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Sample records for helper-dependent adenoviruses mediate

  1. Efficacy of helper-dependent adenovirus vector-mediated gene therapy in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Sun, B; Bird, A; Chen, Y T; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2007-07-01

    Genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, also known as von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation. We tested whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated hepatic delivery of G6Pase would lead to prolonged survival and sustained correction of the metabolic abnormalities in G6Pase knockout (KO) mice, a model for a severe form of GSD-Ia. An HDAd vector encoding G6Pase was administered intravenously (2 or 5 x 10(12)vector particles/kg) to 2-week-old (w.o.) G6Pase-KO mice. Following HDAd vector administration survival was prolonged to a median of 7 months, in contrast to untreated affected mice that did not survive past 3 weeks of age. G6Pase levels increased more than tenfold between 3 days and 28 weeks after HDAd injection (P < 0.03). The weights of untreated 2 w.o. G6Pase-KO mice were approximately half those of their unaffected littermates, and treatment stimulated their growth to the size of wild-type mice. Severe hypoglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, which are hallmarks of GSD-Ia both in humans and in mice, were also restored to normalcy by the treatment. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was markedly reduced. The efficacy of HDAd-G6Pase treatment in reversing the physiological and biochemical abnormalities associated with GSD-Ia in affected G6Pase-KO mice justifies further preclinical evaluation in murine and canine models of GSD-Ia.

  2. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy. PMID:27119096

  3. Innate Functions of Immunoglobulin M Lessen Liver Gene Transfer with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Unzu, Carmen; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors. PMID:24465560

  4. Innate functions of immunoglobulin M lessen liver gene transfer with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Unzu, Carmen; Melero, Ignacio; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors.

  5. Evaluation of helper-dependent canine adenovirus vectors in a 3D human CNS model

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Fernandes, Paulo; Peddie, Christopher J.; Piersanti, Stefania; Collinson, Lucy M.; Salinas, Sara; Saggio, Isabella; Schiavo, Giampietro; Kremer, Eric J.; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach with enormous potential for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Viral vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) present attractive features for gene delivery strategies in the human brain, by preferentially transducing neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent brain structures, have a 30-kb cloning capacity and have low innate and induced immunogenicity in pre-clinical tests. For clinical translation, in-depth pre-clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety in a human setting is primordial. Stem cell-derived human neural cells have a great potential as complementary tools by bridging the gap between animal models, which often diverge considerably from human phenotype, and clinical trials. Herein, we explore helper-dependent CAV-2 (hd-CAV-2) efficacy and safety for gene delivery in a human stem cell-derived 3D neural in vitro model. Assessment of hd-CAV-2 vector efficacy was performed at different multiplicities of infection, by evaluating transgene expression and impact on cell viability, ultrastructural cellular organization and neuronal gene expression. Under optimized conditions, hd-CAV-2 transduction led to stable long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity. hd-CAV-2 preferentially transduced neurons, while human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) showed increased tropism towards glial cells. This work demonstrates, in a physiologically relevant 3D model, that hd-CAV-2 vectors are efficient tools for gene delivery to human neurons, with stable long-term transgene expression and minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:26181626

  6. Toxicity associated with repeated administration of first-generation adenovirus vectors does not occur with a helper-dependent vector.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neal, W. K.; Zhou, H.; Morral, N.; Langston, C.; Parks, R. J.; Graham, F. L.; Kochanek, S.; Beaudet, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Certain gene therapy protocols may require multiple administrations of vectors to achieve therapeutic benefit to the patient. This may be especially relevant for vectors such as adenoviral vectors that do not integrate into the host chromosome. Because immunocompetent animal models used for gene transfer studies develop neutralizing antibodies to adenoviral vectors after a single administration, little is known about how repeat administrations of vectors might affect transgene expression and vector toxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used mice deficient in the membrane spanning region of immunoglobulin (IgM), which do not develop antibodies, to evaluate the effect of repeated intravenous administration of first-generation and helper-dependent adenoviral vectors expressing human alpha 1-antitrypsin (hAAT). The duration and levels of transgene expression were evaluated after repeated administration of vectors. Toxicity was assessed by measuring the level of liver enzymes in the serum and the degrees of hepatocyte hypertrophy and proliferation. RESULTS: We found that previous administration of first-generation adenoviral vectors can alter the response to subsequent doses. These alterations included an increase in transgene expression early (within 1 and 3 days), followed by a rapid drop in expression by day 7. In addition, previous administrations of first-generation vectors led to an increase in toxicity of subsequent doses, as indicated by a rise in liver enzymes and an increase in hepatocyte proliferation. In contrast to first-generation vectors, use of the helper-dependent adenovirus vector, Ad-STK109, which contained no viral coding regions, did not lead to increased toxicity after multiple administrations. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the response of the host to adenoviral vectors can be altered after repeated administration, compared with the response after the initial vector dose. In addition, these experiments provide further evidence for the

  7. Corrective GUSB transfer to the canine mucopolysaccharidosis VII cornea using a helper-dependent canine adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Serratrice, Nicolas; Cubizolle, Aurelie; Ibanes, Sandy; Mestre-Francés, Nadine; Bayo-Puxan, Neus; Creyssels, Sophie; Gennetier, Aurelie; Bernex, Florence; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Haskins, Mark E; Couderc, Guilhem; Malecaze, Francois; Kalatzis, Vasiliki; Kremer, Eric J

    2014-05-10

    Corneal transparency is maintained, in part, by specialized fibroblasts called keratocytes, which reside in the fibrous lamellae of the stroma. Corneal clouding, a condition that impairs visual acuity, is associated with numerous diseases, including mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII. MPS VII is due to deficiency in β-glucuronidase (β-glu) enzymatic activity, which leads to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and secondary accumulation of gangliosides. Here, we tested the efficacy of canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) vectors to transduce keratocyte in vivo in mice and nonhuman primates, and ex vivo in dog and human corneal explants. Following efficacy studies, we asked if we could treat corneal clouding by the injection a helper-dependent (HD) CAV-2 vector (HD-RIGIE) harboring the human cDNA coding for β-glu (GUSB) in the canine MPS VII cornea. β-Glu activity, GAG content, and lysosome morphology and physiopathology were analyzed. We found that HD-RIGIE injections efficiently transduced coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor-expressing keratocytes in the four species and, compared to mock-injected controls, improved the pathology in the canine MPS VII cornea. The key criterion to corrective therapy was the steady controlled release of β-glu and its diffusion throughout the collagen-dense stroma. These data support the continued evaluation of HD CAV-2 vectors to treat diseases affecting corneal keratocytes.

  8. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells.

  9. Central nervous system delivery of helper-dependent canine adenovirus corrects neuropathology and behavior in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Lorena; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Pagès, Gemma; García-Lareu, Belén; Serratrice, Nicolas; Cots, Dan; Thwaite, Rosemary; Chillón, Miguel; Kremer, Eric J; Bosch, Assumpció

    2014-03-01

    Canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2) are promising tools to treat global central nervous system (CNS) disorders because of their preferential transduction of neurons and efficient retrograde axonal transport. Here we tested the potential of a helper-dependent CAV-2 vector expressing β-glucuronidase (HD-RIGIE) in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency in β-glucuronidase activity. MPS VII leads to glycosaminoglycan accumulation into enlarged vesicles in peripheral tissues and the CNS, resulting in peripheral and neuronal dysfunction. After intracranial administration of HD-RIGIE, we show long-term expression of β-glucuronidase that led to correction of neuropathology around the injection site and in distal areas. This phenotypic correction correlated with a decrease in secondary-elevated lysosomal enzyme activity and glycosaminoglycan levels, consistent with global biochemical correction. Moreover, HD-RIGIE-treated mice show significant cognitive improvement. Thus, injections of HD-CAV-2 vectors in the brain allow a global and sustained expression and may have implications for brain therapy in patients with lysosomal storage disease.

  10. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  11. Overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in arteries infused with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Zhang, Jingwan; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David

    2012-11-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ad) are useful tools for in vivo gene transfer into endothelial cells. However, endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired after Ad infusion, and this impairment is not prevented by use of advanced-generation "helper-dependent" (HD) Ad that lack all viral genes. We hypothesized that endothelium-dependent vasodilation could be improved in Ad-infused arteries by overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We tested this hypothesis in hyperlipidemic, atherosclerosis-prone rabbits because HDAd will likely be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. Moreover, the consequences of eNOS overexpression might differ in normal and atherosclerosis-prone arteries and could include atherogenic effects, as reported in transgenic mice. We cloned rabbit eNOS and constructed an HDAd that expresses it. HDAdeNOS increased NO production by cultured endothelial cells and increased arterial eNOS mRNA in vivo by ∼10-fold. Compared to arteries infused with a control HDAd, HDAdeNOS-infused arteries of hyperlipidemic rabbits had significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and similar responses to phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Moreover, infusion of HDAdeNOS had local atheroprotective effects including large, significant decreases in intimal lipid accumulation and arterial tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression (p≤0.04 for both). HDAdeNOS infusion yields a durable (≥2 weeks) increase in arterial eNOS expression, improves vasomotor function, and reduces artery wall inflammation and lipid accumulation. Addition of an eNOS expression cassette improves the performance of HDAd, has no harmful effects, and may reduce atherosclerotic lesion growth.

  12. Rescue administration of a helper-dependent adenovirus vector with long-term efficacy in dogs with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Crane, B; Luo, X; Demaster, A; Williams, K D; Kozink, D M; Zhang, P; Brown, T T; Pinto, C R; Oka, K; Sun, F; Jackson, M W; Chan, L; Koeberl, D D

    2012-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) stems from glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency and causes hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hypercholesterolemia and lactic acidemia. Three dogs with GSD-Ia were initially treated with a helper-dependent adenovirus encoding a human G6Pase transgene (HDAd-cG6Pase serotype 5) on postnatal day 3. Unlike untreated dogs with GSD-Ia, all three dogs initially maintained normal blood glucose levels. After 6-22 months, vector-treated dogs developed hypoglycemia, anorexia and lethargy, suggesting that the HDAd-cG6Pase serotype 5 vector had lost efficacy. Liver biopsies collected at this time revealed significantly elevated hepatic G6Pase activity and reduced glycogen content, when compared with affected dogs treated only by frequent feeding. Subsequently, the HDAd-cG6Pase serotype 2 vector was administered to two dogs, and hypoglycemia was reversed; however, renal dysfunction and recurrent hypoglycemia complicated their management. Administration of a serotype 2 HDAd vector prolonged survival in one GSD-Ia dog to 12 months of age and 36 months of age in the other, but the persistence of long-term complications limited HDAd vectors in the canine model for GSD-Ia.

  13. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  14. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are superior in vitro to first-generation vectors for endothelial cell-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rowan; Buckler, Joshua M; Tang, Chongren; Kim, Francis; Dichek, David A

    2010-12-01

    Arterial endothelial cells (EC) are attractive targets for gene therapy of atherosclerosis because they are accessible to hematogenous and catheter-based vector delivery and overlie atherosclerotic plaques. Vector-mediated expression-in EC-of proteins that mediate cholesterol transfer out of the artery wall and decrease inflammation could prevent and reverse atherosclerosis. However, clinical application of this strategy is limited by lack of a suitable gene-transfer vector. First-generation adenovirus (FGAd) is useful for EC gene transfer in proof-of-concept studies, but is unsuitable for atheroprotective human gene therapy because of limited duration of expression and proinflammatory effects. Moreover, others have reported detrimental effects of FGAd on critical aspects of EC physiology including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) either alone or expressing an atheroprotective gene [apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)] could circumvent these limitations. In contrast to control FGAd, HDAd did not alter any of several critical EC physiologic functions (including proliferation, migration, apoptosis, metabolic activity, and nitric oxide (NO) production) and did not stimulate proinflammatory pathways [including expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6)]. Expression of apoA-I by HDAd reduced EC VCAM-1 expression. HDAd is a promising vector and apoA-I is a promising gene for atheroprotective human gene therapy delivered via EC.

  15. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2008-04-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  17. Highly efficient retinal gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Simon; Cao, Huibi; Wu, Jing; Duan, Rongqi; Hu, Jim

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant advancements in the field of retinal gene therapy in the past several years. In particular, therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in three separate human clinical trials conducted to assess the ability of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) to treat of a type of Leber’s congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. However, despite the success of retinal gene therapy with AAV, challenges remain for delivering large therapeutic genes or genes requiring long DNA regulatory elements for controlling their expression. For example, Stargardt’s disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration, is caused by defects in ABCA4, a gene that is too large to be packaged in AAV. Therefore, we investigated the ability of helper dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad) to deliver genes to the retina as it has a much larger transgene capacity. Using an EGFP reporter, our results showed that HD-Ad can transduce the entire retinal epithelium of a mouse using a dose of only 1 × 105 infectious units and maintain transgene expression for at least 4 months. The results demonstrate that HD-Ad has the potential to be an effective vector for the gene therapy of the retina. PMID:26161435

  18. An efficient and scalable process for helper-dependent adenoviral vector production using polyethylenimine-adenofection.

    PubMed

    Dormond, E; Meneses-Acosta, A; Jacob, D; Durocher, Y; Gilbert, R; Perrier, M; Kamen, A

    2009-02-15

    Safety requirements for adenoviral gene therapy protocols have led to the development of the third generation of vectors commonly called helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). HDVs have demonstrated a high therapeutic potential; however, the poor efficiency and reliability of the actual production process hampers further large-scale clinical evaluation of this new vector. The current HDV production methods involve a preliminary rescue step through transfection of adherent cell cultures by an HDV plasmid followed by a helper adenovirus (HV) infection. Amplification by serial co-infection of complementary cells allows an increase in the HDV titer. Using a HEK293 FLP/frt cell system in suspension culture, an alternative protocol to the current transfection/infection procedure was evaluated. In this work, the adenofection uses the HDV plasmid linked to the HV with the help of polyethylenimine (PEI) and has shown to outperform standard protocols by producing higher HDV yield. The influence of complex composition on the HDV production was examined by a statistical design. The optimized adenofection and amplification conditions were successively performed to generate HDV at the 3 L bioreactor scale. Following only two serial co-infection passages, up to 1.44 x 10(8) HDV infectious units/mL of culture were generated, which corresponded to 26% of the total particles produced. This production strategy, realized in cell suspension culture, reduced process duration and therefore the probability of vector recombination by introducing a cost-effective transfection protocol, ensuring production of high-quality vector stock.

  19. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  20. Adenovirus-mediated efficient gene transfer into cultured three-dimensional organoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell-based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured "mini-gut" organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D "mini-gut" organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids.

  1. Pancreatic Transduction by Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors via Intraductal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morró, Meritxell; Teichenne, Joan; Jimenez, Veronica; Kratzer, Ramona; Marletta, Serena; Maggioni, Luca; Mallol, Cristina; Ruberte, Jesus; Kochanek, Stefan; Bosch, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic gene transfer could be useful to treat several diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic cancer. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are promising tools for gene therapy because of their large cloning capacity, high levels of transgene expression, and long-term persistence in immunocompetent animals. Nevertheless, the ability of HDAds to transduce the pancreas in vivo has not been investigated yet. Here, we have generated HDAds carrying pancreas-specific expression cassettes, that is, driven either by the elastase or insulin promoter, using a novel and convenient plasmid family and homologous recombination in bacteria. These HDAds were delivered to the pancreas of immunocompetent mice via intrapancreatic duct injection. HDAds, encoding a CMV-GFP reporter cassette, were able to transduce acinar and islet cells, but transgene expression was lost 15 days postinjection in correlation with severe lymphocytic infiltration. When HDAds encoding GFP under the control of the specific elastase promoter were used, expression was detected in acinar cells, but similarly, the expression almost disappeared 30 days postinjection and lymphocytic infiltration was also observed. In contrast, long-term transgene expression (>8 months) was achieved with HDAds carrying the insulin promoter and the secretable alkaline phosphatase as the reporter gene. Notably, transduction of the liver, the preferred target for adenovirus, was minimal by this route of delivery. These data indicate that HDAds could be used for pancreatic gene therapy but that selection of the expression cassette is of critical importance to achieve long-term expression of the transgene in this tissue. PMID:25046147

  2. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  3. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin (IL)-24 immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Rajagopal; Ioannides, Constantine G; Roth, Jack A; Chada, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family. IL-24, also known as melanoma differentiation associated gene 7 (mda-7), is a unique cytokine in that it has cytokine properties and functions as a novel tumor suppressor gene. Studies by us and other investigators using viral and non-viral vectors have demonstrated IL-24 overexpression in human cancer cells inhibited tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. A majority of these studies using immunodeficient animal models have focused on demonstrating the direct anticancer properties of IL-24. Very few studies have focused on studying the immunotherapeutic properties of IL-24 despite it being reported to function as a Th1 cytokine. A phase I clinical trial using an adenovirus vector expressing IL-24 (Ad-IL24/INGN241) reported Ad-IL24 treatment of cancer patients resulted in changes in cytokines and T cells. However, well-designed and detailed preclinical studies to support the clinical findings are warranted. Demonstrating immune modulation by IL-24 will provide a rationale for developing IL-24-based immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer treatment.In the present chapter, we provide experimental details for conducting IL-24-based immunotherapy studies. As it is not possible for the authors to cover all of the information the authors recommend reading other immunology-based literature and procedures for a better understanding of conducting preclinical studies.

  4. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation. PMID:27727248

  5. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-10-11

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  6. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 promotes the extracellular matrix expression in degenerative nucleus pulposus cells*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu-wei; Liu, Kang; Chen, Zhu; Zhao, Ming; Han, Xiao-wei; Bai, Yi-guang; Feng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector-carrying human growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) gene, investigate the biological effects of adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 (Ad-GDF-5) on extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in human degenerative disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and explore a candidate gene therapy method for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Methods: Human NP cells of a degenerative disc were isolated, cultured, and infected with Ad-GDF-5 using the AdEasy-1 adenovirus vector system. On Days 3, 7, 14, and 21, the contents of the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and hydroxyproline (Hyp), synthesis of proteoglycan and collagen II, gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan, and NP cell proliferation were assessed. Results: The adenovirus was an effective vehicle for gene delivery with prolonged expression of GDF-5. Biochemical analysis revealed increased sGAG and Hyp contents in human NP cells infected by Ad-GDF-5 whereas there was no conspicuous change in basal medium (BM) or Ad-green fluorescent protein (GFP) groups. Only cells in the Ad-GDF-5 group promoted the production of ECM, as demonstrated by the secretion of proteoglycan and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at both protein and mRNA levels. The NP cell proliferation was significantly promoted. Conclusions: The data suggest that Ad-GDF-5 gene therapy is a potential treatment for IDD, which restores the functions of degenerative intervertebral disc through enhancing the ECM production of human NP cells. PMID:26739524

  8. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a recombinant human alpha 1-antitrypsin cDNA to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lemarchand, P; Jaffe, H A; Danel, C; Cid, M C; Kleinman, H K; Stratford-Perricaudet, L D; Perricaudet, M; Pavirani, A; Lecocq, J P; Crystal, R G

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using a replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus to transfer human genes to the human endothelium, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were infected in vitro with adenovirus vectors containing the lacZ gene or a human alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) cDNA. After in vitro infection with the lacZ adenovirus vector, cultured endothelial cells expressed beta-galactosidase. In parallel studies with the alpha 1AT adenovirus vector, infected cells expressed human alpha 1AT transcripts, as evidenced by in situ hybridization and Northern analysis, and de novo synthesized and secreted glycosylated, functional alpha 1AT within 6 hr of infection, as shown by [35S]methionine labeling and immunoprecipitation. Quantification of the culture supernatants demonstrated 0.3-0.6 micrograms of human alpha 1AT secreted per 10(6) cells in 24 hr, for at least 14 days after adenovirus vector infection. To demonstrate the feasibility of direct transfer of genes into endothelial cells in human blood vessels, lacZ or alpha 1AT adenovirus vectors were placed in the lumen of intact human umbilical veins ex vivo. Histologic evaluation of the veins after 24 hr demonstrated transfer and expression of the lacZ gene specifically to the endothelium. alpha 1AT adenovirus infection resulted both in expression of alpha 1AT transcripts in the endothelium and in de novo synthesis and secretion of alpha 1AT. Quantification of alpha 1AT in the vein perfusates showed average levels of 13 micrograms/ml after 24 hr. These observations strongly support the feasibility of in vivo human gene transfer to the endothelium mediated by replication-deficient adenovirus vectors. Images PMID:1631146

  9. Adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene selectively kills gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian-Run; Li, Jian-Sheng; Niu, Ying; Miao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene (CD/TK) for selective killing of gastric cancer cells. Gastric cancer cells SCG7901 and normal gastric epithelial cell lines were infected by adenoviruses Ad-survivin/GFP and Ad-survivin/CD/TK. GFP expression and CD-TK were detected by fluorescence microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. After treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs ganciclovir (GCV) and/or 5-FC, the cell growth status was evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell cycle changes were detected using flow cytometry. In nude mice bearing human gastric cancer, the recombinant adenovirus vector was injected directly into the tumor followed by an intraperitoneal injection of GCV and/or 5-FC. The subsequent tumor growth was then observed. The GFP gene driven by survivin could be expressed within the gastric cancer line SCG7901, but not in normal gastric epithelial cells. RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of the CD/TK gene product in the infected SCG7901 cells, but not in the infected normal gastric epithelial cells. The infected gastric cancer SCG7901, but not the gastric cells, was highly sensitive to the pro-drugs. The CD/TK fusion gene system showed significantly greater efficiency than either of the single suicide genes in killing the target cells (P<0.01). Treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs resulted in increased cell percentage in G0-Gl phase and decreased percentage in S phase. In nude mice bearing SCG7901 cells, treatment with the double suicide gene system significantly inhibited tumor growth, showing much stronger effects than either of the single suicide genes (P<0.01). The adenovirus-mediated CD/TK double suicide gene driven by survivin promoter combined with GCV an 5-FC treatment could be an effective therapy against experimental gastric cancer with much greater efficacy than the single suicide gene CD/TK combined

  10. Insights into Adenovirus Uncoating from Interactions with Integrins and Mediators of Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are large (150 MDa) nonenveloped double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses that cause acute respiratory, gastrointestinal and ocular infections. Despite these disease associations, adenovirus has aided basic and clinical research efforts through studies of its association with cells and as a target of host antiviral responses. This review highlights the knowledge of adenovirus disassembly and nuclear transport gleaned from structural, biophysical and functional analyses of adenovirus interactions with soluble and membrane-associated host molecules. PMID:28009821

  11. [Adenovirus vectors and their clinical application in gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Adám, E; Nász, I

    2001-09-23

    The potential therapeutic application of the gene transfer technology with adenovirus vectors seems to be enormous. Adenovirus vectors offer several advantages over other vectors, but several important limitations of adenovirus mediated gene transfer are also known. Great number of studies in inherited diseases and in different cancer therapy clinical trials have provided information of critical importance for design of efficient clinical protocols. Clinical trials have been extended to the treatment of many other diseases, too. There are about thirty currently active gene therapy protocols for the treatment only of HIV-1 infection in the USA. These programs aim to confer protective immunity against HIV-1 transmission to individuals who are in risk of infection, to develop preventive or therapeutic vaccines for patients with AIDS and other infectious diseases. Gene therapy represents one of the most important developments in oncology, however, before this can be realised as standard treatment the technical problems of gene delivery and higher safety must be overcome. The early--first and second generation--adenovirus vectors are now likely to be phased out for most diseases, and further experiments seem to be necessary. It might be change to the third generation or other, more modern vector application in clinical trials, as the helper dependent vectors. Almost all transcriptional unit is removed from the DNA of these vectors ("gutless vectors"), therefore they cannot reproduce, give higher gene expression and far less inflammatory. Despite the latest achievement reported in vector design it is not possible to predict yet to what extent and when gene therapy will be effective.

  12. Adenovirus dodecahedron cell attachment and entry are mediated by heparan sulfate and integrins and vary along the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Fender, Pascal; Schoehn, Guy; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Tucker, Gordon C; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2008-02-05

    The adenovirus penton base is a strategic protein involved in the virus internalisation pathway through interaction between its RGD sequences and integrin. In some human adenovirus serotypes, this pentameric protein features the ability of interacting together by twelve, leading to the formation of a symmetric nanoparticle called dodecahedron (Dd). This non-infectious adenovirus-like particle exhibiting sixty RGD sequences interacts with integrin but also with heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) expressed at the cell surface. In this study, we discriminate the respective importance of HSPGs and integrin on human adenovirus serotype 3 dodecahedron attachment and entry. Using different cell lines and a specific integrin inhibitor, we have determined that HSPGs are mainly responsible for particle attachment to the cell surface, favouring a strictly required interaction with integrin that triggers internalisation. No other receptors are involved in Dd entry and integrins on their own can mediate the particle entry in HSPGs-deficient cells. Moreover, integrin recognition by Dd is highly susceptible to cations and particularly to manganese that enhances particle binding by 4- to 7-fold compared to calcium. Interestingly, investigations on Dd receptors along the cell cycle revealed an enhanced particle targeting to mitotic cells and a loss of internalisation at this stage. This phenomenon observed with both HeLa- and HSPGs-deficient cells, depends on integrin remodelling during mitosis. This provides new clues for the use of this adenovirus nanoparticle as a delivery vector and sheds light on the integrin and HSPGs relationship in both resting and dividing cells.

  13. Correction of chromosomal mutation and random integration in embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Fumi; Balamotis, Michael A; Kishimoto, Atsuhiro; Aizawa, Emi; Diaz, Arturo; Hasty, Paul; Graham, Frank L; Caskey, C Thomas; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2005-09-20

    For gene therapy of inherited diseases, targeted integration/gene repair through homologous recombination (HR) between exogenous and chromosomal DNA would be an ideal strategy to avoid potentially serious problems of random integration such as cellular transformation and gene silencing. Efficient sequence-specific modification of chromosomes by HR would also advance both biological studies and therapeutic applications of a variety of stem cells. Toward these goals, we developed an improved strategy of adenoviral vector (AdV)-mediated HR and examined its ability to correct an insertional mutation in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) locus in male mouse ES cells. The efficiency of HR was compared between four types of AdVs that contained various lengths of homologies at the Hprt locus and with various multiplicities of infections. The frequency of HR with helper-dependent AdVs (HD AdVs) with an 18.6-kb homology reached 0.2% per transduced cell at a multiplicity of infection of 10 genomes per cell. Detection of random integration at DNA levels by PCR revealed extremely high efficiency of 5% per cell. We also isolated and characterized chromosomal sites where HD AdVs integrated in a random manner. In contrast to retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vectors, which tend to integrate into genes, the integration sites of AdV was distributed randomly inside and outside genes. These findings suggest that HR mediated by HD AdVs is efficient and relatively safe and might be a new viable option for ex vivo gene therapy as well as a tool for chromosomal manipulation of a variety of stem cells.

  14. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Licursi, Valerio; Brito, Catarina; La Torre, Mattia; Alves, Paula M.; Simao, Daniel; Mottini, Carla; Salinas, Sara; Negri, Rodolfo; Tagliafico, Enrico; Kremer, Eric J.; Saggio, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD) canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2) are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR. PMID:26207738

  15. Potential of mesenchymal stem cells by adenovirus-mediated erythropoietin gene therapy approaches for bone defect.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ding, Jian; Jiang, Liming; Shi, Ce; Ni, Shilei; Jin, Han; Li, Daowei; Sun, Hongchen

    2014-11-01

    Regeneration of large bone defects is a common clinical problem. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a promising alternative to traditional surgical techniques. However, it is still a key question how to enhance the osteogenic potential of MSCs for possible clinical trials. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of adenovirus-mediated erythropoietin (Ad-EPO) transfer on BMSCs, we performed extensive in vitro/in vivo assays in this study. Flow cytometry analysis and the result of MTT showed that EPO could promote BMSCs proliferation. QPCR data demonstrated that EPO increased expressions of Runx2, Sp7, and Col1 in osteoblast at various time points and also increased alkaline phosphatase activity and the calcium deposition. These results indicate that EPO can increase the differentiation of osteoblast. Importantly, in vivo assays clearly demonstrate that EPO can efficiently induce new bone formation in the bone defect model. Our results strongly suggest that EPO can affect osteoblast differentiation and play important roles in bone regeneration leading to an increase in bone formation.

  16. Adenovirus fiber disrupts CAR-mediated intercellular adhesion allowing virus escape.

    PubMed

    Walters, Robert W; Freimuth, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Ganske, Ingrid; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    Adenovirus binds its receptor (CAR), enters cells, and replicates. It must then escape to the environment to infect a new host. We found that following infection, human airway epithelia first released adenovirus to the basolateral surface. Virus then traveled between epithelial cells to emerge on the apical surface. Adenovirus fiber protein, which is produced during viral replication, facilitated apical escape. Fiber binds CAR, which sits on the basolateral membrane where it maintains tight junction integrity. When fiber bound CAR, it disrupted junctional integrity, allowing virus to filter between the cells and emerge apically. Thus, adenovirus exploits its receptor for two important but distinct steps in its life cycle: entry into host cells and escape across epithelial barriers to the environment.

  17. Heparan Sulfates and Coxsackievirus-Adenovirus Receptor: Each One Mediates Coxsackievirus B3 PD Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zautner, A. E.; Körner, U.; Henke, A.; Badorff, C.; Schmidtke, M.

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid exchanges in the virus capsid protein VP1 allow the coxsackievirus B3 variant PD (CVB3 PD) to replicate in decay accelerating factor (DAF)-negative and coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR)-negative cells. This suggests that molecules other than DAF and CAR are involved in attachment of this CVB3 variant to cell surfaces. The observation that productive infection associated with cytopathic effect occurred in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells, whereas heparinase-treated CHO-K1 cells, glucosaminoglycan-negative pgsA-745, heparan sulfate (HS)-negative pgsD-677, and pgsE-606 cells with significantly reduced N-sulfate expression resist CVB3 PD infection, indicates a critical role of highly sulfated HS. 2-O-sulfate-lacking pgsF-17 cells represented the cell line with minimum HS modifications susceptible for CVB3 PD. Inhibition of virus replication in CHO-K1 cells by polycationic compounds, pentosan polysulfate, lung heparin, and several intestinal but not kidney HS supported the hypothesis that CVB3 PD uses specific modified HS for entry. In addition, recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor blocked CVB3 PD infection. However, CAR also mediates CVB3 PD infection, because this CVB3 variant replicates in HS-lacking but CAR-bearing Raji cells, infection could be prevented by pretreatment of cells with CAR antibody, and HS-negative pgsD-677 cells transfected with CAR became susceptible for CVB3 PD. These results demonstrate that the amino acid substitutions in the viral capsid protein VP1 enable CVB3 PD to use specific modified HS as an entry receptor in addition to CAR. PMID:12941917

  18. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Raffaele; Borzone, Roberta; D’Aria, Stefania; Annunziata, Patrizia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate which ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Towards this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared to saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with Ethylene Glycol (EG), a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy. PMID:26609667

  19. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Castello, R; Borzone, R; D'Aria, S; Annunziata, P; Piccolo, P; Brunetti-Pierri, N

    2016-02-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an inborn error of liver metabolism due to deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), which catalyzes conversion of glyoxylate into glycine. AGT deficiency results in overproduction of oxalate that ultimately leads to end-stage renal disease and death. Organ transplantation as either preemptive liver transplantation or combined liver/kidney transplantation is the only available therapy to prevent disease progression. Gene therapy is an attractive option to provide an alternative treatment for PH1. Toward this goal, we investigated helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors for liver-directed gene therapy of PH1. Compared with saline controls, AGT-deficient mice injected with an HDAd encoding the AGT under the control of a liver-specific promoter showed a significant reduction of hyperoxaluria and less increase of urinary oxalate following challenge with ethylene glycol, a precursor of glyoxylate. These studies may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd for PH1 gene therapy.

  20. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  1. Human papillomavirus E6E7-mediated adenovirus cell killing: selectivity of mutant adenovirus replication in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Balagué, C; Noya, F; Alemany, R; Chow, L T; Curiel, D T

    2001-08-01

    Replication-competent adenoviruses are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. Exclusive virus replication in cancer cells has been proposed as a safety trait to be considered in the design of oncolytic adenoviruses. From this perspective, we have investigated several adenovirus mutants for their potential to conditionally replicate and promote the killing of cells expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which are present in a high percentage of anogenital cancers. For this purpose, we have employed an organotypic model of human stratified squamous epithelium derived from primary keratinocytes that have been engineered to express HPV-18 oncoproteins stably. We show that, whereas wild-type adenovirus promotes a widespread cytopathic effect in all infected cells, E1A- and E1A/E1B-deleted adenoviruses cause no deleterious effect regardless of the coexpression of HPV18 E6E7. An adenovirus deleted in the CR2 domain of E1A, necessary for binding to the pRB family of pocket proteins, shows no selectivity of replication as it efficiently kills all normal and E6E7-expressing keratinocytes. Finally, an adenovirus mutant deleted in the CR1 and CR2 domains of E1A exhibits preferential replication and cell killing in HPV E6E7-expressing cultures. We conclude that the organotypic keratinocyte culture represents a distinct model to evaluate adenovirus selectivity and that, based on this model, further modifications of the adenovirus genome are required to restrict adenovirus replication to tumor cells.

  2. Human Papillomavirus E6E7-Mediated Adenovirus Cell Killing: Selectivity of Mutant Adenovirus Replication in Organotypic Cultures of Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balagué, Cristina; Noya, Francisco; Alemany, Ramon; Chow, Louise T.; Curiel, David T.

    2001-01-01

    Replication-competent adenoviruses are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. Exclusive virus replication in cancer cells has been proposed as a safety trait to be considered in the design of oncolytic adenoviruses. From this perspective, we have investigated several adenovirus mutants for their potential to conditionally replicate and promote the killing of cells expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which are present in a high percentage of anogenital cancers. For this purpose, we have employed an organotypic model of human stratified squamous epithelium derived from primary keratinocytes that have been engineered to express HPV-18 oncoproteins stably. We show that, whereas wild-type adenovirus promotes a widespread cytopathic effect in all infected cells, E1A- and E1A/E1B-deleted adenoviruses cause no deleterious effect regardless of the coexpression of HPV18 E6E7. An adenovirus deleted in the CR2 domain of E1A, necessary for binding to the pRB family of pocket proteins, shows no selectivity of replication as it efficiently kills all normal and E6E7-expressing keratinocytes. Finally, an adenovirus mutant deleted in the CR1 and CR2 domains of E1A exhibits preferential replication and cell killing in HPV E6E7-expressing cultures. We conclude that the organotypic keratinocyte culture represents a distinct model to evaluate adenovirus selectivity and that, based on this model, further modifications of the adenovirus genome are required to restrict adenovirus replication to tumor cells. PMID:11462032

  3. SPOC1-Mediated Antiviral Host Cell Response Is Antagonized Early in Human Adenovirus Type 5 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Kinkley, Sarah; Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Wimmer, Peter; Schubert, Tobias; Groitl, Peter; Will, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about immediate phases after viral infection and how an incoming viral genome complex counteracts host cell defenses, before the start of viral gene expression. Adenovirus (Ad) serves as an ideal model, since entry and onset of gene expression are rapid and highly efficient, and mechanisms used 24–48 hours post infection to counteract host antiviral and DNA repair factors (e.g. p53, Mre11, Daxx) are well studied. Here, we identify an even earlier host cell target for Ad, the chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader, SPOC1, recently found recruited to double strand breaks, and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its functional association with the Ad major core protein pVII that enters with the viral genome, followed by E1B-55K/E4orf6-dependent proteasomal degradation of SPOC1. Mimicking removal of SPOC1 in the cell, knock down of this cellular restriction factor using RNAi techniques resulted in significantly increased Ad replication, including enhanced viral gene expression. However, depletion of SPOC1 also reduced the efficiency of E1B-55K transcriptional repression of cellular promoters, with possible implications for viral transformation. Intriguingly, not exclusive to Ad infection, other human pathogenic viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV) also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host cells should provide new perspectives for developing antiviral agents and therapies. Conversely, for Ad vectors used in gene therapy, counteracting mechanisms eradicating incoming

  4. Adenovirus-Mediated CCR7 and BTLA Overexpression Enhances Immune Tolerance and Migration in Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Haiming; Zhu, Jinhong; Miao, Hongcheng; Gong, Zhenyu; Jiang, Xiaochen; Feng, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Our previous report revealed that immature dendritic cells (imDCs) with adenovirus-mediated CCR7 overexpression acquired an enhanced migratory ability but also exhibited the lower immune tolerance observed in more mature cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether BTLA overexpression was sufficient to preserve immune tolerance in imDCs with exogenous CCR7 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy and surface antigens analysis revealed that BTLA overexpression suppressed DC maturation, an effect further potentiated in CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpressing cells. Correspondingly, in vitro chemotaxis assays and mixed lymphocyte reactions demonstrated increased migratory potential and immune tolerance in CCR7 and BTLA coexpressing cells. Furthermore, CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpressed imDCs suppressed IFN-γ and IL-17 expression and promoted IL-4 and TGF-beta expression of lymphocyte, indicating an increase of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory T cell (Treg). Thus, these data indicate that CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpression imparts an intermediate immune phenotype in imDCs when compared to that in CCR7- or BTLA-expressing counterparts that show a more immunocompetent or immunotolerant phenotype, respectively. All these results indicated that adenovirus-mediated CCR7 and BTLA overexpression could enhance immune tolerance and migration of imDCs. Our study provides a basis for further studies on imDCs in immune tolerance, with the goal of developing effective cellular immunotherapies for transplant recipients. PMID:28393074

  5. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  6. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  7. Virus-mediated release of endosomal content in vitro: different behavior of adenovirus and rhinovirus serotype 2

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Endosomal penetration by nonenveloped viruses might be accomplished by either local breakdown of the endosomal membrane (e.g., adenovirus) or formation of a membrane-spanning pore by capsid proteins. Uncoating of the nonenveloped virus human rhinovirus serotype 2 (HRV2) has been shown to occur from late endosomes and to be entirely dependent on the acidic pH in this compartment (Prchla, E., E. Kuechler, D. Blaas, and R. Fuchs. 1994. J. Virol. 68: 3713-3723). To investigate further the mechanism of uncoating of HRV2, an in vitro assay was established to test viruses or virus-derived peptides for their capacity to release cointernalized biotin-dextran of different molecular mass (10 and 70 kD) from isolated endosomes. The suitability of the assay was demonstrated by use of a fusogenic peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (GALA-INF3). Whereas adenovirus induced a low pH- dependent release of up to 46% of the internalized biotin-dextran and did not show any significant size selectivity (as expected for endosome disruption), HRV2 mediated release of 27% of the 10 kD dextran and only traces of the 70-kD dextran. Similarly, GALA-INF3-induced release of biotin-dextran was also size dependent. The potential role of the capsid protein VP1 in HRV2 uncoating in vivo was also substantiated in our in vitro system using an amphipathic, NH2-terminal peptide of VP1. Taken together, these data favor the model of a specific pore-forming mechanism for HRV2 uncoating which is in contrast to the membrane- disrupting mechanism of adenovirus. PMID:7559769

  8. MicroRNA-Mediated Suppression of Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3′ untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver. PMID:23349911

  9. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  10. Enhanced Protection against Ebola Virus Mediated by an Improved Adenovirus-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kaylie N.; Croyle, Maria A.; Strong, James E.; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP). The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP) and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP). Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the previous generation

  11. Tamoxifen improves cytopathic effect of oncolytic adenovirus in primary glioblastoma cells mediated through autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, Ilya V.; Shah, Nameeta; Kaverina, Natalya V.; Lee, Hwahyang; Lin, Biaoyang; Lieber, Andre; Kadagidze, Zaira G.; Yoon, Jae-Guen; Schroeder, Brett; Hothi, Parvinder; Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Baryshnikov, Anatoly Y.; Cobbs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic gene therapy using viral vectors may provide an attractive therapeutic option for malignant gliomas. These viral vectors are designed in a way to selectively target tumor cells and spare healthy cells. To determine the translational impact, it is imperative to assess the factors that interfere with the anti-glioma effects of the oncolytic adenoviral vectors. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of survivin-driven oncolytic adenoviruses pseudotyping with adenoviral fiber knob belonging to the adenoviral serotype 3, 11 and 35 in their ability to kill glioblastoma (GBM) cells selectively without affecting normal cells. Our results indicate that all recombinant vectors used in the study can effectively target GBM in vitro with high specificity, especially the 3 knob-modified vector. Using intracranial U87 and U251 GBM xenograft models we have also demonstrated that treatment with Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd-S-5/3) vectors can effectively regress tumor. However, in several patient-derived GBM cell lines, cells exhibited resistance to the CRAd infection as evident from the diminishing effects of autophagy. To improve therapeutic response, tumor cells were pretreated with tamoxifen. Our preliminary data suggest that tamoxifen sensitizes glioblastoma cells towards oncolytic treatment with CRAd-S-5/3, which may prove useful for GBM in future experimental therapy. PMID:25738357

  12. Adenovirus-Mediated FKHRL1/TM Sensitizes Melanoma Cells to Apoptosis Induced by Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Michael E.; McNally, Lacey R.; Nitz, Jonathan; McMasters, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Melanoma exhibits variable resistance to the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ). We evaluated the potential of adenovirus expressing forkhead human transcription factor like 1 triple mutant (Ad-FKHRL1/TM) to sensitize melanoma cells to TMZ. Four melanoma cell lines were treated with Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ, alone or in combination. Apoptosis was assessed by activation and inhibition of caspase pathway, nuclei fragmentation, and annexin V staining. The potential therapeutic efficacy of Ad-FKHRL1/TM with TMZ was also assessed in a mouse melanoma xenograft model. Combination therapy of Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ resulted in greater cell killing (<20% cell viability) compared with single therapy and controls (p<0.05). Combination indices of Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ therapy indicated significant (p<0.05) synergistic killing effect. Greater apoptosis induction was found in cells treated with Ad-FKHRL1/TM and TMZ than with Ad-FKHRL1/TM or TMZ-treated cells alone. Treatment with TMZ enhanced adenovirus transgene expression in a cell type-dependent manner. In an in vivo model, combination therapy of Ad-FKHRL1/TM with TMZ results in greater tumor growth reduction in comparison with single treatments. We suggest that Ad-FKHRL1/TM is a promising vector to sensitize melanoma cells to TMZ, and that a combination of both approaches would be effective in the clinical setting. PMID:25238278

  13. Improved hepatic transduction, reduced systemic vector dissemination, and long-term transgene expression by delivering helper-dependent adenoviral vectors into the surgically isolated liver of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Thomas; Iannitti, David A; Palmer, Donna J; Beaudet, Arthur L; Finegold, Milton J; Carey, K Dee; Cioffi, William G; Ng, Philip

    2006-04-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) are attractive vectors for liver-directed gene therapy because they can mediate sustained, high-level transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potentially severe and lethal consequences. We hypothesize that the threshold to efficient hepatic transduction may be circumvented by delivering the vector into the surgically isolated liver via the portal vein. Total hepatic isolation was achieved by occluding hepatic inflow from the portal vein and hepatic artery and by occluding hepatic venous outflow at the inferior vena cava. We demonstrate in nonhuman primates that this approach resulted in significantly higher efficiency hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with systemic intravascular delivery. This method of delivery was associated with transient acute toxicity, the severity of which was variable. Importantly, stable, high levels of transgene expression were obtained for at least 665 days for one baboon and for at least 560 days for two baboons with no evidence of long-term toxicity.

  14. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  15. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  16. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  17. Comparison of efficiency between FLPe and Cre for recombinase-mediated cassette exchange in vitro and in adenovirus vector production.

    PubMed

    Takata, Yuki; Kondo, Saki; Goda, Naoki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu

    2011-07-01

    Cre and FLP recombinases mediate not only specific deletions and insertions, but also the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) reaction, which is used in cell biotechnology including ES cells and mouse genetics. However, comparison of efficiencies for Cre and FLP in RMCE has not been made. We here examined the detailed process of RMCE with Cre and FLP in vitro using mutant loxP 2272 and three mutant FRTs (FRT G, FRT H, and FRT F3) and then quantitatively compared the RMCE reactions in vitro. Interestingly, in the in vitro reactions, the RMCE efficiency of Cre reached a plateau level of approximately 5% and did not proceed further, whereas that of FLPe reached approximately 12-13%, showing that FLPe reached a higher level of efficiency than Cre possibly when they were supplied at a very high concentration. Moreover, we quantitatively compared the production efficiency of E1-deleted adenovirus vector using the RMCE method with Cre or FLP. The results showed that FLPe was again found more efficient than Cre in RMCE reaction. Thus, although Cre is considered more active than, or similar to, FLPe, it may not be necessarily true for RMCE reaction. Possible reasons explaining these results are discussed.

  18. Aminoclay as a highly effective cationic vehicle for enhancing adenovirus-mediated gene transfer through nanobiohybrid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2017-02-01

    Electrostatic complexation of adenovirus (Ad) with cationic lipids or polymers has been shown to be an effective means for overcoming the limitations of adenoviral vectors and enhancing gene-transfer efficacy. However, such complexation causes cytotoxicity, limiting the use of this strategy. The present study explored the potential of 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay) as a cationic vehicle for improving Ad-mediated gene transfer without inducing cytotoxicity. Aminoclay complexation produced a dose-dependent increase in Ad-mediated transgene expression in both Ad infection-sensitive and -refractory cells, thereby greatly lowering the Ad dose required for transgene expression. Unlike the case for cationic lipids (Lipofectamine) or polymers (Polybrene), the enhancement effect of aminoclay was not accompanied by significant cytotoxicity regardless of cell lines and it was not observed for nonviral plasmid vectors. Physical characterization studies revealed that nanobiohybrid complexes formed between aminoclay and Ad particles through electrostatic interactions, creating aggregates of Ad particles whose surface was shielded with aminoclay nanosheet oligomers. It appears that aminoclay complexation changes the surface charge of Ad particles from a negative to a highly positive value and thus increases Ad binding to cellular membranes, thereby providing an additional cellular entry mechanism, namely caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Aminoclay-Ad nanobiohybrids may serve as a next-generation efficient, versatile and biocompatible gene-delivery carrier.

  19. Role of an adenovirus E2 promoter binding factor in E1A-mediated coordinate gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, I; Reichel, R; Nevins, J R

    1987-01-01

    A product of the adenovirus gene E1A is responsible for the stimulation of transcription from six viral promoters as well as at least two cellular promoters. We have detected a HeLa cell factor, termed E2 promoter binding factor (E2F), that appears to mediate the transcriptional stimulation of the viral E2 promoter. Competition experiments revealed that E2F did not recognize and bind to the E1B, E3, E4, or major late promoter sequences. Furthermore, three additional promoters stimulated by E1A, heat shock protein 70, beta-globin, and early simian virus 40, do not bind E2F. In contrast, the factor does recognize sequences in the E1A enhancer, and within the E1A enhancer are duplicated binding sites for E2F. Finally, a single E2F binding site from the E1A enhancer can confer increased transcription to a mouse beta-globin promoter, dependent on the action of the E1A gene product. This stimulation requires binding of E2F since methylation of the binding site, which blocks binding in vitro, reduces transcription stimulation in vivo. We, therefore, conclude that E2F is likely to be responsible for the E1A-mediated stimulation of the E1A gene as well as the E2 gene but is not involved in the activation of the other E1A-inducible promoters. Images PMID:2951737

  20. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings: The vaccine regimen...falciparum malaria vaccine, in healthy, malaria -nave adults’’, work unit number 62787A 870 F 1432. The funders had no role in study design, data...fused to hepatitis B surface protein. RTS,S provides 50% protection against controlled human malaria infection, mediated primarily by the induction of

  1. Adenovirus vector-mediated FAM176A overexpression induces cell death in human H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Hu, Jia; Pan, Huan; Lou, Yaxin; Lv, Ping; Chen, Yingyu

    2014-02-01

    FAM176A (family with sequence similarity 176 member A) is a novel molecule related to programmed cell death. A decreased expression of FAM176A has been found in several types of human tumors in including lung cancers. In the present study, we investigated the biological activities of FAM176A on the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus 5-FAM176A vector (Ad5-FAM176A) and evaluated the expression and anti-tumor activities in vitro. Cell viability analysis revealed that the adenovirus-mediated increase of FAM176A inhibited the growth of the tumor cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was mediated by both autophagy and apoptosis that involved caspase activation. In addition, cell cycle analysis suggested that Ad5-FAM176A could induce cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, all of which suggested that adenovirus-mediated FAM176A gene transfer might present a new therapeutic approach for lung cancer treatment.

  2. Efficient adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primary T cells and thymocytes in a new coxsackie/adenovirus receptor transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Hurez, Vincent; Dzialo-Hatton, Robin; Oliver, James; Matthews, R James; Weaver, Casey T

    2002-01-01

    Background Gene transfer studies in primary T cells have suffered from the limitations of conventional viral transduction or transfection techniques. Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are an attractive alternative for gene delivery. However, naive lymphocytes are not readily susceptible to infection with adenoviruses due to insufficient expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor. Results To render T cells susceptible to adenoviral gene transfer, we have developed three new murine transgenic lines in which expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (hCAR) with a truncated cytoplasmic domain (hCARΔcyt) is limited to thymocytes and lymphocytes under direction of a human CD2 mini-gene. hCARΔcyt.CD2 transgenic mice were crossed with DO11.10 T cell receptor transgenic mice (DO11.hCARΔcyt) to allow developmental studies in a defined, clonal T cell population. Expression of hCARΔcyt enabled adenoviral transduction of resting primary CD4+ T cells, differentiated effector T cells and thymocytes from DO11.hCARΔcyt with high efficiency. Expression of hCARΔcyt transgene did not perturb T cell development in these mice and adenoviral transduction of DO11.hCARΔcyt T cells did not alter their activation status, functional responses or differentiative potential. Adoptive transfer of the transduced T cells into normal recipients did not modify their physiologic localization. Conclusion The DO11.hCARΔcyt transgenic model thus allows efficient gene transfer in primary T cell populations and will be valuable for novel studies of T cell activation and differentiation. PMID:12019030

  3. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan mediates the selective attachment and internalization of serotype 3 human adenovirus dodecahedron.

    PubMed

    Vivès, Romain R; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Fender, Pascal

    2004-04-10

    During adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) infection cycle, the penton (Pt) of the viral capsid, a noncovalent complex of fiber and penton base proteins, is produced in large excess and self-assembles to form a highly organized dodecahedral structure, termed dodecahedron (Dd). The physiological role of these particles is poorly understood, but we have recently reported that they can penetrate cells with high efficiency and thus may constitute an attractive tool for gene or protein delivery approaches. Surprisingly, Dd displayed the ability to enter cells non-permissive to Ad3, suggesting the existence of additional internalization modes. In this study, we show that Ad3 Dd binds to cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) through high affinity interaction with the penton base. Furthermore, binding to HS was found to be the prerequisite for a novel and Dd specific entry pathway that could not be used by Ad3. Overall, these data provide new insights in the possible role of Dd during viral infection and potential therapeutic applications.

  4. Disappearance of body fat in normal rats induced by adenovirus-mediated leptin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoxun; Koyama, Kazunori; Yuan, Xue; Lee, Young; Zhou, Yan-Ting; O’Doherty, Robert; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1996-01-01

    Sustained hyperleptinemia of 8 ng/ml was induced for 28 days in normal Wistar rats by infusing a recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA (AdCMV-leptin). Hyperleptinemic rats exhibited a 30–50% reduction in food intake and gained only 22 g over the experimental period versus 115–132 g in control animals that received saline infusions or a recombinant virus containing the β-galactosidase gene (AdCMV-βGal). Body fat was absent in hyperleptinemic rats, whereas control rats pair-fed to the hyperleptinemic rats retained ≈50% body fat. Further, plasma triglycerides and insulin levels were significantly lower in hyperleptinemic versus pair-fed controls, while fatty acid and glucose levels were similar in the two groups, suggestive of enhanced insulin sensitivity in the hyperleptinemic animals. Thus, despite equivalent reductions in food intake and weight gain in hyperleptinemic and pair-fed animals, identifiable fat tissue was completely ablated only in the former group, raising the possibility of a specific lipoatrophic activity for leptin. PMID:8962134

  5. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Vasopressin is synthesized by magnocellular neurons in supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei and released by their axon terminals in the neurohypophysis (NH). With its actions as an antidiuretic hormone and vasoactive agent, vasopressin plays a pivotal role in the control of body fluids and cardiovascular homeostasis. Because of its well-defined neurobiology and functional importance, the SON/PVN-NH system is ideal to establish methods for gene transfer of genetic material into specific pathways in the mouse central nervous system. In these studies, we compared the efficiency of transferring the gene lacZ, encoding for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), versus a gene encoding for green fluorescent protein by using replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors in adult mice. Transfection with viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units per coverslip of NH, PVN, and SON in dissociated, cultured cells caused efficient transfection without cytotoxicity. However, over an extended period of time, higher levels (50% to 75% of the cells) of beta-gal expression were detected in comparison with green fluorescent protein (5% to 50% of the cells). With the use of a stereotaxic approach, the pituitary glands of mice were injected with Ad (4 x 10(6) plaque-forming units). In material from these animals, we were able to visualize the expression of the beta-gal gene in the NH and in magnocellular neurons of both the PVN and SON. The results of these experiments indicate that Ad-Rous sarcoma virus promoter-beta-gal is taken up by nerve terminals at the injection site (NH) and retrogradely transported to the soma of the neurons projecting to the NH. We conclude that the application of these experimental approaches will provide powerful tools for physiological studies and potential approaches to deliver therapeutic genes to treat diseases.

  7. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  8. Midkine promoter-driven suicide gene expression and -mediated adenovirus replication produced cytotoxic effects to immortalised and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Hamada, K; Namba, M; Kadomatsu, K; Muramatsu, T; Matsubara, S; Tagawa, M

    2004-07-01

    We examined possible application of a regulatory region of midkine (MK) gene, which is frequently upregulated in a number of human tumours but not in normal cells, to cancer gene therapy. We examined transcriptional activity of the MK genomic fragments in paired cell lines, immortalized cells and their parental normal fibroblasts, and found that the MK fragments activated a fused reporter or a suicide gene preferentially in the immortalized cells. Recombinant adenoviruses (Ad), in which the MK fragment was inserted upstream to the E1A gene (AdMK), replicated preferentially in the immortalized cells and were cytotoxie to them. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells were significantly susceptible to AdMK compared with human normal fibroblasts in vitro and the replication of AdMK was less than that of wild-type Ad in the infected fibroblasts. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells infected with AdMK did not form tumours in immunocompromised mice and intratumoural injection of AdMK into the hepatocellular carcinoma developed in mice retarded the subsequent tumour growth. Expression of E1A and necrosis of tumours were detected in AdMK-injected but not control Ad-injected cases. The MK promoter-driven suicide gene therapy and -mediated replicative Ad can thereby produce cytotoxic effects to immortalized and tumour cells with minimal damage to normal cells.

  9. A ubiquitin-specific protease possesses a decisive role for adenovirus replication and oncogene-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Wilhelm; Koyuncu, Emre; Singh, Sonia; Arbelo-Roman, Christina; Hartl, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Speiseder, Thomas; Meier, Chris; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Adenoviral replication depends on viral as well as cellular proteins. However, little is known about cellular proteins promoting adenoviral replication. In our screens to identify such proteins, we discovered a cellular component of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway interacting with the central regulator of adenoviral replication. Our binding assays mapped a specific interaction between the N-terminal domains of both viral E1B-55K and USP7, a deubiquitinating enzyme. RNA interference-mediated downregulation of USP7 severely reduced E1B-55K protein levels, but more importantly negatively affected adenoviral replication. We also succeeded in resynthesizing an inhibitor of USP7, which like the knockdown background reduced adenoviral replication. Further assays revealed that not only adenoviral growth, but also adenoviral oncogene-driven cellular transformation relies on the functions of USP7. Our data provide insights into an intricate mechanistic pathway usurped by an adenovirus to promote its replication and oncogenic functions, and at the same time open up possibilities for new antiviral strategies.

  10. A Ubiquitin-specific Protease Possesses a Decisive Role for Adenovirus Replication and Oncogene-mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Arbelo-Roman, Christina; Hartl, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Speiseder, Thomas; Meier, Chris; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviral replication depends on viral as well as cellular proteins. However, little is known about cellular proteins promoting adenoviral replication. In our screens to identify such proteins, we discovered a cellular component of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway interacting with the central regulator of adenoviral replication. Our binding assays mapped a specific interaction between the N-terminal domains of both viral E1B-55K and USP7, a deubiquitinating enzyme. RNA interference-mediated downregulation of USP7 severely reduced E1B-55K protein levels, but more importantly negatively affected adenoviral replication. We also succeeded in resynthesizing an inhibitor of USP7, which like the knockdown background reduced adenoviral replication. Further assays revealed that not only adenoviral growth, but also adenoviral oncogene-driven cellular transformation relies on the functions of USP7. Our data provide insights into an intricate mechanistic pathway usurped by an adenovirus to promote its replication and oncogenic functions, and at the same time open up possibilities for new antiviral strategies. PMID:23555268

  11. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis by systemic and subconjunctival adenovirus-mediated transfer of the viral IL-10 gene

    PubMed Central

    De Kozak, Y; Thillaye-Goldenberg, B; Naud, M -C; Viana Da Costa, A; Auriault, C; Verwaerde, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathological ocular manifestations result from a dysregulation in the balance between proinflammatory type 1 cytokines and regulatory type 2 cytokines. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with potent immunosuppressive effects. We have examined the efficiency of viral IL-10 adenovirus (Ad-vIL-10)-mediated gene transfer on experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced in mice and rats by purified retinal autoantigens, respectively, interphotoreceptor binding protein (IRBP) and S-antigen (S-Ag). B10-A mice that received a single unilateral injection of Ad-vIL-10 in the retro-orbital sinus venosus performed 1 day before immunization with IRBP in the footpads showed high levels of circulating vIL-10 in their sera and a significant reduction in pathological ocular manifestations. Lower levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 were found in cellular supernatants from IRBP-stimulated splenic cells in these treated mice. The local effect on ocular disease of vIL-10 was neutralized completely by injection of a monoclonal anti-vIL-10 antibody, demonstrating the specificity of the treatment. To determine whether the transfer of the vIL-10 gene within the periocular tissues of the eye could prevent acute EAU, a subconjunctival injection of Ad-vIL-10 was performed in Lewis rats simultaneously with S-antigen in the footpads. This injection determined in situ vIL-10 expression with very low circulating vIL-10 and led to a significant reduction of EAU without affecting the systemic immune response. The present results suggest that Ad-mediated gene transfer resulting in systemic and local expression of vIL-10 provide a promising approach for the treatment of uveitis. PMID:12390308

  12. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment.

  13. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  14. Adenovirus-mediated shRNA interference against HSV-1 replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Liu, Xinjing; Wang, Qingzhi; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Ting; Han, Zhiqiang; Xu, Yuming

    2016-12-01

    The UL29 and UL28 proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are critical for its replication and packaging, respectively. Research has demonstrated that synthesized siRNA molecules targeting the UL29 gene are able to suppress HSV-2 replication and the UL28-null HSV-1 gene cannot form infectious viruses in vitro. Silencing the UL28 and UL29 genes by RNAi might lead to the development of novel antiviral agents for the treatment of HSV-1 infections. Two kinds of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the UL29 and UL28 genes were chemically synthesized and then delivered into cells by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Adv5) vector. (-) shRNAs targeting none of the genome of HSV-1 were used as the control. Vero cells were inoculated with Ad-UL28shRNA or Ad-UL29shRNA at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 and challenged 24 h later with HSV-1 at an MOI of 0.01 to inhibit HSV-1 replication, as measured by the level of the corresponding RNA and proteins. In addition, the amount of progeny virus was assessed at daily intervals. The antiviral effects of Ad-shRNAs at ongoing HSV-1 infection were explored at 12 h after inoculation of the HSV-1. The results showed that the shRNAs delivered by Adv5 significantly suppressed HSV-1 replication in vitro, as determined by the levels of viral RNA transcription, viral protein synthesis, and viral production. The Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA suppressed the replication of HSV-1, respectively, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). When Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA were combined, a synergistic effect was observed. The antiviral effects could sustain for at least 4 days after the HSV-1 infection (P < 0.001). Furthermore, antiviral effects were achieved 12 h prior to inoculation of Adv5-shRNAs (P < 0.001). Our data demonstrated comparable antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus by shRNAs targeting either UL29 or UL28 sites in vitro and the effectiveness of using the Adv5

  15. PEGylated helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human Apo A-I for gene therapy in LDLR-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Leggiero, E; Astone, D; Cerullo, V; Lombardo, B; Mazzaccara, C; Labruna, G; Sacchetti, L; Salvatore, F; Croyle, M; Pastore, L

    2013-12-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors have great potential for gene therapy applications; however, their administration induces acute toxicity that impairs safe clinical applications. We previously observed that PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors strongly reduces the acute response in murine and primate models. To evaluate whether PEGylated HD-Ad vectors combine reduced toxicity with the correction of pathological phenotypes, we administered an HD-Ad vector expressing the human apolipoprotein A-I (hApoA-I) to low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-deficient mice (a model for familial hypercholesterolemia) fed a high-cholesterol diet. Mice were treated with high doses of HD-Ad-expressing apo A-I or its PEGylated version. Twelve weeks later, LDL levels were lower and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels higher in mice treated with either of the vectors than in untreated mice. After terminal killing, the areas of atherosclerotic plaques were much smaller in the vector-treated mice than in the control animals. Moreover, the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was lower and consequently the toxicity profile better in mice treated with PEGylated vector than in mice treated with the unmodified vector. This finding indicates that the reduction in toxicity resulting from PEGylation of HD-Ad vectors does not impair the correction of pathological phenotypes. It also supports the clinical potential of these vectors for the correction of genetic diseases.

  16. Improved efficacy and reduced toxicity by ultrasound-guided intrahepatic injections of helper-dependent adenoviral vector in Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Nunzia; Nusco, Edoardo; Piccolo, Pasquale; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Vaníkova, Jana; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna J; Vitek, Libor; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-10-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I is caused by mutations of the uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene resulting in life-threatening increase of serum bilirubin. Life-long correction of hyperbilirubinemia was previously shown with intravenous injection of high doses of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector expressing UGT1A1 in the Gunn rat, the animal model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome. However, such high vector doses can activate an acute and potentially lethal inflammatory response with elevated serum interleukin-6 (IL-6). To overcome this obstacle, we investigated safety and efficacy of direct injections of low HDAd doses delivered directly into the liver parenchyma of Gunn rats. Direct hepatic injections performed by either laparotomy or ultrasound-guided percutaneous injections were compared with the same doses given by intravenous injections. A greater reduction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased conjugated bilirubin in bile were achieved with 1 × 10(11) vp/kg by direct liver injections compared with intravenous injections. In sharp contrast to intravenous injections, direct hepatic injections neither raised serum IL-6 nor resulted in thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of HDAd vectors into liver parenchyma resulted in improved hepatocyte transduction and reduced toxicity compared with systemic injections and is clinically attractive for liver-directed gene therapy of Crigler-Najjar syndrome.

  17. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia in gunn rats by surgical delivery of low doses of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Françoise; Pastore, Nunzia; Abarrategui-Pontes, Cecilia; Flageul, Maude; Myara, Anne; Laplanche, Sophie; Labrune, Philippe; Podevin, Guillaume; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-06-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors are attractive for liver-directed gene therapy because they can drive sustained high levels of transgene expression without chronic toxicity. However, high vector doses are required to achieve efficient hepatic transduction by systemic delivery because of a nonlinear dose response. Unfortunately, such high doses result in systemic vector dissemination and dose-dependent acute toxicity with potential lethal consequences. We have previously shown in nonhuman primates that delivery of HDAd in surgically isolated livers resulted in a significantly higher hepatic transduction with reduced systemic vector dissemination compared with intravenous delivery and multiyear transgene expression. Encouraged by these data, we have now employed a surgical vector delivery method in the Gunn rat, an animal model for Crigler-Najjar syndrome. After vector delivery into the surgically isolated liver, we show phenotypic correction at the low and clinically relevant vector dose of 1 × 10(11) vp/kg. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased glucuronidation of bilirubin in bile was achieved for up to 1 year after vector administration. Surgical delivery of the vector was well tolerated without signs of acute or chronic toxicity. This method of delivery could thereby be a safer alternative to liver transplantation for long-term treatment of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I.

  18. Neutralized adenovirus-immune complexes can mediate effective gene transfer via an Fc receptor-dependent infection pathway.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Philip L; Wendland, Rebecca L; Vincent, Theresa; Crystal, Ronald G

    2006-10-01

    Neutralization of adenovirus (Ad) by anti-Ad neutralizing antibodies in serum involves formation of Ad-immune complexes that prevent the virus from interacting with target cells. We hypothesized that Ad-immune complexes likely contain viable Ad vectors which, although no longer capable of gaining access to receptors on target cells, may be able to express transgenes in cells bearing Fc receptors for immunoglobulins, i.e., that antibody-based "neutralization" of Ad vectors may be circumvented by the Fc receptor pathway. To test this hypothesis, we expressed the Fcgamma receptor IIA (FcgammaR) in A549 lung epithelial cells or human dermal fibroblasts and evaluated gene transfer in the presence of human neutralizing anti-Ad serum. FcgammaR-expressing cells bound and internalized copious amounts of Ad, with a distinct population of internalized Ad trafficking to the nucleus. The dose-response curves for inhibition of gene transfer revealed that FcgammaR-expressing cells required a more-than-10-fold higher concentration of anti-Ad serum to achieve 50% inhibition of Ad-encoded beta-galactosidase expression compared with non-FcgammaR-expressing cells. The discrepancy between neutralization of Ad during infection of FcgammaR-expressing cells and neutralization of Ad during infection of non-FcgammaR-expressing cells occurred with either heat-inactivated or non-heat-inactivated sera, was blocked by addition of purified Fc domain protein, and did not require the cytoplasmic domain of FcgammaR, suggesting that immune complex internalization proceeded via endocytosis rather than phagocytosis. FcgammaR-mediated infection by Ad-immune complexes did not require expression of the coxsackie virus-Ad receptor (CAR) since similar data were obtained when CAR-deficient human dermal fibroblasts were engineered to express FcgammaR. However, interaction of the Ad penton base with cell surface integrins contributed to the difference in neutralization between FcgammaR-expressing and non

  19. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Oka, K; Mullins, C E; Kushwaha, R S; Leen, A M; Chan, L

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/-) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high-cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery or by catheter-based intrahepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ⩽1.1 × 10(12) viral particles (vp) kg(-1) failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pre-treatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1 × 10(12) vp kg(-1) that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pre-treatment level on days 20-48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransferase remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upward on day 72 and returned to pre-treatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol-lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78 and 50% in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR

  20. Gene therapy for rhesus monkeys heterozygous for LDL receptor deficiency by balloon-catheter hepatic delivery of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Mullins, Charles E.; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; Leen, Ann M; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a monogenic life-threatening disease. We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy using helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) in a nonhuman primate model of FH, comparing intravenous injection versus intrahepatic arterial injection in the presence of balloon catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion. Rhesus monkeys heterozygous for mutant LDLR gene (LDLR+/−) developed hypercholesterolemia while on a high cholesterol diet. We treated them with HDAd-LDLR either by intravenous delivery, or by catheter-based intra-hepatic artery injection. Intravenous injection of ≤1.1×1012 viral particles (vp)/kg failed to have any effect on plasma cholesterol. Increasing the dose to 5×1012 vp/kg led to a 59% lowering of the plasma cholesterol that lasted for 30 days before it returned to pretreatment levels by day 40. A further increase in dose to 8.4×1012 vp/kg resulted in severe lethal toxicity. In contrast, direct hepatic artery injection following catheter-based hepatic venous occlusion enabled the use of a reduced HDAd-LDLR dose of 1×1012 vp/kg that lowered plasma cholesterol within a week, and reached a nadir of 59% pretreatment level on days 20 to 48 after injection. Serum alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) remained normal until day 48 when it went up slightly and stayed mildly elevated on day 72 before it returned to normal on day 90. In this monkey, the HDAd-LDLR-induced trough of hypocholesterolemia started trending upwards on day 72 and returned to pretreatment levels on day 120. We measured the LDL apolipoprotein B turnover rate at 10 days before, and again 79 days after, HDAd-LDLR treatment in two monkeys that exhibited a cholesterol lowering response. HDAd-LDLR therapy increased the LDL fractional catabolic rate by 78% and 50%, respectively, in the two monkeys, coincident with an increase in hepatic LDLR mRNA expression. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated LDLR gene delivery to

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  4. A better experimental method to detect the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs after adenovirus-mediated introduction of two kinds of p53 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, WeiYing; Lai, BaiTang; Yang, XueHui; Zhang, ChunYan; Li, JinZhao; Zhu, YunZhong

    2015-09-01

    p53 plays an important role in drug responses by regulating cell cycle progression and inducing programmed cell death. The C-terminal of p53 self-regulates the protein negatively; however, whether it affects the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs is unclear. In this study, two experimental methods were used to compare the sensitivity to anticancer drugs of human lung 801D cancer cells transfected with adenovirus bearing either full-length p53 or the deleted-C-terminal p53 in vivo. Adenovirus-mediated deliveries of full-length or deleted-C-terminal p53 were performed after development of tumors (the first method) or by infection into cells before xenotransplantation (the second method). The results showed that infection with the deleted-C-terminal p53 increased 801D cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs in the second, but not in the first method, as indicated by greater tumor-inhibition rates. In addition, compared with the first method, the second method resulted in viruses with more uniformly infected cells and the infection rates between groups were similar. This yielded smaller within-group variations and greater uniformity among transplanted tumors. The second method could circumvent the difficulties associated with intratumoral injection.

  5. Gene therapy for colorectal cancer by adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CD147 based on loss of the IGF2 imprinting system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuqin; He, Bangshun; Chen, Jie; Sun, Huiling; Deng, Qiwen; Wang, Feng; Ying, Houqun; Liu, Xian; Lin, Kang; Peng, Hongxin; Xie, Hongguang; Wang, Shukui

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene is an epigenetic abnormality phenomenon in CRC. Recently observed association of CRC with cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) could provide a novel approach for gene therapy. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of using adenovirus‑mediated siRNA targeting CD147 based on the IGF2 LOI system for targeted gene therapy of CRC. A novel adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CD147, rAd-H19-CD147mirsh, which was driven by the IGF2 imprinting system, was constructed. The results showed that the EGFP expression was detected only in the IGF2 LOI cell lines (HT-29 and HCT-8), but that no EGFP was produced in cell lines with maintenance of imprinting (MOI) (HCT116). Moreover, rAd-H19-CD147mirsh significantly inhibited the expression of CD147, decreased cell viability and invasive ability, and increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs only in the LOI cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, mice bearing HT-29 xenografted tumors, which received intratumoral administration of the rAd-H19-CD147mirsh, showed significantly reduced tumor growth and enhanced survival. We conclude that recombinant adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CD147 based on the IGF2 LOI system inhibited the growth of the LOI cells in vitro and in vivo, which would provide a novel approach for targeted CRC gene therapy.

  6. Adenovirus structure.

    PubMed

    Rux, John J; Burnett, Roger M

    2004-12-01

    Structural studies continue to play an essential role as the focus of adenovirus research shifts in emphasis from basic biology to adenovirus-based vector technologies. A crucial step in developing novel therapeutics for gene replacement, cancer, and vaccines is often to modify the virion. Such engineered changes are designed to retarget the virus, or to reduce the immunological responses to infection. These efforts are far more effective when they are based on detailed structural knowledge. This minireview provides a brief summary of the wealth of information that has been obtained from the combined application of X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. This knowledge now includes a good working model for the architectural organization of the virion, and atomic resolution molecular structures for all the major capsid proteins, hexon, penton, and fiber. We highlight new developments, which include the structure of the penton base and the discovery that adenovirus has several relatives. We sketch how the structural information can be used to engineer novel virions and conclude with the prospects for future progress.

  7. Replication-incompetent adenovirus vector-mediated MDA-7/IL-24 selectively induces growth suppression and apoptosis of hepatoma cell Line SMMC-7721.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congjun; Xue, Xinbo; Yi, Jilin; Wu, Zaide; Chen, Kun; Zheng, Jianwei; Ji, Wenwei; Yu, Yuan

    2008-02-01

    In order to investigate the effect of replication-incompetent adenovirus vector expressing MDA-7/IL-24 on tumor growth and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC-7721 and normal liver cell line L02, the recombinant replication-incompetent Ad.mda-7 virus vector was constructed and infected into the HCC cell line SMMC-7721 and normal liver cell line L02. RT-PCR was performed to examine the expression of MDA-7 mRNA. The concentrations of MDA-7/IL-4 in culture supernatants were determined by using ELISA. MTT and Hoechst staining assay were applied to observe the inhibitory and killing effects of MDA-7 on the HCC cells. By using flow cytometry, the apoptosis, cell cycle and proliferation of SMMC-7721 and L02 cells were measured. The results showed recombinant replication-incompetent virus expressing MDA-7/IL-24 was constructed successfully, and RT-PCR revealed that it could mediate the high expression of the exogenous gene MDA-7/IL-24 in SMMC-7721 and L02 cells. The expression of MDA-7/IL-24 proteins in the culture supernatant was detectable by ELISA. Ad.mda-7 infection induced apoptosis and growth suppression in SMMC-7721 cells and an increased percentage of HCC cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, but not in L02 cells. It was concluded that mda-7/IL-24 gene, mediated with replication-incompetent adenovirus vector, could selectively induce growth suppression and apoptosis in HCC cell line SMMC-7721 but without any toxic side-effect on normal liver line L02.

  8. An adenovirus with enhanced infectivity mediates molecular chemotherapy of ovarian cancer cells and allows imaging of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, A; Belousova, N; Zinn, K R; Liu, B; Wang, M; Chaudhuri, T R; Rogers, B E; Buchsbaum, D J; Siegal, G P; Barnes, M N; Gomez-Navarro, J; Curiel, D T; Alvarez, R D

    2001-09-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) is a useful vector for cancer gene therapy due to its unparalleled gene transfer efficiency to dividing and quiescent cells. Primary cancer cells, however, often have highly variable or low levels of the requisite coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Also, assessment of gene transfer and vector persistence has been logistically difficult in human clinical trials. We describe here two novel bicistronic adenoviral (Ad) vectors, AdTKSSTR and RGDTKSSTR, which contain the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (TK) for molecular chemotherapy and bystander effect. In addition, the viruses contain the human somatostatin receptor subtype-2 gene (SSTR2), the expression of which can be noninvasively imaged. We enhanced the infectivity of RGDTKSSTR by genetically incorporating the RGD-4C motif into the HI-loop of the fiber. This allows the virus to circumvent CAR deficiency by binding to alpha(v)beta(3) and alpha(v)beta(5) integrins, which are highly expressed on most ovarian cancers. The expanded tropism of RGDTKSSTR results in increased infectivity of purified primary ovarian cancer cells and allows enhanced gene transfer in the presence of malignant ascites containing anti-Ad antibodies. RGDTKSSTR may be a useful agent for treating ovarian cancer in clinical trials.

  9. Hypercholesterolemia in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice and its reversal by adenovirus-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, S; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Gerard, R D; Hammer, R E; Herz, J

    1993-01-01

    We employed homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to produce mice lacking functional LDL receptor genes. Homozygous male and female mice lacking LDL receptors (LDLR-/- mice) were viable and fertile. Total plasma cholesterol levels were twofold higher than those of wild-type litter-mates, owing to a seven- to ninefold increase in intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) and LDL without a significant change in HDL. Plasma triglyceride levels were normal. The half-lives for intravenously administered 125I-VLDL and 125I-LDL were prolonged by 30-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively, but the clearance of 125I-HDL was normal in the LDLR-/- mice. Unlike wild-type mice, LDLR-/- mice responded to moderate amounts of dietary cholesterol (0.2% cholesterol/10% coconut oil) with a major increase in the cholesterol content of IDL and LDL particles. The elevated IDL/LDL level of LDLR-/- mice was reduced to normal 4 d after the intravenous injection of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus encoding the human LDL receptor driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The virus restored expression of LDL receptor protein in the liver and increased the clearance of 125I-VLDL. We conclude that the LDL receptor is responsible in part for the low levels of VLDL, IDL, and LDL in wild-type mice and that adenovirus-encoded LDL receptors can acutely reverse the hypercholesterolemic effects of LDL receptor deficiency. Images PMID:8349823

  10. An Update on Canine Adenovirus Type 2 and Its Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Thierry; Salinas, Sara; Kremer, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors have significant potential for long- or short-term gene transfer. Preclinical and clinical studies using human derived adenoviruses (HAd) have demonstrated the feasibility of flexible hybrid vector designs, robust expression and induction of protective immunity. However, clinical use of HAd vectors can, under some conditions, be limited by pre-existing vector immunity. Pre-existing humoral and cellular anti-capsid immunity limits the efficacy and duration of transgene expression and is poorly circumvented by injections of larger doses and immuno-suppressing drugs. This review updates canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV-2, also known as CAdV-2) biology and gives an overview of the generation of early region 1 (E1)-deleted to helper-dependent (HD) CAV-2 vectors. We also summarize the essential characteristics concerning their interaction with the anti-HAd memory immune responses in humans, the preferential transduction of neurons, and its high level of retrograde axonal transport in the central and peripheral nervous system. CAV-2 vectors are particularly interesting tools to study the pathophysiology and potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as anti-tumoral and anti-viral vaccines, tracer of synaptic junctions, oncolytic virus and as a platform to generate chimeric vectors. PMID:21994722

  11. Effects of adenovirus-mediated expression of p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A in cell lines derived from t(2;5) anaplastic large cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Franceso; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Seth, Prem

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the response of SUDHL-1 and L428 cells, derived from t(2;5)-anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), respectively, to recombinant adenoviruses expressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27Kip1 (Adp27), p21Waf1 (Adp21) and p16INK4A (Adp16). Cell cycle analysis of SUDHL-1 cells after 24 h of infection with 200 multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Adp27, Adp21, and Adp16, showed very high levels of cell debris in the subG1 area. The magnitude of cell debris-events was Adp27/Adp21 > Adp16. Cell cycle analysis of L428 cells revealed absence of cell debris and increased G2 phase in all the groups of cells tested as compared to the controls (mock and AdNull). A minimal increase in G1 phase was also evident in cells infected with Adp27 (52%) compared to uninfected cells (43%), AdNull (45%) and to cells infected with Adp21 (37%) and Adp16 (31%). The presence of significant levels of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the cell surface of L428 cells excluded the cell membrane-barrier as responsible for the differences in cell observed in response to the recombinant adenovirus-mediated CDKIs expression as compared to SUDHL-1. We also showed that the recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxicity measured as apoptosis was MOI- and vector-dependent in SUDHL-1 cells at lower MOI (100). In conclusion, the therapeutic effect induced by recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A is cell-dependent in cells derived from selected lymphoid malignancies. Biochemical cellular differences more than cell surface barriers seem to be responsible for differences in response to recombinant adenovirus-mediated expression of cytotoxic genes. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A may be further explored as a tool for gene therapy of t(2;5)-derived ALCL.

  12. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  13. Effective restoration of dystrophin-associated proteins in vivo by adenovirus-mediated transfer of truncated dystrophin cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, K; Miyagoe, Y; Yamamoto, K; Nabeshima, Y; Dickson, G; Takeda, S

    1998-03-27

    A series of truncated dystrophin cDNAs (3.1-4.2 kbp) containing only three, three, two or one rod repeats with hinge 1 and 4 (named deltaDysAX2, AX11, AH3, M3, respectively) or no rod repeat retaining either hinge 1 or 4 (named deltaDysH1, H4, respectively) were constructed. These cDNAs were introduced into skeletal muscle of adult mdx mice using the adenovirus vector with a strong CAG promoter. deltaDysAX2, AX11, AH3 and deltaDysM3 expressed themselves successfully and recovered dystrophin-associated proteins effectively. Especially 3.7 kbp cDNA for deltaDysM3 offers the possibility of an approach utilizing newly developed virus vectors, such as an adeno-associated virus vector, toward gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Extensive beta-glucuronidase activity in murine central nervous system after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to brain.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, A; Stein, C; Derksen, T; Yang, G; Anderson, R D; Davidson, B L

    1998-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), caused by beta-glucuronidase deficiency, is a classic lysosomal storage disease. In the central nervous system (CNS), there is widespread pathology with distention of vacuoles in neurons and glia. An approach to therapy for MPS VII would require extensive delivery of enzyme to the CNS and subsequent uptake by the affected cells. In this study we show that intrastriatal injection of recombinant adenovirus encoding beta-glucuronidase (Ad betagluc) to MPS VII or wild-type mice results in focal, intense beta-glucuronidase mRNA expression near the injection site. Further, histochemical staining for enzyme activity showed that beta-glucuronidase activity extended well beyond transduced cells. Activity was detected throughout the ipsilateral striatum as well as in the corpus callosum, ventricles, and bilateral neocortex. Similarly, after injection into the right lateral ventricle or cisterna magna, enzyme activity was present in the ependymal cells of the ventricles, in the subarachnoid spaces, and also in the underlying cortex (150-500 microm from ependyma). The distribution of enzyme was most extensive 21 days after gene transfer to normal mouse brain, with more than 50% of the hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity. Eighty-four days after adenovirus injection a substantial level of enzyme expression remained (>40% of hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity). Histological sections from striatum of beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice injected with Ad betagluc showed a marked reduction in the number of distended vacuoles in both neurons and glia, as compared with uninjected striatum. Importantly, correction was noted in both hemispheres. Our finding that a relatively small number of transduced cells produce enzyme that reaches a large proportion of the CNS has favorable implications in developing direct gene transfer therapies for lysosomal storage disorders.

  15. A decay-accelerating factor-binding strain of coxsackievirus B3 requires the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein to mediate lytic infection of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shafren, D R; Williams, D T; Barry, R D

    1997-01-01

    The composition of the cellular receptor complex for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been an area of much contention for the last 30 years. Recently, two individual components of a putative CVB3 cellular receptor complex have been identified as (i) decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and (ii) the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein (CAR). The present study elucidates the individual roles of DAF and CAR in cell entry of CVB3 Nancy. First, we confirm that the DAF-binding phenotype of CVB3 correlates to the presence of key amino acids located in the viral capsid protein, VP2. Second, using antibody blockade, we show that complete protection of permissive cells from infection by high input multiplicities of CVB3 requires a combination of both anti-DAF and anti-CAR antibodies. Finally, it is shown that expression of the CAR protein on the surface of nonpermissive DAF-expressing RD cells renders them highly susceptible to CVB3-mediated lytic infection. Therefore, although the majority of CVB3 Nancy attaches to the cell via DAF, only virus directly interacting with the CAR protein mediates lytic infection. The role of DAF in CVB3 cell infection may be analogous to that recently described for coxsackievirus A21 (D. R. Shafren, D. J. Dorahy, R. A. Ingham, G. F. Burns, and R. D. Barry, J. Virol. 71:4736-4743, 1997), in that DAF may act as a CVB3 sequestration site, enhancing viral presentation to the functional CAR protein. PMID:9371658

  16. Induction of CD8(+) T cell responses and protective efficacy following microneedle-mediated delivery of a live adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Frances E; O'Mahony, Conor; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-06-22

    There is an urgent need for improvements in vaccine delivery technologies. This is particularly pertinent for vaccination programmes within regions of limited resources, such as those required for adequate provision for disposal of used needles. Microneedles are micron-sized structures that penetrate the stratum corneum of the skin, creating temporary conduits for the needle-free delivery of drugs or vaccines. Here, we aimed to investigate immunity induced by the recombinant simian adenovirus-vectored vaccine ChAd63.ME-TRAP; currently undergoing clinical assessment as a candidate malaria vaccine, when delivered percutaneously by silicon microneedle arrays. In mice, we demonstrate that microneedle-mediated delivery of ChAd63.ME-TRAP induced similar numbers of transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells compared to intradermal (ID) administration with needle-and-syringe, following a single immunisation and after a ChAd63/MVA heterologous prime-boost schedule. When mice immunised with ChAd63/MVA were challenged with live Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, microneedle-mediated ChAd63.ME-TRAP priming demonstrated equivalent protective efficacy as did ID immunisation. Furthermore, responses following ChAd63/MVA immunisation correlated with a specific design parameter of the array used ('total array volume'). The level of transgene expression at the immunisation site and skin-draining lymph node (dLN) was also linked to total array volume. These findings have implications for defining silicon microneedle array design for use with live, vectored vaccines.

  17. Enhanced anti-tumor activity by the combination of a conditionally replicating adenovirus mediated interleukin-24 and dacarbazine against melanoma cells via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan; Liu, Yan-Qun; Wei, Zhi-Ping; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Li-Jun; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2010-08-28

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most lethal and aggressive human malignancies. It is notoriously resistant to all of the current therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy. Suppressed apoptosis and extraordinary invasiveness are the distinctive features that contribute to the malignancy of melanoma. Dacarbazine (DTIC) has been considered as the gold standard for melanoma treatment with a response rate of 15-20%. Unfortunately, the resistance to this chemotherapeutic agent occurs frequently. ZD55-IL-24 is a selective conditionally replicating adenovirus that can mediate the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene, which has a strong anti-tumor effect. In this study, we hypothesized that a combination of ZD55-IL-24-mediated gene virotherapy and chemotherapy using DTIC would produce an increased cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells in comparison with these agents alone. Our results showed that the combination of ZD55-IL-24 and DTIC significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity by more effectively inducing apoptosis in melanoma cells than either agent used alone without any overlapping toxicity against normal cells. This additive or synergistic effect of ZD55-IL-24 in combination with DTIC in killing human malignant melanoma cells implies a promising novel approach for melanoma therapy.

  18. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  19. Adenovirus-mediated tBid overexpression results in therapeutic effects on p53-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Chen, George G; Chun, Suk-Ying; Yun, Jing-Ping; Chak, Ernest C W; Ho, Rocky L K; Lai, Paul B S

    2006-10-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with a very high mortality. Because the success of the conventional therapies is limited, gene therapy may represent an alternative for HCC management. Our earlier study has shown that Bid plays a role in the development of HCC. The aim of our study is to evaluate the possibility of using truncated Bid (tBid) as a novel therapy for HCC treatment. Two HCC cell lines, Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5, were used in the experiment. Hep3B was a p53-resistant while PLC/PRF/5 a p53-sensitive. A recombinant adenovirus-Ad/AFPtBid, which contained a tBid gene driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter, was constructed. Both Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5 cells infected with Ad/AFPtBid showed a significant decrease in cell viability. The decrease in cell viability by Ad/AFPtBid resulted from apoptosis of HCC cells, evident by enhanced activity of caspases and increased release of cytochrome c. In vivo experiment was performed by the intratumor injection of Ad/AFPtBid in nude mice inoculated with Hep3B. Ad/AFPtBid injection significantly inhibited tumor growth, and tumor tissues showed a marked increase in TUNEL-positive cells. Our experiment also demonstrated that Ad/AFPtBid only targeted AFP-producing cells but not those non-AFP producing cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that the introduction of Ad/AFPtBid can not only significantly but specifically kill HCC cells that produce AFP. The cell death induced by Ad/AFPtBid in HCC cells is via an apoptotic pathway that can be independent of p53 status.

  20. Effect of adenovirus mediated β2-AR overexpression on IL-10 level secreted by cardiomyocytes of heart failure rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Zheng, Cheng; Liu, Ying; Wang, Lei; Gong, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    The effect of β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) overexpression on interleukin (IL)-10 content secreted by cardiomyocytes of heart failure (HF) rats was investigated. A rat model of chronic HF was established by partially banding abdominal aorta and the cardiomyocytes were isolated with collagenase II. The cardiomyocytes were then transfected with adenovirus type 5-ADRβ2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) for 48 h to observe the changes of β2-AR protein expression using western blot analysis. The IL-10 level was detected by ELISA. The experiment was divided into seven groups: Control, HF, HF+EGFP, HF+β2, sham, sham+EGFP and sham+β2 groups. Compared with the sham-operated group, left ventricular diastolic dimension, and left ventricular systolic dimension were increased (P<0.05), whereas ejection fraction and fractional shortening were decreased (P<0.05) in the HF group. Compared with the sham group, the cardiomyocyte survival rate of the HF group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). Compared with the control or sham group, the β2-AR protein level of the HF group showed no significant differences (P>0.05). Compared with the HF and HF+EGFP groups, the expression of β2-AR protein of cardiomyocytes was increased in the HF+β2 group (P<0.05). Compared with the sham group, IL-10 content secreted by cardiomyocytes in the HF group was increased (P<0.05). Compared with the HF and HF+EGFP groups, IL-10 content in the HF+β2 group was increased significantly (P<0.05). In conclusion, the concentration of IL-10 secreted by cardiomyocytes of HF rats was increased. The overexpression of β2-AR in the cardiomyocytes of HF rats was able to enhance the secretion of IL-10. PMID:27602066

  1. Augmentation of lung liquid clearance via adenovirus-mediated transfer of a Na,K-ATPase beta1 subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Factor, P; Saldias, F; Ridge, K; Dumasius, V; Zabner, J; Jaffe, H A; Blanco, G; Barnard, M; Mercer, R; Perrin, R; Sznajder, J I

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alveolar Na,K-ATPases play an important role in active Na+ transport and lung edema clearance. We reasoned that overexpression of Na,K-ATPase subunit genes could increase Na,K-ATPase function in lung epithelial cells and edema clearance in rat lungs. To test this hypothesis we produced replication deficient human type 5 adenoviruses containing cDNAs for the rat alpha1 and beta1 Na,K-ATPase subunits (adMRCMValpha1 and adMRCMVbeta1, respectively). As compared to controls, adMRCMVbeta1 increased beta1 subunit expression and Na,K-ATPase function by 2. 5-fold in alveolar type 2 epithelial cells and rat airway epithelial cell monolayers. No change in Na,K-ATPase function was noted after infection with adMRCMValpha1. Rat lungs infected with adMRCMVbeta1, but not adMRCMValpha1, had increased beta1 protein levels and lung liquid clearance 7 d after tracheal instillation. Alveolar epithelial permeability to Na+ and mannitol was mildly increased in animals infected with adMRCMVbeta1 and a similar Escherichia coli lacZ-expressing virus. Our data shows, for the first time, that transfer of the beta1 Na,K-ATPase subunit gene augments Na,K-ATPase function in epithelial cells and liquid clearance in rat lungs. Conceivably, overexpression of Na,K-ATPases could be used as a strategy to augment lung liquid clearance in patients with pulmonary edema. PMID:9769335

  2. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  3. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of endostatin in vivo results in high level of transgene expression and inhibition of tumor growth and metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Bernhard V.; Martinet, Olivier; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Mandeli, John; Woo, Savio L. C.

    2000-04-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis has been shown to be an effective strategy in cancer therapy in mice. However, its widespread application has been hampered by difficulties in the large-scale production of the antiangiogenic proteins. This limitation may be resolved by in vivo delivery and expression of the antiangiogenic genes. We have constructed a recombinant adenovirus that expresses murine endostatin that is biologically active both in vitro, as determined in endothelial cell proliferation assays, and in vivo, by suppression of angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor 165. Persistent high serum levels of endostatin (605-1740 ng/ml; mean, 936 ng/ml) were achieved after systemic administration of the vector to nude mice, which resulted in significant reduction of the growth rates and the volumes of JC breast carcinoma and Lewis lung carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). In addition, the endostatin vector treatment completely prevented the formation of pulmonary micrometastases in Lewis lung carcinoma (P = 0.0001). Immunohistochemical staining of the tumors demonstrated a decreased number of blood vessels in the treatment group versus the controls. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the potential of vector-mediated antiangiogenic gene therapy as a component in cancer therapy.

  4. Adenovirus-Mediated Somatic Genome Editing of Pten by CRISPR/Cas9 in Mouse Liver in Spite of Cas9-Specific Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Mou, Haiwei; Li, Shaoyong; Li, Yingxiang; Hough, Soren; Tran, Karen; Li, Jia; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Sontheimer, Erik J; Weng, Zhiping; Gao, Guangping; Xue, Wen

    2015-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 derived from the bacterial adaptive immunity pathway is a powerful tool for genome editing, but the safety profiles of in vivo delivered Cas9 (including host immune responses to the bacterial Cas9 protein) have not been comprehensively investigated in model organisms. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a prevalent human liver disease characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver. In this study, we used adenovirus (Ad) vector to deliver a Streptococcus pyogenes-derived Cas9 system (SpCas9) targeting Pten, a gene involved in NASH and a negative regulator of the PI3K-AKT pathway, in mouse liver. We found that the Ad vector mediated efficient Pten gene editing even in the presence of typical Ad vector-associated immunotoxicity in the liver. Four months after vector infusion, mice receiving the Pten gene-editing Ad vector showed massive hepatomegaly and features of NASH, consistent with the phenotypes following Cre-loxP-induced Pten deficiency in mouse liver. We also detected induction of humoral immunity against SpCas9 and the potential presence of an SpCas9-specific cellular immune response. Our findings provide a strategy to model human liver diseases in mice and highlight the importance considering Cas9-specific immune responses in future translational studies involving in vivo delivery of CRISPR/Cas9.

  5. Silk-Elastinlike Hydrogel Improves the Safety of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene-Directed Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Joshua A.; Price, Robert A.; Greish, Khaled; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein polymers (SELPs) are well-known for their highly tunable properties on both the molecular and macroscopic hydrogel level. One specific structure of these polymers, SELP-815K, has been investigated as an injectable controlled delivery system for the treatment of head and neck cancer via a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Due to its pore size and gelation properties in vivo, SELP restricts the distribution and controls the release of therapeutic viruses for up to one month. It has been shown that SELP-mediated delivery significantly improves therapeutic outcome of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system in xenograft models of human head and neck cancer. However little is known about potential benefits of this approach with regard to toxicity in the presence of a fully intact immune system. The studies presented here were designed to assess the change in toxicity of the SELP mediated viral delivery compared to free viral injection in a non-tumor bearing immune competent mouse model. Toxicity was assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks via body weight monitoring, complete blood count (CBC), and blood chemistry. It was found that in the acute and subacute phases (weeks 1-4) there is significant toxicity in groups combining the virus and the prodrug, and matrix-mediated gene delivery with SELP demonstrates a reduction in toxicity from the 2 week time point through the 4 week time point. At the end of the subchronic phase (12 weeks), signs of toxicity had subsided in both groups. Based on these results, recombinant SELPs offer a significant reduction in toxicity of virus-mediated GDEPT treatment compared to free virus injection in the acute and subacute phases. PMID:20586469

  6. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  7. Sublingual administration of a helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing the codon-optimized soluble fusion glycoprotein of human respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan-hui; Jiao, Yue-Ying; He, Jin-sheng; Giang, Gui-Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Yi-Fei; Ma, Yao; Hua, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Peng, Xiang-Lei; Shi, Chang-Xin; Hong, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Sublingual (s.l.) immunization has been described as a convenient and safe way to induce mucosal immune responses in the respiratory and genital tracts. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector expressing a condon-optimized soluble fusion glycoprotein (sFsyn) of respiratory syncytial virus (HDAd-sFsyn) and explored the potential of s.l. immunization with HDAd-sFsyn to stimulate immune responses in the respiratory mucosa. The RSV specific systemic and mucosal immune responses were generated in BALB/c mice, and the serum IgG with neutralizing activity was significantly elevated after homologous boost with s.l. application of HDAd-sFsyn. Humoral immune responses could be measured even 14weeks after a single immunization. Upon challenge, s.l. immunization with HDAd-sFsyn displayed an effective protection against RSV infection. These findings suggest that s.l. administration of HDAd-sFsyn acts as an effective and safe mucosal vaccine against RSV infection, and may be a useful tool in the prevention of RSV infection.

  8. Silencing E1A mRNA by RNA interference inhibits adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-S; Kim, M-K; Lee, W-J; Kang, C

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus family contains 51 human serotypes, and most human adenoviruses cause widespread respiratory tract infections. Adenovirus infections can result in severe complications in some cases, such as in adenovirus type 11 infection in immunocompromised patients. However, effective treatment methods for adenovirus infections are currently unavailable. This prompted the search for antiviral agents effective against adenovirus infections. In the present study, adenovirus E1A was targeted by RNA interference (RNAi) using synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in an attempt to inhibit viral replication, since adenovirus E1A proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional activation of the viral and cellular genes necessary for controlling the cell cycle and viral replication. The results indicated that the siRNAs effectively reduced the amount of adenovirus E1A mRNA and the levels of replicative intermediates. Additionally, siRNA-mediated gene silencing inhibited adenovirus replication by suppressing the E1A mRNA. These results suggest that the RNAi-mediated targeting of adenovirus E1A may have a potentially therapeutic effect in controlling adenovirus infections.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers.

  10. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  11. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer radiosensitizes H1299 cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Duan, Xin; Hao, Jifang; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Wang, Yanling; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    To determine whether adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer after radiotherapy could radiosensitize non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion beam (C-beam), H1299 cells were exposed to a C-beam or gamma-ray and then infected with 5 MOI of AdCMV-p53 or GFP (C-beam or gamma-ray with p53 or GFP). Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometric analysis. The apoptosis was examined by a fluorescent microscope with DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation was monitored by the TUNEL assay. P53 mRNA was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The expression of p53, MDM(2), and p21 was monitored by Western blot. Survival fractions were determined by colony-forming assay. The percentages of G(1)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 8.2%-16.0%, 5.2%-7.0%, and 5.8%-18.9%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The accumulation of G(2)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 5.7%-8.9% and 8.8%-14.8%, compared with those in gamma-ray with p53 or p53 only, respectively. The percentage of apoptosis for C-beam with p53 increased by 7.4%-19.1%, 5.8%-11.7%, and 5.2 %-19.2%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The level of p53 mRNA in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in p53 only. The expression level of p53 and p21 in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in both C-beam with GFP and p53 only. The survival fractions for C-beam with p53 were significantly less than those for the other groups (p < 0.05). The data suggested that AdCMV-p53 transfer could more efficiently radiosensitize H1299 cells to subclinical-dose C-beam irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

  12. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common in late winter, spring, and early summer conjunctivitis (pinkeye) and pharyngoconjunctival fever caused by adenovirus tend to ... cystitis usually resolves on its own. Eye infections: Pinkeye (conjunctivitis) is a mild inflammation of the conjunctiva ( ...

  13. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  14. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  15. Proinflammatory Effects of Interferon Gamma in Mouse Adenovirus 1 Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mary K.; Procario, Megan C.; Twisselmann, Nele; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Archambeau, Ashley J.; Michele, Daniel E.; Day, Sharlene M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviruses are frequent causes of pediatric myocarditis. Little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, and the species specificity of human adenoviruses has limited the development of animal models, which is a significant barrier to strategies for prevention or treatment. We have developed a mouse model of myocarditis following mouse adenovirus 1 (MAV-1) infection to study the pathogenic mechanisms of this important cause of pediatric myocarditis. Following intranasal infection of neonatal C57BL/6 mice, we detected viral replication and induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the hearts of infected mice. MAV-1 caused myocyte necrosis and induced substantial cellular inflammation that was composed predominantly of CD3+ T lymphocytes. Depletion of IFN-γ during acute infection reduced cardiac inflammation in MAV-1-infected mice without affecting viral replication. We observed decreased contractility during acute infection of neonatal mice, and persistent viral infection in the heart was associated with cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy in adulthood. IFN-γ is a proinflammatory mediator during adenovirus-induced myocarditis, and persistent adenovirus infection may contribute to ongoing cardiac dysfunction. IMPORTANCE Studying the pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by different viruses is essential in order to characterize both virus-specific and generalized factors that contribute to disease. Very little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, which is a significant impediment to the development of treatment or prevention strategies. We used MAV-1 to establish a mouse model of human adenovirus myocarditis, providing the means to study host and pathogen factors contributing to adenovirus-induced cardiac disease during acute and persistent infection. The MAV-1 model will enable fundamental studies of viral myocarditis, including IFN-γ modulation as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:25320326

  16. A Genetically Engineered Adenovirus Vector Targeted to CD40 Mediates Transduction of Canine Dendritic Cells and Promotes Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Erin E.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Smith, Bruce F.; Bird, R. Curtis; Muminova, Zhanat; Strong, Theresa; Timares, Laura; Korokhov, Nikolay; O'Neill, Ann Marie; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Tani, Kenzaburo; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting viral vectors encoding tumor-associated antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo is likely to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. We have previously shown that genetic modification of adenovirus (Ad) 5 to incorporate CD40 ligand (CD40L) rather than native fiber allows selective transduction and activation of DCs in vitro. Here, we examine the capacity of this targeted vector to induce immune responses to the tumor antigen CEA in a stringent in vivo canine model. CD40-targeted Ad5 transduced canine DCs via the CD40-CD40L pathway in vitro, and following vaccination of healthy dogs, CD40-targeted Ad5 induced strong anti-CEA cellular and humoral responses. These data validate the canine model for future translational studies and suggest targeting of Ad5 vectors to CD40 for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs is a feasible approach for successful cancer therapy. PMID:19786146

  17. Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) differentially affects cell-mediated and antibody responses to CSP and AMA1 induced by adenovirus vaccines with and without DNA-priming

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that a DNA-prime followed by an adenovirus-5 boost vaccine containing CSP and AMA1 (DNA/Ad) successfully protected 4 of 15 subjects to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). However, the adenovirus-5 vaccine alone (AdCA) failed to induce protection despite eliciting cellular responses that were often higher than those induced by DNA/Ad. Here we determined the effect of CHMI on pre-CHMI cellular and antibody responses against CSP and AMA1 expressed as fold-changes in activities. Generally, in the DNA/Ad trial, CHMI caused pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the protected subjects to fall but among non-protected subjects, CHMI caused rises of pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ but falls of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses. In contrast in the AdCA trial, CHMI caused both pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the AdCA subjects to fall. We suggest that the falls in activities are due to migration of peripheral CD8+ T cells to the liver in response to developing liver stage parasites, and this fall, in the DNA/Ad trial, is masked in ELISpot responses of the non-protected subjects by rises in other immune cell types. In addition, CHMI caused falls in antibody activities of protected subjects, but rises in non-protected subjects in both trials to CSP, and dramatically in the AdCA trial to AMA1, reaching 380 μg/ml that is probably due to boosting by transient blood stage infection before chloroquine treatment. Taken together, these results further define differences in cellular responses between DNA/Ad and AdCA trials, and suggest that natural transmission may boost responses induced by these malaria vaccines especially when protection is not achieved. PMID:26292027

  18. Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) differentially affects cell-mediated and antibody responses to CSP and AMA1 induced by adenovirus vaccines with and without DNA-priming.

    PubMed

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that a DNA-prime followed by an adenovirus-5 boost vaccine containing CSP and AMA1 (DNA/Ad) successfully protected 4 of 15 subjects to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). However, the adenovirus-5 vaccine alone (AdCA) failed to induce protection despite eliciting cellular responses that were often higher than those induced by DNA/Ad. Here we determined the effect of CHMI on pre-CHMI cellular and antibody responses against CSP and AMA1 expressed as fold-changes in activities. Generally, in the DNA/Ad trial, CHMI caused pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the protected subjects to fall but among non-protected subjects, CHMI caused rises of pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ but falls of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses. In contrast in the AdCA trial, CHMI caused both pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the AdCA subjects to fall. We suggest that the falls in activities are due to migration of peripheral CD8+ T cells to the liver in response to developing liver stage parasites, and this fall, in the DNA/Ad trial, is masked in ELISpot responses of the non-protected subjects by rises in other immune cell types. In addition, CHMI caused falls in antibody activities of protected subjects, but rises in non-protected subjects in both trials to CSP, and dramatically in the AdCA trial to AMA1, reaching 380 μg/ml that is probably due to boosting by transient blood stage infection before chloroquine treatment. Taken together, these results further define differences in cellular responses between DNA/Ad and AdCA trials, and suggest that natural transmission may boost responses induced by these malaria vaccines especially when protection is not achieved.

  19. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4+ or CD8+ cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3DTR mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma. PMID:27633092

  20. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-09-16

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4(+) or CD8(+) cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3(DTR) mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma.

  1. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Gene therapy for human nasopharyngeal carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated transfer of human p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Su-Ping; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Bin; Han, Ying; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2008-10-01

    Incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains high in endemic regions. Prevention of tumor recurrences and metastases is a crucial approach to improve therapeutic outcome in NPC patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cotransfer of the tumor suppressor gene, p53, in combination with the immunostimulatory genes, GM-CSF and B7-1, on tumor regression and subsequent tumor recurrence. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus carrying human wild-type p53, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and B7-1 genes (Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1), which mediated high-level expression of these three genes in NPC CNE-1 cells. Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 infection inhibited the growth of CNE-1 cells and induced tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro. In CNE-1 xenograft tumor models in huPBL-nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, an intratumoral injection of Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 resulted in a reduced tumor burden, compared to normal saline (NS) and Ad-p53 controls. Tumors in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group displayed diffuse necrosis and infiltration of human T-cells. Further, the tumor occurrence of CNE-1 cell rechallenge largely decreased after the primary tumor was intratumorally injected with Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 in the HuPBL-NOD/SCID mice model. Only 2 of 8 (25%) animals in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group had developed measurable tumors, which demonstrated extensive necrosis and much more human T-cell infiltration, compared to 5 of 7 (71%) in the NS and Ad-p53 groups. Therefore, the adenovirus-mediated introduction of p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes could improve local control and prevent the recurrence or metastases of NPC tumors, which suggests a potential therapeutic value in NPC treatment.

  4. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  5. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  6. Multi-layered control of Galectin-8 mediated autophagy during adenovirus cell entry through a conserved PPxY motif in the viral capsid

    PubMed Central

    Montespan, Charlotte; Marvin, Shauna A.; Burrage, Andrew M.; Roger, Benoit; Rayne, Fabienne; Schneider, Carola; Reimer, Rudolph; Wiethoff, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    Cells employ active measures to restrict infection by pathogens, even prior to responses from the innate and humoral immune defenses. In this context selective autophagy is activated upon pathogen induced membrane rupture to sequester and deliver membrane fragments and their pathogen contents for lysosomal degradation. Adenoviruses, which breach the endosome upon entry, escape this fate by penetrating into the cytosol prior to autophagosome sequestration of the ruptured endosome. We show that virus induced membrane damage is recognized through Galectin-8 and sequesters the autophagy receptors NDP52 and p62. We further show that a conserved PPxY motif in the viral membrane lytic protein VI is critical for efficient viral evasion of autophagic sequestration after endosomal lysis. Comparing the wildtype with a PPxY-mutant virus we show that depletion of Galectin-8 or suppression of autophagy in ATG5-/- MEFs rescues infectivity of the PPxY-mutant virus while depletion of the autophagy receptors NDP52, p62 has only minor effects. Furthermore we show that wildtype viruses exploit the autophagic machinery for efficient nuclear genome delivery and control autophagosome formation via the cellular ubiquitin ligase Nedd4.2 resulting in reduced antigenic presentation. Our data thus demonstrate that a short PPxY-peptide motif in the adenoviral capsid permits multi-layered viral control of autophagic processes during entry. PMID:28192531

  7. The adaptor protein DCAF7 mediates the interaction of the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein with the protein kinases DYRK1A and HIPK2

    PubMed Central

    Glenewinkel, Florian; Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Kaspar, Sophie; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Mymryk, Joe S.; Becker, Walter

    2016-01-01

    DYRK1A is a constitutively active protein kinase that has a critical role in growth and development which functions by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. DCAF7 (also termed WDR68 or HAN11) is a cellular binding partner of DYRK1A and also regulates signalling by the protein kinase HIPK2. DCAF7 is an evolutionarily conserved protein with a single WD40 repeat domain and has no catalytic activity. We have defined a DCAF7 binding motif of 12 amino acids in the N-terminal domain of class 1 DYRKs that is functionally conserved in DYRK1 orthologs from Xenopus, Danio rerio and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. A similar sequence was essential for DCAF7 binding to HIPK2, whereas the closely related HIPK1 family member did not bind DCAF7. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments identified DCAF7 as an adaptor for the association of the adenovirus E1A protein with DYRK1A and HIPK2. Furthermore, DCAF7 was required for the hyperphosphorylation of E1A in DYRK1A or HIPK2 overexpressing cells. Our results characterize DCAF7 as a substrate recruiting subunit of DYRK1A and HIPK2 and suggest that it is required for the negative effect of DYRK1A on E1A-induced oncogenic transformation. PMID:27307198

  8. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated ectopic expression of Msx2 in even-numbered rhombomeres induces apoptotic elimination of cranial neural crest cells in ovo.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nuckolls, G H; Tanaka, O; Semba, I; Takahashi, I; Dashner, R; Shum, L; Slavkin, H C

    1998-05-01

    Distinct cranial neural crest-derived cell types (a number of neuronal as well as non-neuronal cell lineages) are generated at characteristic times and positions in the rhombomeres of the hindbrain in developing vertebrate embryos. To examine this developmental process, we developed a novel strategy designed to test the efficacy of gain-of-function Msx2 expression within rhombomeres in ovo prior to the emigration of cranial neural crest cells (CNCC). Previous studies indicate that CNCC from odd-numbered rhombomeres (r3 and r5) undergo apoptosis in response to exogenous BMP4. We provide evidence that targeted infection in ovo using adenovirus containing Msx2 and a reporter molecule indicative of translation can induce apoptosis in either even- or odd-numbered rhombomeres. Furthermore, infected lacZ-control explants indicated that CNCC emigrated, and that 20% of these cells were double positive for crest cell markers HNK-1 and beta-gal. In contrast, there were no HNK-1 and Msx2 double positive cells emigrating from Msx2 infected explants. These results support the hypothesis that apoptotic elimination of CNCC can be induced by 'gain-of-function' Msx2 expression in even-numbered rhombomeres. These inductive interactions involve qualitative, quantitative, positional and temporal differences in TGF-beta-related signals, Msx2 expression and other transcriptional control.

  10. Antiviral antibodies target adenovirus to phagolysosomes and amplify the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Anne K; Vilaysane, Akosua; Cotter, Matthew J; Clark, Sharon A; Meijndert, H Christopher; Colarusso, Pina; Yates, Robin M; Petrilli, Virginie; Tschopp, Jurg; Muruve, Daniel A

    2009-06-01

    Adenovirus is a nonenveloped dsDNA virus that activates intracellular innate immune pathways. In vivo, adenovirus-immunized mice displayed an enhanced innate immune response and diminished virus-mediated gene delivery following challenge with the adenovirus vector AdLacZ suggesting that antiviral Abs modulate viral interactions with innate immune cells. Under naive serum conditions in vitro, adenovirus binding and internalization in macrophages and the subsequent activation of innate immune mechanisms were inefficient. In contrast to the neutralizing effect observed in nonhematopoietic cells, adenovirus infection in the presence of antiviral Abs significantly increased FcR-dependent viral internalization in macrophages. In direct correlation with the increased viral internalization, antiviral Abs amplified the innate immune response to adenovirus as determined by the expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes, type I IFNs, and caspase-dependent IL-1beta maturation. Immune serum amplified TLR9-independent type I IFN expression and enhanced NLRP3-dependent IL-1beta maturation in response to adenovirus, confirming that antiviral Abs specifically amplify intracellular innate pathways. In the presence of Abs, confocal microscopy demonstrated increased targeting of adenovirus to LAMP1-positive phagolysosomes in macrophages but not epithelial cells. These data show that antiviral Abs subvert natural viral tropism and target the adenovirus to phagolysosomes and the intracellular innate immune system in macrophages. Furthermore, these results illustrate a cross-talk where the adaptive immune system positively regulates the innate immune system and the antiviral state.

  11. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  12. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  13. Anti-prostate cancer effects of CTL cell induction in vitro by recombinant adenovirus mediated PSMA/4-1BBL dendritic cells: an immunotherapy study.

    PubMed

    Sui, C-G; Wu, D; Meng, F-D; Yang, M-H; Jiang, Y-H

    2015-06-29

    This study aimed to examine anti-prostate cancer immune response induced by dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with PSMA/4-1BBL recombinant adenoviruses in vitro. Ad-PSMA, Ad-4-1BBL, and Ad-GFP were transfected into DCs derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Ad-PSMA/4-1BBL-DC, Ad-PSMA-DC, Ad-4-1BBL-DC, Ad-GFP-DC, and normal-DC, PSMA and 4-1BBL protein levels in DCs were detected by western blot. IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. Mixed lymphocyte reaction and the cytotoxicity of each group targeted to LNCap, Du145, and 22RV prostate cancer cells were determined by CCK-8 assay. PSMA and 4-1BBL protein could express on DC successfully, the IL-12 supernatant content (134.29 ± 2.22 pg) was higher than others (P < 0.05). The ability to stimulate autologous T lymphocyte proliferation in the co-transfection group was higher than others (P < 0.05). When the DCs were co-cultured with CTLs, the PSMA/4-1BBL-DC-CTL group showed the highest content of IFN-γ (1176.10 ± 14.37pg/5 x 10(6) cells), but the lowest IL-10 content (75.14 ± 2.01 pg/5 x 10(6) cells) (P < 0.05), and the strongest anti-tumor effect when the effector to target ratio was 40:1, along with a higher killing ratio of LNCap cells than others (P < 0.05). Overall, Mature DCs transfected with Ad-PSMA/4- 1BBL not only showed high secretion of IL-12, but also induced CTLs to stimulate and enhance the killing effect of PSMA specific effector cells to PSMA positively expressing prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the DCs infected with two kinds of tumor-associated antigens would induce more effective tumor-specific CTL induction.

  14. Exploiting features of adenovirus replication to support mammalian kinase production

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, Matt; Stegmueller, Kerstin; Eickhoff, Jan; Hanke, Miriam; Herzberger, Katrin; Herget, Thomas; Choidas, Axel; Daub, Henrik; Godl, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Faced with the current wealth of genomic data, it is essential to have robust and reliable methods of converting DNA sequences into their functional gene products. We demonstrate here that when conditions are established that take advantage of the replication-associated virus amplification, the virus-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis as well as the activation of signalling pathways that normally occur during virus replication, adenovirus biology can be exploited to generate a potent kinase expression system. Residual virus in the protein production has always been a limitation for adenovirus systems and we describe a DNA intercalator/ultraviolet light treatment that eliminates residual adenovirus in protein preparations that has no deleterious effect on enzyme activity. The use of mammalian cells in combination with adenovirus generated a variety of active enzymes which could not be produced in Escherichia coli or baculovirus-infected insect cells. Thus, the utility of adenovirus-mediated enzyme expression as a versatile alternative to established protein production technologies is demonstrated. PMID:14576328

  15. Exploiting features of adenovirus replication to support mammalian kinase production.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Matt; Stegmueller, Kerstin; Eickhoff, Jan; Hanke, Miriam; Herzberger, Katrin; Herget, Thomas; Choidas, Axel; Daub, Henrik; Godl, Klaus

    2003-11-01

    Faced with the current wealth of genomic data, it is essential to have robust and reliable methods of converting DNA sequences into their functional gene products. We demonstrate here that when conditions are established that take advantage of the replication-associated virus amplification, the virus-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis as well as the activation of signalling pathways that normally occur during virus replication, adenovirus biology can be exploited to generate a potent kinase expression system. Residual virus in the protein production has always been a limitation for adenovirus systems and we describe a DNA intercalator/ultraviolet light treatment that eliminates residual adenovirus in protein preparations that has no deleterious effect on enzyme activity. The use of mammalian cells in combination with adenovirus generated a variety of active enzymes which could not be produced in Escherichia coli or baculovirus-infected insect cells. Thus, the utility of adenovirus-mediated enzyme expression as a versatile alternative to established protein production technologies is demonstrated.

  16. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  17. Gene targeting with a replication-defective adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, A; Sakagami, K; Kanegae, Y; Saito, I; Kobayashi, I

    1995-01-01

    Wide application of the gene-targeting technique has been hampered by its low level of efficiency. A replication-defective adenovirus vector was used for efficient delivery of donor DNA in order to bypass this problem. Homologous recombination was selected between a donor neo gene inserted in the adenovirus vector and a target mutant neo gene on a nuclear papillomavirus plasmid. These recombinant adenoviruses allowed gene transfer to 100% of the treated cells without impairing their viability. Homologous recombinants were obtained at a level of frequency much higher than that obtained by electroporation or a calcium phosphate procedure. The structure of the recombinants was analyzed in detail after recovery in an Escherichia coli strain. All of the recombinants examined had experienced a precise correction of the mutant neo gene. Some of them had a nonhomologous rearrangement of their sequences as well. One type of nonhomologous recombination took place at the end of the donor-target homology. The vector adenovirus DNA was inserted into some of the products obtained at a high multiplicity of infection. The insertion was at the end of the donor-target homology with a concomitant insertion of a 10-bp-long filler sequence in one of the recombinants. The possible relationship between these rearrangements and the homologous recombination is discussed. These results demonstrate the applicability of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in gene targeting and gene therapy. PMID:7666520

  18. Safety of adenovirus-mediated transfer of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator cDNA to the lungs of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, R W; Amin, R S; Perez, C R; Wert, S E; Keller, G; Boivin, G P; Hirsch, R; De Inocencio, J; Lu, P; Reising, S F; Yei, S; Whitsett, J A; Trapnell, B C

    1996-02-10

    To define the toxicity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) gene therapy with a replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (Av1Cf2) in a nonhuman primate model, 10(10) plaque forming units (pfu) were instilled directly through a bronchoscope into the right lung of 5 macaques, and a lower dose of 4 x 10(6) pfu was administered to the right lung of 1 macaque. One sham-treated control received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The macaques were evaluated sequentially by clinical examination, vital signs, weight, hematology, blood chemistry, chest radiography, pulse oximetry, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at baseline and 3-28 days post-treatment. After the period of observation, macaques were sacrificed for autopsy and histological examination. The macaques tolerated the experimental therapy clinically with no changes in body temperature, oxygen saturation, heart rate, body weight, or blood pressure. However, 1 macaque with visible evidence of aspiration at the time of initial bronchoscopy developed tachypnea with right lower lobe (RLL) pneumonia on chest radiograph and by histology. There were no changes in Hgb, Wbc, BUN, plasma electrolytes, bilirubin, or hepatic transaminases. In the macaques that received 10(10) pfu, there was a progressive increase in the number of CD8+ lymphocytes in BAL that was maximal at 28 days. Histological examination of the treated lungs of the high-dose macaques at 3 days showed marked peribronchial and perivascular cuffing by inflammatory cells and alveolar accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. The alveolitis appeared to be resolving at 28 days, although the perivascular and peribronchial aggregates of mononuclear cells were still present. In the high-dose macaques, BAL interleukin-8 (IL-8) was increased at all time points (256-388 pg/ml versus 1-84 pg/ml at baseline and in control), whereas IL-1 beta was increased only at days 21 and 28 (341-852 pg/ml versus 30-92 pg/ml at baseline and in control

  19. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to adenovirus in serum. Additionally... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus...

  20. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen M.; Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A.; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C.; Parks, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  1. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-12-29

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene).

  2. Defining Therapeutic Targets by Using Adenovirus: Blocking NF-kappa B Inhibits Both Inflammatory and Destructive Mechanisms in Rheumatoid Synovium but Spares Anti-Inflammatory Mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondeson, Jan; Foxwell, Brian; Brennan, Fionula; Feldmann, Marc

    1999-05-01

    The role of the transcription factor NF-kappa B in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis has long been a subject of controversy. We used an adenoviral technique of blocking NF-kappa B through overexpression of the inhibitory subunit Ikappa Bα , which has the advantage that it can be used in the diseased tissue itself, with >90% of the synovial macrophages, fibroblasts, and T cells infected. We found that the spontaneous production of tumor necrosis factor α and other pro-inflammatory cytokines is NF-kappa B-dependent in rheumatoid synovial tissue, in contrast to the main anti-inflammatory mediators, like IL-10 and -11, and the IL-1 receptor antagonist. Of even more interest, Ikappa Bα overexpression inhibited the production of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 while not affecting their tissue inhibitor. Blocking NF-kappa B in the rheumatoid joint thus has a very beneficial profile, reducing both the inflammatory response and the tissue destruction. The adenoviral technique described here has widespread applicability, allowing rapid testing of the effects of blocking a potential therapeutic target in either cultures of normal cells or in the diseased tissue itself.

  3. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  4. Adenoviruses in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C

    1992-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the many pathogens and opportunistic agents that cause serious infection in the congenitally immunocompromised, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment for organ and tissue transplants and for cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Adenovirus infections in these patients tend to become disseminated and severe, and the serotypes involved are clustered according to the age of the patient and the nature of the immunosuppression. Over 300 adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 48%, are reviewed in this paper. Children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and other primary immunodeficiencies are exposed to the serotypes of subgroups B and C that commonly infect young children, and thus their infections are due to types 1 to 7 and 31 of subgenus A. Children with bone marrow and liver transplants often have lung and liver adenovirus infections that are due to an expanded set of subgenus A, B, C, and E serotypes. Adults with kidney transplants have viruses of subgenus B, mostly types 11, 34, and 35, which cause cystitis. This review indicates that 11% of transplant recipients become infected with adenoviruses, with case fatality rates from 60% for bone marrow transplant patients to 18% for renal transplant patients. Patients with AIDS become infected with a diversity of serotypes of all subgenera because their adult age and life-style expose them to many adenoviruses, possibly resulting in antigenically intermediate strains that are not found elsewhere. Interestingly, isolates from the urine of AIDS patients are generally of subgenus B and comprise types 11, 21, 34, 35, and intermediate strains of these types, whereas isolates from stool are of subgenus D and comprise many rare, new, and intermediate strains that are untypeable for practical purposes. It has been estimated that adenoviruses cause active infection in 12% of AIDS patients and that 45% of

  5. Adenovirus-receptor interaction with human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mentel, R; Döpping, G; Wegner, U; Seidel, W; Liebermann, H; Döhner, L

    1997-03-01

    Lymphocytes play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and are host cells for several viral and bacterial pathogens. Their importance in adenovirus (Ad) infections is not yet fully understood. The initial event, the attachment of Ad to lymphocytes and their subsets, was examined using flow cytometry. The study included analysis of stimulated T cells in binding assays with FITC-labeled Ad fiber. The results confirm that native peripheral lymphocytes express very small amounts of Ad receptors. Stimulation with PHA and interleukin 2 induced the expression. The presence of Ad DNA as a sign of internalization in stimulated cells was demonstrated using the polymerase chain reaction. The findings suggest that lymphocytes after stimulation can turn into target cells for Ad. This is particularly important if there are indications for persistence of Ad, and in the case of immunocompromised patients severe, life-threatening diseases can develop.

  6. [Gene engineering of the adenovirus vector].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Saki; Terashima, Miho; Fukuda, Hiromitsu; Saito, Izumu; Kanegae, Yumi

    2007-06-01

    The adenovirus vector is very attractive tool not only for the gene therapy but also for the basic sciences. However, because a construction method of this vector had been complex, only limited scientists had constructed and enjoyed the benefits. Recently, various methods were developed and the researchers came to be able to choose an efficient method, which is the COS-TPC method, or a concise procedure, which is the intact-genome transfection method (in vitro ligation method). Here we described not only these methods but also new method to construct the various Ads simultaneously using the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) by the site-specific recombinase. And also we want to refer the possibility to the worth of the vector, especially the vector of the expression-switch.

  7. Adenovirus Core Protein pVII Is Translocated into the Nucleus by Multiple Import Receptor Pathways†

    PubMed Central

    Wodrich, Harald; Cassany, Aurelia; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Guan, Tinglu; Nemerow, Glen; Gerace, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses are nonenveloped viruses with an ∼36-kb double-stranded DNA genome that replicate in the nucleus. Protein VII, an abundant structural component of the adenovirus core that is strongly associated with adenovirus DNA, is imported into the nucleus contemporaneously with the adenovirus genome shortly after virus infection and may promote DNA import. In this study, we evaluated whether protein VII uses specific receptor-mediated mechanisms for import into the nucleus. We found that it contains potent nuclear localization signal (NLS) activity by transfection of cultured cells with protein VII fusion constructs and by microinjection of cells with recombinant protein VII fusions. We identified three NLS-containing regions in protein VII by deletion mapping and determined important NLS residues by site-specific mutagenesis. We found that recombinant protein VII and its NLS-containing domains strongly and specifically bind to importin α, importin β, importin 7, and transportin, which are among the most abundant cellular nuclear import receptors. Moreover, these receptors can mediate the nuclear import of protein VII fusions in vitro in permeabilized cells. Considered together, these data support the hypothesis that protein VII is a major NLS-containing adaptor for receptor-mediated import of adenovirus DNA and that multiple import pathways are utilized to promote efficient nuclear entry of the viral genome. PMID:16973564

  8. Adenovirus core protein pVII is translocated into the nucleus by multiple import receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Wodrich, Harald; Cassany, Aurelia; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Guan, Tinglu; Nemerow, Glen; Gerace, Larry

    2006-10-01

    Adenoviruses are nonenveloped viruses with an approximately 36-kb double-stranded DNA genome that replicate in the nucleus. Protein VII, an abundant structural component of the adenovirus core that is strongly associated with adenovirus DNA, is imported into the nucleus contemporaneously with the adenovirus genome shortly after virus infection and may promote DNA import. In this study, we evaluated whether protein VII uses specific receptor-mediated mechanisms for import into the nucleus. We found that it contains potent nuclear localization signal (NLS) activity by transfection of cultured cells with protein VII fusion constructs and by microinjection of cells with recombinant protein VII fusions. We identified three NLS-containing regions in protein VII by deletion mapping and determined important NLS residues by site-specific mutagenesis. We found that recombinant protein VII and its NLS-containing domains strongly and specifically bind to importin alpha, importin beta, importin 7, and transportin, which are among the most abundant cellular nuclear import receptors. Moreover, these receptors can mediate the nuclear import of protein VII fusions in vitro in permeabilized cells. Considered together, these data support the hypothesis that protein VII is a major NLS-containing adaptor for receptor-mediated import of adenovirus DNA and that multiple import pathways are utilized to promote efficient nuclear entry of the viral genome.

  9. Adenovirus vector delivery stimulates natural killer cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tomasec, Peter; Wang, Eddie C. Y.; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; McSharry, Brian P.; Aicheler, Rebecca J.; Stanton, Richard J.; Wilkinson, Gavin W. G.

    2007-01-01

    We report that delivery of first-generation replication-deficient adenovirus (RDAd) vectors into primary human fibroblasts is associated with the induction of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytolysis in vitro. RDAd vector delivery induced cytolysis by a range of NK cell populations including the NK cell clone NKL, primary polyclonal NK lines and a proportion of NK clones (36 %) in autologous HLA-matched assays. Adenovirus-induced cytolysis was inhibited by antibody blocking of the NK-activating receptor NKG2D, implicating this receptor in this function. NKG2D is ubiquitously expressed on NK cells and CD8+ T cells. Significantly, γ-irradiation of the vector eliminated the effect, suggesting that breakthrough expression from the vector induces at least some of the pro-inflammatory responses of unknown aetiology following the application of RDAd vectors during in vivo gene delivery. PMID:17374753

  10. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  11. Direct selection of targeted adenovirus vectors by random peptide display on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Yoshida, K; Nishimoto, T; Hatanaka, K; Ohnami, S; Asaka, M; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T; Yoshida, T; Aoki, K

    2007-10-01

    Targeting of gene transfer at the level of cell entry is one of the most attractive challenges in vector development. However, attempts to redirect adenovirus vectors to alternative receptors by engineering the capsid-coding region have shown limited success because proper targeting ligand-receptor systems on the cells of interest are generally unknown. Systematic approaches to generate adenovirus vectors targeting any given cell type need to be developed to achieve this goal. Here, we constructed an adenovirus library that was generated by a Cre-lox-mediated in vitro recombination between an adenoviral fiber-modified plasmid library and genomic DNA to display random peptides on a fiber knob. As proof of concept, we screened the adenovirus display library on a glioma cell line and observed selection of several particular peptide sequences. The targeted vector carrying the most frequently isolated peptide significantly enhanced gene transduction in the glioma cell line but not in many other cell lines. Because the insertion of a pre-selected peptide into a fiber knob often fails to generate an adenovirus vector, the selection of targeting peptides is highly useful in the context of the adenoviral capsid. This vector-screening system can facilitate the development of a targeted adenovirus vector for a variety of applications in medicine.

  12. Production of high-capacity adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Kreppel, Florian

    2014-01-01

    High-capacity adenoviral vectors (HC-Ad), also known as "helper-dependent" (HD-Ad), "gutless", "gutted", or "third-generation" Ad vectors, are devoid of all viral coding sequences and have shown promising potential for a wide variety of different applications-from classic gene therapy to genetic vaccination and tumor treatment. However, compared to first-generation adenoviral vectors their production is more complex and requires specific in-depth knowledge. This chapter delivers a detailed protocol for the successful production of HC-Ad vectors to high titers.

  13. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  14. Combination therapy with conditionally replicating adenovirus and replication defective adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Taek; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Ohm, Joyce E; Nadaf, Sorena; Dikov, Mikhail M; Curiel, David T; Carbone, David P

    2004-09-15

    Low gene transfer rate is the most substantial hurdle in the practical application of gene therapy. One strategy to improve transfer efficiency is the use of a conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD) that can selectively replicate in tumor cells. We hypothesized that conventional E1-deleted adenoviruses (ad) can become replication-competent when cotransduced with a CRAD to selectively supply E1 in trans in tumors. The resulting selective production of large numbers of the E1-deleted ad within the tumor mass will increase the transduction efficiency. We used a CRAD (Delta24RGD) that produces a mutant E1 without the ability to bind retinoblastoma but retaining viral replication competence in cancer cells with a defective pRb/p16. Ad-lacZ, adenovirus-luciferase (ad-luc), and adenovirus insulin-like growth factor-1R/dominant-negative (ad-IGF-1R/dn; 482, 950) are E1-deleted replication-defective adenoviruses. The combination of CRAD and ad-lacZ increased the transduction efficiency of lacZ to 100% from 15% observed with ad-lacZ alone. Transfer of media of CRAD and ad-lacZ cotransduced cells induced the transfer of lacZ (media transferable bystander effect). Combination of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/dn increased the production of truncated IGF-1R or soluble IGF-1R > 10 times compared with transduction with ad-IGF-1R/dn alone. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-luc increased the luciferase expression about 70 times compared with ad-luc alone without substantial systemic spread. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/482 induced stronger growth suppression of established lung cancer xenografts than single injections. The combination of CRAD and E1-deleted ad induced tumor-specific replication of CRAD and E1-deleted ad and increased the transduction rate and therapeutic efficacy of these viruses in model tumors.

  15. Effect of adenovirus infection on expression of human histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Flint, S J; Plumb, M A; Yang, U C; Stein, G S; Stein, J L

    1984-01-01

    The influence of adenovirus type 2 infection of HeLa cells upon expression of human histone genes was examined as a function of the period of infection. Histone RNA synthesis was assayed after run-off transcription in nuclei isolated from mock-infected cells and after various periods of adenovirus infection. Histone protein synthesis was measured by [3H]leucine labeling of intact cells and fluorography of electrophoretically fractionated nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. The cellular representation of RNA species complementary to more than 13 different human histone genes was determined by RNA blot analysis of total cellular, nuclear or cytoplasmic RNA by using a series of 32P-labeled cloned human histone genes as hybridization probes and also by analysis of 3H-labeled histone mRNA species synthesized in intact cells. By 18 h after infection, HeLa cell DNA synthesis and all parameters of histone gene expression, including transcription and the nuclear and cytoplasmic concentrations of core and H1 mRNA species, were reduced to less than 5 to 10% of the control values. By contrast, transcription and processing of other cellular mRNA sequences have been shown to continue throughout this period of infection. The early period of adenovirus infection was marked by an inhibition of transcription of histone genes that accompanied the reduction in rate of HeLa cell DNA synthesis. These results suggest that the adenovirus-induced inhibition of histone gene expression is mediated in part at the transcriptional level. However, the persistence of histone mRNA species at concentrations comparable to those of mock-infected control cells during the early phase of the infection, despite a reduction in histone gene transcription and histone protein synthesis, implies that histone gene expression is also regulated post-transcriptionally in adenovirus-infected cells. These results suggest that the tight coupling between histone mRNA concentrations and the rate of cellular DNA

  16. Delivery of oncolytic adenovirus into the nucleus of tumorigenic cells by tumor microparticles for virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Li; Tan, Xiaohua; Li, Yanchun; Zhang, Huafeng; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Dong, Wenqian; Tong, Tong; Liu, Yuying; Chen, Degao; Yin, Xiaonan; Liang, Xiaoyu; Tang, Ke; Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Xuetao; Hu, Zhuowei; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been utilized for the treatment of various cancers. However, delivery of the viral particles to tumor cells remains a major challenge. Microparticles (MP) are vesicle forms of plasma membrane fragments of 0.1-1 μm in size that are shed by cells. We have previously shown the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs using tumor cell-derived MPs (T-MP). Here we report that T-MPs can be utilized as a unique carrier system to deliver oncolytic adenoviruses to human tumors, leading to highly efficient cytolysis of tumor cells needed for in vivo treatment efficacy. This T-MP-mediated oncolytic virotherapy approach holds multiple advantages, including: 1) delivery of oncolytic adenovirus by T-MPs is able to avoid the antiviral effect of host antibodies; 2) delivery of oncolytic adenovirus by T-MPs is not limited by virus-specific receptor that mediates the entry of virus into tumor cells; 3) T-MPs are apt at delivering oncolytic adenoviruses to the nucleus of tumor cells as well as to stem-like tumor-repopulating cells for the desired purpose of killing them. These findings highlight a novel oncolytic adenovirus delivery system with highly promising clinical applications.

  17. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  18. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  19. In vivo transduction of primitive mobilized hematopoietic stem cells after intravenous injection of integrating adenovirus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Saydaminova, Kamola; Yumul, Roma; Krishnan, Rohini; Liu, Jing; Nagy, Eniko-Eva; Singh, Manvendra; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Cattaneo, Roberto; Uckert, Wolfgang; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Haworth, Kevin G.; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Ehrhardt, Anja; Papayannopoulou, Thalia

    2016-01-01

    Current protocols for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) gene therapy, involving the transplantation of ex vivo genetically modified HSPCs are complex and not without risk for the patient. We developed a new approach for in vivo HSPC transduction that does not require myeloablation and transplantation. It involves subcutaneous injections of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor/AMD3100 to mobilize HSPCs from the bone marrow (BM) into the peripheral blood stream and the IV injection of an integrating, helper-dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad5/35++) vector system. These vectors target CD46, a receptor that is uniformly expressed on HSPCs. We demonstrated in human CD46 transgenic mice and immunodeficient mice with engrafted human CD34+ cells that HSPCs transduced in the periphery home back to the BM where they stably express the transgene. In hCD46 transgenic mice, we showed that our in vivo HSPC transduction approach allows for the stable transduction of primitive HSPCs. Twenty weeks after in vivo transduction, green fluorescent protein (GFP) marking in BM HSPCs (Lin−Sca1+Kit− cells) in most of the mice was in the range of 5% to 10%. The percentage of GFP-expressing primitive HSPCs capable of forming multilineage progenitor colonies (colony-forming units [CFUs]) increased from 4% of all CFUs at week 4 to 16% at week 12, indicating transduction and expansion of long-term surviving HSPCs. Our approach was well tolerated, did not result in significant transduction of nonhematopoietic tissues, and was not associated with genotoxicty. The ability to stably genetically modify HSPCs without the need of myeloablative conditioning is relevant for a broader clinical application of gene therapy. PMID:27554082

  20. The downstream regulatory sequence of the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter is functionally redundant.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X C; Huang, W L; Flint, S J

    1992-01-01

    Mutagenesis of promoter sequences and oligonucleotide competition assays have been used to demonstrate the late-phase-specific stimulation of the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter is mediated by functionally redundant elements located between positions +75 and +125. These octamer motif-related sequences are recognized by multiple factors. Images PMID:1501301

  1. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; ...

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  2. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  3. Estramustine phosphate reversibly inhibits an early stage during adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Everitt, E; Ekstrand, H; Boberg, B; Hartley-Asp, B

    1990-01-01

    Estramustine phosphate, an estradiol-mustard conjugate, was shown to reversibly inhibit a stage during the first hour of productive adenovirus 2 infection of HeLa cells. This drug, employed in the therapy of advanced prostatic cancer, specifically interacts with microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) of the cytoskeleton. The results obtained under physiological conditions in vivo suggest a MAPs-interference with the microtubule-mediated vectorial migration of the virus inoculum to the nucleus. Virus attachment, uncoating kinetics and the appearance of established uncoating intermediates were not affected.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting TNF-α and overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes early osteoblast differentiation on a cell model of Ti particle-induced inflammatory response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, H H; Yu, C C; Sun, S X; Ma, X J; Yang, X C; Sun, K N; Jin, Q H

    2013-10-01

    Wear particles are phagocytosed by macrophages and other inflammatory cells, resulting in cellular activation and release of proinflammatory factors, which cause periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening, the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty failure. During this pathological process, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in wear-particle-induced osteolysis. In this study, recombination adenovirus (Ad) vectors carrying both target genes [TNF-α small interfering RNA (TNF-α-siRNA) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)] were synthesized and transfected into RAW264.7 macrophages and pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, respectively. The target gene BMP-2, expressed on pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and silenced by the TNF-α gene on cells, was treated with titanium (Ti) particles that were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We showed that recombinant adenovirus (Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2) can induce osteoblast differentiation when treated with conditioned medium (CM) containing RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with a combination of Ti particles and Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 (Ti-ad CM) assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was downregulated in pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells treated with Ti-ad CM in comparison with conditioned medium of RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with Ti particles (Ti CM). We suggest that Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 induced osteoblast differentiation and inhibited osteoclastogenesis on a cell model of a Ti particle-induced inflammatory response, which may provide a novel approach for the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  6. Adenovirus 36 and Obesity: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Gnessi, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity starting about 1980 in both developed and undeveloped countries definitely associated with multiple etiologies. About 670 million people worldwide are obese. The incidence of obesity has increased in all age groups, including children. Obesity causes numerous diseases and the interaction between genetic, metabolic, social, cultural and environmental factors are possible cofactors for the development of obesity. Evidence emerging over the last 20 years supports the hypothesis that viral infections may be associated with obesity in animals and humans. The most widely studied infectious agent possibly linked to obesity is adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Adv36 causes obesity in animals. In humans, Adv36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of Adv36 increases in relation to the body mass index. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the viral E4orf1 protein (early region 4 open reading frame 1, Adv) mediates the Adv36 effect including its adipogenic potential. The Adv36 infection should therefore be considered as a possible risk factor for obesity and could be a potential new therapeutic target in addition to an original way to understand the worldwide rise of the epidemic of obesity. Here, the data indicating a possible link between viral infection and obesity with a particular emphasis to the Adv36 will be reviewed. PMID:26184280

  7. Characterization of an upstream regulatory element of adenovirus L1 poly (A) site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li

    2005-06-20

    The transition from early to late stage infection by adenovirus involves a change in mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit (AdMLTU). This early to late switch centers around alternative selection of one of five poly (A) sites (L1-L5) that code for the major structural proteins of Adenovirus. During the early stage of infection, steady state mRNA is primarily derived from the L1 poly (A) site. During the late stage of infection, each of the MLTU poly (A) sites is represented in the steady state mRNA pool (Falck-Pedersen, E., Logan, J., 1989. Regulation of poly(A) site selection in adenovirus. J. Virol. 63 (2), 532-541.). Using transient transfection of a plasmid expressing Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase with a tandem poly (A) minigene system (L13) (DeZazzo, J.D., Falck-Pedersen, E., Imperiale, M.J., 1991. Sequences regulating temporal poly(A) site switching in the adenovirus major late transcription unit. Mol. Cell. Biol. 11 (12), 5977-5984; Prescott, J., Falck-Pedersen, E., 1994. Sequence elements upstream of the 3' cleavage site confer substrate strength to the adenovirus L1 and L3 polyadenylation sites. Mol. Cell. Biol. 14 (7), 4682-4693.), it has been demonstrated that the promoter-proximal L1 poly (A) site which is poorly recognized by the 3' end processing machinery, contains an upstream repressor element (URE) that influences steady state levels of mRNA (Prescott, J.C., Liu, L., Falck-Pedersen, E., 1997. Sequence-mediated regulation of adenovirus gene expression by repression of mRNA accumulation. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17 (4), 2207-2216.). In this study, we have further characterized the elements that mediate L1URE function. These studies indicate that the L1 upstream regulatory element (L1 URE) contains a complex RNA architecture that serves to repress gene expression through multiple sub-effectors. The L1URE functions when located upstream of a heterologous poly (A) site, and is able to strongly suppress steady state m

  8. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  9. Adenovirus Replaces Mitotic Checkpoint Controls

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Roberta L.; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with adenovirus triggers the cellular DNA damage response, elements of which include cell death and cell cycle arrest. Early adenoviral proteins, including the E1B-55K and E4orf3 proteins, inhibit signaling in response to DNA damage. A fraction of cells infected with an adenovirus mutant unable to express the E1B-55K and E4orf3 genes appeared to arrest in a mitotic-like state. Cells infected early in G1 of the cell cycle were predisposed to arrest in this state at late times of infection. This arrested state, which displays hallmarks of mitotic catastrophe, was prevented by expression of either the E1B-55K or the E4orf3 genes. However, E1B-55K mutant virus-infected cells became trapped in a mitotic-like state in the presence of the microtubule poison colcemid, suggesting that the two viral proteins restrict entry into mitosis or facilitate exit from mitosis in order to prevent infected cells from arresting in mitosis. The E1B-55K protein appeared to prevent inappropriate entry into mitosis through its interaction with the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53. The E4orf3 protein facilitated exit from mitosis by possibly mislocalizing and functionally inactivating cyclin B1. When expressed in noninfected cells, E4orf3 overcame the mitotic arrest caused by the degradation-resistant R42A cyclin B1 variant. IMPORTANCE Cells that are infected with adenovirus type 5 early in G1 of the cell cycle are predisposed to arrest in a mitotic-like state in a p53-dependent manner. The adenoviral E1B-55K protein prevents entry into mitosis. This newly described activity for the E1B-55K protein appears to depend on the interaction between the E1B-55K protein and the tumor suppressor p53. The adenoviral E4orf3 protein facilitates exit from mitosis, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of cyclin B1. By preventing entry into mitosis and by promoting exit from mitosis, these adenoviral proteins act to prevent the infected cell from arresting in a

  10. Adenovirus sensing by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2016-12-01

    The host immune system developed multiple ways for recognition of viral pathogens. Upon disseminated adenovirus infection, the immune system senses adenovirus invasion from the moment it enters the bloodstream. The soluble blood factors, FX, antibodies, and complement, can bind and activate plethora of host-protective immune responses. Adenovirus binding to the cellular β3 integrin and endosomal membrane rupture trigger activation of IL-1α/IL-1R1 proinflammatory cascade leading to attraction of cytotoxic immune cells to the site of infection. Upon cell entry, adenovirus exposes its DNA genome in the cytoplasm and triggers DNA sensors signaling. Even when inside the nucleus, the specialized cellular machinery that recognizes the double-strand DNA breaks become activated and triggers viral DNA replication arrest. Thus, the host employs very diverse mechanisms to prevent viral dissemination.

  11. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  12. Platelet-adenovirus vs. inert particles interaction: effect on aggregation and the role of platelet membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Gupalo, Elena; Kuk, Cynthia; Qadura, Mohammad; Buriachkovskaia, Liudmila; Othman, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are involved in host defense via clearance of bacteria from the circulation, interaction with virus particles, and uptake of various size particulates. There is a growing interest in micro- and nanoparticles for drug delivery and there is evidence that the properties of these particles critically influence their interaction and uptake by various tissues and cells including platelets. Virus mediated gene therapy applications are still challenged by the resultant thrombocytopenia and the mechanism(s) of platelet-foreign particles interaction remains unclear. We studied the specifics of platelet interaction with an active biological agent (adenovirus) and inert latex microspheres (MS) and investigated the role of platelet proteins in this interaction. We show that activated and not resting platelets internalize MS, without influencing platelet aggregation. In contrast, adenovirus induces and potentiates ADP-induced platelet aggregation and results in rapid expression of P-selectin. Platelets then internalize adenovirus and viral particles appear inside the open canalicular system. Inhibition of platelet αIIbβ3, GPIbα, and P-selectin decreases both platelet aggregation and internalization of MS. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 and αVβ3 does not abolish adenovirus platelet internalization and adenovirus-induced platelet activation is maintained. Our study demonstrates that platelets react differentially with foreign particles and that αIIbβ3 is a key player in platelet engulfing of foreign particles but not in mediating adenovirus internalization. Other platelet candidate molecules remain to be investigated as potential targets for management of adenovirus-induced thrombocytopenia.

  13. Adenovirus vector-mediated Gli1 siRNA induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer with Smo-dependent or Smo-independent Hh pathway activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiefang; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Gong, Yanfang; Man, Xiaohua; Jin, Jing; Wu, Hongyu

    2013-10-10

    Activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a core molecular mechanism in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, the inhibition of upstream Hh signals does not inhibit the growth of a subset of pancreatic cancer (PC). This study was to examine the effect of siRNA targeting Gli1, the downstream component of Hh pathway, on PC cells and to provide some insight into the underlying mechanisms. A Gli1siRNA-expressing adenovirus (Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA) was constructed, and its effect on PC cells was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Gli1 was expressed in 83.3% (20/24) PC tissues, whereas no expression was found in normal pancreatic ductal epithelium. Gli1 was expressed in SW1990 and CFPAC cells in which Smo was completely absent, as well as in PaTu8988, Panc-1 and BxPC-3 cells in which Smo was concomitantly present. Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA induced cell growth inhibition, strong G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in all five human PC cell lines. Meanwhile, Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA significantly suppressed the expression of Gli1, Ptch1 and two target genes, Cyclin D2 and Bcl-2, in all five lines. Furthermore, two tumor xenograft nude mice models were established by subcutaneously injecting Smo-positive Panc-1 cells or Smo-negative SW1990 cells. The in vivo experimental results demonstrated that Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA inhibited the growth of both Panc1-derived and SW1990-derived tumors and induced cell apoptosis. Our study indicates that Gli1-targeting siRNA could induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in PC through knockdown of Gli1 and its target genes; and this method may represent a more effective therapeutic strategy for PC with Smo-dependent or Smo-independent Hh pathway activation.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates from Previously Vaccinated Young Adults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF ADENOVIRUS ISOLATES FROM PREVIOUSLY VACCINATED YOUNG ADULTS D. A. Blasiole...Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates From Previously Vaccinated Young Adults . 6. AUTHORS Daniel A Blasiole, David Metzgar, Luke T Daum, Margaret AK

  15. Adenovirus Serotype 14 Infection, New Brunswick, Canada, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Garceau, Richard; Thibault, Louise; Oussedik, Youcef; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    We describe 3 culture-proven cases of adenovirus serotype 14 infection in New Brunswick, Canada, during the summer of 2011. Strains isolated from severely ill patients were closely related to strains of a genomic variant, adenovirus 14p1, circulating in the United States and Ireland. Physicians in Canada should be aware of this emerging adenovirus. PMID:23260201

  16. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  17. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Nász, I; Adám, E

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade adenovirus (AdV) vectors have emerged as promising technology in gene therapy. They have been used for genetic modification of a variety of somatic cells in vitro and in vivo. They have been widely used as gene delivery vectors in experiments both with curative and preventive purposes. AdV vectors have been used in the experimental and in some extent in the clinical gene therapy of a variety of cancers. The combination of recombinant AdV technology with chemotherapy (pro drug system) seems to be promising, too. AdV vectors offer several advantages over other vectors. Replication defective vectors can be produced in very high titers (10(11) pfu/ml) thus allowing a substantially greater efficiency of direct gene transfer; they have the capacity to infect both replicating and nonreplicating (quiescent) cells from a variety of tissues and species. Several important limitations of adenovirus mediated gene transfer are also known, such as the relatively short-term (transient) expression of foreign genes, induction of the host humoral and cellular immune response to viral proteins and viral infected cells, which may substantially inhibit the effect of repeated treatment with AdV vectors, the limited cloning capacity and the lack of target cell specificity. However, the well-understood structure, molecular biology and host cell interactions of AdV-s offer some potential solutions to these limitations.

  18. Elasticity and Binding of Adenovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Negishi, Atsuko; Seeger, Adam; McCarty, Doug; Taylor, Russell; Samulshi, Jude; Superfine, Richard

    1999-11-01

    Adenovirus was the first human virus found to cause the transformation of cells and is one of the more common vectors being used for the development of gene therapy. As such, much is known about the viral structure and genome; however, the events of the early infection cycle, such as binding of the virus to the cell membrane and the release of genetic material from the capsid, for this and other nonenveloped viruses, are not fully understood. With the atomic force microscope (AFM) we are able to image the virus in both air and liquids, allowing us to change the surrounding environment, varying such physiologically relevant parameters as osmolality or pH. We additionally have the ability to do manipulations on single virus particles in these environments using the nanoManipulator. The nanoManipulator is an advanced interface for AFM that allows real time three dimensional rendering of the topographical data, allows the sample surface to be non-destructively felt using a hand held stylus that responds to the information being sensed at the tip, and allows controlled modification of the surface. Using this tool we have translated single virions over various surfaces, allowing us to measure the adhesion between the capsid and these surfaces. Additionally, we are able to place the tip directly atop individual viruses and measure their elasticity under a compressive load being supplied by that tip. We can explore how this property changes as a function of the properties of the surrounding liquid.

  19. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer in combination with bronchial arterial infusion for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-song; Liu, Yuan; Zou, Qing; He, Qing; La, Zi; Yang, Lin; Hu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we have examined the safety and efficacy of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) injection in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the combination with the therapy of bronchial arterial infusion (BAI). Methods: A total of 58 patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in a non-randomized, two-armed clinical trial. Of which, 19 received a combination treatment of BAI and rAd-p53 (the combo group), while the remaining 39 were treated with only BAI (the control group). Patients were followed up for 12 months, with safety and local response evaluated by the National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria and response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST), respectively. Time to progression (TTP) and survival rates were also analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In the combo group, 19 patients received a total of 49 injections of rAd-p53 and 46 times of BAI, respectively, while 39 patients in the control group received a total of 113 times of BAI. The combination treatment was found to have less adverse events such as anorexia, nausea and emesis, pain, and leucopenia (P<0.05) but more arthralgia, fever, influenza-like symptom, and myalgia (P<0.05), compared with the control group. The overall response rates (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) were 47.3% and 38.4% for the combo group and the control group, respectively (P>0.05). Patients in the combo group had a longer TTP than those in the control group (a median 7.75 vs 5.5 months, P=0.018). However, the combination treatment did not lead to better survival, with survival rates at 3, 6, and 12 months in the combo group being 94.74%, 89.47%, and 52.63%, respectively, compared with 92.31%, 69.23%, and 38.83% in the control group (P=0.224). Conclusion: Our results show that the combination of rAd-p53 and BAI was well tolerated in patients with NSCLC and may have improved the quality of life and delayed

  20. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields.

  1. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  2. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5-FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad-FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.

  3. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models.

  4. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  5. Immunologic and Genetic Selection of Adenovirus Vaccine Strains: Synthesis and Characterization of Adenovirus Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    exhibited strikingly different chromatographic characteristics. 2. Effect of proflavine on the synthesis of adenovirus, type 5, and associated soluble...antigens. The synthesis of type 5 adenovirus in HeLa cells was suppressed to a considerable extent by low concentrations of proflavine , an acridine dye...chemical. Addition of proflavine to infected cells at different times during the virus growth cycle revealed that the processes leading to the synthesis

  6. Incorporation of adenovirus in calcium phosphate precipitates enhances gene transfer to airway epithelia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Fasbender, A; Lee, J H; Walters, R W; Moninger, T O; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    1998-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient because the apical membrane lacks the receptor activity to bind adenovirus fiber protein. Calcium phosphate (CaPi) precipitates have been used to deliver plasmid DNA to cultured cell lines. However, such precipitates are not effective in many primary cultures or in vivo. Here we show that incorporating recombinant adenovirus into a CaPi coprecipitate markedly enhances transgene expression in cells that are resistant to adenovirus infection. Enhancement requires that the virus be contained in the precipitate and viral proteins are required to increase expression. Ad: CaPi coprecipitates increase gene transfer by increasing fiber-independent binding of virus to cells. With differentiated cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vitro, a 20-min application of Ad:CaPi coprecipitates that encode CF transmembrane conductance regulator produced as much CF transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- current as a 24-h application of adenovirus alone. We found that Ad:CaPi coprecipitates also increased transgene expression in mouse lung in vivo; importantly, expression was particularly prominent in airway epithelia. These results suggest a new mechanism for gene transfer that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer applications and could be of value in gene transfer to CF airway epithelia in vivo. PMID:9649572

  7. Adenoviral transduction of enterocytes and M-cells using in vitro models based on Caco-2 cells: the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates both apical and basolateral transduction.

    PubMed

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Fleisher, David; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2010-06-07

    Understanding virus-cell interaction is a key to the design of successful gene delivery vectors. In the present study we investigated Ad5 transduction of enterocytes and M-cells utilizing differentiated Caco-2 cells and cocultures of Caco-2 cells with lymphocytes. Transduction inhibition studies showed that CAR is the major receptor mediating apical and basolateral virus entry in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Integrins and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans do not appear to play a significant role. Immunofluorescence localized CAR to sites of cell-cell contact, with staining mostly observed on the cell perimeter. Staining was observed even in nonpermeabilized monolayers, suggesting apical accessibility of the receptor. Cocultures with mouse Peyer's patch lymphocytes or Raji B human lymphocytes were more susceptible to transduction than Caco-2 cells, and the effects were dose-dependent. Similar to Caco-2 cells, CAR and not integrins mediated apical transduction. In conclusion, contrary to other epithelial cell lines, both apical and basolateral transduction of absorptive enterocytes and M-cells is mediated by binding to CAR. The coculture system can be used to study the interactions between M-cells and gene delivery vectors.

  8. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  9. Replicating Single-Cycle Adenovirus Vectors Generate Amplified Influenza Vaccine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Catherine M.; Matchett, William E.; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie S.; Parks, Christopher A.; Weaver, Eric A.; Pease, Larry R.; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Head-to-head comparisons of conventional influenza vaccines with adenovirus (Ad) gene-based vaccines demonstrated that these viral vectors can mediate more potent protection against influenza virus infection in animal models. In most cases, Ad vaccines are engineered to be replication-defective (RD-Ad) vectors. In contrast, replication-competent Ad (RC-Ad) vaccines are markedly more potent but risk causing adenovirus diseases in vaccine recipients and health care workers. To harness antigen gene replication but avoid production of infectious virions, we developed “single-cycle” adenovirus (SC-Ad) vectors. Previous work demonstrated that SC-Ads amplify transgene expression 100-fold and produce markedly stronger and more persistent immune responses than RD-Ad vectors in Syrian hamsters and rhesus macaques. To test them as potential vaccines, we engineered RD and SC versions of adenovirus serotype 6 (Ad6) to express the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza A/PR/8/34 virus. We show here that it takes approximately 33 times less SC-Ad6 than RD-Ad6 to produce equal amounts of HA antigen in vitro. SC-Ad produced markedly higher HA binding and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers than RD-Ad in Syrian hamsters. SC-Ad-vaccinated cotton rats had markedly lower influenza titers than RD-Ad-vaccinated animals after challenge with influenza A/PR/8/34 virus. These data suggest that SC-Ads may be more potent vaccine platforms than conventional RD-Ad vectors and may have utility as “needle-free” mucosal vaccines. IMPORTANCE Most adenovirus vaccines that are being tested are replication-defective adenoviruses (RD-Ads). This work describes testing newer single-cycle adenovirus (SC-Ad) vectors that replicate transgenes to amplify protein production and immune responses. We show that SC-Ads generate markedly more influenza virus hemagglutinin protein and require substantially less vector to generate the same immune responses as RD-Ad vectors. SC-Ads therefore hold

  10. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Julie E; DeZure, Adam D; Stanley, Daphne A; Coates, Emily E; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E; Berkowitz, Nina M; Hu, Zonghui; Joshi, Gyan; Ploquin, Aurélie; Sitar, Sandra; Gordon, Ingelise J; Plummer, Sarah A; Holman, LaSonji A; Hendel, Cynthia S; Yamshchikov, Galina; Roman, Francois; Nicosia, Alfredo; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Bailer, Robert T; Schwartz, Richard M; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Graham, Barney S

    2017-03-09

    Background The unprecedented 2014 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) prompted an international response to accelerate the availability of a preventive vaccine. A replication-defective recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 3-vectored ebolavirus vaccine (cAd3-EBO), encoding the glycoprotein from Zaire and Sudan species, that offers protection in the nonhuman primate model, was rapidly advanced into phase 1 clinical evaluation. Methods We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalation, open-label trial of cAd3-EBO. Twenty healthy adults, in sequentially enrolled groups of 10 each, received vaccination intramuscularly in doses of 2×10(10) particle units or 2×10(11) particle units. Primary and secondary end points related to safety and immunogenicity were assessed throughout the first 8 weeks after vaccination; in addition, longer-term vaccine durability was assessed at 48 weeks after vaccination. Results In this small study, no safety concerns were identified; however, transient fever developed within 1 day after vaccination in two participants who had received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Glycoprotein-specific antibodies were induced in all 20 participants; the titers were of greater magnitude in the group that received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than in the group that received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose (geometric mean titer against the Zaire antigen at week 4, 2037 vs. 331; P=0.001). Glycoprotein-specific T-cell responses were more frequent among those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than among those who received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose, with a CD4 response in 10 of 10 participants versus 3 of 10 participants (P=0.004) and a CD8 response in 7 of 10 participants versus 2 of 10 participants (P=0.07) at week 4. Assessment of the durability of the antibody response showed that titers remained high at week 48, with the highest titers in those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Conclusions Reactogenicity and immune responses

  11. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of an adenovirus-PEI-bile-acid complex in tumors with low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cho-Hee; Kasala, Dayananda; Na, Youjin; Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Sung Wan; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2014-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) is a potential vehicle for cancer gene therapy. However, cells that express low levels of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) demonstrate poor Ad infection efficiency. We developed a bile acid-conjugated poly(ethyleneimine) (DA3)-coated Ad complex (Ad/DA3) to enhance Ad transduction efficiency. The size distribution and zeta potential of Ad/DA3 increased to 324 ± 3.08 nm and 10.13 ± 0.21 mV, respectively, compared with those of naked Ad (108 ± 2.26 nm and -17.7 ± 1.5 mV). The transduction efficiency of Ad/DA3 increased in a DA3 polymer concentration-dependent manner. Enhanced gene transfer by Ad/DA3 was more evident in CAR-moderate and CAR-negative cancer cells. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody revealed that internalization of Ad/DA3 was not mediated primarily by CAR but involved clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis. Cancer cell death was significantly increased when oncolytic Ad and DA3 were complexed (RdB-KOX/DA3) compared to that of naked oncolytic Ad and was inversely proportional to CAR levels. Importantly, RdB-KOX/DA3 significantly enhanced apoptosis, reduced angiogenesis, reduced proliferation, and increased active viral replication in human tumor xenografts compared to that of naked Ad. These results demonstrate that a hybrid vector system can increase the efficacy of oncolytic Ad virotherapy, particularly in CAR-limited tumors.

  12. Suppression of Adenovirus Replication by Cardiotonic Steroids.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Filomena; Stoilov, Peter; Lingwood, Clifford; Brown, Martha; Cochrane, Alan

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of adenovirus on the host pre-RNA splicing machinery for expression of its complete genome potentially makes it vulnerable to modulators of RNA splicing, such as digoxin and digitoxin. Both drugs reduced the yields of four human adenoviruses (HAdV-A31, -B35, and -C5 and a species D conjunctivitis isolate) by at least 2 to 3 logs by affecting one or more steps needed for genome replication. Immediate early E1A protein levels are unaffected by the drugs, but synthesis of the delayed protein E4orf6 and the major late capsid protein hexon is compromised. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that both drugs altered E1A RNA splicing (favoring the production of 13S over 12S RNA) early in infection and partially blocked the transition from 12S and 13S to 9S RNA at late stages of virus replication. Expression of multiple late viral protein mRNAs was lost in the presence of either drug, consistent with the observed block in viral DNA replication. The antiviral effect was dependent on the continued presence of the drug and was rapidly reversible. RIDK34, a derivative of convallotoxin, although having more potent antiviral activity, did not show an improved selectivity index. All three drugs reduced metabolic activity to some degree without evidence of cell death. By blocking adenovirus replication at one or more steps beyond the onset of E1A expression and prior to genome replication, digoxin and digitoxin show potential as antiviral agents for treatment of serious adenovirus infections. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which digoxin and digitoxin inhibit adenovirus replication will guide the development of novel antiviral therapies.

  13. Bak and Bax Function To Limit Adenovirus Replication through Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Cuconati, Andrea; Degenhardt, Kurt; Sundararajan, Ramya; Anschel, Alan; White, Eileen

    2002-01-01

    Adenovirus infection and expression of E1A induces both proliferation and apoptosis, the latter of which is blocked by the adenovirus Bcl-2 homologue E1B 19K. The mechanism of apoptosis induction and the role that it plays in productive infection are not known. Unlike apoptosis mediated by death receptors, infection with proapoptotic E1B 19K mutant viruses did not induce cleavage of Bid but nonetheless induced changes in Bak and Bax conformation, Bak-Bax interaction, caspase 9 and 3 activation, and apoptosis. In wild-type-adenovirus-infected cells, in which E1B 19K inhibits apoptosis, E1B 19K was bound to Bak, precluding Bak-Bax interaction and changes in Bax conformation. Infection with E1B 19K mutant viruses induced apoptosis in wild-type and Bax- or Bak-deficient baby mouse kidney cells but not in those deficient for both Bax and Bak. Furthermore, Bax and Bak deficiency dramatically increased E1A expression and virus replication. Thus, Bax- and Bak-mediated apoptosis severely limits adenoviral replication, demonstrating that Bax and Bak function as an antiviral response at the cellular level. PMID:11932420

  14. Bak and Bax function to limit adenovirus replication through apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Cuconati, Andrea; Degenhardt, Kurt; Sundararajan, Ramya; Anschel, Alan; White, Eileen

    2002-05-01

    Adenovirus infection and expression of E1A induces both proliferation and apoptosis, the latter of which is blocked by the adenovirus Bcl-2 homologue E1B 19K. The mechanism of apoptosis induction and the role that it plays in productive infection are not known. Unlike apoptosis mediated by death receptors, infection with proapoptotic E1B 19K mutant viruses did not induce cleavage of Bid but nonetheless induced changes in Bak and Bax conformation, Bak-Bax interaction, caspase 9 and 3 activation, and apoptosis. In wild-type-adenovirus-infected cells, in which E1B 19K inhibits apoptosis, E1B 19K was bound to Bak, precluding Bak-Bax interaction and changes in Bax conformation. Infection with E1B 19K mutant viruses induced apoptosis in wild-type and Bax- or Bak-deficient baby mouse kidney cells but not in those deficient for both Bax and Bak. Furthermore, Bax and Bak deficiency dramatically increased E1A expression and virus replication. Thus, Bax- and Bak-mediated apoptosis severely limits adenoviral replication, demonstrating that Bax and Bak function as an antiviral response at the cellular level.

  15. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  16. The α2 helix in the DNA ligase IV BRCT-1 domain is required for targeted degradation of ligase IV during adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Timra; Greer, Amy E; Vindigni, Alessandro; Ketner, Gary; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2012-07-05

    In adenovirus E4 mutant infections, viral DNAs form concatemers through a process that requires host Non-homologous End Joining (NHEJ) proteins including DNA Ligase IV (LigIV). Adenovirus proteins E4 34k and E1b 55k form the substrate-selection component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase and prevent concatenation by targeting LigIV for proteasomal degradation. The mechanisms and sites involved in targeting this and other E3 ligase substrates generally are poorly-understood. Through genetic analysis, we identified the α2 helix of one LigIV BRCT domain (BRCT-1) as essential for adenovirus-mediated degradation. Replacement of the BRCT domain of DNA ligase III (LigIII), which is resistant to degradation, with LigIV BRCT-1 does not promote degradation. A humanized mouse LigIV that possesses a BRCT-1 α2 helix identical to the human protein, like its parent, is also resistant to adenovirus-mediated degradation. Thus, both the BRCT-1 α2 helix and an element outside BRCT-1 are required for adenovirus-mediated degradation of LigIV.

  17. Genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells with adenoviral vectors: differences of infectability between lines and correlation of infectability with expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Brokhman, Irina; Pomp, Oz; Fishman, Lital; Tennenbaum, Tamar; Amit, Michal; Itzkovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    Adenovirus is an efficient vector for expression of transgenes in dividing and nondividing cells. However, very few studies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have utilized adenoviral vectors. We examine here the ability of adenovirus to infect naive hESCs and the differentiated derivatives of multiple hESC lines. We found a striking variation in adenovirus infection rates between lines. The variability in infection rates was positively correlated with the expression of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, but not that of alpha(nu)-integrin. Adenoviral infection did not interfere with the expression of pluripotency markers, even after passaging. In addition, infection did not affect differentiation of hESC-derived neural precursors in vitro. We also found that green fluorescent protein expression mediated by adenovirus can be a useful marker for tracking hESC in xenografts. We conclude that adenovirus is a practical vector for genetic modification of naive hESC from most, but not all lines, but may be more generally useful for gene transfer into differentiated derivatives of hESC lines.

  18. Molecular characterization of adenoviruses among finnish military conscripts.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Rönkkö, Esa; Virkki, Maria; Nikkari, Simo; Ziegler, Thedi

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses were identified as important respiratory pathogens many years ago, little information is available concerning the prevalence of different adenovirus serotypes, which are circulating and causing epidemics in Finnish military training centers. Over a period of five years from 2008 to 2012, 3577 respiratory specimens were collected from military conscripts presenting with symptoms compatible with acute respiratory tract infection. Upon initial testing for certain respiratory viruses by real-time PCR, 837 of these specimens were identified as adenovirus-positive. For 672 of these specimens, the serotype of the adenovirus responsible was successfully determined by DNA sequencing. Serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 were detected in 1, 3, 181, and 487 samples, respectively. Adenovirus epidemics were observed during each year of this study. Based on these findings, adenovirus vaccination should be considered for military conscripts in the Finnish Defence Forces.

  19. “Hit-and-Run” Transformation by Adenovirus Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nevels, Michael; Täuber, Birgitt; Spruss, Thilo; Wolf, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    According to classical concepts of viral oncogenesis, the persistence of virus-specific oncogenes is required to maintain the transformed cellular phenotype. In contrast, the “hit-and-run” hypothesis claims that viruses can mediate cellular transformation through an initial “hit,” while maintenance of the transformed state is compatible with the loss (“run”) of viral molecules. It is well established that the adenovirus E1A and E1B gene products can cooperatively transform primary human and rodent cells to a tumorigenic phenotype and that these cells permanently express the viral oncogenes. Additionally, recent studies have shown that the adenovirus E4 region encodes two novel oncoproteins, the products of E4orf6 and E4orf3, which cooperate with the viral E1A proteins to transform primary rat cells in an E1B-like fashion. Unexpectedly, however, cells transformed by E1A and either E4orf6 or E4orf3 fail to express the viral E4 gene products, and only a subset contain E1A proteins. In fact, the majority of these cells lack E4- and E1A-specific DNA sequences, indicating that transformation occurred through a hit-and-run mechanism. We provide evidence that the unusual transforming activities of the adenoviral oncoproteins may be due to their mutagenic potential. Our results strongly support the possibility that even tumors that lack any detectable virus-specific molecules can be of viral origin, which could have a significant impact on the use of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:11238835

  20. Adenovirus dodecahedron, a new vector for human gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Ruigrok, R W; Gout, E; Buffet, S; Chroboczek, J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus is one of most efficient delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, the initial enthusiasm for the use of recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy has been tempered by strong immune responses that develop to the virus and virus-infected cells. Even though recombinant adenoviruses are replication-defective, they introduce into the recipient cell, together with the gene of interest, viral genetes that might lead to fortuitous recombination if the recipient is infected by wild-type adenovirus. We propose the use of a dodecahedron made of adenovirus pentons or penton bases as an alternative vector for human gene therapy. The penton is a complex of two oligomeric proteins, a penton base and fiber, involved in the cell attachment, internalization, and liberation of virus into the cytoplasm. The dodecahedron retains many of the advantages of adenovirus for gene transfer such as efficiency of entry, efficient release of DNA from endosomes, and wide range of cell and tissue targets. Because it consists of only one or two adenovirus proteins instead of the 11 contained in an adenovirus virion and it does not contain the viral genome, it is potentially a safer alternative to recombinant adenovirus.

  1. Selective Modification of Adenovirus Replication Can Be Achieved through Rational Mutagenesis of the Adenovirus Type 5 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Capella, Cristina; Beltejar, Michael-John; Brown, Caitlin; Fong, Vincent; Daddacha, Waaqo; Kim, Baek

    2012-01-01

    Mutations that reduce the efficiency of deoxynucleoside (dN) triphosphate (dNTP) substrate utilization by the HIV-1 DNA polymerase prevent viral replication in resting cells, which contain low dNTP concentrations, but not in rapidly dividing cells such as cancer cells, which contain high levels of dNTPs. We therefore tested whether mutations in regions of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) DNA polymerase that interact with the dNTP substrate or DNA template could alter virus replication. The majority of the mutations created, including conservative substitutions, were incompatible with virus replication. Five replication-competent mutants were recovered from 293 cells, but four of these mutants failed to replicate in A549 lung carcinoma cells and Wi38 normal lung cells. Purified polymerase proteins from these viruses exhibited only a 2- to 4-fold reduction in their dNTP utilization efficiency but nonetheless could not be rescued, even when intracellular dNTP concentrations were artificially raised by the addition of exogenous dNs to virus-infected A549 cells. The fifth mutation (I664V) reduced biochemical dNTP utilization by the viral polymerase by 2.5-fold. The corresponding virus replicated to wild-type levels in three different cancer cell lines but was significantly impaired in all normal cell lines in which it was tested. Efficient replication and virus-mediated cell killing were rescued by the addition of exogenous dNs to normal lung fibroblasts (MRC5 cells), confirming the dNTP-dependent nature of the polymerase defect. Collectively, these data provide proof-of-concept support for the notion that conditionally replicating, tumor-selective adenovirus vectors can be created by modifying the efficiency with which the viral DNA polymerase utilizes dNTP substrates. PMID:22811532

  2. Selective modification of adenovirus replication can be achieved through rational mutagenesis of the adenovirus type 5 DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Capella, Cristina; Beltejar, Michael-John; Brown, Caitlin; Fong, Vincent; Daddacha, Waaqo; Kim, Baek; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Mutations that reduce the efficiency of deoxynucleoside (dN) triphosphate (dNTP) substrate utilization by the HIV-1 DNA polymerase prevent viral replication in resting cells, which contain low dNTP concentrations, but not in rapidly dividing cells such as cancer cells, which contain high levels of dNTPs. We therefore tested whether mutations in regions of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) DNA polymerase that interact with the dNTP substrate or DNA template could alter virus replication. The majority of the mutations created, including conservative substitutions, were incompatible with virus replication. Five replication-competent mutants were recovered from 293 cells, but four of these mutants failed to replicate in A549 lung carcinoma cells and Wi38 normal lung cells. Purified polymerase proteins from these viruses exhibited only a 2- to 4-fold reduction in their dNTP utilization efficiency but nonetheless could not be rescued, even when intracellular dNTP concentrations were artificially raised by the addition of exogenous dNs to virus-infected A549 cells. The fifth mutation (I664V) reduced biochemical dNTP utilization by the viral polymerase by 2.5-fold. The corresponding virus replicated to wild-type levels in three different cancer cell lines but was significantly impaired in all normal cell lines in which it was tested. Efficient replication and virus-mediated cell killing were rescued by the addition of exogenous dNs to normal lung fibroblasts (MRC5 cells), confirming the dNTP-dependent nature of the polymerase defect. Collectively, these data provide proof-of-concept support for the notion that conditionally replicating, tumor-selective adenovirus vectors can be created by modifying the efficiency with which the viral DNA polymerase utilizes dNTP substrates.

  3. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation.

    PubMed

    Mangel, Walter F; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a "molecular sled" to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  4. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  5. Structure and uncoating of immature adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marabini, Roberto; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Mangel, Walter F.; Flint, S. Jane; Martín, Carmen San

    2009-01-01

    Summary Maturation via proteolytical processing is a common trait in the viral world, and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins, but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion; and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytical processing are not infectious. We present the 3D structure of immature adenovirus particles, as represented by the thermosensitive mutant Ad2 ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions, and compare it with the mature capsid. Our 3DEM maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the location of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help to define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged. PMID:19563809

  6. Structure, Function and Dynamics in Adenovirus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed. PMID:25421887

  7. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  8. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  9. Adenovirus DNA polymerase is a phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, M; Nakano, R; Mohan, P M; Rawitch, A B; Padmanabhan, R

    1993-01-05

    Biological activities of many of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins are modulated by protein phosphorylation. Investigations of the phosphorylation of adenovirus DNA polymerase (AdPol) have been difficult mainly because of its low level of synthesis in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells. However, when AdPol was overproduced using the recombinant vaccinia virus (RV-AdPol) and the baculovirus expression systems, or by a large scale metabolic labeling of adenovirus 2-infected HeLa cells (native AdPol), in vivo phosphorylation of AdPol could be demonstrated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of [32P]AdPol indicated the presence of phosphoserine independent of the source of AdPol. Comparison of tryptic peptide maps of native AdPol and RV-AdPol revealed that the majority of phosphopeptides were common. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography and sequencing of one of the major phosphopeptides revealed serine 67 as a site of phosphorylation. Interestingly, this site is located close to the nuclear localization signal of AdPol and has a consensus substrate recognition sequence for histone H1 (cdc2-related) kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Dephosphorylation of AdPol with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase resulted in significant decrease in its activity in the in vitro DNA replication initiation assay, suggesting that phosphorylation is important for its biological activity.

  10. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Dong; Zhong, Zhirong; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  11. Application of conditionally replicating adenoviruses in tumor early diagnosis technology, gene-radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Ou, Mengting; Wang, Guixue; Tang, Liling

    2016-10-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds), or known as replication-selective adenoviruses, were discovered as oncolytic gene vectors several years ago. They have a strong ability of scavenging tumor and lesser toxicity to normal tissue. CRAds not only have a tumor-killing ability but also can combine with gene therapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy to induce tumor cell apoptosis. In this paper, we review the structure of CRAds and CRAd vectors and summarize the current application of CRAds in tumor detection as well as in radiotherapy and suicide gene-mediating chemotherapy. We also propose further research strategies that can improve the application value of CRAds, including enhancing tumor destruction effect, further reducing toxic effect, reducing immunogenicity, constructing CRAds that can target tumor stem cells, and trying to use mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as the carriers for oncolytic adenoviruses. As their importance to cancer diagnosis, gene-radiation, and chemotherapy, CRAds may play a considerable role in clinical diagnosis and various cancer treatments in the future.

  12. Enhanced inactivation of adenovirus under polychromatic UV lamps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most UV-resistant waterborne pathogen of concern to public health microbiologists. The US EPA has stipulated that a UV fluence (dose) of 186 mJ cm-2 is required for 4-log inactivation credit in water treatment. However, all adenovirus inactivation data to date publi...

  13. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  14. The search for adenovirus 14 in children in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Laham, Federico R; Jewell, Alan M; Schoonover, Shauna L; Demmler, Gail J; Piedra, Pedro A

    2008-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)14 has recently emerged in the United States causing outbreaks of severe respiratory disease. To determine if Ad14 circulated in Houston, Texas, during the same time as an outbreak in military recruits in nearby San Antonio, 215 pediatric adenovirus isolates were serotyped using microneutralization. None were Ad14; Ad1, Ad2, and Ad3 were the most common identified serotypes.

  15. A novel adenovirus in Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-05-07

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  16. Adenovirus dodecahedron allows large multimeric protein transduction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Schoehn, G; Foucaud-Gamen, J; Gout, E; Garcel, A; Drouet, E; Chroboczek, J

    2003-04-01

    Adenovirus dodecahedron is a virus-like particle composed of only two viral proteins of human adenovirus serotype 3 that are responsible for virus attachment and internalization. We show here that this dodecameric particle, devoid of genetic information, efficiently penetrates human cells and can deliver large multimeric proteins such as immunoglobulins.

  17. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  18. Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy Against Viral Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-12

    economy. Vaccine development is an important strategy to thwart the threat of these viral biothreat agents. There is an urgent need to improve...Alberta, Tl A 8K6. Canada E-mail: josh. wu@drdc-rddc.gc.ca .• 78 JoshQ.H. Wu existing vaccines against these agents and to develop new ones. Gene...of vaccines against viral biothreat agents. Genes encoding protective antigens of viral biothreat agents can be carried by these viral vectors and

  19. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  20. Mechanisms of pathogenesis of emerging adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cook, James; Radke, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of human adenovirus infections can cause severe illness in people with no known predisposing conditions. The reasons for this increased viral pathogenicity are uncertain. Adenoviruses are constantly undergoing mutation during circulation in the human population, but related phenotypic changes of the viruses are rarely detected because of the infrequency of such outbreaks and the limited biological studies of the emergent strains. Mutations and genetic recombinations have been identified in these new strains. However, the linkage between these genetic changes and increased pathogenicity is poorly understood. It has been observed recently that differences in virus-induced immunopathogenesis can be associated with altered expression of non-mutant viral genes associated with changes in viral modulation of the host innate immune response. Initial small animal studies indicate that these changes in viral gene expression can be associated with enhanced immunopathogenesis in vivo. Available evidence suggests the hypothesis that there is a critical threshold of expression of certain viral genes that determines both the sustainability of viral transmission in the human population and the enhancement of immunopathogenesis. Studies of this possibility will require extension of the analysis of outbreak viral strains from a sequencing-based focus to biological studies of relationships between viral gene expression and pathogenic responses. Advances in this area will require increased coordination among public health organizations, diagnostic microbiology laboratories, and research laboratories to identify, catalog, and systematically study differences between prototype and emergent viral strains that explain the increased pathogenicity that can occur during clinical outbreaks. PMID:28184296

  1. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2005). In this study, the virus was successfully isolated and propagated in peregrine falcon embryo fibroblasts, in which it caused visible and reproducible cytopathology. Testing for serum neutralizing antibodies found that infection with this virus was limited almost exclusively to falcons. Serology also found that wild and captive peregrine falcons had high seropositivity rates of 80% and 100%, respectively, although clinical disease was rarely reported in this species. These data implicate peregrine falcons as the natural host and primary reservoir for the virus. Other species of North American falcons, including aplomado falcons, had lower seropositivity rates of 43 to 57%. Falcon species of tropical and/or island origin were uniformly seronegative, although deaths among adults of these species have been described, suggesting they are highly susceptible. Chickens and quail were uniformly seronegative and not susceptible to infection, indicating that fowl were not the source of infection. Based on the information from this study, the primary control of falcon adenovirus infections should be based on segregation of carrier and susceptible falcon species. PMID:16000467

  2. Adenovirus as a gene therapy vector for hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Marini, F C; Yu, Q; Wickham, T; Kovesdi, I; Andreeff, M

    2000-06-01

    Adenovirus (Adv)-mediated gene transfer has recently gained new attention as a means to deliver genes for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) or progenitor cell gene therapy. In the past, HSCs have been regarded as poor Adv targets, mainly because they lack the specific Adv receptors required for efficient and productive Adv infection. In addition, the nonintegrating nature of Adv has prevented its application to HSC and bone marrow transduction protocols where long-term expression is required. There is even controversy as to whether Adv can infect hematopoietic cells at all. In fact, the ability of Adv to infect epithelium-based targets and its inability to effectively transfect HSCs have been used in the development of eradication schemes that use Adv to preferentially infect and "purge" tumor cell-contaminating HSC grafts. However, there are data supporting the existence of productive Adv infections into HSCs. Such protocols involve the application of cytokine mixtures, high multiplicities of infection, long incubation periods, and more recently, immunological and genetic modifications to Adv itself to enable it to efficiently transfer genes into HSCs. This is a rapidly growing field, both in terms of techniques and applications. This review examines the two sides of the Adv/CD34 controversy as well as the current developments in this field.

  3. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  4. A Single Maturation Cleavage Site in Adenovirus Impacts Cell Entry and Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Crystal L.; Besser, Eli S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteolytic maturation drives the conversion of stable, immature virus particles to a mature, metastable state primed for cell infection. In the case of human adenovirus, this proteolytic cleavage is mediated by the virally encoded protease AVP. Protein VI, an internal capsid cement protein and substrate for AVP, is cleaved at two sites, one of which is near the N terminus of the protein. In mature capsids, the 33 residues at the N terminus of protein VI (pVIn) are sequestered inside the cavity formed by peripentonal hexon trimers at the 5-fold vertex. Here, we describe a glycine-to-alanine mutation in the N-terminal cleavage site of protein VI that profoundly impacts proteolytic processing, the generation of infectious particles, and cell entry. The phenotypic effects associated with this mutant provide a mechanistic framework for understanding the multifunctional nature of protein VI. Based on our findings, we propose that the primary function of the pVIn peptide is to mediate interactions between protein VI and hexon during virus replication, driving hexon nuclear accumulation and particle assembly. Once particles are assembled, AVP-mediated cleavage facilitates the release of the membrane lytic region at the amino terminus of mature VI, allowing it to lyse the endosome during cell infection. These findings highlight the importance of a single maturation cleavage site for both infectious particle production and cell entry and emphasize the exquisite spatiotemporal regulation governing adenovirus assembly and disassembly. IMPORTANCE Postassembly virus maturation is a cornerstone principle in virology. However, a mechanistic understanding of how icosahedral viruses utilize this process to transform immature capsids into infection-competent particles is largely lacking. Adenovirus maturation involves proteolytic processing of seven precursor proteins. There is currently no information for the role of each independent cleavage event in the generation of

  5. The Dual Nature of Nek9 in Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Richard; Radko, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To successfully replicate in an infected host cell, a virus must overcome sophisticated host defense mechanisms. Viruses, therefore, have evolved a multitude of devices designed to circumvent cellular defenses that would lead to abortive infection. Previous studies have identified Nek9, a cellular kinase, as a binding partner of adenovirus E1A, but the biology behind this association remains a mystery. Here we show that Nek9 is a transcriptional repressor that functions together with E1A to silence the expression of p53-inducible GADD45A gene in the infected cell. Depletion of Nek9 in infected cells reduces virus growth but unexpectedly enhances viral gene expression from the E2 transcription unit, whereas the opposite occurs when Nek9 is overexpressed. Nek9 localizes with viral replication centers, and its depletion reduces viral genome replication, while overexpression enhances viral genome numbers in infected cells. Additionally, Nek9 was found to colocalize with the viral E4 orf3 protein, a repressor of cellular stress response. Significantly, Nek9 was also shown to associate with viral and cellular promoters and appears to function as a transcriptional repressor, representing the first instance of Nek9 playing a role in gene regulation. Overall, these results highlight the complexity of virus-host interactions and identify a new role for the cellular protein Nek9 during infection, suggesting a role for Nek9 in regulating p53 target gene expression. IMPORTANCE In the arms race that exists between a pathogen and its host, each has continually evolved mechanisms to either promote or prevent infection. In order to successfully replicate and spread, a virus must overcome every mechanism that a cell can assemble to block infection. On the other hand, to counter viral spread, cells must have multiple mechanisms to stifle viral replication. In the present study, we add to our understanding of how the human adenovirus is able to circumvent cellular roadblocks

  6. Expression of Coxsackie-Adenovirus receptor (CAR) in the developing mouse olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Giri; Behrens, Maik; Pyrski, Martina; Margolis, Frank L

    2005-09-01

    Interest in manipulating gene expression in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) has led to the use of adenoviruses (AdV) as gene delivery vectors. OSNs are the first order neurons in the olfactory system and the initial site of odor detection. They are highly susceptible to adenovirus infection although the mechanism is poorly understood. The Coxsackie-Adenovirus receptor (CAR) and members of the integrin family have been implicated in the process of AdV infection in various systems. Multiple serotypes of AdV efficiently bind to the CAR, leading to entry and infection of the host cell by a mechanism that can also involve integrins. Cell lines that do not express CAR are relatively resistant, but not completely immune to AdV infection, suggesting that other mechanisms participate in mediating AdV attachment and entry. Using in situ hybridization and western blot analyses, we show that OSNs and olfactory bulbs (OB) of mice express abundant CAR mRNA at embryonic and neonatal stages, with progressive diminution during postnatal development. By contrast to the olfactory epithelium (OE), CAR mRNA is still present in the adult mouse OB. Furthermore, despite a similar postnatal decline, CAR protein expression in the OE and OB of mice continues into adulthood. Our results suggest that the robust AdV infection observed in the postnatal olfactory system is mediated by CAR and that expression of even small amounts of CAR protein as seen in the adult rodent, permits efficient AdV infection and entry. CAR is an immunoglobulin domain-containing protein that bears homology to cell-adhesion molecules suggesting the possibility that it may participate in organization of the developing olfactory system.

  7. Systemic Delivery of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Decorin for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuefeng; Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Guise, Theresa; Yun, Chae-Ok; Brendler, Charles B; Iozzo, Renato V; Seth, Prem

    2015-12-01

    The development of novel therapies for breast cancer bone metastasis is a major unmet medical need. Toward that end, we have constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad.dcn, and a nonreplicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).dcn, both containing the human decorin gene. Our in vitro studies showed that Ad.dcn produced high levels of viral replication and the decorin protein in the breast tumor cells. Ad(E1-).dcn-mediated decorin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells downregulated the expression of Met, β-catenin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A, all of which are recognized decorin targets and play pivotal roles in the progression of breast tumor growth and metastasis. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited cell migration and induced mitochondrial autophagy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mice bearing MDA-MB-231-luc skeletal metastases were systemically administered with the viral vectors, and skeletal tumor growth was monitored over time. The results of bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography indicated that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn significantly inhibited the progression of bone metastases. At the terminal time point, histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, and bone destruction biomarkers showed that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn reduced tumor burden and inhibited bone destruction. A nonreplicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).luc expressing the luciferase 2 gene had no significant effect on inhibiting bone metastases, and in several assays, Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn were better than Ad.luc, a replicating virus expressing the luciferase 2 gene. Our data suggest that adenoviral replication coupled with decorin expression could produce effective antitumor responses in a MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis model of breast cancer. Thus, Ad.dcn could potentially be developed as a candidate gene therapy vector for treating breast cancer bone metastases.

  8. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  9. IMMUNOFLUORESCENT STUDIES OF THE POTENTIATION OF AN ADENOVIRUS-ASSOCIATED VIRUS BY ADENOVIRUS 7

    PubMed Central

    Blacklow, Neil R.; Hoggan, M. David; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1967-01-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescent procedure for detection of viral antigen was used to study the potentiation of AAV-1 by Ad.7. AAV viral antigen formed only when the cells were also infected with adenovirus, and only in cell culture systems in which the adenovirus infection proceeded to completion. Ad. 7 infection of AGMK. cell cultures did not potentiate AAV unless the Ad. 7 infection was itself potentiated by SV40. Dose-response studies indicated that a single AAV particle and a single infectious Ad. 7 particle sufficed to initiate AAV antigen synthesis. Sequential inoculation studies showed that AAV antigen formed simultaneously with Ad. 7 viral antigen when the AAV was inoculated any time between 15 hr before to 10 hr after the Ad. 7, both antigens appearing about 15 hr after inoculation of Ad. 7. The AAV-1 antigen formation had a minimum latent period of 5 hr, as seen with Ad. 7 preinfection of 10 hr or more. When UV-irradiated Ad. 7 was used as helper, the AAV antigen still appeared simultaneously with the Ad. 7 viral antigen, even though the latter was delayed by 23 hr compared to nonirradiated virus. When the early replicative events of both viruses were allowed to proceed in FUDR-inhibited cells, and then the FUDR inhibition was reversed, AAV antigen formed within 2 hr, which was 3 hr before the Ad. 7 viral antigen appeared. It was inferred that the event in the adenovirus cycle that renders a cell competent to synthesize AAV occurs after the 10th hr and may be temporally associated with replication of the adenovirus DNA. PMID:4225814

  10. Adenovirus-based strategies overcome temozolomide resistance by silencing the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Bekele, B Nebiyou; Yung, W K Alfred; Fueyo, Juan

    2007-12-15

    Currently, the most efficacious treatment for malignant gliomas is temozolomide; however, gliomas expressing the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are resistant to this drug. Strong clinical evidence shows that gliomas with methylation and subsequent silencing of the MGMT promoter are sensitive to temozolomide. Based on the fact that adenoviral proteins directly target and inactivate key DNA repair genes, we hypothesized that the oncolytic adenovirus Delta-24-RGD could be successfully combined with temozolomide to overcome the reported MGMT-mediated resistance. Our studies showed that the combination of Delta-24-RGD and temozolomide induces a profound therapeutic synergy in glioma cells. We observed that Delta-24-RGD treatment overrides the temozolomide-mediated G(2)-M arrest. Furthermore, Delta-24-RGD infection was followed by down-modulation of the RNA levels of MGMT. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Delta-24-RGD prevented the recruitment of p300 to the MGMT promoter. Importantly, using mutant adenoviruses and wild-type and dominant-negative forms of the p300 protein, we showed that Delta-24-RGD interaction with p300 was required to induce silencing of the MGMT gene. Of further clinical relevance, the combination of Delta-24-RGD and temozolomide significantly improved the survival of glioma-bearing mice. Collectively, our data provide a strong mechanistic rationale for the combination of oncolytic adenoviruses and temozolomide, and should propel the clinical testing of this therapy approach in patients with malignant gliomas.

  11. Temporal regulation of adenovirus major late alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Akusjarvi, Goran

    2008-05-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced mRNAs during replication. The accumulation of viral mRNAs is subjected to a temporal regulation, a mechanism that ensures that proteins that are needed at certain stages of the virus life cycle are produced in a timely fashion. The complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery has been studied in detail during the last decade. These studies have resulted in the characterization of two viral proteins, E4-ORF4 and L4-33K, that adenovirus uses to remodel the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here I will review the current knowledge of how mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit is controlled with a particular emphasis on how cis-acting sequence element, trans-acting factors and mechanisms regulating adenovirus major late L1 alternative RNA splicing is controlled.

  12. An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0629 TITLE: An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Igor P. Dmitriev...Aug 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1...epithelial cells, the origin of most human cancers. However, realization of the full potential of Ad vectors for targeted cancer treatment is currently

  13. Adenovirus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are an important cause of infections in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, and they continue to provide clinical challenges pertaining to diagnostics and treatment. The growing number of HAdV types identified by genomic analysis, as well as the improved understanding of the sites of viral persistence and reactivation, requires continuous adaptions of diagnostic approaches to facilitate timely detection and monitoring of HAdV infections. In view of the clinical relevance of life-threatening HAdV diseases in the immunocompromised setting, there is an urgent need for highly effective treatment modalities lacking major side effects. The present review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding and management of HAdV infections. PMID:24982316

  14. Vaccine Design: Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Zhiquan; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2016-01-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for gene transfer for correction of genetic diseases. Although Ad vectors achieved high levels of transgene product expression in a variety of target cells, expression of therapeutic proteins was found to be transient as vigorous T cell responses directed to components of the vector as well as the transgene product rapidly eliminate Ad vector-transduced cells. This opened the use of Ad vectors as vaccine carriers and by now a multitude of preclinical as well as clinical studies has shown that Ad vectors induce very potent and sustained transgene product-specific T and B cell responses. This chapter provides guidance on developing E1-deleted Ad vectors based on available viral molecular clones. Specifically, it describes methods for cloning, viral rescue and purification as well as quality control studies.

  15. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  16. Immune-mediated canine and feline keratitis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Stacy E

    2008-03-01

    Although the normal cornea is devoid of vasculature and lymphatics, there are still several immune-mediated corneal conditions that can occur in dogs and cats. An overview of corneal immunology is presented. Diseases of dogs, including chronic superficial keratitis, superficial punctate keratitis, and canine adenovirus endotheliitis, as well as feline diseases, including eosinophilic keratitis and herpesvirus-related conditions, are discussed.

  17. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Adenoviruses Persistently Shed from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Grant, Rebecca; Calcedo, Roberto; Yuan, Xin; Keough, Martin; Sandhu, Arbans; Wang, Qiang; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Wilson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that have been developed as vectors for gene therapies and genetic vaccines. Previous studies indicated that human infections with adenoviruses are self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts with evidence of some persistence in adenoid tissue. We sought to better understand the natural history of adenovirus infections in various non-human primates and discovered that healthy populations of great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) and macaques shed substantial quantities of infectious adenoviruses in stool. Shedding in stools from asymptomatic humans was found to be much less frequent, comparable to frequencies reported before. We purified and fully sequenced 30 novel adenoviruses from apes and 3 novel adenoviruses from macaques. Analyses of the new ape adenovirus sequences (as well as the 4 chimpanzee adenovirus sequences we have previously reported) together with 22 complete adenovirus genomes available from GenBank revealed that (a) the ape adenoviruses could clearly be classified into species corresponding to human adenovirus species B, C, and E, (b) there was evidence for intraspecies recombination between adenoviruses, and (c) the high degree of phylogenetic relatedness of adenoviruses across their various primate hosts provided evidence for cross species transmission events to have occurred in the natural history of B and E viruses. The high degree of asymptomatic shedding of live adenovirus in non-human primates and evidence for zoonotic transmissions warrants caution for primate handling and housing. Furthermore, the presence of persistent and/or latent adenovirus infections in the gut should be considered in the design and interpretation of human and non-human primate studies with adenovirus vectors. PMID:19578438

  19. Interaction of cellular proteins with BCL-xL targeted to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in adenovirus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, T; Vijayalingam, S; Kuppuswamy, M; Chinnadurai, G

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus-mediated apoptosis was suppressed when cellular anti-apoptosis proteins (BCL-2 and BCL-xL) were substituted for the viral E1B-19K. For unbiased proteomic analysis of proteins targeted by BCL-xL in adenovirus-infected cells and to visualize the interactions with target proteins, BCL-xL was targeted to cytosolic inclusion bodies utilizing the orthoreovirus µNS protein sequences. The chimeric protein was localized in non-canonical cytosolic factory-like sites and promoted survival of virus-infected cells. The BCL-xL-associated proteins were isolated from the cytosolic inclusion bodies in adenovirus-infected cells and analyzed by LC-MS. These proteins included BAX, BAK, BID, BIK and BIM as well as mitochondrial proteins such as prohibitin 2, ATP synthase and DNA-PKcs. Our studies suggested that in addition to the interaction with various pro-apoptotic proteins, the association with certain mitochondrial proteins such as DNA-PKcs and prohibitins might augment the survival function of BCL-xL in virus infected cells.

  20. Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with Hsp70 gene exerts effective antitumor efficacy in gastric cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiguo; Ji, Weidan; Hu, Huanzhang; Ma, Juming; Li, Xiaoya; Mei, Weiqun; Xu, Yang; Hu, Huizhen; Yan, Yan; Song, Qizhe; Li, Zhigang; Su, Changqing

    2014-01-15

    Gene therapy is a promising adjuvant therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. To overcome the limitations of current gene therapy, such as poor transfection efficiency of vectors, low levels of transgene expression and lack of tumor targeting, the Survivin promoter was used to regulate the selective replication of oncolytic adenovirus in tumor cells, and the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) gene was loaded as the anticancer transgene to generate an AdSurp-Hsp70 viral therapy system. The efficacy of this targeted immunotherapy was examined in gastric cancer. The experiments showed that the oncolytic adenovirus can selectively replicate in and lyse the Survivin-positive gastric cancer cells, without significant toxicity to normal cells. AdSurp-Hsp70 reduced viability of cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth of gastric cancer xenografts in immuno-deficient and immuno-reconstruction mouse models. AdSurp-Hsp70 produced dual antitumor effects due to viral replication and high Hsp70 expression. This therapeutic system used the Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector to mediate targeted expression of the Hsp70 gene and ensure safety and efficacy for subsequent gene therapy programs against a variety of cancers.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of the DNA and Protein Binding Activities of Adenovirus Core Protein V

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Vaughan, Robert C.; Houser, Carolyn; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure of adenovirus outer capsid was revealed recently at 3- to 4-Å resolution (V. Reddy, S. Natchiar, P. Stewart, and G. Nemerow, Science 329:1071–1075, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1187292); however, precise details on the function and biochemical and structural features for the inner core still are lacking. Protein V is one the most important components of the adenovirus core, as it links the outer capsid via association with protein VI with the inner DNA core. Protein V is a highly basic protein that strongly binds to DNA in a nonspecific manner. We report the expression of a soluble protein V that exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Using reversible cross-linking affinity purification in combination with mass spectrometry, we found that protein V contains multiple DNA binding sites. The binding sites from protein V mediate heat-stable nucleic acid associations, with some of the binding sites possibly masked in the virus by other core proteins. We also demonstrate direct interaction between soluble proteins V and VI, thereby revealing the bridging of the inner DNA core with the outer capsid proteins. These findings are consistent with a model of nucleosome-like structures proposed for the adenovirus core and encapsidated DNA. They also suggest an additional role for protein V in linking the inner nucleic acid core with protein VI on the inner capsid shell. IMPORTANCE Scant knowledge exists of how the inner core of adenovirus containing its double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome and associated proteins is organized. Here, we report a purification scheme for a recombinant form of protein V that allowed analysis of its interactions with the nucleic acid core region. We demonstrate that protein V exhibits stable associations with dsDNA due to the presence of multiple nucleic acid binding sites identified both in the isolated recombinant protein and in virus particles. As protein V also binds to the membrane lytic protein VI molecules

  2. Pertussis-like syndrome associated with adenovirus presenting with hyperleukocytosis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Sarbay, Hakan; Polat, Aziz; Mete, Emin; Balci, Yasemin Isik; Akin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is an infectious viral agent that causes variety of clinical presentations such as respiratory disease, conjunctivitis, and gastroenteritis. Hepatitis, pancreatitis, myocarditis, encephalitis, and disseminated infection are primarily seen in immunocompromised patients. Rarely, adenovirus infection can present with pertussis-like syndrome. Described here is case of pertussis-like syndrome associated with adenovirus presenting with hyperleukocytosis. PMID:28058402

  3. Oncolytic virotherapy for osteosarcoma using midkine promoter-regulated adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Takagi-Kimura, M; Yamano, T; Tagawa, M; Kubo, S

    2014-03-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy using adenoviruses has potential therapeutic benefits for a variety of cancers. We recently developed MOA5, a tumor-specific midkine promoter-regulated oncolytic vector based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). We modified the binding tropism of MOA5 by replacing the cell-binding domain of the Ad5 fiber knob with that from another adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35); the resulting vector was designated MOA35. Here we evaluated the therapeutic efficacies of MOA5 and MOA35 for human osteosarcoma. Midkine mRNA expression and its promoter activity was significantly high in five human osteosarcoma cell lines, but was restricted in normal cells. Very low levels of adenovirus cellular receptor coxsackievirus/adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad5 receptor) expression were observed in MNNG-HOS and MG-63 cells, whereas high levels of CAR expression were seen in the other osteosarcoma cell lines. By contrast, CD46 (Ad35 receptor) was highly expressed in all osteosarcoma cell lines. Infectivity and in vitro cytocidal effect of MOA35 was significantly enhanced in MNNG-HOS and MG-63 cells compared with MOA5, although the cytocidal effects of MOA5 were sometimes higher in high CAR-expressing cell lines. In MG-63 xenograft models, MOA35 significantly enhanced antitumor effects compared with MOA5. Our findings indicate that MOA5 and MOA35 allow tailored virotherapy and facilitate more effective treatments for osteosarcoma.

  4. Bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Ayalew, Lisanework E; Kumar, Pankaj; Gaba, Amit; Makadiya, Niraj; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-01-15

    The use of vaccines is an effective and relatively inexpensive means of controlling infectious diseases, which cause heavy economic losses to the livestock industry through animal loss, decreased productivity, treatment expenses and decreased carcass quality. However, some vaccines produced by conventional means are imperfect in many respects including virulence, safety and efficacy. Moreover, there are no vaccines for some animal diseases. Although genetic engineering has provided new ways of producing effective vaccines, the cost of production for veterinary use is a critical criterion for selecting the method of production and delivery of vaccines. The cost effective production and intrinsic ability to enter cells has made adenovirus vectors a highly efficient tool for delivery of vaccine antigens. Moreover, adenoviruses induce both humoral and cellular immune responses to expressed vaccine antigens. Since nonhuman adenoviruses are species specific, the development of animal specific adenoviruses as vaccine delivery vectors is being evaluated. This review summarizes the work related to the development of bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle in animals, particularly cattle.

  5. Effects of nanoparticle coatings on the activity of oncolytic adenovirus-magnetic nanoparticle complexes.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Holm, Per Sonne; Schillinger, Ulrike; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Limitations to adenovirus infectivity can be overcome by association with magnetic nanoparticles and enforced infection by magnetic field influence. Here we examined three core-shell-type iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles differing in their surface coatings, particle sizes and magnetic properties for their ability to enhance the oncolytic potency of adenovirus Ad520 and to stabilize it against the inhibitory effects of serum or a neutralizing antibody. It was found that the physicochemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles are critical determinants of the properties which govern the oncolytic productivities of their complexes with Ad520. Although high serum concentration during infection or a neutralizing antibody had strong inhibitory influence on the uptake or oncolytic productivity of the naked virus, one particle type was identified which conferred high protection against both inhibitory factors while enhancing the oncolytic productivity of the internalized virus. This particle type equipped with a silica coating and adsorbed polyethylenimine, displaying a high magnetic moment and high saturation magnetization, mediated a 50% reduction of tumor growth rate versus control upon intratumoral injection of its complex with Ad520 and magnetic field influence, whereas Ad520 alone was inefficient. The correlations between physical properties of the magnetic particles or virus complexes and oncolytic potency are described herein.

  6. Loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor contributes to gastric cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Anders, M; Vieth, M; Röcken, C; Ebert, M; Pross, M; Gretschel, S; Schlag, P M; Wiedenmann, B; Kemmner, W; Höcker, M

    2009-01-01

    Loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has previously been observed in gastric cancer. The role of CAR in gastric cancer pathobiology, however, is unclear. We therefore analysed CAR in 196 R0-resected gastric adenocarcinomas and non-cancerous gastric mucosa samples using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor was found at the surface and foveolar epithelium of all non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples (n=175), whereas only 56% of gastric cancer specimens showed CAR positivity (P<0.0001). Loss of CAR correlated significantly with decreased differentiation, increased infiltrative depths, presence of distant metastases, and was also associated with reduced carcinoma-specific survival. To clarify whether CAR impacts the tumorbiologic properties of gastric cancer, we subsequently determined the role of CAR in proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines by application of specific CAR siRNA or ectopic expression of a human full-length CAR cDNA. These experiments showed that RNAi-mediated CAR knock down resulted in increased proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines, whereas enforced ectopic CAR expression led to opposite effects. We conclude that the association of reduced presence of CAR in more severe disease states, together with our findings in gastric cancer cell lines, suggests that CAR functionally contributes to gastric cancer pathogenesis, showing features of a tumour suppressor. PMID:19142187

  7. Assessment of a novel, capsid-modified adenovirus with an improved vascular gene transfer profile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disorders, including coronary artery bypass graft failure and in-stent restenosis remain significant opportunities for the advancement of novel therapeutics that target neointimal hyperplasia, a characteristic of both pathologies. Gene therapy may provide a successful approach to improve the clinical outcome of these conditions, but would benefit from the development of more efficient vectors for vascular gene delivery. The aim of this study was to assess whether a novel genetically engineered Adenovirus could be utilised to produce enhanced levels of vascular gene expression. Methods Vascular transduction capacity was assessed in primary human saphenous vein smooth muscle and endothelial cells using vectors expressing the LacZ reporter gene. The therapeutic capacity of the vectors was compared by measuring smooth muscle cell metabolic activity and migration following infection with vectors that over-express the candidate therapeutic gene tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3). Results Compared to Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5), the novel vector Ad5T*F35++ demonstrated improved binding and transduction of human vascular cells. Ad5T*F35++ mediated expression of TIMP-3 reduced smooth muscle cell metabolic activity and migration in vitro. We also demonstrated that in human serum samples pre-existing neutralising antibodies to Ad5T*F35++ were less prevalent than Ad5 neutralising antibodies. Conclusions We have developed a novel vector with improved vascular transduction and improved resistance to human serum neutralisation. This may provide a novel vector platform for human vascular gene transfer. PMID:23937994

  8. Latest insights on adenovirus structure and assembly.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å) and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25), but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber) had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  9. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å) and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25), but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber) had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies. PMID:22754652

  10. Thixotropic solutions enhance viral-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Michael P; Luner, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zabner, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient in part because its receptor is absent on the apical surface of the airways. Targeting adenovirus to other receptors, increasing the viral concentration, and even prolonging the incubation time with adenovirus vectors can partially overcome the lack of receptors and facilitate gene transfer. Unfortunately, mucociliary clearance would prevent prolonged incubation time in vivo. Thixotropic solutions (TS) are gels that upon a vigorous shearing force reversibly become liquid. We hypothesized that formulating recombinant adenoviruses in TS would decrease virus clearance and thus enhance gene transfer to the airway epithelia. We found that clearance of virus-sized fluorescent beads by human airway epithelia in vitro and by monkey trachea in vivo were markedly decreased when the beads were formulated in TS compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Adenovirus formulated in TS significantly increased adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of a reporter gene in human airway epithelia in vitro and in murine airway epithelia in vivo. Furthermore, an adenovirus encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene (AdCFTR) formulated in TS was more efficient in correcting the chloride transport defect in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia than AdCFTR formulated in PBS. These data indicate a novel strategy to augment the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer vectors and could be of value in gene transfer to cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vivo.

  11. Interspecies Differences in Virus Uptake versus Cardiac Function of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Fabian; Sauter, Martina; Pinkert, Sandra; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Kaldrack, Joanna; Thakkar, Meghna; Fechner, Henry; Klingel, Karin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein with an important role in virus uptake. Its extracellular immunoglobulin domains mediate the binding to coxsackievirus and adenovirus as well as homophilic and heterophilic interactions between cells. The cytoplasmic tail links CAR to the cytoskeleton and intracellular signaling cascades. In the heart, CAR is crucial for embryonic development, electrophysiology, and coxsackievirus B infection. Noncardiac functions are less well understood, in part due to the lack of suitable animal models. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse that rescued the otherwise embryonic-lethal CAR knockout (KO) phenotype by expressing chicken CAR exclusively in the heart. Using this rescue model, we addressed interspecies differences in coxsackievirus uptake and noncardiac functions of CAR. Survival of the noncardiac CAR KO (ncKO) mouse indicates an essential role for CAR in the developing heart but not in other tissues. In adult animals, cardiac activity was normal, suggesting that chicken CAR can replace the physiological functions of mouse CAR in the cardiomyocyte. However, chicken CAR did not mediate virus entry in vivo, so that hearts expressing chicken instead of mouse CAR were protected from infection and myocarditis. Comparison of sequence homology and modeling of the D1 domain indicate differences between mammalian and chicken CAR that relate to the sites important for virus binding but not those involved in homodimerization. Thus, CAR-directed anticoxsackievirus therapy with only minor adverse effects in noncardiac tissue could be further improved by selectively targeting the virus-host interaction while maintaining cardiac function. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is one of the most common human pathogens causing myocarditis. Its receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), not only mediates virus uptake but also relates to cytoskeletal organization and intracellular signaling

  12. Adenovirus type 5 early encoded proteins of the E1 and E4 regions induce oncogenic transformation of primary rabbit cells.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Peter; Täuber, Birgit; Spruss, Thilo; Dobner, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the molecular mechanisms of viral-mediated oncogenesis has contributed enormously to the understanding of the basic principles of normal/malignant cell growth. Transformation by human adenoviruses is a multi-step process involving the modulation of numerous cellular pathways, leading to inhibition of apoptosis and growth arrest. However, the molecular mechanism of how the adenovirus oncogenes facilitate transformation of rodent cells, while concurrently failing to do so for human cells, remains elusive. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time that the transformation capabilities of adenovirus type 5 oncogenes are not restricted to rodent cells, but include cells of the related mammalian order Lagomorpha, inducing considerable morphological alterations, enhanced cell growth and tumour induction in vivo. Furthermore, the established cell lines may represent a suitable tool for further development to generate E4-mutated adenoviruses, which has so far been difficult as mutations within the E4 region often prove to be lethal without a helper-cell system.

  13. Complete genome sequences of pigeon adenovirus 1 and duck adenovirus 2 extend the number of species within the genus Aviadenovirus.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ana; Kaján, Győző L; Kosiol, Carolin; Harrach, Balázs; Schlötterer, Christian; Hess, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Complete genomes of the first isolates of pigeon adenovirus 1 (PiAdV-1) and Muscovy duck adenovirus (duck adenovirus 2, DAdV-2) were sequenced. The PiAdV-1 genome is 45,480bp long, and has a gene organization most similar to turkey adenovirus 1. Near the left end of the genome, it lacks ORF0, ORF1A, ORF1B and ORF1C, and possesses ORF52, whereas six novel genes were found near the right end. The DAdV-2 genome is 43,734bp long, and has a gene organization similar to that of goose adenovirus 4 (GoAdV-4). It lacks ORF51, ORF1C and ORF54, and possesses ORF55A and five other novel genes. PiAdV-1 and DAdV-2 genomes contain two and one fiber genes, respectively. Genome organization, G+C content, molecular phylogeny and host type confirm the need to establish two novel species (Pigeon aviadenovirus A and Duck aviadenovirus B) within the genus Aviadenovirus. Phylogenetic data show that DAdV-2 is most closely related to GoAdV-4.

  14. Inhibition of adenovirus replication in vitro by trifluridine.

    PubMed

    Lennette, D A; Eiferman, R A

    1978-09-01

    At present, there is no effective chemotherapeutic agent available for the treatment of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Recent evidence suggests that trifluridine (3FT) may effectively inhibit the replication of some adenovirus serotypes known to cause keratoconjunctivitis. The ability of 3FT to inhibit two reference strains of adenoviruses, type 8 and type 19, was examined using cell cultures. Two second-passage isolates of adenoviruses, identified as serotype 13, were also tested. Compared with untreated, virusinfected cell cultures, drug-treated cell cultures developed a lesser degree of cytopathic effect following infection with all three serotypes. Virus production was reduced in the drug-treated cell cultures: approximately tenfold for type 8, more than 1,000-fold for type 19, and 5,000-fold for the type 13 isolates.

  15. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,F.; Burnett, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid.

  16. Genetic Relatedness Studies with Adenovirus-associated Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rose, James A.; Hoggan, M. David; Koczot, Frank; Shatkin, Aaron J.

    1968-01-01

    Adenovirus-associated viruses (AAV) contain double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). DNA from each of the four AAV serotypes was used as template for the in vitro synthesis of complementary 3H-ribonucleic acids(RNA). An estimation of genetic interrelatedness was made on the basis of hybridization reactions between synthetic AAV RNA and AAV DNA. Heterologous reactions were 27 to 37% of homologous reactions, suggesting that the AAV serotypes are related to about the same extent. AAV-1 synthetic RNA was also reacted with DNA from helper adenovirus types 2, 7, and SV15. Very low levels of RNA binding were observed, but it is not likely that these reactions represent AAV-adenovirus genetic relatedness. PMID:5739847

  17. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus.

  18. Development of a generic adenovirus delivery system based on structure-guided design of bispecific trimeric DARPin adapters.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Birgit; Honegger, Annemarie; Hess, Christian; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Mittl, Peer R E; Grütter, Markus G; Belousova, Natalya; Mikheeva, Galina; Krasnykh, Victor; Plückthun, Andreas

    2013-03-05

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have shown promise as vectors for gene delivery in clinical trials. Efficient viral targeting to a tissue of choice requires both ablation of the virus' original tropism and engineering of an efficient receptor-mediated uptake by a specific cell population. We have developed a series of adapters binding to the virus with such high affinity that they remain fully bound for >10 d, block its natural receptor binding site and mediate interaction with a surface receptor of choice. The adapter contains two fused modules, both consisting of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), one binding to the fiber knob of adenovirus serotype 5 and the other binding to various tumor markers. By solving the crystal structure of the complex of the trimeric knob with three bound DARPins at 1.95-Å resolution, we could use computer modeling to design a link to a trimeric protein of extraordinary kinetic stability, the capsid protein SHP from the lambdoid phage 21. We arrived at a module which binds the knob like a trimeric clamp. When this clamp was fused with DARPins of varying specificities, it enabled adenovirus serotype 5-mediated delivery of a transgene in a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, epidermal growth factor receptor-, or epithelial cell adhesion molecule-dependent manner with transduction efficiencies comparable to or even exceeding those of Ad itself. With these adapters, efficiently produced in Escherichia coli, Ad can be converted rapidly to new receptor specificities using any ligand as the receptor-binding moiety. Prefabricated Ads with different payloads thus can be retargeted readily to many cell types of choice.

  19. Effects of cold atmospheric plasmas on adenoviruses in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J. L.; Dumler, K.; Shimizu, T.; Morfill, G. E.; Wolf, A.; Boxhammer, V.; Schlegel, J.; Gansbacher, B.; Anton, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were performed with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) to inactivate adenovirus, a non-enveloped double stranded DNA virus, in solution. The plasma source used was a surface micro-discharge technology operating in air. Various plasma diagnostic measurements and tests were performed in order to determine the efficacy of CAPs and to understand the inactivation mechanism(s). Different stages of the adenovirus ‘life cycle’ were investigated—infectivity and gene expression as well as viral replication and spread. Within 240 s of CAP treatment, inactivation of up to 6 decimal log levels can be achieved.

  20. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  1. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  2. Adenovirus infection stimulates the Raf/MAPK signaling pathway and induces interleukin-8 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, J T; Kovesdi, I

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that airway administration of adenovirus or adenovirus vectors results in a dose-dependent inflammatory response which limits the duration of transgene expression. We explored the possibility that adenovirus infection triggers signal transduction pathways that induce the synthesis of cytokines and thus contribute to the early inflammatory response. Since stimulation of the Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activates transcription factors that control the expression of inflammatory cytokines, we examined the activation of this pathway following adenovirus infection. Adenovirus infection induced the rapid activation of Raf-1 and a transient increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of p42mapk at early times postinfection. Activation of the Raf/MAPK pathway by adenovirus is likely triggered by the infection process, since it occurred rapidly and with various mutant adenoviruses and adenovirus vectors. Moreover, interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA accumulation was evident at 20 min postinfection and was induced even in the presence of cycloheximide. Both MAPK activation and IL-8 production were inhibited by forskolin, a potent inhibitor of Raf-1. These results suggest that adenovirus-induced Raf/MAPK activation contributes to IL-8 production. Adenovirus-induced activation of the Raf/MAPK signaling pathway and IL-8 production may play critical roles in the inflammation observed following in vivo administration of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy. PMID:8985363

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    SciTech Connect

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls.

  4. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  5. A Stochastic Model for Microtubule Motors Describes the In Vivo Cytoplasmic Transport of Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Mattia; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Bayati, Basil; Engelke, Martin; Greber, Urs F.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-01-01

    Cytoplasmic transport of organelles, nucleic acids and proteins on microtubules is usually bidirectional with dynein and kinesin motors mediating the delivery of cargoes in the cytoplasm. Here we combine live cell microscopy, single virus tracking and trajectory segmentation to systematically identify the parameters of a stochastic computational model of cargo transport by molecular motors on microtubules. The model parameters are identified using an evolutionary optimization algorithm to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the in silico and the in vivo run length and velocity distributions of the viruses on microtubules. The present stochastic model suggests that bidirectional transport of human adenoviruses can be explained without explicit motor coordination. The model enables the prediction of the number of motors active on the viral cargo during microtubule-dependent motions as well as the number of motor binding sites, with the protein hexon as the binding site for the motors. PMID:20041204

  6. A stochastic model for microtubule motors describes the in vivo cytoplasmic transport of human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Mattia; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Bayati, Basil; Engelke, Martin; Greber, Urs F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-12-01

    Cytoplasmic transport of organelles, nucleic acids and proteins on microtubules is usually bidirectional with dynein and kinesin motors mediating the delivery of cargoes in the cytoplasm. Here we combine live cell microscopy, single virus tracking and trajectory segmentation to systematically identify the parameters of a stochastic computational model of cargo transport by molecular motors on microtubules. The model parameters are identified using an evolutionary optimization algorithm to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the in silico and the in vivo run length and velocity distributions of the viruses on microtubules. The present stochastic model suggests that bidirectional transport of human adenoviruses can be explained without explicit motor coordination. The model enables the prediction of the number of motors active on the viral cargo during microtubule-dependent motions as well as the number of motor binding sites, with the protein hexon as the binding site for the motors.

  7. A novel multi-target RNAi adenovirus inhibits hepatoma cell proliferation, migration, and induction of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tingting; Cheng, Ya; Ren, Weihua; Jia, Weidong; Ma, Jinliang; Xu, Geliang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multi-step process involving many genes. Consequently, single gene targeting therapy has limited efficacy, making combination therapy targeting multiple genes a necessity. Based on our previous findings, we constructed a single vector mediating simultaneous expression of multiple short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), chemokine C-C motif receptor 1 (CCR1), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), three genes closely related to HCC progression that act through separate pathways. The shRNA vector efficiently downregulated the mRNA and protein of all three molecules in Huh7 hepatoma cells. The vector also inhibited cell proliferation and migration and reduced angiogenesis. Furthermore, this shRNA vector can be recombined into adenovirus, a gene therapy vector, for better in vivo application. It thus offers a potentially effective future gene therapy approach to treating human liver cancer. PMID:27221035

  8. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  9. Novel Fiber-Dependent Entry Mechanism for Adenovirus Serotype 5 in Lacrimal Acini▿

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansong; Chiang, Lilian; Contreras, Janette; Wu, Kaijin; Garner, Judy A.; Medina-Kauwe, Lali; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2006-01-01

    The established mechanism for infection of most cells with adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) involves fiber capsid protein binding to coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) at the cell surface, followed by penton base capsid protein binding to αv integrins, which triggers clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the virus. Here we determined the identity of the capsid proteins responsible for mediating Ad5 entry into the acinar epithelial cells of the lacrimal gland. Ad5 transduction of primary rabbit lacrimal acinar cells was inhibited by excess Ad5 fiber or knob (terminal region of the fiber) but not excess penton base. Investigation of the interactions of recombinant Ad5 penton base, fiber, and knob with lacrimal acini revealed that the penton base capsid protein remained surface associated, while the knob domain of the fiber capsid protein was rapidly internalized. Introduction of rabbit CAR-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) into lacrimal acini under conditions that reduced intracellular CAR mRNA significantly inhibited Ad5 transduction, in contrast to a control (nonspecific) siRNA. Preincubation of Ad5 with excess heparin or pretreatment of acini with a heparinase cocktail each inhibited Ad5 transduction by a separate and apparently additive mechanism. Functional and imaging studies revealed that Ad5, fiber, and knob, but not penton base, stimulated macropinocytosis in acini and that inhibition of macropinocytosis significantly reduced Ad5 transduction of acini. However, inhibition of macropinocytosis did not reduce Ad5 uptake. We propose that internalization of Ad5 into lacrimal acini is through a novel fiber-dependent mechanism that includes CAR and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans and that the subsequent intracellular trafficking of Ad5 is enhanced by fiber-induced macropinocytosis. PMID:16987972

  10. Biodistribution and inflammatory profiles of novel penton and hexon double-mutant serotype 5 adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Angela C.; Coughlan, Lynda; Miller, Ashley M.; Alba, Raul; van Rooijen, Nico; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The use of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors in the clinical setting is severely hampered by the profound liver tropism observed after intravascular delivery coupled with the pronounced inflammatory and innate immune response elicited by these vectors. Liver transduction by circulating Ad5 virions is mediated by a high-affinity interaction between the capsid hexon protein and blood coagulation factor X (FX), whilst penton–αvintegrin interactions are thought to contribute to the induction of anti-Ad5 inflammatory and innate immune responses. To overcome these limitations, we sought to develop and characterise for the first time novel Ad5 vectors possessing mutations ablating both hexon:FX and penton:integrin interactions. As expected, intravascular administration of the FX binding-ablated Ad5HVR5*HVR7*E451Q vector (AdT*) resulted in significantly reduced liver transduction in vivo compared to Ad5. In macrophage-depleted mice, increased spleen uptake of AdT* was accompanied by an elevation in the levels of several inflammatory mediators. However ablation of the penton RGD motif in the AdT* vector background (AdT*RGE) resulted in a significant 5-fold reduction in spleen uptake and attenuated the antiviral inflammatory response. A reduction in spleen uptake and inflammatory activation was also observed in animals after intravascular administration of Ad5RGE compared to the parental Ad5 vector, with reduced co-localisation of the viral beta-galactosidase transgene with MAdCAM-1 + sinus-lining endothelial cells. Our detailed assessment of these novel adenoviruses indicates that penton base RGE mutation in combination with FX binding-ablation may be a viable strategy to attenuate the undesired liver uptake and pro-inflammatory responses to Ad5 vectors after intravascular delivery. PMID:22626939

  11. [Deletion of IV a2 gene from adenoviral genome by lambda-Red recombinase system and packaging of the recombinant adenovirus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Fan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Liu, Xue-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Ruan, Li

    2011-05-01

    This investigation is to delete the most of the coding sequence (1104 bp) of the IV a2 gene in an adenovirus genome by a lambda-Red recombinase system-mediated PCR-targeting approach and rescue a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion. First, the template pAK of PCR targeting, containing kanamycin cassette, was constructed. Then, a linear fragment for PCR targeting, which had 39 bp homologous arms at both of its terminus, was amplified by PCR from the pAK. The pFG140 and the linear fragment were electroporated into E. coli BW25113/pIJ790 sequentially and the recombinant pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) was established by homologous recombination between the linear fragment and the pFG140 with aid of X-Red recombinase. The precise deletion of 1 104 bp fragment from IV a2 was confirmed by restriction endonucleases digestion and DNA sequencing. ORF of IV a2 was amplified by PCR from pFG140 and then cloned into the pAAV2neo vector. The recombinant adenovirus Ad5delta IV a2 (1104) was rescued by co-transfection of pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) and pAAV2neo-IV a2 into HEK293 cells. It was shown by Western Blot that IV a2 could not be detected in the Ad5deltaIV a2 (1104)- infected HEK293 cells. This study established a PCR-targeting strategy for manipulating adenovirus genome directly by a lambda-Red recombinase system, and a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion was obtained.

  12. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  16. Mechanics of Viral Chromatin Reveals the Pressurization of Human Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Condezo, Gabriela N; Pérez-Berná, Ana J; Chillón, Miguel; Flint, S Jane; Reguera, David; San Martín, Carmen; de Pablo, Pedro J

    2015-11-24

    Tight confinement of naked genomes within some viruses results in high internal pressure that facilitates their translocation into the host. Adenovirus, however, encodes histone-like proteins that associate with its genome resulting in a confined DNA-protein condensate (core). Cleavage of these proteins during maturation decreases core condensation and primes the virion for proper uncoating via unidentified mechanisms. Here we open individual, mature and immature adenovirus cages to directly probe the mechanics of their chromatin-like cores. We find that immature cores are more rigid than the mature ones, unveiling a mechanical signature of their condensation level. Conversely, intact mature particles demonstrate more rigidity than immature or empty ones. DNA-condensing polyamines revert the mechanics of mature capsid and cores to near-immature values. The combination of these experiments reveals the pressurization of adenovirus particles induced by maturation. We estimate a pressure of ∼30 atm by continuous elasticity, which is corroborated by modeling the adenovirus mini-chromosome as a confined compact polymer. We propose this pressurization as a mechanism that facilitates initiating the stepwise disassembly of the mature particle, enabling its escape from the endosome and final genome release at the nuclear pore.

  17. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Serologic and hexon phylogenetic analysis of ruminant adenoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the antigenic relationship among ruminant adenoviruses and determine their phylogenetic relationship based on the deduced hexon gene amino acid sequence. Results of reciprocal cross-neutralization tests demonstrated antigenic relationships in either on...

  19. Transcription activation by the adenovirus E1a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, James W.; Green, Michael R.

    1989-03-01

    The adenovirus Ela protein stimulates transcription of a wide variety of viral and cellular genes. It is shown here that Ela has the two functions characteristic of a typical cellular activator: one direct Ela to the promoter, perhaps by interacting with a DMA-bound protein, and the other, an activating region, enables the bound activator to stimulate transcription.

  20. Acute respiratory infection with mouse adenovirus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jason B.; Stempfle, Gregory S.; Wilkinson, John E.; Younger, John G.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory disease are limited by the strict species-specificity of the adenoviruses. Following intranasal inoculation of adult C57BL/6 mice with mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), we detected MAV-1 early region 3 (E3) and hexon gene expression in the lungs at 7 days post-infection (dpi). We detected MAV-1 E3 protein in the respiratory epithelium 7 dpi. We did not detect viral mRNA or protein at 14 dpi, but MAV-1 DNA was detected by PCR at 21 dpi. Chemokine transcript levels increased between 7 and 14 dpi in the lungs of infected mice. MAV-1 infection induced a patchy cellular infiltrate in lungs at 7 and 14 dpi. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of MAV-1 in the respiratory epithelium of infected mice and describing chemokine responses in the lung induced by MAV-1 respiratory infection. MAV-1 infection of mice has the potential to serve as a model for inflammatory changes seen in human adenovirus respiratory disease. PMID:16054189

  1. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  2. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  3. Site-specific nicking within the adenovirus inverted terminal repetition.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, K C; Pearson, G D

    1984-01-01

    Site-specific nicking occurs on the l-strand, but not on the r-strand, of the adenovirus left inverted terminal repeat. Nicks are presumably introduced into double- or single-stranded DNA by a cellular endonuclease in an ATP-independent reaction. The consensus nick site has the sequence: (sequence in text). Images PMID:6322107

  4. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  5. Traceless Bioresponsive Shielding of Adenovirus Hexon with HPMA Copolymers Maintains Transduction Capacity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Prill, Jan-Michael; Šubr, Vladimír; Pasquarelli, Noemi; Engler, Tatjana; Hoffmeister, Andrea; Kochanek, Stefan; Ulbrich, Karel; Kreppel, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Capsid surface shielding of adenovirus vectors with synthetic polymers is an emerging technology to reduce unwanted interactions of the vector particles with cellular and non-cellular host components. While it has been shown that attachment of shielding polymers allows prevention of undesired interactions, it has become evident that a shield which is covalently attached to the vector surface can negatively affect gene transfer efficiency. Reasons are not only a limited receptor-binding ability of the shielded vectors but also a disturbance of intracellular trafficking processes, the latter depending on the interaction of the vector surface with the cellular transport machinery. A solution might be the development of bioresponsive shields that are stably maintained outside the host cell but released upon cell entry to allow for efficient gene delivery to the nucleus. Here we provide a systematic comparison of irreversible versus bioresponsive shields based on synthetic N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers. In addition, the chemical strategy used for generation of the shield allowed for a traceless bioresponsive shielding, i.e., polymers could be released from the vector particles without leaving residual linker residues. Our data demonstrated that only a bioresponsive shield maintained the high gene transfer efficiency of adenovirus vectors both in vitro and in vivo. As an example for bioresponsive HPMA copolymer release, we analyzed the in vivo gene transfer in the liver. We demonstrated that both the copolymer's charge and the mode of shielding (irreversible versus traceless bioresponsive) profoundly affected liver gene transfer and that traceless bioresponsive shielding with positively charged HPMA copolymers mediated FX independent transduction of hepatocytes. In addition, we demonstrated that shielding with HPMA copolymers can mediate a prolonged blood circulation of vector particles in mice. Our results have significant implications for the

  6. Transformation Potentials of the Noninfectious (Defective) Component in Pools of Adenoviruses Type 12 and Simian Adenovirus 7

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, J. P.; Yohn, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Pools of adenovirus 12 and simian adenovirus 7 were separated into four or five fractions by density gradient centrifugation in cesium chloride. Each fraction was analyzed for total in vitro infectivity units, total transformation activity, and for total virus particle (VP) content. Two major subpopulations were separated with mean densities of 1.30 ± 0.02 and 1.34 ± 0.02 g/ml, respectively. Virions in the 1.34 g/ml range were highly infectious (102 to 103 VP per infectivity unit) in contrast to virions at 1.30 g/ml density (104 to 105 VP per infectivity units). Transformation capacity was evenly distributed throughout fractions of both viruses, indicating that genetically incomplete or defective virus particles were not deficient in their ability to induce transformation. The average VP per transformation unit for adenovirus 12 (2.85 × 106) and for simian adenovirus 7 (4.00 × 106) did not vary significantly from fraction to fraction. These values were obtained with optimal input multiplicities of 16 to 64 VP per cell. At higher multiplicities the apparent increase in VP per transformation unit was attributable to the viral cytocidal effect on hamster cells. These studies revealed that quantitation of in vitro transformation based on VP multiplicities was more reliable than on the basis of infectious units. These estimates were independent of method of virus production, extraction, and purification. Images PMID:4211167

  7. iRGD tumor-penetrating peptide-modified oncolytic adenovirus shows enhanced tumor transduction, intratumoral dissemination and antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Puig-Saus, C; Rojas, L A; Laborda, E; Figueras, A; Alba, R; Fillat, C; Alemany, R

    2014-08-01

    Endovenously administered oncolytic viruses extravasate and penetrate poorly into tumors. iRGD is a cyclic peptide that enhances tumor penetration when conjugated or coadministered with different types of molecules such as drugs, nanoparticles or phages. iRGD-mediated tumor penetration occurs in three steps: binding to αv-integrins on tumor vasculature or tumor cells, exposure by proteolysis of a C-terminal motif that binds to neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) and cell internalization. We have genetically inserted the iRGD peptide in the fiber C terminus of ICOVIR15K, an oncolytic tumor-retargeted adenovirus to increase its tumor penetration. In vitro, NRP-1 interaction improved binding and internalization of the virus in different cancer cells overexpressing integrins and NRP-1. However, such NRP-1-mediated internalization did not affect transduction or cytotoxicity. In vivo, iRGD did not change the normal organ transduction pattern, with liver and spleen as main targeted organs. In tumors, however, iRGD enhanced transduction and early adenovirus dissemination through the tumor mass leading to an improved antitumor efficacy.

  8. Optimization and internalization mechanisms of PEGylated adenovirus vector with targeting peptide for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Lei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Mukai, Yohei; Okada, Naoki; Gao, Jian-Qing; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2012-08-13

    We have previously developed a novel adenovirus vector (Adv) that targeted tumor tissues/vasculatures after systemic administration. The surface of this Adv is conjugated with CGKRK tumor homing peptide by the cross-linking reaction of polyethyleneglycol (PEG). In this study, we showed that the condition of PEG modification was important to minimize the gene expression in normal tissues after systemic treatment. When Adv was modified only with PEG-linked CGKRK, its luciferase expression was enhanced even in the liver tissue, as well as the tumor tissue. However, in the reaction with the mixture of non-cross-linking PEG and PEG-linked CGKRK, we found out that the best modification could suppress its gene expression in the liver, without losing that in the tumor. We also studied the internalization mechanisms of CGKRK-conjugated Adv. Results suggested that there is a specific interaction of the CGKRK peptide with a receptor at the cell surface enabling efficient internalization of CGKRK-conjugated Adv. The presence of cell-surface heparan sulfate is important receptor for the cellular binding and uptake of CGKRK-conjugated Adv. Moreover, macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis is also important in endocytosis of CGKRK-conjugated Adv, aside from clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. These results could help evaluate the potentiality of CGKRK-conjugated Adv as a prototype vector with suitable efficacy and safety for systemic cancer gene therapy.

  9. Routine monitoring of adenovirus and norovirus within the health care environment.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, Louise; Cloutman-Green, Elaine; Canales, Melisa; D'Arcy, Nikki; Hartley, John C

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the presence of adenovirus and norovirus on ward surfaces using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assist in the development of evidence-based infection control policy. Screening was carried out weekly for 6 months in the common areas of 2 pediatric wards. Additionally, a one-off screening was undertaken for adenovirus and norovirus on a day unit and for adenovirus only in patient cubicles while occupied. Over the 6-month screening of common areas, 2.4% of samples were positive for adenovirus or norovirus. In rooms occupied with adenovirus-infected children, all cubicle screening sites and almost all swabs were contaminated with adenovirus. In the day unit, 13% of samples were positive. Cleaning and environmental interaction strategies must therefore be designed to control nosocomial transmission of viruses outside of outbreak scenarios.

  10. Combined Therapy with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 Induce Enhanced Antitumor Activity in Liver Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Juanjuan; Shen, Junjie; Liu, Limei; Xu, Yanmin; Xia, Feng; Bie, Ping; Zhang, Xia; Cui, Youhong; Bian, Xiu-wu; Qian, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Both adoptive immunotherapy and gene therapy hold a great promise for treatment of malignancies. However, these strategies exhibit limited anti-tumor activity, when they are used alone. In this study, we explore whether combination of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) adoptive immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of human interleukin-12 (hIL-12) gene induce the enhanced antitumor potency. Our results showed that oncolytic adenovirus carrying hIL-12 (AdCN205-IL12) could produce high levels of hIL-12 in liver cancer cells, as compared with replication-defective adenovirus expressing hIL-12 (Ad-IL12). AdCN205-IL12 could specifically induce cytotoxocity to liver cancer cells. Combination of CIK cells with AdCN205-IL12 could induce higher antitumor activity to liver cancer cells in vitro than that induced by either CIK or AdCN205-IL12 alone, or combination of CIK and control vector AdCN205-GFP. Furthermore, treatment of the established liver tumors with the combined therapy of CIK cells and AdCN205-IL12 resulted in tumor regression and long-term survival. High level expression of hIL-12 in tumor tissues could increase traffic of CIK cells to tumor tissues and enhance their antitumor activities. Our study provides a novel strategy for the therapy of cancer by the combination of CIK adoptive immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of immune stimulatory molecule hIL-12. PMID:23028626

  11. Province-wide adenovirus type 3 outbreak with severe cases in New Brunswick

    PubMed Central

    Girouard, Gabriel; Garceau, Richard; Thibault, Louise; Bourque, Christine; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus is a commonly isolated virus in clinical samples. Life-threatening infections, although rare, are described worldwide. An epidemic spread of an adenovirus type 3 strain occurred in the province of New Brunswick during the fall of 2008 to the winter of 2009; it resulted in three severely ill patients, with one fatality. Adenovirus should be considered as a cause of severe community-acquired viral pneumonia, especially when the influenza test is negative. PMID:22379488

  12. Large Epidemic of Respiratory Illness Due to Adenovirus Types 7 and 3 in Healthy Young Adults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-15

    Epidemic of Respiratory fliness Due to Adenovirus Types 7 and 3 in Healthy Young Adults Margaret A. K. Ryan, Gregory C. Gray," Besa Smith, Jamie A...immunization, respiratory infections due to adenoviruses have reemerged to threaten the health of young adults in the military. Shortly after the loss...challenges for young adults in the military in the postvaccine era. The US military has long had concern about the impact adenovirus serotypes 4 and 7

  13. Dramatic Decline of Respiratory Illness Among US Military Recruits After the Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Naval Health Research Center Dramatic Decline of Respiratory Illness Among US Military Recruits After the Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines ...Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines Jennifer M. Radin,1,2 Anthony W. Hawksworth,1 Patrick J. Blair,1 Dennis J. Faix,3 Rema Raman,4 Kevin L. Russell,5...hiatus, oral vaccines against adenovirus types 4 (Ad4) and 7 (Ad7) were again produced and administered to US military recruits. This study examined the

  14. Adenovirus urethritis and concurrent conjunctivitis: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Olivia Louise; Samuel, Mannampallil Itty; Sudhanva, Malur; Ellis, Joanna; Taylor, Chris

    2015-03-01

    We present eight cases and review the literature of concurrent urethritis and conjunctivitis where adenovirus was identified as the causative pathogen. The focus of this review concerns the identification of specific sexual practices, symptoms, signs and any serotypes that seem more commonly associated with such adenovirus infections. We discuss the seasonality of adenovirus infection and provide practical advice for clinicians to give to the patient.

  15. Dual tumor targeting with pH-sensitive and bioreducible polymer-complexed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Choi, Joung-Woo; Kasala, Dayananda; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) have shown great promise in cancer gene therapy but their efficacy has been compromised by potent immunological, biochemical, and specific tumor-targeting limitations. To take full advantage of the innate cancer-specific killing potency of oncolytic Ads but also exploit the subtleties of the tumor microenvironment, we have generated a pH-sensitive and bio-reducible polymer (PPCBA)-coated oncolytic Ad. Ad-PPCBA complexes showed higher cellular uptake at pH 6.0 than pH 7.4 in both high and low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor-(CAR)-expressing cells, thereby demonstrating Ad-PPCBA's ability to target the low pH hypoxic tumor microenvironment and overcome CAR dependence for target cell uptake. Endocytic mechanism studies indicated that Ad-PPCBA internalization is mediated by macropinocytosis instead of the CAR-dependent endocytic pathway that internalizes naked Ad. VEGF-specific shRNA-expressing oncolytic Ad complexed with PPCBA (RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA) elicited much more potent suppression of U87 human brain cancer cell VEGF gene expression in vitro, and human breast cancer MCF7 cell/Matrigel plug vascularization in a mouse model, when cancer cells had been previously infected at pH 6.0 versus pH 7.4. Moreover, intratumorally and intravenously injected RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA nanocomplexes elicited significantly higher therapeutic efficacy than naked virus in U87-tumor mouse xenograft models, reducing IL-6, ALT, and AST serum levels. These data demonstrated PPCBA's biocompatibility and capability to shield the Ad surface to prevent innate immune response against Ad after both intratumoral and systemic administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that smart, tumor-specific, oncolytic Ad-PPCBA complexes can be exploited to treat both primary and metastatic tumors.

  16. Hepatoma targeting peptide conjugated bio-reducible polymer complexed with oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Hyun Ah; Nam, Kihoon; Na, Youjin; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, SungWan

    2015-12-28

    Despite adenovirus (Ad) vector's numerous advantages for cancer gene therapy, such as high ability of endosomal escape, efficient nuclear entry mechanism, and high transduction, and therapeutic efficacy, tumor specific targeting and antiviral immune response still remain as a critical challenge in clinical setting. To overcome these obstacles and achieve cancer-specific targeting, we constructed tumor targeting bioreducible polymer, an arginine grafted bio-reducible polymer (ABP)-PEG-HCBP1, by conjugating PEGylated ABP with HCBP1 peptides which has high affinity and selectivity towards hepatoma. The ABP-PEG-HCBP1-conjugated replication incompetent GFP-expressing ad, (Ad/GFP)-ABP-PEG-HCBP1, showed a hepatoma cancer specific uptake and transduction compared to either naked Ad/GFP or Ad/GFP-ABP. Competition assays demonstrated that Ad/GFP-ABP-PEG-HCBP1-mediated transduction was specifically inhibited by HCBP1 peptide rather than coxsackie and adenovirus receptor specific antibody. In addition, ABP-PEG-HCBP1 can protect biological activity of Ad against serum, and considerably reduced both innate and adaptive immune response against Ad. shMet-expressing oncolytic Ad (oAd; RdB/shMet) complexed with ABP-PEG-HCBP1 delivered oAd efficiently into hepatoma cancer cells. The oAd/ABP-PEG-HCBP1 demonstrated enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy in comparison to oAd/ABP complex. Furthermore, Huh7 and HT1080 cancer cells treated with oAd/shMet-ABP-PEG-HCBP1 complex had significantly decreased Met and VEGF expression in hepatoma cancer, but not in non-hepatoma cancer. In sum, these results suggest that HCBP1-conjugated bioreducible polymer could be used to deliver oncolytic Ad safely and efficiently to treat hepatoma.

  17. Overcoming pre-existing adenovirus immunity by genetic engineering of adenovirus-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors offer several benefits showing their potential for use in a variety of vaccine applications. Recombinant Ad-based vaccines possess potent immunogenic potential, capable of generating humoral and cellular immune responses to a variety of pathogen-specific antigens expressed by the vectors. Ad5 vectors can be readily produced, allowing for usage in thousands of clinical trial subjects. This is now coupled with a history of safe clinical use in the vaccine setting. However, traditional Ad5-based vaccines may not be generating optimal antigen-specific immune responses, and generate diminished antigen-specific immune responses when pre-existing Ad5 immunity is present. These limitations have driven initiation of several approaches to improve the efficacy of Ad-based vaccines, and/or allow modified vaccines to overcome pre-existing Ad immunity. These include: generation of chemically modified Ad5 capsids; generation of chimeric Ads; complete replacement of Ad5-based vaccine platforms with alternative (human and non-human origin) Ad serotypes, and Ad5 genome modification approaches that attempt to retain the native Ad5 capsid, while simultaneously improving the efficacy of the platform as well as minimizing the effect of pre-existing Ad immunity. Here we discuss recent advances in- and limitations of each of these approaches, relative to their abilities to overcome pre-existing Ad immunity.

  18. Phylogenetic analyses of novel squamate adenovirus sequences in wild-caught Anolis lizards.

    PubMed

    Ascher, Jill M; Geneva, Anthony J; Ng, Julienne; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Glor, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has emerged as a serious threat to the health of captive snakes and lizards (i.e., squamates), but we know relatively little about this virus' range of possible hosts, pathogenicity, modes of transmission, and sources from nature. We report the first case of adenovirus infection in the Iguanidae, a diverse family of lizards that is widely-studied and popular in captivity. We report adenovirus infections from two closely-related species of Anolis lizards (anoles) that were recently imported from wild populations in the Dominican Republic to a laboratory colony in the United States. We investigate the evolution of adenoviruses in anoles and other squamates using phylogenetic analyses of adenovirus polymerase gene sequences sampled from Anolis and a range of other vertebrate taxa. These phylogenetic analyses reveal that (1) the sequences detected from each species of Anolis are novel, and (2) adenoviruses are not necessarily host-specific and do not always follow a co-speciation model under which host and virus phylogenies are perfectly concordant. Together with the fact that the Anolis adenovirus sequences reported in our study were detected in animals that became ill and subsequently died shortly after importation while exhibiting clinical signs consistent with acute adenovirus infection, our discoveries suggest the need for renewed attention to biosecurity measures intended to prevent the spread of adenovirus both within and among species of snakes and lizards housed in captivity.

  19. Addition of Polyadenylate Sequences to Virus-Specific RNA during Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, L.; Wall, R.; Glickman, G.; Darnell, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Adenovirus-specific nuclear and polysomal RNA, both early and late in the infectious cycle, contain a covalently linked region of polyadenylic acid 150-250 nucleotides long. A large proportion of the adenovirus-specific messenger RNA contains poly(A). As revealed by hybridization experiments, the poly(A) is not transcribed from adenovirus DNA. Furthermore, an adenosine analogue, cordycepin, blocks the synthesis of poly(A) and also inhibits the accumulation of adenovirus messenger RNA on polysomes. Addition of poly(A) to viral RNA may involve a host-controlled mechanism that regulates the processing and transport of messenger RNA. PMID:5315962

  20. Inhibitory effect of interferon-gamma on adenovirus replication and late transcription.

    PubMed

    Mistchenko, A S; Diez, R A; Falcoff, R

    1989-06-15

    We have previously shown that human interferon-gamma inhibited adenovirus multiplication in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. This action was previous to capsid proteins synthesis and did not involve virus adsorption nor penetration. In this report we have analysed viral mRNA levels at early (7 hr post infection (p.i.)) or late (20 hr p.i.) times, as well as DNA replication in Wish cells pretreated with interferon-gamma and infected with adenovirus 5. Controls included untreated cells as well as cells treated with interferon-alpha, to which adenovirus are reported to be resistant. Transcription of adenovirus regions E1, E4, L1 and L2 has been analysed by Northern blot. Adenovirus DNA replication was determined by DNA-DNA hybridization with total adenovirus 2 DNA. We have also searched for adenovirus E1A proteins by immunoblot with a specific monoclonal antibody. Although pretreatment of cells with either interferon-alpha or interferon-gamma resulted in reduced amounts of E1 and E4 mRNA in the early phase of infection (7 hr p.i.), the near complete inhibition of viral DNA and late transcription was only achieved by interferon-gamma. Immunoblot has shown the absence of the 48-kD E1A protein in cells pretreated with interferon-gamma. The lack of this regulatory adenovirus protein may be involved in the inhibitory mechanism of interferon-gamma on adenovirus.

  1. Addition of polyadenylate sequences to virus-specific RNA during adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Philipson, L; Wall, R; Glickman, G; Darnell, J E

    1971-11-01

    Adenovirus-specific nuclear and polysomal RNA, both early and late in the infectious cycle, contain a covalently linked region of polyadenylic acid 150-250 nucleotides long. A large proportion of the adenovirus-specific messenger RNA contains poly(A). As revealed by hybridization experiments, the poly(A) is not transcribed from adenovirus DNA. Furthermore, an adenosine analogue, cordycepin, blocks the synthesis of poly(A) and also inhibits the accumulation of adenovirus messenger RNA on polysomes. Addition of poly(A) to viral RNA may involve a host-controlled mechanism that regulates the processing and transport of messenger RNA.

  2. Phylogenetic Analyses of Novel Squamate Adenovirus Sequences in Wild-Caught Anolis Lizards

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, Jill M.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Ng, Julienne; Wyatt, Jeffrey D.; Glor, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has emerged as a serious threat to the health of captive snakes and lizards (i.e., squamates), but we know relatively little about this virus' range of possible hosts, pathogenicity, modes of transmission, and sources from nature. We report the first case of adenovirus infection in the Iguanidae, a diverse family of lizards that is widely-studied and popular in captivity. We report adenovirus infections from two closely-related species of Anolis lizards (anoles) that were recently imported from wild populations in the Dominican Republic to a laboratory colony in the United States. We investigate the evolution of adenoviruses in anoles and other squamates using phylogenetic analyses of adenovirus polymerase gene sequences sampled from Anolis and a range of other vertebrate taxa. These phylogenetic analyses reveal that (1) the sequences detected from each species of Anolis are novel, and (2) adenoviruses are not necessarily host-specific and do not always follow a co-speciation model under which host and virus phylogenies are perfectly concordant. Together with the fact that the Anolis adenovirus sequences reported in our study were detected in animals that became ill and subsequently died shortly after importation while exhibiting clinical signs consistent with acute adenovirus infection, our discoveries suggest the need for renewed attention to biosecurity measures intended to prevent the spread of adenovirus both within and among species of snakes and lizards housed in captivity. PMID:23593364

  3. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses.

  4. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    de Vrij, Jeroen; Willemsen, Ralph A; Lindholm, Leif; Hoeben, Rob C; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; de Ridder, Corrina; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Essand, Magnus; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Jennings, Ian; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nugent, Regina; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schenk-Braat, Ellen; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Slade, Michael; Szyjanowicz, Pio; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, Laura; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Zuber, Guy

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death among men in Western countries. Whereas the survival rate approaches 100% for patients with localized cancer, the results of treatment in patients with metastasized prostate cancer at diagnosis are much less successful. The patients are usually presented with a variety of treatment options, but therapeutic interventions in prostate cancer are associated with frequent adverse side effects. Gene therapy and oncolytic virus therapy may constitute new strategies. Already a wide variety of preclinical studies has demonstrated the therapeutic potential of such approaches, with oncolytic prostate-specific adenoviruses as the most prominent vector. The state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer are reviewed, with a focus on adenoviral vectors. We summarize advances in adenovirus technology for prostate cancer treatment and highlight areas where further developments are necessary.

  5. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  6. Critical Role for Arginine Methylation in Adenovirus-Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Iacovides, Demetris C.; O'Shea, Clodagh C.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Burlingame, Alma; McCormick, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During the late stages of adenovirus infection, the 100K protein (100K) inhibits the translation of cellular messages in the cytoplasm and regulates hexon trimerization and assembly in the nucleus. However, it is not known how it switches between these two functions. Here we show that 100K is methylated on arginine residues at its C terminus during infection and that this region is necessary for binding PRMT1 methylase. Methylated 100K is exclusively nuclear. Mutation of the third RGG motif (amino acids 741 to 743) prevents localization to the nucleus during infection, suggesting that methylation of that sequence is important for 100K shuttling. Treatment of infected cells with methylation inhibitors inhibits expression of late structural proteins. These data suggest that arginine methylation of 100K is necessary for its localization to the nucleus and is a critical cellular function necessary for productive adenovirus infection. PMID:17686851

  7. An Analysis of Adenovirus Genomes Using Whole Genome Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of sequencing technology has lead to an enormous increase in the number of genomes that have been sequenced. This is especially true in the field of virus genomics. In order to extract meaningful biological information from these genomes, whole genome data mining software tools must be utilized. Hundreds of tools have been developed to analyze biological sequence data. However, only some of these tools are user-friendly to biologists. Several of these tools that have been successfully used to analyze adenovirus genomes are described here. These include Artemis, EMBOSS, pDRAW, zPicture, CoreGenes, GeneOrder, and PipMaker. These tools provide functionalities such as visualization, restriction enzyme analysis, alignment, and proteome comparisons that are extremely useful in the bioinformatics analysis of adenovirus genomes. PMID:28293072

  8. Therapy of Breast Cancers Using Conditionally Replicating Adenovirus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    virotherapy on breast cancer cells in vitro. We have developed a CRAd using the fit-I promoter element for specific EIA gene expression (CRAdflt), RGD...replicating adenoviruses (CRAd) and investigate effects of CRAd virotherapy on endothelial cells and breast cancer cells in vitro. Vascular targeting...determined the capacity of CRAdRGDflt-mda-7 virotherapy to induce breast cancer cell death. To verify the levels of MDA-7/IL-24 protein expression in vitro

  9. Inhibition of telomerase RNA (hTR) in cervical cancer by adenovirus-delivered siRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Li, H; Yao, G; Li, W; Wang, F; Jiang, Z; Li, M

    2007-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become a powerful tool for selectively silencing gene expression in cultured mammalian cells. In this study, a 67-bp oligonucleotide encoding human telomerase RNA (hTR) was introduced into pSIREN, a shuttle vector for construction of recombinant adenovirus. Then the U6-RNA promoter and siRNA-encoding insert were cut out from the pSIREN and subcloned into pAdeno-X to construct the plasmid pAd-hTR. After the pAd-hTR was transfected into a mammalian cell line HEK-293, adenovirus carrying the hTR-targeting siRNA (Ad-hTR-siRNA) was obtained. We performed a series of experiments to demonstrate silencing of the telomerase mediated by Ad-hTR-siRNA in HeLa cells. Compared with control virus (Ad-NT-siRNA), Ad-hTR-siRNA significantly reduced both hTR mRNA level (by 70.21%) and telomerase activity (by 58.87%) in HeLa cells. Moreover, it induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Treatment of subcutaneous tumor xenografted with Ad-hTR-siRNA could slow down tumor growth, at least partially due to the induction of apoptosis (P<0.05) in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated efficient and specific knockdown of telomerase in HeLa cell line by the hTR siRNA, and indicated the prospect of applying this siRNA expressing recombinant adenovirus system in cancer gene therapy.

  10. The PDZ3 domain of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1 interacts with the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR).

    PubMed

    Yan, Ran; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Martin, Sterling C T; Readler, James M; Kotha, Poornima L N; Hostetler, Heather A; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2015-04-01

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is an essential cellular protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion, protein trafficking, and viral infection. The major isoform of CAR is selectively sorted to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells where it co-localizes with the cellular scaffolding protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain structure-1 (MAGI-1). Previously, we demonstrated CAR interacts with MAGI-1 through a PDZ-domain dependent interaction. Here, we show that the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 is exclusively responsible for the high affinity interaction between the seven exon isoform of CAR and MAGI-1 using yeast-two-hybrid analysis and confirming this interaction biochemically and in cellular lysates by in vitro pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. The high affinity interaction between the PDZ3 domain and CAR C-terminus was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Further, we investigated the biological relevance of this high affinity interaction between CAR and the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 and found that it does not alter CAR-mediated adenovirus infection. By contrast, interruption of this high affinity interaction altered the localization of MAGI-1 indicating that CAR is able to traffic MAGI-1 to cell junctions. These data deepen the molecular understanding of the interaction between CAR and MAGI-1 and indicate that although CAR plays a role in trafficking PDZ-based scaffolding proteins to cellular junctions, association with a high affinity intracellular binding partner does not significantly alter adenovirus binding and entry via CAR.

  11. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

  12. Effect of CD4 gene expression on adenovirus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, J; Shi, L; Ginsberg, H S

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding the CD4 receptor was introduced into KB cells to establish the KBT4 cell line, a cell line susceptible to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Adenovirus replication was found to be significantly less in these cells than in the parental KB cells. Similar decreased adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication occurred in HeLaT4 cells compared with the original HeLa cells. The presence of CD4 did not alter the cell surface population of KB cell adenovirus receptors, since viral adsorption was similar in the two cell lines. Moreover, addition of soluble CD4 did not reduce viral replication in either KB or KBT4 infected cells. Uncoating of viral DNA was also unchanged in KBT4 cells compared with the parental KB cells. In contrast, migration to or entrance of viral DNA into nuclei and synthesis of early viral RNAs was delayed and reduced in KBT4 cells. These effects were more pronounced for Ad7 than for Ad5. The yields of infectious viruses were the same in both cell lines, however, after transfection of naked viral DNAs to initiate infection. These results imply that the expression of the CD4 gene in KBT4 cells interfered with passage of uncoated virus across endosomal vesicles and/or transfer of uncoated core viral DNA into the nucleus. Images PMID:7933112

  13. Effect of CD4 gene expression on adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Hotta, J; Shi, L; Ginsberg, H S

    1994-11-01

    The gene encoding the CD4 receptor was introduced into KB cells to establish the KBT4 cell line, a cell line susceptible to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Adenovirus replication was found to be significantly less in these cells than in the parental KB cells. Similar decreased adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication occurred in HeLaT4 cells compared with the original HeLa cells. The presence of CD4 did not alter the cell surface population of KB cell adenovirus receptors, since viral adsorption was similar in the two cell lines. Moreover, addition of soluble CD4 did not reduce viral replication in either KB or KBT4 infected cells. Uncoating of viral DNA was also unchanged in KBT4 cells compared with the parental KB cells. In contrast, migration to or entrance of viral DNA into nuclei and synthesis of early viral RNAs was delayed and reduced in KBT4 cells. These effects were more pronounced for Ad7 than for Ad5. The yields of infectious viruses were the same in both cell lines, however, after transfection of naked viral DNAs to initiate infection. These results imply that the expression of the CD4 gene in KBT4 cells interfered with passage of uncoated virus across endosomal vesicles and/or transfer of uncoated core viral DNA into the nucleus.

  14. Ion etching of human adenovirus 2: structure of the core

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, W.W.; Boring, J.W.; Brown, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    The surface of human adenovirus 2 was etched by irradiating intact virions with low-energy (1-keV) Ar/sup +/ ions in a Technics Hummer V sputter coater. Viral structures exposed by the etching process were shadowed and then examined in the electron microscope. Periods of etching that were sufficient to reduce the viral diameter by 20 to 30 nm revealed distinct substructural elements in the virion core. Cores were found to consist of a cluster of 12 large, uniformly sized spheres which abutted one another in the intact virion. The spheres, for which we suggest the name adenosomes, had a diameter of 23.0 +/- 2.3 nm, and they were related to each other by two-, three-, and fivefold axes of rotational symmetry. The results support the view, originally suggested by Brown et al. that the adenovirus 2 core is composed of 12 large spheres packed tightly together in such a way that each is directed toward the vertex of an icosahedron. Such a structure, constructed of 23.0-nm-diameter spheres, would have an outside diameter (vertex-to-vertex distance) of 67.0 nm and a face-to-face distance of 58.2 nm. It could be accommodated inside the icosahedral adenovirus capsid if each large sphere were located beneath a capsid vertex.

  15. Structural organization and polypeptide composition of the avian adenovirus core.

    PubMed Central

    Li, P; Bellett, A J; Parish, C R

    1984-01-01

    CELO virus (fowl adenovirus 1) contained three core polypeptides of molecular weights 20,000, 12,000, and 9,500. The core was similar to that of human adenoviruses, with some evidence of compact subcore domains. Micrococcal nuclease digestion of CELO virus cores produced a smear of DNA fragments of gradually decreasing size, with no nucleosome subunit or repeat pattern. Moreover, when digested cores were analyzed without protease treatment, there was again no evidence of a nucleosome substructure; neither DNA fragments nor core proteins entered a 4% polyacrylamide gel. The organization of the core is thus quite unlike that of chromatin. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA from digested cores showed that the right end was on the outside of the core. We suggest that adenovirus DNA is condensed into the core by cross-linking and neutralization by the core proteins, beginning with the packaging sequence at the center of the core and ending with the right end of the DNA on the outside. Images PMID:6092686

  16. Template requirements for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Challberg, M D; Rawlins, D R

    1984-01-01

    The first step in the replication of the adenovirus genome is the covalent attachment of the 5'-terminal nucleotide, dCMP, to the virus-encoded terminal protein precursor (pTP). This reaction can be observed in vitro and has been previously shown to be dependent upon either viral DNA or linearized plasmid DNA containing viral terminal sequences. Plasmids containing deletions or point mutations within the viral terminal sequence were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. In the case of linear double-stranded templates, pTP-dCMP formation required sequences located within the first 18 base pairs of the viral genome. This sequence contains a segment of 10 base pairs that is conserved in all human adenovirus serotypes. Point mutations within the conserved segment greatly reduced the efficiency of initiation, while a point mutation at a nonconserved position within the first 18 base pairs had little effect. Single-stranded DNAs can also support pTP-dCMP formation in vitro. In contrast to the results obtained with duplex templates, experiments with a variety of single-stranded templates, including phage M13-adenovirus recombinants, denatured plasmids, and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, failed to reveal any requirements for specific nucleotide sequences. With single-stranded templates containing no dG residues, the specific deoxynucleoside triphosphate requirements of the initiation reaction were altered. Images PMID:6320160

  17. Adenovirus infection elevates levels of cellular topoisomerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, K C; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a specific, sensitive, and quantitative assay for topoisomerase I, which is based on the formation of a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. Our assay measures the quantitative transfer of 32P radioactivity from 32P-labeled DNA to topoisomerase I. Since 32P-labeled topoisomerase molecules are resolved by NaDodSO4/PAGE, HeLa topoisomerase I (100 kDa) and calf thymus topoisomerase I (82 kDa) can be quantitatively assayed in the same reaction mixture. The assay can detect at least 0.3 ng (3 fmol) of topoisomerase I. We have used our assay to measure the levels of topoisomerase I activity in crude extracts of nuclei prepared from uninfected, adenovirus-infected, and adenovirus-transformed human cells. The evidence suggests that an adenovirus early gene product, presumably a protein encoded in early region 1A (E1A), increases cellular topoisomerase I activity at least 10-fold. Immunoblotting analysis with antiserum against calf thymus topoisomerase I shows that the increase in activity is due to an increase in the amount of enzyme. Images PMID:2986107

  18. Prevalence of human adenoviruses in raw and treated water.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, J; Ehlers, M M; van Zyl, W B; Grabow, W O K

    2004-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAds), of which there are 51 antigenic types, are associated aetiologically with gastrointestinal, respiratory, urinary tract and eye infections. The clinical importance of HAds and the potential health risks constituted by HAds in water environments are widely recognised. This study was conducted to assess the use of an optimised integrated cell culture molecular-based technique to determine the prevalence of HAds in raw and treated drinking-water supplies in South Africa. Selected supplies were monitored weekly for the presence of adenoviruses over a one-year period (July 2001 to June 2002). Drinking-water supplies were derived from acceptable quality surface water sources using treatment processes that conformed to international standards for the production of safe drinking water. Adenoviruses were detected by amplification in cell cultures, followed by amplifying the extracted nucleic acids using molecular techniques (nested PCR). HAds were detected in 29.8% (59/198) of the treated drinking water, 16% (8/50) of dam water and 44% (22/50) of river-water samples tested. The results of this study confirmed the presence of HAds in some raw and treated drinking water supplies in South Africa.

  19. History of the restoration of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine, live oral (Adenovirus Vaccine) in the context of the Department of Defense acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Charles H; Snyder, Clifford E

    2013-03-15

    Respiratory pathogens cause morbidity and mortality in US military basic trainees. Following the influenza pandemic of 1918, and stimulated by WWII, the need to protect military personnel against epidemic respiratory disease was evident. Over several decades, the US military elucidated etiologies of acute respiratory diseases and invented and deployed vaccines to prevent disease caused by influenza, meningococcus, and adenoviruses. In 1994, the Adenovirus Vaccine manufacturer stopped its production. By 1999, supplies were exhausted and adenovirus-associated disease, especially serotype 4-associated febrile respiratory illness, returned to basic training installations. Advisory bodies persuaded Department of Defense leaders to initiate restoration of Adenovirus Vaccine. In 2011, after 10 years of effort by government and contractor personnel and at a cost of about $100 million, the Adenovirus Vaccine was restored to use at all military basic training installations. Disease and adenovirus serotype 4 isolation rates have fallen dramatically since vaccinations resumed in October 2011 and remain very low. Mindful of the adage that "The more successful a vaccine is, the more quickly the need for it will be forgotten.", sustainment of the supply of the Adenovirus Vaccine may be a challenge, and careful management will be required for such sustainment.

  20. The transduction of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-negative cells and protection against neutralizing antibodies by HPMA-co-oligolysine copolymer-coated adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chung-Huei K.; Chan, Leslie W.; Johnson, Russell N.; Chu, David S.H.; Shi, Julie; Schellinger, Joan G.; Lieber, Andre; Pun, Suzie H.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviral (AdV) gene vectors offer efficient nucleic acid transfer into both dividing and non-dividing cells. However issues such as vector immunogenicity, toxicity and restricted transduction to receptor-expressing cells have prevented broad clinical translation of these constructs. To address this issue, engineered AdV have been prepared by both genetic and chemical manipulation. In this work, a polymer-coated Ad5 formulation is optimized by evaluating a series of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA)-co-oligolysine copolymers synthesized by living polymerization techniques. This synthesis approach was used to generate highly controlled and well-defined polymers with varying peptide length (K5, K10 and K15), polymer molecular weight, and degradability to coat the viral capsid. The optimal formulation was not affected by the presence of serum during transduction and significantly increased Ad5 transduction of several cell types that lack the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) by up to 6-fold compared to unmodified AdV. Polymer-coated Ad5 also retained high transduction capability in the presence of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies. The critical role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in mediating cell binding and internalization of polymer-coated AdV was also demonstrated by evaluating transduction in HSPG-defective recombinant CHO cells. The formulations developed here are attractive vectors for ex vivo gene transfer in applications such as cell therapy. In addition, this platform for adenoviral modification allows for facile introduction of alternative targeting ligands. PMID:21959008

  1. Tropism modification of adenovirus vectors by peptide ligand insertion into various positions of the adenovirus serotype 41 short-fiber knob domain.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Andrea; Kosmides, Daniela; Kontermann, Roland E; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses have emerged as promising agents in therapeutic gene transfer, genetic vaccination, and viral oncolysis. Therapeutic applications of adenoviruses, however, would benefit substantially from targeted virus cell entry, for example, into cancer or immune cells, as opposed to the broad tropism that adenoviruses naturally possess. Such tropism modification of adenoviruses requires the deletion of their natural cell binding properties and the incorporation of cell binding ligands. The short fibers of subgroup F adenoviruses have recently been suggested as a tool for genetic adenovirus detargeting based on the reduced infectivity of corresponding adenovectors with chimeric fibers in vitro and in vivo. The goal of our study was to determine functional insertion sites for peptide ligands in the adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41) short fiber knob. With a model peptide, CDCRGDCFC, we could demonstrate that ligand incorporation into three of five analyzed loops of the knob, namely, EG, HI, and IJ, is feasible without a loss of fiber trimerization. The resulting adenovectors showed enhanced infectivity for various cell types, which was superior to that of viruses with the same peptide fused to the fiber C terminus. Strategies to further augment gene transfer efficacy by extension of the fiber shaft, insertion of tandem copies of the ligand peptide, or extension of the ligand-flanking linkers failed, indicating that precise ligand positioning is pivotal. Our study establishes that internal ligand incorporation into a short-shafted adenovirus fiber is feasible and suggests the Ad41 short fiber with ligand insertion into the top (IJ loop) or side (EG and HI loops) of the knob domain as a novel platform for genetic targeting of therapeutic adenoviruses.

  2. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  3. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A.

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  4. A novel molecular therapy using bioengineered adenovirus for human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Replication-selective tumor-specific viruses constitute a novel approach for treatment of neoplastic disease. These vectors are designed to induce virus-mediated lysis of tumor cells after selective viral propagation within the tumor. Human telomerase is highly active in more than 85オ of primary cancers, regardless of their tissue origins, and its activity correlates closely with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression. We constructed an attenuated adenovirus 5 vector (Telomelysin, OBP-301), in which the hTERT promoter element drives expression of E1 genes. Since only tumor cells that express telomerase activity would activate this promoter, the hTERT proximal promoter would allow for preferential expression of viral genes in tumor cells, leading to selective viral replication and oncolytic cell death. Lymphatic invasion is a major route for cancer cell dissemination, and adequate treatment of locoregional lymph nodes is required for curative treatment in patients with gastrointestinal tumors. We demonstrated that intratumoral injection of Telomelysin mediates effective in vivo purging of metastatic tumor cells from regional lymph nodes. Moreover, using noninvasive whole-body imaging, we found that intratumoral injection of Telomelysin followed by regional irradiation induces a substantial antitumor effect, resulting from tumor cell-specific radiosensitization, in an orthotopic human esophageal cancer xenograft model. These results illustrate the potential of oncolytic virotherapy as a promising strategy in the management of human gastrointestinal cancer.

  5. The cellular Mre11 protein interferes with adenovirus E4 mutant DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2007-09-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) relocalizes and degrades the host DNA repair protein Mre11, and efficiently initiates viral DNA replication. Mre11 associates with Ad E4 mutant DNA replication centers and is important for concatenating viral genomes. We have investigated the role of Mre11 in the E4 mutant DNA replication defect. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mre11 dramatically rescues E4 mutant DNA replication in cells that do or do not concatenate viral genomes, suggesting that Mre11 inhibits DNA replication independent of genome concatenation. The mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) protein is involved in recruiting and sustaining Mre11 at sites of DNA damage following ionizing radiation. We observe foci formation by Mdc1 in response to viral infection, indicating that this damage response protein is activated. However, knockdown of Mdc1 does not prevent Mre11 from localizing at viral DNA replication foci or rescue E4 mutant DNA replication. Our results are consistent with a model in which Mre11 interferes with DNA replication when it is localized at viral DNA replication foci.

  6. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  7. Recombinant Adenovirus Delivery of Calreticulin–ESAT-6 Produces an Antigen-Specific Immune Response but no Protection Against a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-González, S. C.; Troy, A.; Troudt, J.; Loera-Arias, M. J.; Villatoro-Hernández, J.; Torres-López, E.; Ancer-Rodríguez, J.; Gutiérrez-Puente, Y.; Muñoz-Maldonado, G.; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.; Izzo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) has failed to efficaciously control the worldwide spread of the disease. New vaccine development targets virulence antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Immunization with ESAT-6 and CFP10 provides protection against M. tuberculosis in a murine infection model. Further, previous studies have shown that calreticulin increases the cell-mediated immune responses to antigens. Therefore, to test whether calreticulin enhances the immune response against M. tuberculosis antigens, we fused ESAT-6 to calreticulin and constructed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus to express the resulting fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6). The adjuvant effect of calreticulin was assayed by measuring cytokine responses specific to ESAT-6. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the fusion protein produced higher levels of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α in response to ESAT-6. This immune response was not improved by the addition of CFP-10 to the CRT-ESAT-6 fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6–CFP10). Mice immunized with these recombinant adenoviruses did not decrease the mycobacterial burden after low-dose aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. We conclude that calreticulin can be used as an adjuvant to enhance the immune response against mycobacterial antigens, but it is not enough to protect against tuberculosis. PMID:22010821

  8. B23/nucleophosmin is involved in regulation of adenovirus chromatin structure at late infection stages, but not in virus replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Samad, Mohammad Abdus; Komatsu, Tetsuro; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-06-01

    B23/nucleophosmin has been identified in vitro as a stimulatory factor for replication of adenovirus DNA complexed with viral basic core proteins. In the present study, the in vivo function of B23 in the adenovirus life cycle was studied. It was found that both the expression of a decoy mutant derived from adenovirus core protein V that tightly associates with B23 and small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of B23 impeded the production of progeny virions. However, B23 depletion did not significantly affect the replication and transcription of the virus genome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that B23 depletion significantly increased the association of viral DNA with viral core proteins and cellular histones. These results suggest that B23 is involved in the regulation of association and/or dissociation of core proteins and cellular histones with the virus genome. In addition, these results suggest that proper viral chromatin assembly, regulated in part by B23, is crucial for the maturation of infectious virus particles.

  9. Novel replication-incompetent vector derived from adenovirus type 11 (Ad11) for vaccination and gene therapy: low seroprevalence and non-cross-reactivity with Ad5.

    PubMed

    Holterman, Lennart; Vogels, Ronald; van der Vlugt, Remko; Sieuwerts, Martijn; Grimbergen, Jos; Kaspers, Jorn; Geelen, Eric; van der Helm, Esmeralda; Lemckert, Angelique; Gillissen, Gert; Verhaagh, Sandra; Custers, Jerome; Zuijdgeest, David; Berkhout, Ben; Bakker, Margreet; Quax, Paul; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo

    2004-12-01

    A novel plasmid-based adenovirus vector system that enables manufacturing of replication-incompetent (DeltaE1) adenovirus type 11 (Ad11)-based vectors is described. Ad11 vectors are produced on PER.C6/55K cells yielding high-titer vector batches after purification. Ad11 seroprevalence proves to be significantly lower than that of Ad5, and neutralizing antibody titers against Ad11 are low. Ad11 seroprevalence among human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV(+)) individuals is as low as that among HIV(-) individuals, independent of the level of immune suppression. The low level of coinciding seroprevalence between Ad11 and Ad35 in addition to a lack of correlation between high neutralizing antibody titers towards either adenovirus strongly suggest that the limited humoral cross-reactive immunity between these two highly related B viruses appears not to preclude the use of both vectors in the same individual. Ad11 transduces primary cells including smooth muscle cells, synoviocytes, and dendritic cells and cardiovascular tissues with higher efficiency than Ad5. Ad11 and Ad35 appear to have a similar tropism as judged by green fluorescent protein expression levels determined by using a panel of cancer cell lines. In addition, Ad5 preimmunization did not significantly affect Ad11-mediated transduction in C57BL/6 mice. We therefore conclude that the Ad11-based vector represents a novel and useful candidate gene transfer vehicle for vaccination and gene therapy.

  10. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  11. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; ...

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  12. Anti-cancer effect of adenovirus p53 on human cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ahn, W S; Bae, S M; Lee, J M; Namkoong, S E; Yoo, J Y; Seo, Y-S; Nam, S L; Cho, Y-L; Nam, K H; Kim, C K; Kim, Y-W

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate anti-tumor effects of recombinant adenovirus p53, time-course p53, E6 expression, and cell growth inhibition were investigated in vitro and in vivo using cervical cancer cell lines such as CaSki, SiHa, HeLa, HeLaS3, C33A, and HT3. The cell growth inhibition was studied via cell count assay, MTT assay and neutral red assay. After transfecting AdCMVp53 into SiHa cells-xenografted nude mice, the transduction efficiency and anti-tumor effect were investigated for a month. The results showed that adenoviral p53 expression induced significant growth suppression on the cancer cells, in which E6 transcript was strongly repressed, and that the expression of p53 and E6 were remarkably dependent on each cell type. The transduction efficiency was highly maintained in vivo as well as in vitro, and the size of tumor was remarkably decreased in comparison with AdCMVLacZ control. The results suggest that the adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfection was done very effectively in vitro and in vivo experiment, and the cell growth was suppressed via p53-dependent apoptotic cell death, and that the anti-tumor effect could be related to E6 and p53 expression pattern.

  13. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  14. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  15. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  16. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  17. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  18. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  19. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  20. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  1. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  2. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  3. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-01-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus. PMID:8627709

  4. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-03-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus.

  5. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication competent adenovirus (RCA)-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial layer-type chicken groups were singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, or singly v...

  6. Protection of chickens against avian influenza with non-replicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus (Ad) vector encoding a H7 hemagglutinin gene from a low pathogenic North American isolate (AdChNY94.H7). Chickens vaccinate...

  7. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  8. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines.

  9. Comparison of throat swab and nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens for rapid detection of adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie

    2015-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and throat swab (TS) specimens from individual patients were compared with regard to usefulness for adenovirus detection. In 153 adenovirus-infected patients, rapid test sensitivities with NPAs (90.8%) were nearly equivalent to those with TSs (91.5%) based on real-time polymerase chain reaction standards, indicating that NPAs are equally useful.

  10. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji; Nakajima, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles.

  11. Location of the Origin of DNA Replication in Adenovirus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.

    1974-01-01

    Utilizing the isolated left and right halves of both adenovirus type 2 and the nondefective adenovirus simian virus 40 hybrid (Ad2+ND1), studies were undertaken to find the site on the DNA molecules at which replication begins. The data are consistent with several models which include an initiation event at both ends and bidirectional growth. PMID:4363250

  12. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  13. Optimization and evaluation of a method to detect adenoviruses in river water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This dataset includes the recoveries of spiked adenovirus through various stages of experimental optimization procedures. This dataset is associated with the following publication:McMinn , B., A. Korajkic, and A. Grimm. Optimization and evaluation of a method to detect adenoviruses in river water. JOURNAL OF VIROLOGICAL METHODS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 231(1): 8-13, (2016).

  14. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:23127366

  15. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude.

  16. Studies on the Interaction of Tumor-Derived HD5 Alpha Defensins with Adenoviruses and Implications for Oncolytic Adenovirus Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vragniau, Charles; Hübner, Jens-Martin; Beidler, Peter; Gil, Sucheol; Saydaminova, Kamola; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Yumul, Roma; Wang, Hongjie; Richter, Maximilian; Sova, Pavel; Drescher, Charles; Fender, Pascal; Lieber, André

    2017-03-15

    Defensins are small antimicrobial peptides capable of neutralizing human adenovirus (HAdV) in vitro by binding capsid proteins and blocking endosomal escape of virus. In humans, the alpha defensin HD5 is produced by specialized epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tracts. Here, we demonstrate, using patient biopsy specimens, that HD5 is also expressed as an active, secreted peptide by epithelial ovarian and lung cancer cells in situ This finding prompted us to study the role of HD5 in infection and spread of replication-competent, oncolytic HAdV type 3 (HAdV3). HAdV3 produces large amounts of penton-dodecahedra (PtDd), virus-like particles, during replication. We have previously shown that PtDd are involved in opening epithelial junctions, thus facilitating lateral spread of de novo-produced virions. Here, we describe a second function of PtDd, namely, the blocking of HD5. A central tool to prove that viral PtDd neutralize HD5 and support spread of progeny virus was an HAdV3 mutant virus in which formation of PtDd was disabled (mut-Ad3GFP, where GFP is green fluorescent protein). We demonstrated that viral spread of mut-Ad3GFP was blocked by synthetic HD5 whereas that of the wild-type (wt) form (wt-Ad3GFP) was only minimally impacted. In human colon cancer Caco-2 cells, induction of cellular HD5 expression by fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) significantly inhibited viral spread and progeny virus production of mut-Ad3GFP but not of wt-Ad3GFP. Finally, the ectopic expression of HD5 in tumor cells diminished the in vivo oncolytic activity of mut-Ad3GFP but not of wt-Ad3GFP. These data suggest a new mechanism of HAdV3 to overcome innate antiviral host responses. Our study has implications for oncolytic adenovirus therapy.IMPORTANCE Previously, it has been reported that human defensin HD5 inactivates specific human adenoviruses by binding to capsid proteins and blocking endosomal escape of virus. The central new findings described in our

  17. Human adenoviruses in water: occurrence and health implications: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sunny C

    2006-12-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that are responsible for both enteric illnesses and respiratory and eye infections. Recently, these viruses have been found to be prevalent in rivers, coastal waters, swimming pool waters, and drinking water supplies worldwide. United Sates Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) listed adenovirus as one of nine microorganisms on the Contamination Candidate List for drinking water because their survival characteristic during water treatment is not yet fully understood. Adenoviruses have been found to be significantly more stable than fecal indicator bacteria and other enteric viruses during UV treatment. Adenovirus infection may be caused by consumption of contaminated water or inhalation of aerosolized droplets during water recreation. The goal of this review is to summarize the state of technology for adenovirus detection in natural and drinking waters and the human health risk imposed by this emerging pathogen. The occurrence of these viruses in natural and treated waters is summarized from worldwide reports.

  18. Rotavirus and adenovirus prevalence at Tepecik education and research hospital (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Ece, Gulfem; Samlioglu, Pinar; Ulker, Temel; Kose, Sukran; Ersan, Gursel

    2012-06-01

    Diarrhoea affects many people globally. Rotaviruses and enteric adenovirus types 40 and 41 are the most common viruses causing childhood gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus and adenovirus from the faecal samples obtained at the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of Tepecik Education and Research Hospital. The faecal samples were screened for rotavirus, and adenovirus by commercially available immunochromatographic EIA kit (Rotavirus/Adenovirus Combo Rapid Test Device) (San Diego, CA, USA). A total of 1112 stool samples were collected from May 23rd 2008 to May 25th 2010. Of these faecal samples, 201(18.07%) were positive for rotavirus and 14 (1.2 %) for adenovirus antigen. In our study the most common agent detected was rotavirus. Viral antigen analysis in stool specimens is important for diagnosis. Detection of the viral aetiology in gastroenteritis cases will prevent unnecessary antibiotic consumption.

  19. Boosting oncolytic adenovirus potency with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Holm, Per Sonne; Holzmüller, Regina; Anton, Martina; Thalhammer, Stefan; Adigüzel, Denis; Döblinger, Markus; Plank, Christian

    2010-08-02

    Oncolytic adenoviruses rank among the most promising innovative agents in cancer therapy. We examined the potential of boosting the efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl520 by associating it with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic-field-guided infection in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo. The virus was complexed by self-assembly with core-shell nanoparticles having a magnetite core of about 10 nm and stabilized by a shell containing 68 mass % lithium 3-[2-(perfluoroalkyl)ethylthio]propionate) and 32 mass % 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine. Optimized virus binding, sufficiently stable in 50% fetal calf serum, was found at nanoparticle-to-virus ratios of 5 fg of Fe per physical virus particle (VP) and above. As estimated from magnetophoretic mobility measurements, 3,600 to 4,500 magnetite nanocrystallites were associated per virus particle. Ultrastructural analysis by electron and atomic force microscopy showed structurally intact viruses surrounded by magnetic particles that occasionally bridged several virus particles. Viral uptake into cells at a given virus dose was enhanced 10-fold compared to nonmagnetic virus when infections were carried out under the influence of a magnetic field. Increased virus internalization resulted in a 10-fold enhancement of the oncolytic potency in terms of the dose required for killing 50% of the target cells (IC(50) value) and an enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude in virus progeny formation at equal input virus doses compared to nonmagnetic viruses. Furthermore, the full oncolytic effect developed within two days postinfection compared with six days in a nonmagnetic virus as a reference. Plotting target cell viability versus internalized virus particles for magnetic and nonmagnetic virus showed that the inherent oncolytic productivity of the virus remained unchanged upon association with magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, we conclude that the mechanism of boosting the

  20. Novel adenovirus detected in kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei) with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gál, János; Mándoki, Míra; Sós, Endre; Kertész, Péter; Koroknai, Viktória; Bányai, Krisztián; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2017-02-15

    A male kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei) originating from a zoo facility was delivered for post mortem evaluation in Hungary. Acute lobar pneumonia with histopathologic changes resembling an adenovirus (AdV) infection was detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an AdV was confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Although the exact taxonomic position of this novel marsupial origin virus could not be determined, pairwise identity analyses and phylogenetic calculations revealed that it is distantly related to other members in the family Adenoviridae.

  1. Packaging capacity and stability of human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bett, A J; Prevec, L; Graham, F L

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are extensively used for high-level expression of proteins in mammalian cells and are receiving increasing attention for their potential use as live recombinant vaccines and as transducing viruses for use in gene therapy. Although it is commonly argued that one of the chief advantages of adenovirus vectors is their relative stability, this has not been thoroughly investigated. To examine the genetic stability of adenovirus type 5 vectors and in particular to examine the relationship between genetic stability and genome size, adenovirus vectors were constructed with inserts of 4.88 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), 4.10 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), or 3.82 (LacZ) kb combined with a 1.88-kb E3 deletion or with a newly generated 2.69-kb E3 deletion. The net excess of DNA over the wild-type (wt) genome size ranged from 1.13 to 3.00 kb or 3.1 to 8.3%. Analysis of these vectors during serial passage in tissue culture revealed that when the size exceeded 105% of the wt genome length by approximately 1.2 kb (4.88-kb insert combined with a 1.88-kb deletion), the resulting vector grew very poorly and underwent rapid rearrangement, resulting in loss of the insert after only a few passages. In contrast, vectors with inserts resulting in viral DNA close to or less than a net genome size of 105% of that of the wt grew well and were relatively stable. In general, viruses with genomes only slightly above 105% of that of the wt were unstable and the rapidity with which rearrangement occurred correlated with the size of the insert. These findings suggest that there is a relatively tight constraint on the amount of DNA which can be packaged into virions and that exceeding the limit results in a sharply decreased rate of virus growth. The resultant strong selection for variants which have undergone rearrangement, generating smaller genomes, is manifested as genetic instability of the virus population. Images PMID:8371349

  2. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing.

  3. The Length of the Terminal Repetition in Adenovirus-2 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Richard J.; Arrand, John R.; Keller, Walter

    1974-01-01

    Adenovirus-2 DNA was end-labeled by partial digestion with Escherichia coli exonuclease III and resynthesis with the DNA polymerase from avian myeloblastosis virus and α-32P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. This end-labeled DNA was cleaved with several specific endonucleases and the terminal fragments were characterized by gel electrophoresis and pyrimidine tract analysis. Two endonucleases gave identical fragments from both ends, presumably from cleavage within the inverted terminal repetition, while all other endonucleases gave dissimilar fragments from the two ends. From the sizes of these fragments it is estimated that the inverted terminal repetition is between 100 and 140 nucleotide pairs long. Images PMID:4139703

  4. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) undergoes ectodomain shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP).

    PubMed

    Houri, Nadia; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule originally characterized as a virus receptor but subsequently shown to be involved in physiological processes such as neuronal and heart development, epithelial tight junction integrity, and tumour suppression. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules and a wide variety of other cell surface proteins serves as a mechanism for protein turnover and, in some cases, cell signaling. Metalloproteases such as A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) family members cleave cell surface receptors to release their substrates' ectodomains, while the presenilin/ɣ-secretase complex mediates regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), releasing intracellular domain fragments from the plasma membrane. In the case of some substrates such as Notch and amyloid precursor protein (APP), the released intracellular domains enter the nucleus to modulate gene expression. We report that CAR ectodomain is constitutively shed from glioma cells and developing neurons, and is also shed when cells are treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. We identified ADAM10 as a sheddase of CAR using assays involving shRNA knockdown and rescue, overexpression of wild-type ADAM10 and inhibition of ADAM10 activity by addition of its prodomain. In vitro peptide cleavage, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis revealed the amino acids M224 to L227 of CAR as the site of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain cleavage. CAR also undergoes RIP by the presenilin/γ-secretase complex, and the intracellular domain of CAR enters the nucleus. Ectodomain shedding is a prerequisite for RIP of CAR. Thus, CAR belongs to the increasing list of cell surface molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding and that are substrates for ɣ-secretase-mediated RIP.

  5. Toxic activity of the CdtB component of Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin expressed from an adenovirus 5 vector.

    PubMed

    Wising, Catharina; Magnusson, Maria; Ahlman, Karin; Lindholm, Leif; Lagergård, Teresa

    2010-02-01

    The Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin (HdCDT) catalytic subunit CdtB has DNase-like activity and mediates DNA damage after its delivery into target cells. We constructed a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector expressing CdtB and investigated the toxic properties of this vector on HeLa cells. Ad5CdtB caused loss of cell viability, morphologic changes, and cell cycle arrest, findings similar to HdCDT intoxication. This confirmed that CdtB is responsible for the toxicity of the holotoxin when expressed in cells following transduction by an adenoviral vector, and indicated a possible potential of this novel strategy in studies of activity of intracellular products and in gene therapy of cancer.

  6. Long-term gene transfer to mouse fetuses with recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M; Jerebtsova, M; Batshaw, M L; Newman, K; Ye, X

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a micro-injection technique to deliver recombinant adenovirus and AAV to mouse fetuses at day 15 after conception. Several routes of delivery, including injections to the amniotic fluid, the front limb, the placenta, the liver, and the retro-orbital venus plexus, were tested using an E1-deleted recombinant adenovirus (Ad.CBlacZ) or a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV.CMVlacZ) carrying a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ into the amniotic cavity led to transgene expression in the skin and in the digestive tract of the fetuses. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ in the front limb resulted in LacZ expression in all major muscle groups around the injection site and at low levels in the liver. The other three routes of delivery, ie intra-placental, intra-hepatic and retro-orbital injections of Ad.CBlacZ, all led to lacZ expression predominantly in the liver. Further studies revealed a maximal tolerant dose (defined as the highest viral dose with < or =20% mortality in the injected fetuses) of 1 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra- hepatic injections, 3 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra-placental injection, 1 x 1010 particles per fetus for retro-orbital and intra-amniotic injections, and 2 x 10(10) particle per fetus for intra-muscular injection. The adenovirus-mediated lacZ expression in liver and muscle persisted for at least 6 weeks. Intra-muscular injection of AAV.CMVlacZ also resulted in lacZ expression in the muscle up to 3 months after birth with no indication of cellular immune response at the injection site. Taken together, our results demonstrated that prolonged transgene expression can be achieved by in utero gene transfer using either adenoviral or AAV vectors. The distribution of virus-mediated gene transfer appeared to determined mostly by the route of viral administration.

  7. Functional interactions of antiapoptotic proteins and tumor necrosis factor in the context of a replication-competent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Liu, T-C; Wang, Y; Hallden, G; Brooks, G; Francis, J; Lemoine, N R; Kirn, D

    2005-09-01

    Replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses hold promise, but novel mechanisms must be identified to maximize intratumoral virus persistence, spread and therapeutic transgene-carrying capacity while maintaining safety. One of the main approaches to engineering cancer-selectivity has been to delete a viral gene that is theoretically expendable in cancer cells. Results with this approach have been mixed, however, as evidenced by controversy over Onyx-015 (E1B-55kD(-)) selectivity. We hypothesized that the functional redundancy between viral gene products might limit selectivity and/or potency with this approach. Antiviral immune inducers of apoptosis (eg TNF-alpha) have not been thoroughly investigated in previous studies. We therefore explored whether deletion of functionally redundant viral genes, E1B-19kD and E3B, both independently antagonize TNF-alpha, could lead to enhanced oncolytic potency while maintaining selectivity. Since tumors have numerous blocks in apoptotic pathways, we hypothesized that deletion of one or both gene regions would result in cancer-selectivity in the presence of TNF-alpha. We have previously shown that the E1B-19kD deletion resulted in enhanced viral spread in vitro and in immunocompetent tumor models in vivo. In contrast, the impact of E3B deletion, especially its in vitro selectivity and potency, was not thoroughly characterized, although it resulted in rapid immune-mediated viral clearance in vivo. Furthermore, previous publications indicated that double-deleted mutants have selectivity but unsatisfactory efficacy. We compared the selectivity and potency of E1B-19kD(-), E3B(-) and E1B-19kD(-)/E3B(-) mutants to wild-type adenovirus. In cancer cells, the E1B-19kD(-) mutant had superior replication, spread and cytolysis (+) or (-) TNF-alpha; deletion of both E1B-19kD and E3B was relatively deleterious. In normal cells without TNF-alpha, similar results were obtained. In contrast, all three mutants were significantly inhibited in the

  8. Noninvasive visualization of adenovirus replication with a fluorescent reporter in the E3 region.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hidetaka A; Le, Long P; Davydova, Julia G; Gavrikova, Tatyana; Yamamoto, Masato

    2005-11-15

    To overcome the inefficacy and undesirable side effects of current cancer treatment strategies, conditionally replicative adenoviruses have been developed to exploit the unique mechanism of oncolysis afforded by tumor-specific viral replication. Despite rapid translation into clinical trials and the established safety of oncolytic adenoviruses, the in vivo function of these agents is not well understood due to lack of a noninvasive detection system for adenovirus replication. To address this issue, we propose the expression of a reporter from the adenovirus E3 region as a means to monitor replication. Adenovirus replication reporter vectors were constructed with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene placed in the deleted E3 region under the control of the adenoviral major late promoter while retaining expression of the adenovirus death protein to conserve the native oncolytic capability of the virus. Strong EGFP fluorescence was detected from these vectors in a replication-dependent manner, which correlated with viral DNA replication. Fluorescence imaging in vivo confirmed the ability to noninvasively detect fluorescent signal during replication, which generally corresponded with the underlying level of viral DNA replication. EGFP representation of viral replication was further confirmed by Western blot comparison with the viral DNA content in the tumors. Imaging reporter expression controlled by the adenoviral major late promoter provides a viable approach to noninvasively monitor adenovirus replication in preclinical studies and has the potential for human application with clinically relevant imaging reporters.

  9. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counihan, Katrina; Skerratt, Lee; Franson, J. Christian; Hollmen, Tuula E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  10. Adenovirus with DNA Packaging Gene Mutations Increased Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Wechman, Stephen L.; Rao, Xiao-Mei; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have been extensively manipulated for the development of cancer selective replication, leading to cancer cell death or oncolysis. Clinical studies using E1-modified oncolytic Ads have shown that this therapeutic platform was safe, but with limited efficacy, indicating the necessity of targeting other viral genes for manipulation. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic Ads, we treated the entire Ad genome repeatedly with UV-light and have isolated AdUV which efficiently lyses cancer cells as reported previously (Wechman, S. L. et al. Development of an Oncolytic Adenovirus with Enhanced Spread Ability through Repeated UV Irradiation and Cancer Selection. Viruses 2016, 8, 6). In this report, we show that no mutations were observed in the early genes (E1 or E4) of AdUV while several mutations were observed within the Ad late genes which have structural or viral DNA packaging functions. This study also reported the increased release of AdUV from cancer cells. In this study, we found that AdUV inhibits tumor growth following intratumoral injection. These results indicate the potentially significant role of the viral late genes, in particular the DNA packaging genes, to enhance Ad oncolysis. PMID:27999391

  11. Fluctuating expression of microRNAs in adenovirus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxing; Chen, Maoshan; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Pettersson, Ulf

    2015-04-01

    The changes in cellular microRNA (miRNA) expression during the course of an adenovirus type 2 infection in human lung fibroblast were studied by deep RNA sequencing. Expressions of 175 miRNAs with over 100 transcripts per million nucleotides were changed more than 1.5-fold. The expression patterns of these miRNAs changed dramatically during the course of the infection, from upregulation of the miRNAs known as tumor suppressors (such as miR-22, miR-320, let-7, miR-181b, and miR-155) and down-regulation of oncogenic miRNAs (such as miR-21 and miR-31) early to downregulation of tumor suppressor miRNAs (such as let-7 family, mir-30 family, 23/27 cluster) and upregulation of oncogenic miRNAs (include miR-125, miR-27, miR-191) late after infection. The switch in miRNA expression pattern occurred when adenovirus DNA replication started. Furthermore, deregulation of cellular miRNA expression was a step-wise and special sets of miRNAs were deregulated in different phases of infection.

  12. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  13. A novel adenovirus of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Wevers, Diana; Leendertz, Fabian H; Scuda, Nelly; Boesch, Christophe; Robbins, Martha M; Head, Josephine; Ludwig, Carsten; Kühn, Joachim; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2010-11-05

    Adenoviruses (AdV) broadly infect vertebrate hosts including a variety of primates. We identified a novel AdV in the feces of captive gorillas by isolation in cell culture, electron microscopy and PCR. From the supernatants of infected cultures we amplified DNA polymerase (DPOL), preterminal protein (pTP) and hexon gene sequences with generic pan primate AdV PCR assays. The sequences in-between were amplified by long-distance PCRs of 2-10 kb length, resulting in a final sequence of 15.6 kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel gorilla AdV into a cluster of primate AdVs belonging to the species Human adenovirus B (HAdV-B). Depending on the analyzed gene, its position within the cluster was variable. To further elucidate its origin, feces samples of wild gorillas were analyzed. AdV hexon sequences were detected which are indicative for three distinct and novel gorilla HAdV-B viruses, among them a virus nearly identical to the novel AdV isolated from captive gorillas. This shows that the discovered virus is a member of a group of HAdV-B viruses that naturally infect gorillas. The mixed phylogenetic clusters of gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo and human AdVs within the HAdV-B species indicate that host switches may have been a component of the evolution of human and non-human primate HAdV-B viruses.

  14. Investigation of the mechanical and interfacial properties of adenovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, William Garrett

    The ability to investigate materials at the single molecule and macromolecule level became a reality with the introduction of the atomic force microscope (AFM) by Bennig et al. in 1986. Presented in this dissertation is a modification to the AFM that facilitates imaging of delicate samples under liquids. The instrument was subsequently used to investigate a variety of material and interfacial properties of adenovirus. Firstly, the elasticity of adenovirus particles in air and in water was measured. The virus was found to be some fifty fold more compliant in water than in air, with the measured elastic modulus changing from 15 MPa to 770 MPa. Individual viruses also were translated across a variety of surfaces, and the force required to do these manipulations was recorded. A variety of behaviors were observed, including evidence for rolling of the particles. This measurement constitutes one of the first direct observations of rolling behavior on this length scale. Finally, viruses were observed to shed their capsid proteins when deposited on positively charged magnesium intercalated mica. The resulting core structure was investigated, and the uncoating process was captured in a series of images. These images represent one of the first molecular level processes to be observed at the single molecule level.

  15. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever.

    PubMed

    Warimwe, George M; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K; Al-dubaib, Musaad A; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V S

    2016-02-05

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A 'One Health' vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs.

  16. Directed adenovirus evolution using engineered mutator viral polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Uil, Taco G.; Vellinga, Jort; de Vrij, Jeroen; van den Hengel, Sanne K.; Rabelink, Martijn J. W. E.; Cramer, Steve J.; Eekels, Julia J. M.; Ariyurek, Yavuz; van Galen, Michiel; Hoeben, Rob C.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are the most frequently used viruses for oncolytic and gene therapy purposes. Most Ad-based vectors have been generated through rational design. Although this led to significant vector improvements, it is often hampered by an insufficient understanding of Ad’s intricate functions and interactions. Here, to evade this issue, we adopted a novel, mutator Ad polymerase-based, ‘accelerated-evolution’ approach that can serve as general method to generate or optimize adenoviral vectors. First, we site specifically substituted Ad polymerase residues located in either the nucleotide binding pocket or the exonuclease domain. This yielded several polymerase mutants that, while fully supportive of viral replication, increased Ad’s intrinsic mutation rate. Mutator activities of these mutants were revealed by performing deep sequencing on pools of replicated viruses. The strongest identified mutators carried replacements of residues implicated in ssDNA binding at the exonuclease active site. Next, we exploited these mutators to generate the genetic diversity required for directed Ad evolution. Using this new forward genetics approach, we isolated viral mutants with improved cytolytic activity. These mutants revealed a common mutation in a splice acceptor site preceding the gene for the adenovirus death protein (ADP). Accordingly, the isolated viruses showed high and untimely expression of ADP, correlating with a severe deregulation of E3 transcript splicing. PMID:21138963

  17. Inactivation kinetics of adenovirus serotype 2 with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Shisler, Joanna L; Mariñas, Benito J

    2008-03-01

    The effect of pH (6-10), temperature (10-30 degrees C), disinfectant concentration (1-11mg/l as Cl(2)), and ammonia nitrogen-to-chlorine molar ratio (1.3-52) on the inactivation kinetics of adenovirus serotype 2 with monochloramine was investigated by performing batch-reactor experiments with synthetic 0.01M buffer (phosphate or borate) solutions. The inactivation kinetics was independent of monochloramine concentration and ammonia nitrogen-to-chlorine molar ratio but had strong pH dependence, with the rate of inactivation decreasing with increasing pH. The kinetics at pH 6 and 8 were consistent with pseudo-first-order kinetics, while curves at pH 10 were characterized by a lag phase followed by a pseudo-first-order phase. The rate of inactivation increased with increasing temperature-activation energies of 56.5kJ/mole (pH 8) and 72.6kJ/mole (pH 10). The results obtained in this study revealed that monochloramine disinfection might not generally provide adequate control of adenoviruses in drinking water at high pH and low temperature.

  18. Gene Transcript Abundance Profiles Distinguish Kawasaki Disease from Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Watson, Virginia E.; Shimizu, Chisato; Kanegaye, John T.; Burns, Jane C.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute Kawasaki disease (KD) is difficult to distinguish from other illnesses that involve acute rash or fever, in part because the etiologic agent(s) and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. As a result, diagnosis and critical therapies may be delayed. Methods We used DNA microarrays to identify possible diagnostic features of KD. We compared gene expression patterns in the blood of 23 children with acute KD and 18 age-matched febrile children with 3 illnesses that resemble KD. Results Genes associated with platelet and neutrophil activation were expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in patients with acute adenovirus infections or systemic adverse drug reactions, but levels in patients with KD were not higher than those in patients with scarlet fever. Genes associated with B cell activation were also expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in control subjects. A striking absence of interferon-stimulated gene expression in patients with KD was confirmed in an independent cohort of patients with KD. Using a set of 38 gene transcripts, we successfully predicted the diagnosis for 21 of 23 patients with KD and 7 of 8 patients with adenovirus infection. Conclusions These findings provide insight into the molecular features that distinguish KD from other febrile illnesses and support the feasibility of developing novel diagnostic reagents for KD based on the host response. PMID:19583510

  19. Impact of Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Oligomerization and Protein Localization on Cellular Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Vink, Elizabeth I; Zheng, Yueting; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Stamminger, Thomas; Krug, Laurie T; Hearing, Patrick

    2015-05-13

    The Adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein facilitates virus replication through the relocalization of cellular proteins into nuclear inclusions termed tracks. This sequestration event disrupts antiviral properties associated with target proteins. Relocalization of Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 proteins prevents the DNA damage response from inhibiting Ad replication. Relocalization of PML and Daxx impedes the interferon-mediated antiviral response. Several E4-ORF3 targets regulate gene expression, linking E4-ORF3 to transcriptional control. Furthermore, E4-ORF3 was shown to promote the formation of heterochromatin, down-regulating p53-dependent gene expression. Here, we characterize how E4-ORF3 alters cellular gene expression. Using an inducible, E4-ORF3-expressing cell line, we performed microarray experiments to highlight cellular gene expression changes influenced by E4-ORF3 expression, identifying over four hundred target genes. Enrichment analysis of these genes suggests that E4-ORF3 influences factors involved in signal transduction and cellular defense, among others. The expression of mutant E4-ORF3 proteins revealed that nuclear track formation is necessary to induce these expression changes. Through the generation of knockdown cells, we demonstrate that the observed expression changes may be independent of Daxx and TRIM33 suggesting that an additional factor(s) may be responsible. The ability of E4-ORF3 to manipulate cellular gene expression through the sequestration of cellular proteins implicates a novel role for E4-ORF3 in transcriptional regulation.

  20. Adenovirus vector-induced immune responses in nonhuman primates: responses to prime boost regimens.

    PubMed

    Tatsis, Nia; Lasaro, Marcio O; Lin, Shih-Wen; Haut, Larissa H; Xiang, Zhi Q; Zhou, Dongming; Dimenna, Lauren; Li, Hua; Bian, Ang; Abdulla, Sarah; Li, Yan; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Engram, Jessica; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Silvestri, Guido; Ertl, Hildegund C; Betts, Michael R

    2009-05-15

    In the phase IIb STEP trial an HIV-1 vaccine based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors of the human serotype 5 (AdHu5) not only failed to induce protection but also increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in individuals with preexisting neutralizing Abs against AdHu5. The mechanisms underlying the increased HIV-1 acquisition rates have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, it remains unclear if the lack of the vaccine's efficacy reflects a failure of the concept of T cell-mediated protection against HIV-1 or a product failure of the vaccine. Here, we compared two vaccine regimens based on sequential use of AdHu5 vectors or two different chimpanzee-derived Ad vectors in rhesus macaques that were AdHu5 seropositive or seronegative at the onset of vaccination. Our results show that heterologous booster immunizations with the chimpanzee-derived Ad vectors induced higher T and B cell responses than did repeated immunizations with the AdHu5 vector, especially in AdHu5-preexposed macaques.

  1. shRNA-armed conditionally replicative adenoviruses: a promising approach for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ding, Meng; Xu, Kai; Mao, Lijun; Zheng, Junian

    2016-01-01

    The small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been employed to knockdown the expression of cancer-associated genes and shown some promise in cancer therapy. However, synthetic siRNA duplexes or plasmid mediated delivery of siRNAs have several problems, such as short half-life, low transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity associated with transfection. Conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAds) as the delivery vector for short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) could overcome these limitations and have shown augmented anti-tumor effects in experimental studies and preclinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the development of CRAds-shRNA for cancer treatment. Combination of CRAds-shRNA with chemotherapeutics, radiation, dendritic cells, monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors will be necessary to eradicate cancer cells and cancer stem cells and achieve superior outcomes. The use of CRAd platform for efficient delivery of shRNAs and foreign genes will open a new avenue for cancer therapy. PMID:26980708

  2. Infectivity and expression of the early adenovirus proteins are important regulators of wild-type and DeltaE1B adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, W T; Riteco, N; Bos, J L

    1999-09-09

    An adenovirus mutant lacking the expression of the large E1B protein (DeltaE1B) has been reported to replicate selectively in cells lacking the expression of functionally wild-type (wt) p53. Based on these results the DeltaE1B or ONYX-015 virus has been proposed to be an oncolytic virus which might be useful to treat p53-deficient tumors. Recently however, contradictory results have been published indicating that p53-dependent cell death is required for productive adenovirus infection. Since there is an urgent need for new methods to treat aggressive, mutant p53-expressing primary tumors and their metastases we carefully examined adenovirus replication in human cells to determine whether or not the DeltaE1B virus can be used for tumor therapy. The results we present here show that not all human tumor cell lines take up adenovirus efficiently. In addition, we observed inhibition of the expression of adenovirus early proteins in tumor cells. We present evidence that these two factors rather than the p53 status of the cell determine whether adenovirus infection results in lytic cell death. Furthermore, the results we obtained by infecting a panel of different tumor cell lines show that viral spread of the DeltaE1B is strongly inhibited in almost all p53-proficient and -deficient cell lines compared to the wt virus. We conclude that the efficiency of the DeltaE1B virus to replicate efficiently in tumor cells is determined by the ability to infect cells and to express the early adenovirus proteins rather than the status of p53.

  3. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  4. Molecular detection of two adenoviruses associated with disease in Australian lizards.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, T; Shilton, C M

    2011-06-01

    We give the first published description of the pathology and molecular findings associated with adenovirus infection in lizards in Australia. A central netted dragon (Ctenophorus nuchalis) exhibited severe necrotising hepatitis with abundant intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes and rarely within intestinal epithelial cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using pooled tissues yielded an amplicon that shared strong nucleotide identity with an agamid adenovirus (EU914203). PCR on the liver of a bearded dragon (Pogona minor minor) with illthrift, coccidiosis, nematodiasis and hepatic lipidosis yielded an amplicon with strong nucleotide identity to a helodermatid adenovirus (EU914207).

  5. Molecular Characterization of a Lizard Adenovirus Reveals the First Atadenovirus with Two Fiber Genes and the First Adenovirus with Either One Short or Three Long Fibers per Penton

    PubMed Central

    Pénzes, Judit J.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Condezo, Gabriela N.; Ball, Inna; Papp, Tibor; Doszpoly, Andor; Paradela, Alberto; Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; López-Sanz, María; Nguyen, Thanh H.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Marschang, Rachel E.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkő, Mária

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although adenoviruses (AdVs) have been found in a wide variety of reptiles, including numerous squamate species, turtles, and crocodiles, the number of reptilian adenovirus isolates is still scarce. The only fully sequenced reptilian adenovirus, snake adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1), belongs to the Atadenovirus genus. Recently, two new atadenoviruses were isolated from a captive Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Mexican beaded lizards (Heloderma horridum). Here we report the full genomic and proteomic characterization of the latter, designated lizard adenovirus 2 (LAdV-2). The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of LAdV-2 is 32,965 bp long, with an average G+C content of 44.16%. The overall arrangement and gene content of the LAdV-2 genome were largely concordant with those in other atadenoviruses, except for four novel open reading frames (ORFs) at the right end of the genome. Phylogeny reconstructions and plesiomorphic traits shared with SnAdV-1 further supported the assignment of LAdV-2 to the Atadenovirus genus. Surprisingly, two fiber genes were found for the first time in an atadenovirus. After optimizing the production of LAdV-2 in cell culture, we determined the protein compositions of the virions. The two fiber genes produce two fiber proteins of different sizes that are incorporated into the viral particles. Interestingly, the two different fiber proteins assemble as either one short or three long fiber projections per vertex. Stoichiometry estimations indicate that the long fiber triplet is present at only one or two vertices per virion. Neither triple fibers nor a mixed number of fibers per vertex had previously been reported for adenoviruses or any other virus. IMPORTANCE Here we show that a lizard adenovirus, LAdV-2, has a penton architecture never observed before. LAdV-2 expresses two fiber proteins—one short and one long. In the virion, most vertices have one short fiber, but a few of them have three long fibers attached to the same penton

  6. Molecular Detection of Adenoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, and Paramyxoviruses in Bats from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F.; Anderson, Larry J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-01-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  7. Fatal pulmonary edema in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sorden, S D; Woods, L W; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-07-01

    Sporadic sudden deaths in adult white-tailed deer occurred from November 1997 through August 1998 on an Iowa game farm. Three of the 4 deer necropsied had severe pulmonary edema, widespread mild lymphocytic vasculitis, and amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in scattered endothelial cells in blood vessels in the lung and abdominal viscera. Immunohistochemistry with bovine adenovirus 5 antisera and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated adenoviral antigen and nucleocapsids, respectively, within endothelial cells. Adenovirus was isolated in cell culture from 1 of the affected deer. The isolate was neutralized by California black-tailed deer adenovirus antiserum. These findings indicate that adenovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of both black-tailed and white-tailed deer with pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhagic enteropathy.

  8. Liposomal enhancement of the immunogenicity of adenovirus type 5 hexon and fiber vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Kramp, W J; Six, H R; Drake, S; Kasel, J A

    1979-01-01

    Immunogenicity of adenovirus capsid proteins carried in liposomes was comparable to that with equivalent doses administered in Freund adjuvant, and both forms were more potent than aqueous vaccines. PMID:489132

  9. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  10. Inhibition of Adenovirus In Vitro DNA Replication by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Leader RNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-18

    19 Inhibition of Macromolecular Synthesis •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 22 Adenovirus Structure and Life Cycle...be possible to determine the affects of VSV and VSV leader RNA on eukaryotic DNA synthesis. ; . 1 .· 29 Adenovirus Structure and Life Cycle

  11. Ganciclovir Inhibits Human Adenovirus Replication and Pathogenicity in Permissive Immunosuppressed Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E.; Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R. Mark L.; Wold, William S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment. PMID:25224011

  12. Ganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathogenicity in permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R Mark L; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment.

  13. Unambiguous typing of canine adenovirus isolates by deoxyribonucleic acid restriction-endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, R; Marsolais, G; Yelle, J; Hamelin, C

    1983-01-01

    Viral deoxyribonucleic acid extracted from a limited number of cells infected with canine adenovirus type 1 or type 2 was cleaved with several restriction endonucleases. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the limit digests showed stable differences between the canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2 cleavage patterns. Rapid and accurate typing of large numbers of clinical isolates may thus be done by deoxyribonucleic acid restriction-endonuclease analysis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6321002

  14. Adenovirus type 2 nuclear RNA accumulating during productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bachenheimer, S L

    1977-01-01

    The viral-specific nuclear RNA which accumulates early and late during productive infection of HeLa cells by adenovirus-type 2 (Ad2) has been characterized with respect to its size and stability after denaturation by Me2SO. Early nuclear transcripts, under nondenaturing conditions, sediment in the range 28 to 45S, but treatment with Me2SO prior to sedimentation results in a shift to about 20S. Later nuclear RNA accumulates as a composite of two populations of molecules: one with a broad size distribution centering on 45S under nondenaturing conditions and less than 32S after denaturation and a second having a narrow size distribution around 35S which is quite stable to Me2SO. Analysis of late RNA by hybridization to Sma fragments of Ad2 DNA suggests that the 35S RNA species is derived from a limited portion of the left half of the viral genome. PMID:864839

  15. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R.; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  16. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor is essential for cardiomyocyte development.

    PubMed

    Asher, Damon R; Cerny, Anna M; Weiler, Sarah R; Horner, James W; Keeler, Marilyn L; Neptune, Mychell A; Jones, Stephen N; Bronson, Roderick T; Depinho, Ronald A; Finberg, Robert W

    2005-06-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a transmembrane protein that is known to be a site of viral attachment and entry, but its physiologic functions are undefined. CAR expression is maximal in neonates and wanes rapidly after birth in organs such as heart, muscle, and brain, suggesting that CAR plays a role in the development of these tissues. Here, we show that CAR deficiency resulted in an embryonic lethal condition associated with cardiac defects. Specifically, commencing approximately 10.5 days postconception (dpc), CAR-/- cardiomyocytes exhibited regional apoptosis evidenced by both histopathologic features of cell death and positive staining for the apoptotic marker cleaved caspase 3. CAR-/- fetuses invariably suffered from degeneration of the myocardial wall and thoracic hemorrhaging, leading to death by 11.5 dpc. These findings are consistent with the view that CAR provides positive survival signals to cardiomyocytes that are essential for normal heart development.

  17. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  18. Adenovirus Membrane Penetration: Tickling the Tail of a Sleeping Dragon

    PubMed Central

    Wiethoff, Christopher M.; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    As is the case for nearly every viral pathogen, non-enveloped viruses (NEV) must maintain their integrity under potentially harsh environmental conditions while retaining the ability to undergo rapid disassembly at the right time and right place inside host cells. NEVs generally exist in this metastable state until they encounter key cellular stimuli such as membrane receptors, decreased intracellular pH, digestion by cellular proteases, or a combination of these factors. These stimuli trigger conformational changes in the viral capsid that exposes a sequestered membrane-perturbing protein. This protein subsequently modifies the cell membrane in such a way as to allow passage of the virion and accompanying nucleic acid payload into the cell cytoplasm. Different NEVs employ variations of this general pathway for cell entry (1), however this review will focus on significant new knowledge obtained on cell entry by human adenovirus(HAdV). PMID:25798531

  19. Partial characterization of new adenoviruses found in lizards.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Behncke, Helge; Schmidt, Volker; Geflügel, F T A; Papp, Tibor; Stöhr, Anke C; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-06-01

    In the years 2011-2012, a consensus nested polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection of adenovirus (AdV) infection in reptiles. During this screening, three new AdVs were detected. One of these viruses was detected in three lizards from a group of green striped tree dragons (Japalura splendida). Another was detected in a green anole (Anolis carolinensis). A third virus was detected in a Jackson's chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii). Analysis of a portion of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase genes of each of these viruses revealed that they all were different from one another and from all previously described reptilian AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial DNA polymerase gene sequence showed that all newly detected viruses clustered within the genus Atadenovirus. This is the first description of AdVs in these lizard species.

  20. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Eric A; Camacho, Zenaido T; Hillestad, Matthew L; Crosby, Catherine M; Turner, Mallory A; Guenzel, Adam J; Fadel, Hind J; Mercier, George T; Barry, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination.

  1. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  2. Role of preterminal protein processing in adenovirus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A; Leith, I R; Nicholson, J; Hounsell, J; Hay, R T

    1997-01-01

    Preterminal protein (pTP), the protein primer for adenovirus DNA replication, is processed at two sites by the virus-encoded protease to yield mature terminal protein (TP). Here we demonstrate that processing to TP, via an intermediate (iTP), is conserved in all serotypes sequenced to date; and in determining the sites cleaved in Ad4 pTP, we extend the previously published substrate specificity of human adenovirus proteases to include a glutamine residue at P4. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies raised against pTP, we show that processing to iTP and TP are temporally separated in the infectious cycle, with processing to iTP taking place outside the virus particles. In vitro and in vivo studies of viral DNA replication reveal that iTP can act as a template for initiation and elongation and argue against a role for virus-encoded protease in switching off DNA replication. Virus DNA with TP attached to its 5' end (TP-DNA) has been studied extensively in in vitro DNA replication assays. Given that in vivo pTP-DNA, not TP-DNA, is the template for all but the first round of replication, the two templates were compared in vitro and shown to have different properties. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that a region spanning the TP cleavage site is involved in defining the subnuclear localization of pTP. Therefore, a likely role for the processing of pTP-DNA is to create a distinct template for early transcription (TP-DNA), while the terminal protein moiety, be it TP or pTP, serves to guide the template to the appropriate subcellular location through the course of infection. PMID:9261355

  3. Role of preterminal protein processing in adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Webster, A; Leith, I R; Nicholson, J; Hounsell, J; Hay, R T

    1997-09-01

    Preterminal protein (pTP), the protein primer for adenovirus DNA replication, is processed at two sites by the virus-encoded protease to yield mature terminal protein (TP). Here we demonstrate that processing to TP, via an intermediate (iTP), is conserved in all serotypes sequenced to date; and in determining the sites cleaved in Ad4 pTP, we extend the previously published substrate specificity of human adenovirus proteases to include a glutamine residue at P4. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies raised against pTP, we show that processing to iTP and TP are temporally separated in the infectious cycle, with processing to iTP taking place outside the virus particles. In vitro and in vivo studies of viral DNA replication reveal that iTP can act as a template for initiation and elongation and argue against a role for virus-encoded protease in switching off DNA replication. Virus DNA with TP attached to its 5' end (TP-DNA) has been studied extensively in in vitro DNA replication assays. Given that in vivo pTP-DNA, not TP-DNA, is the template for all but the first round of replication, the two templates were compared in vitro and shown to have different properties. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that a region spanning the TP cleavage site is involved in defining the subnuclear localization of pTP. Therefore, a likely role for the processing of pTP-DNA is to create a distinct template for early transcription (TP-DNA), while the terminal protein moiety, be it TP or pTP, serves to guide the template to the appropriate subcellular location through the course of infection.

  4. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  5. Use of cidofovir in pediatric patients with adenovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Lakshmi; Arnold, Alana; Jones, Sarah; Patterson, Al; Graham, Dionne; Harper, Marvin; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adenoviruses contribute to morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised pediatric patients including stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients. Cidofovir (CDV), an antiviral compound approved by the FDA in 1996, is used for treatment of adenoviral (ADV) infections in immunocompromised patients despite concern of potential nephrotoxicity.   Methods: We conducted a retrospective 5-year review at Boston Children’s Hospital of 16 patients (mean age = 6.5 years) receiving 19 courses of CDV. During therapy all pertinent data elements were reviewed to characterize potential response to therapy and incidence of renal dysfunction.   Results: Of the 19 CDV courses prescribed, 16 courses (84%) were in patients who had a positive blood ADV Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) alone or in combination with positive ADV PCR/ Direct Immunofluorescence Assay (DFA) at another site. Respiratory symptoms with or without pneumonia were the most common presentation (10/19, 53%). In the majority of blood positive courses (10/16, 63%), viral clearance was also accompanied by clinical response. This was not the case in four courses where patients expired despite viral clearance, including one in which death was directly attributable to adenovirus. There was reversible renal dysfunction observed during the use of CDV. Conclusions:  CDV appeared safe and reasonably tolerated for treatment of ADV in this pediatric population and was associated with viral response and clinical improvement in the majority of patients but reversible renal dysfunction was a side effect. Further studies of the efficacy of CDV for immunocompromised children with ADV infection are warranted. PMID:27239277

  6. Adenovirus Vectors Targeting Distinct Cell Types in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5ΔRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5ΔRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5ΔRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5ΔRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  7. Hepatocyte Heparan Sulfate Is Required for Adeno-Associated Virus 2 but Dispensable for Adenovirus 5 Liver Transduction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Foley, Erin M.; Lawrence, Roger; Schneider, Lina S.; Hoveida, Hamidreza; Secrest, Patrick; Catapang, Arthur B.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Alemany, Ramon; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) and adenovirus 5 (Ad5) are promising gene therapy vectors. Both display liver tropism and are currently thought to enter hepatocytes in vivo through cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). To test directly this hypothesis, we created mice that lack Ext1, an enzyme required for heparan sulfate biosynthesis, in hepatocytes. Ext1HEP mutant mice exhibit an 8-fold reduction of heparan sulfate in primary hepatocytes and a 5-fold reduction of heparan sulfate in whole liver tissue. Conditional hepatocyte Ext1 gene deletion greatly reduced AAV2 liver transduction following intravenous injection. Ad5 transduction requires blood coagulation factor X (FX); FX binds to the Ad5 capsid hexon protein and bridges the virus to HSPGs on the cell surface. Ad5.FX transduction was abrogated in primary hepatocytes from Ext1HEP mice. However, in contrast to the case with AAV2, Ad5 transduction was not significantly reduced in the livers of Ext1HEP mice. FX remained essential for Ad5 transduction in vivo in Ext1HEP mice. We conclude that while AAV2 requires HSPGs for entry into mouse hepatocytes, HSPGs are dispensable for Ad5 hepatocyte transduction in vivo. This study reopens the question of how adenovirus enters cells in vivo. IMPORTANCE Our understanding of how viruses enter cells, and how they can be used as therapeutic vectors to manage disease, begins with identification of the cell surface receptors to which viruses bind and which mediate viral entry. Both adeno-associated virus 2 and adenovirus 5 are currently thought to enter hepatocytes in vivo through heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). However, direct evidence for these conclusions is lacking. Experiments presented herein, in which hepatic heparan sulfate synthesis was genetically abolished, demonstrated that HSPGs are not likely to function as hepatocyte Ad5 receptors in vivo. The data also demonstrate that HSPGs are required for hepatocyte transduction by AAV2. These

  8. Isolation of a novel adenovirus from California sea lions Zalophus californianus.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, T; Colegrove, K M; Hanson, M; Gulland, F M D

    2011-05-09

    Viral hepatitis associated with adenoviral infection has been reported in California sea lions Zalophus californianus admitted to rehabilitation centers along the California coast since the 1970s. Canine adenovirus 1 (CAdV-1) causes viral hepatitis in dogs and infects a number of wildlife species. Attempts to isolate the virus from previous sea lion hepatitis cases were unsuccessful, but as the hepatitis had morphologic features resembling canine infectious hepatitis, and since the virus has a wide host range, it was thought that perhaps the etiologic agent was CAdV-1. Here, we identify a novel adenovirus in 2 stranded California sea lions and associate the infection with viral hepatitis and endothelial cell infection. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the classification of the sea lion adenovirus in the Mastadenovirus genus with the most similarity to tree shrew adenovirus 1 (TSAdV-1, 77%). However, as the sea lion adenovirus appeared to be equally distant from the other Mastadenovirus species based on phylogenetic analysis, results indicate that it represents an independent lineage and species. Although sequences from this novel virus, otarine adenovirus 1 (OtAdV-1), show some similarity to CAdV-1 and 2, it is clearly distinct and likely the cause of the viral hepatitis in the stranded California sea lions.

  9. Replication of adenovirus type 4 DNA by a purified fraction from infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Temperley, S M; Hay, R T

    1991-01-01

    An extract from Adenovirus type 4 infected HeLa cells was fractionated by ion-exchange and DNA affinity chromatography. One fraction, which bound tightly to single stranded DNA, contained predominantly a protein of apparent molecular weight 65,000 and three less abundant proteins. Immunological cross-reactivity with adenovirus type 2 proteins confirmed the presence of preterminal protein and indicated that the abundant species was the virus coded DNA binding protein. This fraction contained an aphidicolin resistant DNA polymerase activity and in the presence of a linearised plasmid containing the adenovirus type 4 origin of DNA replication efficient transfer of dCMP onto preterminal protein, indicative of initiation, was observed. Furthermore, addition of all four deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and an ATP regenerating system resulted in the elongation of initiated molecules to generate plasmid molecules covalently attached to preterminal protein. Adenovirus type 4 DNA binding protein was extensively purified from crude adenovirus-4 infected HeLa extract by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody raised against adenovirus type 2 DNA binding protein. A low level of initiation of DNA replication was detected in the fraction depleted of DNA binding protein but activity was restored by addition of purified DNA binding protein. DNA binding protein therefore plays an important role in the initiation of Ad4 DNA replication. Images PMID:1829516

  10. TheQ1 Influence of Innate and Pre-Existing Immunity on Adenovirus Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors have been studied extensively in preclinical gene therapy models and in a range of clinical trials. However, innate immune responses to adenovirus vectors limit effectiveness of Ad5 based therapies. Moreover, extensive pre-existing Ad5 immunity in human populations will likely limit the clinical utility of adenovirus vectors, unless methods to circumvent neutralizing antibodies that bind virus and block target cell transduction can be developed; Furthermore, memory T cell and humoral responses to Ad5 are associated with increased toxicity, raising safety concerns for therapeutic adenovirus vectors in immunized hosts. Most preclinical studies have been performed in naïve animals; although pre-existing immunity is among the greatest hurdles for adenovirus therapies, it is also one of the most neglected experimentally. Here we summarize findings using adenovirus vectors in naïve animals, in Ad-immunized animals and in clinical trials, and review strategies proposed to overcome innate immune responses and pre-existing immunity. PMID:19711370

  11. Adenovirus Vectors Target Several Cell Subtypes of Mammalian Inner Ear In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian inner ear harbors diverse cell types that are essential for hearing and balance. Adenovirus is one of the major vectors to deliver genes into the inner ear for functional studies and hair cell regeneration. To identify adenovirus vectors that target specific cell subtypes in the inner ear, we studied three adenovirus vectors, carrying a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from two vendors or with a genome editing gene Cre recombinase (Cre), by injection into postnatal days 0 (P0) and 4 (P4) mouse cochlea through scala media by cochleostomy in vivo. We found three adenovirus vectors transduced mouse inner ear cells with different specificities and expression levels, depending on the type of adenoviral vectors and the age of mice. The most frequently targeted region was the cochlear sensory epithelium, including auditory hair cells and supporting cells. Adenovirus with GFP transduced utricular supporting cells as well. This study shows that adenovirus vectors are capable of efficiently and specifically transducing different cell types in the mammalian inner ear and provides useful tools to study inner ear gene function and to evaluate gene therapy to treat hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. PMID:28116172

  12. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  13. Detection of infectious enteroviruses and adenoviruses in tap water in urban areas in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the viral contamination of tap water at 11 urban sites in Korea between 1997 and 1998 over a period of 11 months. A total of 23 tap water samples were examined for infectious enteroviruses and adenoviruses by a cell culture technique followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. To identify the recovered viruses, sequence analysis of PCR products was performed. Infectious enteroviruses and adenoviruses were detected in 11 (47.8%) and 9 (39.1%) of the samples, respectively. Both enteroviruses and adenoviruses were detected in five samples (21.7%). The level of viral contamination was quite high, ranging from 2 x 10(-3) to 2.9 x 10(-2) Most Probable Number of Infectious Unit L(-1), far above the recommended virus level in drinking water set by the US EPA. Poliovirus type I derived from vaccine was frequently detected and the remainder comprised coxsackievirus B type or echovirus type 6, which were causative agents of aseptic meningitis in Korea in 1997 and 1998, respectively. Several types of adenovirus were detected in tap water samples and some water samples were found to contain adenoviruses which were closely related to enteric adenovirus types 40 and 41.

  14. Translation of adenovirus 2 late mRNAs microinjected into cultured African green monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.D.; Anderson, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    Adenovirus 2-infected monkey cells fail to synthesize fiber, a 62,000 M/sub r/ virion polypeptide expressed at late times in productively infected cells. Yet these cells contain fiber mRNA that, after isolation, can be translated in vitro. The reason for the failure of monkey cells to translate fiber mRNA has been approached by microinjecting adenovirus mRNA into the cytoplasm of cultured monkey cells. Late adenovirus 2 mRNA, isolated from infected HeLa cells, was efficiently expressed when microinjected into the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-C. Expressed viral proteins identified by immunoprecipitation included the adenovirus fiber polypeptide. This result demonstrates that the monkey cell translational apparatus is capable of recognizing and expressing functional adenovirus mRNA. Microinjection of late virus mRNA into cells previously infected with wild-type adenovirus 2 failed to increase significantly the yield of infectious virus. 26 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  15. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 short fibre

    SciTech Connect

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. Schoehn, Guy

    2008-08-15

    There are more than 100 known adenovirus serotypes, including 50 human serotypes. They can infect all 5 major vertebrate classes but only Aviadenovirus infecting birds and Mastadenovirus infecting mammals have been well studied. CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan) adenovirus is responsible for mild respiratory pathologies in birds. Most studies on CELO virus have focussed on its genome sequence and organisation whereas the structural work on CELO proteins has only recently started. Contrary to most adenoviruses, the vertices of CELO virus reveal pentons with two fibres of different lengths. The distal parts (or head) of those fibres are involved in cellular receptor binding. Here we have determined the atomic structure of the short-fibre head of CELO (amino acids 201-410) at 2.0 A resolution. Despite low sequence identity, this structure is conserved compared to the other adenovirus fibre heads. We have used the existing CELO long-fibre head structure and the one we show here for a structure-based alignment of 11 known adenovirus fibre heads which was subsequently used for the construction of an evolutionary tree. Both the fibre head sequence and structural alignments suggest that enteric human group F adenovirus 41 (short fibre) is closer to the CELO fibre heads than the canine CAdV-2 fibre head, that lies closer to the human virus fibre heads.

  16. Dendritic cells serve as a “Trojan horse” for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-cheng; Wang, Zi-ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Methods: Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Results: Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. Conclusion: DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa. PMID:27345628

  17. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  18. Targeted cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus coding for a fully human monoclonal antibody specific for CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Dias, J D; Hemminki, O; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Bonetti, A; Guse, K; Escutenaire, S; Kanerva, A; Pesonen, S; Löskog, A; Cerullo, V; Hemminki, A

    2012-10-01

    Promising clinical results have been achieved with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as ipilimumab and tremelimumab that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4, CD152). However, systemic administration of these agents also has the potential for severe immune-related adverse events. Thus, local production might allow higher concentrations at the target while reducing systemic side effects. We generated a transductionally and transcriptionally targeted oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 expressing complete human mAb specific for CTLA-4 and tested it in vitro, in vivo and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal donors and patients with advanced solid tumors. mAb expression was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Biological functionality was determined in a T-cell line and in PBMCs from cancer patients. T cells of patients, but not those of healthy donors, were activated by an anti-CTLA4mAb produced by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4. In addition to immunological effects, a direct anti-CTLA-4-mediated pro-apoptotic effect was observed in vitro and in vivo. Local production resulted in 43-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor versus plasma anti-CTLA4mAb concentration. Plasma levels in mice remained below what has been reported safe in humans. Replication-competent Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 resulted in 81-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor mAb levels as compared with a replication-deficient control. This is the first report of an oncolytic adenovirus producing a full-length human mAb. High mAb concentrations were seen at tumors with lower systemic levels. Stimulation of T cells of cancer patients by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 suggests feasibility of testing the approach in clinical trials.

  19. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Engler, Tatjana; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad) vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf) was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i) covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii) the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii) combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting.

  20. Retargeted oncolytic adenovirus displaying a single variable domain of camelid heavy-chain-only antibody in a fiber protein.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Elisabeth A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kaliberov, Sergey A; Curiel, David T

    2015-01-01

    Conditionally replicative adenoviruses are promising agents for oncolytic virotherapy. Various approaches have been attempted to retarget adenoviruses to tumor-specific antigens to circumvent deficiency of receptor for adenoviral binding and to provide an additional level of tumor specificity. Functional incorporation of highly specific targeting molecules into the viral capsid can potentially retarget adenoviral infection. However, conventional antibodies are not compatible with the cytoplasmic adenovirus capsid synthesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies for retargeting of adenovirus infection. We have combined transcriptional targeting using a tumor-specific promoter with transductional targeting through viral capsid incorporation of antihuman carcinoembryonic antigen single variable domains. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of a single variable domain genetically incorporated into an adenovirus fiber increased specificity of infection and efficacy of replication of single variable domain-targeted oncolytic adenovirus. The double targeting, both transcriptional through the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter and transductional using the single variable domain, is a promising means to improve the therapeutic index for these advanced generation conditionally replicative adenoviruses. A successful strategy to transductional retargeting of oncolytic adenovirus infection has not been shown before and therefore we believe this is the first employment of transductional targeting using single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies to enhance specificity of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

  1. Immune responses against hepatitis C virus genotype 3a virus-like particles in mice: A novel VLP prime-adenovirus boost strategy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Das, Soma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Lahiri, Priyanka; Tatineni, Ranjitha; Goswami, Debashree; Bhat, Prasanna; Torresi, Joseph; Gowans, Eric James; Karande, Anjali Anoop; Das, Saumitra

    2016-02-17

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a major health threat to global population. In India, approximately 15-20% of cases of chronic liver diseases are caused by HCV infection. Although, new drug treatments hold great promise for HCV eradication in infected individuals, the treatments are highly expensive. A vaccine for preventing or treating HCV infection would be of great value, particularly in developing countries. Several preclinical trials of virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccine strategies are in progress throughout the world. Previously, using baculovirus based system, we have reported the production of hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV-LPs) encoding structural proteins for genotype 3a, which is prevalent in India. In the present study, we have generated HCV-LPs using adenovirus based system and tried different immunization strategies by using combinations of both kinds of HCV-LPs with other genotype 3a-based immunogens. HCV-LPs and peptides based ELISAs were used to evaluate antibody responses generated by these combinations. Cell-mediated immune responses were measured by using T-cell proliferation assay and intracellular cytokine staining. We observed that administration of recombinant adenoviruses expressing HCV structural proteins as final booster enhances both antibody as well as T-cell responses. Additionally, reduction of binding of VLP and JFH1 virus to human hepatocellular carcinoma cells demonstrated the presence of neutralizing antibodies in immunized sera. Taken together, our results suggest that the combined regimen of VLP followed by recombinant adenovirus could more effectively inhibit HCV infection, endorsing the novel vaccine strategy.

  2. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country.

  3. A replicating adenovirus capsid display recombinant elicits antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae monkeys.

    PubMed

    Karen, Kasey A; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization.

  4. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  5. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Hollmén, Tuula E; Franson, J Christian; Flint, Paul L; Grand, James B; Lanctot, Richard B; Docherty, Douglas E; Wilson, Heather M

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  6. Effects of adeno-associated virus on adenovirus replication and gene expression during coinfection.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Jennifer M; Verrill, Kristin C; Trempe, James P

    2006-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a nonpathogenic parvovirus that requires adenovirus (Ad) or another helper virus for a fully permissive infection. AAV-mediated inhibition of Ad is well documented, yet many details of this interaction remain unclear. In this study, we observed a maximum 50-fold decrease in infectious virus production and a 10- to 40-fold reduction in Ad DNA synthesis during coinfections with AAV. With the exception of the E3 gene, AAV decreased all steady-state Ad mRNA levels at 24 h postinfection (hpi) in a dose-dependent manner. However, not all transcription units were affected equally. E4 and late transcription were the most strongly inhibited, and E1A and E2A were the least affected. The temporal effects of AAV on Ad mRNA transcript levels also varied among the Ad genes. Ad protein expression paralleled mRNA levels at 24 hpi, suggesting that coinfecting AAV does not exert substantial effects on translation. In plasmid transfection assays, Rep78 protein most effectively limited Ad amplification, while Rep40 had no effect. Since E2a and E4 proteins are essential for efficient Ad DNA amplification, we examined the relationship between reduced E2A and E4 expression and decreased DNA amplification. Transfected Rep78 did not reduce E2A and E4 transcript levels prior to DNA replication. Also, AAV-induced inhibition of E2A and E4 mRNA production did not occur in the presence of hydroxyurea. It is therefore unlikely that decreased early gene expression is solely responsible for AAV's suppression of Ad DNA replication. Our results suggest that AAV amplification and/or Rep gene expression inhibits Ad DNA synthesis.

  7. Effects of Adeno-Associated Virus on Adenovirus Replication and Gene Expression during Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Timpe, Jennifer M.; Verrill, Kristin C.; Trempe, James P.

    2006-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a nonpathogenic parvovirus that requires adenovirus (Ad) or another helper virus for a fully permissive infection. AAV-mediated inhibition of Ad is well documented, yet many details of this interaction remain unclear. In this study, we observed a maximum 50-fold decrease in infectious virus production and a 10- to 40-fold reduction in Ad DNA synthesis during coinfections with AAV. With the exception of the E3 gene, AAV decreased all steady-state Ad mRNA levels at 24 h postinfection (hpi) in a dose-dependent manner. However, not all transcription units were affected equally. E4 and late transcription were the most strongly inhibited, and E1A and E2A were the least affected. The temporal effects of AAV on Ad mRNA transcript levels also varied among the Ad genes. Ad protein expression paralleled mRNA levels at 24 hpi, suggesting that coinfecting AAV does not exert substantial effects on translation. In plasmid transfection assays, Rep78 protein most effectively limited Ad amplification, while Rep40 had no effect. Since E2a and E4 proteins are essential for efficient Ad DNA amplification, we examined the relationship between reduced E2A and E4 expression and decreased DNA amplification. Transfected Rep78 did not reduce E2A and E4 transcript levels prior to DNA replication. Also, AAV-induced inhibition of E2A and E4 mRNA production did not occur in the presence of hydroxyurea. It is therefore unlikely that decreased early gene expression is solely responsible for AAV's suppression of Ad DNA replication. Our results suggest that AAV amplification and/or Rep gene expression inhibits Ad DNA synthesis. PMID:16873238

  8. Identification of HI-like loop in CELO adenovirus fiber for incorporation of receptor binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Logunov, Denis Y; Zubkova, Olga V; Karyagina-Zhulina, Anna S; Shuvalova, Eugenia A; Karpov, Andrei P; Shmarov, Maxim M; Tutykhina, Irina L; Alyapkina, Yulia S; Grezina, Natalia M; Zinovieva, Natalia A; Ernst, Lev K; Gintsburg, Alexsandr L; Naroditsky, Boris S

    2007-09-01

    Vectors based on the chicken embryo lethal orphan (CELO) avian adenovirus (Ad) have two attractive properties for gene transfer applications: resistance to preformed immune responses to human Ads and the ability to grow in chicken embryos, allowing low-cost production of recombinant viruses. However, a major limitation of this technology is that CELO vectors demonstrate decreased efficiency of gene transfer into cells expressing low levels of the coxsackie-Ad receptor (CAR). In order to improve the efficacy of gene transfer into CAR-deficient cells, we modified viral tropism via genetic alteration of the CELO fiber 1 protein. The alphav integrin-binding motif (RGD) was incorporated at two different sites of the fiber 1 knob domain, within an HI-like loop that we identified and at the C terminus. Recombinant fiber-modified CELO viruses were constructed containing secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and enhanced green fluorescent protein genes as reporter genes. Our data show that insertion of the RGD motif within the HI-like loop of the fiber resulted in significant enhancement of gene transfer into CAR-negative and CAR-deficient cells. In contrast, CELO vectors containing the RGD motif at the fiber 1 C terminus showed reduced transduction of all cell lines. CELO viruses modified with RGD at the HI-like loop transduced the SEAP reporter gene into rabbit mammary gland cells in vivo with an efficiency significantly greater than that of unmodified CELO vector and similar to that of Ad type 5 vector. These results illustrate the potential for efficient CELO-mediated gene transfer into a broad range of cell types through modification of the identified HI-like loop of the fiber 1 protein.

  9. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes: extending the concept of invariant chain linkage.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Schlüter, Dirk; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2013-10-15

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP linked to Ii compared with vaccination with the unlinked vaccine. Studies using knockout mice demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells were largely responsible for this protection, which is mediated through perforin-dependent lysis of infected cells and IFN-γ production. Taking the concept a step further, vaccination of C57BL/6 (L. monocytogenes-resistant) and BALB/c (L. monocytogenes-susceptible) mice with adenoviral vectors encoding natural L. monocytogenes-derived soluble Ags (listeriolysin O and p60) revealed that tethering of these Ags to Ii markedly improved the vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cell response to two of three epitopes studied. More importantly, Ii linkage accelerated and augmented vaccine-induced protection in both mouse strains and prolonged protection, in particular that induced by the weak Ag, p60, in L. monocytogenes-susceptible BALB/c mice.

  10. Impact of preexisting adenovirus vector immunity on immunogenicity and protection conferred with an adenovirus-based H5N1 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Singh, Neetu; Vemula, Sai V; Couëtil, Laurent; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of preexisting immunity to adenoviruses in the majority of the human population might adversely impact the development of adaptive immune responses against adenovirus vector-based vaccines. To address this issue, we primed BALB/c mice either intranasally (i.n.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) with varying doses of wild type (WT) human adenovirus subtype 5 (HAd5). Following the development of immunity against HAd5, we immunized animals via the i.n. or i.m. route of inoculation with a HAd vector (HAd-HA-NP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) influenza virus. The immunogenicity and protection results suggest that low levels of vector immunity (<520 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with up to 10(7) plaque forming units (p.f.u.) of HAd-WT did not adversely impact the protective efficacy of the vaccine. Furthermore, high levels of vector immunity (approximately 1500 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with 10(8) p.f.u. of HAd-WT were overcome by either increasing the vaccine dose or using alternate routes of vaccination. A further increase in the priming dose to 10(9) p.f.u. allowed only partial protection. These results suggest possible strategies to overcome the variable levels of human immunity against adenoviruses, leading to better utilization of HAd vector-based vaccines.

  11. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  12. Interaction of human adenoviruses and coliphages with kaolinite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Bellou, Maria I; Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Tselepi, Maria A; Kokkinos, Petros A; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros C; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses (hAdVs) are pathogenic viruses responsible for public health problems worldwide. They have also been used as viral indicators in environmental systems. Coliphages (e.g., MS2, ΦX174) have also been studied as indicators of viral pollution in fecally contaminated water. Our objective was to evaluate the distribution of three viral fecal indicators (hAdVs, MS2, and ΦΧ174), between two different phyllosilicate clays (kaolinite and bentonite) and the aqueous phase. A series of static and dynamic experiments were conducted under two different temperatures (4, 25°C) for a time period of seven days. HAdV adsorption was examined in DNase I reaction buffer (pH=7.6, and ionic strength (IS)=1.4mM), whereas coliphage adsorption in phosphate buffered saline solution (pH=7, IS=2mM). Moreover, the effect of IS on hAdV adsorption under static conditions was evaluated. The adsorption of hAdV was assessed by real-time PCR and its infectivity was tested by cultivation methods. The coliphages MS2 and ΦΧ174 were assayed by the double-layer overlay method. The experimental results have shown that coliphage adsorption onto both kaolinite and bentonite was higher for the dynamic than the static experiments; whereas hAdV adsorption was lower under dynamic conditions. The adsorption of hAdV increased with decreasing temperature, contrary to the results obtained for the coliphages. This study examines the combined effect of temperature, agitation, clay type, and IS on hAdV adsorption onto clays. The results provide useful new information on the effective removal of viral fecal indicators (MS2, ΦX174 and hAdV) from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption onto kaolinite and bentonite. Factors enabling enteric viruses to penetrate soils, groundwater and travel long distances within aquifers are important public health issues. Because the observed adsorption behavior of surrogate coliphages MS2 and ΦΧ174 is substantially different to that of hAdV, neither MS2 nor

  13. Comparison of adenovirus fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres as scaffolds for vector purification and cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A. . E-mail: mab@bcm.edu

    2006-06-05

    The direct genetic modification of adenoviral capsid proteins with new ligands is an attractive means to confer targeted tropism to adenoviral vectors. Although several capsid proteins have been reported to tolerate the genetic fusion of foreign peptides and proteins, direct comparison of cell targeting efficiencies through the different capsomeres has been lacking. Likewise, direct comparison of with one or multiple ligands has not been performed due to a lack of capsid-compatible ligands available for retargeting. Here we utilize a panel of metabolically biotinylated Ad vectors to directly compare targeted transduction through the fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres using a variety of biotinylated ligands including antibodies, transferrin, EGF, and cholera toxin B. These results clearly demonstrate that cell targeting with a variety of high affinity receptor-binding ligands is only effective when transduction is redirected through the fiber protein. In contrast, protein IX and hexon-mediated targeting by the same set of ligands failed to mediate robust vector targeting, perhaps due to aberrant trafficking at the cell surface or inside targeted cells. These data suggest that vector targeting by genetic incorporation of high affinity ligands will likely be most efficient through modification of the adenovirus fiber rather than the protein IX and hexon capsomeres. In contrast, single-step monomeric avidin affinity purification of Ad vectors using the metabolic biotinylation system is most effective through capsomeres like protein IX and hexon.

  14. Nbs1-dependent binding of Mre11 to adenovirus E4 mutant viral DNA is important for inhibiting DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2008-04-25

    Adenovirus (Ad) infections stimulate the activation of cellular DNA damage response and repair pathways. Ad early regulatory proteins prevent activation of DNA damage responses by targeting the MRN complex, composed of the Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 proteins, for relocalization and degradation. In the absence of these viral proteins, Mre11 colocalizes with viral DNA replication foci. Mre11 foci formation at DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation depends on the Nbs1 component of the MRN complex and is stabilized by the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (Mdc1). We find that Nbs1 is required for Mre11 localization at DNA replication foci in Ad E4 mutant infections. Mre11 is important for Mdc1 foci formation in infected cells, consistent with its role as a sensor of DNA damage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that both Mre11 and Mdc1 are physically bound to viral DNA, which could account for their localization in viral DNA containing foci. Efficient binding of Mre11 to E4 mutant DNA depends on the presence of Nbs1, and is correlated with a significant E4 mutant DNA replication defect. Our results are consistent with a model in which physical interaction of Mre11 with viral DNA is mediated by Nbs1, and interferes with viral DNA replication.

  15. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  16. Lesions and transmission of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in black-tailed deer fawns.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Lehmkuhl, H D; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1999-03-01

    Adenovirus infection was the cause of an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California during the latter half of 1993. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. To study transmission of adenovirus infection in deer and susceptibility of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) fawns to adenovirus infection, six 3-6-month-old black-tailed fawns were divided into two treatment groups. One group was inoculated intravenously and the other group was inoculated through the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose and mouth with purified adenovirus. Each treatment group also included two additional fawns (four total) that were not inoculated but were exposed to inoculated animals (contact animals). One fawn served as a negative control. Between 4 and 16 days postinoculation, 8/10 fawns developed systemic or localized infection with lesions identical to lesions seen in animals with natural disease that died during the epizootic. Transmission was by direct contact, and the route of inoculation did not affect the incubation period or the distribution of the virus (systemic or the localized infection). Immunohistochemical analysis using polyclonal antiserum against bovine adenovirus type 5 demonstrated staining in endothelial cells of vessels in numerous tissues in animals with systemic infection and endothelial staining only in vessels subtending necrotic foci in the upper alimentary tract in animals with the localized form of the disease. All inoculated or exposed animals had staining in the tonsillar epithelium. Transmission electron microscopic examination of lung and ileum from two fawns with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy demonstrated endothelial necrosis and

  17. Adenovirus Modulates Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling by Reprogramming ORP1L-VAP Protein Contacts for Cholesterol Transport from Endosomes to the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Cianciola, Nicholas L; Chung, Stacey; Manor, Danny; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2017-03-15

    Human adenoviruses (Ads) generally cause mild self-limiting infections but can lead to serious disease and even be fatal in high-risk individuals, underscoring the importance of understanding how the virus counteracts host defense mechanisms. This study had two goals. First, we wished to determine the molecular basis of cholesterol homeostatic responses induced by the early region 3 membrane protein RIDα via its direct interaction with the sterol-binding protein ORP1L, a member of the evolutionarily conserved family of oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins (ORPs). Second, we wished to determine how this interaction regulates innate immunity to adenovirus. ORP1L is known to form highly dynamic contacts with endoplasmic reticulum-resident VAP proteins that regulate late endosome function under regulation of Rab7-GTP. Our studies have demonstrated that ORP1L-VAP complexes also support transport of LDL-derived cholesterol from endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it was converted to cholesteryl esters stored in lipid droplets when ORP1L was bound to RIDα. The virally induced mechanism counteracted defects in the predominant cholesterol transport pathway regulated by the late endosomal membrane protein Niemann-Pick disease type C protein 1 (NPC1) arising during early stages of viral infection. However, unlike NPC1, RIDα did not reconstitute transport to endoplasmic reticulum pools that regulate SREBP transcription factors. RIDα-induced lipid trafficking also attenuated proinflammatory signaling by Toll-like receptor 4, which has a central role in Ad pathogenesis and is known to be tightly regulated by cholesterol-rich "lipid rafts." Collectively, these data show that RIDα utilizes ORP1L in a way that is distinct from its normal function in uninfected cells to fine-tune lipid raft cholesterol that regulates innate immunity to adenovirus in endosomes.IMPORTANCE Early region 3 proteins encoded by human adenoviruses that attenuate immune-mediated

  18. Genome Sequence of a Cynomolgus Macaque Adenovirus (CynAdV-1) Isolate from a Primate Colony in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Bofill-Mas, Silvia; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-11-03

    The genome sequence of a simian adenovirus from a cynomolgus macaque, denoted CynAdV-1, is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis supports CynAdV-1 in an independent clade, comprising a new simian adenovirus (SAdV) species. These genome data are critical for understanding the evolution and relationships of primate adenoviruses, including zoonosis and emergent human pathogens.

  19. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  20. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  1. Correction of a deletion mutant by gene targeting with an adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Taylor, M W

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of adenovirus type 5 as a vector for homologous recombination was examined in CHO cells by using the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene. Infection of a hemizygous CHO APRT- cell line containing a 3-bp deletion in exon 5 of the aprt gene with a recombinant adenovirus containing the wild-type gene resulted in restoration of the APRT+ phenotype at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-6) per infected cell. A relatively high frequency (approximately 6 to 20%) of the transductants appears to result from a homologous recombination event. The mutation on the chromosomal aprt gene is corrected in the homologous recombinants, and APRT expression is restored to a normal hemizygous level. Neither adenovirus nor exogenous promoter sequences are detected in the homologous recombinants. The remaining transductants result from random integration of the aprt gene with the adenovirus sequence. A number of adenovirus vectors containing different promoter sequences linked to the hamster aprt gene were constructed. A possible role for the promoter region in the homologous recombination event was indicated by the lack of homologous recombination in constructs lacking an active promoter. Images PMID:8423811

  2. Isolation of an adenovirus and an adeno-associated virus from goat kids with enteritis.

    PubMed

    Olson, Erik J; Haskell, Scott R R; Frank, Rodney K; Lehmkuhl, Howard D; Hobbs, Lea Ann; Warg, Janet V; Landgraf, John G; Wünschmann, Arno

    2004-09-01

    A dairy goat operation in Minnesota experienced a sudden, markedly increased mortality among its neonatal goats. Approximately 60 of 130 kids (46%) died. The animals had diarrhea and dyspnea of 1-2 days duration before death. Necropsy of 4 goat kids revealed marked, acute, catarrhal enteritis and fibrinous pleuropneumonia. Mannheimia haemolytica was isolated from the lungs. Basophilic inclusion bodies filling the entire nucleus were present in enterocytes of the ileum of 3 goats. Adenoviral particles were detected in the feces by electron microscopy and adenovirus was subsequently isolated from the intestinal content together with a parvo-like virus (dependovirus). Morphology, physicochemical characteristics, and neutralization tests indicated that the adenovirus resembled ovine adenovirus-2 (OAdV-2). However, the PstI restriction endonuclease pattern produced by the goat adenovirus was distinct from that of OAdV-2. This is the first report of enteritis in goats with an adenovirus antigenically related to OAdV-2 and with a parvo-like dependovirus.

  3. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract.

  4. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Anitra L.; Peng, Binghao J.; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi’s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  5. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  6. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  7. Adenovirus and mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Szilvia L; Gál, János

    2009-07-02

    A female, adult ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) with fatty liver was submitted for virologic examination in Hungary. Signs of an adenovirus infection including degeneration of the liver cells, enlarged nuclei and intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an adenovirus was later confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this novel chelonian adenovirus was distinct from previously described reptilian adenoviruses, not belonging to any of the recognized genera of the family Adenoviridae. As a part of the routine diagnostic procedure for chelonians the detection of herpes-, rana- and iridoviruses together with Mycoplasma spp. was attempted. Amplicons were generated by a general mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S/23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) intergenic spacer region, as well as, a specific Mycoplasma agassizii PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Based on the analyses of partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, the Mycoplasma sp. of the ornate box turtle seemed to be identical with the recently described eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) Mycoplasma sp. This is the first report of a novel chelonian adenovirus and a mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (T. ornata ornata) in Europe.

  8. Radioisotopic imaging allows optimization of adenovirus lung deposition for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lerondel, S; Le Pape, A; Sené, C; Faure, L; Bernard, S; Diot, P; Nicolis, E; Mehtali, M; Lusky, M; Cabrini, G; Pavirani, A

    2001-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common, heriditary disease resulting from mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Airway transfer of the CFTR gene is a potential strategy to treat or prevent the lung pathology that is the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Among the vectors used for gene therapy, adenoviruses have shown their ability to transfer the CFTR gene to respiratory epithelial cells, using either instillation or nebulization. Our objective was to characterize the lung deposition of aerosolized adenovirus by quantitative radioisotopic imaging, the only noninvasive technique allowing in vivo quantitation of inhaled drugs. We first labeled an adenovirus expressing human CFTR with the gamma-emitting radioisotope, technetium 99m (99mTc), and determined the best labeling conditions to allow preservation of virus bioactivity. We then administered the radioaerosol to baboons, determined lung regional deposition of 99mTc-labeled adenovirus, and compared the expression of CFTR transcripts 3 and 21 days after inhalation. The expression of vector-encoded mRNA ranged from 4 to 22% with respect to the endogenous CFTR mRNA depending on the lung segments. Moreover, we have developed a model using 99mTc-DTPA (diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), which can be used, as an alternative to adenovirus, to determine the profile of lung deposition of the vector. This study demonstrates that scintigraphy is a useful technique to achieve optimization of gene administration to the airways.

  9. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV.

  10. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  11. Screening for adenoviruses in haematological neoplasia: High prevalence in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, Karin; Rauch, Margit; Ambros, Peter F; Pötschger, Ulrike; Chott, Andreas; Jäger, Ulrich; Drach, Johannes; Nader, Alexander; Lion, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Human adenoviruses possess oncogenic capacity which is well documented in mammalian animal models, but their possible implication in human malignancy has remained enigmatic. Following primary infection, adenoviruses can persist in a latent state in lymphocytes where the virus is apparently able to evade immune surveillance. In the present study, we have employed a broad-spectrum adenovirus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to systematically screen more than 200 diagnostic specimens of different lymphoid malignancies including acute lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n=50), various types of malignant lymphoma (n=100) and multiple myeloma (n=11) for the presence of adenoviral sequences. While most entities analysed revealed negative findings in virtually all specimens tested, adenoviral DNA was detected in 15/36 (42%) mantle cell lymphomas investigated. The most prevalent adenoviral species detected was C, and less commonly B. Adenovirus-positive findings in patients with mantle cell lymphoma were made at different sites including bone marrow (n=7), intestine (n=5), lymph nodes (n=2) and tonsillar tissue (n=1). The presence of adenoviral sequences identified by PCR was confirmed in individual cells by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). The frequent observation of adenoviruses in mantle cell lymphoma is intriguings, and raises questions about their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of this lymphoid malignancy.

  12. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris and characterization of its anti-coxsackievirus activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kebin; Yu, Hua; Xie, Wei; Xu, Zihui; Zhou, Shiwen; Huang, Chunji; Sheng, Halei; He, Xiaomei; Xiong, Junzhi; Qian, Guisheng

    2013-04-15

    Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors (CARs) are the common cellular receptors which mediate coxsackievirus or adenovirus infection. Receptor trap therapy, which uses soluble viral receptors to block the attachment and internalization of virus, has been developed for the inhibition of virus infection. In this study, we have constructed a pPIC3.5K/CAR-Fc expression plasmid for the economical and scale-up production of CAR-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris. The coding sequence of the fusion protein was optimized according to the host codon usage bias. The amount of the CAR-Fc protein to total cell protein was up to 10% by 1% methanol induction for 96h and the purity was up to 96% after protein purification. Next, the virus pull-down assay demonstrated the binding activity of the CAR-Fc to coxsackievirus. The analyses of MTT assay, immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR after virus neutralization assay revealed that CAR-Fc could significantly block coxsackievirus B3 infection in vitro. In coxsackievirus B3 infected mouse models, CAR-Fc treatment reduced mortality, myocardial edema, viral loads and inflammation, suggesting the significant virus blocking effect in vivo. Our results indicated that the P. pastoris expression system could be used to produce large quantities of bioactive CAR-Fc for further clinical purpose.

  13. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests.

  14. Luciferase imaging for evaluation of oncolytic adenovirus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guse, K; Dias, J D; Bauerschmitz, G J; Hakkarainen, T; Aavik, E; Ranki, T; Pisto, T; Särkioja, M; Desmond, R A; Kanerva, A; Hemminki, A

    2007-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells by tumor-selective replication. Clinical data have established the safety of the approach but also the need of improvements in potency. Efficacy of oncolysis is linked to effective infection of target cells and subsequent productive replication. Other variables include intratumoral barriers, access to target cells, uptake by non-target organs and immune response. Each of these aspects relates to the location and degree of virus replication. Unfortunately, detection of in vivo replication has been difficult, labor intensive and costly and therefore not much studied. We hypothesized that by coinfection of a luciferase expressing E1-deleted virus with an oncolytic virus, both viruses would replicate when present in the same cell. Photon emission due to conversion of D-Luciferin is sensitive and penetrates tissues well. Importantly, killing of animals is not required and each animal can be imaged repeatedly. Two different murine xenograft models were used and intratumoral coinjections of luciferase encoding virus were performed with eight different oncolytic adenoviruses. In both models, we found significant correlation between photon emission and infectious virus production. This suggests that the system can be used for non-invasive quantitation of the amplitude, persistence and dynamics of oncolytic virus replication in vivo, which could be helpful for the development of more effective and safe agents.

  15. Phylogenomic characterization of California sea lion adenovirus-1.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Gulland, Frances M D; Goldstein, Tracey; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Rivera, Rebecca; Waltzek, Thomas B; Salemi, Marco; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-04-01

    Significant adenoviral diversity has been found in humans, but in domestic and wild animals the number of identified viruses is lower. Here we present the complete genome of a recently discovered mastadenovirus, California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1) isolated from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), an important pathogen associated with hepatitis in pinnipeds. The genome of this virus has the typical mastadenoviral structure with some notable differences at the carboxy-terminal end, including a dUTPase that does not cluster with other mastadenoviral dUTPases, and a fiber that shows similarity to a trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi and choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The GC content is low (36%), and phylogenetic analyses placed the virus near the root of the clade infecting laurasiatherian hosts in the genus Mastadenovirus. These findings support the hypothesis that CSLAdV-1 in California sea lions represents a host jump from an unknown mammalian host in which it is endemic.

  16. The composed antigenic structure of the adenovirus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Nász, I

    1988-01-01

    Three panels of MAbs were prepared against AV1, AV35, and BAV2 hexons, respectively. It was shown, that in all cases, antibodies are developed against the genus specific determinant of the adenovirus hexon. The other MAbs specified numerous identical or overlapping epitopes on the hexon types studied. The epitopes could be characterized as intertype-, intersubgenus-, subgenus- and type-specific ones beside the genus-specific determinant based on the RPs of the MAbs from indirect ELISA and passive HA results. The identical epitopes are present in more than one copy on the trimeric form of the hexon capsomer. The epitopes on the hexon molecule could be separated into three antigenic sites, of which one antigenic site is characterized by seven epitope clusters (antigenic site II). Monoclonal antibodies were able to precipitate different hexon types in gel diffusion tests by which the differentiation of the distinct epitopes seemed to be possible. With the help of monoclonal antibodies to AV1 hexon, 17 hours after the infection, hexons (or epitopes) were detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of the infected cells showing different distribution patterns in indirect immunofluorescence assay.

  17. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Wechman, Stephen L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-01-01

    Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads) are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viral mRNA export, and cell cycle disruption. PMID:26561828

  18. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens.

  19. Epidemiology of enteric adenovirus infection in prospectively monitored Argentine families.

    PubMed Central

    Mistchenko, A. S.; Huberman, K. H.; Gomez, J. A.; Grinstein, S.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the role of enteric adenoviruses (EAV) in an urban area of Buenos Aires (Argentina), we prospectively studied faecal samples from 49 families of newborns. These were monitored weekly for diarrhoea for 2 years. A total of 180 samples from cases of diarrhoea and 766 samples obtained during diarrhoea-free periods were studied by dot-blot hybridization with an EAV-specific DNA probe. EAV were found in 6/180 (3.3%) cases of diarrhoea and 6/766 (0.8%) asymptomatic samples (P < 0.015). Incidence of EAV was 3.9 cases per 100 person-years in children < 60 months old. EAV-related diarrhoeas were slight and of short duration. In addition, 129 faeces from hospital out-patients, 1-30 months old, were also studied. EAV was identified in 7/129 cases (5.4%). These cases were 9.5 +/- 3.5 months old and the diarrhoea was mild or severe, of 3 +/- 1.5 days of duration. We suggest that EAV are low-risk causes of diarrhoea under natural conditions, although a few children may develop more severe diarrhoea. The diagnosis of EAV needs to be considered in these patients. PMID:1468536

  20. Magnesium-Dependent Interaction of PKR with Adenovirus VAI

    SciTech Connect

    K Launer -Felty; C Wong; A Wahid; G Conn; J Cole

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg{sup 2+}. Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  1. How I treat adenovirus in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Lindemans, Caroline A.; Leen, Ann M.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) infections are very common in the general pediatric population. The delayed clearance in young persons imposes a threat to immunocompromised patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), who can reactivate the virus, resulting in life-threatening disseminated disease. Although a definitive cure requires adequate immune reconstitution, 2 approaches appear to be feasible and effective to improve the outcomes of AdV infections. Strict monitoring with AdV quantitative polymerase chain reaction followed by preemptive treatment with low-dose (1 mg/kg) cidofovir 3 times a week, is effective in most cases to bridge the severely immunocompromised period shortly after HSCT, with acceptable toxicity rates. For centers who have the access, AdV-specific cytotoxic T cells can be the other important cornerstone of anti-AdV therapy with promising results so far. Methods to positively influence the reconstitution of the immune system after HSCT and optimizing new and currently available cellular immunotherapies will make HSCT safer against the threat of AdV infection/reactivation and associated disease. PMID:20837781

  2. Taxonomy proposal for Old World monkey adenoviruses: characterisation of several non-human, non-ape primate adenovirus lineages.

    PubMed

    Pantó, Laura; Podgorski, Iva I; Jánoska, Máté; Márkó, Orsolya; Harrach, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    A species classification regarding Old World monkey adenoviruses is proposed. We determined the nucleotide sequences of PCR-amplified fragments from the genes of the IVa2, DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, penton base, and hexon proteins from every simian adenovirus (SAdV) serotype that originated from Old World monkeys for which the full genome sequence had not yet been published. We confirmed that the majority of Old Word monkey SAdVs belong to two previously established species. Interestingly, one is the most recently established human AdV species, Human mastadenovirus G, which includes a single human virus, HAdV-52, as well as SAdV-1, -2, -7, -11, -12, and -15. The other approved species, Simian mastadenovirus A includes SAdV-3, -4, -6, -9, -10, -14, and -48. Several SAdVs (SAdV-5, -8, -49, -50) together with baboon AdV-1 and rhesus monkey AdV strains A1139, A1163, A1173, A1258, A1285, A1296, A1312, A1327 and A1335 have been proposed to be classified into an additional species, Simian mastadenovirus B. Another proposed species, Simian mastadenovirus C has been described for SAdV-19, baboon AdV-2/4 and -3. Our study revealed the existence of four additional AdV lineages. The corresponding new candidate species are Simian mastadenovirus D (for SAdV-13), Simian mastadenovirus E (for SAdV-16), Simian mastadenovirus F (for SAdV-17 and -18), and Simian mastadenovirus G (for SAdV-20). Several biological and genomic properties, such as the host origin, haemagglutination profile, number of fibre genes, and G+C content of the genome, strongly support this classification. Three SAdV strains originating from the American Type Culture Collection turned out to be mixtures of at least two virus types, either of the same species (SAdV-12 and -15 types from Human mastadenovirus G) or of two different species (SAdV-5 types from Simian mastadenovirus B and Human mastadenovirus G).

  3. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-Ad-IU-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    PSMA postivie LNCaP and C4-2 cells. 6 Task 3. Investigate the capability of m6 to drive adenovirus replication in a prostate cancer-specific manner...of PSES to direct adenovirus replication , and HSV-TK gene, a pro-drug enzyme gene, under the control of another copy of PSES enhancer to restrict

  4. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  5. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments.

    PubMed

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner.

  6. An adenovirus associated with intestinal impaction and mortality of male eiders (Somateria mollissima) in the Baltic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J Christian; Kilpi, Mikael; Docherty, Douglas E.; Myllys, V.

    2003-01-01

    We examined 10 common eider (Somateria mollissima) males found dead in 1998 during a die-off in the northern Baltic Sea off the southwestern coast of Finland. We diagnosed impaction of the posterior small intestine with mucosal necrosis as the cause of death in all 10 and isolated adenoviruses from cloacal samples of six birds. The adenovirus isolates were not neutralized by reference antisera to group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses. Cloacal swabs from 22 apparently healthy eider females nesting at the mortality area were negative for viruses. An adenovirus isolated from one of the eiders caused clinical signs of illness and gastrointestinal pathology in experimentally infected mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings. These findings suggest that the adenovirus contributed to the mortality of common eider males in the Finnish archipelago.

  7. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia; Kieweg, Lisa; Müncheberg, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Once transported to the replication sites, human adenoviruses (HAdVs) need to ensure decondensation and transcriptional activation of their viral genomes to synthesize viral proteins and initiate steps to reprogram the host cell for viral replication. These early stages during adenoviral infection are poorly characterized but represent a decisive moment in the establishment of a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin-associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of the host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks and chromatin compaction. In response to DNA damage, KAP1 is phosphorylated and functionally inactive, resulting in chromatin relaxation. We discovered that KAP1 posttranslational modification is dramatically altered during HAdV infection to limit the antiviral capacity of this host restriction factor, which represents an essential step required for efficient viral replication. Conversely, we also observed during infection an HAdV-mediated decrease of KAP1 SUMO moieties, known to promote chromatin decondensation events. Based on our findings, we provide evidence that HAdV induces KAP1 deSUMOylation to minimize epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. IMPORTANCE Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for human adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation and cellular SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling play key roles in HAdV transcriptional regulation. We observed that the cellular chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader SPOC1 represses HAdV infection and gene expression. Here, we illustrate the role of the SPOC1-interacting factor KAP1 during productive HAdV growth. KAP1 binds to the viral E1B-55K protein, promoting its SUMO modification, therefore illustrating a crucial step for

  8. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  9. Attachment and Detachment Behaviour of Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Margaret; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Kirschner, Alexander; Farnleitner, Andreas; Sommer, Regina; Sidhu, Jatinder

    2015-04-01

    Comparison of transport of virus surrogates to the pathogenic virus is necessary to understand the differences between the virus and surrogate. Since experiments using pathogenic viruses cannot be done in the field, laboratory tests using flow through soil columns are used. Adenovirus, nanoparticles, PRD1 and MS2 bacteriophages were tested in fine granular limestone aquifer material taken from a borehole at a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Southern Australia. Results show that PRD1 is the most appropriate surrogate for adenovirus in an aquifer dominated by calcite material, although PRD1 did not mimic the detachment behaviour of adenovirus successfully under high pH conditions. It was also found that the charge of the colloid is not a dominant removal mechanism in this system. Implications from this study could influence how field tests using bacteriophages and nanoparticles are interpreted.

  10. An epizootic of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease in captive black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Boyce, W M; Woods, L W; Keel, M K; MacLachlan, N J; Porter, C O; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-09-01

    Ten fawns and four adult black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in a captive herd died as a result of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease. Acute, systemic infections were characterized by hemorrhagic enteropathy, pulmonary edema, and occasional ulceration of the upper alimentary tract. Localized infections were limited to the upper alimentary tract and included stomatitis, pharyngitis, mandibular osteomyelitis, and rumenitis. In deer with acute, systemic infections, a diagnosis was made by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The serum neutralization test was useful for confirming a diagnosis in animals with prolonged, localized infections. Deer originating from herds with a history of adenovirus infection should not be transferred to other captive herds or released into free-ranging populations because they may serve as carriers of adenovirus.

  11. Adenoviruses as a model in the study of the effect of space flight factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosach, L. M.; Povnitsa, O. Yu.; Zhovnovata, V. L.

    Simulated microgravity conditions, independently of multiplicity of infection, does not influence the reproduction of adenoviruses in cells which were clinorotated for 48 hours after adsorption of virus. The incubation of infected cells before clinorotation under static conditions at a temperature of 4 °C for three days (the conditions for keeping cells before the flight) does not change the number of infected cells relatively to control, but some changes of cell morphology are revealed, namely round off and aggregation of cells. The adenoviruses which were exposed in the medium keep infectivity under the conditions of clinorotation at 4 and 20-22 °C over prolonged periods (90 and 60 days, respectively). A model is elaborated for investigation of the influence of space flight factors on the interaction of the adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus genomes at combined infection of limphoblastoid cells.

  12. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of class I major histocompatibility complex genes following transformation with human adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, J; Rotem-Yehudar, R; Ehrlich, R

    1991-01-01

    Transformation of rodent cells by human adenoviruses is a well-established model system for studying the expression, regulation, and function of class I antigens. In this report, we demonstrate that the highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 operates at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in regulating the activity of major histocompatibility complex class I genes and products in transformed cells. Adenovirus type 12 suppresses the cell surface expression of class I antigens in most cell lines. Nevertheless, in a number of cell lines suppression is the result of reduction in the amount of stable specific mRNA, while in another group of cell lines suppression involves interference with processing of a posttranscriptional product. The two mechanisms operate both for the endogenous H-2 genes and for a miniature swine class I transgene that is expressed in the cells. Images PMID:1895404

  13. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.

  14. Chapter eight--Oncolytic adenoviruses for cancer immunotherapy: data from mice, hamsters, and humans.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Koski, Anniina; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and two products have already been approved for treatment of cancer in China (Gendicine(R) and Oncorine(R)). An intriguing aspect of oncolytic adenoviruses is that by their very nature they potently stimulate multiple arms of the immune system. Thus, combined tumor killing via oncolysis and inherent immunostimulatory properties in fact make these viruses in situ tumor vaccines. When further engineered to express cytokines, chemokines, tumor-associated antigens, or other immunomodulatory elements, they have been shown in various preclinical models to induce antigen-specific effector and memory responses, resulting both in full therapeutic cures and even induction of life-long tumor immunity. Here, we review the state of the art of oncolytic adenovirus, in the context of their capability to stimulate innate and adaptive arms of the immune system and finally how we can modify these viruses to direct the immune response toward cancer.

  15. Adenovirus-Mediated p202 Gene Transfer in Breast Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Jares P, Cazorla M, Fernandez PL, Sanjuan X, Dawson MJ and Trapani JA. (1995). J. Cell. Biochem., 57, Hernandez L, Pinyol M, Aldea M, Mallofre C...C., K. Doctor, A. Rojas , J. M. Zapata, C. Stehlik, L. Fiorentino, J. Damiano, W. Roth, S. Matsuzawa, R. Newman, S. Takayama, H. Marusawa, F. Xu, G

  16. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the cur