation. In the absence of these viral proteins, Mre11 colocalizes with viral DNA replication foci. Mre11 foci formation at DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation depends on the Nbs1 component of the MRN complex and is stabilized by the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (Mdc1). We find that Nbs1 is required for Mre11 localization at DNA replication foci in Ad E4 mutant infections. Mre11 is important for Mdc1 foci formation in infected cells, consistent with its role as a sensor of DNA damage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that both Mre11 and Mdc1 are physically bound to viral DNA, which could account for their localization in viral DNA containing foci. Efficient binding of Mre11 to E4 mutant DNA depends on the presence of Nbs1, and is correlated with a significant E4 mutant DNA replication defect. Our results are consistent with a model in which physical interaction of Mre11 with viral DNA is mediated by Nbs1, and interferes with viral DNA replication.

  11. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  12. Lesions and transmission of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in black-tailed deer fawns.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Lehmkuhl, H D; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1999-03-01

    Adenovirus infection was the cause of an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California during the latter half of 1993. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. To study transmission of adenovirus infection in deer and susceptibility of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) fawns to adenovirus infection, six 3-6-month-old black-tailed fawns were divided into two treatment groups. One group was inoculated intravenously and the other group was inoculated through the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose and mouth with purified adenovirus. Each treatment group also included two additional fawns (four total) that were not inoculated but were exposed to inoculated animals (contact animals). One fawn served as a negative control. Between 4 and 16 days postinoculation, 8/10 fawns developed systemic or localized infection with lesions identical to lesions seen in animals with natural disease that died during the epizootic. Transmission was by direct contact, and the route of inoculation did not affect the incubation period or the distribution of the virus (systemic or the localized infection). Immunohistochemical analysis using polyclonal antiserum against bovine adenovirus type 5 demonstrated staining in endothelial cells of vessels in numerous tissues in animals with systemic infection and endothelial staining only in vessels subtending necrotic foci in the upper alimentary tract in animals with the localized form of the disease. All inoculated or exposed animals had staining in the tonsillar epithelium. Transmission electron microscopic examination of lung and ileum from two fawns with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy demonstrated endothelial necrosis and

  13. Fiber-mutant technique can augment gene transduction efficacy and anti-tumor effects against established murine melanoma by cytokine-gene therapy using adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kanehira, Makiko; Nishino, Naoko; Takahashi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuyasu; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2002-03-01

    Melanoma cells are relatively resistant to adenovirus vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer due to the low expression of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), which acts as a primitive Ad-receptor. Therefore, extremely high doses of Ad are required for effective gene therapy against melanoma. In the present study, we investigated whether fiber-mutant Ad containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the fiber knob could promote gene delivery and anti-tumor effects in the murine B16 BL6 tumor model. B16 BL6 cells (in vitro) and tumors (in vivo) infected with RGD fiber-mutant Ad containing a tumor necrosis factor alpha gene (Ad-RGD-TNFalpha) produced more TNFalpha than those infected with conventional Ad-TNFalpha. In addition, Ad-RGD-TNFalpha required about one-tenth the dosage of Ad-TNFalpha for induction of equal therapeutic effects upon intratumoral injection into established B16 BL6 tumors. Furthermore, the combination of both TNFalpha- and interleukin 12-expressing RGD fiber-mutant Ads exhibited more effective tumor regression than the Ad expressing each alone. These results suggested that the fiber-mutant for altering Ad-tropism is a very potent technology for advancing gene therapy for melanoma. PMID:11809531

  14. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris and characterization of its anti-coxsackievirus activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kebin; Yu, Hua; Xie, Wei; Xu, Zihui; Zhou, Shiwen; Huang, Chunji; Sheng, Halei; He, Xiaomei; Xiong, Junzhi; Qian, Guisheng

    2013-04-15

    Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors (CARs) are the common cellular receptors which mediate coxsackievirus or adenovirus infection. Receptor trap therapy, which uses soluble viral receptors to block the attachment and internalization of virus, has been developed for the inhibition of virus infection. In this study, we have constructed a pPIC3.5K/CAR-Fc expression plasmid for the economical and scale-up production of CAR-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris. The coding sequence of the fusion protein was optimized according to the host codon usage bias. The amount of the CAR-Fc protein to total cell protein was up to 10% by 1% methanol induction for 96h and the purity was up to 96% after protein purification. Next, the virus pull-down assay demonstrated the binding activity of the CAR-Fc to coxsackievirus. The analyses of MTT assay, immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR after virus neutralization assay revealed that CAR-Fc could significantly block coxsackievirus B3 infection in vitro. In coxsackievirus B3 infected mouse models, CAR-Fc treatment reduced mortality, myocardial edema, viral loads and inflammation, suggesting the significant virus blocking effect in vivo. Our results indicated that the P. pastoris expression system could be used to produce large quantities of bioactive CAR-Fc for further clinical purpose.

  15. A vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein epitope-incorporated oncolytic adenovirus overcomes CAR-dependency and shows markedly enhanced cancer cell killing and suppression of tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Utility of traditional oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) has been limited due to low expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in cancer cells which results in poor infectivity of Ads. Here with an aim of improving the efficiency of Ad's entry to the cell, we generated a novel tropism-expanded oncolytic Ad which contains the epitope of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) at the HI-loop of Ad fiber. We generated 9 variants of oncolytic Ads with varying linkers and partial deletion to the fiber. Only one VSVG epitope-incorporated variant, RdB-1L-VSVG, which contains 1 linker and no deletion to fiber, was produced efficiently. Production of 3-dimensionaly stable fiber in RdB-1L-VSVG was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. RdB-1L-VSVG shows a remarkable improvement in cytotoxicity and total viral yield in cancer cells. RdB-1L-VSVG demonstrates enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells with subdued CAR-expression as it can be internalized by an alternate pathway. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody (Ab) or VSVG receptor, phosphatidyl serine (PS), reveals that cell internalization of RdB-1L-VSVG is mediated by both CAR and PS. Furthermore, treatment with RdB-1L-VSVG significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect in vivo. These studies demonstrate that the strategy to expand oncolytic Ad tropism may significantly improve therapeutic profile for cancer treatment. PMID:26430798

  16. Hyaluronidase expression by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances its intratumoral spread and suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Guedan, Sonia; Rojas, Juan José; Gros, Alena; Mercade, Elena; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2010-07-01

    Successful virotherapy requires efficient virus spread within tumors. We tested whether the expression of hyaluronidase, an enzyme which dissociates the extracellular matrix (ECM), could enhance the intratumoral distribution of an oncolytic adenovirus and improve its therapeutic activity. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that intratumoral coadministration of hyaluronidase in mice-bearing tumor xenografts improves the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus. Next, we constructed a replication-competent adenovirus expressing a soluble form of the human sperm hyaluronidase (PH20) under the control of the major late promoter (MLP) (AdwtRGD-PH20). Intratumoral treatment of human melanoma xenografts with AdwtRGD-PH20 resulted in degradation of hyaluronan (HA), enhanced viral distribution, and induced tumor regression in all treated tumors. Finally, the PH20 cDNA was inserted in an oncolytic adenovirus that selectively kills pRb pathway-defective tumor cells. The antitumoral activity of the novel oncolytic adenovirus expressing PH20 (ICOVIR17) was compared to that of the parental virus ICOVIR15. ICOVIR17 showed more antitumor efficacy following intratumoral and systemic administration in mice with prestablished tumors, along with an improved spread of the virus within the tumor. Importantly, a single intravenous dose of ICOVIR17 induced tumor regression in 60% of treated tumors. These results indicate that ICOVIR17 is a promising candidate for clinical testing.

  17. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract.

  18. Occurrence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. and adenoviruses in Finnish bathing waters and purified sewage effluents.

    PubMed

    Hokajärvi, Anna-Maria; Pitkänen, Tarja; Siljanen, Henri M P; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Torvinen, Eila; Siitonen, Anja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-03-01

    A total of 50 Finnish bathing water samples and 34 sewage effluent samples originating from 17 locations were studied in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Campylobacter were present in 58% and adenoviruses in 12% of all bathing water samples; 53% of all sewage effluent samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. and 59% for adenoviruses. C. jejuni was the most common Campylobacter species found and human adenovirus serotype 41 was the most common identified adenovirus type. Bathing water temperature displayed a significant negative relationship with the occurrence of Campylobacter. One location had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of C. coli isolates in the bathing water and in sewage effluent, suggesting that sewage effluent was the source of C. coli at this bathing site. The counts of faecal indicator bacteria were not able to predict the presence of Campylobacter spp. or adenoviruses in the bathing waters. Thus the observed common presence of these pathogens in Finnish sewage effluents and bathing waters may represent a public health risk. The low water temperature in Finland may enhance the prevalence of Campylobacter in bathing waters. More attention needs to be paid to minimizing the concentrations of intestinal pathogens in bathing waters.

  19. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  20. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  1. Screening for adenoviruses in haematological neoplasia: High prevalence in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, Karin; Rauch, Margit; Ambros, Peter F; Pötschger, Ulrike; Chott, Andreas; Jäger, Ulrich; Drach, Johannes; Nader, Alexander; Lion, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Human adenoviruses possess oncogenic capacity which is well documented in mammalian animal models, but their possible implication in human malignancy has remained enigmatic. Following primary infection, adenoviruses can persist in a latent state in lymphocytes where the virus is apparently able to evade immune surveillance. In the present study, we have employed a broad-spectrum adenovirus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to systematically screen more than 200 diagnostic specimens of different lymphoid malignancies including acute lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), various types of malignant lymphoma (n=100) and multiple myeloma (n=11) for the presence of adenoviral sequences. While most entities analysed revealed negative findings in virtually all specimens tested, adenoviral DNA was detected in 15/36 (42%) mantle cell lymphomas investigated. The most prevalent adenoviral species detected was C, and less commonly B. Adenovirus-positive findings in patients with mantle cell lymphoma were made at different sites including bone marrow (n=7), intestine (n=5), lymph nodes (n=2) and tonsillar tissue (n=1). The presence of adenoviral sequences identified by PCR was confirmed in individual cells by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). The frequent observation of adenoviruses in mantle cell lymphoma is intriguings, and raises questions about their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of this lymphoid malignancy. PMID:24246703

  2. Characterizing clearance of helper adenovirus by a clinical rAAV1 manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Barbara A; Quigley, Paulene; Nichols, Gina; Moore, Christine; Pastor, Eric; Price, David; Ament, Jon W; Takeya, Ryan K; Peluso, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV) are being developed as gene therapy delivery vehicles and as genetic vaccines, and some of the most scaleable manufacturing methods for rAAV use live adenovirus to induce production. One aspect of establishing safety of rAAV products is therefore demonstrating adequate and reliable clearance of this helper virus by the vector purification process. The ICH Q5A regulatory guidance on viral safety provides recommendations for process design and characterization of viral clearance for recombinant proteins, and these principles were adapted to a rAAV serotype 1 purification process for clinical vectors. Specific objectives were to achieve overall adenovirus clearance factors significantly greater than input levels by using orthogonal separation and inactivation methods, and to segregate adenovirus from downstream operations by positioning a robust clearance step early in the process. Analytical tools for process development and characterization addressed problematic in-process samples, and a viral clearance validation study was performed using adenovirus and two non-specific model viruses. Overall clearance factors determined were >23 LRV for adenovirus, 11 LRV for BVDV, and >23 LRV for AMuLV.

  3. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV.

  4. Technical aspects of using human adenovirus as a viral water quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Rames, Emily; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Despite dramatic improvements in water treatment technologies in developed countries, waterborne viruses are still associated with many of cases of illness each year. These illnesses include gastroenteritis, meningitis, encephalitis, and respiratory infections. Importantly, outbreaks of viral disease from waters deemed compliant from bacterial indicator testing still occur, which highlights the need to monitor the virological quality of water. Human adenoviruses are often used as a viral indicator of water quality (faecal contamination), as this pathogen has high UV-resistance and is prevalent in untreated domestic wastewater all year round, unlike enteroviruses and noroviruses that are often only detected in certain seasons. Standard methods for recovering and measuring adenovirus numbers in water are lacking, and there are many variations in published methods. Since viral numbers are likely under-estimated when optimal methods are not used, a comprehensive review of these methods is both timely and important. This review critically evaluates how estimates of adenovirus numbers in water are impacted by technical manipulations, such as during adenovirus concentration and detection (including culturing and polymerase-chain reaction). An understanding of the implications of these issues is fundamental to obtaining reliable estimation of adenovirus numbers in water. Reliable estimation of HAdV numbers is critical to enable improved monitoring of the efficacy of water treatment processes, accurate quantitative microbial risk assessment, and to ensure microbiological safety of water.

  5. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  6. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Anitra L.; Peng, Binghao J.; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi’s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  7. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  8. A genetic fiber modification to achieve matrix-metalloprotease-activated infectivity of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Luna, Jeroni; Giménez-Alejandre, Marta; Vaquero, Eva; García de la Torre, Beatriz; Andreu, David; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-10-28

    Selective tumor targeting of oncolytic adenovirus at the level of cell entry remains a major challenge to improve efficacy and safety. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors and in particular in pancreatic cancer. In the current work, we have exploited the expression of MMPs together with the penetration capabilities of a TAT-like peptide to engineer tumor selective adenoviruses. We have generated adenoviruses containing CAR-binding ablated fibers further modified with a C-terminus TAT-like peptide linked to a blocking domain by an MMP-cleavable sequence. This linker resulted in a MMP-dependent cell transduction of the reporter MMP-activatable virus AdTATMMP and in efficient transduction of neoplastic cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Intravenous and intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice showed very low AdTATMMP activity in the normal pancreas, whereas increased transduction was observed in pancreatic tumors of transgenic Ela-myc mice. Intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice bearing orthotopic tumors led to a 25-fold increase in tumor targeting compared to the wild type fiber control. A replication competent adenovirus, Ad(RC)MMP, with the MMP-activatable fiber showed oncolytic efficacy and increased antitumor activity compared to Adwt in a pancreatic orthotopic model. Reduced local and distant metastases were observed in Ad(RC)MMP treated-mice. Moreover, no signs of pancreatic toxicity were detected. We conclude that MMP-activatable adenovirus may be beneficial for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  9. Systemic adenovirus infection associated with high mortality in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Swift, P K; Barr, B C; Horzinek, M C; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Patton, J F; Oliver, M N; Jones, K R; MacLachlan, N J

    1996-03-01

    Seventeen counties in northern California experienced epizootics of high mortality in the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) population during the latter half of 1993. Thirteen deer submitted to the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System as part of this natural die-off had systemic adenovirus infection. Pulmonary edema was present in all 13 deer. Erosions, ulceration, and abscessation of the upper alimentary tract occurred in 7/13 deer. Four of 13 deer had hemorrhagic enteritis. All 13 deer had widespread systemic vasculitis with endothelial intranuclear inclusions. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibody directed against bovine adenovirus type 5 bound to antigen in endothelial cells. Adenovirus was identified by transmission electron microscopy within the nuclei of endothelial cells in 6/6 deer examined. An adenovirus was isolated from lung homogenates of one deer that were cultured on black-tailed deer pulmonary artery endothelial cells. With the exception of the intranuclear inclusions evident on histologic evaluation, gross and histologic changes were similar to those described for bluetongue virus infection and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus infection in white-tailed deer. Nine additional deer were emaciated and had pharyngeal abscesses with focal vasculitis, which may represent the chronic affects of previous nonfatal adenovirus infection.

  10. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract. PMID:27486139

  11. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  12. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA.

  13. Construction and identification of recombinant adenovirus carrying human TIMP-1shRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y L; Xie, H; Lin, H L; Feng, Q; Liu, Y

    2015-01-16

    The aim of this study was to construct the recombinant adenovirus carrying human TIMP-1shRNA gene expression system for preliminary identification to lay the foundation for the further study of gene therapy. Using the Adeno-X system, the recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAdeno-X green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 small hairpin (1shRNA) was constructed by including the target gene fragment of the TIMP-1shRNA shuttle plasmid pShuttle2-GFP-TIMP-1shRNA and the backbone plasmid pAdeno-X by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEK293A cells to package the recombinant adenovirus rvAdeno-XGFP-TIMP-1shRNA. The recombinant adenovirus was identified by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral titer and infection efficiency were detected using GFP. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digestion demonstrated that rvAdeno-XGFP-TIMP-1shRNA had been successfully constructed, which has a strong ability to infect the kidney. The TIMP-1shRNA adenovirus expression vector was successfully constructed using homologous recombination methods.

  14. Recombinant adenovirus of human p66Shc inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoshan; Xu, Rong; Lin, Yajun; Zhen, Yongzhan; Wei, Jie; Hu, Gang; Sun, Hongfan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a human recombinant p66Shc adenovirus and to investigate the inhibition of recombinant p66Shc adenovirus on MCF-7 cells. The recombinant adenovirus expression vector was constructed using the Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3. Inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Intracellular ROS was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probes, and 8-OHdG was detected by ELISA. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were assayed by flow cytometry. Western blot were used to observe protein expression. p66Shc expression was upregulated in 4 cell lines after infection. The inhibitory effect of p66Shc recombinant adenovirus on MCF-7 cells was accompanied by enhanced ROS and 8-OHdG. However, no significant differences were observed in the cell apoptosis rate. The ratio of the cell cycle G2/M phase showed a significant increase. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the expressions of p53, p-p53, cyclin B1 and CDK1 were upregulated with the overexpression of p66Shc. The Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3 can be used to efficiently construct recombinant adenovirus containing p66Shc gene, and the Adeno-X can inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. These results suggested that p66Shc may be a key target for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27530145

  15. Biophysical and Functional Analyses Suggest That Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Protein Requires Higher-order Multimerization to Function against Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Nuclear Bodies*

    PubMed Central

    Patsalo, Vadim; Yondola, Mark A.; Luan, Bowu; Shoshani, Ilana; Kisker, Caroline; Green, David F.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Hearing, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The early region 4 open reading frame 3 protein (E4-ORF3; UniProt ID P04489) is the most highly conserved of all adenovirus-encoded gene products at the amino acid level. A conserved attribute of the E4-ORF3 proteins of different human adenoviruses is the ability to disrupt PML nuclear bodies from their normally punctate appearance into heterogeneous filamentous structures. This E4-ORF3 activity correlates with the inhibition of PML-mediated antiviral activity. The mechanism of E4-ORF3-mediated reorganization of PML nuclear bodies is unknown. Biophysical analysis of the purified WT E4-ORF3 protein revealed an ordered secondary/tertiary structure and the ability to form heterogeneous higher-order multimers in solution. Importantly, a nonfunctional E4-ORF3 mutant protein, L103A, forms a stable dimer with WT secondary structure content. Because the L103A mutant is incapable of PML reorganization, this result suggests that higher-order multimerization of E4-ORF3 may be required for the activity of the protein. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that the E4-ORF3 L103A mutant protein acts as a dominant-negative effector when coexpressed with the WT E4-ORF3 in mammalian cells. It prevents WT E4-ORF3-mediated PML track formation presumably by binding to the WT protein and inhibiting the formation of higher-order multimers. In vitro protein binding studies support this conclusion as demonstrated by copurification of coexpressed WT and L103A proteins in Escherichia coli and coimmunoprecipitation of WT·L103A E4-ORF3 complexes in mammalian cells. These results provide new insight into the properties of the Ad E4-ORF3 protein and suggest that higher-order protein multimerization is essential for E4-ORF3 activity. PMID:22573317

  16. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  17. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  18. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease.

  19. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens.

  20. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HELA CELLS INFECTED WITH ADENOVIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Carl G.; Hamlin, Alice; Parker, Esther; van Ravenswaay, Theodore

    1956-01-01

    HeLa cells were infected with adenoviruses (types 1–4) and sectioned for electron microscopy after intervals of 20 to 48 hours. Clusters of virus-like particles were found within the nuclei of infected cultures but not in those of uninfected controls. The particles were often arranged in rows as if in crystalline formation. Maximal diameter of particles was approximately 65 mµ, and internal bodies were demonstrated. Lesions of infected cells included target-like structures of the nuclear membrane, large nuclear vacuoles (type 2), and increased numbers of large irregular electron-dense granules in the cytoplasm 48 hours after infection. Examination of infected cultures by light microscopy, using the Feulgen reaction, showed intranuclear inclusion bodies and a cytopathogenic effect consisting of clumping of cells without pyknosis of nuclei. A lipide stain showed numerous cytoplasmic granules that were not identical with the large, irregular, electron-dense granules of the cytoplasm. Practically all the cells showed the viral cytopathogenic effect, but only a minority of cells were found to contain virus-like particles or intranuclear inclusion bodies. PMID:13357696

  1. Magnesium-Dependent Interaction of PKR with Adenovirus VAI

    SciTech Connect

    K Launer -Felty; C Wong; A Wahid; G Conn; J Cole

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg{sup 2+}. Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  2. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens. PMID:26944930

  3. Fiber-modified adenoviruses for targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongju; Curiel, David T

    2008-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector. To achieve highly efficient and specific gene delivery, it is often necessary to re-direct Ad5 tropism. Because the capsid protein fiber plays an essential role in directing Ad5 infection, our laboratory attempted to re-target Ad5 through fiber modification. We have developed two strategies in this regard. One is a bi-specific adaptor protein strategy, in which the adaptor protein is designed to bind both the Ad5 fiber and an alternative cell-surface receptor. Another is genetic modification, in which alternative targeting motifs are genetically incorporated into the fiber knob domain so that the Ad5 vectors can infect cells through the alternative receptors. In this chapter, we will focus on the genetic fiber modification strategy and provide a detailed protocol for generation of fiber-modified Ad5 vectors. A series of techniques/procedures used in our laboratory will be described, which include the generation of fiber-modified Ad5 genome by homologous recombination in a bacterial system, rescuing the modified Ad5 viruses, virus amplification and purification, and virus titration.

  4. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for acute adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Roggendorf, M; Wigand, R; Deinhardt, F; Frösner, G G

    1982-02-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described for demonstrating antibodies to the hexone antigen of adenoviruses. The antigen-coated, flat-bottomed microtiter plates are incubated sequentially with dilutions of patients' sera (2 h at 37 degrees C) and peroxidase-coupled anti-human IgG (2 h at 37 degrees C). After a final washing, orthophenylenediamine is added to the plates, and the absorbance (A) measured 30 min later. The ELISA was found to be a hundred-fold more sensitive than complement fixation. An evaluation methods for determining antibody concentration is described which correlates the absorbance of sera diluted 10(-3) to the absorbance of a reference serum containing an arbitrary value (100) of antibody. This methods avoids titration of sera and day-to-day assay variations by different background reactions. A significant increase in antibody concentration of acute-phase serum over that of convalescent phase serum is observed. The ability to test sera in a single dilution and the automatic reading of results and their evaluation by computer make this assay suitable for diagnostic laboratories.

  5. Magnesium-dependent interaction of PKR with adenovirus VAI.

    PubMed

    Launer-Felty, Katherine; Wong, C Jason; Wahid, Ahmed M; Conn, Graeme L; Cole, James L

    2010-10-01

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the α-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg(2+). Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg(2+), but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  6. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests. PMID:25163614

  7. Non-classical export of an adenovirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Lloyd C; Achermann, Dominik P; Keller, Stephan; Straub, Monika; Greber, Urs F

    2003-06-01

    The icosahedral capsids of Adenoviruses (Ads) consist of the hexon and stabilizing proteins building the facettes, and of the vertex protein penton base (Pb) anchoring the protruding fibers. The fibers bind to the Coxsackie virus B Ad cell surface receptor (CAR) and Pb to integrins. Here we describe a novel property of the Ad2 Pb. Pb was found to leave the infected cell and, upon exit, it attached to the surrounding noninfected cells forming a radial gradient with highest Pb levels on cells adjacent to the infected cell. The producer cells remained intact until at least 30 h post infection. At this point, Pb was not recovered from the extracellular medium, suggesting that its cell-cell spread might not involve free Pb. When viral particles were released at late stages of infection, soluble Pb was found in the extracellular medium and it randomly bound to noninfected cells. Nonlytic export of Pb occurred upon transient transfection with plasmid DNA, but plasmid-encoded fiber was not exported, indicating that cell-cell spread of Pb is autonomous of infection. Pb export was not affected by Brefeldin A-induced disruption of the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that it occurred via a nonclassical mechanism. Interestingly, the coexpression of Pb and fiber leads to both Pb and fiber export, termed 'protein abduction'. We suggest that fiber abduction might support viral dissemination in infected tissues by interfering with tissue integrity.

  8. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests.

  9. Phylogenomic characterization of California sea lion adenovirus-1.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Gulland, Frances M D; Goldstein, Tracey; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Rivera, Rebecca; Waltzek, Thomas B; Salemi, Marco; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-04-01

    Significant adenoviral diversity has been found in humans, but in domestic and wild animals the number of identified viruses is lower. Here we present the complete genome of a recently discovered mastadenovirus, California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1) isolated from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), an important pathogen associated with hepatitis in pinnipeds. The genome of this virus has the typical mastadenoviral structure with some notable differences at the carboxy-terminal end, including a dUTPase that does not cluster with other mastadenoviral dUTPases, and a fiber that shows similarity to a trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi and choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The GC content is low (36%), and phylogenetic analyses placed the virus near the root of the clade infecting laurasiatherian hosts in the genus Mastadenovirus. These findings support the hypothesis that CSLAdV-1 in California sea lions represents a host jump from an unknown mammalian host in which it is endemic.

  10. mRNAs from human adenovirus 2 early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Gilardi, P; Näslund, A; LeMoullec, J M; Pettersson, U; Perricaudet, M

    1984-01-01

    The molecular structure of the mRNAs from early region 4 of human adenovirus 2 has been studied by Northern blot analysis, S1 nuclease analysis, and sequence analysis of cDNA clones. The results make it possible to identify four different splice donor sites and six different splice acceptor sites. The structure of 12 different mRNAs can be deduced from the analysis. The mRNAs have identical 5' and 3' ends and are thus likely to be processed from a common mRNA precursor by differential splicing. The different mRNA species are formed by the removal of one to three introns, and they all carry a short 5' leader segment. The introns appear to serve two functions; they either place a 5' leader segment in juxtaposition with an open reading frame or fuse two open translational reading frames. The early region 4 mRNAs can encode at least seven unique polypeptides. Images PMID:6088804

  11. Falcon adenovirus infection in breeding Taita falcons (Falco fasciinucha).

    PubMed

    Dean, Jason; Latimer, Kenneth S; Oaks, J Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Redig, Patrick T; Wünschmann, Arno

    2006-05-01

    Four female and 3 male Taita falcons (Falco fasciinucha) out of a breeding colony of 14 Taita falcons (7 pairs) died during the breeding season after showing lethargy and anorexia for 1 to 2 days. All animals were submitted for necropsy. Gross lesions in the female falcons were characterized by anemia secondary to marked hemorrhage into the ovary and oviduct, serofibrinous effusion into the cardioabdominal cavity and serosal petechiae. In addition, marked necrotizing splenitis and pulmonary hemorrhage were present. Histologically, the female falcons had mild necrotizing hepatitis with numerous intranuclear inclusion bodies and necrotizing splenitis with rare inclusion bodies. There were no gross lesions in the male falcons, and the histological lesions were characterized by urate deposition and rare intranuclear inclusion bodies in the renal tubular epithelial cells. Adenoviral particles were found by electron microscopy in the cloacal contents of the female Taita falcons but not in the male falcons. DNA in situ hybridization revealed widespread aviadenoviral nucleic acid within the nuclei of hepatocytes, renal tubular epithelial cells, and adrenal cells in the female falcons but no aviadenoviral nucleic acid in 1 male falcon and only a low quantity of adenoviral nucleic acid in the liver and kidney of another male Taita falcon. PCR amplified aviadenoviral DNA in the liver and intestine of all Taita falcons. The amplicons were sequenced, and the virus was identified as falcon adenovirus. The deaths of the female and male birds were attributed to the aviadenovirus infection.

  12. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  13. Nedocromil sodium inhibits canine adenovirus bronchiolitis in beagle puppies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K A; Lemen, R J; Weger, N S; Chen, H; Bowers, M C; Witten, M L; Lantz, R C; Bice, D E; Muggenburg, B A

    2000-01-01

    Nedocromil sodium is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used to control asthmatic attacks. Our hypothesis is that nedocromil sodium inhibits virus-induced airway inflammation, a common trigger of asthma. We nebulized nedocromil sodium into beagle dogs (n = 10, mean +/- SEM ages: 149 +/- 13 days) before and after inoculation with canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Control dogs (n = 10) received saline aerosols and were either infected with CAV2 (Sal/CAV2, n = 7, mean +/- SEM ages: 140 +/- 11 days) or were not infected (Sal/Sal, n = 3, ages: 143 +/- 0 days). All dogs were anesthetized with choralose (80 mg/kg i.v.), intubated, and mechanically ventilated. Pulmonary function tests and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed using standard techniques. Pulmonary function tests revealed no significant change between the nedocromil sodium and non-nedocromil-treated groups. The percentage of infected bronchioles was quantitated as the number of inflamed airways of 40 bronchioles examined times 100 for each dog. Nedocromil-treated dogs had significantly (p < 0.05) less mucosal inflammation (mean +/- SEM, 39% +/- 5%), epithelial denudation (36% +/- 5%), and BAL neutrophilia (11 +/- 3) than did Sal/CAV2 dogs (51% +/- 6%, 57% +/- 4%, and 33% +/- 8%, respectively). We concluded that pretreatment with nedocromil sodium aerosols attenuated CAV2-induced airway inflammation in these beagle puppies.

  14. Adenovirus type 3 induces platelet activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying-Yu; Yu, Xiu-Nan; Qu, Zhang-Yi; Zhang, Ai-Ai; Xing, Yu-Ling; Jiang, Li-Xin; Shang, Lei; Wang, Ying-Chen

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate platelet activation induced by adenovirus type 3 (HAdV3) in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or whole blood was incubated with or without HAdV at various concentrations. Platelet aggregation, platelet counting, fibrinogen and expression of platelet membrane antigens (CD41a and CD62P) were determined following incubation with HAdV for different periods of time. The results demonstrated that HAdV at the concentrations of 109-1011 vp/ml enhanced adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation, however did not alter the platelet count. Infection with HAdVs also reduced fibrinogen level. P-selectin and CD41a appeared rapidly on the surface after platelets were incubated with HAdVs in vitro for 30 min. In conclusion, HAdVs may induce activation of platelets and lead to a pre-thrombotic state of peripheral blood. This finding may aid in the development of measures to prevent severe HAdV infection.

  15. Phylogenomic evidence for recombination of adenoviruses in wild gorillas.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Robbins, Martha; Gray, Maryke; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Nishuli, Radar; Boji Mungu-Akonkwa, Dieu-Donné; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) of species Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B) are genetically highly diverse and comprise several pathogenic types. AdVs closely related to members of HAdV-B infect African great apes and the evolutionary origin of HAdV-B has recently been determined in ancient gorillas. Genetic evidence for intra- and inter-species recombination has been obtained for AdVs of humans and captive great apes, but evidence from wild great apes is lacking. In this study, potential HAdV-B members of wild Eastern gorillas were analysed for evidence of recombination. One near-complete genome was amplified from primary sample material and sequenced, and from another six individuals genome fragments were obtained. In phylogenomic analysis, their penton base, pVII-pVI, hexon and fiber genes were compared with those of all publicly available HAdV-B full-genome sequences of humans and captive great apes. Evidence for intra-species recombination between different HAdV-B members of wild gorillas as well as between HAdV-B members of chimpanzees and gorillas was obtained. Since zoonotic AdVs have been reported to cause respiratory outbreaks in both humans and monkeys, and humans in West and Central Africa frequently hunt and butcher primates thereby increasing the chance of zoonotic transmission, such HAdV-B recombinants might widen the pool of potential human pathogens. PMID:26219820

  16. SEQUENTIAL CELLULAR CHANGES PRODUCED BY TYPES 5 AND 7 ADENOVIRUSES IN HELA CELLS AND IN HUMAN AMNIOTIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Georgiana S.; Denny, Floyd W.; Ginsberg, Harold S.

    1959-01-01

    The sequential cytological changes which develop in tissue culture cells infected with adenovirus types 5 and 7 are described and compared with those produced by adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, and 4. The evidence that is presented indicates that types 1, 2, and 5 belong to one major subdivision of the adenovirus group and types 3, 4, and 7 to another. That the host cell nucleus is the principal site of adenovirus synthesis has been confirmed by fluorescent antibody studies. They have demonstrated the occurrence of type-specific adenovirus antigen in the characteristic intranuclear inclusions and other virus-induced structures reported to contain virus-like particles or shown by electronmicroscopy. PMID:13803575

  17. An adenovirus associated with intestinal impaction and mortality of male eiders (Somateria mollissima) in the Baltic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Kilpi, Mikael; Docherty, D.E.; Myllys, V.

    2003-01-01

    We examined 10 common eider (Somateria mollissima) males found dead in 1998 during a die-off in the northern Baltic Sea off the southwestern coast of Finland. We diagnosed impaction of the posterior small intestine with mucosal necrosis as the cause of death in all 10 and isolated adenoviruses from cloacal samples of six birds. The adenovirus isolates were not neutralized by reference antisera to group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses. Cloacal swabs from 22 apparently healthy eider females nesting at the mortality area were negative for viruses. An adenovirus isolated from one of the eiders caused clinical signs of illness and gastrointestinal pathology in experimentally infected mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings. These findings suggest that the adenovirus contributed to the mortality of common eider males in the Finnish archipelago.

  18. Switching a replication-defective adenoviral vector into a replication-competent, oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The adenovirus immediate early gene E1A initiates the program of viral gene transcription and reprograms multiple aspects of cell function and behavior. For adenoviral (Ad) vector-mediated gene transfer and therapy approaches, where replication-defective (RD) gene transfer is required, E1A has thus been the primary target for deletions. For oncolytic gene therapy for cancer, where replication-competent (RC) Ad viral gene expression is needed, E1A has been either mutated or placed under tumor-specific transcriptional control. A novel Ad vector that initially infected target tumor cells in an RD manner for transgene expression but that could be "switched" into an RC, oncolytic state when needed might represent an advance in vector technology. Here, we report that we designed such an Ad vector (proAdΔ24.GFP), where initial Ad replication is silenced by a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene that blocks cytomegalovirus (CMV)-mediated transcription of E1A. This vector functions as a bona fide E1A-deleted RD vector in infected tumor cells. However, because the silencing GFP transgene is flanked by FLP recombination target (FRT) sites, we show that it can be efficiently excised by Flp recombinase site-specific recombination, either when Flp is expressed constitutively in cells or when it is provided in trans by coinfection with a second RD herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector. This switches the RD Ad, proAdΔ24.GFP, into a fully RC, oncolytic Ad (rAdΔ24) that lyses tumor cells in culture and generates oncolytic progeny virions. In vivo, coinfection of established flank tumors with the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon leads to generation of RC, oncolytic rAdΔ24. In an orthotopic human glioma xenograft tumor model, coinjection of the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon also led to a significant increase in animal survival, compared to controls. Therefore, Flp-FRT site-specific recombination can be applied to switch RD Ad

  19. Switching a replication-defective adenoviral vector into a replication-competent, oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The adenovirus immediate early gene E1A initiates the program of viral gene transcription and reprograms multiple aspects of cell function and behavior. For adenoviral (Ad) vector-mediated gene transfer and therapy approaches, where replication-defective (RD) gene transfer is required, E1A has thus been the primary target for deletions. For oncolytic gene therapy for cancer, where replication-competent (RC) Ad viral gene expression is needed, E1A has been either mutated or placed under tumor-specific transcriptional control. A novel Ad vector that initially infected target tumor cells in an RD manner for transgene expression but that could be "switched" into an RC, oncolytic state when needed might represent an advance in vector technology. Here, we report that we designed such an Ad vector (proAdΔ24.GFP), where initial Ad replication is silenced by a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene that blocks cytomegalovirus (CMV)-mediated transcription of E1A. This vector functions as a bona fide E1A-deleted RD vector in infected tumor cells. However, because the silencing GFP transgene is flanked by FLP recombination target (FRT) sites, we show that it can be efficiently excised by Flp recombinase site-specific recombination, either when Flp is expressed constitutively in cells or when it is provided in trans by coinfection with a second RD herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector. This switches the RD Ad, proAdΔ24.GFP, into a fully RC, oncolytic Ad (rAdΔ24) that lyses tumor cells in culture and generates oncolytic progeny virions. In vivo, coinfection of established flank tumors with the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon leads to generation of RC, oncolytic rAdΔ24. In an orthotopic human glioma xenograft tumor model, coinjection of the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon also led to a significant increase in animal survival, compared to controls. Therefore, Flp-FRT site-specific recombination can be applied to switch RD Ad

  20. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  1. Characteristics of a human cell line transformed by DNA from human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed

    Graham, F L; Smiley, J; Russell, W C; Nairn, R

    1977-07-01

    Human embryonic kidney cells have been transformed by exposing cells to sheared fragments of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The transformed cells (designated 293 cells) exhibited many of the characteristics of transformation including the elaboration of a virus-specific tumour antigen. Analysis of the polypeptides synthesized in the 293 cells by labelling with 35S-methionine and SDS PAGE showed a variable pattern of synthesis, different in a number of respects from that seen in otheruman cells. On labelling the surface of cells by lactoperoxidase catalysed radio-iodination, the absence of a labelled polypeptide analogous to the 250 K (LETS) glycoprotein was noted. Hybridization of labelled cellular RNA with restriction fragments of adenovirus type 5 DNA indicated transcription of a portion of the adenovirus genome at the conventional left hand end. PMID:886304

  2. Attachment and Detachment Behaviour of Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Margaret; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Kirschner, Alexander; Farnleitner, Andreas; Sommer, Regina; Sidhu, Jatinder

    2015-04-01

    Comparison of transport of virus surrogates to the pathogenic virus is necessary to understand the differences between the virus and surrogate. Since experiments using pathogenic viruses cannot be done in the field, laboratory tests using flow through soil columns are used. Adenovirus, nanoparticles, PRD1 and MS2 bacteriophages were tested in fine granular limestone aquifer material taken from a borehole at a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Southern Australia. Results show that PRD1 is the most appropriate surrogate for adenovirus in an aquifer dominated by calcite material, although PRD1 did not mimic the detachment behaviour of adenovirus successfully under high pH conditions. It was also found that the charge of the colloid is not a dominant removal mechanism in this system. Implications from this study could influence how field tests using bacteriophages and nanoparticles are interpreted.

  3. An epizootic of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease in captive black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Boyce, W M; Woods, L W; Keel, M K; MacLachlan, N J; Porter, C O; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-09-01

    Ten fawns and four adult black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in a captive herd died as a result of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease. Acute, systemic infections were characterized by hemorrhagic enteropathy, pulmonary edema, and occasional ulceration of the upper alimentary tract. Localized infections were limited to the upper alimentary tract and included stomatitis, pharyngitis, mandibular osteomyelitis, and rumenitis. In deer with acute, systemic infections, a diagnosis was made by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The serum neutralization test was useful for confirming a diagnosis in animals with prolonged, localized infections. Deer originating from herds with a history of adenovirus infection should not be transferred to other captive herds or released into free-ranging populations because they may serve as carriers of adenovirus.

  4. Analysis of purified Wild type and mutant adenovirus particles by SILAC based quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Ali; Heesom, Kate; Bramson, Jonathan L.; Curiel, David; Ugai, Hideyo

    2014-01-01

    We used SILAC (stable isotope labelling of amino acids in cell culture) and high-throughput quantitative MS mass spectrometry to analyse the protein composition of highly purified WT wild type adenoviruses, mutant adenoviruses lacking an internal protein component (protein V) and recombinant adenoviruses of the type commonly used in gene therapy, including one virus that had been used in a clinical trial. We found that the viral protein abundance and composition were consistent across all types of virus examined except for the virus lacking protein V, which also had reduced amounts of another viral core protein, protein VII. In all the samples analysed we found no evidence of consistent packaging or contamination with cellular proteins. We believe this technique is a powerful method to analyse the protein composition of this important gene therapy vector and genetically engineered or synthetic virus-like particles. The raw data have been deposited at proteomexchange, identifer PXD001120. PMID:25096814

  5. Therapeutic potential of adenovirus-mediated delivery of β-defensin 2 for experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jeong-Im; Kil, Sung-Hee; Brough, Douglas E; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lim, David J; Moon, Sung K

    2015-02-01

    Otitis media (OM), one of the most prevalent diseases in young children, is clinically important owing to its high incidence in children and its potential impact on language development and motor coordination. OM is the most common reason for the prescription of antibiotics (accounting for 25% of prescriptions) due to its extremely high incidence. A recent increase in antibiotic resistance among OM pathogens is emerging as a major public health concern globally, which led us to consider non-antibiotic approaches for the management of OM. In this study, we evaluated gene transfer of an antimicrobial peptide, human β-defensin 2 (DEFB4), using an adenoviral vector (Ad5 with deletions of E1/E3/E4) as a potential therapeutic approach. We demonstrated that the transduction of human β-defensin 2 induces the production of human β-defensin 2 and suppresses non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) adhesion to human middle ear epithelial cells. Moreover, intratympanic inoculation of Ad-DEFB4 was found to attenuate NTHi-induced middle ear effusions without eliciting a significant immune response. Most importantly, intratympanic inoculation of Ad-DEFB4 appeared to significantly augment clearance of NTHi from middle ear cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that intratympanic gene delivery of antimicrobial molecules may serve as an alternative/adjuvant approach for the management of OM.

  6. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections.

  7. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections. PMID:25786873

  8. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  9. Neutrophils Interact with Adenovirus Vectors via Fc Receptors and Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Matthew J.; Zaiss, Anne K.; Muruve, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophils are effectors of the innate immune response to adenovirus vectors. Following the systemic administration of Cy2-labeled AdLuc in mice, flow cytometry and PCR analysis of liver leukocytes revealed that 25% of recruited neutrophils interacted with adenovirus vectors. In vitro, flow cytometry of human neutrophils incubated with Cy2-labeled AdLuc also demonstrated a significant interaction with adenovirus vectors. Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed vector internalization by neutrophils. The AdLuc-neutrophil interaction reduced vector transduction efficiency by more than 50% in coincubation assays in epithelium-derived cells. Adenovirus vector uptake by neutrophils occurred independently of coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor (CAR) and capsid RGD motifs, since neutrophils do not express CAR and uptake of the RGD-deleted vector AdL.PB* was similar to that of AdLuc. Furthermore, both AdLuc and AdL.PB* activated neutrophils and induced similar degrees of L-selectin shedding. Neutrophil uptake of AdLuc was dependent on the presence of complement and antibodies, since the interaction between AdLuc and neutrophils was significantly reduced when they were incubated in immunoglobulin G-depleted or heat-inactivated human serum. Blocking of complement receptor 1 (CD35) but not complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18) significantly reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc. Blocking of FcγRI (CD64), FcγRII (CD32), and FcγRIII (CD16) individually or together also reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc, although less than blocking of CD35 alone. Combined CR1 and Fc receptor blockade synergistically inhibited neutrophil-AdLuc interactions close to baseline. These results demonstrate opsonin-dependent adenovirus vector interactions with neutrophils and their corresponding receptors. PMID:16282462

  10. The Utility of a Tissue Slice Model System to Determine Breast Cancer Infectivity by Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Krista; Chu, Quyen D.; Curiel, David T.; Li, Benjamin D.L.; Mathis, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to advances in viral design, oncolytic adenoviruses have emerged as a promising approach for treatment of breast cancer. Tumor tissue slices offer a stringent model system for preclinical evaluation of adenovirus therapies, since the slices retain a morphology and phenotype that more closely resembles the in vivo setting than cell line cultures, and it has been shown to have utility in the evaluation of viral infectivity and replication. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of viral infection and replication using a tropism-modified oncolytic adenovirus. Methods Breast tumor tissue slices were infected with a tropism-modified oncolytic adenovirus, and a wild-type adenovirus for comparison. Efficiency of infection was evaluated using fluorescent microscopy, as the viruses used have been modified to express red fluorescent protein. Replication of the viruses was evaluated with quantitative real-time PCR to assay viral E4 genome copy number, a surrogate indicator for the number of virions. The breast tumor tissue slices were evaluated for the expression of CD46 expression by immunohistochemistry. Results Infection and replication of our tropism modified oncolytic virus has been observed in breast cancer tissue slice model system and is comparative to wild-type virus. A qualitative increase in the number of cells showing RFP expression was observed correlating with increasing multiplicity of infection. Higher relative infectivity of the virus was observed in tumor tissue compared with normal breast tissue. Replication of the virus was demonstrated through increases in E4 copy number at 48 and 72 hours after infection in human breast tumor slices. Conclusions We have shown that a tropism modified oncolytic oncolytic adenovirus can infect and replicate in breast cancer tissue slices, which may be an important preclinical indicator for its therapeutic utility. PMID:20691986

  11. Safety evaluation of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine live, oral in military recruits.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Azhar; Mathena, Julie; Albano, Jessica D; Yacovone, Margaret; Collins, Limone

    2016-08-31

    Before the widespread adoption of vaccination, adenovirus type 4 and type 7 were long associated with respiratory illnesses among military recruits. When supplies were depleted and vaccination was suspended in 1999 for approximately a decade, respiratory illnesses due to adenovirus infections resurged. In March 2011, a new live, oral adenovirus vaccine was licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration and was first universally administered to military recruits in October 2011, leading to rapid, dramatic elimination of the disease within a few months. As part of licensure, a postmarketing study (Sentinel Surveillance Plan) was performed to detect potential safety signals within 42days after immunization of military recruits. This study retrospectively evaluated possible adverse events related to vaccination using data from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) database. Among 100,000 recruits who received the adenovirus vaccine, no statistically significant greater risk of prespecified medical events was observed within 42days after vaccination when compared with a historical cohort of 100,000 unvaccinated recruits. In an initial statistical analysis of International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, a statistically significant higher risk for 19 other (not prespecified) medical events occurring in 5 or more recruits was observed among vaccinated compared with unvaccinated groups. After case record data abstraction for attribution and validation, two events (psoriasis [21 vs 7 cases] and serum reactions [12 vs 4 cases]) occurred more frequently in the vaccinated cohort. A causal relation of these rare events with adenovirus vaccination could not be established given confounding factors in the DMSS, such as coadministration of other vaccines and incomplete or inaccurate medical information, for some recruits. Prospective surveillance assessing these uncommon, but potentially

  12. Intraductal Delivery of Adenoviruses Targets Pancreatic Tumors in Transgenic Ela-myc Mice and Orthotopic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Camacho-Sánchez, Juan Miguel; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p<0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors. PMID:23328228

  13. CCL21/IL21-armed oncolytic adenovirus enhances antitumor activity against TERT-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Yi-Fei; Si, Chong-Zhan; Zhu, Yu-Hui; Jin, Yan; Zhu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2016-07-15

    Multigene-armed oncolytic adenoviruses are capable of efficiently generating a productive antitumor immune response. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21) binds to CCR7 on naïve T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to promote their chemoattraction to the tumor and resultant antitumor activity. Interleukin 21 (IL21) promotes survival of naïve T cells while maintaining their CCR7 surface expression, which increases their capacity to transmigrate in response to CCL21 chemoattraction. IL21 is also involved in NK cell differentiation and B cell activation and proliferation. The generation of effective antitumor immune responses is a complex process dependent upon coordinated interactions of various subsets of effector cells. Using the AdEasy system, we aimed to construct an oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing CCL21 and IL21 that could selectively replicate in TERTp-positive tumor cells (Ad-CCL21-IL21 virus). The E1A promoter of these oncolytic adenoviruses was replaced by telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp). Ad-CCL21-IL21 was constructed from three plasmids, pGTE-IL21, pShuttle-CMV-CCL21 and AdEasy-1 and was homologously recombined and propagated in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183 and the packaging cell line HEK-293, respectively. Our results showed that our targeted and armed oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-CCL21-IL21 can induce apoptosis in TERTp-positive tumor cells to give rise to viral propagation, in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, we confirm that these modified oncolytic adenoviruses do not replicate efficiently in normal cells even under high viral loads. Additionally, we investigate the role of Ad-CCL21-IL21 in inducing antitumor activity and tumor specific cytotoxicity of CTLs in vitro. This study suggests that Ad-CCL21-IL21 is a promising targeted tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:27157859

  14. Human adenovirus-host cell interactions: comparative study with members of subgroups B and C.

    PubMed Central

    Defer, C; Belin, M T; Caillet-Boudin, M L; Boulanger, P

    1990-01-01

    Host cell interactions of human adenovirus serotypes belonging to subgroups B (adenovirus type 3 [Ad3] and Ad7) and C (Ad2 and Ad5) were comparatively analyzed at three levels: (i) binding of virus particles with host cell receptors; (ii) cointernalization of macromolecules with adenovirions; and (iii) adenovirus-induced cytoskeletal alterations. The association constants with human cell receptors were found to be similar for Ad2 and Ad3 (8 x 10(9) to 9 x 10(9) M-1), and the number of receptor sites per cell ranged from 5,000 (Ad2) to 7,000 (Ad3). Affinity blottings, competition experiments, and immunofluorescence stainings suggested that the receptor sites for adenovirus were distinct for members of subgroups B and C. Adenovirions increased the permeability of cells to macromolecules. We showed that this global effect could be divided into two distinct events: (i) cointernalization of macromolecules and virions into endocytotic vesicles, a phenomenon that occurred in a serotype-independent way, and (ii) release of macromolecules into the cytoplasm upon adenovirus-induced lysis of endosomal membranes. The latter process was found to be type specific and to require unaltered and infectious virus particles of serotype 2 or 5. Perinuclear condensation of the vimentin filament network was observed at early stages of infection with Ad2 or Ad5 but not with Ad3, Ad7, and noninfectious particles of Ad2 or Ad5, obtained by heat inactivation of wild-type virions or with the H2 ts1 mutant. This phenomenon appeared to be a cytological marker for cytoplasmic transit of infectious virions within adenovirus-infected cells. It could be experimentally dissociated from vimentin proteolysis, which was found to be serotype dependent, occurring only with members of subgroup C, regardless of the infectivity of the input virus. Images PMID:2196380

  15. Detection and Analysis of Six Lizard Adenoviruses by Consensus Primer PCR Provides Further Evidence of a Reptilian Origin for the Atadenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wellehan, James F. X.; Johnson, April J.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Garner, Michael M.; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2004-01-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses. PMID:15542689

  16. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses.

  17. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Adenovirus Respiratory Infections in Taiwanese Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Shen, Fan-Ching; Wang, Shan-Li; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Tsai, Huey-Pin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chi, Chia-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are important causes of respiratory infections in children. They usually cause mild upper respiratory symptoms, but they can also produce severe pneumonia and other complications. The aims of this retrospective study were to better define the molecular epidemiology of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in Taiwanese children during 2002 and 2013, detect reinfections and co-infections, and characterize the clinical features and laboratory findings according to the causative genotypes. We collected a representative sample of 182 isolates of adenoviruses from 175 children during the 12-year study period. The most prevalent species was HAdV-B genotype 3 (HAdV-3) (92/182, 50.5%) followed by HAdV-C (HAdV-2) (38/182, 20.9%). A single outbreak of HAdV-E (6/182, 3.3%) was noted in 2007. The mean age of children with adenovirus infections was 3.7 ± 2.0 years, with a slight predominance of males (53.1%). Children with HAdV-B tended to be older, had more lower respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal symptoms, and a higher rate of hospitalization than those with HAdV-C (P < 0.05). Adenovirus co-infections were noted in 25/175 (14.3%) of the children. The most frequent co-infections were with species B (HAdV-3) and C (HAdV-2) (14/25, 56.0%). Additional infections were noted in 23/175 (13.1%) of the children. Of these repeated infections, the initial isolates were always genotypes of HAdV-C. The second isolates were genotypes of HAdV-B or HAdV-E. The clinical features of the first HAdV-B infection and the reinfection of HAdV-B followed the HAdV-C were similar. In conclusion, HAdV-B, C, and E were the only adenovirus species that were isolated from children who were sufficiently ill with respiratory infections to require a visit to the hospital. Human adenovirus B (HAdV-3) accounted for half of these species. HAdV-B was more likely than other species to produce severe disease. The high incidence of adenovirus co-infection and

  18. Muscle-specific overexpression of the adenovirus primary receptor CAR overcomes low efficiency of gene transfer to mature skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, J; Larochelle, N; Wolf, E; Karpati, G; Lochmuller, H; Holland, P C

    2001-05-01

    Significant levels of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer occur only in immature muscle or in regenerating muscle, indicating that a developmentally regulated event plays a major role in limiting transgene expression in mature skeletal muscle. We have previously shown that in developing mouse muscle, expression of the primary Ad receptor CAR is severely downregulated during muscle maturation. To evaluate how global expression of CAR throughout muscle affects Ad vector (AdV)-mediated gene transfer into mature skeletal muscle, we produced transgenic mice that express the CAR cDNA under the control of the muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter. Five-month-old transgenic mice were compared to their nontransgenic littermates for their susceptibility to AdV transduction. In CAR transgenics that had been injected in the tibialis anterior muscle with AdVCMVlacZ, increased gene transfer was demonstrated by the increase in the number of transduced muscle fibers (433 +/- 121 in transgenic mice versus 8 +/- 4 in nontransgenic littermates) as well as the 25-fold increase in overall beta-galactosidase activity. Even when the reporter gene was driven by a more efficient promoter (the cytomegalovirus enhancer-chicken beta-actin gene promoter), differential transducibility was still evident (893 +/- 149 versus 153 +/- 30 fibers; P < 0.001). Furthermore, a fivefold decrease in the titer of injected AdV still resulted in significant transduction of muscle (253 +/- 130 versus 14 +/- 4 fibers). The dramatic enhancement in AdV-mediated gene transfer to mature skeletal muscle that is observed in the CAR transgenics indicates that prior modulation of the level of CAR expression can overcome the poor AdV transducibility of mature skeletal muscle and significant transduction can be obtained at low titers of AdV.

  19. Biosynthesis of adenovirus type 2 i-leader protein.

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J S; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The i-leader is a 440-base-pair sequence located between 21.8 and 23.0 map units on the adenovirus type 2 genome and is spliced between the second and third segments of the major tripartite leader in certain viral mRNA molecules. The i-leader contains an open translational reading frame for a hypothetical protein of Mr about 16,600, and a 16,000-Mr polypeptide (16K protein) has been translated in vitro on mRNA selected with DNA containing the i-leader (A. Virtanen, P. Aleström, H. Persson, M. G. Katze, and U. Pettersson, Nucleic Acids Res. 10:2539-2548, 1982). To determine whether the i-leader protein is synthesized during productive infection and to provide an immunological reagent to study the properties and functions of the i-leader protein, we prepared antipeptide antibodies directed to a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide which is encoded near the N terminus of the hypothetical i-leader protein and contains a high acidic amino acid and proline content. Antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated from extracts of adenovirus type 2-infected cells a major 16K protein that comigrated with a 16K protein translated in vitro. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by Edman degradation of radiolabeled 16K antigen showed that methionine is present at residue 1 and leucine is present at residues 8 and 10, as predicted from the DNA sequence, establishing that the 16K protein precipitated by this antibody is indeed the i-leader protein. Thus, the i-leader protein is a prominent species that is synthesized during productive infection. The i-leader protein is often seen as a doublet on polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that either two related forms of i-leader protein are synthesized in infected cells or that a posttranslational modification occurs. Time course studies using immunoprecipitation analysis with antipeptide antibodies revealed that the E1A 289R T antigen and the E1B-19K (175R) T antigen are synthesized beginning at 2 to 3 and 4 to 5 h postinfection

  20. Investigation of Adenovirus Occurrence in Pediatric Tumor Entities▿

    PubMed Central

    Kosulin, Karin; Haberler, Christine; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Amann, Gabriele; Lang, Susanna; Lion, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) contain genes coding for proteins with transforming potential, and certain AdV serotypes have been shown to induce tumors in rodents. However, data on the possible oncogenicity of AdVs in humans are scarce. We have therefore employed a real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) assay permitting highly sensitive detection of all 51 currently known human AdV serotypes to screen more than 500 tumor specimens derived from 17 different childhood cancer entities including leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. Most tumor entities analyzed showed no evidence for the presence of AdV sequences, but AdV DNA was detected by RQ-PCR in different brain tumors including 25/30 glioblastomas, 22/30 oligodendrogliomas, and 20/30 ependymomas. Nonmalignant counterparts of AdV-positive brain tumors, including specimens of ependymal cells, plexus choroideus, and periventricular white matter, were screened for control purposes and revealed the presence of AdV DNA in most specimens tested. Identification of the AdV types present in positive malignant and nonmalignant brain tissue specimens revealed predominantly representatives of species B and D and, less commonly, C. To exclude contamination as a possible cause of false-positive results, specimens with AdV sequences detectable by PCR were subsequently analyzed by in situ hybridization, which confirmed the PCR findings in all instances. The central nervous system appears to represent a common site of AdV infection with virus persistence, thus providing the first evidence for the possible contribution of AdVs to the multistep process of tumor pathogenesis in brain tissue. PMID:17494079

  1. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extractio