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Sample records for hematologic malignancies final

  1. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1992-03-24

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.

  2. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  3. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  4. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  5. Iron overload and hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-01-01

    Although iron is essential for cell replication and survival, an increase of body iron stores has been implicated in the development of cancer. However, while the association between iron overload and hepatocellular carcinoma is well documented, the relationship with nonhepatocellular malignancies remains ill-defined. In this review, we briefly report the present knowledge regarding the association between iron overload and hematologic malignancies.

  6. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  7. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  8. Novel immunotherapies for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise the state of the art in immunotherapy with a focus on strategies that exploit the patient’s immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematological malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab, (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs), (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4 and IDO), and (iv) adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T-cell receptors (TCRs). We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  9. MicroRNAs in Myeloid Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Maria; Calin, George Adrian

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are 19-24 nucleotides noncoding RNAs which silence modulate the expression of target genes by binding to the messenger RNAs. Myeloid malignancies include a broad spectrum of acute and chronic disorders originating from from the clonal transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell. Specific genetic abnormalities may define myeloid malignancies, such as translocation t(9;22) that represent the hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia. Although next-generation sequencing pro-vided new insights in the genetic characterization and pathogenesis of myeloid neoplasms, the molecular mechanisms underlying myeloid neoplasms are lacking in most cases. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that the expression levels of specific miRNAs may vary among patients with myeloid malignancies compared with healthy individuals and partially unveiled how miRNAs participate in the leukemic transformation process. Finally, in vitro experiments and pre-clinical model provided preliminary data of the safety and efficacy of miRNA inhibitory molecules, opening new avenue in the treatment of myeloid hematological malignancies. PMID:27047254

  10. Tetanus immunity in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hamarström, V; Pauksen, K; Svensson, H; Oberg, G; Paul, C; Ljungman, P

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate long-term immunity to tetanus toxoid among patients with hematological disease who had been treated with conventional doses of chemotherapy. Altogether 206 patients with different hematological malignancies were included in the study. There were marked differences between the rates of seronegativity against tetanus, varying from 20% to 70% in different groups of study patients. We found that 21 of 80 (36%) patients with AML, 45 of 80 (56%) with ALL, 12 of 22 (54%) with lymphoma, 4 of 13 (31%) with myeloma and 2 of 11 (18%) with CML were not immune to tetanus. In a multivariate logistic regression model increasing age (P = 0.0001), lymphoid malignancy (P = 0.0005) and advanced disease stage (P = 0.0001) were independent risk factors for loss of tetanus immunity in patients with hematological malignancies.

  11. Hematologic malignancies during pregnancy: A review.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Hossam K; Samra, Mohamed A; Fathy, Gamal M

    2016-07-01

    Malignancy is the second most common cause of mortality in the reproductive period and it complicates up to one out of every 1000 pregnancies. When cancer is diagnosed during pregnancy, the management approach must take into consideration both the mother and her fetus. Hematologic cancers diagnosed in pregnancy are not common, resulting in paucity of randomized controlled trials. Diagnosis of such malignancies may be missed or delayed, as their symptoms are similar to those encountered during normal pregnancy. Also, many imaging studies may be hazardous during pregnancy. Management of these malignancies during pregnancy induces many treatment-related risks for mother and baby and should consider patient's preferences for pregnancy continuation. In this article, hematologic malignancies diagnosed in pregnant patients including acute leukemias, chronic myeloid leukemia, lymphomas, multiple myeloma and myeloproliferative neoplasms, will be reviewed, including diagnostic and management strategies and their impact on the pregnant patient and the developing fetus. PMID:27408762

  12. Vaccinations in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsigrelis, C; Ljungman, P

    2016-03-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies are at risk for a number of infections that are potentially preventable by vaccinations such as pneumococcal infections and influenza. Treatment, especially with anti-B-cell antibodies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), negatively impacts the response to vaccination for several months. It is therefore recommended that patients be vaccinated before initiating immunosuppressive therapy if possible. The risk of side-effects with inactivated vaccines is low, but care has to be taken with live vaccines, such as varicella-zoster virus vaccine, since severe and fatal complications have been reported. HSCT patients require repeated doses of most vaccines to achieve long-lasting immune responses. New therapeutic options for patients with hematological malignancies that are rapidly being introduced into clinical practice will require additional research regarding the efficacy of vaccinations. New vaccines are also in development that will require well-designed studies to ascertain efficacy and safety.

  13. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1992-03-24

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.

  14. Leptin and its receptor in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tian-Jie; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine coded by the obese gene, not only regulates metabolism, but also participates in hematopoiesis. Aberrant leptin levels in patients with hematologic malignancies were observed and associates with clinical characters, such as body mass index (BMI), gender, blast cell percentage. Leptin concentrations alter while diseases progress or remission. Leptin receptor is expressed in hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, blast cells and samples in leukemia and lymphoma patients. The adipokine stimulates cell proliferation, cytokine secretion and protects malignant cells from apoptosis through Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal activated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2), or 3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways. These findings indicate leptin signaling possibility take part in occurrence, progression and prognosis of hematologic malignancies. This article reviews leptin/leptin receptor expression and the correlations with clinical characters, treatment and prognosis in myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms. PMID:26884894

  15. Targeting the Apoptosis Pathway in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death program that is well-orchestrated for normal tissue homeostasis and for removal of damaged, old, or infected cells. It is regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway responds to signals such as ultraviolet radiation or DNA damage and activates “executioner” caspases through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The extrinsic pathway is activated by death signals induced, for example, by an infection that activates the immune system or receptor-mediated pathways. The extrinsic pathway signals also cascade down to executioner caspases that cleave target proteins and lead to cell death. Strict control of cellular apoptosis is important for the hematopoietic system as it has a high turnover rate. However, the apoptosis program is often deregulated in hematologic malignancies leading to the accumulation of malignant cells. Therefore, apoptosis pathways have been identified for development of anticancer therapeutics. We review here the proteins that have been targeted for anticancer drug development in hematologic malignancies. These include BCL-2 family proteins, death ligands and receptors, inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins, and caspases. Except for caspase activators, drugs that target each of these classes of proteins have advanced into clinical trials. PMID:24295132

  16. BMI1: A Biomarker of Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A.

    2016-01-01

    BMI1 oncogene is a catalytic member of epigenetic repressor polycomb group proteins. It plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression pattern and consequently several cellular processes during development, including cell cycle progression, senescence, aging, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and importantly self-renewal of adult stem cells of several lineages. Preponderance of evidences indicates that deregulated expression of PcG protein BMI1 is associated with several human malignancies, cancer stem cell maintenance, and propagation. Importantly, overexpression of BMI1 correlates with therapy failure in cancer patients and tumor relapse. This review discusses the diverse mode of BMI1 regulation at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels as well as at various critical signaling pathways regulated by BMI1 activity. Furthermore, this review highlights the role of BMI1 as a biomarker and therapeutic target for several subtypes of hematologic malignancies and the importance to target this biomarker for therapeutic applications. PMID:27168727

  17. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  18. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  19. Nanotechnology applications in hematological malignancies (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SAMIR, AHMED; ELGAMAL, BASMA M; GABR, HALA; SABAAWY, HATEM E

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation to current cancer therapies is the development of therapy-related side-effects and dose limiting complications. Moreover, a better understanding of the biology of cancer cells and the mechanisms of resistance to therapy is rapidly developing. The translation of advanced knowledge and discoveries achieved at the molecular level must be supported by advanced diagnostic, therapeutic and delivery technologies to translate these discoveries into useful tools that are essential in achieving progress in the war against cancer. Nanotechnology can play an essential role in this aspect providing a transforming technology that can translate the basic and clinical findings into novel diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive tools useful in different types of cancer. Hematological malignancies represent a specific class of cancer, which attracts special attention in the applications of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the present review is to elucidate the emerging applications of nanotechnology in cancer management and describe the potentials of nanotechnology in changing the key fundamental aspects of hematological malignancy diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. PMID:26134389

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  1. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  2. Glycemic crises in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Daniel, B T

    2000-09-01

    Persons with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myeloma often have coexisting medical conditions. Among these may be diabetes mellitus. The physiologic and psychologic stress of diagnosis and treatment may precipitate the life-threatening complications of DKA or HHNS in this group of patients. People with personal risk factors may develop diabetes mellitus secondary to diagnosis and treatment and present with either DKA or HHNS. It is essential that the health care team have a heightened awareness of potential complications. These are complex syndromes involving severe hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and neurologic and cardiovascular collapse. Working collaboratively with the critical care team to provide optimal care, nurses play an essential role in the management of these challenging complications of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Cellular immunotherapy for refractory hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other aggressive refractory hematological malignancies unresponsive to upfront therapy remain difficult conditions to treat. Often, the focus of therapy is centered on achieving complete remission of disease in order to proceed with a consolidative stem cell transplant. At issue with this paradigm is the multitude of patients who are unable to achieve complete remission with standard chemotherapeutic options. A major benefit of transplantation is the graft versus tumor effect that follows successful engraftment. However, with this graft versus tumor effect comes the risk of graft versus host disease. Therefore, alternative treatment options that utilize immunotherapy while minimizing toxicity are warranted. Herein, we propose a novel treatment protocol in which haploidentical peripheral blood stem cells are infused into patients with refractory hematological malignancies. The end goal of cellular therapy is not engraftment but instead is the purposeful rejection of donor cells so as to elicit a potent immune reaction that appears to break host tumor tolerance. Methods/design The trial is a FDA and institutional Rhode Island Hospital/The Miriam Hospital IRB approved Phase I/II study to determine the efficacy and safety of haploidentical peripheral blood cell infusions into patients with refractory hematological malignancies. The primary objective is the overall response rate while secondary objectives will assess the degree and duration of response as well as safety considerations. Patients with refractory acute leukemias and aggressive lymphomas over the age of 18 are eligible. Donors will be selected amongst family members. Full HLA typing of patients and donors will occur as will chimerism assessments. 1-2x108 CD3+ cells/kilogram will be infused on Day 0 without preconditioning. Patients will be monitored for their response to therapy, in particular for the development of a cytokine release syndrome (CRS) that has been

  4. Role of leptin and leptin receptors in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shahab; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-derived cytokine that has an important role in bodyweight homeostasis and energy balance. There are a number of studies which have suggested that leptin and its receptors dysregulation play a critical role in the development of malignancies including hematological malignancies, mainly via activation of the JAK/STAT pathway which regulates downstream signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT signaling and ERK1/2. In this review, current understandings of leptin/leptin receptors mediated pathogenesis in various lymphoid malignancies are described. Blocking of the leptin receptor might be a unique therapeutic approach for many hematological malignancies.

  5. Targeting Cyclooxygenase-2 in Hematological Malignancies: Rationale and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, M. P.; Bancos, S.; Sime, P. J.; Phipps, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastases. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies. PMID:18691115

  6. Targeting cyclooxygenase-2 in hematological malignancies: rationale and promise.

    PubMed

    Bernard, M P; Bancos, S; Sime, P J; Phipps, R P

    2008-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastasis. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies.

  7. Notch signaling: its roles and therapeutic potential in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yisu

    2016-01-01

    Notch is a highly conserved signaling system that allows neighboring cells to communicate, thereby controlling their differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, with the outcome of its activation being highly dependent on signal strength and cell type. As such, there is growing evidence that disturbances in physiological Notch signaling contribute to cancer development and growth through various mechanisms. Notch was first reported to contribute to tumorigenesis in the early 90s, through identification of the involvement of the Notch1 gene in the chromosomal translocation t(7;9)(q34;q34.3), found in a small subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since then, Notch mutations and aberrant Notch signaling have been reported in numerous other precursor and mature hematological malignancies, of both myeloid and lymphoid origin, as well as many epithelial tumor types. Of note, Notch has been reported to have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, dependent on the cancer cell type. In this review, we will first give a general description of the Notch signaling pathway, and its physiologic role in hematopoiesis. Next, we will review the role of aberrant Notch signaling in several hematological malignancies. Finally, we will discuss current and potential future therapeutic approaches targeting this pathway. PMID:26934331

  8. Exploring Big Data in Hematological Malignancies: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Westin, Gustavo F; Dias, Ajoy L; Go, Ronald S

    2016-08-01

    Secondary analysis of large datasets has become a useful alternative to address research questions outside the reach of clinical trials. It is increasingly utilized in hematology and oncology. In this review, we provided an overview of some examples of commonly used large datasets in the USA and described common research themes that can be pursued using such a methodology. We selected a sample of 14 articles on adult hematologic malignancies published in 2015 and highlighted their contributions as well as limitations.

  9. Notch Signaling: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lingbao; Yuan, Keyu; Ding, Wei; Lin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling is a well-conserved cell-fate determining factor in embryo development, and the dyregulation of this signaling is frequently observed in many types of cancers, including hematological malignancies. In this review, we briefly describe the Notch signaling pathway, and we primarily focus on the relationship between Notch and hematological malignancies. We also discuss the clinical development of promising agents including γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Complete response has been observed among patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) when treated with GSIs. Furthermore, a recent study has suggested that targeting Zmiz1, a direct, selective cofactor of Notch1, rather than targeting Notch directly, maybe helpful to reduce the current target-related toxicities. Taken together, we summarize the role of Notch signaling in hematological malignancies and discuss the treatment strategies for these diseases through targeting Notch signaling. PMID:27650987

  10. Lessons from next-generation sequencing analysis in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Braggio, E; Egan, J B; Fonseca, R; Stewart, A K

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has led to a revolution in the study of hematological malignancies with a substantial number of publications and discoveries in the last few years. Significant discoveries associated with disease diagnosis, risk stratification, clonal evolution and therapeutic intervention have been generated by this powerful technology. As part of the post-genomic era, sequencing analysis will likely become part of routine clinical testing and the challenge will ultimately be successfully transitioning from gene discovery to preventive and therapeutic intervention as part of individualized medicine strategies. In this report, we review recent advances in the understanding of hematological malignancies derived through genome-wide sequence analysis. PMID:23872706

  11. In the sandbox: palliative care and hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W

    2014-02-01

    Palliative care specialists have had little involvement in the care of patients with hematologic malignancies. The reasons for this are not clear, because these patients certainly face a significant symptom burden, and many hematologic malignancies are either incurable or carry poor prognoses. For example, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in patients over age 60 has a 5-year survival of less than 10%, akin to pancreatic cancer. Although most oncologists would agree with involving palliative care specialists in the case of advanced pancreatic cancer, few seem to consider this in the context of AML. Why should AML be any different?

  12. Aptamers in hematological malignancies and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wanyan; Yu, Ziqiang; Zhao, Xiaohong; Lu, Shiyun; Wang, Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Aptamers are short DNA/RNA oligonucleotides selected by the process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). Due to their functional similarity to monoclonal antibodies with some superior characters, such as high specificity and affinity, flexible modification and stability, and lack of toxicity and immunogenicity, they are promising alternative and complementary targeted therapy for hematologic malignancies. The trends in aptamer technology including production, selection, modifications are briefly discussed in this review. The key aspect is to illustrate aptamers against cancer cells in hematologic malignancies especially those that have entered clinical trials. We also discuss some challenges remain in the application of aptamers. PMID:27637356

  13. Hematologic malignancies: at the forefront of immunotherapeutic innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bachireddy, Pavan; Burkhardt, Ute E.; Rajasagi, Mohini; Wu, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent successes of cancer immunotherapy have stimulated interest for the potential widespread application of these approaches; hematologic malignancies have provided both initial proofs-of-concept and an informative testing ground for a variety of immune-based therapeutics. The immune-cell origin of many of the blood malignancies provides a unique opportunity to both understand the mechanisms of human immune-responsiveness and immune-evasion as well as to exploit the unique therapeutic opportunities they provide. PMID:25786696

  14. Bacterial Infections Following Splenectomy for Malignant and Nonmalignant Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Giuseppe; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, finds its primary indication for patients with underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infections found in splenectomized patients are due to Gram

  15. Nonengraftment Haploidentical Cellular Therapy for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, John L.; Fast, Loren D.; Winer, Eric S.; Safran, Howard; Butera, James N.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the therapeutic benefit of allogeneic transplant is by a graft versus tumor effect. Further data shows that transplant engraftment is not dependant on myeloablation, instead relying on quantitative competition between donor and host cells. In the clinical setting, engraftment by competition alone is not feasible due to the need for large numbers of infused cells. Instead, low-level host irradiation has proven to be an effective engraftment strategy that is stem cell toxic but not myeloablative. The above observations served as the foundation for clinical trials utilizing allogeneic matched and haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell infusions with minimal conditioning in patients with refractory malignancies. Although engraftment was transient or not apparent, there were compelling responses in a heavily pretreated patient population that appear to result from the breaking of tumor immune tolerance by the host through the actions of IFNγ, invariant NK T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, or antigen presenting cells. PMID:22312367

  16. Target Therapy in Hematological Malignances: New Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Pawlowski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Apart from radio- and chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) represent a new, more selective tool in the treatment of hematological malignancies. MoAbs bind with the specific antigens of the tumors. This interaction is a basis for targeted therapies which exhibit few side effects and significant antitumor activity. This review provides an overview of the functional characteristics of MoAbs, with some examples of their clinical application. The promising results in the treatment of hematological malignancies have led to the more frequent usage of MoAbs in the therapy. Development of MoAbs is a subject of extensive research. They are a promising method of cancer treatment in the future. PMID:27433507

  17. [Extracellular vesicles and their role in hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Rzepiel, Andrea; Kutszegi, Nóra; Cs Sági, Judit; Kelemen, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; F Semsei, Ágnes; Buzás, Edit; Erdélyi, Dániel János

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are produced in all organisms. The most intensively investigated categories of extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. Among a very wide range of areas, their role has been confirmed in intercellular communication, immune response and angiogenesis (in both physiological and pathological conditions). Their alterations suggest the potential use of them as biomarkers. In this paper the authors give an insight into the research of extracellular vesicles in general, and then focus on published findings in hematological malignancies. Quantitative and qualitative changes of microvesicles and exosomes may have value in diagnostics, prognostics and minimal residual disease monitoring of hematological malignancies. The function of extracellular vesicles in downregulation of natural killer cells' activity has been demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, microvesicles seem to play a role in drug resistance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1379-1384. PMID:27569460

  18. The TET2 interactors and their links to hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Feng; Weeks, Ophelia; Yang, Feng-Chun; Xu, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation family proteins are dioxygenases that oxidize 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine in DNA, early steps of active DNA demethylation. TET2, the second member of TET protein family, is frequently mutated in patients with hematological malignancies, leading to aberrant DNA methylation profiling and decreased 5hmC levels. Located in the nucleus and acting as a DNA-modifying enzyme, TET2 is thought to exert its function via TET2-containing protein complexes. Identifying the interactome network of TET2 likely holds the key to uncover the mechanisms by which TET2 exerts its function in cells. Here, we review recent literature on TET2 interactors and discuss their possible roles in TET2 loss-mediated dysregulation of hematopoiesis and pathogenesis of hematological malignancies. PMID:26099018

  19. FDG-PET imaging in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Valls, L; Badve, C; Avril, S; Herrmann, K; Faulhaber, P; O'Donnell, J; Avril, N

    2016-07-01

    The majority of aggressive lymphomas is characterized by an up regulated glycolytic activity, which enables the visualization by F-18 FDG-PET/CT. One-stop hybrid FDG-PET/CT combines the functional and morphologic information, outperforming both, CT and FDG-PET as separate imaging modalities. This has resulted in several recommendations using FDG-PET/CT for staging, restaging, monitoring during therapy, and assessment of treatment response as well as identification of malignant transformation. FDG-PET/CT may obviate the need for a bone marrow biopsy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. FDG-PET/CT response assessment is recommended for FDG-avid lymphomas, whereas CT-based response evaluation remains important in lymphomas with low or variable FDG avidity. The treatment induced change in metabolic activity allows for assessment of response after completion of therapy as well as prediction of outcome early during therapy. The five-point scale Deauville Criteria allows the assessment of treatment response based on visual FDG-PET analysis. Although the use of FDG-PET/CT for prediction of therapeutic response is promising it should only be conducted in the context of clinical trials. Surveillance FDG-PET/CT after complete remission is discouraged due to the relative high number of false-positive findings, which in turn may result in further unnecessary investigations. Future directions include the use of new PET tracers such as F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT), a surrogate biomarker of cellular proliferation and Ga-68 CXCR4, a chemokine receptor imaging biomarker as well as innovative digital PET/CT and PET/MRI techniques. PMID:27090170

  20. Human herpesvirus 6 in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2009-11-01

    Pathogenetic roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 in lymphoproliferative diseases have been of continued interest. Many molecular studies have tried to establish a pathogenic role for HHV-6 in lymphoid malignancies. However, whether HHV-6 plays a role in these pathologies remains unclear, as positive polymerase chain reaction results for HHV-6 in those studies may reflect latent infection or reactivation rather than presence of HHV-6 in neoplastic cells. A small number of studies have investigated HHV-6 antigen expression in pathologic specimens. As a result, the lack of HHV-6 antigen expression on neoplastic cells argues against any major pathogenic role of HHV-6. The role of HHV-6 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has also been of interest but remains controversial, with 2 studies documenting higher levels of HHV-6 antibody in ALL patients, and another 2 large-scale studies finding no significant differences in HHV-6 seroprevalences between ALL patients and controls. Alternatively, HHV-6 is increasingly recognized as an important opportunistic pathogen. HHV-6 reactivation is common among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and is linked to various clinical manifestations. In particular, HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be significant, life-threatening complication. Most HHV-6 encephalitis develops in patients receiving transplant from an unrelated donor, particularly cord blood, typically around the time of engraftment. Symptoms are characterized by short-term memory loss and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Prognosis for HHV-6 encephalitis is poor, but appropriate prophylactic measures have not been established. Establishment of preventive strategies against HHV-6 encephalitis represents an important challenge for physicians involved with SCT.

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor therapy for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Simmons, Gary L; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate cell cycle progression. Certain CDKs (e.g., CDK7, CDK9) also control cellular transcription. Consequently, CDKs represent attractive targets for anti-cancer drug development, as their aberrant expression is common in diverse malignancies, and CDK inhibition can trigger apoptosis. CDK inhibition may be particularly successful in hematologic malignancies, which are more sensitive to inhibition of cell cycling and apoptosis induction. AREAS COVERED A number of CDK inhibitors, ranging from pan-CDK inhibitors such as flavopiridol (alvocidib) to highly selective inhibitors of specific CDKs (e.g., CDK4/6), such as PD0332991, that are currently in various phases of development, are profiled in this review. Flavopiridol induces cell cycle arrest, and globally represses transcription via CDK9 inhibition. The latter may represent its major mechanism of action via down-regulation of multiple short-lived proteins. In early phase trials, flavopiridol has shown encouraging efficacy across a wide spectrum of hematologic malignancies. Early results with dinaciclib and PD0332991 also appear promising. EXPERT OPINION In general, the anti-tumor efficacy of CDK inhibitor monotherapy is modest, and rational combinations are being explored, including those involving other targeted agents. While selective CDK4/6 inhibition might be effective against certain malignancies, broad spectrum CDK inhibition will likely be required for most cancers. PMID:23647051

  2. Approaches to Managing Safety With Lenalidomide in Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Blumel, Susan; Broadway-Duren, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory agent approved in relapsed multiple myeloma with dexamethasone, for transfusion-dependent anemia in myelodysplastic syndrome associated with deletion 5q, and in relapsed/progressive mantle cell lymphoma following bortezomib. In recent clinical trials, lenalidomide has shown promising activity in hematologic malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Starting doses and dosing schedules vary by malignancy, with lenalidomide started at a lower dose for CLL than for NHL or multiple myeloma. Certain adverse events (AEs) are common across tumor types (e.g., neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, fatigue), whereas others are more often associated with CLL patients (e.g., tumor lysis syndrome and tumor flare reaction). Effective management requires awareness of these differences as well as appropriate prophylaxis, monitoring, and treatment of AEs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of lenalidomide in CLL and NHL, focusing on approaches for the advanced practitioner to improve patient quality of life through optimal management of side effects. With these steps, lenalidomide can be administered safely, at the best starting doses and with minimal dose interruptions or reductions across hematologic malignancies. PMID:26110071

  3. How I treat influenza in patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Corey; Englund, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has heightened the interest of clinicians for options in the prevention and management of influenza virus infection in immunocompromised patients. Even before the emergence of the novel 2009 H1N1 strain, influenza disease was a serious complication in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy or undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Here we review the clinical manifestations of seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza and discuss current diagnosis, antiviral treatment, and prophylaxis options. We also summarize infection control and vaccination strategies for patients, family members, and caregivers. PMID:20009037

  4. Information transfer by exosomes: A new frontier in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Boyiadzis, Michael; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2015-09-01

    Exosomes are small (30-150 mm) vesicles secreted by all cell types and present in all body fluids. They are emerging as vehicles for delivery of membrane-tethered signaling molecules and membrane enclosed genes to target cells. Exosome-mediated information transfer allows for crosstalk of cells within the hematopoietic system and for interactions between hematopoietic cells and local or distant tissue cells. Exosomes carry physiological signals essential for health and participate in pathological processes, including malignant transformation. In hematologic malignancies, exosomes reprogram the bone marrow microenvironment, creating a niche for abnormal cells and favoring their expansion. The molecular and genetic mechanisms exosomes utilize to shuttle information between cells are currently being examined as are the potential roles exosomes play as biomarkers of disease or future therapeutic targets.

  5. Targeting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Ottmann, Oliver G.; Deininger, Michael; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway represents an important anticancer target because it has been implicated in cancer cell growth, survival, and motility. Recent studies show that PI3K may also play a role in the development of resistance to currently available therapies. In a broad range of cancers, various components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling axis are genetically modified, and the pathway can be activated through many different mechanisms. The frequency of genetic alterations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway, coupled with the impact in oncogenesis and disease progression, make this signaling axis an attractive target in anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the critical function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in leukemias and lymphomas has led to the clinical evaluation of novel rationally designed inhibitors in this setting. Three main categories of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors have been developed so far: agents that target phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (dual inhibitors), pan-phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors that target all class I isoforms, and isoform-specific inhibitors that selectively target the α, -β, -γ, or -δ isoforms. Emerging data highlight the promise of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in combination with other therapies for the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. Further evaluation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in first-line or subsequent regimens may improve clinical outcomes. This article reviews the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in hematologic malignancies and the potential clinical utility of inhibitors that target this pathway. PMID:24425689

  6. Molecular study of the perforin gene in familial hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Perforin gene (PRF1) mutations have been identified in some patients diagnosed with the familial form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and in patients with lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with a familial aggregation of hematological malignancies harbor germline perforin gene mutations. For this purpose, 81 unrelated families from Tunisia and France with aggregated hematological malignancies were investigated. The variants detected in the PRF1 coding region amounted to 3.7% (3/81). Two of the three variants identified were previously described: the p.Ala91Val pathogenic mutation and the p.Asn252Ser polymorphism. A new p.Ala 211Val missense substitution was identified in two related Tunisian patients. In order to assess the pathogenicity of this new variation, bioinformatic tools were used to predict its effects on the perforin protein structure and at the mRNA level. The segregation of the mutant allele was studied in the family of interest and a control population was screened. The fact that this variant was not found to occur in 200 control chromosomes suggests that it may be pathogenic. However, overexpression of mutated PRF1 in rat basophilic leukemia cells did not affect the lytic function of perforin differently from the wild type protein. PMID:21936944

  7. Nanotechnology applications in hematological malignancies (Review).

    PubMed

    Samir, Ahmed; Elgamal, Basma M; Gabr, Hala; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2015-09-01

    A major limitation to current cancer therapies is the development of therapy-related side-effects and dose limiting complications. Moreover, a better understanding of the biology of cancer cells and the mechanisms of resistance to therapy is rapidly developing. The translation of advanced knowledge and discoveries achieved at the molecular level must be supported by advanced diagnostic, therapeutic and delivery technologies to translate these discoveries into useful tools that are essential in achieving progress in the war against cancer. Nanotechnology can play an essential role in this aspect providing a transforming technology that can translate the basic and clinical findings into novel diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive tools useful in different types of cancer. Hematological malignancies represent a specific class of cancer, which attracts special attention in the applications of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the present review is to elucidate the emerging applications of nanotechnology in cancer management and describe the potentials of nanotechnology in changing the key fundamental aspects of hematological malignancy diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  8. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Methods and Findings By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Conclusions Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM. PMID:26871570

  9. Extracorporeal Life Support in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kuk Bin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Jo, Keon Hyon; Kim, Do Yeon; Choi, Hang Jun; Hong, Seok Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in patients with hematologic malignancies is considered to have a poor prognosis. However, to date, there is only one case series reported in the literature. In this study, we compared the in-hospital survival of ECLS in patients with and without hematologic malignancies. Methods We reviewed a total of 66 patients who underwent ECLS for treatment of acute respiratory failure from January 2012 to December 2014. Of these patients, 22 (32%) were diagnosed with hematologic malignancies, and 13 (59%) underwent stem cell transplantation before ECLS. Results The in-hospital survival rate of patients with hematologic malignancies was 5% (1/22), while that of patients without malignancies was 26% (12/46). The number of platelet transfusions was significantly higher in patients with hematologic malignancies (9.69±7.55 vs. 3.12±3.42 units/day). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of hematologic malignancies was a significant negative predictor of survival to discharge (odds ratio, 0.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–0.79); p=0.031). Conclusion ECLS in patients with hematologic malignancies had a lower in-hospital survival rate, compared to patients without hematologic malignancies. PMID:27525237

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics and Dosing Optimization of Vancomycin in Children with Malignant Hematological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daolun; Fakhoury, May; Fahd, Mony; Duquesne, Frédérique; Storme, Thomas; Baruchel, André

    2014-01-01

    An increase in vancomycin dose has been proposed in adults with malignant hematological disease. As pediatric data are limited, our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in order to define the appropriate dosing regimen in children with malignant hematological disease. Vancomycin concentrations were collected prospectively during therapeutic monitoring. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. Seventy children (age range, 0.3 to 17.7 years) were included. With the current recommended dosing regimen of 40 to 60 mg/kg/day, 53 children (76%) had subtherapeutic steady-state trough concentrations (Css/min of <10 mg/liter). A one-compartment model with first-order elimination was developed. Systematic covariate analysis identified that weight significantly influenced clearance (CL) and volume of distribution (V) with power functions of 0.677 for CL and 0.838 for V. Vancomycin CL also significantly increased with increases in creatinine clearance and seemed to be higher in children with malignant hematological disease than in the general pediatric population. The model was validated internally. Its predictive performance was further confirmed in an external validation by Bayesian estimation. A patient-tailored dosing regimen was developed based on the final pharmacokinetic model and showed that a higher proportion of patients reached the target Css/min than with the traditional mg/kg-basis dose (60% versus 49%) and that the risks associated with underdosing or overdosing were reduced. This is the first population pharmacokinetic study of vancomycin in children with malignant hematological disease. An optimized dosing regimen, taking into account patient weight, creatinine clearance, and susceptibility of the pathogens involved, could routinely be used to individualize vancomycin therapy in this vulnerable population. PMID:24663023

  11. Whole genome scanning as a cytogenetic tool in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Ghulam J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, methods of cytogenetic analysis evolved and became part of routine laboratory testing, providing valuable diagnostic and prognostic information in hematologic disorders. Karyotypic aberrations contribute to the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of disease and thereby to rational application of therapeutic modalities. Most of the progress in this field stems from the application of metaphase cytogenetics (MC), but recently, novel molecular technologies have been introduced that complement MC and overcome many of the limitations of traditional cytogenetics, including a need for cell culture. Whole genome scanning using comparative genomic hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (CGH-A; SNP-A) can be used for analysis of somatic or clonal unbalanced chromosomal defects. In SNP-A, the combination of copy number detection and genotyping enables diagnosis of copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, a lesion that cannot be detected using MC but may have important pathogenetic implications. Overall, whole genome scanning arrays, despite the drawback of an inability to detect balanced translocations, allow for discovery of chromosomal defects in a higher proportion of patients with hematologic malignancies. Newly detected chromosomal aberrations, including somatic uniparental disomy, may lead to more precise prognostic schemes in many diseases. PMID:18505780

  12. Tetraspanins as therapeutic targets in hematological malignancy: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Kyle A.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins belong to a family of transmembrane proteins which play a major role in the organization of the plasma membrane. While all immune cells express tetraspanins, most of these are present in a variety of other cell types. There are a select few, such as CD37 and CD53, which are restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Tetraspanins associate with numerous partners involved in a diverse set of biological processes, including cell activation, survival, proliferation, adhesion, and migration. The historical view has assigned them a scaffolding role, but recent discoveries suggest some tetraspanins can directly participate in signaling through interactions with cytoplasmic proteins. Given their potential roles in supporting tumor survival and immune evasion, an improved understanding of tetraspanin activity could prove clinically valuable. This review will focus on emerging data in the study of tetraspanins, advances in the clinical development of anti-CD37 therapeutics, and the future prospects of targeting tetraspanins in hematological malignancy. PMID:25852576

  13. Management of Hematologic Malignancies: Special Considerations in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Amit, Odelia; Barzilai, Merav; Avivi, Irit

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and management of hematologic malignancy during pregnancy is a significant challenge. This is due to both medical and ethical considerations regarding when and how to treat this special sub-group of patients. Recurring uncertainties remain around appropriate imaging techniques, timing and dosage of chemotherapy, and timing of delivery. In this article we examine and summarize current literature in this field to assist physicians in their understanding and management of this patient group. Special attention has been given to diagnostic and staging procedures, risks associated with chemotherapy at different stages of gestation, and chemotherapy-dose adaption during pregnancy. In addition, recommended guidelines for management of lymphoma, leukemia, and planning delivery are discussed. A multidisciplinary team approach is critical for patient care, as is shared decision making with the patient and family.

  14. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  15. Using Functional Genomics to Overcome Therapeutic Resistance in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Calderon, Francesca; Gregory, Mark A.; DeGregori, James

    2013-01-01

    Despite great advances in our understanding of the driving events involved in malignant transformation, only a small number of oncogenic drivers have been targeted and translated into tangible clinical benefit. Moreover, even when a targeted therapy can be shown to effectively inhibit an oncogenic driver, leading to cancer remission, disease persistence and/or relapse is typically inevitable. Reemergence of the cancer can result from either intrinsic or acquired resistance mechanisms that result in failure to eliminate all cancer cells. Intrinsic mechanisms of resistance include tumor heterogeneity and pathways that can compensate for the inhibition of the oncogenic driver. Acquired resistance mechanisms include mutation of the oncogenic driver to directly prevent drug-mediated inhibition and the activation of compensatory survival pathways. RNA interference (RNAi)-based screening provides a powerful approach for the interrogation of both intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms. The availability of short interfering (si)RNA libraries targeting all human and mouse genes has made it possible to perform large-scale unbiased screens to identify pathways that are specifically required in cancer cells of particular genotypes or following particular treatments, facilitating the design of potential new therapeutic strategies that may limit resistance mechanisms. In this review, we will discuss how RNAi screens can be used to uncover critical growth and survival pathways and aid in the identification of novel therapeutic targets for improved treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:22941562

  16. [Immunophenotypic analysis of hematogones in patients with hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shoichi; Kumagai, Risa; Omiya, Akiko; Tanno, Hideki; Ishii, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Takasaki, Hirotaka; Sakai, Rika; Numata, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Kanamori, Heiwa; Motomura, Shigeki; Maruta, Atsuo

    2012-08-01

    We studied immunophenotypic analysis of hematogones by flow cytometry. A total of 102 specimens from 93 patients with acute leukemia (52 specimens), myelodysplastic syndromes (4), or malignant lymphoma (46) were analyzed between April and August, 2011. Hematogones were detected in 55 specimens and highly identified in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in remission and B cell lymphoma. Stage 1 (CD34(+)CD20(-)) and stage 2/3 (CD34(-)CD20(+)) were detected in 9.9% and 52.7%, respectively. In addition, the intermediate type (CD34(+)CD20(+)) was identified in 37.4%. All specimens of stage 3 in bright CD45 expression were positive for CD5 and included CD5(+)CD23(-)CD11c(-), 11.1%, CD5(+)CD23(+)CD11c(-), 85.2%, and CD5(+)CD23(+)CD11c(+), 3.7%. These findings suggest that hematogones with unreported immunophenotypes may exist and the appearance of hematogones in hematologic malignancies may be relatively frequent.

  17. The growing threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Baker, Thomas M; Satlin, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Prolonged neutropenia and chemotherapy-induced mucositis render patients with hematologic malignancies highly vulnerable to Gram-negative bacteremia. Unfortunately, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria are increasingly encountered globally, and current guidelines for empirical antibiotic coverage in these patients may not adequately treat these bacteria. This expansion of resistance, coupled with traditional culturing techniques requiring 2-4 days for bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility results, have grave implications for these immunocompromised hosts. This review characterizes the epidemiology, risk factors, resistance mechanisms, recommended treatments, and outcomes of the MDR Gram-negative bacteria that commonly cause infections in patients with hematologic malignancies. We also examine the infection prevention strategies in hematology patients, such as infection control practices, antimicrobial stewardship, and targeted decolonization. Finally, we assess the strategies to improve outcomes of the infected patients, including gastrointestinal screening to guide empirical antibiotic therapy, new rapid diagnostic tools for expeditious identification of MDR pathogens, and use of two new antimicrobial agents, ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam. PMID:27339405

  18. Ewing's Sarcoma as a Second Malignancy in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grotzer, Michael A.; Niggli, Felix; Zimmermann, Dieter; Rushing, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Modern multimodal treatment has significantly increased survival for patients affected by hematologic malignancies, especially in childhood. Following remission, however, the risk of developing a further malignancy is an important issue. The long-term estimated risk of developing a sarcoma as a secondary malignancy is increased severalfold in comparison to the general population. Ewing's sarcoma family encompasses a group of highly aggressive, undifferentiated, intra- and extraosseous, mesenchymal tumors, caused by several types of translocations usually involving the EWSR1 gene. Translocation associated sarcomas, such as Ewing sarcoma, are only rarely encountered as therapy associated secondary tumors. We describe the clinical course and management of three patients from a single institution with Ewing's sarcoma that followed successfully treated lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The literature on secondary Ewing's sarcoma is summarized and possible pathogenic mechanisms are critically discussed. PMID:27524931

  19. Ewing's Sarcoma as a Second Malignancy in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Fabian; Grotzer, Michael A; Niggli, Felix; Zimmermann, Dieter; Rushing, Elisabeth; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Modern multimodal treatment has significantly increased survival for patients affected by hematologic malignancies, especially in childhood. Following remission, however, the risk of developing a further malignancy is an important issue. The long-term estimated risk of developing a sarcoma as a secondary malignancy is increased severalfold in comparison to the general population. Ewing's sarcoma family encompasses a group of highly aggressive, undifferentiated, intra- and extraosseous, mesenchymal tumors, caused by several types of translocations usually involving the EWSR1 gene. Translocation associated sarcomas, such as Ewing sarcoma, are only rarely encountered as therapy associated secondary tumors. We describe the clinical course and management of three patients from a single institution with Ewing's sarcoma that followed successfully treated lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The literature on secondary Ewing's sarcoma is summarized and possible pathogenic mechanisms are critically discussed. PMID:27524931

  20. MYC-mediated synthetic lethality for treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Xin A; Xie, Wei; Li, Xiaoqing; Huang, Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated c-MYC expression is found in many human malignancies. MYC activation induces multiple lineages of hematological malignancies in single Myc transgenic mice. MYC inactivation causes tumor regression. MYC is therefore an attractive target for cancer treatment. However, little progress has been made in the development and application of targeted MYC inactivation in clinical practice. In double Myc transgenic mouse models, Myc-driven leukemogenesis and lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by transduction of non-MYC oncogenes, leading to dual addiction to MYC and the non-MYC oncogenes. Wang et al. (2004) first established the concept of MYC-mediated synthetic lethality (MYC-SL). MYC overexpression sensitized cells to TRAILand DR5-agonist-induced apoptosis. This suggests that MYC-dependent tumor cells may be killed by targeting partner oncogenes of MYC. Many small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) have been proven to induce MYC-SL by targeting AUK-B, Brd4, CDK1, CHK1, MCL-1, the mTOR/4E-BP1/eIF4E pathway, and PIM1/2. Compared with conventional treatment approaches, SMI-induced MYC-SL displays highly selective anticancer activity and much lower cytotoxicity to normal cells. SMI-induced MYC-SL can reverse eIF4F- and PIM2-induced multiple chemoresistance. The combination of an SMI with chemotherapeutic agents can elevate chemotherapy efficacy by enhancing chemosensitivity. This combination will be a promising novel approach to treating MYC-dependent tumors by inducing MYC-SL. PMID:25564254

  1. Epidemiology of Candida kefyr in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Simon F.; Sydnor, Emily; Staab, Janet F.; Karp, Judith E.; Lu, Kit; Zhang, Sean X.; Lavallée, Christian; Perl, Trish M.; Neofytos, Dionysios

    2014-01-01

    Candida kefyr is an emerging pathogen among patients with hematologic malignancies (HM). We performed a retrospective study at Johns Hopkins Hospital to evaluate the epidemiology of C. kefyr colonization and infection in HM patients between 2004 and 2010. Eighty-three patients were colonized and/or infected with C. kefyr, with 8 (9.6%) having invasive candidiasis (IC). The yearly incidence of C. kefyr colonization and candidemia increased over the study period (P < 0.01), particularly after 2009. In 2010, C. kefyr caused 16.7% of candidemia episodes. The monthly incidence of C. kefyr was higher during the summer throughout the study. In a cohort of patients with acute myelogenic leukemia receiving induction chemotherapy, risks for C. kefyr colonization included the summer season (odds ratio [OR], 3.1; P = 0.03); administration of an azole (OR, 0.06; P < 0.001) or amphotericin B (OR, 0.35; P = 0.05) was protective. Fingerprinting of 16 isolates by repetitive sequence-based PCR showed that all were different genotypes. The epidemiology of C. kefyr candidemia was evaluated in another hospital in Montreal, Canada; data confirmed higher rates of C. kefyr infection in the summer. C. kefyr appears to be increasing in HM patients, with prominent summer seasonality. These findings raise questions about the effect of antifungal agents and health care exposures (e.g., yogurt) on the epidemiology of this yeast. PMID:24622105

  2. MLL-SEPTIN gene fusions in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2011-08-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) locus is involved in more than 60 different rearrangements with a remarkably diverse group of fusion partners in approximately 10% of human leukemias. MLL rearrangements include chromosomal translocations, gene internal duplications, chromosome 11q deletions or inversions and MLL gene insertions into other chromosomes, or vice versa. MLL fusion partners can be classified into four distinct categories: nuclear proteins, cytoplasmatic proteins, histone acetyltransferases and septins. Five different septin genes (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) have been identified as MLL fusion partners, giving rise to chimeric fusion proteins in which the N terminus of MLL is fused, in frame, to almost the entire open reading frame of the septin partner gene. The rearranged alleles result from heterogeneous breaks in distinct introns of both MLL and its septin fusion partner, originating distinct gene fusion variants. MLL-SEPTIN rearrangements have been repeatedly identified in de novo and therapy related myeloid neoplasia in both children and adults, and some clinicopathogenetic associations are being uncovered. The fundamental roles of septins in cytokinesis, membrane remodeling and compartmentalization can provide some clues on how abnormalities in the septin cytoskeleton and MLL deregulation could be involved in the pathogenesis of hematological malignancies. PMID:21714766

  3. Clinical management of HIV-associated hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Ching J; Kaplan, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    HIV is associated with an excess risk for lymphoid malignancies. Although the risk of lymphoma has decreased in HIV-infected individuals in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapy, it remains high. Treatment outcomes have improved due to improvements in HIV and cancer therapeutics for the common HIV-associated lymphomas. R-CHOP/R-EPOCH are the standard of care for HIV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. HIV-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma and good performance status should receive dose-intensive regimens. HIV-infected patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma can respond favorably to high-dose methotrexate-based therapy. In many cases, treatment and expected outcomes for HIV-infected patients with either Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are very similar to HIV-negative patients. There is currently no standard treatment for HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease or primary effusion lymphoma. For those hematologic cancers in which transplantation is part of standard care, this modality should be considered an option in those with well-controlled HIV infection. PMID:26652941

  4. BET inhibitors in the treatment of hematologic malignancies: current insights and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, Sameem M; Boddy, Craig S; Munshi, Hidayatullah G

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins are important epigenetic regulators involved in promoting gene expression of critical oncogenes. BET inhibitors have been demonstrated to repress c-Myc expression, and were initially shown to have efficacy in a number of c-Myc-dependent hematologic malignancies. Recent studies have now revealed a broader role for BET inhibitors in hematologic malignancies. In this review, we summarize the efficacy of BET inhibitors in preclinical models of acute leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. We also summarize recent results of clinical trials utilizing BET inhibitors in hematologic malignancies, characterize potential resistance mechanisms to BET inhibitors, and discuss potential combination therapies with BET inhibitors in patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:27729803

  5. Non-caseating granulomas in patients with hematologic malignancies. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tangen, J M; Naess, A; Aasen, T; Morild, I

    1988-01-01

    Sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like lesions occurred in three patients with hematologic malignancies. In one patient, an overlap syndrome sarcoidosis/polycythemia vera was the most probable diagnosis. In the other two cases, the granulomas were probably secondary to myelofibrosis and Waldenström's disease, respectively. Recent epidemiological studies have failed to show a causal relationship between sarcoidosis and malignancy. The co-existence of sarcoidosis and malignancy is probably fortuitous, but non-caseating granulomas may occur secondary to malignant diseases.

  6. Perceptions of Palliative Care Among Hematologic Malignancy Specialists: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Thomas W.; O'Donnell, Jonathan D.; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Rabow, Michael W.; Smith, Cardinale B.; White, Douglas B.; Tiver, Greer A.; Arnold, Robert M.; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with hematologic malignancies are less likely to receive specialist palliative care services than patients with solid tumors. Reasons for this difference are poorly understood. Methods: This was a multisite, mixed-methods study to understand and contrast perceptions of palliative care among hematologic and solid tumor oncologists using surveys assessing referral practices and in-depth semistructured interviews exploring views of palliative care. We compared referral patterns using standard statistical methods. We analyzed qualitative interview data using constant comparative methods to explore reasons for observed differences. Results: Among 66 interviewees, 23 oncologists cared exclusively for patients with hematologic malignancies; 43 treated only patients with solid tumors. Seven (30%) of 23 hematologic oncologists reported never referring to palliative care; all solid tumor oncologists had previously referred. In qualitative analyses, most hematologic oncologists viewed palliative care as end-of-life care, whereas most solid tumor oncologists viewed palliative care as a subspecialty that could assist with complex patient cases. Solid tumor oncologists emphasized practical barriers to palliative care referral, such as appointment availability and reimbursement issues. Hematologic oncologists emphasized philosophic concerns about palliative care referrals, including different treatment goals, responsiveness to chemotherapy, and preference for controlling even palliative aspects of patient care. Conclusion: Most hematologic oncologists view palliative care as end-of-life care, whereas solid tumor oncologists more often view palliative care as a subspecialty for comanaging patients with complex cases. Efforts to integrate palliative care into hematologic malignancy practices will require solutions that address unique barriers to palliative care referral experienced by hematologic malignancy specialists. PMID:25784580

  7. The Use of Indwelling Tunneled Pleural Catheters for Recurrent Pleural Effusions in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hans J.; Skalski, Joseph H.; Maldonado, Fabien; Wahidi, Momen; Choi, Philip J.; Bessich, Jamie; Sterman, Daniel; Argento, A. Christine; Shojaee, Samira; Gorden, Jed A.; Wilshire, Candice L.; Feller-Kopman, David; Ortiz, Ricardo; Nonyane, Bareng Aletta Sanny; Yarmus, Lonny

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural effusion is a common complication of advanced malignancies. Indwelling tunneled pleural catheter (IPC) placement provides effective palliation but can be associated with complications, including infection. In particular, hematologic malignancy and the associated immunosuppressive treatment regimens may increase infectious complications. This study aimed to review outcomes in patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing IPC placement. METHODS: A retrospective multicenter study of IPCs placed in patients with hematologic malignancy from January 2009 to December 2013 was performed. Inclusion criteria were recurrent, symptomatic pleural effusion and an underlying diagnosis of hematologic malignancy. Records were reviewed for patient demographics, operative reports, and pathology, cytology, and microbiology reports. RESULTS: Ninety-one patients (mean ± SD age, 65.4 ± 15.4 years) were identified from eight institutions. The mean × SD in situ dwell time of all catheters was 89.9 ± 127.1 days (total, 8,160 catheter-days). Seven infectious complications were identified, all of the pleural space. All patients were admitted to the hospital for treatment, with four requiring additional pleural procedures. Two patients died of septic shock related to pleural infection. CONCLUSIONS: We present, to our knowledge, the largest study examining clinical outcomes related to IPC placement in patients with hematologic malignancy. An overall 7.7% infection risk and 2.2% mortality were identified, similar to previously reported studies, despite the significant immunosuppression and pancytopenia often present in this population. IPC placement appears to remain a reasonable clinical option for patients with recurrent pleural effusions related to hematologic malignancy. PMID:25789576

  8. Targeted Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Busulfan Before Donor Progenitor Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Hematologic Malignancies; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hodgkin Lymphoma,; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Syndrome

  9. Deep venous thromboses in patients with hematological malignancies after peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ha; Arellano, Martha; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Flowers, Christopher; Heffner, Leonard T; Langston, Amelia; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Tindol, Allen; Waller, Edmund; Winton, Elliott F; Khoury, Hanna J

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of deep venous thromboses (DVTs) associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients with hematological malignancies is not well described. We sought to determine the incidence, characteristics, and outcomes of PICC-related DVTs in this patient population. Retrospective, single center cohort analysis of patients with hematological malignancies with upper extremity PICCs and symptomatic upper extremity DVTs were identified by electronic medical record databases search. Between April 2001 and February 2006, 899 PICCs were placed in 498 patients, and ultrasound documented DVTs were observed in 39 (7.8%) a median of 26 days after PICC placement. Twenty-three (59%) had a new diagnosis of hematological malignancy at the time of PICC placement. DVT management included PICC removal (71%), thrombectomy/thrombolysis (13%), and 3-month anticoagulation. No pulmonary emboli or hemorrhages were observed. A change to centrally inserted tunneled internal jugular (IJ) catheters was instituted February 2006, and the incidence of DVTs was 0.4% among 843 tunneled IJ catheters placed in a subsequent cohort of 667 patients with hematological malignancies. Patients with hematological malignancies have a high incidence of PICC-associated DVTs. Internal jugular vein tunneled PICCs are associated with a very low incidence of DVTs in this patient population.

  10. Mechanisms and clinical prospects of Notch inhibitors in the therapy of hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nefedova, Yulia; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    Activation of Notch signaling has been implicated in pathogenesis of various hematologic tumors including leukemias, lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. Pre-clinical studies have suggested that inhibition of Notch could be an attractive new approach to treatment of hematologic malignancies. This review discusses most recent findings in the field and potential role of Notch signaling as a therapeutic target focusing on the effects of γ-secretase inhibitors. PMID:18951834

  11. Nutritional status of children and adolescents at diagnosis of hematological and solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Priscila dos Santos Maia; de Oliveira, Fernanda Luisa Ceragioli; Caran, Eliana Maria Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the nutritional status of child and adolescent patients with cancer at diagnosis. Methods A total of 1154 patients were included and divided into two groups: solid and hematological malignancies. The parameters used for nutritional assessment were weight, height, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper arm circumference, arm muscle circumference, body mass index and percentage weight loss. Results At diagnosis, below adequate body mass index was observed by anthropometric analysis in 10.85% of the patients – 12.2% in the solid tumor group and 9.52% in the hematologic group. The average weight loss adjusted for a period of 7 days was −2.82% in the hematologic group and −2.9% in the solid tumor group. Conclusions The prevalence of malnutrition is higher among patients with malignancies than in the general population, even though no difference was observed between the two groups. PMID:25453652

  12. Invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a young patient with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo de Carvalho; Rolim Neto, Pedro José; da Silva, Carolina Maria; Domingos, Igor de Farias; Gonçalves, Sarah Santos; Leite, Edinalva Pereira; de Morais, Vera Lúcia Lins; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; de Lima Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a patient with hematological malignancies after chemotherapy treatment and empiric antifungal therapy with caspofungin. Although severely immunocompromised the patient survived been treated with amphotericin B lipid complex associated with voriconazole. PMID:26273269

  13. Invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a young patient with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo de Carvalho; Rolim, Pedro José; da Silva, Carolina Maria; Domingos, Igor de Farias; Gonçalves, Sarah Santos; Leite, Edinalva Pereira; de Morais, Vera Lúcia Lins; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; de Lima, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a patient with hematological malignancies after chemotherapy treatment and empiric antifungal therapy with caspofungin. Although severely immunocompromised the patient survived been treated with amphotericin B lipid complex associated with voriconazole. PMID:26273269

  14. T-Regulatory Cell and CD3 Depleted Double Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-04

    Hematologic Malignancy; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Crisis; Anemia, Refractory, With Excess of Blasts; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Lymphoma; Large Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; High Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  15. Exploring Therapeutic Potentials of Baicalin and Its Aglycone Baicalein for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jianlei; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Buyuan; Hu, Jianda; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in the targeted therapy for various types of hematological malignancies with successful improvements in the survival rates, emerging resistance issues are startlingly high and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In addition, chemoprevention is currently becoming an elusive goal. Plant-derived natural products have garnered considerable attention in recent years due to the potential dual functions as chemotherapeutics and dietary chemoprevention. One of the particularly ubiquitous families is the polyphenolic flavonoids. Among them, baicalin and its aglycone baicalein have been widely investigated in hematological malignancies because both of them exhibit remarkable pharmacological properties. This review focuses on the recent achievements in drug discovery research associated with baicalin and baicalein for hematological malignancy therapies. The promising anticancer activities of these two flavonoids targeting diverse signaling pathways and their potential biological mechanisms in different types of hematological malignancies, as well as the combination strategy with baicalin or baicalein as chemotherapeutic adjuvants for recent therapies in these intractable diseases are discussed. Meanwhile, the biotransformation of baicalin and baicalein and the relevant approaches to improve their bioavailability are also summarized. PMID:25128647

  16. The role of telomeres and telomerase in hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are specific nucleoprotein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres and telomere-associated proteins maintain genome stability by protecting the ends of chromosomes from fusion and degradation. In normal somatic cells, the length of the telomeres gradually becomes shortened with cell division. In tumor cells, the shortening of telomeres length is accelerated under the increased proliferation pressure. However, it will be maintained at an extremely short length as the result of activation of telomerase. Significantly shortened telomeres, activation of telomerase, and altered expression of telomere-associated proteins are common features of various hematologic malignancies and are related with progression or chemotherapy resistance in these diseases. In patients who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the telomere length and the telomerase activity of the engrafted donor cells have a significant influence on HSCT outcomes. Transplantation-related factors should be taken into consideration because of their impacts on telomere homeostasis. As activation of telomerase is widespread in tumor cells, it has been employed as a target point in the treatment of neoplastic hematologic disorders. In this review, the characteristics and roles of telomeres and telomerase both in hematologic malignancies and in HSCT will be summarized. The current status of telomerase-targeted therapies utilized in the treatment of hematologic malignancies will also be reviewed. PMID:25139287

  17. Meeting the challenge of hematologic malignancies in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Shea, Thomas C.; Naresh, Kikkeri N.; Kazembe, Peter N.; Casper, Corey; Hesseling, Peter B.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death and disability in sub-Saharan Africa and will eclipse infectious diseases within the next several decades if current trends continue. Hematologic malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, account for nearly 10% of the overall cancer burden in the region, and the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma is rapidly increasing as a result of HIV. Despite an increasing burden, mechanisms for diagnosing, treating, and palliating malignant hematologic disorders are inadequate. In this review, we describe the scope of the problem, including the impact of endemic infections, such as HIV, Epstein-Barr virus, malaria, and Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus. We additionally describe current limitations in hematopathology, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and supportive care and palliation. We review contemporary treatment and outcomes of hematologic malignancies in the region and outline a clinical service and research agenda, which builds on recent global health successes combating HIV and other infectious diseases. Achieving similar progress against hematologic cancers in sub-Saharan Africa will require the sustained collaboration and advocacy of the entire global cancer community. PMID:22461494

  18. Unmet Needs for Psychosocial Care in Hematologic Malignancies and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Barata, Anna; Wood, William A; Choi, Sung Won; Jim, Heather S L

    2016-08-01

    Individuals diagnosed with hematologic malignancies experience significant unmet psychological, physical, informational, financial, and spiritual needs. The goal of the current review is to summarize and highlight recent research focused on these issues in the diagnosis and treatment periods and beyond. The review also describes the needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) and pediatric patients. While a large body of research has reported on unmet needs among adult hematologic cancer patients, there is far less data regarding the challenges confronted by AYA and pediatric populations. Available data suggests that among all age groups, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a risk factor for greater unmet needs. Recommendations for screening and evidence-based interventions to prevent or ameliorate unmet needs are provided. Future research is needed to develop additional evidence-based psychosocial interventions with a focus on hematologic cancer. PMID:27113094

  19. The emerging role of Twist proteins in hematopoietic cells and hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Merindol, N; Riquet, A; Szablewski, V; Eliaou, J-F; Puisieux, A; Bonnefoy, N

    2014-01-01

    Twist1 and Twist2 (Twist1–2) are two transcription factors, members of the basic helix-loop-helix family, that have been well established as master transcriptional regulators of embryogenesis and developmental programs of mesenchymal cell lineages. Their role in oncogenesis in epithelium-derived cancer and in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition has also been thoroughly characterized. Recently, emerging evidence also suggests a key role for Twist1–2 in the function and development of hematopoietic cells, as well as in survival and development of numerous hematological malignancies. In this review, we summarize the latest data that depict the role of Twist1–2 in monocytes, T cells and B lymphocyte activation, and in associated hematological malignancies. PMID:24769647

  20. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells as Therapeutic Target in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    De Veirman, Kim; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Lahmar, Qods; Geeraerts, Xenia; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Riet, Ivan; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that accumulate during pathological conditions such as cancer and are associated with a poor clinical outcome. MDSC expansion hampers the host anti-tumor immune response by inhibition of T cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, and recruitment of regulatory T cells. In addition, MDSC exert non-immunological functions including the promotion of angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Recent years, MDSC are considered as a potential target in solid tumors and hematological malignancies to enhance the effects of currently used immune modulating agents. This review focuses on the characteristics, distribution, functions, cell–cell interactions, and targeting of MDSC in hematological malignancies including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and leukemia. PMID:25538893

  1. Epigenetic programming contributes to development of drug resistance in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-yuan; Zhong, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics is the study of long term and stable but not necessarily heritable alterations in transcriptional potential and gene expression profile of a cell that are not due to any alterations in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications include DNA methylation, posttranslational modifications of histone proteins and expression of small regulatory RNAs. In recent years, the role of epigenetic modifications in the development of hematological malignancies and drug resistance has been studied in depth and has shed light on this important issue. Here, we review the major epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the generation and evolution of hematological malignancies and development of resistance to chemotherapy.  We will also discuss the development of epigenetic drugs that can overcome resistance to conventional chemotherapy.

  2. Exaggerated NT-proBNP production in patients with hematologic malignancies: a case series.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Aileen; Guglin, Maya

    2012-01-01

    ©2011 Wiley Periodicals Inc. Extremely elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in cancer patients is a poorly understood phenomenon. The authors report three cases of patients with hematologic malignancies and serial N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) measurements with values in the range of tens to hundred thousands pg/mL. Through matching NT-proBNP results with clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic and radiologic data, the authors found that these patients demonstrated exaggerated responses to fluid overload. Patients with hematologic malignancies may have higher than expected values of NT-proBNP in response to hypervolemic states. The authors hypothesize that this may be related to possible infiltration of the myocardium by substances produced in the setting of these diseases or due to proteins interfering with the assay.Congest Heart Fail. PMID:23167814

  3. Comparison of survival of adolescents and young adults with hematologic malignancies in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakata-Yamada, Kayo; Inoue, Masami; Ioka, Akiko; Ito, Yuri; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Miyashiro, Isao; Masaie, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Jun; Hino, Masayuki; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    The survival gap between adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hematological malignancies persists in many countries. To determine to what extent it does in Japan, we investigated survival and treatment regimens in 211 Japanese AYAs (15-29 years) in the Osaka Cancer Registry diagnosed during 2001-2005 with hematological malignancies, and compared adolescents (15-19 years) with young adults (20-29 years). AYAs with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had a poor 5-year survival (44%), particularly young adults (29% vs. 64% in adolescents, p = 0.01). Additional investigation for patients with ALL revealed that only 19% of young adults were treated with pediatric treatment regimens compared with 45% of adolescents (p = 0.05). Our data indicate that we need to focus on young adults with ALL and to consider establishing appropriate cancer care system and guidelines for them in Japan.

  4. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  5. Combination epigenetic and immunotherapy overcomes resistance to monoclonal antibodies in hematologic malignancies: A new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Epner, Elliot M; Saroya, Bikramajit Singh; Hasanali, Zainul S; Loughran, Thomas P

    2016-03-01

    We recently reported that addition of epigenetic agents could overcome resistance of leukemic cells to monoclonal antibody-mediated anti-tumor effects in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. We also reported that epigenetic agents could induce expression of the CD30 gene, thus providing a therapeutic target for the antibody drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin. Here we discuss these findings and their generality to treatment of other hematologic and solid malignancies. PMID:26802532

  6. Combination epigenetic and immunotherapy overcomes resistance to monoclonal antibodies in hematologic malignancies: A new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Epner, Elliot M; Saroya, Bikramajit Singh; Hasanali, Zainul S; Loughran, Thomas P

    2016-03-01

    We recently reported that addition of epigenetic agents could overcome resistance of leukemic cells to monoclonal antibody-mediated anti-tumor effects in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. We also reported that epigenetic agents could induce expression of the CD30 gene, thus providing a therapeutic target for the antibody drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin. Here we discuss these findings and their generality to treatment of other hematologic and solid malignancies.

  7. Critical methodological factors in diagnosing minimal residual disease in hematological malignancies using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg

    2015-05-01

    Hematological malignancies are a heterogeneous group of cancers with respect to both presentation and prognosis, and many subtypes are nowadays associated with aberrations that make up excellent molecular targets for the quantification of minimal residual disease. The quantitative PCR methodology is outstanding in terms of sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility and thus an excellent choice for minimal residual disease assessment. However, the methodology still has pitfalls that should be carefully considered when the technique is integrated in a clinical setting.

  8. [The experience of disease and treatments among teenagers and young adults with hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Polomeni, Alice

    2011-10-01

    We conducted an exploratory study of young patients (< 25 years) in remission from hematologic malignancies to better understand their experiences of care, the impact of disease and therapeutics on their quality of life (assessed by the FACT-BMT) and on their mental state (assessed by the HADS). On the plan of research, the findings of this study confirm the relevance of the qualitative approach; on the plan of care, the need of interdisciplinary support for these patients in remission.

  9. Going viral: chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to CTL019, the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania. This is the first personalized cellular therapy for cancer to be so designated and occurred 25 years after the first publication describing genetic redirection of T cells to a surface antigen of choice. The peer-reviewed literature currently contains the outcomes of more than 100 patients treated on clinical trials of anti-CD19 redirected T cells, and preliminary results on many more patients have been presented. At last count almost 30 clinical trials targeting CD19 were actively recruiting patients in North America, Europe, and Asia. Patients with high-risk B-cell malignancies therefore represent the first beneficiaries of an exciting and potent new treatment modality that harnesses the power of the immune system as never before. A handful of trials are targeting non-CD19 hematological and solid malignancies and represent the vanguard of enormous preclinical efforts to develop CAR T-cell therapy beyond B-cell malignancies. In this review, we explain the concept of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells, describe the extant results in hematologic malignancies, and share our outlook on where this modality is likely to head in the near future.

  10. Endogenous transmembrane protein UT2 inhibits pSTAT3 and suppresses hematological malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Kalaitzidis, Demetrios; Ramachandran, Janani; Sykes, David B.; Raje, Noopur; Scadden, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of STAT3 activation is critical for normal and malignant hematopoietic cell proliferation. Here, we have reported that the endogenous transmembrane protein upstream-of-mTORC2 (UT2) negatively regulates activation of STAT3. Specifically, we determined that UT2 interacts directly with GP130 and inhibits phosphorylation of STAT3 on tyrosine 705 (STAT3Y705). This reduces cytokine signaling including IL6 that is implicated in multiple myeloma and other hematopoietic malignancies. Modulation of UT2 resulted in inverse effects on animal survival in myeloma models. Samples from multiple myeloma patients also revealed a decreased copy number of UT2 and decreased expression of UT2 in genomic and transcriptomic analyses, respectively. Together, these studies identify a transmembrane protein that functions to negatively regulate cytokine signaling through GP130 and pSTAT3Y705 and is molecularly and mechanistically distinct from the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of genes. Moreover, this work provides evidence that perturbations of this activation-dampening molecule participate in hematologic malignancies and may serve as a key determinant of multiple myeloma pathophysiology. UT2 is a negative regulator shared across STAT3 and mTORC2 signaling cascades, functioning as a tumor suppressor in hematologic malignancies driven by those pathways. PMID:26927669

  11. Advances in haploidentical stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Juan; Sanz, Jaime; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important advances in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the use of alternative donors and cell sources, such as haploidentical transplants (haplo-HSCT) from family donors. Several approaches have been developed to overcome the challenging bidirectional alloreactivity. We discuss these approaches, including ex vivo T-cell-depleted grafts with megadose of CD34(+) cells, not requiring immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, and other strategies using unmanipulated T-cell-replete grafts with intensive immunosuppression or post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to minimize the GVHD. We also address the role of other strategies developed in the context of the haplo-HSCT platforms, such as ex vivo selective depletion of alloreactive donor T-cell subpopulations, infusion of antigen-specific T-cells against several pathogens, and infusion of regulatory T-cells, among other experimental approaches. Finally, some considerations about the selection of the most suitable donor, when more than one family member is available, are also addressed.

  12. Detection and Identification of Hematologic Malignancies and Solid Tumors by an Electrochemical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bowen; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Xuemei; Cheng, Jian; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Develop and evaluate an electrochemical method to identify healthy individuals, malignant hematopathic patients and solid tumor patients by detecting the leukocytes in whole-blood. Methods A total of 114 individual blood samples obtained from our affiliated hospital in China (June 2015- August 2015) were divided into three groups: healthy individuals (n = 35), hematologic malignancies (n = 41) and solid tumors (n = 38). An electrochemical workstation system was used to measure differential pulse voltammetry due to the different electrochemical behaviors of leukocytes in blood samples. Then, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to analyze the scanning curves and to compare the peak potential and peak current. Results The scanning curve demonstrated the specific electrochemical behaviors of the blank potassium ferricyanide solution and that mixed with blood samples in different groups. Significant differences in mean peak potentials of mixture and shifts (ΔEp (mV)) were observed of the three groups (P< = 0.001). 106.00±9.00 and 3.14±7.48 for Group healthy individuals, 120.90±11.18 and 18.10±8.81 for Group hematologic malignancies, 136.84±11.53 and 32.89±10.50 for Group solid tumors, respectively. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the peak currents and shifts. Conclusions The newly developed method to apply the electrochemical workstation system to identify hematologic malignancies and solid tumors with good sensitivity and specificity might be effective, suggesting a potential utility in clinical application. PMID:27115355

  13. HIV-associated hematologic malignancies: Experience from a Tertiary Cancer Center in India

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rakesh; Gogia, Ajay; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Atul; Bakhshi, Sameer; Sharma, Mehar C.; Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Sahoo, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Context and Aim: Data on HIV associated hematologic malignancies is sparse from India. This study attempts to analyze the spectrum and features of this disease at a tertiary cancer center in India. Setting and Methods: Retrospective study from case records of patients registered with a diagnosis of hematologic malignancy and HIV infection between January 2010 and June 2015. Results: Thirteen cases of HIV associated hematologic malignancies were identified, six of them pediatric. HIV diagnosis was concurrent to diagnosis of cancer in 12 and preceded it in one of them. ECOG PS at presentation was >1 in all of them. All patients, except one, had B symptoms. Six of the patients had bulky disease and six are stage 4. Predominant extranodal disease was seen in 67% of them. NHL accounted for 10 of 13 patients and DLBCL-Germinal center was the most common subtype. Mean CD4+ cell count was 235/μL (range, 32-494). HAART could be given along with chemotherapy to 11 patients. Two-thirds of patients received standard doses of therapy. Chemo-toxicity required hospitalization in 58%. CR was achieved in 45% and 36% had progressive disease with first-line therapy. At the time of last follow up, 3 patients were alive with responsive disease, 2 in CR and 1 in PR. None of the pediatric patients were long time responders. Conclusions: These malignancies were of advanced stage and higher grade. Goal of therapy, in the HAART era, is curative. Pediatric patients had dismal outcome despite good chemotherapy and HAART. There is an urgent need to improve data collection for HIV related cancers in India. PMID:27688606

  14. HIV-associated hematologic malignancies: Experience from a Tertiary Cancer Center in India

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rakesh; Gogia, Ajay; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Atul; Bakhshi, Sameer; Sharma, Mehar C.; Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Sahoo, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Context and Aim: Data on HIV associated hematologic malignancies is sparse from India. This study attempts to analyze the spectrum and features of this disease at a tertiary cancer center in India. Setting and Methods: Retrospective study from case records of patients registered with a diagnosis of hematologic malignancy and HIV infection between January 2010 and June 2015. Results: Thirteen cases of HIV associated hematologic malignancies were identified, six of them pediatric. HIV diagnosis was concurrent to diagnosis of cancer in 12 and preceded it in one of them. ECOG PS at presentation was >1 in all of them. All patients, except one, had B symptoms. Six of the patients had bulky disease and six are stage 4. Predominant extranodal disease was seen in 67% of them. NHL accounted for 10 of 13 patients and DLBCL-Germinal center was the most common subtype. Mean CD4+ cell count was 235/μL (range, 32-494). HAART could be given along with chemotherapy to 11 patients. Two-thirds of patients received standard doses of therapy. Chemo-toxicity required hospitalization in 58%. CR was achieved in 45% and 36% had progressive disease with first-line therapy. At the time of last follow up, 3 patients were alive with responsive disease, 2 in CR and 1 in PR. None of the pediatric patients were long time responders. Conclusions: These malignancies were of advanced stage and higher grade. Goal of therapy, in the HAART era, is curative. Pediatric patients had dismal outcome despite good chemotherapy and HAART. There is an urgent need to improve data collection for HIV related cancers in India.

  15. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou-Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  16. Financial distress during relocation for treatment of a hematological malignancy: Findings for social work.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2016-04-01

    The findings presented in this article are from qualitative research, funded by the Leukaemia Foundation of Queensland, which explored the financial impact of relocation for specialist treatment for hematology patients living in Queensland, Australia. The findings describe the factors that contribute to the lack of, or erosion of, a buffer to the financial distress created by diagnosis and relocation for treatment for a hematological malignancy. Individuals vulnerable to financial distress are those who lose or reduce employment, have restricted or no access to work cover or leave (sick, recreation or long service), have limited savings, and who have major repayments (e.g., home and car repayments). A combination of these factors can facilitate a spiral to acute and irreversible financial distress. The implications of the findings to social work are explored.

  17. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination in Hematological Malignancies: a Systematic Review of Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Mannocci, Alice; Colamesta, Vittoria; D’Egidio, Valeria; Sestili, Cristina; Spadea, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of getting influenza and pneumococcal disease is higher in cancer patients, and serum antibody levels tend to be lower in patients with hematological malignancy. Objective To assess flu and pneumococcal vaccinations efficacy, effectiveness, and safety in onco-hematological patients. Methods Two systematic reviews and possible meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the results of all primary study in the scientific literature about the flu and pneumococcal vaccine in onco-hematological patients. Literature searches were performed using Pub-Med and Scopus databases. StatsDirect 2.8.0 was used for the analysis. Results 22 and 26 studies were collected respectively for flu and pneumococcal vaccinations. Protection rate of booster dose was 30% (95% CI=6–62%) for H1N1. Pooled prevalence protection rate of H3N2 and B was available for meta-analysis only for first dose, 42.6% (95% CI=23.2 – 63.3 %) and 39.6 % (95% CI=26%–54.1%) for H3N2 and B, respectively. Response rate of booster dose resulted 35% (95% CI=19.7–51.2%) for H1N1, 23% (95% CI=16.6–31.5%) for H3N2, 29% (95% CI=21.3–37%) for B. Conclusion Despite the low rate of response, flu, and pneumococcal vaccines are worthwhile for patients with hematological malignancies. Patients undergoing chemotherapy in particular rituximab, splenectomy, transplant recipient had lower and impaired response. No serious adverse events were reported for both vaccines.

  18. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination in Hematological Malignancies: a Systematic Review of Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Mannocci, Alice; Colamesta, Vittoria; D’Egidio, Valeria; Sestili, Cristina; Spadea, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of getting influenza and pneumococcal disease is higher in cancer patients, and serum antibody levels tend to be lower in patients with hematological malignancy. Objective To assess flu and pneumococcal vaccinations efficacy, effectiveness, and safety in onco-hematological patients. Methods Two systematic reviews and possible meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the results of all primary study in the scientific literature about the flu and pneumococcal vaccine in onco-hematological patients. Literature searches were performed using Pub-Med and Scopus databases. StatsDirect 2.8.0 was used for the analysis. Results 22 and 26 studies were collected respectively for flu and pneumococcal vaccinations. Protection rate of booster dose was 30% (95% CI=6–62%) for H1N1. Pooled prevalence protection rate of H3N2 and B was available for meta-analysis only for first dose, 42.6% (95% CI=23.2 – 63.3 %) and 39.6 % (95% CI=26%–54.1%) for H3N2 and B, respectively. Response rate of booster dose resulted 35% (95% CI=19.7–51.2%) for H1N1, 23% (95% CI=16.6–31.5%) for H3N2, 29% (95% CI=21.3–37%) for B. Conclusion Despite the low rate of response, flu, and pneumococcal vaccines are worthwhile for patients with hematological malignancies. Patients undergoing chemotherapy in particular rituximab, splenectomy, transplant recipient had lower and impaired response. No serious adverse events were reported for both vaccines. PMID:27648207

  19. PIM serine/threonine kinases in the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Laurent; Gasser, Christelle; Bracher, Franz; Huber, Kilian; Knapp, Stefan; Schwaller, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The identification as cooperating targets of Proviral Integrations of Moloney virus in murine lymphomas suggested early on that PIM serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cancer biology. Whereas elevated levels of PIM1 and PIM2 were mostly found in hematologic malignancies and prostate cancer, increased PIM3 expression was observed in different solid tumors. PIM kinases are constitutively active and their activity supports in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth and survival through modification of an increasing number of common as well as isoform-specific substrates including several cell cycle regulators and apoptosis mediators. PIM1 but not PIM2 seems also to mediate homing and migration of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells by regulating chemokine receptor surface expression. Knockdown experiments by RNA interference or dominant-negative acting mutants suggested that PIM kinases are important for maintenance of a transformed phenotype and therefore potential therapeutic targets. Determination of the protein structure facilitated identification of an increasing number of potent small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors with in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. Ongoing efforts aim to identify isoform-specific PIM inhibitors that would not only help to dissect the kinase function but hopefully also provide targeted therapeutics. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of PIM serine/threonine kinases for the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers, and we highlight structural principles and recent progress on small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors that are on their way into first clinical trials. PMID:20145274

  20. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Debernardo, Robert; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  1. Prediction of Clinical Deterioration in Hospitalized Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Scott B.; Wong, Deborah J. L.; Correa, Aditi; Li, Ning; Deng, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical deterioration (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest) occurs during approximately 5–10% of hospital admissions. Existing prediction models have a high false positive rate, leading to multiple false alarms and alarm fatigue. We used routine vital signs and laboratory values obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR) along with a machine learning algorithm called a neural network to develop a prediction model that would increase the predictive accuracy and decrease false alarm rates. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The hematologic malignancy unit in an academic medical center in the United States. Patient Population Adult patients admitted to the hematologic malignancy unit from 2009 to 2010. Intervention None. Measurements and Main Results Vital signs and laboratory values were obtained from the electronic medical record system and then used as predictors (features). A neural network was used to build a model to predict clinical deterioration events (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest). The performance of the neural network model was compared to the VitalPac Early Warning Score (ViEWS). Five hundred sixty five consecutive total admissions were available with 43 admissions resulting in clinical deterioration. Using simulation, the neural network outperformed the ViEWS model with a positive predictive value of 82% compared to 24%, respectively. Conclusion We developed and tested a neural network-based prediction model for clinical deterioration in patients hospitalized in the hematologic malignancy unit. Our neural network model outperformed an existing model, substantially increasing the positive predictive value, allowing the clinician to be confident in the alarm raised. This system can be readily implemented in a real-time fashion in existing EMR systems. PMID:27532679

  2. Optimal stem cell source for allogeneic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Daniel KL

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is a standard treatment for many hematological malignancies. Three different sources of stem cells, namely bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and cord blood (CB) can be used for HSCT, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that there is no significant survival advantage of PBSC over BM in Human Leukocyte Antigen-matched sibling transplant for adult patients with hematological malignancies. PBSC transplant probably results in lower risk of relapse and hence better disease-free survival, especially in patients with high risk disease at the expense of higher risks of both severe acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the unrelated donor setting, the only RCT available suggests that PBSC and BM result in comparable overall and disease-free survivals in patients with hematological malignancies; and PBSC transplant results in lower risk of graft failure and higher risk of chronic GVHD. High level evidence is not available for CB in comparison to BM or PBSC. The risks and benefits of different sources of stem cells likely change with different conditioning regimen, strategies for prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD and manipulation of grafts. The recent success and rapid advance of double CB transplant and haploidentical BM and PBSC transplants further complicate the selection of stem cell source. Optimal selection requires careful weighing of the risks and benefits of different stem cell source for each individual recipient and donor. Detailed counseling of patient and donor regarding risks and benefits in the specific context of the patient and transplant method is essential for informed decision making. PMID:24392314

  3. Emerging therapeutic paradigms to target the dysregulated JAK/STAT pathways in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Girnius, Saulius; Rosen, Steven T.; Kumar, Shaji; Wiestner, Adrian; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Van Etten, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been increasing biochemical evidence that the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway is aberrantly activated in malignant cells from patients with a wide spectrum of cancers of the blood and immune systems. The emerging availability of small molecule inhibitors of JAK kinases and other signaling molecules in the JAK-STAT pathway has allowed preclinical studies validating an important role of this pathway in the pathogenesis of many hematologic malignancies, and provided motivation for new strategies for treatment of these diseases. Here, a roundtable panel of experts reviews the current preclinical and clinical landscape of the JAK-STAT pathway in acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias, lymphomas and myeloma, and chronic myeloid neoplasms. PMID:24206094

  4. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  5. Limited miR-17-92 overexpression drives hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Laura S.; Reavie, Linsey; Coussens, Marc; Davalos-Vega, Veronica; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Guijarro, Maria; Coffre, Maryaline; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Aifantis, Iannis; Ibrahim, Sherif; Liu, Cynthia; Koralov, Sergei; Hernando, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of microRNA cluster miR-17-92 has been implicated in development of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. The role of miR-17-92 in lymphomagenesis has been extensively investigated; however, because of the developmental defects caused by miR-17-92 dysregulation, its ability to drive tumorigenesis has remained undetermined until recently. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of miR-17-92 in a limited number of hematopoietic cells is sufficient to cause B cell malignancies. In sum, our study provides a novel and physiologically relevant model that exposes the potent ability of miR-17-92 to act as a driver of tumourigenesis. PMID:25597017

  6. Mold colonization of fiberglass insulation of the air distribution system: effects on patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Takuma, Takahiro; Okada, Kaoru; Yamagata, Akihiro; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Niki, Yoshihito

    2011-02-01

    We investigated mold colonization of air handling units (AHUs) of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and its effects, including invasive pulmonary mycoses and febrile neutropenia, in patients with hematological malignancies. Sample collection with transparent adhesive tape and culture swabs revealed that AHUs were heavily colonized with molds, including thermotolerant, variously distributed Penicillium spp. Cases of nosocomial invasive pulmonary mycosis were not clustered in specific patient rooms but did occur frequently when the HVAC systems were not in use, prior to intervention (i.e., sealing and disuse of AHUs in private room), and during construction of a new hospital building. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of initial episodes of febrile neutropenia showed that the rate of febrile neutropenia was significantly associated with the duration of neutropenia (odds ratio [OR]: 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.27) and with sex (OR: 0.469; CI: 0.239-0.902). An evaluation of private rooms showed that female patients also had a lower rate of fever after intervention (OR: 0.0016; 95% CI: 0.000-0.209). The reduced rate of febrile neutropenia after intervention suggests that mold colonization of AHUs had adverse effects on patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:20807030

  7. Renin expression in hematological malignancies and its role in the regulation of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Teresa Gomez Casares, M; de la Iglesia, Silvia; Perera, Maria; Lemes, Angelina; Campo, Conrado; Gonzalez San Miguel, Jose D; Bosch, Jose M; Suarez, Alexia; Guerra, Luisa; Rodriguez-Peréz, Jose C; Molero, Teresa

    2002-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that some myeloid blasts express renin, but normal bone marrow (BM) does not display this expression. The aim of the present work was to analyze the renin expression in different hematological malignancies and different myeloid cell lines. We investigated the expression of renin by RT-PCR in BM from patients with hematological malignancies (106 patients), in nine normal BM from healthy donors and in leukemic cell lines (K562, KU812, MEG-01, U-937 and HL60), as well in K562 cell line subjected to differentiation treatments. We have observed renin expression in cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases. The highest frequency was observed in AML-non acute promyelocytic leukemia(APL) cases (47.2% of the cases). The disappearance of this expression was associated with the status of complete remission of AML. Renin is expressed in some myeloid human leukemia cell lines such as K562, KU812 and MEG-01. However, when K562 cells were treated with inducers of growth inhibition and/or differentiation, the expression did not disappear, indicating that renin expression is associated with a blastic phenotype rather than with cell proliferation. The obtained findings suggest that the renin expression could have a role on the disease development and could be used as an aberrant marker of leukemia.

  8. The Basic Biology of PP2A in Hematologic Cells and Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Haesen, Dorien; Sents, Ward; Lemaire, Katleen; Hoorne, Yana; Janssens, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in regulating cell signaling. In normal cells, phosphoregulation is tightly controlled by a network of protein kinases counterbalanced by several protein phosphatases. Deregulation of this delicate balance is widely recognized as a central mechanism by which cells escape external and internal self-limiting signals, eventually resulting in malignant transformation. A large fraction of hematologic malignancies is characterized by constitutive or unrestrained activation of oncogenic kinases. This is in part achieved by activating mutations, chromosomal rearrangements, or constitutive activation of upstream kinase regulators, in part by inactivation of their anti-oncogenic phosphatase counterparts. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a large family of cellular serine/threonine phosphatases with suspected tumor suppressive functions. In this review, we highlight our current knowledge about the complex structure and biology of these phosphatases in hematologic cells, thereby providing the rationale behind their diverse signaling functions. Eventually, this basic knowledge is a key to truly understand the tumor suppressive role of PP2A in leukemogenesis and to allow further rational development of therapeutic strategies targeting PP2A.

  9. Role of p53 family members p73 and p63 in human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Evguenia M; Moll, Ute M

    2012-11-01

    p53, mutated in over half of human cancers and about 13% of all hematological malignancies, maintains genomic integrity and triggers cellular senescence and apoptosis of damaged cells. In contrast to p53, the homologs p73 and p63 play critical roles in development of the central nervous system and skin/limbs, respectively. Moreover, dependent on the context they can exert tumor suppressor activities that cooperate with p53. Unlike p53, p73 and p63 are rarely mutated in cancers. Instead, up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic dominant-negative ΔNp73 and ΔNp63 isoforms is the most frequent abnormality in solid cancers. In hematological malignancies the most frequent p73 defect is promoter methylation and loss of expression, associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. This suggests an essential tumor suppressor role of p73 in blood cells, also supported by genetic mouse models. Many therapeutic approaches aiming to restore p73 activity are currently being investigated. In contrast, the most frequent p63 abnormality is protein overexpression, associated with higher disease grade and poorer prognosis. Surprisingly, although available data are still scarce, the emerging picture is up-regulation of transactivation-competent TAp63 isoforms, suggesting a tumor-promoting role in this context. PMID:22497596

  10. Value of innovation in hematologic malignancies: a systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses

    PubMed Central

    Saret, Cayla J.; Winn, Aaron N.; Shah, Gunjan; Parsons, Susan K.; Lin, Pei-Jung; Cohen, Joshua T.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed cost-effectiveness studies related to hematologic malignancies from the Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry (www.cearegistry.org), focusing on studies of innovative therapies. Studies that met inclusion criteria were categorized by 4 cancer types (chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) and 9 treatment agents (interferon-α, alemtuzumab, bendamustine, bortezomib, dasatinib, imatinib, lenalidomide, rituximab alone or in combination, and thalidomide). We examined study characteristics and stratified cost-effectiveness ratios by type of cancer, treatment, funder, and year of study publication. Twenty-nine studies published in the years 1996-2012 (including 44 cost-effectiveness ratios) met inclusion criteria, 22 (76%) of which were industry funded. Most ratios fell below $50 000 per quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) (73%) and $100 000/QALY (86%). Industry-funded studies (n = 22) reported a lower median ratio ($26 000/QALY) than others (n = 7; $33 000/QALY), although the difference was not statistically significant. Published data suggest that innovative treatments for hematologic malignancies may provide reasonable value for money. PMID:25655601

  11. The copper chelator ATN-224 induces peroxynitrite-dependent cell death in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kristy; Briehl, Margaret M; Mazar, Andrew P; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Reboucas, Julio S; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty; Rimsza, Lisa M; Tome, Margaret E

    2013-07-01

    Chemoresistance due to oxidative stress resistance or upregulation of Bcl-2 contributes to poor outcome in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In this study, we utilize the copper-chelator drug ATN-224 (choline tetrathiomolybdate) to induce cell death in oxidative stress-resistant cells and cells overexpressing Bcl-2 by modulating the cellular redox environment and causing mitochondrial dysfunction. ATN-224 treatment decreases superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) activity, increases intracellular oxidants, and induces peroxynitrite-dependent cell death. ATN-224 also targets the mitochondria, decreasing both cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. The concentration of ATN-224 required to induce cell death is proportional to SOD1 levels, but independent of Bcl-2 status. In combination with doxorubicin, ATN-224 enhances cell death. In primary B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient samples, ATN-224 decreases the viable cell number. Our findings suggest that ATN-224's dual targeting of SOD1 and CcOX is a promising approach for treatment of hematological malignancies either as an adjuvant or as a single agent.

  12. Clinical efficacy and safety of arbekacin for high-risk infections in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsuhiro; Nakagawa, Masaru; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Uchino, Yoshihito; Kodaira, Hitomi; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Sakagami, Masashi; Ohtake, Shimon; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Hojo, Atsuko; Kurita, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Yujin; Kusuda, Machiko; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takei, Masami

    2016-03-01

    We performed a clinical trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of arbekacin (ABK), a unique aminoglycoside with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in patients with hematological malignancies complicated by high-risk infections. ABK was administered intravenously at a dose of approximately 5 mg/kg with various broad-spectrum β-lactams, followed by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). A total of 54 febrile or infectious episodes were registered, and TDM was performed in 44 (81%) cases. The absolute neutrophil count was below 500/μl in 49 (91%) cases, and cytotoxic chemotherapy was being administered in 47 (87%) cases. Before initiation of ABK, 52 (96%) patients had received fluoroquinolones (n = 37) and/or broad-spectrum β-lactams (n = 34). There were 10 cases of documented infections including one of MRSA pneumonia, and 44 cases of febrile neutropenia. The efficacy at the end of treatment was 80% for all patients, and efficacy was significantly higher in patients attaining maximum concentrations ≥ 16 µg/ml or receiving TDM-guided dose-adjustment of ABK (n = 19, 95 vs. 71%, P = 0.039). Renal toxicity was observed in six cases (11%) but was generally acceptable. This study demonstrated that TDM-guided ABK administration may be applicable under limited conditions for patients with hematological malignancies.

  13. From the Biology of PP2A to the PADs for Therapy of Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Maria; Calin, George A.; Perrotti, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, an emerging role of phosphatases in the pathogenesis of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors has been established. The tumor-suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) belongs to the serine–threonine phosphatases family and accounts for the majority of serine–threonine phosphatase activity in eukaryotic cells. Numerous studies have shown that inhibition of PP2A expression and/or function may contribute to leukemogenesis in several hematological malignancies. Likewise, overexpression or aberrant expression of physiologic PP2A inhibitory molecules (e.g., SET and its associated SETBP1 and CIP2A) may turn off PP2A function and participate to leukemic progression. The discovery of PP2A as tumor suppressor has prompted the evaluation of the safety and the efficacy of new compounds, which can restore PP2A activity in leukemic cells. Although further studies are needed to better understand how PP2A acts in the intricate phosphatases/kinases cancer network, the results reviewed herein strongly support the development on new PP2A-activating drugs and the immediate introduction of those available into clinical protocols for leukemia patients refractory or resistant to current available therapies. PMID:25763353

  14. Abdominal ultrasound findings mimicking hematological malignancies in a study of 218 Gaucher patients.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, O; Hadas-Halpern, I; Elstein, D; Abrahamov, A; Zimran, A

    1997-05-01

    Gaucher disease, the most prevalent sphingolipidosis, generally presents with splenomegaly, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Hence, hematologists are often the specialists involved in diagnosis and management of these patients. We present ultrasonographic characteristics in a cohort of 218 consecutive Gaucher patients evaluated in our clinic during the past 5 years. Our data emphasize the high prevalence of lesions mimicking hematological malignancies in Gaucher disease. One fifth of 184 non-splenectomized patients had intra-splenic lesions, 6% of all patients had similar lesions in the liver, and 32% of 34 splenectomized patients (but none of the other patients) had marked retroperitoneal or peri-portal lymphadenopathy. The presence of splenic lesions correlated with age and splenic size, but not with extent of bone involvement or genotype. Interestingly, they were not affected by reduction in splenomegaly following enzyme replacement therapy. The importance of these findings is to include Gaucher disease in the differential diagnosis of splenic or hepatic lesions, especially in Ashkenazi Jews. Conversely, they are relevant for follow-up of all Gaucher patients, including asymptomatic individuals, because of the reported increased incidence of hematological malignancies in Gaucher disease. PMID:9136914

  15. The use of giant cell tumor conditioned media in cytogenetic studies of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wason, D; Richkind, K E

    1992-07-15

    The use of conditioned media produced from solid tumor cell lines has been beneficial in the study of hematologic malignancies. Conditioned media from giant cell tumors (GCT), human lung adenocarcinoma, and human bladder carcinoma express growth factors that have been used to stimulate growth of bone marrow cells and improve the quality of the preparations. It has been reported that addition of Lu-CSF1-conditioned media from a lung adenocarcinoma cell line masks abnormalities in cases of acute leukemia [1.] Because we routinely use GCT-CM in bone marrow and leukemic blood cultures for chromosome analysis in our lab, we investigated this potential effect on our case analysis. We have performed a serial study of a 100 cases of hematologic malignancies received for analysis in our lab to determine the effect of the addition of GCT-CM to our culture media with respect to 1) mitotic index, 2) quality of preparation, and 3) differential selection of either chromosomally normal or abnormal cell lines. Our results indicate that the mitotic index and quality of metaphases is enhanced with the addition of GCT media and that there is no difference in the rate of abnormality detection with or without the addition of GCT media.

  16. [Neutrophil CD64 Expression as A Biomarker in the Early Diagnosis of Sepsis in Malignant Hematologic Disease--Review].

    PubMed

    Shang, Yu-Xi; Wang, Li-Ru

    2016-02-01

    Malignant hematologic disease with sepsis has been characterized by high mortality and difficulty in diagnosis at early stage. A good biomarker may help to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and to reduce the mortality rate. In the early diagnosis of sepsis, neutrophil CD64 expression is a better candidate for biomarker rather than C-reactive proteins. Moreover, neutrophil CD64 expression is also helpful for assessing the severity of infection and prognosis of disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies of neutrophil CD64 expression on the early diagnosis of malignant hematologic diseases. This review focuses on the advantages, limitations, feasibilities and progresses of neutrophil CD64 expression in the early diagnosis of infection in malignant hematologic diseases in this paper.

  17. Evaluation of the risk factors for febrile neutropenia associated with hematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Kenshi; Masaoka, Toru

    2009-06-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) can frequently become a very serious problem. In 2002, Klastersky and colleagues established the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) score, which consisted of risk factors for conditions that included solid tumors. However, hematopoietic tumors, in comparison to solid tumors, are plagued by such problems as the quantity and quality of abnormalities associated with leukocytes and neutrophils and the requirement for higher dosages of both radio- and chemotherapy. FN is a complication associated with hematological malignancies that can lead to a fatal outcome, but it is avoidable if the appropriate preventive treatment is performed at an early stage. The subjects of the present study consisted of 354 patients with hematopoietic malignancies who were treated at the Japanese Red Cross Medical Center Hospital, Tokyo, between August 2000 and September 2004. They were retrospectively evaluated for the risk factors of FN by applying Wilcoxon's rank sum test. A scoring index was defined and the patients were classified into high- and low-risk groups before evaluation. The following nine risk factors, which may significantly influence the relationship between the time required for defervescence and the duration of neutropenia - age; hematological diseases; the leukocyte count during the febrile period; the reduction in leukocyte count per day before the onset of FN; the prophylactic administration of antimycotic agents; sterilization of the intestinal tract; and urine albumin content, creatine level, and C-reactive protein (CRP) level - were expressed in points and their sum was termed risk points. The range of risk points was classified as 0-3 and 4-9. The time required for defervescence was 5.1 days when the risk points were in the range of 0-3 and 8.1 days when the points were in the range of 4-9. These figures were distributed normally and there was a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.0016). FN

  18. Evaluation of the risk factors for febrile neutropenia associated with hematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Kenshi; Masaoka, Toru

    2009-06-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) can frequently become a very serious problem. In 2002, Klastersky and colleagues established the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) score, which consisted of risk factors for conditions that included solid tumors. However, hematopoietic tumors, in comparison to solid tumors, are plagued by such problems as the quantity and quality of abnormalities associated with leukocytes and neutrophils and the requirement for higher dosages of both radio- and chemotherapy. FN is a complication associated with hematological malignancies that can lead to a fatal outcome, but it is avoidable if the appropriate preventive treatment is performed at an early stage. The subjects of the present study consisted of 354 patients with hematopoietic malignancies who were treated at the Japanese Red Cross Medical Center Hospital, Tokyo, between August 2000 and September 2004. They were retrospectively evaluated for the risk factors of FN by applying Wilcoxon's rank sum test. A scoring index was defined and the patients were classified into high- and low-risk groups before evaluation. The following nine risk factors, which may significantly influence the relationship between the time required for defervescence and the duration of neutropenia - age; hematological diseases; the leukocyte count during the febrile period; the reduction in leukocyte count per day before the onset of FN; the prophylactic administration of antimycotic agents; sterilization of the intestinal tract; and urine albumin content, creatine level, and C-reactive protein (CRP) level - were expressed in points and their sum was termed risk points. The range of risk points was classified as 0-3 and 4-9. The time required for defervescence was 5.1 days when the risk points were in the range of 0-3 and 8.1 days when the points were in the range of 4-9. These figures were distributed normally and there was a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.0016). FN

  19. Liquid biopsies for liquid tumors: emerging potential of circulating free nucleic acid evaluation for the management of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Jay; Mithraprabhu, Sridurga; Kalff, Anna; Spencer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Circulating free nucleic acids; cell free DNA and circulating micro-RNA, are found in the plasma of patients with hematologic and solid malignancies at levels higher than that of healthy individuals. In patients with hematologic malignancy cell free DNA reflects the underlying tumor mutational profile, whilst micro-RNAs reflect genetic interference mechanisms within a tumor and potentially the surrounding microenvironment and immune effector cells. These circulating nucleic acids offer a potentially simple, non-invasive, repeatable analysis that can aid in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions in cancer treatment. PMID:27458529

  20. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) as potential molecular targets for therapy of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Smolewski, P; Robak, T

    2011-11-01

    Apoptosis, a programmed cell death, plays a key role in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. However, impairment of its regulation may promote formation and progression of malignancy. An important part of the apoptotic machinery are the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, regulating caspase activity, cell division or cell survival pathways through binding to their baculovirus AIP repeat (BIR) domains and/or by their ubiquitin-ligase RING zinc finger (RZF) activity. The following IAPs have been described so far: NAIP (neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein; BIRC1), cIAP1 and cIAP2 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 and 2; BIRC2 and BIRC3, respectively), XIAP (X-chromosome binding IAP; BIRC4), survivin (BIRC5), BRUCE (Apollon; BIRC6), livin (BIRC7) and Ts-IAP (testis-specific IAP; BIRC8). Several studies suggested a potential contribution of IAPs to oncogenesis and resistance to anti-tumor treatment. Increased IAP expression was found in variety of human cancers, including hematological malignancies, such as leukemias and B-cell lymphomas. A correlation between the progression of those diseases and high levels of survivin or XIAP has been reported. Overexpression of XIAP in acute myeloid leukemia or survivin in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been indicated as an unfavorable prognostic factors. Elevated cellular levels of cIAP1, cIAP2, XIAP and survivin correlated with a progressive course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Thus, targeting IAPs with small-molecule inhibitors by their antisense approaches or natural IAP antagonist mimetics, may be an attractive strategy of anti-cancer treatment. Such agents can either directly induce apoptosis of tumor cells or sensitize them to other cytotoxic agents, hence overcoming drug-resistance. This review demonstrates the current knowledge on IAP molecular biology, as well as the mechanisms of action and the development of IAP-targeting agents for treatment of hematological

  1. A retrospective examination of mean relative telomere length in the Tasmanian Familial Hematological Malignancies Study

    PubMed Central

    BLACKBURN, NICHOLAS B.; CHARLESWORTH, JAC C.; MARTHICK, JAMES R.; TEGG, ELIZABETH M.; MARSDEN, KATHERINE A.; SRIKANTH, VELANDAI; BLANGERO, JOHN; LOWENTHAL, RAY M.; FOOTE, SIMON J.; DICKINSON, JOANNE L.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length has a biological link to cancer, with excessive telomere shortening leading to genetic instability and resultant malignant transformation. Telomere length is heritable and genetic variants determining telomere length have been identified. Telomere biology has been implicated in the development of hematological malignancies (HMs), therefore, closer examination of telomere length in HMs may provide further insight into genetic etiology of disease development and support for telomere length as a prognostic factor in HMs. We retrospectively examined mean relative telomere length in the Tasmanian Familial Hematological Malignancies Study using a quantitative PCR method on genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples. Fifty-five familial HM cases, 191 unaffected relatives of familial HM cases and 75 non-familial HM cases were compared with 758 population controls. Variance components modeling was employed to identify factors influencing variation in telomere length. Overall, HM cases had shorter mean relative telomere length (P=2.9×10−6) and this was observed across both familial and non-familial HM cases (P=2.2×10−4 and 2.2×10−5, respectively) as well as additional subgroupings of HM cases according to broad subtypes. Mean relative telomere length was also significantly heritable (62.6%; P=4.7×10−5) in the HM families in the present study. We present new evidence of significantly shorter mean relative telomere length in both familial and non-familial HM cases from the same population adding further support to the potential use of telomere length as a prognostic factor in HMs. Whether telomere shortening is the cause of or the result of HMs is yet to be determined, but as telomere length was found to be highly heritable in our HM families this suggests that genetics driving the variation in telomere length is related to HM disease risk. PMID:25351806

  2. Challenges in the Role of Gammaglobulin Replacement Therapy and Vaccination Strategies for Hematological Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Dhalla, Fatima; Chapel, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are prone to present with antibody production deficits associated with recurrent or severe bacterial infections that might benefit from human immunoglobulin (Ig) (IVIg/SCIg) replacement therapy. However, the original IVIg trial data were done before modern therapies were available, and the current indications do not take into account the shift in the immune situation of current treatment combinations and changes in the spectrum of infections. Besides, patients affected by other B cell malignancies present with similar immunodeficiency and manifestations while they are not covered by the current IVIg indications. A potential beneficial strategy could be to vaccinate patients at monoclonal B lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance stages (for CLL and MM, respectively) or at B-cell malignancy diagnosis, when better antibody responses are attained. We have to re-emphasize the need for assessing and monitoring specific antibody responses; these are warranted to select adequately those patients for whom early intervention with prophylactic anti-infective therapy and/or IVIg is preferred. This review provides an overview of the current scenario, with a focus on prevention of infection in patients with hematological malignancies and the role of Ig replacement therapy.

  3. Challenges in the Role of Gammaglobulin Replacement Therapy and Vaccination Strategies for Hematological Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Dhalla, Fatima; Chapel, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are prone to present with antibody production deficits associated with recurrent or severe bacterial infections that might benefit from human immunoglobulin (Ig) (IVIg/SCIg) replacement therapy. However, the original IVIg trial data were done before modern therapies were available, and the current indications do not take into account the shift in the immune situation of current treatment combinations and changes in the spectrum of infections. Besides, patients affected by other B cell malignancies present with similar immunodeficiency and manifestations while they are not covered by the current IVIg indications. A potential beneficial strategy could be to vaccinate patients at monoclonal B lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance stages (for CLL and MM, respectively) or at B-cell malignancy diagnosis, when better antibody responses are attained. We have to re-emphasize the need for assessing and monitoring specific antibody responses; these are warranted to select adequately those patients for whom early intervention with prophylactic anti-infective therapy and/or IVIg is preferred. This review provides an overview of the current scenario, with a focus on prevention of infection in patients with hematological malignancies and the role of Ig replacement therapy. PMID:27597852

  4. Challenges in the Role of Gammaglobulin Replacement Therapy and Vaccination Strategies for Hematological Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Dhalla, Fatima; Chapel, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are prone to present with antibody production deficits associated with recurrent or severe bacterial infections that might benefit from human immunoglobulin (Ig) (IVIg/SCIg) replacement therapy. However, the original IVIg trial data were done before modern therapies were available, and the current indications do not take into account the shift in the immune situation of current treatment combinations and changes in the spectrum of infections. Besides, patients affected by other B cell malignancies present with similar immunodeficiency and manifestations while they are not covered by the current IVIg indications. A potential beneficial strategy could be to vaccinate patients at monoclonal B lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance stages (for CLL and MM, respectively) or at B-cell malignancy diagnosis, when better antibody responses are attained. We have to re-emphasize the need for assessing and monitoring specific antibody responses; these are warranted to select adequately those patients for whom early intervention with prophylactic anti-infective therapy and/or IVIg is preferred. This review provides an overview of the current scenario, with a focus on prevention of infection in patients with hematological malignancies and the role of Ig replacement therapy. PMID:27597852

  5. Gene expression profiling identifies IRF4-associated molecular signatures in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yao, Zhi Q; Moorman, Jonathan P; Xu, Yanji; Ning, Shunbin

    2014-01-01

    The lymphocyte-specific transcription factor Interferon (IFN) Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is implicated in certain types of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its interactions with these malignancies are largely unknown. In this study, we have first profiled molecular signatures associated with IRF4 expression in associated cancers, by analyzing existing gene expression profiling datasets. Our results show that IRF4 is overexpressed in melanoma, in addition to previously reported contexts including leukemia, myeloma, and lymphoma, and that IRF4 is associated with a unique gene expression pattern in each context. A pool of important genes involved in B-cell development, oncogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and cell death including BATF, LIMD1, CFLAR, PIM2, and CCND2 are common signatures associated with IRF4 in non-Hodgkin B cell lymphomas. We confirmed the correlation of IRF4 with LIMD1 and CFLAR in a panel of cell lines derived from lymphomas. Moreover, we profiled the IRF4 transcriptome in the context of EBV latent infection, and confirmed several genes including IFI27, IFI44, GBP1, and ARHGAP18, as well as CFLAR as novel targets for IRF4. These results provide valuable information for understanding the IRF4 regulatory network, and improve our knowledge of the unique roles of IRF4 in different hematological malignancies. PMID:25207815

  6. Incidence of hematologic malignancies in Europe by morphologic subtype: results of the HAEMACARE project.

    PubMed

    Sant, Milena; Allemani, Claudia; Tereanu, Carmen; De Angelis, Roberta; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Visser, Otto; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Maynadié, Marc; Simonetti, Arianna; Lutz, Jean-Michel; Berrino, Franco

    2010-11-11

    Changing definitions and classifications of hematologic malignancies (HMs) complicate incidence comparisons. HAEMACARE classified HMs into groupings consistent with the latest World Health Organization classification and useful for epidemiologic and public health purposes. We present crude, age-specific and age-standardized incidence rates for European HMs according to these groupings, estimated from 66,371 lymphoid malignancies (LMs) and 21,796 myeloid malignancies (MMs) registered in 2000-2002 by 44 European cancer registries, grouped into 5 regions. Age-standardized incidence rates were 24.5 (per 100,000) for LMs and 7.55 for MMs. The commonest LMs were plasma cell neoplasms (4.62), small B-cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphatic leukemia (3.79), diffuse B-cell lymphoma (3.13), and Hodgkin lymphoma (2.41). The commonest MMs were acute myeloid leukemia (2.96), other myeloproliferative neoplasms (1.76), and myelodysplastic syndrome (1.24). Unknown morphology LMs were commonest in Northern Europe (7.53); unknown morphology MMs were commonest in Southern Europe (0.73). Overall incidence was lowest in Eastern Europe and lower in women than in men. For most LMs, incidence was highest in Southern Europe; for MMs incidence was highest in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Differences in diagnostic and registration criteria are an important cause of incidence variation; however, different distribution of HM risk factors also contributes. The quality of population-based HM data needs further improvement.

  7. Targeting protein-protein interactions in hematologic malignancies: still a challenge or a great opportunity for future therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over the past several years, there has been an increasing research effort focused on inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) to develop novel therapeutic approaches for cancer, including hematologic malignancies. These efforts have led to development of small molecule inhibitors of PPIs, some of which already advanced to the stage of clinical trials while others are at different stages of pre-clinical optimization, emphasizing PPIs as an emerging and attractive class of drug targets. Here, we review several examples of recently developed inhibitors of protein-protein interactions highly relevant to hematologic cancers. We address the existing skepticism about feasibility of targeting PPIs and emphasize potential therapeutic benefit from blocking PPIs in hematologic malignancies. We then use these examples to discuss the approaches for successful identification of PPI inhibitors and provide analysis of the protein-protein interfaces, with the goal to address ‘druggability’ of new PPIs relevant to hematology. We discuss lessons learned to improve the success of targeting new protein-protein interactions and evaluate prospects and limits of the research in this field. We conclude that not all PPIs are equally tractable for blocking by small molecules, and detailed analysis of PPI interfaces is critical for selection of those with the highest chance of success. Together, our analysis uncovers patterns that should help to advance drug discovery in hematologic malignancies by successful targeting of new protein-protein interactions. PMID:25510283

  8. A novel antibody–drug conjugate targeting SAIL for the treatment of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S Y; Theunissen, J-W; Balibalos, J; Liao-Chan, S; Babcock, M C; Wong, T; Cairns, B; Gonzalez, D; van der Horst, E H; Perez, M; Levashova, Z; Chinn, L; D‘Alessio, J A; Flory, M; Bermudez, A; Jackson, D Y; Ha, E; Monteon, J; Bruhns, M F; Chen, G; Migone, T-S

    2015-01-01

    Although several new therapeutic approaches have improved outcomes in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, unmet need persists in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), multiple myeloma (MM) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Here we describe the proteomic identification of a novel cancer target, SAIL (Surface Antigen In Leukemia), whose expression is observed in AML, MM, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL). While SAIL is widely expressed in CLL, AML, MM, DLBCL and FL patient samples, expression in cancer cell lines is mostly limited to cells of AML origin. We evaluated the antitumor activity of anti-SAIL monoclonal antibodies, 7-1C and 67-7A, conjugated to monomethyl auristatin F. Following internalization, anti-SAIL antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) exhibited subnanomolar IC50 values against AML cell lines in vitro. In pharmacology studies employing AML cell line xenografts, anti-SAIL ADCs resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition. The restricted expression profile of this target in normal tissues, the high prevalence in different types of hematologic cancers and the observed preclinical activity support the clinical development of SAIL-targeted ADCs. PMID:26024286

  9. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes and ligands and their role in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Varbanova, Viktoria; Naumova, Elissaveta; Mihaylova, Anastasiya

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are considered crucial for the elimination of emerging tumor cells. Effector NK-cell functions are controlled by interactions of inhibitory and activating killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands on target cells. KIR and HLA are highly polymorphic genetic systems segregating independently, creating a great diversity in KIR/HLA gene profiles in different individuals. There is an increasing evidence supporting the relevance of KIR and HLA ligand gene background for the occurrence and outcome of certain cancers. However, the data are still controversial and the mechanisms of receptor-ligand mediated NK-cell action remain unclear. Here, the main characteristics and functions of KIRs and their HLA class I ligands are reviewed. In addition, we review the HLA and KIR correlations with different hematological malignancies and discuss our current understanding of the biological significance and mechanisms underlying these associations.

  10. Emerging therapies targeting tumor vasculature in multiple myeloma and other hematologic and solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Podar, K; Anderson, K C

    2011-11-01

    Research on the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in general and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in particular is a major focus in biomedicine and has led to the clinical approval of the monoclonal anti- VEGF antibody bevazicumab; and the second-generation multitargeted receptor kinase inhibitors (RTKIs) sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib. Although these agents show significant preclinical and clinical anti-cancer activity, they prolong overall survival of cancer patients for only months, followed by a restoration of tumor growth and progression. Therefore, there is a clear need to increase our understanding of tumor angiogenesis and the development of resistance. In this review we discuss up-to-date knowledge on mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis, and summarize preclinical and clinical data on existing and potential future anti-angiogenic agents and treatment strategies for Multiple Myeloma (MM) and other hematologic and solid malignancies. PMID:21933109

  11. CD 123 is a membrane biomarker and a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that abnormalities of the alpha-chain of the interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3RA or CD123) are frequently observed in some leukemic disorders and may contribute to the proliferative advantage of leukemic cells. This review analyzes the studies indicating that CD123 is overexpressed in various hematologic malignancies, including a part of acute myeloid and B-lymphoid leukemias, blastic plasmocytoid dendritic neoplasms (BPDCN) and hairy cell leukemia. Given the low/absent CD123 expression on normal hematopoietic stem cells, attempts have been made at preclinical first, and then at clinical level to target this receptor. Since the IL-3R is a membrane receptor there are two relatively simple means to target this molecule, either using its natural ligand or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Recent reports using a fusion molecule composed by human IL-3 coupled to a truncated diphteria toxin have shown promising antitumor activity in BPDCN and AML patients. PMID:24513123

  12. [Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenasase (IDO) as a prognostic factor of hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Tsurumi, Hisashi

    2011-12-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyses tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway, and plays an important role in immune tolerance by regulating antigen-presenting cells. We introduce the results of our investigations of IDO for hematological malignancies. Serum L-kynurenine (KYN) for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL): The Complete remission (CR) rates of patients with lower KYN and higher KYN were 83% and 61%, respectively (p < 0.05). The 3-year overall survival (OS) rates for patients with lower KYN and higher KYN were 89% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.005). IDO expression for DLBCL: CR rates in patients with IDO-positive DLBCL and IDO-negative DLBCL were 55.3% and 79.0% (p = 0.008), while 3-year overall survival rates were 49.8% and 78.8%, respectively (p = 0.0003). Serum KYN and IDO expression for DLBCL: Three-year OS rates were 55% and 78% for patients with higher KYN and lower KYN, respectively (p = 0.027), and 44% and 75% for patients with IDO-positive and IDO-negative DLBCL, respectively (p = 0.0017). Patients with low KYN and IDO-negative showed the best outcomes, while patients with high KYN and IDO-positive showed the poorest outcome. Serum KYN for T-cell lymphoma: The 5-year OS rates for patients with lower KYN and higher KYN were 77% and 38%, respectively (p < 0.005). Serum KYN and IDO expression for AML: The 5-year OS rates for patients with lower KYN and higher KYN were 68% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.05). The 5-year OS rates for patients with IDO mRNA expression and without IDO mRNA expression were 64% and 41%, respectively (p < 0.05). IDO activity might play an important role in the disease activity of hematological malignancies.

  13. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Teras, Lauren R; Diver, W Ryan; Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Sahar, Liora; Ward, Elizabeth; Gapstur, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148Bq/m(3)) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74Bq/m(3)) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23-2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HRcontinuous=1.38, 95% CI:1.15-1.65 per 100Bq/m(3); p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1996-08-15

    Experiments were performed to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells. An attempt was made to examine in vivo the effects of lysosomotropic amines and thioamides on the retention of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies by tumor cells. Experiments also examined the impact of newer radioiodination techniques on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies, and on the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of neoplasms. The endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with I-131, In-111, and Y-90 were compared. The utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer was investigated.

  15. The casein kinase 2 inhibitor, CX-4945, as an anti-cancer drug in treatment of human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hae J; Bae, Kyoung J; Lee, Yura; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    The casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein kinase is a pro-survival kinase and therapeutic target in treatment of various human cancers. CK2 overexpression has been demonstrated in hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma. CX-4945, also known as Silmitasertib, is an orally administered, highly specific, ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2. CX-4945 induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of many cancer types. In the past 2 years, the focus on the therapeutic potential of CX-4945 has shifted from solid tumors to hematological malignancies. CX-4945 exerts anti-proliferative effects in hematological tumors by downregulating CK2 expression and suppressing activation of CK2-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, combination of CX-4945 with other inhibitors yielded synergistic effects in cell death induction. These new findings demonstrate that CK2 overexpression contributes to blood cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Combinatorial use of CX-4945 is a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of hematological malignancies.

  16. Mutational analysis of JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 genes in familial aggregation of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hamadou, Walid S; Bourdon, Violaine; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Besbes, Sawsen; Fabre, Aurélie; Youssef, Yosra B; Regaieg, Haifa; Laatiri, Mohamed A; Eisinger, François; Mari, Véronique; Gesta, Paul; Dreyfus, Hélène; Bonadona, Valérie; Dugast, Catherine; Zattara, Hélène; Faivre, Laurence; Jemni, Saloua Yacoub; Noguchi, Testsuro; Khélif, Abderrahim; Sobol, Hagay; Soua, Zohra

    2016-06-01

    Familial aggregation of hematological malignancies has been reported highlighting inherited genetic predisposition. In this study, we targeted four candidate genes: JAK2 and RUNX1 genes assuring a prominent function in hematological process and CBL and NPM1 as proto-oncogenes. Their disruption was described in several sporadic hematological malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine whether JAK2, CBL, RUNX1, and NPM1 germline genes mutations are involved in familial hematological malignancies. Using direct sequencing, we analyzed JAK2 (exons 12 and 14); CBL (exons 7, 8 and 9); NPM1 (exon 12) and the entire RUNX1 in 88 independent families belonging to Tunisian and French populations. Twenty-one sporadic acute leukemias were included in this study. We reported a heterozygous intronic c.1641 + 6 T > C JAK2 variant (rs182123615) found in two independent familial cases diagnosed with gastric lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. The in silico analysis suggested a potential impact on splicing, but the functional splicing minigene reporter assay on rs182123615 variant showed no aberrant transcripts. In one sporadic acute myeloblastic leukemia, we reported an insertion 846 in. TGTT in exon 12 of NPM1 gene that may impact the normal reading frame. The rs182123615 JAK2 variant was described in several contexts including myeloproliferative neoplasms and congenital erythrocytosis and was supposed to be pathogenic. Through this current study, we established the assessment of pathogenicity of rs182123615 and we classified it rather as rare polymorphism. PMID:27106701

  17. Humoral immunity against hepatitis B, tetanus, and diphtheria following chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies: a report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Samin; Rashidi, Armin; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi; Shamsian, Bibishahin; Nourbakhsh, Kazem

    2010-04-01

    Malignancy and its treatment are major causes of secondary immunodeficiency in childhood. The authors investigated the effects of chemotherapy on humoral immunity against hepatitis B, tetanus, and diphtheria in children with hematologic malignancies. The authors recruited 54 patients with hematologic malignancies after the completion of chemotherapy (group A), 25 patients with newly diagnosed hematologic malignancies before initiation of chemotherapy (group B), and 74 healthy controls (group C). All participants had been vaccinated against hepatitis B, tetanus, and diphtheria according to the Iranian national vaccination scheme. Patients in group A achieved protective levels of diphtheria and hepatitis B antibodies significantly less frequently than the other 2 groups and protective levels of tetanus antibody significantly less frequently than group C (P <.05). After controlling for age, the association observed for tetanus lost its significance, but chemotherapy was a significant and independent predictor of failure to achieve protective levels of antibodies against diphtheria (odds ratio [OR] = 7.7, P < .001) and hepatitis B (OR = 3.13, P = .008). These results indicate that chemotherapy has independent adverse effects on vaccine-induced antibody protection against diphtheria and hepatitis B.

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for non-malignant hematological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Hossam K.; Elhaddad, Alaa M.; Fahmy, Omar A.; Samra, Mohamed A.; Abdelfattah, Raafat M.; El-Nahass, Yasser H.; Fathy, Gamal M.; Abdelhady, Mohamed S.

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) from a geno-identical matched sibling (MSD) is one of the most successful therapies in patients with non-malignant hematological disorders. This study included 273 patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA), 152 patients with B-Thalassemia major (BTM), 31 patients with Fanconi’s anemia (FA), 20 patients with congenital immunodeficiency diseases (ID), and 13 patients with inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) allografted from a MSD. In SAA, the 8-year overall survival (OS) of the whole group patients was 74%. OS was significantly better in patients conditioned with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (Flu/Cy) than in those who received cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin (Cy/ATG) (p = 0.021). Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) grade II–IV occurred in 15% while chronic GVHD (cGVHD) occurred in 28%. In BTM, the 12-year disease-free survival (DFS) of the whole group of BTM patients was 72.4%. DFS was 74% for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) group compared to 64% in the BM stem cell group. The incidence of graft rejection was significantly lower in patients who received PBSC than in those who received BM (9% vs 25%) (p = 0.036). AGVHD grade II–IV and cGVHD occurred in 15% and 12% of the whole group of BTM patients respectively. In FA, the 5-year OS was 64.5%. Graft rejection occurred in 10% of patients. Grade II–IV aGVHD occurred in 16% while cGVHD occurred in 4%. In ID, the 5-year OS was 62%. Graft rejection occurred in two (10%) patients. Three patients (15%) developed grade II–IV aGVHD, 2 of them progressed to secondary cGVHD. In IMD, OS was 46% at 5 years. Graft rejection occurred in 8% of patients. AGVHD grade II–IV occurred in 15% while cGVHD occurred in 14%. In conclusion, Allo-HSCT provides a higher DFS rate over conventional therapies for patients with non-malignant hematological disorders with prolonged survival. PMID:26257943

  19. Validation and Implementation of a Custom Next-Generation Sequencing Clinical Assay for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kluk, Michael J; Lindsley, R Coleman; Aster, Jon C; Lindeman, Neal I; Szeto, David; Hall, Dimity; Kuo, Frank C

    2016-07-01

    Targeted next-generation sequencing panels to identify genetic alterations in cancers are increasingly becoming an integral part of clinical practice. We report here the design, validation, and implementation of a comprehensive 95-gene next-generation sequencing panel targeted for hematologic malignancies that we named rapid heme panel. Rapid heme panel is amplicon based and covers hotspot regions of oncogenes and most of the coding regions of tumor suppressor genes. It is composed of 1330 amplicons and covers 175 kb of genomic sequence in total. Rapid heme panel's average coverage is 1500× with <5% of the amplicons with <50× coverage, and it reproducibly detects single nucleotide variants and small insertions/deletions at allele frequencies of ≥5%. Comparison with a capture-based next-generation sequencing assay showed that there is >95% concordance among a wide array of variants across a range of allele frequencies. Read count analyses that used rapid heme panel showed high concordance with karyotypic results when tumor content was >30%. The average turnaround time was 7 days over a 6-month span with an average volume of ≥40 specimens per week and a low sample fail rate (<1%), demonstrating its suitability for clinical application. PMID:27339098

  20. The prevalence of molecular and immunologic infective markers of hepatitis viruses in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mirzaee, Mitra; Yaghobi, Ramin; Ramzi, Mani; Roshan Nia, Mahdi

    2012-02-01

    Acute and chronic viral hepatitis infections are corresponding to increase the risk of different types of hematological malignancies especially with leukemia. In this study the serological and molecular markers of hepatitis viruses were evaluated in patients with different types of leukemia in comparing with control group. In this cross sectional study, 100 EDTA-treated blood samples were collected from leukemia patients and also from healthy control group, respectively. Serological and molecular markers of HBV, HCV and HDV viruses were analyzed for determination of the role of these hepatitis viruses in clinical outcomes of leukemia disorders. Increasing risk factors of leukemia were evaluated statistically in two studied groups by SPSS software. One of molecular and immunological markers of HBV, HDV and HCV was found in 24 of 100 (24%), 22 of 100 (22%), and 1 of 100 (1%) patients with leukemia and in 12 of 100 (12%), 6 of 100 (6%), and 2 of 100 (2%) control patients. Significant differences were detected in detection of HBsAg (P = 0.02), HBeAb (P = 0.009), and HCV-RNA (P = 0.05) between leukemia patients and control group, respectively. The high prevalence of HBV and HCV infective markers were detected in ALL and AML patients. Identification of high prevalence of HBV and HCV infective markers in leukemia patients proposed strong association between hepatitis viral infections and leukemia. Therefore, evaluation of the prevalence of viral hepatitis infections in larger groups of patients with long lasting follow up is suggesting.

  1. Integrated genomic DNA/RNA profiling of hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Nahas, Michelle K; Wang, Kai; Rampal, Raajit K; Intlekofer, Andrew M; Patel, Jay; Krivstov, Andrei; Frampton, Garrett M; Young, Lauren E; Zhong, Shan; Bailey, Mark; White, Jared R; Roels, Steven; Deffenbaugh, Jason; Fichtenholtz, Alex; Brennan, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Mark; Pelak, Kimberly; Knapp, Kristina M; Brennan, Kristina W; Donahue, Amy L; Young, Geneva; Garcia, Lazaro; Beckstrom, Selmira T; Zhao, Mandy; White, Emily; Banning, Vera; Buell, Jamie; Iwanik, Kiel; Ross, Jeffrey S; Morosini, Deborah; Younes, Anas; Hanash, Alan M; Paietta, Elisabeth; Roberts, Kathryn; Mullighan, Charles; Dogan, Ahmet; Armstrong, Scott A; Mughal, Tariq; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Labrecque, Elaine; Erlich, Rachel; Vietz, Christine; Yelensky, Roman; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Otto, Geoff A; Lipson, Doron; Levine, Ross L

    2016-06-16

    The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes of genomic alterations using archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blood and bone marrow samples with high accuracy in a clinically relevant time frame, which is performed in our Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified College of American Pathologists-accredited laboratory. Targeted capture of DNA/RNA and next-generation sequencing reliably identifies substitutions, indels, CNAs, and gene fusions, with similar accuracy to lower-throughput assays that focus on specific genes and types of genomic alterations. Profiling of 3696 samples identified recurrent somatic alterations that impact diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. This comprehensive genomic profiling approach has proved effective in detecting all types of genomic alterations, including fusion transcripts, which increases the ability to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations with therapeutic relevance. PMID:26966091

  2. Advances in conditioning regimens for older adults undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation to treat hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    William, Basem M; de Lima, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with hematological malignancies. These diseases, however, have their peak incidence in the sixth to eighth decades of life. Historically, elderly patients have been considered unsuitable candidates for SCT because of high treatment-related mortality (TRM). Over the past 15 years, the use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens before SCT has allowed patients in the sixth and seventh decades of life to be routinely transplanted. Despite major differences among transplant centers in the intensity and composition of the conditioning regimen and immunosuppression, choice of graft source, postgraft immunomodulation, and supportive care, there has been a dramatic decrease in TRM, allowing safer delivery of SCT. Major obstacles to SCT in elderly patients include donor availability, graft-versus-host disease, delayed immune recovery, multiple comorbidities, and chemo refractoriness. Here we review the current results of SCT in elderly patients, focusing on the role of RIC, and using myeloid diseases as the model for discussion.

  3. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  4. Effect of body mass in children with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aplenc, Richard; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Sung, Lillian; Zhu, Xiaochun; Ho, Vincent T.; Cooke, Kenneth; Dvorak, Christopher; Hale, Gregory; Isola, Luis M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Olsson, Richard; Pulsipher, Michael; Bunin, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The rising incidence of pediatric obesity may significantly affect bone marrow transplantation (BMT) outcomes. We analyzed outcomes in 3687 children worldwide who received cyclophosphamide-based BMT regimens for leukemias between 1990 and 2007. Recipients were classified according to age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentiles as underweight (UW), at risk of UW (RUW), normal, overweight (OW), or obese (OB). Median age and race were similar in all groups. Sixty-one percent of OB children were from the United States/Canada. Three-year relapse-free and overall survival ranged from 48% to 52% (P = .54) and 55% to 58% (P = .81) across BMI groups. Three-year leukemia relapses were 33%, 33%, 29%, 25%, and 21% in the UW, RUW, normal, OW, and OB groups, respectively (P < .001). Corresponding cumulative incidences for transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 18%, 19%, 21%, 22%, and 28% (P < .01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a decreased risk of relapse compared with normal BMI (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; P < .01) and a trend toward higher TRM (RR = 1.28; P = .014). BMI in children is not significantly associated with different survival after BMT for hematologic malignancies. Obese children experience less relapse posttransplant compared with children with normal BMI; however, this benefit is offset by excess in TRM. PMID:24711663

  5. Integrated genomic DNA/RNA profiling of hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Nahas, Michelle K.; Wang, Kai; Rampal, Raajit K.; Intlekofer, Andrew M.; Patel, Jay; Krivstov, Andrei; Frampton, Garrett M.; Young, Lauren E.; Zhong, Shan; Bailey, Mark; White, Jared R.; Roels, Steven; Deffenbaugh, Jason; Fichtenholtz, Alex; Brennan, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Mark; Pelak, Kimberly; Knapp, Kristina M.; Brennan, Kristina W.; Donahue, Amy L.; Young, Geneva; Garcia, Lazaro; Beckstrom, Selmira T.; Zhao, Mandy; White, Emily; Banning, Vera; Buell, Jamie; Iwanik, Kiel; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Morosini, Deborah; Younes, Anas; Hanash, Alan M.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Roberts, Kathryn; Mullighan, Charles; Dogan, Ahmet; Armstrong, Scott A.; Mughal, Tariq; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Labrecque, Elaine; Erlich, Rachel; Vietz, Christine; Yelensky, Roman; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Otto, Geoff A.; Lipson, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes of genomic alterations using archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blood and bone marrow samples with high accuracy in a clinically relevant time frame, which is performed in our Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments–certified College of American Pathologists–accredited laboratory. Targeted capture of DNA/RNA and next-generation sequencing reliably identifies substitutions, indels, CNAs, and gene fusions, with similar accuracy to lower-throughput assays that focus on specific genes and types of genomic alterations. Profiling of 3696 samples identified recurrent somatic alterations that impact diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. This comprehensive genomic profiling approach has proved effective in detecting all types of genomic alterations, including fusion transcripts, which increases the ability to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations with therapeutic relevance. PMID:26966091

  6. Serum alpha 2-HS glycoprotein concentration in patients with hematological malignancies. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kalabay, L; Cseh, K; Benedek, S; Fekete, S; Masszi, T; Herjeczki, K; Pozsonyi, T; Jakab, L; Jakab, L

    1991-11-01

    We observed significantly reduced serum alpha 2-HS glycoprotein concentrations in patients with acute lymphocytic, acute nonlymphocytic, chronic granulocytic and chronic myelomonocytic leukemias, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myelofibrosis, and multiple myeloma, but not in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and polycythemia vera, as compared with healthy controls. We followed the serum level of the protein for 18 months. Patients with infectious complications, those receiving cytostatic treatment, and those in the preterminal period had further reduced serum alpha 2-HS glycoprotein levels. The reduction of serum alpha 2-HS glycoprotein concentration was primarily due to decreased production caused by infiltration of the liver, a hepatotoxic effect of cytostatic treatment, and, to a lesser degree, to increased consumption. We found statistically significant negative correlations between serum alpha 2-HS glycoprotein concentration and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities, and IgG and IgM concentrations. The determination of the alpha 2-HS glycoprotein concentration is useful for the assessment and follow-up of the clinical status and therapy of patients with hematological malignancies and also has prognostic significance.

  7. Anticancer Role of PPARγ Agonists in Hematological Malignancies Found in the Vasculature, Marrow, and Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Haidaris, P. J.; Pollock, S. J.; Ramon, S.; Guo, N.; Woeller, C. F.; Feldon, S. E.; Phipps, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of targeted cancer therapies in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiation treatment has increased overall survival of cancer patients. However, longer survival is accompanied by increased incidence of comorbidities due, in part, to drug side effects and toxicities. It is well accepted that inflammation and tumorigenesis are linked. Because peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists are potent mediators of anti-inflammatory responses, it was a logical extension to examine the role of PPARγ agonists in the treatment and prevention of cancer. This paper has two objectives: first to highlight the potential uses for PPARγ agonists in anticancer therapy with special emphasis on their role when used as adjuvant or combined therapy in the treatment of hematological malignancies found in the vasculature, marrow, and eyes, and second, to review the potential role PPARγ and/or its ligands may have in modulating cancer-associated angiogenesis and tumor-stromal microenvironment crosstalk in bone marrow. PMID:20204067

  8. T-Cell Receptor-Engineered Cells for the Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Nasheed M; Chapuis, Aude G; Walter, Roland B

    2016-08-01

    Recent attention in adoptive immunotherapy for hematologic malignancies has focused on lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors. An alternative technique to redirect the immune system toward cancer cells involves the use of T-cells carrying an engineered tumor-recognizing T-cell receptor (TCR). This approach allows targeting of surface or intracellular/nuclear proteins as long as they are processed and presented on the cell surface by human leukocyte antigen molecules. Several trials in advanced solid tumors, particularly melanoma and synovial sarcoma, support the validity of this strategy, although tumor responses have often been short-lived. Emerging data from patients with multiple myeloma and myeloid neoplasms suggest that the benefit of TCR-modified cells may extend to blood cancers. Methodological refinements may be necessary to increase the in vivo persistence and functionality of these cells. Particularly with affinity-enhanced TCRs, however, more effective therapies may increase the potential for serious toxicity due to the unexpected on- or off-target reactivity.

  9. Serum voriconazole level variability in patients with hematological malignancies receiving voriconazole therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Lalit; Seki, Jack T; Kumar, Deepali; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Cole, David EC; Wong, Betty YL; Božović, Andrea; Brandwein, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Voriconazole plasma concentrations have been correlated with oral dosing in healthy subjects, but have been poorly characterized in ill patients with hematological malignancies receiving intensive chemotherapy. METHODS: The relationship between orally administered voriconazole, plasma concentrations and liver toxicity was examined in a cohort of 69 primarily acute leukemia patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy. RESULTS: Oral administration of voriconazole was associated with significant interpatient variability, with voriconazole steady-state concentrations ranging from 0 μg/mL to 16.6 μg/mL. Approximately 20% of patients achieved steady-state concentrations <1 μg/mL. When adjusted for weight, patients receiving higher voriconazole doses tended toward higher plasma concentrations; however, there was no significant relationship between the plasma concentration and genotype, age, sex or use of concomitant proton pump inhibitors. Voriconazole concentrations were correlated with higher serum alkaline phosphatase levels at day 6 to 8, and with higher bilirubin and aspartate aminotransferase levels at day 14 to 16, but not with other liver enzyme levels. CONCLUSION: In ill patients with acute leukemia and related disorders undergoing treatment with oral voriconazole, there is a poor correlation between the voriconazole dose and plasma concentrations, and many patients achieve levels that are considered to be subtherapeutic. The findings support the routine use of therapeutic drug monitoring in these patients. PMID:25371690

  10. Diagnostic medical imaging radiation exposure and risk of development of solid and hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Berkes, Marschall B; Dy, Christopher J; Bogner, Eric A

    2012-05-01

    Limiting patients' exposure to ionizing radiation during diagnostic imaging is of concern to patients and clinicians. Large single-dose exposures and cumulative exposures to ionizing radiation have been associated with solid tumors and hematologic malignancy. Although these associations have been a driving force in minimizing patients' exposure, significant risks are found when diagnoses are missed and subsequent treatment is withheld. Therefore, based on epidemiologic data obtained after nuclear and occupational exposures, dose exposure limits have been estimated. A recent collaborative effort between the US Food and Drug Administration and the American College of Radiology has provided information and tools that patients and imaging professionals can use to avoid unnecessary ionizing radiation scans and ensure use of the lowest feasible radiation dose necessary for studies. Further collaboration, research, and development should focus on producing technological advances that minimize individual study exposures and duplicate studies. This article outlines the research used to govern safe radiation doses, defines recent initiatives in decreasing radiation exposure, and provides orthopedic surgeons with techniques that may help decrease radiation exposure in their daily practice.

  11. [Galectins in hematological malignancies--role, functions and potential therapeutic targets].

    PubMed

    Wdowiak, Kamil; Spychałowicz, Wojciech; Fajkis, Marcin; Wojnar, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Galectins are a family of lectins characterized by an affinity for β-galactosides through the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). The extracellular and intracellular presence of Galectins has been described. Their activity and functions are mainly attributed to cell type. The tumor microenviroment is a complex milieu connected with immunosupression, angiogenesis and hypoxic compartments. The studies of interactions between Glycans-Lectins are highly advanced and promising. We are not able to explain the pathogenesis of many diseases only by protein-protein interactions, that is why in these studies is a chance to find a new therapeutic targets. Galectins play a fundametal functions in tumor growth and progression, angiogenesis, adhesion, tumor immune-escape. They are also active in inflammation, fibrosis, organogenesis and immunological functions. The most known Galectin is Gal-3. Depending on the localization Gal-3 may exhibit either pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic activity. This publication presents role of Galectins in hematological malignancies and shows potencial prognostoic value and new therapeutic possibilities.

  12. MicroRNA-regulated pathways in hematological malignancies: how to avoid cells playing out of tune.

    PubMed

    Fatica, Alessandro; Fazi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The coordinated expression and interplay among lineage specific transcription factors and microRNAs contribute to the regulation of gene expression and determination of cell specificity. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), unique combinations of transcription factors largely control growth and maturation of different blood cell lineages through cooperative regulation of specific target genes. MicroRNAs provide an additional level of control beyond transcription factors. By acting as regulators of crucial lineage-specific genetic programs, microRNAs direct early multipotential progenitor cells to adopt a certain cell fate program. Thus, alteration of specific microRNA levels may affect proliferation, differentiation and genetic stability of HSCs, contributing to the onset of myeloproliferative disorders and leukemia. The major aim of this review is to highlight the critical role of microRNA-regulated pathways during the establishment and progression of hematological malignancies, with a particular attention to leukemia, lymphomas and myelodysplastic syndromes. This will give us the opportunity to discuss the potential use of microRNA-based therapeutic approaches in these diseases. MicroRNAs are indeed emerging as relevant tools to improve the efficacy of currently used therapeutic protocols.

  13. HLA-DR9 and DR14 are associated with the allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Park, Seon-Yang; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely used urate-lowering agent, is a leading cause of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), especially in patients with HLA-B*58:01. Despite its routine use for the prevention of tumor lysis-related hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy, the risk of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity has not been investigated in patients with hematologic malignancies. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence and risk factors of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in patients at least 18 years of age with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed 463 patients who had ever taken allopurinol for the prevention of hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy and had undergone serologic HLA typing as a pre-transplant evaluation from January 2000 to May 2010. Thirteen (2.8%) patients experienced maculopapular eruptions (MPE) and none experienced SCARs. Among subtypes of underlying hematologic malignancies, percentage of chronic myeloid leukemia was significantly higher in the allopurinol hypersensitivity group compared with the tolerant group (23.1% (3/13) vs. 5.9% (26/440), P = 0.044). According to HLA subtypes, the incidence of allopurinol-induced MPE was 4.0% in HLA-B58 (+) patients (2/50) and 2.7% in HLA-B58 (-) patients (11/403) but this difference was statistically insignificant. In contrast to HLA-B58, the frequencies of DR9 and DR14 were significantly higher in the allopurinol-induced MPE group compared with the allopurinol tolerant group (38.5% (5/13) vs. 13.6% (53/443), P = 0.019, and 38.5% (5/13) vs. 15.6% (41/440), P = 0.038, respectively). In conclusion, HLA-DR9 and DR14, but not HLA-B58, are associated with hypersensitivity reaction by allopurinol when administered in patients with hematologic malignancy prior to chemotherapy.

  14. Prevalence and Positive Correlates of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms among Chinese Patients with Hematological Malignancies: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Yang, Yi-Long; Wang, Zi-Yue; Wu, Hui; Wang, Yang; Wang, Lie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Positive psychological constructs have been given increasing attention in research on the coping resources of cancer-related distresses. However, little research is available on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with hematological malignancies. The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence of PTSD symptoms and to explore the associations of perceived social support (PSS), hope, optimism and resilience with PTSD symptoms among Chinese patients with hematological malignancies. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted during the period from July 2013 through April 2014. A total of 225 inpatients with hematological malignancies, which were eligible for the study, completed the Post-traumatic Stress Checklist-Civilian Version, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Adult Hope Scale, Life Orientation Scale-Revised, and Resilience Scale. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed to explore the correlates of PTSD symptoms. Results Overall, the prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 10.7%. Initially, PSS was negatively associated with PTSD symptoms (β = -0.248, P < 0.01). However, when positive psychological variables were added, optimism was negatively associated with PTSD symptoms (β = -0.452, P < 0.01), and gender had a significant effect on PTSD symptoms. Women were more vulnerable to these symptoms than men (β = 0.123, P < 0.05). When the analysis was performed separately by gender, only optimism showed a significantly negative association with PTSD symptoms in both men (β = -0.389, P < 0.01) and women (β = -0.493, P < 0.01). Conclusions Some patients with hematological malignancies suffer from PTSD symptoms. The positive effects of PSS and optimism on PTSD symptoms suggest that an integrated approach to psychosocial intervention from both external and internal perspectives could have practical significance. Gender difference should be considered in developing potential interventions in reducing cancer-related PTSD

  15. The MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism increase gastrointestinal cancer and hematological malignancy risk: evidence from a meta-analysis and FPRP test

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiang; Zheng, Bing; Tong, Qiaoyi; Liu, Sitong; Peng, Sifeng; Yang, Xin; Fan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) -173G/C gene polymorphism has been implicated in the susceptibility to cancer, but the results are not conclusive. So the aim of study to investigate the association between MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism and cancer risk by a comprehensive meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase, Wanfang and China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI) databases, with the last updated search being performed on May 24, 2015. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were used to assess the association. Statistical analysis was performed by STATA 11.0 software. Finally, 7,253 participants from 15 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results of meta-analysis indicated the significant association between MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism and cancer susceptibility, especially in Asians (C vs. G, OR: 1.22, 95% CI=1.00-1.50). In addition, the significant relationship between MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism and gastrointestinal tumors (CC+CG vs. GG, OR: 1.25, 95% CI=1.05-1.50), hematological malignancy (CC+CG vs. GG, OR: 1.27, 95% CI=1.03-1.56), gynecolgical tumors (CC vs. CG+GG, OR: 1.51, 95% CI=1.04-2.19) risk was found. However, to avoid the “false positive report”, we investigated the significant associations observed in the present meta-analysis by the false positive report probabilities (FPRPs) test. Interestingly, the results of FPRP test indicated the MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism only associated with gastrointestinal cancer and hematological malignancy risk (FPRP=0.132, 0.067 respectively) at the level of a prior probability is 0.1. Therefore, the meta-analysis suggested MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism would be a risk factor for the gastrointestinal cancer and hematological malignancy. PMID:26629098

  16. (1, 3)-β-D-glucan assay for diagnosing invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Elie; Guigue, Nicolas; Darmon, Michael; Mokart, Djamel; Lemiale, Virginie; Kouatchet, Achille; Mayaux, Julien; Vincent, François; Nyunga, Martine; Bruneel, Fabrice; Rabbat, Antoine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Lebert, Christine; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique; Pene, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are life-threatening complications of hematological malignancies that must be diagnosed early to allow effective treatment. Few data are available on the performance of serum (1–3)-β-D-glucan (BG) assays for diagnosing IFI in patients with hematological malignancies admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, 737 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies admitted to 17 ICUs routinely underwent a BG assay at ICU admission. IFIs were diagnosed using standard criteria applied by three independent specialists. Among the 737 patients, 439 (60%) required mechanical ventilation and 273 (37%) died before hospital discharge. Factors known to alter BG concentrations were identified in most patients. IFIs were documented in 78 (10.6%) patients (invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, n = 54; Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, n = 13; candidemia, n = 13; and fusarium infections, n = 3). BG concentrations (pg/mL) were higher in patients with than without IFI (144 (77–510) vs. 50 (30–125), < 0.0001). With 80 pg/mL as the cutoff, sensitivity was 72%, specificity 65%, and area-under-the-curve 0.74 (0.68–0.79). Assuming a prevalence of 10%, the negative and positive predictive values were 94% and 21%. By multivariable analysis, factors independently associated with BG > 80 pg/mL were IFI, admission SOFA score, autologous bone-marrow or hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, and microbiologically documented bacterial infection. In conclusion, in unselected critically ill hematology patients with factors known to affect serum BG, this biomarker showed only moderate diagnostic performance and rarely detected IFI. However, the negative predictive value was high. Studies are needed to assess whether a negative BG test indicates that antifungal de-escalation is safe. PMID:26910891

  17. Robust Vaccine Responses in Adult and Pediatric Cord Blood Transplantation Recipients Treated for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gunjan L; Shune, Leyla; Purtill, Duncan; Devlin, Sean; Lauer, Emily; Lubin, Marissa; Bhatt, Valkal; McElrath, Courtney; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Giralt, Sergio; Perales, Miguel A; Ponce, Doris M; Young, James W; Shah, Monica; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-12-01

    Because cord blood (CB) lacks memory T and B cells and recent decreases in herd immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases in many developed countries have been documented, vaccine responses in CB transplantation (CBT) survivors are of great interest. We analyzed vaccine responses in double-unit CBT recipients transplanted for hematologic malignancies. In 103 vaccine-eligible patients, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) most commonly precluded vaccination. Sixty-five patients (63%; engrafting units median HLA-allele match 5/8; range, 2 to 7/8) received protein conjugated vaccines, and 63 patients (median age, 34 years; range, .9 to 64) were evaluated for responses. Median vaccination time was 17 months (range, 7 to 45) post-CBT. GVHD (n = 42) and prior rituximab (n = 13) delayed vaccination. Responses to Prevnar 7 and/or 13 vaccines (serotypes 14, 19F, 23F) were seen in children and adults (60% versus 49%, P = .555). Responses to tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, and polio were observed in children (86% to 100%) and adults (53% to 89%) even if patients had prior GVHD or rituximab. CD4(+)CD45RA(+) and CD19(+) cell recovery significantly influenced tetanus and polio responses. In a smaller cohort responses were seen to measles (65%), mumps (50%), and rubella (100%) vaccines. No vaccine side effects were identified, and all vaccinated patients survived (median follow-up, 57 months). Although GVHD and rituximab can delay vaccination, CBT recipients (including adults and those with prior GVHD) have similar vaccine response rates to adult donor allograft recipients supporting vaccination in CBT recipients. PMID:26271191

  18. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  19. Tumor lysis syndrome in the era of novel and targeted agents in patients with hematologic malignancies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Howard, Scott C; Trifilio, Steven; Gregory, Tara K; Baxter, Nadine; McBride, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Effective new treatments are now available for patients with hematologic malignancies. However, their propensity to cause tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) has not been systematically examined. A literature search identified published Phase I-III clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies (otlertuzumab, brentuximab, obinutuzumab, ibritumomab, ofatumumab); tyrosine kinase inhibitors (alvocidib [flavopiridol], dinaciclib, ibrutinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, idelalisib, venetoclax [ABT-199]); proteasome inhibitors (oprozomib, carfilzomib); chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells; and the proapoptotic agent lenalidomide. Abstracts from major congresses were also reviewed. Idelalisib and ofatumumab had no reported TLS. TLS incidence was ≤5 % with brentuximab vedotin (for anaplastic large-cell lymphoma), carfilzomib and lenalidomide (for multiple myeloma), dasatinib (for acute lymphoblastic leukemia), and oprozomib (for various hematologic malignancies). TLS incidences were 8.3 and 8.9 % in two trials of venetoclax (for chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL]) and 10 % in trials of CAR T cells (for B-cell malignancies) and obinutuzumab (for non-Hodgkin lymphoma). TLS rates of 15 % with dinaciclib and 42 and 53 % with alvocidib (with sequential cytarabine and mitoxantrone) were seen in trials of acute leukemias. TLS mitigation was employed routinely in clinical trials of alvocidib and lenalidomide. However, TLS mitigation strategies were not mentioned or stated only in general terms for many studies of other agents. The risk of TLS persists in the current era of novel and targeted therapy for hematologic malignancies and was seen to some extent with most agents. Our findings underscore the importance of continued awareness, risk assessment, and prevention to reduce this serious potential complication of effective anticancer therapy. PMID:26758269

  20. JAK kinase targeting in hematologic malignancies: a sinuous pathway from identification of genetic alterations towards clinical indications

    PubMed Central

    Springuel, Lorraine; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Knoops, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation occurs in most myeloproliferative neoplasms as well as in a significant proportion of other hematologic malignancies, and is frequently a marker of poor prognosis. The underlying molecular alterations are heterogeneous as they include activating mutations in distinct components (cytokine receptor, JAK, STAT), overexpression (cytokine receptor, JAK) or rare JAK2 fusion proteins. In some cases, concomitant loss of negative regulators contributes to pathogenesis by further boosting the activation of the cascade. Exploiting the signaling bottleneck provided by the limited number of JAK kinases is an attractive therapeutic strategy for hematologic neoplasms driven by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. However, given the conserved nature of the kinase domain among family members and the interrelated roles of JAK kinases in many physiological processes, including hematopoiesis and immunity, broad usage of JAK inhibitors in hematology is challenged by their narrow therapeutic window. Novel therapies are, therefore, needed. The development of more selective inhibitors is a questionable strategy as such inhibitors might abrogate the beneficial contribution of alleviating the cancer-related pro-inflammatory microenvironment and raise selective pressure to a threshold that allows the emergence of malignant subclones harboring drug-resistant mutations. In contrast, synergistic combinations of JAK inhibitors with drugs targeting cascades that work in concert with JAK-STAT pathway appear to be promising therapeutic alternatives to JAK inhibitors as monotherapies. PMID:26432382

  1. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  2. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-07-28

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  3. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-07-28

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  4. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  5. Disseminated toxoplasmosis in non-allografted patients with hematologic malignancies: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Scerra, S; Coignard-Biehler, H; Lanternier, F; Suarez, F; Charlier-Woerther, C; Bougnoux, M-E; Gilquin, J; Lecuit, M; Hermine, O; Lortholary, O

    2013-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis can be a severe opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and also among solid organ transplant and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. Patients with low-grade or chronic hematologic malignancies are treated with increasing immunosuppressive regimens and, therefore, represent an emerging population at risk for opportunistic diseases. We report here two cases of disseminated toxoplasmosis occurring in non-allografted hematologic patients with chronic lymphoproliferations. A review of 44 cases from the literature reveals that toxoplasmosis occurs increasingly in indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Aggressive lymphoproliferations, adenosine analogs, autologous HSCT, and the absence of chemoprophylaxis are the main risk factors for opportunistic toxoplasmosis. The central nervous system is the main organ involved. Fever is only present in half of all cases. Latent Toxoplasma cysts reactivation (LTCR) is the most common, but primary infection occurs in about 20% of cases. Global mortality is over 50%.

  6. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis to Evaluate Cell Type Specific Expression of Targets Relevant for Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Honders, M. W.; Kremer, A. N.; van Kooten, C.; Out, C.; Hiemstra, P. S.; de Boer, H. C.; Jager, M. J.; Schmelzer, E.; Vries, R. G.; Al Hinai, A. S.; Kroes, W. G.; Monajemi, R.; Goeman, J. J.; Böhringer, S.; Marijt, W. A. F.; Falkenburg, J. H. F.; Griffioen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, dependent on the tissue distribution of the antigens that are targeted, anti-tumor responses can be accompanied by undesired side effects. Therefore, detailed tissue distribution analysis is essential to estimate potential efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies. We performed microarray gene expression analysis of hematological malignancies of different origins, healthy hematopoietic cells and various non-hematopoietic cell types from organs that are often targeted in detrimental immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation leading to graft-versus-host disease. Non-hematopoietic cells were also cultured in the presence of IFN-γ to analyze gene expression under inflammatory circumstances. Gene expression was investigated by Illumina HT12.0 microarrays and quality control analysis was performed to confirm the cell-type origin and exclude contamination of non-hematopoietic cell samples with peripheral blood cells. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR showing strong correlations between both platforms. Detailed gene expression profiles were generated for various minor histocompatibility antigens and B-cell surface antigens to illustrate the value of the microarray dataset to estimate efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy. In conclusion, our microarray database provides a relevant platform to analyze and select candidate antigens with hematopoietic (lineage)-restricted expression as potential targets for immunotherapy of hematological cancers. PMID:27171398

  7. Integration of microarray analysis into the clinical diagnosis of hematological malignancies: How much can we improve cytogenetic testing?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jess F.; Aggarwal, Nidhi; Smith, Clayton A.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Surti, Urvashi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Swerdlow, Steven H.; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical utility, diagnostic yield and rationale of integrating microarray analysis in the clinical diagnosis of hematological malignancies in comparison with classical chromosome karyotyping/fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Methods G-banded chromosome analysis, FISH and microarray studies using customized CGH and CGH+SNP designs were performed on 27 samples from patients with hematological malignancies. A comprehensive comparison of the results obtained by three methods was conducted to evaluate benefits and limitations of these techniques for clinical diagnosis. Results Overall, 89.7% of chromosomal abnormalities identified by karyotyping/FISH studies were also detectable by microarray. Among 183 acquired copy number alterations (CNAs) identified by microarray, 94 were additional findings revealed in 14 cases (52%), and at least 30% of CNAs were in genomic regions of diagnostic/prognostic significance. Approximately 30% of novel alterations detected by microarray were >20 Mb in size. Balanced abnormalities were not detected by microarray; however, of the 19 apparently “balanced” rearrangements, 55% (6/11) of recurrent and 13% (1/8) of non-recurrent translocations had alterations at the breakpoints discovered by microarray. Conclusion Microarray technology enables accurate, cost-effective and time-efficient whole-genome analysis at a resolution significantly higher than that of conventional karyotyping and FISH. Array-CGH showed advantage in identification of cryptic imbalances and detection of clonal aberrations in population of non-dividing cancer cells and samples with poor chromosome morphology. The integration of microarray analysis into the cytogenetic diagnosis of hematologic malignancies has the potential to improve patient management by providing clinicians with additional disease specific and potentially clinically actionable genomic alterations. PMID:26299921

  8. Retrospective evaluation of the clinical and laboratory data from 300 patients of various hematological malignancies with chromosome 3 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Suning; Pan, Jinlan; He, Xuefeng; Liang, Jianying; Chen, Zixing

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the clinical and laboratory behaviors of chromosome 3 abnormalities by analyzing the morphological, cytogenetic, and follow-up data from 300 patients of various hematological malignancies with chromosome 3 abnormalities. From the results, trisomy 3, translocation (3q), and del(3) were the abnormal types most frequently observed (>10%) among the chromosome 3 abnormalities. In hematological malignancies, chromosome 3 abnormalities were most frequently seen in the patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (24.7%) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (16%), followed by those with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) (13.7%) and multiple myeloma (MM) (12.7%). In this series, genomic losses were the most frequent genetic abnormalities in AML, ALL, and hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) patients, whereas structural rearrangements were frequently seen in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and MDS patients, and genomic gains in MM, lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. Chromosome 3 abnormalities mainly occurred as a component of a complex abnormality (251/300) rather than a sole one (14/300). Survival analysis demonstrated a statistical difference between the patients with trisomy 3, who had a better prognosis, and patients with del(3), who had a worse prognosis in this series (P < 0.05). Abnormalities in chromosome 3 may imply an unfavorable outcome in CML and ALL.

  9. miR-29s: a family of epi-miRNAs with therapeutic implications in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Nicola; Rossi, Marco; Raimondi, Lavinia; Pitari, Maria Rita; Botta, Cirino; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of studies has highlighted the biological complexity of hematologic malignancies and the role of dysregulated signal transduction pathways. Along with the crucial role of genetic abnormalities, epigenetic aberrations are nowadays emerging as relevant players in cancer development, and significant research efforts are currently focusing on mechanisms by which histone post-translational modifications, DNA methylation and noncoding RNAs contribute to the pathobiology of cancer. As a consequence, these studies have provided the rationale for the development of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors and demethylating compounds, some of which are currently in advanced phase of pre-clinical investigation or in clinical trials. In addition, a more recent body of evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) might target effectors of the epigenetic machinery, which are aberrantly expressed or active in cancers, thus reverting those epigenetic abnormalities driving tumor initiation and progression. This review will focus on the broad epigenetic activity triggered by members of the miR-29 family, which underlines the potential of miR-29s as candidate epi-therapeutics for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:25968566

  10. Risk of solid tumors and hematological malignancy in persons with Turner and Klinefelter syndromes: A national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianguang; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-08-15

    The risk of solid and hematological malignancy in patients with Turner syndrome, characterized by X chromosome monosomy in women, and Klinefelter syndrome, characterized with two and more X chromosomes in men, is not well established, but such evidence may have etiological implications on cancer development. We identified a total of 1,409 women with Turner syndrome and 1,085 men with Klinefelter syndrome from the Swedish Hospital Discharge and Outpatient Register. These individuals were further linked to the Swedish Cancer Register to examine the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer using the general population without Turner and Klinefelter syndromes as reference. The overall risk of cancer was 1.34 for women with Turner syndrome; it was increased only for solid tumors. For a specific type of tumor, the risk of melanoma and central nervous system tumor was significantly increased. For persons with Klinefelter syndrome, the risk of solid tumors was decreased (SIR = 0.66), whereas the risk of hematological malignancy was increased (SIR = 2.72). Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia showed an increased SIR of 3.02 and 3.62, respectively. Our study supported the hypothesis that X chromosome plays an important role in the etiology of solid tumors. The underlying mechanisms for the increased incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia in persons with Klinefelter syndrome need to be investigated further.

  11. Individuals with hematological malignancies before undergoing chemotherapy present oxidative stress parameters and acute phase proteins correlated with nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carolina de Quadros; Borges, Dayanne da Silva; de Oliveira, Paula Fernanda; Chagas, Thayz Rodrigues; Del Moral, Joanita Angela Gonzaga; Durigon, Giovanna Steffanello; Dias, Bruno Vieira; Vieira, André Guedes; Gaspareto, Patrick; Trindade, Erasmo Benício Santos de Moraes; Nunes, Everson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies present abnormal blood cells that may have altered functions. This study aimed to evaluate nutritional status, acute phase proteins, parameters of cell's functionality, and oxidative stress of patients with hematological malignancies, providing a representation of these variables at diagnosis, comparisons between leukemias and lymphomas and establishing correlations. Nutritional status, C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, phagocytic capacity and superoxide anion production of mononuclear cells, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in plasma were evaluated in 16 untreated subjects. Main diagnosis was acute leukemia (n = 9) and median body mass index (BMI) indicated overweight (25.6 kg/m(2)). Median albumin was below (3.2 g/dL) and CRP above (37.45 mg/L) the reference values. Albumin was inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.53). Most patients were overweight before the beginning of treatment and had a high CRP/albumin ratio, which may indicate a nutrition inflammatory risk. BMI values correlated positively with lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. A strong correlation between catalase activity and lipid peroxidation was found (r = 0.75). Besides the elevated BMI, these patients also have elevated CRP values and unexpected relations between nutritional status and albumin, reinforcing the need for nutritional counseling during the course of chemotherapy, especially considering the correlations between oxidative stress parameters and nutritional status evidenced here.

  12. Oral ciclopirox olamine displays biological activity in a phase I study in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Minden, Mark D; Hogge, Donna E; Weir, Scott J; Kasper, Jim; Webster, Debra A; Patton, Lavonne; Jitkova, Yulia; Hurren, Rose; Gronda, Marcela; Goard, Carolyn A; Rajewski, Lian G; Haslam, John L; Heppert, Kathleen E; Schorno, Kevin; Chang, Hong; Brandwein, Joseph M; Gupta, Vikas; Schuh, Andre C; Trudel, Suzanne; Yee, Karen W L; Reed, Gregory A; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2014-04-01

    The antimycotic ciclopirox olamine is an intracellular iron chelator that has anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. We developed an oral formulation of ciclopirox olamine and conducted the first-in-human phase I study of this drug in patients with relapsed or refractory hematologic malignancies (Trial registration ID: NCT00990587). Patients were treated with 5-80 mg/m² oral ciclopirox olamine once daily for five days in 21-day treatment cycles. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic companion studies were performed in a subset of patients. Following definition of the half-life of ciclopirox olamine, an additional cohort was enrolled and treated with 80 mg/m² ciclopirox olamine four times daily. Adverse events and clinical response were monitored throughout the trial. Twenty-three patients received study treatment. Ciclopirox was rapidly absorbed and cleared with a short half-life. Plasma concentrations of an inactive ciclopirox glucuronide metabolite were greater than those of ciclopirox. Repression of survivin expression was observed in peripheral blood cells isolated from patients treated once daily with ciclopirox olamine at doses greater than 10 mg/m², demonstrating biological activity of the drug. Dose-limiting gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in patients receiving 80 mg/m² four times daily, and no dose limiting toxicity was observed at 40 mg/m² once daily. Hematologic improvement was observed in two patients. Once-daily dosing of oral ciclopirox olamine was well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory hematologic malignancies, and further optimization of dosing regimens is warranted in this patient population. PMID:24273151

  13. Informal Financial Assistance for Patients With a Hematological Malignancy: Implications for Oncology Social Work Practice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2015-01-01

    The article presents original research findings on informal financial assistance for hematological patients; that is, the gifts from family, friends, and communities that help patients cope with the financial hardship associated with cancer. The qualitative study involved interviews with 45 hematology patients that were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and then thematically analyzed. The findings examine the differing perspectives that individuals and families bring to the notion of informal financial aid, provide examples of individuals who require and receive informal financial assistance, and conclude with descriptions of those who require informal financial assistance but it is not available. The implications of the findings for oncology social work practice are explored.

  14. Bioequivalence & Food Effect Study in Patients With Solid Tumor or Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Hematological Neoplasms; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neoplasms; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Osteosarcoma; Sarcoma; Thyroid Cancer; Genitourinary

  15. Lessons from the Past: Opportunities to Improve Childhood Cancer Survivor Care through Outcomes Investigations of Historical Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Melissa M.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Woods, William G.; Sandlund, John T.; Ching-Hon, Pui; Kun, Larry E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Green, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of long-term outcomes have been instrumental in designing safer and more effective contemporary therapies for pediatric hematological malignancies. Despite the significant therapeutic changes that have occurred over the last five decades, therapy modifications largely represent refinements of treatment protocols using agents and modalities that have been available for more than 30 years. This review summarizes major trends in the evolution of treatment of pediatric hematological malignancies since 1960 to support the relevance of the study of late effects of historical therapeutic approaches to the design and evaluation of contemporary treatment protocols and the follow-up of present-day survivors. PMID:22038641

  16. T-Cell Depleted Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-05

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Lymphoid Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Malignant Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Anemia, Aplastic; Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. Radiation Therapy and Late Mortality From Second Sarcoma, Carcinoma, and Hematological Malignancies After a Solid Cancer in Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Tukenova, Markhaba; Guibout, Catherine; Hawkins, Mike; Quiniou, Eric; Mousannif, Abddedahir; Pacquement, Helene; Winter, David; Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Oberlin, Odile; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To compare patterns of long-term deaths due to secondary carcinomas, sarcomas, and hematological malignancies occurring after childhood cancer in a cohort of patients followed over a median of 28 years. Methods and Materials: The study included 4,230 patients treated at eight institutions, who were at least 5-year survivors of a first cancer, representing 105,670 person-years of observation. Complete clinical, chemotherapeutic, and radiotherapeutic data were recorded, and the integral radiation dose was estimated for 2,701 of the 2,948 patients who had received radiotherapy. The integral dose was estimated for the volume inside the beam edges. The causes of death obtained from death certificates were validated. Results: In total, 134 events were due to second malignant neoplasm(s) (SMN). We found that the standardized mortality ratio decreased with increasing follow-up for second carcinomas and sarcomas, whereas the absolute excess risk (AER) increased for a second carcinoma but decreased for second sarcomas. There was no clear variation in SMN and AER for hematological malignancies. We found a significant dose-response relationship between the radiation dose received and the mortality rate due to a second sarcoma and carcinoma. The risk of death due to carcinoma and sarcoma as SMN was 5.2-fold and 12.5-fold higher, respectively, in patients who had received a radiation dose exceeding 150 joules. Conclusions: Among patients who had received radiotherapy, only those having received the highest integral radiation dose actually had a higher risk of dying of a second carcinoma or sarcoma.

  18. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL): a potential candidate for combined treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Secchiero, Paola; Vaccarezza, Mauro; Gonelli, Arianna; Zauli, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF gene superfamily, which induces apoptosis through engagement of death receptors. TRAIL is unusual as compared to the other cytokines of this family, as it interacts with a complex system of receptors consisting of two pro-apoptotic death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2) and three decoy receptors (TRAIL-R3, TRAIL-R4 and osteoprotegerin). Moreover, with respect to other members of the TNF superfamily, such as CD95L and TNF-alpha, TRAIL has generated great interest as a potential tumor-specific cancer therapeutic because as a stable soluble trimer it selectively induces apoptosis in many transformed cells but not in normal cells. Of note, TRAIL cytotoxicity is at least partially independent of the major systems involved in resistance to chemotherapy, such as p53 wild-type function and multidrug resistance (MDR) genes. Since one fundamental problem of most cancers is the development of multiple mechanisms of resistance, which progressively reduce or suppress the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapy, new therapeutic approaches that either restore the pro-apoptotic activity of chemotherapeutic drugs or by-pass the mechanisms of resistance are highly desirable. This review will focus on the potential of TRAIL for its application in the therapy of hematological malignancies, used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The scenario emerging from the literature is that the treatment and management of hematological malignancies will require the rational combination of TRAIL plus conventional or new drugs in a regimen that would optimize the anti-neoplastic activity in malignant cells resistant to chemotherapy through restoration of the pro-apoptotic activity of TRAIL. PMID:15579063

  19. Therapeutic Challenges of Hepatic Mucormycosis in Hematologic Malignancy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Raffaele M.; Gurung, Ananta; Jain, Dhanpat; Malinis, Maricar F.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 58 Final Diagnosis: Hepatic mucormycosis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • fever Medication: Amphotericin • posaconazole Clinical Procedure: IR-guided aspiration Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: The clinical presentation of mucormycosis can vary widely based on various host factors. Among malignancy-and bone marrow transplant-associated infections, the lungs are the most common site of infection. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is less frequently encountered. The clinical presentation is often nonspecific, and cultures typically yield no growth, making the diagnosis challenging. Case Report: We present a case of isolated hepatic mucormycosis in the setting of neutropenic fever and abdominal pain following induction chemotherapy for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. The patient was treated with combination antifungal therapy with amphotericin and posaconazole without surgical resection, given the presence of multiple liver lesions. After a prolonged course of dual antifungal therapy, the size of her liver lesions improved. Unfortunately, her lymphoproliferative disorder proved fatal, following approximately 13 months of antifungal therapy. Conclusions: Among patient with mucormycosis, mortality remains high, especially in the setting of gastrointestinal involvement. Although surgical resection along with dual antifungal therapy can improve outcomes, the high mortality rate necessitates further investigation into improved diagnostic and treatment strategies including optimal antifungal therapy. PMID:27406045

  20. Early and late complications related to central venous catheters in hematological malignancies: a retrospective analysis of 1102 patients.

    PubMed

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 - 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  1. Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Turkish Expert Opinion (TEO-2)

    PubMed Central

    Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap; Azap, Alpay; Başaran Demirkazık, Figen; Ener, Beyza; Aşcıoğlu Hayran, Sibel; Özdemir Kumbasar, Özlem; Metan, Gökhan; Odabaşı, Zekaver; Uzun, Ömrüm; Akan, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most problematic issues in hematological malignancies is the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases. Especially, the difficulty of mycological diagnosis and the necessity of immediate intervention in molds have led to the adoption of “surrogate markers” that do not verify but rather strongly suggest fungal infection. The markers commonly used are galactomannan (GM), beta-glucan, and imaging methods. Although there are numerous studies on these diagnostic approaches, none of these markers serve as a support for the clinician, as is the case in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. This paper has been prepared to explain the diagnostic tests. As molecular tests have not been standardized and are not used routinely in the clinics, they will not be mentioned here. PMID:25541650

  2. Diagnostic strategies for invasive fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Wingard, John R

    2013-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) frequently occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies (HMs) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Early diagnosis of IFI in these patients facilitates prompt institution of therapy and leads to improved clinical outcomes. This article reviews widely used methodologies for diagnosing IFIs in patients with HM and HSCT recipients. Advantages and limitations of radiologic studies; microbiologic and histopathologic techniques; fungal biomarker assays, including those for galactomannan antigen and β-(1-3)-D-glucan; and molecular assays that are available to establish an early diagnosis of clinically relevant invasive fungal infections are discussed. Recommendations are provided regarding effective use of these methodologies in clinical practice.

  3. Longitudinal Changes in Body Mass and Composition in Survivors of Childhood Hematologic Malignancies After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Yang, Jie; Kaste, Sue C.; Hartford, Christine M.; Motosue, Megan S.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Triplett, Brandon M.; Shook, David R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Leung, Wing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To measure longitudinal changes in body mass and composition in survivors of childhood hematologic malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients and Methods Body mass index (BMI) was analyzed in 179 survivors by category (underweight, healthy-weight, overweight, and obese) and by z score. Fat and lean body mass measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was analyzed as z scores. Results Over a median 6.6 years of follow-up, BMI z scores diminished significantly (0.32 pre-HSCT v −0.60 at 10 years post-HSCT; P < .001). Mean z scores for fat mass stayed within population norms, but those for lean mass remained below normal levels and diminished significantly over time (P = .018). Pre-HSCT BMI category and/or z score were strongly predictive of post-HSCT BMI (P < .001) and of fat and lean mass z scores (both P < .001). Survivors with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease were more likely than others to have low BMI (P = .004) and low lean mass (P < .001) post-HSCT. Older age at HSCT (P = .015) and T-cell–depleted graft (P = .018) were predictive of lower post-HSCT BMI. Female patients had higher body fat (P = .002) and lower lean mass (P = .013) z scores than male patients, and black patients had higher fat mass z scores than white patients (P = .026). Conclusion BMI declines significantly after allogeneic HSCT for childhood hematologic malignancies, reflecting primarily a substantial decrease in lean mass but not fat mass. Monitoring and preservation of BMI and lean mass are vital, especially in those with the identified risk factors. PMID:23032628

  4. ATF4 induction through an atypical integrated stress response to ONC201 triggers p53-independent apoptosis in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, Jo; Kojima, Kensuke; Chachad, Dhruv; Ruvolo, Peter; Ruvolo, Vivian; Jacamo, Rodrigo O.; Borthakur, Gautam; Mu, Hong; Zeng, Zhihong; Tabe, Yoko; Allen, Joshua E.; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Wencai; Lee, Hans C.; Orlowski, Robert; Sarbassov, Dos D.; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Huang, Xuelin; Neelapu, Sattva S.; McDonnell, Timothy; Miranda, Roberto N.; Wang, Michael; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina; Davis, R. Eric.; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The clinical challenge posed by p53 abnormalities in hematological malignancies requires therapeutic strategies other than standard genotoxic chemotherapies. ONC201 is a first-in-class small molecule that activates p53-independent apoptosis, has a benign safety profile, and is in early clinical trials. We found that ONC201 caused p53-independent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cell lines and in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples from patients; these included samples from patients with genetic abnormalities associated with poor prognosis or cells that had developed resistance to the nongenotoxic agents ibrutinib and bortezomib. Moreover, ONC201 caused apoptosis in stem and progenitor AML cells and abrogated the engraftment of leukemic stem cells in mice while sparing normal bone marrow cells. ONC201 caused changes in gene expression similar to those caused by the unfolded protein response (UPR) and integrated stress responses (ISRs), which increase the translation of the transcription factor ATF4 through an increase in the phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α. However, unlike the UPR and ISR, the increase in ATF4 abundance in ONC201-treated hematopoietic cells promoted apoptosis and did not depend on increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. ONC201 also inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, likely through ATF4-mediated induction of the mTORC1 inhibitor DDIT4. Overexpression of BCL-2 protected against ONC201-induced apoptosis, and the combination of ONC201 and the BCL-2 antagonist ABT-199 synergistically increased apoptosis. Thus, our results suggest that by inducing an atypical ISR and p53-independent apoptosis, ONC201 has clinical potential in hematological malignancies. PMID:26884599

  5. Plasma Levels of Presepsin (Soluble CD14-subtype) as a Novel Prognostic Marker for Hemophagocytic Syndrome in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Satoru; Koh, Hideo; Katayama, Takako; Hashiba, Masamichi; Sato, Ayumi; Makuuchi, Yosuke; Nagasaki, Joji; Kuno, Masatomo; Yoshimura, Takuro; Okamura, Hiroshi; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hirose, Asao; Nakamae, Mika; Nakane, Takahiko; Hino, Masayuki; Nakamae, Hirohisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies suggest that presepsin (soluble CD14-subtype) is a useful diagnostic and prognostic marker for sepsis, with secretion by activated macrophages potentially dependent on phagocytosis of microorganisms. As "hemophagocytosis" is one of the major characteristics in patients with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), we hypothesized that presepsin may reflect the phagocytic activity and be a useful prognostic marker for HPS. Therefore, we aimed to assess the prognostic potential of presepsin in secondary HPS in adult patients with hematological malignancies. Methods Between April 2006 and August 2014, we retrospectively examined consecutive patients with HPS whose blood samples were available at our institution and compared the prognostic value of the following in HPS, singly and in combination: plasma presepsin, serum soluble interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (sIL-2R), ferritin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-6 and IL-10. Results A total of 14 patients were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 46.5 years (range, 22-65). In univariable Cox models, there were no significant variables associated with the prognosis. However, in 12 evaluable patients, only the combination of higher median values of presepsin (>1,935 pg/mL) and sIL-2R (>4,585 U/mL) at the onset of HPS was significantly associated with the 90-day mortality (hazard ratio 14.5; 95% CI, 1.47-143.36; p=0.02). Conclusion These results suggest that a composite model of plasma presepsin and serum sIL-2R levels at the onset of HPS might be a novel predictor of the prognosis of patients with hematological malignancies and secondary HPS. PMID:27522992

  6. Sleep problems and psychological distress in family members of patients with hematological malignancies in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Tanimukai, Hitsohi; Hirai, Kei; Adachi, Hiroyoshi; Kishi, Akane

    2014-12-01

    Patients with cancer frequently suffer from insomnia symptoms, and additionally, their family members also often experience these symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of insomnia symptoms in both family members and patients with hematological malignancies. We conducted an observational cross-sectional study using a clinical self-reported questionnaire for sleep conditions, depressive symptoms (two-question method), and worries (five items that originated from the Brief Cancer Worry Inventory). One hundred twelve family members and 153 patients were investigated. A t test and Chi-square test were used to compare the prevalence of insomnia and depressive symptoms between family members and patients. Logistic regression was used to determine whether insomnia symptoms or worries related to patients' disease had an impact on depressive symptoms. The presence of insomnia symptoms in family members (87 %) was significantly higher than that in patients (60 %, p < 0.001). The prevalence of depressive mood and anhedonia in family members were 55 and 34 %, respectively, and these values were higher than those in patients (43 and 28 %, respectively). Insomnia symptoms and worries about present/prospective disease conditions were significantly associated with depressive mood (insomnia symptoms, odds ratios (OR) 4.3, confidence intervals (CI) 1.2-15.2, p = 0.025; worries, OR 4.4, CI 1.0-19.3, p = 0.048). Taken together, our results demonstrated that insomnia symptoms and depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in family members as well as in patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:24947799

  7. Impact of hematopoietic chimerism at day +14 on engraftment after unrelated donor umbilical cord blood transplantation for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Jaime; Senent, Leonor; Cantero, Susana; de la Rubia, Javier; Montesinos, Pau; Planelles, Dolores; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Cervera, Jose; Palau, Javier; Sanz, Miguel A.; Sanz, Guillermo F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cord blood transplant is a feasible treatment alternative for adult patients with hematologic malignancies lacking a suitable HLA-matched donor. However, the kinetics of myeloid recovery is slow, and primary graft failure cannot be detected easily early after transplantation. We investigated the impact of hematopoietic chimerism status from unselected marrow cells 14 days after transplantation on predicting engraftment after a cord blood transplant. Design and Methods Seventy-one adult patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing single-unit unrelated donor cord blood transplantation after a myeloablative conditioning regimen were included in the study. All patients received conditioning regimens based on busulfan, thiotepa and antithymocyte globulin. Chimerism status was assessed analyzing short tandem repeat polymorphisms. Results The cumulative incidence of myeloid engraftment at 1 month was significantly lower in patients with mixed chimerism than in those with complete donor chimerism (55% vs. 94%; p<0.0001). For patients achieving myeloid recovery, the median time of engraftment was 16 days when donor chimerism at day + 14 was higher than 90%, compared with 24 days when donor chimerism was below this level (p<0.001). A donor chimerism level of 65% was found to be the best cut-off point for predicting primary graft failure, with a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 80%. The incidence of primary graft failure was 67% for patients with less than 65% donor chimerism at day +14 as compared to only 2% for those with more than 65% donor chimerism (p<0.001). Patients with mixed chimerism also had a lower cumulative incidence of platelet engraftment than those with complete chimerism (62% vs. 89%; p=0.01). Conclusions Donor-recipient chimerism status at day +14 predicts engraftment after a single-unit cord blood transplant in adults. PMID:19483157

  8. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs), transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy. PMID:25517545

  9. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Perspectives on CAR T Cells and Other Cellular Therapies for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic oncologists now have at their disposal (or a referral away) a myriad of new options to get from point A (a patient with relapsed or poor-risk disease) to point B (potential tumor eradication and long-term disease-free survival). In this perspective piece, we discuss the putative mechanisms of action and the relative strengths and weaknesses of currently available cellular therapy approaches. Notably, while many of these approaches have been published in high impact journals, with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and of checkpoint inhibitors (PD1/PDL1 or CTLA4 blockade), the published clinical trials have mostly been early phase, uncontrolled studies. Therefore, many of the new cellular therapy approaches have yet to demonstrate incontrovertible evidence of enhanced overall survival compared with controls. Nonetheless, the science behind these is sure to advance our understanding of cancer immunology and ultimately to bring us closer to our goal of curing cancer.

  10. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Perspectives on CAR T Cells and Other Cellular Therapies for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic oncologists now have at their disposal (or a referral away) a myriad of new options to get from point A (a patient with relapsed or poor-risk disease) to point B (potential tumor eradication and long-term disease-free survival). In this perspective piece, we discuss the putative mechanisms of action and the relative strengths and weaknesses of currently available cellular therapy approaches. Notably, while many of these approaches have been published in high impact journals, with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and of checkpoint inhibitors (PD1/PDL1 or CTLA4 blockade), the published clinical trials have mostly been early phase, uncontrolled studies. Therefore, many of the new cellular therapy approaches have yet to demonstrate incontrovertible evidence of enhanced overall survival compared with controls. Nonetheless, the science behind these is sure to advance our understanding of cancer immunology and ultimately to bring us closer to our goal of curing cancer. PMID:27136938

  11. Recommendations for accreditation of laboratories in molecular biology of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Cornillet, Pascale; Hayette, Sandrine; Gachard, Nathalie; Tondeur, Sylvie; Mauté, Carole; Cayuela, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, the development of molecular biology techniques has improved the hematological diseases diagnostic and follow-up. Consequently, these techniques are largely used in the biological screening of these diseases; therefore the Hemato-oncology molecular diagnostics laboratories must be actively involved in the accreditation process according the ISO 15189 standard. The French group of molecular biologists (GBMHM) provides requirements for the implementation of quality assurance for the medical molecular laboratories. This guideline states the recommendations for the pre-analytical, analytical (methods validation procedures, quality controls, reagents), and post-analytical conditions. In addition, herein we state a strategy for the internal quality control management. These recommendations will be regularly updated.

  12. High plasma levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins are associated with the suppressed expression of immunomodulatory molecules in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HAI-QING; QIU, FA-QI; JIN, KE; JIANG, NENG-GANG; ZHANG, LI

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a common feature in immunosuppressed patients, such as kidney and bone marrow transplantation recipients and patients with breast, prostate or gynecological carcinoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition, high levels of oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are closely associated with carcinogenesis. There are, however, no reports on the association between the serum oxLDL levels and the expression of important immunomodulatory molecules in patients with hematological disorders. In the present study, 39 patients with hematological disorders were stratified into four groups: Two groups with malignancies [chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML)] and two groups without malignancies [myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA)]. Immunomodulatory molecules were monitored in these groups. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicated that the plasma oxLDL levels were significantly higher in patients with AML or CML than those in patients with MDS or IDA. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the expression of numerous important immunomodulatory elements, including tumor-related genes, immunological and inflammatory cytokines, defense-responsive genes, genes regulating cell proliferation, adhesion and migration molecules and leukocyte chemotaxis genes, showed considerable variation in patients with hematological disorders, particularly in those with MDS or IDA, as compared with the expression in the healthy volunteers. The present study demonstrated that, in patients with a hematological malignancy (either AML or CML), the activation of numerous immune response-related molecules was inhibited. Thus, an association between hematological malignancies and dyslipidemia, i.e. high levels of oxLDL, is suggested. Further research is necessary to investigate how oxLDL influences cancer progression. PMID:26136994

  13. Therapeutic targeting of CD19 in hematological malignancies: past, present, future and beyond.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ben-Zion; Herishanu, Yair

    2014-05-01

    Abstract During the past few decades, CD19 has been at the center of various scientific/translational endeavors to develop targeted therapeutics against B-cell malignancies. Due to the expression pattern of CD19 throughout the B-cell lineage, and on most B-cell malignancies, it became a preferred target for the development of experimental therapeutic agents during the first years of the monoclonal antibodies era. Successful preclinical experiments led to the first generation of clinical trials, based predominantly on toxin/anti-CD19 murine immunoconjugates. These, however, mostly failed due to poor biochemical design of the reagents, and the generation of human anti-murine antibodies. Modern anti-CD19 reagents are based on humanized anti-CD19 antibodies designed to attract components of the immune system, predominantly T-cells, to eliminate CD19+ target cells. These include, for example, modified anti-CD19 antibodies, and bispecific anti-CD19/CD3 antibodies. One of the most attractive approaches to target malignant B-cells is based on the introduction of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into patient derived T-cells. CARs are composed of extracellular recognition sequences derived from anti-CD19 antibodies, and intracellular signaling components that can foster T-cell activation. The novel anti-B-cell therapeutics have shown promising clinical effects against various B-cell malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), although expected side effects (e.g. significant immunosuppression) were also recorded. These novel successful anti-CD19 agents may have the potential to be used in other fields, such as autoimmunity.

  14. Depression and anxiety in patients with hematological malignancies, prevalence, and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Abuelgasim, Khadega A.; Ahmed, Gasmelseed Y.; Alqahtani, Jamilah A.; Alayed, Aseel M.; Alaskar, Ahmed S.; Malik, Mansoor A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and associated factors of depression and anxiety in hematological cancers (HC) patients. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in all HC patients at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between March 2014 and June 2015. We excluded patients with depression, or generalized anxiety disorder. We conducted a structured face to face interview using an internally developed and validated questionnaire (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 patient’s questionnaire with all participants). Results: Among 211 participants, depression was detected in 98 (46.5%) and anxiety was detected in 47 (22.3%). Thirty-eight (18.1%) had concurrent anxiety and depression. Multiple co-morbidities and tense home atmosphere were predictive for anxiety and depression. We found no association between gender, smoking, income, or being on active therapy and depression or anxiety. Conclusions: Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in HC patients in KAMC. Health care providers should screen HC cancers for depression and anxiety; as early intervention possibly improve their disease outcome and will likely enhance their psychological wellbeing. PMID:27464865

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cogle, Christopher R.; Gore, Steven D.; Hetzer, Joel; Kumar, Keshava; Skikne, Barry; MacBeth, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    CC-486 (oral azacitidine) is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05) reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle), with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983 PMID:26296092

  16. Haploidentical, G-CSF-primed, unmanipulated bone marrow transplantation for patients with high-risk hematological malignancies: an update.

    PubMed

    Arcese, W; Picardi, A; Santarone, S; De Angelis, G; Cerretti, R; Cudillo, L; Pennese, E; Bavaro, P; Olioso, P; Dentamaro, T; Cupelli, L; Chierichini, A; Ferrari, A; Mengarelli, A; Tirindelli, M C; Testi, M; Di Piazza, F; Di Bartolomeo, P

    2015-06-01

    Ninety-seven patients affected by high-risk hematological malignancies underwent G-CSF primed, unmanipulated bone marrow (BM) transplantation from a related, haploidentical donor. All patients were prepared with an identical conditioning regimen including Thiotepa, Busilvex, Fludarabine (TBF) and antithymocyte globulin given at myeloablative (MAC = 68) or reduced (reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) = 29) dose intensity and received the same GvHD prophylaxis consisting of the combination of methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycofenolate-mofetil and basiliximab. Patients were transplanted in 1st or 2nd CR (early phase: n = 60) or in > 2nd CR or active disease (advanced phase: n = 37). With a median time of 21 days (range 12-38 days), the cumulative incidence (CI) of neutrophil engraftment was 94 ± 3%. The 100-day CI of III-IV grade acute GvHD and the 2-year CI of extensive chronic GvHD were 9 ± 3% and 12 ± 4%, respectively. Overall, at a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 0.3-5.6), 44 out of 97 (45%) patients are alive in CR. The 5-year probability of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for patients in early and advanced phase was 53 ± 7 vs 24 ± 8% (P = 0.006) and 48 ± 7 vs 22 ± 8% (P = 0.01), respectively. By comparing MAC with RIC patient groups, the transplant-related mortality was equivalent (36 ± 6 vs 28 ± 9%) while the relapse risk was lower for the MAC patients (22 ± 6 vs 45 ± 11%), who showed higher OS (48 ± 7 vs 29 ± 10%) and DFS (43 ± 7 vs 26 ± 10%). However, all these differences did not reach a statistical significance. In multivariate analysis, diagnosis and recipient age were significant factors for OS and DFS. In conclusion, this analysis confirms, on a longer follow-up and higher number of patients, our previous encouraging results obtained by using MAC and RIC TBF regimen as conditioning for G-CSF primed, unmanipulated BM transplantation from related, haploidentical donor in patients with high-risk hematological

  17. Gene-modified T-cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptors for pediatric hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yozo

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is the generic name for synthetic T cell receptors redirected to tumor-associated antigens. Most CARs consist of an ectodomain (scFv or ligand), a hinge region, a transmembrane domain, and signaling endodomains derived from one or two co-stimulatory molecules (CD28, 4-1BB, etc) and from a CD3-ζ chain. CD19-targeted CAR T cell therapy has achieved major success in the treatment of B cell malignancies. CD19 CAR-T cells elicited complete remission in 70-90% of adult and pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CD19 CAR T cell therapy from allogeneic donors including third party donors is a potential option for B-cell malignancies. CAR T cell therapies for myeloma, acute myeloid leukemia, and T-cell leukemia are still under development. Our group is currently preparing a phase I study of CD19 CAR T cell therapy in pediatric and young adult patients with ALL using a non-viral gene transfer method, the piggyBac-transposon system. PMID:27384848

  18. Thyroid abnormalities in patients treated with lenalidomide for hematological malignancies: results of a retrospective case review.

    PubMed

    Figaro, M Kathleen; Clayton, Warren; Usoh, Chinenye; Brown, Kara; Kassim, Adetola; Lakhani, Vipul T; Jagasia, Shubhada

    2011-06-01

    Lenalidomide is an antiangiogenic drug associated with hypothyroidism. We describe a case-series of lenalidomide use in hematological cancers and the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities. We reviewed medical records of patients treated with lenalidomide at a single center form 2005 to 2010 and extracted demographic, clinical, and laboratory data. Of 170 patients with confirmed lenalidomide use (age 64.9 ± 15 years), 148 were treated for multiple myeloma and 6% had thyroid abnormalities attributable only to lenalidomide. In patients with a previous diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction, the addition of lenalidomide therapy was associated with a higher incidence of subsequent TFTF abnormality (17%) as compared to patients with no previous diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction (6%) (P=0.0001). Many patients (44%) with pre-existing disease and a change in thyroid function before or while on lenalidomide had no further follow-up of their thyroid abnormalities, Of 20 patients who did not undergo any thyroid function testing either before starting or while on lenalidomide for a median of 9.4 months (± 6.5), 35% developed new symptoms compatible with hypothyroidism, including worsened fating, constipation or cold intolerance. Symptoms of thyroid dysfunction overlap with side effects of lenalidomide. Thyroid hormone levels are not regularly evaluated in patients on lenalidomide. While on this treatment, thyroid abnormalities can occur in patients with no previous diagnoses and in patients with pre-existing abnormalities. Because symptoms of thyroid dysfunction could be alleviated by appropriate treatment, thyroid function should be evaluated during the course of lenalidomide to improve patients quality of life. PMID:21544854

  19. Aminobisphosphonates and Toll-like receptor ligands: recruiting Vγ9Vδ2 T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, S; Wesch, D; Kabelitz, D

    2011-01-01

    Gamma delta (γδ) T cells are intrinsically important for preventing the development and progression of hematologic cancers. These innate T cells are particularly suited for the application of cancer therapy due to the fact they: 1) recognize transformed cells independent of antigen processing or presentation by classical MHC molecules, and 2) embody the anti-tumour effector functions of both NK cells and cytotoxic T cells. It was serendipitously discovered that aminobisphosphonates (ABP), a class of drugs used as adjuvant cancer therapy for the treatment of malignant osteolytic bone disease, have the unexpected side-effect of potently activating the antitumour effector functions of human peripheral γδ T cells. Such beneficial therapeutic synergisms are rare, and no time has been wasted to determine how to best harness the anti-cancer potential of γδ T cells and ABP. Despite promising experimental results, the full clinical potential of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been hampered by the subversive strategies employed by cancer cells to obstruct activation of anti-tumour immune responses. These include the promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that maintain tumour tolerance and the corruption of dendritic cell (DC) function and maturation. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists have a long history of breaking free of tumour-induced immune-suppression by resetting DC function and abrogating Treg induced tolerance. This review presents data to support the notion that TLR signalling may perfectly complement the anti-tumour synergy of ABP and activated γδ T cells, and this combined innate artillery could provide the necessary ammunition to topple malignancy's stronghold on the immune system.

  20. Identification of Novel HLA-A*24:02-Restricted Epitope Derived from a Homeobox Protein Expressed in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Maiko; Otsuka, Yohei; Tsutsumida, Naoya; Tanaka, Chiaki; Uchiumi, Akane; Ozawa, Koji; Suzuki, Takuma; Ichikawa, Daiju; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Hattori, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The homeobox protein, PEPP2 (RHOXF2), has been suggested as a cancer/testis (CT) antigen based on its expression pattern. However, the peptide epitope of PEPP2 that is recognized by cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) is unknown. In this study, we revealed that PEPP2 gene was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia cells and some other hematological malignancies. This gene was also expressed in leukemic stem-like cells. We next identified the first reported epitope peptide (PEPP2271-279). The CTLs induced by PEPP2271-279 recognized PEPP2-positive target cells in an HLA-A*24:02-restricted manner. We also found that a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine, could enhance PEPP2 expression in leukemia cells but not in blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. The cytotoxic activity of anti-PEPP2 CTL against leukemic cells treated with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine was higher than that directed against untreated cells. These results suggest a clinical rationale that combined treatment with this novel antigen-specific immunotherapy together with demethylating agents might be effective in therapy-resistant myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:26784514

  1. Beneficial treatment with risedronate in long-term survivors after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tauchmanovà, L; Selleri, C; Esposito, M; Di Somma, C; Orio, F; Bifulco, G; Palomba, S; Lombardi, G; Rotoli, B; Colao, A

    2003-12-01

    In this prospective randomized study we evaluated the effect of risedronate, an aminobisphosphonate, on bone mass and turnover in patients who had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) for hematological malignancies. Thirty-four patients (18 females, 16 males, age 32+/-10 years) with bone mineral density (BMD)

  2. Feasibility study of preemptive withdrawal of immunosuppression based on chimerism testing in children undergoing myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Horn, B; Soni, S; Khan, S; Petrovic, A; Breslin, N; Cowan, M; Pelle-Day, G; Cooperstein, E; Baxter-Lowe, L-A

    2009-03-01

    An increasing percentage of autologous cells (increasing chimerism) in the whole blood (WB) chimerism test following allogeneic transplant is related to a very high risk of relapse. Preemptive immunotherapy may decrease the risk of relapse in some patients. Our prospective multi-institutional study evaluated the feasibility of longitudinal chimerism testing in a central laboratory, compared WB, CD3+ and leukemia-specific lineage chimerism in patients with a variety of hematologic malignancies, and evaluated the feasibility of fast withdrawal of immunosuppression based on WB chimerism results. Centralized chimerism testing was feasible and showed low interassay variability. Increasing mixed chimerism (MC) in WB was not useful as a predictor of relapse in our study. The presence of full donor chimerism in WB, CD3+ and leukemia-specific lineages on all measurements was related to a significantly lower risk of relapse than the presence of MC in either subset (11 vs 71%, respectively; P=0.03). Increasing host chimerism in leukemia-specific lineage heralds relapse, but it was not detected early enough to allow immunotherapy. Further studies correlating lineage-specific chimerism and minimal residual disease are required. The goal of preemptive immunotherapy should be to achieve full donor chimerism in WB in CD3+ and leukemia-specific lineages.

  3. Toll-like receptor 1 variation increases the risk of transplant-related mortality in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Kaori; Mizuno, Shohei; Mizutani, Motonori; Horio, Tomohiro; Hanamura, Ichiro; Espinoza, J Luis; Matsuo, Keitaro; Onizuka, Makoto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Morishima, Yasuo; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Doki, Noriko; Miyamura, Koichi; Mori, Takehiko Mori Takehiko; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) genetic variant (rs5743551, -7202A>G) has been reported to be associated with susceptibility to various infectious diseases. We retrospectively examined the impact of TLR1 variation on transplant outcomes in a cohort of 320 patients who underwent unrelated HLA-matched bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for hematologic malignancies. A multivariate analysis showed that the G/G genotype in the recipients and the donors was associated with a significantly lower 3-year transplant-related mortality (TRM). The recipient G/G genotype also resulted in a better 3-year progression-free survival. This study suggests that the recipient and donor TLR1 G/G genotypes are comparably associated with a reduced risk of death that was not related to relapse. Thus, TLR1 genotyping may be useful for selecting the donor, managing patients in a risk-adapted manner, and creating therapeutic strategies to prevent complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27369862

  4. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to adults with hematologic malignancies: analysis of 66 cases at a single Japanese center.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Toshiro; Ishiyama, Ken; Ozaki, Jun; Yamashita, Yumiko; Iwaki, Noriko; Saito, Chizuru; Arahata, Masahisa; Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Sixty-six adult patients with hematologic malignancies underwent haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) without T cell depletion. The patients were preconditioned with a reduced intensity regimen, and tacrolimus was used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Successful engraftment occurred in 60 patients (90.1%) and graft rejection in only 4 patients (6.1%). Among the 60 engrafted patients, only 5 developed severe (grade III or IV) acute GVHD. Twenty patients, including 19 relapse-free patients were alive at a median follow-up of 48 months (range 6-77 months). The overall survival (OS) at 6 years was 29.3%. The OS of 45 patients < 60 years of age was 43.6%, which was superior to that of 21 patients who were 60 years of age and older (9.5%) (P < 0.01). The OS of 11 patients from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 1 locus-mismatched donors (63.6%) was higher than that of 28 patients from HLA 3 loci-mismatched donors (12.5%) (P < 0.01). Organ injury and infection were the main causes of mortality. Notably, immunosuppressive therapy could be successfully stopped in 9 patients transplanted from HLA 2 or 3 loci-mismatched donors with a median duration of 45 months (range 5-71 months). These data suggest that haplo-HSCT is a promising treatment for patients who need urgent allogeneic transplantation but lack HLA-identical family donors.

  5. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4)

    PubMed Central

    Boğa, Can; Bolaman, Zahit; Çağırgan, Seçkin; Karadoğan, İhsan; Özcan, Mehmet Ali; Özkalemkaş, Fahir; Saba, Rabin; Sönmez, Mehmet; Şenol, Esin; Akan, Hamdi; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease. PMID:26316478

  6. A role for peripherally inserted central venous catheters in the prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Toshiro; Kohda, Kyuhei; Konuma, Yuichi; Hiraoka, Yasuko; Ichikawa, Yukari; Ono, Kaoru; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Takada, Kouichi; Iyama, Satoshi; Kato, Junji

    2014-12-01

    Central venous catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSIs) are a serious complication in patients with hematological malignancies. However, it remains unclear whether there is a difference in the rate of CR-BSI associated with the conventional type of central venous catheters (cCVCs) and peripherally inserted CVCs (PICCs) in such patients. To address this question, we retrospectively investigated the incidence of CR-BSIs associated with PICCs versus cCVCs in patients with hematological malignancies. We used PICCs in all consecutive patients requiring CVC placement between February 2009 and February 2013. We compared the CR-BSI rate in patients with PICCs with that in patients with cCVCs treated between September 2006 and January 2009 (control group). Eighty-four patients received PICCs and 85 received cCVCs. The most common reason for removal due to catheter-related complications was CR-BSI. The CR-BSI rate in the PICC group was significantly lower than that in the cCVC group (PICCs: 1.23/1000 catheter days; cCVCs: 5.30/1000 catheter days; P < 0.01). Catheter-related complications other than CR-BSIs occurred at an extremely low rate in the PICC group. The median catheter-related complication-free survival duration was significantly longer in the PICC group than in the cCVC group. Our study shows that PICCs are useful in patients with hematological malignancies.

  7. Increased adenosine triphosphate production by peripheral blood CD4+ cells in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with stem cell mobilization agents.

    PubMed

    Manga, Kiran; Serban, Geo; Schwartz, Joseph; Slotky, Ronit; Patel, Nita; Fan, Jianshe; Bai, Xiaolin; Chari, Ajai; Savage, David; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Colovai, Adriana I

    2010-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is an important therapeutic option for patients with hematologic malignancies. To explore the immunomodulatory effects of HSC mobilization agents, we studied the function and phenotype of CD4(+) T cells from 16 adult patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing HSC mobilization treatment for autologous transplantation. Immune cell function was determined using the Immuknow (Cylex) assay by measuring the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced by CD4(+) cells from whole blood. ATP activity measured in G-CSF-treated patients was significantly higher than that measured in healthy individuals or "nonmobilized" patients. In patients treated with G-CSF, CD4(+) T cells were predominantly CD25(low)FOXP3(low), consistent with an activated phenotype. However, T-cell depletion did not abrogate ATP production in blood samples from G-CSF-treated patients, indicating that CD4(+) myeloid cells contributed to the increased ATP levels observed in these patients. There was a significant correlation between ATP activity and patient survival, suggesting that efficient activation of CD4(+) cells during mobilization treatment predicts a low risk of disease relapse. Monitoring immune cell reactivity using the Immuknow assay may assist in the clinical management of patients with hematologic malignancies and optimization of HSC mobilization protocols.

  8. Bcl-2–family proteins and hematologic malignancies: history and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BCL-2 was the first antideath gene dis-covered, a milestone that effectively launched a new era in cell death research. Since its discovery more than 2 decades ago, multiple members of the human Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins have been identified, including 6 antiapoptotic proteins, 3 structurally similar proapoptotic proteins, and several structurally diverse proapoptotic interacting proteins that operate as upstream agonists or antagonists. Bcl-2–family proteins regulate all major types of cell death, including apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. As such, they operate as nodal points at the convergence of multiple pathways with broad relevance to biology and medicine. Bcl-2 derives its name from its original discovery in the context of B-cell lymphomas, where chromosomal translocations commonly activate the BCL-2 protooncogene, endowing B cells with a selective survival advantage that promotes their neoplastic expansion. The concept that defective programmed cell death contributes to malignancy was established by studies of Bcl-2, representing a major step forward in current understanding of tumorigenesis. Experimental therapies targeting Bcl-2 family mRNAs or proteins are currently in clinical testing, raising hopes that a new class of anticancer drugs may be near. PMID:18362212

  9. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  10. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M; DeGregori, James

    2015-10-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  11. T cell receptor gamma and delta rearrangements in hematologic malignancies. Relationship to lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, F; Greenberg, J M; Kersey, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied recombinatorial events of the T cell receptor delta and gamma chain genes in hematopoietic malignancies and related these to normal stages of lymphoid differentiation. T cell receptor delta gene recombinatorial events were found in 91% of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia, 68% of non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 80% of mixed lineage acute leukemias. Mature B-lineage leukemias and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias retained the T-cell receptor delta gene in the germline configuration. The incidence of T cell receptor gamma and delta was particularly high in CD10+CD19+ non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor ALL. In lymphoid precursor ALL, T cell receptor delta was frequently rearranged while T cell receptor gamma was in the germline configuration. This suggests that TCR delta rearrangements may precede TCR gamma rearrangements in lymphoid ontogeny. In T-ALL, only concordant T cell receptor delta and gamma rearrangements were observed. Several distinct rearrangements were defined using a panel of restriction enzymes. Most of the rearrangements observed in T-ALL represented joining events of J delta 1 to upstream regions. In contrast, the majority of rearrangements in lymphoid precursor ALL most likely represented D-D or V-D rearrangements, which have been found to be early recombinatorial events of the TCR delta locus. We next analyzed TCR delta rearrangements in five CD3+TCR gamma/delta+ ALL and cell lines. One T-ALL, which demonstrated a different staining pattern with monoclonal antibodies against the products of the TCR gamma/delta genes than the PEER cell line, rearranges J delta 1 to a currently unidentified variable region. Images PMID:2547833

  12. Superior Serum Concentrations with Posaconazole Delayed-Release Tablets Compared to Suspension Formulation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cumpston, Aaron; Caddell, Ryan; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Wen, Sijin; Hamadani, Mehdi; Craig, Michael; Kanate, Abraham S

    2015-08-01

    Posaconazole (PCZ), approved for prophylaxis against invasive fungal disease in high-risk patients, is commercially available orally as a suspension formulation (PCZ-susp) and as a delayed-release tablet (PCZ-tab). We evaluated the serum steady-state concentrations (Css) of PCZ stratified by the administered formulation for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with myeloid malignancies (n = 150). The primary outcome was the attainment rate of the target Css of ≥700 ng/ml. Secondary outcomes included toxicity assessment (hepatotoxicity and corrected QT [QTc] interval prolongation) and breakthrough fungal infections. Patients who received the PCZ-susp (n = 118) or PCZ-tab (n = 32) and had PCZ Css assessment after at least 7 days of therapy were eligible. The median Css in the PCZ-susp group was 390 ng/ml (range, 51 to 1,870 ng/ml; mean, 436 ng/ml) compared to 1,740 ng/ml (range, 662 to 3,350 ng/ml; mean, 1,781 ng/ml) in the PCZ-tab group (P < 0.0001). The percentages of patients achieving the target goal of ≥700 ng/ml were 17% versus 97%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Hepatotoxicity (grade 2 or higher) occurred in 1 patient in each group. QTc interval measurements were available for 32 patients in the PCZ-susp group and for 12 patients in the PCZ-tab group, and prolonged intervals of grade 2 or higher were noted in 9% (n = 3) and 17% (n = 2), respectively (P = 0.6). Breakthrough fungal infections in the PCZ-susp and PCZ-tab groups were 7% (n = 8) and 3% (n = 1), respectively (P = 0.68). We conclude that the use of PCZ-tab was associated with higher Css and with the probability of achieving therapeutic goals without worsening of adverse effects.

  13. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factors for autologous transplant in hematologic malignancies: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gabús, Raul; Borelli, Gabriel; Ferrando, Martín; Bódega, Enrique; Citrín, Estela; Jiménez, Constanza Olivera; Álvarez, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Hematology Service of Hospital Maciel published its experience with peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting for autologous stem cell transplantation using Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim). After mobilization with a mean filgrastim dose of 78 mcg/Kg, 4.7 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg were obtained by apheresis. Age above 50, multiple myeloma as underlying disease and a malignancy that was not in remission were identified as frequent characteristics among patients showing complex mobilization. Objective The aim of this study was to compare stem cell mobilization using different brands of filgrastim. Methods One hundred and fifty-seven mobilizations performed between 1997 and 2006 were analyzed. This retrospective analysis comparative two groups of patients: those mobilized with different brands of filgrastim (Group A) and those who received Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim) as mobilizing agent (Group B). A cluster analysis technique was used to identify four clusters of individuals with different behaviors differentiated by age, total dose of filgrastim required, number of apheresis and harvested CD34+ cells. Results The mean total dose of filgrastim administered was 105 mcg/Kg, the median number of apheresis was 2 procedures and the mean number of harvested stem cells was 4.98 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg. No significant differences were observed between Groups A and B regarding the number of apheresis, harvested CD34+ cells and number of mobilization failures, however the total dose of filgrastim was significantly lower in Group B. Conclusions Among other factors, the origin of the cytokine used as mobilizing agent is an element to be considered when evaluating CD34+ cell mobilization results. PMID:23049356

  14. Targeting STAT5 in Hematological Malignancies through Inhibition of the Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal (BET) Bromodomain Protein BRD2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suhu; Walker, Sarah R.; Nelson, Erik A.; Cerulli, Robert; Xiang, Michael; Toniolo, Patricia A.; Qi, Jun; Stone, Richard M.; Wadleigh, Martha; Bradner, James E.; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) is constitutively activated in a wide range of leukemias and lymphomas, and drives the expression of genes necessary for proliferation, survival, and self-renewal. Thus, targeting STAT5 is an appealing therapeutic strategy for hematological malignancies. Given the importance of bromodomain-containing proteins in transcriptional regulation, we considered the hypothesis that a pharmacological bromodomain inhibitor could inhibit STAT5-dependent gene expression. We found that the small molecule bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 decreases STAT5-dependent (but not STAT3-dependent) transcription of both heterologous reporter genes and endogenous STAT5 target genes. JQ1 reduces STAT5 function in leukemia and lymphoma cells with constitutive STAT5 activation, or inducibly activated by cytokine stimulation. Among the BET bromodomain sub-family of proteins, it appears that BRD2 is the critical mediator for STAT5 activity. In experimental models of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemias, where activated STAT5 contributes to leukemia cell survival, Brd2 knock-down or JQ1 treatment shows strong synergy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in inducing leukemia cells apoptosis. By contrast, mononuclear cells isolated form umbilical cord blood, which is enriched in normal hematopoietic precursor cells, were unaffected by these combinations. These findings indicate a unique functional association between BRD2 and STAT5, and suggest that combinations of JQ1 and tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be an important rational strategy for treating leukemias and lymphomas driven by constitutive STAT5 activation. PMID:24435449

  15. Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation Technique for Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies: A Dosimetric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yeginer, Mete; Roeske, John C.; Radosevich, James A.; Aydogan, Bulent

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric feasibility of linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated total marrow irradiation (IM-TMI) in patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Linear accelerator-based IM-TMI treatment planning was performed for 9 patients using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, except for the forearms and hands. Organs at risk (OAR) to be spared included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, eyes, oral cavity, and bowel and were contoured by a physician on the axial computed tomography images. The three-isocenter technique previously developed by our group was used for treatment planning. We developed and used a common dose-volume objective method to reduce the planning time and planner subjectivity in the treatment planning process. Results: A 95% PTV coverage with the 99% of the prescribed dose of 12 Gy was achieved for all nine patients. The average dose reduction in OAR ranged from 19% for the lungs to 68% for the lenses. The common dose-volume objective method decreased the planning time by an average of 35% and reduced the inter- and intra- planner subjectivity. Conclusion: The results from the present study suggest that the linear accelerator-based IM-TMI technique is clinically feasible. We have demonstrated that linear accelerator-based IM-TMI plans with good PTV coverage and improved OAR sparing can be obtained within a clinically reasonable time using the common dose-volume objective method proposed in the present study.

  16. The impact of oral herpes simplex virus infection and candidiasis on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis among patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-K; Hou, H-A; Chow, J-M; Chen, Y-C; Hsueh, P-R; Tien, H-F

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of oral candidiasis and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM). The medical records of 424 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies who had received chemotherapy at a medical center in Taiwan from January 2006 to November 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. The results of swab cultures of fungus and HSV-1 for OM were correlated with associated clinical features. Younger age, myeloid malignancies, and disease status other than complete remission before chemotherapy were significantly correlated with the development of OM. Risks of fever (p < 0.001) and bacteremia were higher in patients with OM. Among 467 episodes of OM with both swab cultures available, 221 were non-infection (47.3%) and 246 were related to either fungal infections, HSV-1 infections, or both (52.7%); of the 246 episodes, 102 were associated with fungal infections alone (21.8%), 98 with HSV-1 infections alone (21%), and 46 with both infections (9.9%). Patients who had received antifungal agents prior to OM occurrence tended to have HSV-1 infection (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that Candida albicans and HSV-1 play an important role in chemotherapy-induced OM in patients with hematological malignancies.

  17. c-Src activation through a TrkA and c-Src interaction is essential for cell proliferation and hematological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Gyoung Mi; Choi, Yun-Jeong; Kim, Hye Joung; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Jin, Wook

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •TrkA was mainly present in other types of leukemia including AML. •TrkA enhances the survival of leukemia by activation of PI3K/Akt pathway. •TrkA induced significant hematological malignancies by inducing PLK-1 and Twist-1. •TrkA acted as a key regulator of leukemogenesis and survival through c-Src activation. -- Abstract: Although the kinase receptor TrkA may play an important role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), its involvement in other types of leukemia has not been reported. Furthermore, how it contributes to leukemogenesis is unknown. Here, we describe a molecular network that is important for TrkA function in leukemogenesis. We found that TrkA is frequently overexpressed in other types of leukemia such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) including AML. In addition, TrkA was overexpressed in patients with MDS or secondary AML evolving from MDS. TrkA induced significant hematological malignancies by inducing PLK-1 and Twist-1, and enhanced survival and proliferation of leukemia, which was correlated with activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, endogenous TrkA associated with c-Src complexes was detected in leukemia. Suppression of c-Src activation by TrkA resulted in markedly decreased expression of PLK-1 and Twist-1 via suppressed activation of Akt/mTOR cascades. These data suggest that TrkA plays a key role in leukemogenesis and reveal an unexpected physiological role for TrkA in the pathogenesis of leukemia. These data have important implications for understanding various hematological malignancies.

  18. Long-Term Outcomes Among Older Patients Following Nonmyeloablative Conditioning and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Franke, Georg N.; Laport, Ginna G.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Agura, Edward; Maziarz, Richard T.; Langston, Amelia; Hari, Parameswaran; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Bruno, Benedetto; Maris, Michael B.; Yeager, Andrew; Petersen, Finn Bo; Vindeløv, Lars; McSweeney, Peter A.; Hübel, Kai; Mielcarek, Marco; Georges, George E.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Blume, Karl G.; Maloney, David G.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Context A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbidities. Objective To describe outcomes of patients ≥ 60 years. Design, Setting, and Participants From 1998 to 2008, 372 patients, 60–75 years old were enrolled in prospective clinical HCT trials at 18 collaborating institutions using conditioning with low-dose total body irradiation alone or combined with fludarabine 90 mg/m2 before related (n=184) or unrelated (n=188) donor transplants. Post-grafting immunosuppression included mycophenolate mofetil and a calcineurin inhibitor. Main Outcome Measures Overall and progression-free survivals were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Cumulative incidence estimates were calculated for acute and chronic GVHD, toxicities, achievement of full donor chimerism, complete remission, relapse, and non-relapse mortality. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated from Cox regression models. Results Overall, 5-year cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse were 27% (95% CI, 22%–32%) and 41% (95% CI, 36%–46%), respectively, leading to overall and progression-free 5-year survivals of 35% (95% CI, 30%–40%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%–37%), respectively. These outcomes were not statistically significantly different when stratified by age groups. Furthermore, increasing age was not associated with increases in acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or organ toxicities. In multivariate models, HCT-CI scores of 1–2 [HR, 1.58 (95% CI,1.08–2.31)] and ≥3 [HR, 1.97 (95% CI,1.38–2.80)] were associated with worse survival compared to HCT-CI score of 0 (overall P = 0.003). Similarly, standard relapse risk [HR, 1.67 (95% CI, 1.10–2.54)] and high relapse risk [HR, 2.22 (95% CI, 1.43–3.43)] were associated with worse survival compared to low relapse risk (overall P = 0.0008). Conclusion Among patients aged 60

  19. Noninvasive early detection of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in patients with hematologic malignancies using the phased tracking method.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiko; Susukida, Ikuko; Uzuka, Yoshiro; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Anthracyclines are among the most effective and widely used anticancer drugs; however, their use is limited by serious cardiotoxicity. Early detection is necessary to prevent the high mortality rate associated with heart failure (HF). We evaluated cardiac function in 142 patients using conventional echocardiography and the phased tracking method (PTM), which was measured using the minute vibration and the rapid motion components, neither of which is recognized in standard M-mode nor in tissue Doppler imaging. For systolic function comparison, we compared left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in conventional echocardiography with the average velocity of ventricular septum myocytes (Vave ) in the PTM. The Vave of 12 healthy volunteers was 1.5 (m/s)/m or more. At baseline of 99 patients, there was a positive correlation between LVEF and Vave in all patients. There were no significant differences in baseline cardiac function between patients with and without HF. There was a negative correlation between the cumulative anthracycline dose and LVEF or Vave among all patients. We determined that Vave 1.5 (m/s)/m was equivalent to LVEF 60%, 1.25 (m/s)/m to 55%, and 1.0 (m/s)/m to 50%. During the follow-up period, there was a pathological decrease in LVEF (<55%) and Vave (<1.25 m/s/m) in patients with HF; decreases in Vave were detected significantly earlier than those in LVEF (P < 0.001). When Vave declined to 1.5 (m/s)/m or less, careful continuous observation and cardiac examination was required. When Vave further declined to 1.0 (m/s)/m or lower, chemotherapy was postponed or discontinued; thus, serious drug-induced cardiomyopathy was avoided in patients who did not relapse. The PTM was superior to echocardiography for early, noninvasive detection and intermediate-term monitoring of left ventricle systolic function associated with anthracycline chemotherapy, among patients with hematologic malignancies. The PTM was an effective laboratory procedure to avoid the

  20. Population-Based Analysis of Hematologic Malignancy Referrals to a Comprehensive Cancer Center, Referrals for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and Participation in Clinical Trial, Survey, and Biospecimen Research by Race.

    PubMed

    Clay, Alyssa; Peoples, Brittany; Zhang, Yali; Moysich, Kirsten; Ross, Levi; McCarthy, Philip; Hahn, Theresa

    2015-08-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been reported in clinical trial/research participation, utilization of autologous and allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), and availability of allogeneic donors. We performed a population-based cohort study to investigate adult hematologic malignancy referrals to a US tertiary cancer center, utilization of BMT, and participation in clinical trial, survey, and biospecimen research by race. US Census Data and the New York State Public Access Cancer Epidemiology Database identified the racial distribution of the general population and new hematologic malignancy cases in the primary catchment area. From 2005 to 2011, 1106 patients aged 18 to 75 years were referred for BMT consultation; although the rate of BMT among hematologic malignancy referrals did not differ by race, the reasons for not receiving a BMT did. Participation in biospecimen research did not vary by race; however, African Americans and other minorities were significantly less likely to participate in survey research than European Americans. Although rates of hematologic malignancy referrals and use of BMT for minorities appear to be low (<10%), they closely reflect the race distribution of all hematologic malignancy cases and the western New York population. African Americans are equally likely as other races to participate in biospecimen banking, but further study is needed to understand reasons for lower participation in survey research.

  1. Evaluation of a PCR method to determine the clinical significance of blood cultures with Staphylococcus epidermidis in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Erik; Bäckman, Anders; Persson, Lennart; Mölling, Paula; Tidefelt, Ulf; Söderquist, Bo

    2014-06-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the detection and quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA in blood could distinguish S. epidermidis blood stream infections (BSIs) from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies. The hld gene was chosen to identify S. epidermidis DNA and DNA in blood samples was detected by real-time PCR. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis (n = 30), during blood culture-negative episodes (n = 10) and episodes of bacteremia with other bacteria than S. epidermidis (n = 4) and from healthy blood donors (n = 10). In addition, DNA from S. epidermidis and a selection of other bacterial species were analyzed. Three different sets of criteria were used to classify episodes with positive blood cultures with S. epidermidis as BSIs or contaminations. All DNA preparations from S. epidermidis (n = 48) were hld-positive, but other bacterial species (n = 13) were negative. Sixteen (53%) of 30 blood samples from patients with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis were hld-positive, but none of the controls. There was no clear association between a positive hld PCR and episodes interpreted as BSIs. In conclusion, hld PCR failed to distinguish S. epidermidis BSIs from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies.

  2. Hypermethylation of the alternative AWT1 promoter in hematological malignancies is a highly specific marker for acute myeloid leukemias despite high expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) is over-expressed in numerous cancers with respect to normal cells, and has either a tumor suppressor or oncogenic role depending on cellular context. This gene is associated with numerous alternatively spliced transcripts, which initiate from two different unique first exons within the WT1 and the alternative (A)WT1 promoter intervals. Within the hematological system, WT1 expression is restricted to CD34+/CD38- cells and is undetectable after differentiation. Detectable expression of this gene is an excellent marker for minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the underlying epigenetic alterations are unknown. Methods To determine the changes in the underlying epigenetic landscape responsible for this expression, we characterized expression, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles in 28 hematological cancer cell lines and confirmed the methylation signature in 356 cytogenetically well-characterized primary hematological malignancies. Results Despite high expression of WT1 and AWT1 transcripts in AML-derived cell lines, we observe robust hypermethylation of the AWT1 promoter and an epigenetic switch from a permissive to repressive chromatin structure between normal cells and AML cell lines. Subsequent methylation analysis in our primary leukemia and lymphoma cohort revealed that the epigenetic signature identified in cell lines is specific to myeloid-lineage malignancies, irrespective of underlying mutational status or translocation. In addition to being a highly specific marker for AML diagnosis (positive predictive value 100%; sensitivity 86.1%; negative predictive value 89.4%), we show that AWT1 hypermethylation also discriminates patients that relapse from those achieving complete remission after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with similar efficiency to WT1 expression profiling. Conclusions We describe a methylation signature of the AWT1 promoter CpG island that is a promising marker for

  3. The prognostic impact of peripheral blood progenitor cell dose following high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Craig S; Giralt, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDT) followed by autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell transplant (PBPCT) has become a standard intervention in certain clinical settings of hematologic malignancies, particularly multiple myeloma and relapsed/refractory lymphoma. While the minimal required PBPCs infused, as defined by number of CD34 + cells, has been relatively well delineated for adequate hematopoietic recovery post-HDT, optimal PBPC dose has not been clearly defined. This is particularly relevant in the context of retrospective data suggesting improved survival outcomes with increased PBPC doses. The potential confounding of these data as they relate to disease risk is discussed within this review. Additionally, other retrospective data have suggested that enhanced quantitative lymphocyte subset reconstitution post-HDT-PBPCT may confer progression-free and overall survival advantage. These reported series herein reviewed may inform discussion of future, prospective clinical trials with the intent of defining optimal autologous PBPC dose following HDT, especially as it may relate to metrics beyond hematopoietic recovery.

  4. T-cell and natural killer cell therapies for hematologic malignancies after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, C. Russell; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has revolutionized the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but infection, graft-versus-host disease and relapse are still important problems. Calcineurin inhibitors, T-cell depletion strategies, and immunomodulators have helped to prevent graft-versus-host disease, but have a negative impact on the graft-versus-leukemia effect. T cells and natural killer cells are both thought to be important in the graft-versus-leukemia effect, and both cell types are amenable to ex vivo manipulation and clinical manufacture, making them versatile immunotherapeutics. We provide an overview of these immunotherapeutic strategies following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with discussions centered on natural killer and T-cell biology. We discuss the contributions of each cell type to graft-versus-leukemia effects, as well as the current research directions in the field as related to adoptive cell therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26034113

  5. Efficacy and safety of micafungin versus intravenous itraconazole as empirical antifungal therapy for febrile neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies: a randomized, controlled, prospective, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong Hyun; Kim, Dae Young; Jang, Jun Ho; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Jin Seok; Park, Joon Seong

    2016-01-01

    Micafungin, a clinically important echinocandin antifungal drug, needs to be investigated as empirical therapy in febrile neutropenia in comparison with azole compounds. A prospective randomized study was conducted to compare clinical outcomes between micafungin and intravenous itraconazole as an empirical therapy for febrile neutropenia in hematological malignancies. The antifungal drug (micafungin 100 mg or itraconazole 200 mg IV once daily) was given for high fever that was sustained despite the administration of appropriate antibiotics. Treatment success was determined by composite end points based on breakthrough invasive fungal infection (IFI), survival, premature discontinuation, defervescence, and treatment of baseline fungal infection. Duration of fever, hospital stay, and overall survival (OS) were studied. A total of 153 patients were randomized to receive micafungin or itraconazole. The overall success rate was 7.1 % point higher in the micafungin group (64.4 vs. 57.3 %, p = 0.404), satisfying the statistical criteria for the non-inferiority of micafungin. The duration of fever and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the micafungin group (6 vs. 7 days, p = 0.014; 22 vs. 27 days, p = 0.033, respectively). Grade 3 adverse events including hyperbilirubinemia (2 vs. 7), elevation of transaminase levels (2 vs. 4), electrolyte imbalance (1 vs. 2), atrial fibrillation (1 vs. 0), and anaphylaxis (1 vs. 0) occurred in 7 and 13 patients in the micafungin (10.4 %) and itraconazole (18.8 %) groups, respectively. Micafungin, when compared with itraconazole, had favorably comparable success rate and toxicity profiles on febrile neutropenia in patients with hematological malignancies. In addition, it showed superior effect on shortening the hospital stay.

  6. Evaluation of Bloodstream Infections During Chemotherapy-Induced Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Malignant Hematological Diseases: Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Piukovics, Klára; Terhes, Gabriella; Lázár, Andrea; Tímár, Flóra; Borbényi, Zita; Urbán, Edit

    2015-09-01

    From year to year, it is important to get an overview of the occurrence of causative agents in febrile neutropenic patients to determine the empiric treatment. Thus our aims were to evaluate a four-year period regarding the prevalence of bloodstream infections and the most important causative agents. During this period, 1,361 patients were treated in our hematology ward because of various hematological disorders. 812 febrile episodes were recorded in 469 patients. At that time, 3,714 blood culture (BC) bottles were sent for microbiological investigations, 759 of them gave positive signal. From the majority of positive blood culture bottles (67.1%), Gram-positive bacteria, mainly coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), were grown. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 32.9% of the positive blood culture bottles, in these cases the leading pathogen was Escherichia coli. The high prevalence of CNS was attributed to mainly contamination, while lower positivity rate for Gram-negative bacteria was associated with the use of broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic treatment. PMID:26495130

  7. Application of iPS cells derived from congenital myelodysplastic syndrome for research of nomal hematopoesis and hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are not only a valuable resource for regenerative medicine, but also a promising tool for disease modeling and drug discovery. Patient-specific iPSCs harboring disease-specific mutations are extremely useful for investigating disease mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In the field of hematology, attempts to establish iPSCs from tumor cells such as those of leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were largely unsuccessful because proper reprogramming processes were hampered by their extensive genetic alterations. In contrast, congenital disorders caused by a single genetic mutation are ideal candidates for deriving iPSCs. We have been investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying leukemia and MDS by implementing iPSC technology. Familial platelet disorder (FPD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia and a high propensity for developing acute leukemia, which is caused by heterozygous mutation of RUNX1. We have successfully established iPSCs from three distinct FPD pedigrees and examined the responsible defect during hematopoietic development. This system will serve as a novel unprecedented platform for prospectively studying hematologic disorders using human cells. PMID:27599428

  8. Phenotype diversity in type 1 Gaucher disease: discovering the genetic basis of Gaucher disease/hematologic malignancy phenotype by individual genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Sarah M.; Choi, Murim; Liu, Jun; Jain, Dhanpat; Boot, Rolf G.; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Pashankar, Farzana; Kupfer, Gary M.; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), an inherited macrophage glycosphingolipidosis, manifests with an extraordinary variety of phenotypes that show imperfect correlation with mutations in the GBA gene. In addition to the classic manifestations, patients suffer from increased susceptibility to hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies. The mechanism(s) underlying malignancy in GD is not known, but is postulated to be secondary to macrophage dysfunction and immune dysregulation arising from lysosomal accumulation of glucocerebroside. However, there is weak correlation between GD/cancer phenotype and the systemic burden of glucocerebroside-laden macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic modifier(s) may underlie the GD/cancer phenotype. In the present study, the genetic basis of GD/T-cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma in 2 affected siblings was deciphered through genomic analysis. GBA gene sequencing revealed homozygosity for a novel mutation, D137N. Whole-exome capture and massively parallel sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping identified a homozygous novel mutation in the MSH6 gene that leads to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome and increased cancer risk. Enzyme studies demonstrated that the D137N mutation in GBA is a pathogenic mutation, and immunohistochemistry confirmed the absence of the MSH6 protein. Therefore, precise phenotype annotation followed by individual genome analysis has the potential to identify genetic modifiers of GD, facilitate personalized management, and provide novel insights into disease pathophysiology. PMID:22493294

  9. Epidemiology of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS): The experience from the specialized registry of hematologic malignancies of Basse-Normandie (France).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Quentin; Macro, Margaret; Hebert, Benedikte; Cornet, Edouard; Collignon, Albert; Troussard, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the third most common haematologic malignancy in European countries, and is usually preceded by Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS). Therefore epidemiologic studies of MGUS are very limited in a population-based status. Here we report all new cases of MGUS exhaustively recorded by the Basse-Normandie Regional Registry for Hematologic Malignancies (a French region registry) between January 1997 and December 2005, and analyze outcome of patients until 2009 in term of evolution in MM or death. All cases were analyzed by an expert file review, and MGUS diagnosis was retained for: evidence of a monoclonal component <30 g/l and no CRAB criteria (hyperCalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, bone lesions). We showed that the world standardized incidence rate (WSR) for MGUS was 3.76 ± 0.26 per 100,000 inhabitants, increasing regularly with age, and that the median overall survival (OS) was 115.9 months (CI 95%: 10.5-130.2 months) with 78.3% patients alive at 5 years (CI 95%: 74.1-81.9%). We also observed a rate of progression to multiple myeloma of 1.41% per year, concordant with previous reports in a reallife exhaustive registry.

  10. Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Aplastic Anemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Malignant Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  11. Meta-Analysis and Cost Comparison of Empirical versus Pre-Emptive Antifungal Strategies in Hematologic Malignancy Patients with High-Risk Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane; Marty, Francisco M.; Schwarzinger, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal disease (IFD) causes significant morbidity and mortality in hematologic malignancy patients with high-risk febrile neutropenia (FN). These patients therefore often receive empirical antifungal therapy. Diagnostic test-guided pre-emptive antifungal therapy has been evaluated as an alternative treatment strategy in these patients. Methods We conducted an electronic search for literature comparing empirical versus pre-emptive antifungal strategies in FN among adult hematologic malignancy patients. We systematically reviewed 9 studies, including randomized-controlled trials, cohort studies, and feasibility studies. Random and fixed-effect models were used to generate pooled relative risk estimates of IFD detection, IFD-related mortality, overall mortality, and rates and duration of antifungal therapy. Heterogeneity was measured via Cochran’s Q test, I2 statistic, and between study τ2. Incorporating these parameters and direct costs of drugs and diagnostic testing, we constructed a comparative costing model for the two strategies. We conducted probabilistic sensitivity analysis on pooled estimates and one-way sensitivity analyses on other key parameters with uncertain estimates. Results Nine published studies met inclusion criteria. Compared to empirical antifungal therapy, pre-emptive strategies were associated with significantly lower antifungal exposure (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.27–0.85) and duration without an increase in IFD-related mortality (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.36–1.87) or overall mortality (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.46–1.99). The pre-emptive strategy cost $324 less (95% credible interval -$291.88 to $418.65 pre-emptive compared to empirical) than the empirical approach per FN episode. However, the cost difference was influenced by relatively small changes in costs of antifungal therapy and diagnostic testing. Conclusions Compared to empirical antifungal therapy, pre-emptive antifungal therapy in patients with high-risk FN may decrease

  12. Hepatic Manifestations in Hematological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Liver involvement is often observed in several hematological disorders, resulting in abnormal liver function tests, abnormalities in liver imaging studies, or clinical symptoms presenting with hepatic manifestations. In hemolytic anemia, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly are often seen mimicking liver diseases. In hematologic malignancies, malignant cells often infiltrate the liver and may demonstrate abnormal liver function test results accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly or formation of multiple nodules in the liver and/or spleen. These cases may further evolve into fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:23606974

  13. T cell–depleted stem-cell transplantation for adults with hematologic malignancies: sustained engraftment of HLA-matched related donor grafts without the use of antithymocyte globulin

    PubMed Central

    Small, Trudy N.; Young, James W.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Hsu, Katherine C.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Collins, Nancy; Cisek, Christine; Chiu, Michelle; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.

    2007-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) has been used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation to prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Its use, however, has been associated with delayed T-cell reconstitution and prolonged susceptibility to opportunistic infections (OIs) especially in patients undergoing T cell–depleted (TCD) transplantation. Recently, a prospective trial was conducted in 52 adult patients (median age, 47 years) with various hematologic malignancies undergoing TCD transplantation from HLA-matched related donors without the use of ATG. The cytoreductive regimen consisted of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (HFTBI), thiotepa, and fludarabine. The preferred source of the graft was peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). No additional graft rejection or GvHD prophylaxis was given. All evaluable patients engrafted without any immune-mediated graft rejections. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 3 years was 61% in all patients, and 70% in patients with standard-risk disease. Acute GvHD was limited to grade 2 in 8% and chronic GvHD in 9% of patients. Life-threatening OIs occurred in 3 of 52 patients and was fatal in 1. This study demonstrates durable engraftment with a low incidence of GvHD despite the lack of ATG, as well as the curative potential of this regimen. PMID:17717135

  14. Addition of β-mercaptoethanol is a prerequisite for high-quality RNA isolation using QIAsymphony technology as demonstrated by detection of molecular aberrations in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    van der Poel-van de Luytgaarde, Sonja C P A M; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Goudswaard, Chantal S; Hogenbirk-Hupkes, Pauline E; van Hoven-Beijen, M Antoinette; van de Werf, Marloes; Chu, Isabel W T; van Kapel, Jan; Valk, Peter J M

    2013-06-01

    The isolation of high-quality RNA and DNA from various specimens is essential to perform reliable molecular diagnostic assays. In routine diagnostics of hematologic malignancies isolation of high-quality RNA is a prerequisite. We used QIAsymphony technology (QST) using a customized RNA CT 800 V6 protocol for automated semi-high-throughput isolation of RNA from human specimens and compared the results for breakpoint cluster region-c-abl oncogene 1 (BCR-ABL1) quantification by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) and detection of JAK2 V617F mutations by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) on QST RNA with RNA isolation performed with our routine manual method using RNA-Bee (RB). QST RNA was isolated with and without the addition of β-mercaptoethanol (BME). Addition of BME to the lysis buffer RLT Plus resulted in consistently lower Ct values in analyses of the reference gene porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). Further, the BCR-ABL1 mRNA levels of the QST RNA isolation were highly consistent with RB RNA isolation, only when the lysis buffer RLT Plus in addition contained BME. Moreover, cases of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) with low levels of JAK2 V617F mRNA were even missed in QST when lysis buffer RLT Plus was used, but they were readily detected after addition of BME.

  15. Double Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Reduced-Intensity Preparative Regimen without Anti-Thymocyte Globulin

    PubMed Central

    Ostronoff, F; Milano, F; Gooley, T; Gutman, JA; McSweeney, P; Petersen, FB; Sandmaier, BM; Storb, R; Delaney, C

    2013-01-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens in cord blood transplant (CBT) are increasingly utilized for older patients and those with comorbidities. However, the optimal conditioning regimen has not yet been established and remains a significant challenge of this therapeutic approach. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been incorporated into conditioning regimens in order to decrease the risk of graft failure; however, use of ATG is often associated with infusion reactions and risk of post-transplant complications. We report the results of a non-ATG-containing RIC regimen, where patients received 2Gy TBI unless they were considered to be at higher risk of graft failure, in which case they received 3Gy of TBI. Thirty patients underwent CBT using this protocol for high-risk hematological malignancies. There was only one case of secondary and no cases of primary graft failure. At one year, estimates of NRM, OS and PFS were 29%, 53% and 45%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grade III–IV acute and chronic GVHD were 14% and 18%, respectively. In summary, results of this study demonstrate that this non-ATG-containing conditioning regimen provides a low incidence of graft failure without increasing regimen-related toxicity. PMID:23241738

  16. High serum levels of extracellular vesicles expressing malignancy-related markers are released in patients with various types of hematological neoplastic disorders.

    PubMed

    Caivano, Antonella; Laurenzana, Ilaria; De Luca, Luciana; La Rocca, Francesco; Simeon, Vittorio; Trino, Stefania; D'Auria, Fiorella; Traficante, Antonio; Maietti, Maddalena; Izzo, Tiziana; D'Arena, Giovanni; Mansueto, Giovanna; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Laurenti, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Del Vecchio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Many cell types release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles (MVs), and apoptotic bodies, which play a role in physiology and diseases. Presence and phenotype of circulating EVs in hematological malignancies (HMs) remain largely unexplored.The aim of this study was to characterize EVs in peripheral blood of HM patients compared to healthy subjects (controls). We isolated serum EVs from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), multiple myeloma (MM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and controls. EVs were isolated from serum of peripheral blood by ultracentrifuge steps and analyzed by flow cytometry to define count, size, and immunophenotype. MV levels were significantly elevated in WM, HL, MM, AML, and some MPNs and, though at a lesser degree, in CLL and NHL as compared to healthy controls. HL, MM, and MPNs generated a population of MVs characterized by lower size (below 0.3 μm) when compared to controls. MVs from patients specifically expressed tumor-related antigens, such as CD19 in B cell neoplasms, CD38 in MM, CD13 in myeloid tumors, and CD30 in HL. Both total and antigen-specific count of MVs significantly correlated with different HM clinical features such as Rai stage in CLL, International Prognostic Scoring System in WM, International Staging System in MM, and clinical stage in HL. MVs may represent a novel biomarker in HMs.

  17. Two cases of false-positive dengue non-structural protein 1 (NS1) antigen in patients with hematological malignancies and a review of the literature on the use of NS1 for the detection of Dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shimin J; Krishnan, Prabha U; Leo, Yee Sin

    2015-02-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue has been made easier in recent years owing to the advancement in diagnostic technologies. The rapid non-structural protein 1 (NS1) test strip is widely used in many developed and developing regions at risk of dengue. Despite the relatively high specificity of this test, we recently encountered two cases of false-positive dengue NS1 antigen in patients with underlying hematological malignancies. We reviewed the literature for causes of false-positive dengue NS1.

  18. Encephalopathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of intravenous hepsulfam: results of a phase I trial in patients with advanced hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Larson, R A; Geller, R B; Janisch, L; Milton, J; Grochow, L B; Ratain, M J

    1995-01-01

    Hepsulfam is a bisulfamic ester which is similar in structure to busulfan and is believed to act as a bifunctional alkylator inducing both DNA-DNA and DNA-protein crosslinks. Prior studies in patients with refractory solid tumors have identified the dose-limiting toxicity of hepsulfam to be cumulative myelosuppression resulting in prolonged leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. This phase I trial was designed to determine the maximally tolerated dose of hepsulfam administered intravenously in patients with refractory leukemias and other advanced hematologic malignancies. Hepsulfam was administered as a 30-min or 2-h intravenous infusion to 21 patients with advanced leukemia or multiple myeloma. All patients had been extensively treated and had progressive disease. Cycles were repeated every 5 weeks. Cohorts of patients were treated at 360, 480, 640, and 800 mg/m2. The dose-limiting toxicity of intravenous hepsulfam was severe encephalopathy. The single patient treated at 800 mg/m2 became comatose within 48 h and required 3 weeks for his mental status to return to baseline. There were, however, no irreversible neurological sequelae. Several patients treated at 640 mg/m2 had clinical evidence of toxic deliriums and slowing of alpha rhythm waves on electroencephalograms indicative of a gray-matter encephalopathy. When hepsulfam was infused over 30 min, patients complained of uncomfortable parasthesias, but when the drug was administered over 2 h, these acute symptoms were less common. Myelosuppression was observed in most patients. Among those patients who had some suppression of their leukemia, peripheral blood counts recovered to pretreatment levels after 3-5 weeks. Apart from CNS toxicity, non-hematologic toxicity was minimal. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated rapid clearance of hepsulfam so that the drug was not reliably detected in the plasma after 24 h. The recommended phase II dose of hepsulfam as a single 2-h intravenous infusion is 480 mg/m2, but this dose

  19. A Phase I Study of the First-in-Class Anti-Mitochondrial Metabolism Agent, CPI-613, in Patients with Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Timothy S.; Lee, King; Luddy, John; Maturo, Claudia; Rodriguez, Robert; Isom, Scott; Miller, Lance D.; Stadelman, Kristin M.; Levitan, Denise; Hurd, David; Ellis, Leslie R.; Harrelson, Robin; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Lyerly, Susan; Powell, Bayard L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The lipoate derivative CPI-613 is a first-in-class agent that targets mitochondrial metabolism. This study determined the effects of CPI-613 on mitochondrial function and defined the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PKs), and safety in patients with relapsed or refractory hematologic malignancies. Experimental Design Human leukemia cell lines were exposed to CPI-613 and mitochondrial function was assayed. A phase I trial was conducted in which CPI-613 was given as a 2-hour infusion on days 1 and 4 for 3 weeks every 28 days. Results CPI-613 inhibited mitochondrial respiration of human leukemia cells consistent with the proposed mechanism of action. In the phase I trial, 26 patients were enrolled. CPI-613 was well tolerated with no marrow suppression observed. When the infusion time was shortened to 1 hour renal failure occurred in 2 patients. At 3780 mg/m2, there were 2 dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). At a dose of 2940 mg/m2 over 2 hours, no DLTs were observed, establishing this as the MTD. Renal failure occurred in a total of 4 patients and resolved in all but 1, who chose hospice care. CPI-613 has a triphasic elimination with an alpha half-life of ~1.34 hours. Of 21 evaluable, heavily pretreated, patients, 4 achieved an objective response and 2 achieved prolonged stabilization of disease for a clinical benefit rate of 29%. Following drug exposure, gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from responders demonstrated immune activation. Conclusion CPI-613 inhibits mitochondrial function and demonstrates activity in a heavily pretreated cohort of patients. PMID:25165100

  20. The advantage of using SNP array in clinical testing for hematological malignancies--a comparative study of three genetic testing methods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinjie; Johnson, Eric B; Leverton, Lisa; Arthur, Ashley; Watson, Quinn; Chang, Faye L; Raca, Gordana; Laffin, Jennifer J

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic methods, including G-banded chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, serve as a critical part of routine clinical testing for hematological malignancies and provide important diagnostic and prognostic information; however, the limitations of cytogenetic methods, including the requirement for actively dividing cells and lower resolution of G-banded chromosome analysis as well as the inability of both G-banded chromosome analysis and FISH to detect copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH), can result in a failure to detect genomic abnormalities with diagnostic and prognostic significance. Here, we compared the abnormality detection rate of clinically requested testing (i.e., G-banded chromosome analysis and FISH) with high-resolution oligo (i.e., array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)/oligo hybrid (i.e., SNP-CGH) arrays in a series of patients, in an effort to assess the ability of newer technologies to overcome these limitations. This series found the detection rate for SNP-CGH to be 62.5% for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cases and 72.7% for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases, which are significantly higher than the detection rates of aCGH (31.3% for MDS and 54.5% for CLL) and G-banding and/or FISH (43.8% for MDS and 54.5% for CLL). This demonstrates the advantages of combining SNP-CGH with conventional cytogenetics to provide comprehensive clinical information by detecting clonality, large balanced rearrangements, copy number aberrations, and CN-LOH.

  1. xCELLigence system for real-time label-free monitoring of growth and viability of cell lines from hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Gutierrez, Antonio; Muñoz-Capó, Saúl; Navarro-Palou, María; Ros, Teresa; Amat, Juan Carlos; Lopez, Bernardo; Marcus, Toni F; Fueyo, Laura; Suquia, Angela G; Gines, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Ramos, Rafael; Besalduch, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The xCELLigence system is a new technological approach that allows the real-time cell analysis of adherent tumor cells. To date, xCELLigence has not been able to monitor the growth or cytotoxicity of nonadherent cells derived from hematological malignancies. The basis of its technology relies on the use of culture plates with gold microelectrodes located in their base. We have adapted the methodology described by others to xCELLigence, based on the pre-coating of the cell culture surface with specific substrates, some of which are known to facilitate cell adhesion in the extracellular matrix. Pre-coating of the culture plates with fibronectin, compared to laminin, collagen, or gelatin, significantly induced the adhesion of most of the leukemia/lymphoma cells assayed (Jurkat, L1236, KMH2, and K562). With a fibronectin substrate, nonadherent cells deposited in a monolayer configuration, and consequently, the cell growth and viability were robustly monitored. We further demonstrate the feasibility of xCELLigence for the real-time monitoring of the cytotoxic properties of several antineoplastic agents. In order to validate this technology, the data obtained through real-time cell analysis was compared with that obtained from using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. This provides an excellent label-free tool for the screening of drug efficacy in nonadherent cells and discriminates optimal time points for further molecular analysis of cellular events associated with treatments, reducing both time and costs. PMID:24959085

  2. Chimerism-based pre-emptive immunotherapy with fast withdrawal of immunosuppression and donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for pediatric hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Biljana; Petrovic, Aleksandra; Wahlstrom, Justin; Dvorak, Christopher C; Kong, Denice; Hwang, Jimmy; Expose-Spencer, Jueleah; Gates, Michael; Cowan, Morton J

    2015-04-01

    The presence of increasing host chimerism or persistent mixed chimerism (MC) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia in children is a predictor of relapse. To reduce the risk of relapse, we prospectively studied post-transplantation chimerism-based immunotherapy (IT) using fast withdrawal of immunosuppression (FWI) and donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) in children with early post-transplantation MC. Forty-three children with hematologic malignancies at 2 institutions were enrolled prospectively in this study from 2009 until 2012 and were followed for a mean of 42 (SD, 10) months. Twelve patients (28%) were assigned to the observation arm based on the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or full donor chimerism (FDC), and 5 (12%) sustained early events and could not undergo intervention. Twenty-six (60%) patients with MC were assigned to IT with FWI, which started at a median of 49 days (range, 35 to 85 days) after transplantation. Fourteen patients proceeded to DLI after FWI. Toxicities of treatment included GVHD, which developed in 19% of patients undergoing intervention, with 1 of 26 (4%) dying from GVHD and 1 (4%) still requiring therapy for chronic GVHD 21 months after DLI. Patients with MC undergoing IT had similar 2-year event-free survival (EFS) (73%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 55% to 91%) compared with patients who achieved FDC spontaneously (83%; 95% CI, 62% to 100%); however, because 50% of all relapses in the IT occurred later than 2 years after transplantation, the EFS declined to 55% (95% CI, 34% to 76%) at 42 (SD, 11) months. There were no late relapses in the observation group. EFS in the entire cohort was 58% (95% CI, 42% to 73%) at 42 (SD, 11) months after transplantation. Evidence of disease before transplantation remained a significant predictor of relapse, whereas development of chronic GVHD was protective against relapse. PMID:25644958

  3. Development and evaluation of a real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of blastocystis parasites in human stool samples: prospective study of patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Albert, Aurélie; El Alaoui, Hicham; Delbac, Frédéric; Livrelli, Valérie

    2011-03-01

    Blastocystis anaerobic parasites are widespread worldwide in the digestive tract of many animal species, including humans. Epidemiological Blastocystis studies are often limited by the poor sensitivity of standard parasitological assays for its detection. This report presents a highly sensitive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay developed to detect Blastocystis parasites in stool samples. The assay targets a partial sequence of the Blastocystis small ribosomal subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, allowing subtyping (ST) of Blastocystis isolates by direct sequencing of qPCR products. This qPCR method was assessed in a prospective study of 186 patients belonging to two cohorts--a group of 94 immunocompromised patients presenting hematological malignancies and a control group of 92 nonimmunocompromised patients. Direct-light microscopy and xenic in vitro stool culture analysis showed only 29% and 52% sensitivity, respectively, compared to our qPCR assay. Of the 27 (14.5%) Blastocystis-positive patients, 8 (4%) experienced digestive symptoms. No correlation was found between symptomatic patients and immune status, parasite load, or parasite subtypes, although subtyping of all isolates revealed a high (63.0%) prevalence of ST4. Two unexpected avian subtypes were found, i.e., ST6 and ST7, which are frequently isolated in Asia but rarely present in Western countries. In conclusion, this qPCR proved by far the most sensitive of the tested methods and allowed subtype determination by direct sequencing of qPCR products. New diagnostic tools such as the qPCR are essential for evaluating the clinical relevance of Blastocystis subtypes and their role in acute or chronic digestive disorders. PMID:21177897

  4. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Conditioning Regimens with Fludarabine/melphalan or Fludarabine/busulfan for Patients with Hematological Malignancies: A Single-center Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Wataru; Andou, Taiki; Itabashi, Megumi; Koyama, Satoshi; Ishii, Yoshimi; Numata, Ayumi; Motohashi, Kenji; Hagihara, Maki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Fujisawa, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fludarabine plus melphalan (FM) and fludarabine plus busulfan (FB) are two major conditioning regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent allo-HSCT after a conditioning regimen consisting of FM or FB with/without total body irradiation for hematological malignancies between 2005 and 2014. Results There were 41 patients who met the criteria. The median follow-up time for the survivors was 3 years. Thirty-two patients received allo-HSCT after the FM regimen and nine patients received allo-HSCT after the FB regimen. Patients who received FB were older than those who received FM (p=0.041). There was no significant difference in the 3-year overall survival between patients who had received FB and those who had received FM (29.6% vs. 56.5%, p=0.267). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was significantly higher in patients who had received FB than that in patients who had received FM (66.7% vs. 17.8%, p=0.004), and FB was an independent prognostic factor for relapse by a multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 9.8; 95% confidential interval, 2.5-39.3; p=0.001). When we restricted the evaluation to patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, the 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was also significantly higher in patients who had received FB than that in patients who had received FM (75.0% vs. 16.1%, p=0.004). Conclusion The results suggest that FM may provide better disease control than FB.

  5. AMG 319 Lymphoid Malignancy FIH

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Cancer; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Hematologic Malignancies; Hematology; Leukemia; Low Grade Lymphoma; Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Oncology; Oncology Patients; T Cell Lymphoma; Tumors

  6. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimen using low-dose total body irradiation before allogeneic transplant for hematologic malignancies: Experience from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Belkacemi, Yazid . E-mail: y-belkacemi@o-lambret.fr; Labopin, Myriam; Hennequin, Christophe; Hoffstetter, Sylvette; Mungai, Raffaello; Wygoda, Marc; Lundell, Marie; Finke, Jurgen; Aktinson, Chris; Lorchel, Frederic; Durdux, Catherine; Basara, Nadezda

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: The high rate of toxicity is the limitation of myelobalative regimens before allogeneic transplantation. A reduced intensity regimen can allow engraftment of stem cells and subsequent transfer of immune cells for the induction of a graft-vs.-tumor reaction. Methods and Materials: The data from 130 patients (80 males and 50 females) treated between 1998 and 2003 for various hematologic malignancies were analyzed. The median patient age was 50 years (range, 3-72 years). Allogeneic transplantation using peripheral blood or bone marrow, or both, was performed in 104 (82%), 22 (17%), and 4 (3%) patients, respectively, from HLA identical sibling donors (n = 93, 72%), matched unrelated donors (n = 23, 18%), mismatched related donors (4%), or mismatched unrelated donors (6%). Total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 2 Gy delivered in one fraction was given to 101 patients (78%), and a total dose of 4-6 Gy was given in 29 (22%) patients. The median dose rate was 14.3 cGy/min (range, 6-16.4). Results: After a median follow-up period of 20 months (range, 1-62 months), engraftment was obtained in 122 patients (94%). Acute graft-vs.-host disease of Grade 2 or worse was observed in 37% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed three favorable independent factors for event-free survival: HLA identical sibling donor (p < 0.0001; relative risk [RR], 0.15), complete remission (p < 0.0001; RR, 3.08), and female donor to male patient (p = 0.006; RR 2.43). For relapse, the two favorable prognostic factors were complete remission (p < 0.0001, RR 0.11) and HLA identical sibling donor (p = 0.0007; RR 3.59). Conclusions: In this multicenter study, we confirmed high rates of engraftment and chimerism after the reduced intensity regimen. Our results are comparable to those previously reported. Radiation parameters seem to have no impact on outcome. However, the lack of a statistically significant difference in terms of dose rate may have been due, in part, to the small population

  7. A Prospective Study of {sup 18}FDG-PET With CT Coregistration for Radiation Treatment Planning of Lymphomas and Other Hematologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A.; Schöder, Heiko; Kowalski, Alexander; McCann, Patrick; Lim, Remy; Turlakov, Alla; Gonen, Mithat; Barker, Chris; Goenka, Anuj; Lovie, Shona; Yahalom, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective single-institution study examined the impact of positron emission tomography (PET) with the use of 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and computed tomography (CT) scan radiation treatment planning (TP) on target volume definition in lymphoma. Methods and Materials: 118 patients underwent PET/CT TP during June 2007 to May 2009. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on CT-only and PET/CT studies by radiation oncologists (ROs) and nuclear medicine physicians (NMPs) for 95 patients with positive PET scans. Treatment plans and dose-volume histograms were generated for CT-only and PET/CT for 95 evaluable sites. Paired t test statistics and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for analysis. Results: 70 (74%) patients had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 10 (11%) had Hodgkin lymphoma, 12 (10%) had plasma-cell neoplasm, and 3 (3%) had other hematologic malignancies. Forty-three (45%) presented with relapsed/refractory disease. Forty-five (47%) received no prior chemotherapy. The addition of PET increased GTV as defined by ROs in 38 patients (median, 27%; range, 5%-70%) and decreased GTV in 41 (median, 39.5%; range, 5%-80%). The addition of PET increased GTV as defined by NMPs in 27 patients (median, 26.5%; range, 5%-95%) and decreased GTV in 52 (median, 70%; range, 5%-99%). The intraobserver correlation between CT-GTV and PET-GTV was higher for ROs than for NMPs (0.94, P<.01 vs 0.89, P<.01). On the basis of Bland-Altman plots, the PET-GTVs defined by ROs were larger than those defined by NMPs. On evaluation of clinical TPs, only 4 (4%) patients had inadequate target coverage (D95 <95%) of the PET-GTV defined by NMPs. Conclusions: Significant differences between the RO and NMP volumes were identified when PET was coregistered to CT for radiation planning. Despite this, the PET-GTV defined by ROs and NMPs received acceptable prescription dose in nearly all patients. However, given the potential for a marginal miss, consultation with an experienced PET

  8. [From JSLH (The Japanese Society for Laboratory Hematology): An Active Team Approach to Medicine as Laboratory Technologists, through Showing Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Samples Directly to Patients with Hematological Malignancy].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Sanae; Kojima, Yukari; Saito, Kyoko; Wada, Hisako; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Morinaga, Koji; Kawai, Yasukazu; Haba, Toshihiro

    2014-11-01

    The clinical path for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients has been in practice in our hospital since 2003. In the clinical path, laboratory technologists take on the role of explaining the microscopic findings in bone marrow and peripheral blood samples to patients (with or without their families) using the view-sharing microscope in our laboratory. From July 2003 to October 2014, 56 patients were enrolled in the AML clinical path and given an explanation of their bone marrow and peripheral blood samples. The patients' median age was 62, and the median time spent for explanation was 40 minutes. We conducted a questionnaire feedback survey involving those who enrolled, and the results showed significant improvement in the recognition of the disease pathophysiology, treatment efficacy, and the importance of precautions against infectious diseases. Based on the feedback, we have made marked efforts to provide patients with an improved environment during the explanatory session. This includes installing a special display for the patients, drawing a schematic illustration that shows how the blood cells differentiate, and putting them into operation in a hematology ward to promote patient privacy and precautions against infectious diseases. Hematological laboratory technologists have played an important role in patient care in our hospital. To perform their role as effectively as possible, hematological laboratory technologists participate in the conferences of the Department of Hematology and Oncology regularly, in which medical staff members can discuss the conditions and clinical courses of patients. We aim to contribute to patient satisfaction by sophisticating specialized knowledge as hematological laboratory technologists and cooperate with other medical staff members.

  9. Decreased complement mediated binding of antibody//sup 3/-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Buschbacher, R.; Brunner, C.M.; Hess, C.E.; O'Brien, W.M.; Wanebo, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The complement mediated binding of prepared antibody//sup 3/H-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells obtained from a number of patient populations has been investigated. Patients with solid tumors have binding activity similar to that seen in a normal group of individuals. However, a significant fraction of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies have lowered binding activity compared with normal subjects. Quantitative studies indicate the lowered activity probably arises due to a decrease in complement receptors on the respective red blood cells. The potential importance and implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

  10. DCB - Cancer Immunology, Hematology, and Etiology Research

    Cancer.gov

    Part of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology’s research portfolio, studies supported include the characterization of basic mechanisms relevant to anti-tumor immune responses and hematologic malignancies.

  11. Reptile hematology.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Klaphake, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The basic principles of hematology used in mammalian medicine can be applied to reptiles. The appearances of the blood cells are significantly different from those seen in most mammals, and vary with taxa and staining method used. Many causes for abnormalities of the reptilian hemogram are similar to those for mammals, although additional factors such as venipuncture site, season, hibernation status, captivity status, and environmental factors can also affect values, making interpretation of hematologic results challenging. Values in an individual should be compared with reference ranges specific to that species, gender, and environmental conditions when available.

  12. Reptile Hematology.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Klaphake, Eric

    2015-09-01

    The basic principles of hematology used in mammalian medicine can be applied to reptiles. The appearances of the blood cells are significantly different from those seen in most mammals, and vary with taxa and staining method used. Many causes for abnormalities of the reptilian hemogram are similar to those for mammals, although additional factors such as venipuncture site, season, hibernation status, captivity status, and environmental factors can also affect values, making interpretation of hematologic results challenging. Values in an individual should be compared with reference ranges specific to that species, gender, and environmental conditions when available.

  13. The European Hematology Association: strengthening hematology in Europe and beyond.

    PubMed

    Foà, Robin

    2011-04-01

    European hematology is increasingly recognized as a medical speciality that contributes to public health through the development of new therapies for the management of malignant and nonmalignant blood diseases. The European Hematology Association (EHA) is a nonprofit scientific association that represents European medical professionals with an active interest in hematology. Our aim is to promote excellence in clinical practice, research and education in European hematology. An executive board and councillors elected by the members form the governmental body of EHA and are responsible for the strategy and organization of the association. Various EHA committees and units are assigned to the activities and programs of the EHA. The EHA has an important role to play by making education and training easily accessible in Europe and further afield. In order to best serve the European hematologist, the association has developed scientific programs and activities in a variety of areas. Besides focusing on European hematology, the EHA has also dedicated itself to outreach programs; an initiative to complement the needs of hematology education and to emphasize important topics of benefit to hematologists, not only in Europe, but also in other regions.

  14. The role of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of infections in patients with hematological malignancies and persistent febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Paul, Mical; Bernstine, Hanna; Vidal, Liat; Ram, Ron; Raanani, Pia; Yeshurun, Moshe; Tadmor, Boaz; Leibovici, Leonard; Shpilberg, Ofer; Groshar, David

    2013-09-01

    We assessed the performance of PET/CT for diagnosis and management of infections in high-risk hematological cancer patients with persistent febrile neutropenia in a prospective study. (18)F-FDG PET/CT with contrast-enhanced CT was performed on day 5-7 of persistent fever. Between 2008 and 2011, 91 PET/CT examinations were performed for different episodes in 79 patients, resulting in 117 diagnoses. The sensitivity of the PET/CT was 79.8% (71/89) compared to 51.7% (46/89) with chest/sinus CT alone. Specificities were 32.14% (9/28) vs. 42.85% (12/28), respectively. PET/CT resulted in a change from the pre-test diagnosis in 63/91 (69%) of episodes and in modification of patients' management in 46/91 (55%). PET/CT was beneficial in diagnosing abdominal infections. PET/CT has a potential role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with persistent febrile neutropenia.

  15. Chimerism Analysis of Cell-Free DNA in Patients Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation May Predict Early Relapse in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Abalkhail, Hala; Alseraihy, Amal; Mohamed, Said Y.; Ayas, Mouhab; Alsharif, Fahad; Alzahrani, Hazza; Al-Jefri, Abdullah; Aldawsari, Ghuzayel; Al-Ahmari, Ali; Belgaumi, Asim F.; Walter, Claudia Ulrike; El-Solh, Hassan; Rasheed, Walid; Albitar, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Background. We studied DNA chimerism in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in patients treated with HSCT. Methods. Chimerism analysis was performed on CD3+ cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells, and cfDNA using 16 small tandem repeat loci. The resulting labeled PCR-products were size-fractionated and quantified. Results. Analyzing samples from 191 patients treated with HSCT for nonneoplastic hematologic disorders demonstrated that the cfDNA chimerism is comparable to that seen in PMN cells. Analyzing leukemia patients (N = 126) showed that, of 84 patients with 100% donor DNA in PMN, 16 (19%) had evidence of clinical relapse and >10% recipient DNA in the plasma. Additional 16 patients of the 84 (19%) showed >10% recipient DNA in plasma, but without evidence of relapse. Eight patients had mixed chimerism in granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma, but three of these patients had >10% recipient DNA in plasma compared to PMN cells and these three patients had clinical evidence of relapse. The remaining 34 patients showed 100% donor DNA in both PMN and lymphocytes, but cfDNA showed various levels of chimerism. Of these patients 14 (41%) showed laboratory or clinical evidence of relapse and all had >10% recipient DNA in cfDNA. Conclusion. Monitoring patients after HSCT using cfDNA might be more reliable than cellular DNA in predicting early relapse. PMID:27006832

  16. NMS-P937, an orally available, specific small-molecule polo-like kinase 1 inhibitor with antitumor activity in solid and hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Valsasina, Barbara; Beria, Italo; Alli, Cristina; Alzani, Rachele; Avanzi, Nilla; Ballinari, Dario; Cappella, Paolo; Caruso, Michele; Casolaro, Alessia; Ciavolella, Antonella; Cucchi, Ulisse; De Ponti, Anna; Felder, Eduard; Fiorentini, Francesco; Galvani, Arturo; Gianellini, Laura M; Giorgini, Maria L; Isacchi, Antonella; Lansen, Jaqueline; Pesenti, Enrico; Rizzi, Simona; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Sola, Francesco; Moll, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase considered to be the master player of cell-cycle regulation during mitosis. It is indeed involved in centrosome maturation, bipolar spindle formation, chromosome separation, and cytokinesis. PLK1 is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and its overexpression often correlates with poor prognosis. Although five different PLKs are described in humans, depletion or inhibition of kinase activity of PLK1 is sufficient to induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cell lines and in xenograft tumor models. NMS-P937 is a novel, orally available PLK1-specific inhibitor. The compound shows high potency in proliferation assays having low nanomolar activity on a large number of cell lines, both from solid and hematologic tumors. NMS-P937 potently causes a mitotic cell-cycle arrest followed by apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits xenograft tumor growth with clear PLK1-related mechanism of action at well-tolerated doses in mice after oral administration. In addition, NMS-P937 shows potential for combination in clinical settings with approved cytotoxic drugs, causing tumor regression in HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts upon combination with irinotecan and prolonged survival of animals in a disseminated model of acute myelogenous leukemia in combination with cytarabine. NMS-P937, with its favorable pharmacologic parameters, good oral bioavailability in rodent and nonrodent species, and proven antitumor activity in different preclinical models using a variety of dosing regimens, potentially provides a high degree of flexibility in dosing schedules and warrants investigation in clinical settings.

  17. Choice of Unmanipulated T Cell Replete Graft for Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant and Posttransplant Cyclophosphamide in Hematologic Malignancies in Adults: Peripheral Blood or Bone Marrow—Review of Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Shatha; Peres, Edward; Janakiraman, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is often the only curative option for many patients with malignant and benign hematological stem cell disorders. However, some issues are still of concern regarding finding a donor like shrinking family sizes in many societies, underrepresentation of the ethnic minorities in the registries, genetic variability for some races, and significant delays in obtaining stem cells after starting the search. So there is a considerable need to develop alternate donor stem cell sources. The rapid and near universal availability of the haploidentical donor is an advantage of the haploidentical SCT and an opportunity that is being explored currently in many centers especially using T cell replete graft and posttransplant cyclophosphamide. This is probably because it does not require expertise in graft manipulation and because of the lower costs. However, there are still lots of unanswered questions, like the effect of use of bone marrow versus peripheral blood as the source of stem cells on graft-versus-host disease, graft versus tumor, overall survival, immune reconstitution, and quality of life. Here we review the available publications on bone marrow and peripheral blood experience in the haploidentical SCT setting. PMID:27118973

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Radiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    -cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects.

  20. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    /Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Zebrafish in hematology: sushi or science?

    PubMed Central

    Carradice, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    After a decade of the “modern era” of zebrafish hematology research, what have been their major contributions to hematology and what challenges does the model face? This review argues that, in hematology, zebrafish have demonstrated their suitability, are proving their utility, have supplied timely and novel discoveries, and are poised for further significant contributions. It presents an overview of the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of zebrafish hematopoiesis underpinning their use in hematology research. Whereas reverse genetic techniques enable functional studies of particular genes of interest, forward genetics remains zebrafish's particular strength. Mutants with diverse and interesting hematopoietic defects are emerging from multiple genetic screens. Some mutants model hereditary blood diseases, occasionally leading to disease genes first; others provide insights into developmental hematology. Models of malignant hematologic disorders provide tools for drug-target and pharmaceutics discovery. Numerous transgenic zebrafish with fluorescently marked blood cells enable live-cell imaging of inflammatory responses and host-pathogen interactions previously inaccessible to direct observation in vivo, revealing unexpected aspects of leukocyte behavior. Zebrafish disease models almost uniquely provide a basis for efficient whole animal chemical library screens for new therapeutics. Despite some limitations and challenges, their successes and discovery potential mean that zebrafish are here to stay in hematology research. PMID:18182572

  2. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  3. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  4. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients.

  5. Transplantation of filgrastim-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from HLA-identical sibling or alternative family donors in patients with hematologic malignancies: a prospective comparison on clinical outcome, immune reconstitution, and hematopoietic chimerism.

    PubMed

    Beelen, D W; Ottinger, H D; Elmaagacli, A; Scheulen, B; Basu, O; Kremens, B; Havers, W; Grosse-Wilde, H; Schaefer, U W

    1997-12-15

    The clinical results, cellular immune reconstitution, and hematopoietic chimerism obtained after transplantation of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from genotypically human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling (n = 36) or alternative family donors (n = 24) were prospectively compared in patients with hematologic malignancies. Thirty-two of 34 evaluable patients with HLA-identical sibling donors and all patients with alternative family donors achieved trilineage engraftment. The median time intervals to reach peripheral neutrophil counts <500/microL (13 v 17 days) or <1,000/microL (16 v 19 days) and unsupported platelet counts <20,000/microL (11 v 15 days) or <50, 000/microL (19 v 24 days) as well as red blood cell and platelet transfusion requirements were not significantly different between both patient subsets. The cumulative probability of grades II through IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) for the 60 study patients was 48% +/- 10% but ranged between 86% +/- 12% in patients whose donors had at least one HLA-A,B,DR,DQ,DP antigen disparity in direction to acute GVHD, and 25% +/- 9% in recipients of GVHD-matched transplants (P < .003). The 2-year survival estimates were 54% +/- 10% for patients with alternative family donors and 65% +/- 9% for patients with HLA-identical sibling donors. Multivariate analysis identified the pretransplantation disease stage, patient age, and acute GVHD as independent predictors of overall and disease-free survival, whereas alternative family donors alone had no adverse effect on these clinical endpoints. Monthly monitoring of peripheral blood T-helper cell subsets, B cells, and monocytes during the first year posttransplantation showed a nearly identical course of immune cell reconstitution in both patient subsets. In addition, no differences in the proportions of complete chimeric patients were detectable between the two patient subsets by

  6. Filgrastim-Stimulated Bone Marrow Compared with Filgrastim-Mobilized Peripheral Blood in Myeloablative Sibling Allografting for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Randomized Canadian Blood and Marrow Transplant Group Study.

    PubMed

    Couban, Stephen; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Lachance, Sylvie; Walker, Irwin; Toze, Cynthia; Rubinger, Morel; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Lee, Stephanie J; Szer, Richard; Doocey, R; Lewis, Ian D; Huebsch, Lothar; Howson-Jan, Kang; Lalancette, Michel; Almohareb, Fahad; Chaudhri, Nadeem; Ivison, Sabine; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan; Fairclough, Diane; Devins, Gerald; Szwajcer, David; Foley, Ronan; Smith, Clayton; Panzarella, Tony; Kerr, Holly; Kariminia, Amina; Schultz, Kirk R

    2016-08-01

    In adult hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), filgrastim-mobilized peripheral blood (G-PB) has largely replaced unstimulated marrow for allografting. Although the use of G-PB results in faster hematopoietic recovery, it is also associated with more chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). A potential alternative allograft is filgrastim-stimulated marrow (G-BM), which we hypothesized may be associated with prompt hematopoietic recovery but with less cGVHD. We conducted a phase 3, open-label, multicenter randomized trial of 230 adults with hematologic malignancies receiving allografts from siblings after myeloablative conditioning to compare G-PB with G-BM. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure, defined as a composite of extensive cGVHD, relapse/disease progression, and death. With a median follow-up of 36 months (range, 9.6 to 48), comparing G-BM with G-PB, there was no difference between the 2 arms with respect to the primary outcome of this study (hazard ratio [HR], .91; 95% confidence interval [CI], .68 to 1.22; P = .52). However, the cumulative incidence of overall cGVHD was lower with G-BM (HR, .66; 95% CI, .46 to .95; P = .007) and there was no difference in the risk of relapse or progression (P = .35). The median times to neutrophil recovery (P = .0004) and platelet recovery (P = .012) were 3 days shorter for recipients allocated to G-PB compared with those allocated to G-BM, but there were no differences in secondary engraftment-related outcomes, such as time to first hospital discharge (P = .17). In addition, there were no graft failures in either arm. This trial demonstrates that, compared with G-PB, the use of G-BM allografts leads to a significantly lower rate of overall cGVHD without a loss of the graft-versus-tumor effect and comparable overall survival. Our findings suggest that further study of this type of allograft is warranted.

  7. A hematology consensus agreement on antifungal strategies for neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto, Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo, Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica, Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Sorveglianza Epidemiologica delle Infezioni Fungine nelle Emopatie Maligne.

    PubMed

    Girmenia, Corrado; Aversa, Franco; Busca, Alessandro; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Luppi, Mario; Pagano, Livio; Rossi, Giuseppe; Venditti, Adriano; Nosari, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    In the attempt to establish key therapy definitions and provide shared approaches to invasive fungal diseases in neutropenic patients, trials of empiric, preeemptive and targeted antifungal therapy (EAT, PAT and TAT) were reviewed, and a Consensus Development Conference Project was convened. The Expert-Panel concurred that all antifungal treatments, including EAT, should always follow an adequate diagnostic strategy and that the standard definition of PAT may be misleading: being PAT guided by the results of a diagnostic work-up, it should better be termed diagnostic-driven antifungal therapy (DDAT). The Expert-Panel agreed that radiological findings alone are insufficient for the choice of a TAT and that the identification of the etiologic pathogen is needed. The Consensus Agreement proceeded identifying which clinical and microbiological findings were sufficient to start a DDAT and which were not. Finally, an algorithm to rationalize the choice of antifungal drugs on the basis of clinical manifestations, antifungal prophylaxis, instrumental and laboratory findings was drawn up.

  8. Reliability of Breast Ultrasound BI-RADS Final Assessment in Mammographically Negative Patients with Nipple Discharge and Radiologic Predictors of Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chae Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the reliability of breast ultrasound (US) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) final assessment in mammographically negative patients with pathologic nipple discharge, and to determine the clinical and ultrasonographic variables associated with malignancy in this group of patients. Methods A total of 65 patients with 67 mammographically negative breast lesions that were pathologically confirmed through US-guided biopsy were included. Results Of the 53 BI-RADS category 4 and 5 lesions, eight (15.1%) were malignant (six ductal carcinomas in situ, one invasive ductal carcinoma, and one solid papillary carcinoma). There was no malignancy among the remaining 14 category 3 lesions. Malignant lesions more frequently displayed a round or irregular shape (75.0%, 6/8; p=0.030) and nonparallel orientation (33.3%, 4/12; p=0.029) compared to the benign lesions. The increase in the BI-RADS category corresponded with a rise in the malignancy rate (p=0.004). Conclusion The BI-RADS lexicon and final assessment of breast US reliably detect and characterize malignancy in mammographically negative patients with pathologic nipple discharge. PMID:27721881

  9. Abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A; Grace, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hematological indices are frequently encountered in cirrhosis. Multiple causes contribute to the occurrence of hematological abnormalities. Recent studies suggest that the presence of hematological cytopenias is associated with a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. The present article reviews the pathogenesis, incidence, prevalence, clinical significance and treatment of abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis. PMID:19543577

  10. American Society of Hematology

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory company founded by Elizabeth Holmes. ASH in Cuba: Unmasking Challenges and Opportunities in Hematology Following ASH's executive committee's retreat in Havana, Cuba, Dr. Gotlib discusses lessons, challenges and opportunities for ...

  11. Identification of N-(4-((1R,3S,5S)-3-Amino-5-methylcyclohexyl)pyridin-3-yl)-6-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-5-fluoropicolinamide (PIM447), a Potent and Selective Proviral Insertion Site of Moloney Murine Leukemia (PIM) 1, 2, and 3 Kinase Inhibitor in Clinical Trials for Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Burger, Matthew T; Nishiguchi, Gisele; Han, Wooseok; Lan, Jiong; Simmons, Robert; Atallah, Gordana; Ding, Yu; Tamez, Victoriano; Zhang, Yanchen; Mathur, Michelle; Muller, Kristine; Bellamacina, Cornelia; Lindvall, Mika K; Zang, Richard; Huh, Kay; Feucht, Paul; Zavorotinskaya, Tatiana; Dai, Yumin; Basham, Steve; Chan, Julie; Ginn, Elaine; Aycinena, Alex; Holash, Jocelyn; Castillo, Joseph; Langowski, John L; Wang, Yingyun; Chen, Min Y; Lambert, Amy; Fritsch, Christine; Kauffmann, Audry; Pfister, Estelle; Vanasse, K Gary; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-11-12

    Pan proviral insertion site of Moloney murine leukemia (PIM) 1, 2, and 3 kinase inhibitors have recently begun to be tested in humans to assess whether pan PIM kinase inhibition may provide benefit to cancer patients. Herein, the synthesis, in vitro activity, in vivo activity in an acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model, and preclinical profile of the potent and selective pan PIM kinase inhibitor compound 8 (PIM447) are described. Starting from the reported aminopiperidyl pan PIM kinase inhibitor compound 3, a strategy to improve the microsomal stability was pursued resulting in the identification of potent aminocyclohexyl pan PIM inhibitors with high metabolic stability. From this aminocyclohexyl series, compound 8 entered the clinic in 2012 in multiple myeloma patients and is currently in several phase 1 trials of cancer patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26505898

  12. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  13. Audit of pediatric hematology-oncology outpatients in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Menon, Bina Sharine; Juraida, Eni; Ibrahim, Hishamshah; Mohamed, Mahfuzah; Ho, Caroline; Khuzaiah, Raja

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the types of cancers and hematological disorders in patients attending a pediatric hematology-oncology clinic. This was a prospective study at the Pediatric Institute, General Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from June 2005-November 2006. During the 18-month study, 803 patients attended the clinic, 730 had oncological problems and 73 had hematological problems. The age range was from 2 months to 28 years (median 6 years). The patients were Malay (66%), Chinese (23%), Indian (10%) and other races (1%). Of the oncological patients, 51% had either leukemia (n=293) or lymphoma (n=77). The other most common diagnoses were retinoblastoma, followed by Wilm's tumor and germ cell tumors. Six patients (0.8%) developed a second malignant neoplasm. Of the hematological patients, 60% had platelet disorders, most commonly chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Twenty-four per cent had bone marrow failure and 16% had red cell disorders.

  14. Hematology: ATG and Newton's third law of motion.

    PubMed

    Brunstein, Claudio G

    2010-01-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies have a risk of developing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The addition of ATG to prophylaxis regimens decreases the incidence of GVHD without compromising overall survival in these patients. PMID:20029442

  15. Diagnostic hematology of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Nicole I; Alleman, A Rick; Sayler, Katherine A

    2011-03-01

    The hematologic evaluation of reptiles is an indispensable diagnostic tool in exotic veterinary practice. The diversity of reptile species, their characteristic physiologic features, and effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors present unique challenges for accurate interpretation of the hemogram. Combining the clinical presentation with hematologic findings provides valuable information in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease and helps guide the clinician toward therapy and further diagnostic testing. This article outlines the normal and pathologic morphology of blood cells of reptile species. The specific comparative aspects of reptiles are emphasized, and structural and functional abnormalities in the reptilian hemogram are described.

  16. Systems hematology: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Corey, Seth Joel; Kimmel, Marek; Leonard, Joshua N

    2014-01-01

    Hematologists have traditionally studied blood and its components by simplifying it into its components and functions. A variety of new techniques have generated large and complex datasets. Coupled to an appreciation of blood as a dynamic system, a new approach in systems hematology is needed. Systems hematology embraces the multi-scale complexity with a combination of mathematical, engineering, and computational tools for constructing and validating models of biological phenomena. The validity of mathematical modeling in hematopoiesis was established early by the pioneering work of Till and McCulloch. This volume seeks to introduce to the various scientists and physicians to the multi-faceted field of hematology by highlighting recent works in systems biology. Deterministic, stochastic, statistical, and network-based models have been used to better understand a range of topics in hematopoiesis, including blood cell production, the periodicity of cyclical neutropenia, stem cell production in response to cytokine administration, and the emergence of drug resistance. Future advances require technological improvements in computing power, imaging, and proteomics as well as greater collaboration between experimentalists and modelers. Altogether, systems hematology will improve our understanding of normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, better define stem cells and their daughter cells, and potentially lead to more effective therapies.

  17. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-09-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  18. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  19. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Fischer, C. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The hematology and immunology program conducted in support of the Apollo missions was designed to acquire specific laboratory data relative to the assessment of the health status of the astronauts prior to their commitment to space flight. A second objective was to detect and identify any alterations in the normal functions of the immunohematologic systems which could be attributed to space flight exposure, and to evaluate the significance of these changes relative to man's continuing participation in space flight missions. Specific changes observed during the Gemini Program formed the basis for the major portion of the hematology-immunology test schedule. Additional measurements were included when their contribution to the overall interpretation of the flight data base became apparent.

  20. Hematology of camelids.

    PubMed

    Vap, Linda; Bohn, Andrea A

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of camelid hematology results is similar to that of other mammals. Obtaining accurate results and using appropriate reference intervals can be a bit problematic, particularly when evaluating the erythron. Camelid erythrocytes vary from other mammals in that they are small, flat, and elliptical. This variation makes data obtained from samples collected from these species prone to error when using some automated instruments. Normal and abnormal findings in camelid blood are reviewed as well as how to ensure accurate results.

  1. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  2. A hostel for the hostile: the bone marrow niche in hematologic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniela S; Scadden, David T

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of the biology of the normal hematopoietic stem cell niche has increased steadily due to improved murine models and sophisticated imaging tools. Less well understood, but of growing interest, is the interaction between cells in the bone marrow during the initiation, maintenance and treatment of hematologic neoplasms. This review summarizes the emerging concepts of the normal and leukemic hematopoietic bone marrow niche. Furthermore, it reviews current models of how the microenvironment of the bone marrow may contribute to or be modified by leukemogenesis. Finally, it provides the rationale for a "two-pronged" approach, directly targeting cancer cells themselves while also targeting the bone microenvironment to make it inhospitable to malignant cells and, ultimately, eradicating cancer stem-like cells. PMID:26521296

  3. A hostel for the hostile: the bone marrow niche in hematologic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Daniela S.; Scadden, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the biology of the normal hematopoietic stem cell niche has increased steadily due to improved murine models and sophisticated imaging tools. Less well understood, but of growing interest, is the interaction between cells in the bone marrow during the initiation, maintenance and treatment of hematologic neoplasms. This review summarizes the emerging concepts of the normal and leukemic hematopoietic bone marrow niche. Furthermore, it reviews current models of how the microenvironment of the bone marrow may contribute to or be modified by leukemogenesis. Finally, it provides the rationale for a “two-pronged” approach, directly targeting cancer cells themselves while also targeting the bone microenvironment to make it inhospitable to malignant cells and, ultimately, eradicating cancer stem-like cells. PMID:26521296

  4. Malignant melanoma slide review project: Patients from non-Kaiser hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, P.

    1993-01-05

    This project was initiated, in response to concerns that the observed excess of malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) might reflect the incidence of disease diagnostically different than that observed in the general population. LLNL sponsored a slide review project, inviting leading dermatopathology experts to independently evaluate pathology slides from LLNL employees diagnosed with melanoma and those from a matched sample of Bay Area melanoma patients who did not work at the LLNL. The study objectives were to: Identify all 1969--1984 newly diagnosed cases of malignant melanoma among LLNL employees resident in the San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Statistical Area, and diagnosed at facilities other than Kaiser Permanente; identify a comparison series of melanoma cases also diagnosed between 1969--1984 in non-Kaiser facilities, and matched as closely as possible to the LLNL case series by gender, race, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, and hospital of diagnosis; obtain pathology slides for the identified (LLNL) case and (non-LLNL) comparison patients for review by the LLNL-invited panel of dermatopathology experts; and to compare the pathologic characteristics of the case and comparison melanoma patients, as recorded by the dermatopathology panel.

  5. [A decision-support system for hematology].

    PubMed

    Straka, L; Stránský, P; Kmonícek, M

    1998-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia and following bleeding at the treatment of hematological malignancies is a dangerous complication. The indication of thrombocyte transfusion is the key point for the therapy and proylaxy of bleeding. The all problem is divided into two parts. Evaluation of the risk of bleeding (80% of decision), estimation of the risk of aloimunization and risk of connected with the transfusion (20% decision). For now we are concentrated to the evaluation of the risk of bleeding. In the first stage we are concentrated to statistical evaluation of values to define factors possibly highering the risk of bleeding. Factors were determined with help of two test, GUHA method and using literature. For recognized factors were trained 3 layer neuron nets with a non-linear method pack propagation. After that an application was developed to determine the risk of bleeding for a routine use in clinical practice.

  6. Time to look beyond one-year mortality in critically ill hematological patients?

    PubMed

    Moors, Ine; Benoit, Dominique D

    2014-01-01

    The spectacular improvement in long-term prognosis of patients with hematological malignancies since the 1980s, coupled with the subsequent improvement over the past decade in short- and mid-term survival in cases of critical illness, resulted in an increasing referral of such patients to the ICU. A remaining question, however, is how these patients perform in the long term with regard to survival and quality of life. Here we discuss the present multicenter study on survival beyond 1 year in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies. We conclude with suggestions on how we can further improve the long-term outcome of these patients. PMID:24517551

  7. Next generation sequencing: new tools in immunology and hematology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Antonio; Deola, Sara; Xumerle, Luciano; Mijatovic, Vladan; Malerba, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the adaptive immune system is the specificity of B and T cell receptors. Thanks to somatic recombination, a large repertoire of receptors can be generated within an individual that guarantee the recognition of a vast number of antigens. Monoclonal antibodies have limited applicability, given the high degree of diversity among these receptors, in BCR and TCR monitoring. Furthermore, with regard to cancer, better characterization of complex genomes and the ability to monitor tumor-specific cryptic mutations or translocations are needed to develop better tailored therapies. Novel technologies, by enhancing the ability of BCR and TCR monitoring, can help in the search for minimal residual disease during hematological malignancy diagnosis and follow-up, and can aid in improving bone marrow transplantation techniques. Recently, a novel technology known as next generation sequencing has been developed; this allows the recognition of unique sequences and provides depth of coverage, heterogeneity, and accuracy of sequencing. This provides a powerful tool that, along with microarray analysis for gene expression, may become integral in resolving the remaining key problems in hematology. This review describes the state of the art of this novel technology, its application in the immunological and hematological fields, and the possible benefits it will provide for the hematology and immunology community. PMID:24466547

  8. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-01-28

    Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic (ALL); Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute(AML); Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic(CML); Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia(JMML); Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal Nocturnal (PNH); Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin (NHL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

  9. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant for Treatment Refractory Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-02-12

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Secondary AML; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Secondary MDS; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML); Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH); Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  10. Stem Cell Transplantation as Immunotherapy for Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-01-28

    Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  11. The role of B7 family molecules in hematologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The B7 family consists of structurally related, cell-surface proteins that regulate immune responses by delivering costimulatory or coinhibitory signals through their ligands. Eight family members have been identified to date including CD80 (B7-1), CD86 (B7-2), CD274 (programmed cell death-1 ligand [PD-L1]), CD273 (programmed cell death-2 ligand [PD-L2]), CD275 (inducible costimulator ligand [ICOS-L]), CD276 (B7-H3), B7-H4, and B7-H6. B7 ligands are expressed on both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. The importance of the B7 family in regulating immune responses is clear from their demonstrated role in the development of immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases. Manipulation of the signals delivered by B7 ligands shows great potential in the treatment of cancers including leukemias and lymphomas and in regulating allogeneic T-cell responses after stem cell transplantation. PMID:23223433

  12. Non-Ablative Allo HSCT For Hematologic Malignancies or SAA

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer

  13. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Progress report, 1988--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.; Barofsky, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    This progress report describes accomplishments under four headings, namely: The study of the relative rates of metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) targeting tumor associated antigens; Effects of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, and thioamides on the retention of radiolabeled MAbs by tumor cells; Subcellular site of radioimmunoconjugate degradation and the sizes of fragments generated by intracellular metabolism of radiolabeled antibodies; and Patterns of metabolic degradation of radioimmunoconjugates made with different techniques and with different radionuclides.

  14. Study of MLN8237 in Patients With Advanced Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-22

    B-cell Follicular Lymphoma; B-cell Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Mantle Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (SLL); B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (B-CLL); Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia; Noncutaneous Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Not Otherwise Specified (PTCL-NOS); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma (AITL); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma (EATCL); NK Lymphoma (NKL)

  15. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period. PMID:10643868

  16. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period.

  17. Will targeting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling work in hematopoietic malignancies?

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanan; Yuan, Chase Y.

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) signaling pathway has been demonstrated to be critical in clinical cancer patients as well as in laboratory cancer models including hematological malignancies. Great efforts have been made to develop inhibitors targeting this pathway in hematological malignancies but so far the efficacies of these inhibitors were not as good as expected. By analyzing existing literatures and datasets available, we found that mutations of genes in the pathway only constitute a very small subset of hematological malignancies. Deep understanding of the function of gene, the pathway and/or its regulators, and the cellular response to inhibitors, may help us design better drugs targeting the hematological malignancies. PMID:27583254

  18. Multiple primary malignancies of the liver and the colon: a complex diagnostic and decisional process with a final unanswered question.

    PubMed

    Portolani, Nazario; Baiocchi, Gianluca; Baronchelli, Carla; Gheza, Federico; Giulini, Stefano Maria

    2014-01-01

    We herein present the case of a 78-year-old man with an incidental finding of a solid hepatic mass without symptoms and only a laparotomic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis in the past surgical history. A colonoscopy, a magnetic resonance imaging scan, a positron emission tomography scan, and a computed tomography scan completed the preoperative workup: a neoplastic lesion 4.3×3 cm in size was diagnosed at segments IV and V, associated with a neoplastic involvement of the splenic flexure without signs of colonic occlusion. After colonic resection, a frozen section on a granulomatous-like tissue at gastric border suggested a diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma of bilio-pancreatic type, changing the surgical strategy to include gastric resection and hepatic pedicle node dissection. The discussion turns around the idea that a final diagnosis of colon cancer with regional nodal involvement (pT3N1) and metastatic gallbladder cancer with multiple peritoneal seedings cannot be excluded. PMID:24678952

  19. Perspectives and future directions for epigenetics in hematology

    PubMed Central

    Godley, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of hematologic malignancies over the past 5 years has revealed abundant mutations in epigenetic regulators in all classes of disorders. Here, we summarize the observations made within our review series on the role of epigenetics in hematology. We highlight the clinical implications of mutations in epigenetic regulators and outline what we envision are some of the major areas that merit future research. Recent findings may have immediate prognostic value, but also offer new targets for drug development. However, the pleiotropic action of these regulators indicates caution is warranted and argues for investment in understanding of their underlying mechanisms of action as we proceed to exploit these findings for the benefit of patients. PMID:23692857

  20. Simulation of a Hematology Department

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Gustave J.; Balbas, Jose M. Alvarez; Ikeda, Takehiko; Kennedy, O. George

    1970-01-01

    The model described characterizes standard hematological tests by the elementary steps composing them and permits study of the time required to process blood samples under various modes of laboratory organization and sample input schedules. The model was validated by use of one day's data from the hematology section of the clinical pathology laboratory at Passavant Memorial Hospital; different laboratories may be simulated by changing the relevant parameters. The basic purpose of the simulation is to generate a transformation function representing the clinical pathology laboratory as part of a general model of a complete hospital. PMID:5444868

  1. Fish hematology and associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Grant, Krystan R

    2015-01-01

    Fish health is a growing concern as pets, education, and aquaculture evolves. For the veterinary staff, fish handling, diagnostics, medicine, and surgery may require specialized training and equipment in comparison with terrestrial and arboreal animals, simply because of their aquatic nature and diversity. Fish hematology is one diagnostic tool that may not require additional equipment, may be inexpensive, and provide useful information in guiding treatment options. Challenges involving hematology may include handling and restraint, venipuncture, evaluation, and interpretation. In this article, strategies for these challenges are discussed for teleost (bony fish) and elasmobranch (cartilaginous fish) fish types.

  2. Fish Hematology and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Grant, Krystan R

    2015-09-01

    Fish health is a growing concern as pets, education, and aquaculture evolves. For the veterinary staff, fish handling, diagnostics, medicine, and surgery may require specialized training and equipment in comparison with terrestrial and arboreal animals, simply because of their aquatic nature and diversity. Fish hematology is one diagnostic tool that may not require additional equipment, may be inexpensive, and provide useful information in guiding treatment options. Challenges involving hematology may include handling and restraint, venipuncture, evaluation, and interpretation. In this article, strategies for these challenges are discussed for teleost (bony fish) and elasmobranch (cartilaginous fish) fish types.

  3. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  4. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  5. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  6. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  7. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  8. 42 CFR 493.941 - Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). 493.941 Section 493.941 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF....941 Hematology (including routine hematology and coagulation). (a) Program content and frequency...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1215 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.1215 Section 493.1215 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1215 Condition: Hematology. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Hematology,...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1215 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.1215 Section 493.1215 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1215 Condition: Hematology. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Hematology,...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1215 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.1215 Section 493.1215 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1215 Condition: Hematology. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Hematology,...

  12. 42 CFR 493.849 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.849 Section 493.849 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.849 Condition: Hematology. The specialty of hematology, for the purpose of...

  13. 42 CFR 493.849 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.849 Section 493.849 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.849 Condition: Hematology. The specialty of hematology, for the purpose of...

  14. 42 CFR 493.849 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.849 Section 493.849 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.849 Condition: Hematology. The specialty of hematology, for the purpose of...

  15. 42 CFR 493.849 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.849 Section 493.849 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.849 Condition: Hematology. The specialty of hematology, for the purpose of...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1215 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.1215 Section 493.1215 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1215 Condition: Hematology. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Hematology,...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1215 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.1215 Section 493.1215 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1215 Condition: Hematology. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Hematology,...

  18. 42 CFR 493.849 - Condition: Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Hematology. 493.849 Section 493.849 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.849 Condition: Hematology. The specialty of hematology, for the purpose of...

  19. Malignant adenolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, H; Ryan, C; Schwartz, S; Donnelly, J A

    1980-01-01

    Adenolymphoma (Warthin's tumor) is a well studied benign tumor of the salivary gland. Malignant transformation of such a tumor is rare and not well documented in the literature. The light microscopic and ultrastructural features of an undifferentiated carcinoma arising in an adenolymphoma in the parotid gland of a middle aged male are described, and the relevant literature is reviewed. Similarities between the benign adenolymphoma and the undifferentiated malignant tumor, such as the presence of interstitial lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltrates, dark and light epithelial cells, similar cytoplasmic organelles, and nuclear morphology, suggest a malignant transformation of a previously existing benign adenolymphoma.

  20. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Brockhouse, R T

    1979-04-01

    A case has been presented that illustrates successful managment of a patient with suspected malignant hyperthermia. The causes of this disorder are uncertain. If screening procedures identify a patient as susceptible to this disorder, careful planning in the preoperative stage is indicated. Preparedness during the operative procedure for any emergency is mandatory. Early and effective treatment seems to be the only method of preventing mortality with patients experiencing malignant hyperthermia. PMID:285135

  1. Malignant oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Laurian, N; Zohar, Y; Kende, L

    1977-09-01

    A case of malignant oncocytoma of the parotid gland in a 32-year-old male is presented. Ten months after parotidectomy an undifferentiated carcinoma, in which oncocytes still could be recognized, developed in the operated area. According to the literature available to us, this is the second reported case in which malignant transformation in a benign oncocytoma of the salivary gland has been observed.

  2. Hematologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Litzow, Mark R.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common systemic disorder that can have multiple hematologic manifestations. Patients with celiac disease may present to hematologists for evaluation of various hematologic problems prior to receiving a diagnosis of celiac disease. Anemia secondary to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, and/or vitamin B12 is a common complication of celiac disease and many patients have anemia at the time of diagnosis. Celiac disease may also be associated with thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, venous thromboembolism, hyposplenism, and IgA deficiency. Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk of being diagnosed with lymphoma, especially of the T-cell type. The risk is highest for enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and B-cell lymphoma of the gut, but extraintestinal lymphomas can also be seen. ETL is an aggressive disease with poor prognosis, but strict adherence to a gluten-free diet may prevent its occurrence. PMID:16973955

  3. Pharmacodynamic analysis of hematologic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, G.L.; Mueller, P.

    1994-12-01

    We discuss the analysis of the myelosuppressive effects of chemotherapy. Such analyses examine hematologic data that arise by monitoring patients after treatment with high doses of chemotherapy. We propose a flexible approach for modeling such information and, using data collected as part of a Phase I study of an anticancer agent, show some interesting aspects of the data that become available after fitting models this way. 29 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pleural malignancies.

    PubMed

    Vargas, F S; Teixeira, L R

    1996-07-01

    Carcinoma of the lung, metastatic breast carcinoma, and lymphoma are responsible for approximately 75% of all malignant pleural effusions. The presence of malignant cells in the pleural fluid or in the parietal pleura confirms the diagnosis. Recently, several authors have proposed the combination of morphometric procedures and quantitative analysis of nucleolar organizer regions stained by silver nitrate. Videothoracoscopy is recommended for patients suspected of having a malignant pleural effusion in whom the diagnosis is not established after two cytologic studies of the fluid and one needle biopsy. The standard treatment is the intrapleural instillation of a chemical agent to produce a pleurodesis. The recommended sclerosant is talc, a tetracycline derivative, or Corynebacterium parvum where it is available. When a patient is not an ideal candidate for chemical pleurodesis, the options include symptomatic treatment, serial thoracentesis, implantation of a pleuroperitoneal shunt, and pleurectomy. PMID:9363162

  5. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in hematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Myunggon; An, Jungeun; Pastor, William A; Koralov, Sergei B; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation has pivotal regulatory roles in mammalian development, retrotransposon silencing, genomic imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. Cancer cells display highly dysregulated DNA methylation profiles characterized by global hypomethylation in conjunction with hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands that presumably lead to genome instability and aberrant expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The recent discovery of ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family dioxygenases that oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA has led to profound progress in understanding the mechanism underlying DNA demethylation. Among the three TET genes, TET2 recurrently undergoes inactivating mutations in a wide range of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor particularly in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies resembling chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in human. Here we review diverse functions of TET proteins and the novel epigenetic marks that they generate in DNA methylation/demethylation dynamics and normal and malignant hematopoietic differentiation. The impact of TET2 inactivation in hematopoiesis and various mechanisms modulating the expression or activity of TET proteins are also discussed. Furthermore, we also present evidence that TET2 and TET3 collaborate to suppress aberrant hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transformation. A detailed understanding of the normal and pathological functions of TET proteins may provide new avenues to develop novel epigenetic therapies for treating hematological malignancies.

  6. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Taiclet, L

    1985-01-01

    Despite numerous reviews and clinical reports, much remains to be learned about the cause, treatment, and prevention of malignant hyperthermia.Among the most worrisome concerns of the clinician administering anesthesia is the malignant hyperthermia crisis. When it arises, it is always frightening-and sometimes fatal. Usually occurring very suddenly and without warning, malignant hyperthermia is considered to be a hypercatabolic crisis; the condition is known to affect humans and certain breeds of pigs. The exact triggering mechanisms of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in humans are not known, but a crisis can be initiated by volatile general anesthetics, neuromuscular blocking agents, and amide local anesthetics. Although a history of an MH crisis is a diagnostic aid, previous uneventful exposure to anesthesia does not guarantee the safety of the patient in subsequent anesthetic procedures.(1) For these reasons, it is important for the anesthesiologist to be aware of the initial signs of MH and to be prepared to provide immediate treatment to reverse such a crisis. PMID:3865561

  7. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abraham, R.; Adnet, P.; Glauber, V.; Perel, A.

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a rare autosomal dominant trait that predisposes affected individuals to great danger when exposed to certain anaesthetic triggering agents (such as potent volatile anaesthetics and succinylcholine). A sudden hypermetabolic reaction in skeletal muscle leading to hyperthermia and massive rhabdomyolysis can occur. The ultimate treatment is dantrolene sodium a nonspecific muscle relaxant. Certain precautions should be taken before anaesthesia of patients known to be susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. These include the prohibition of the use of triggering agents, monitoring of central body temperature and expired CO2, and immediate availability of dantrolene. In addition, careful cleansing of the anaesthesia machine of vapours of halogenated agents is recommended. If these measures are taken, the chances of an MH episode are greatly reduced. When malignant hyperthermia-does occur in the operating room, prompt recognition and treatment usually prevent a potentially fatal outcome. The most reliable test to establish susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia is currently the in vitro caffeine-halothane contracture test. It is hoped that in the future a genetic test will be available. PMID:9538480

  8. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625 Hematology quality control mixture. (a) Identification. A hematology quality control mixture is a device used...

  9. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625 Hematology quality control mixture. (a) Identification. A hematology quality control mixture is a device used...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625 Hematology quality control mixture. (a) Identification. A hematology quality control mixture is a device used...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8625 Hematology quality control mixture. (a) Identification. A hematology quality control mixture is a device used...

  12. Genome-wide association studies for hematological traits in Chinese Sutai pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been shown that hematological traits are strongly associated with the metabolism and the immune system in domestic pig. However, little is known about the genetic architecture of hematological traits. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling hematological traits, we performed single marker Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and haplotype analysis for 15 hematological traits in 495 Chinese Sutai pigs. Results We identified 161 significant SNPs including 44 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 11 hematological traits by single marker GWAS. Most of them were located on SSC2. Meanwhile, we detected 499 significant SNPs containing 154 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 9 hematological traits by haplotype analysis. Most of the identified loci were located on SSC7 and SSC9. Conclusions We detected 4 SNPs with pleiotropic effects on SSC2 by single marker GWAS and (or) on SSC7 by haplotype analysis. Furthermore, through checking the gene functional annotations, positions and their expression variation, we finally selected 7 genes as potential candidates. Specially, we found that three genes (TRIM58, TRIM26 and TRIM21) of them originated from the same gene family and executed similar function of innate and adaptive immune. The findings will contribute to dissection the immune gene network, further identification of causative mutations underlying the identified QTLs and providing insights into the molecular basis of hematological trait in domestic pig. PMID:24674592

  13. Clinical hematology of rodent species.

    PubMed

    Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-09-01

    Pet rodents, such as rats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas, differ from more traditional companion animal species in many aspects of their hematologic parameters. Animals within this order have much diversity in size, anatomy, methods of restraint, and blood collection technique. Appropriate sample collection is often the most challenging aspect of the diagnostic protocol, and inappropriate restraint may cause a stress response that interferes with blood test results. For many of these patients, sedation is required and can also affect results as well. In most cases, however, obtaining a standard database is necessary and very possible when providing medical care for this popular group of pets. PMID:18675732

  14. Circulating endothelial cells: a new biomarker of endothelial dysfunction in hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Smadja, David M

    2016-08-01

    The endothelium and its integrity are in the center of numerous cardiovascular, pulmonary and tumoral diseases. Several studies identified different circulating cellular sub-populations, which allow a noninvasive exploration of endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, angiogenesis plays a major role in the biology of benign and malignant hematologic diseases. Among these biomarkers, circulating endothelial cells could be considered as a marker of endothelial injury and/or endothelial activation as well as vascular remodeling, whereas circulating endothelial progenitor cells would be only involved in the vascular regeneration. In the future, the quantification of circulating endothelial cells in many diseases could be a noninvasive biomarker used in diagnosis, prognostic and therapeutic follow-up of lung vasculopathy and/or residual disease of hematological malignancies.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Hematologic Disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pivkin, Igor; Pan, Wenxiao; Dao, Ming; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E.

    2012-01-28

    Parasitic infectious diseases and other hereditary hematologic disorders are often associated with major changes in the shape and viscoelastic properties of red blood cells (RBCs). Such changes can disrupt blood flow and even brain perfusion, as in the case of cerebral malaria. Modeling of these hematologic disorders requires a seamless multiscale approach, where blood cells and blood flow in the entire arterial tree are represented accurately using physiologically consistent parameters. In this chapter, we present a computational methodology based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which models RBCs as well as whole blood in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to small arteries and can also be used to model RBCs down to spectrin level. To this end, we present two complementary mathematical models for RBCs and describe a systematic procedure on extracting the relevant input parameters from optical tweezers and microfluidic experiments for single RBCs. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the behavior of whole healthy blood and compare with experimental results. The same procedure is applied to modeling malaria, and results for infected single RBCs and whole blood are presented.

  16. 42 CFR 493.851 - Standard; Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Hematology. 493.851 Section 493.851 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.851 Standard; Hematology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  17. 42 CFR 493.851 - Standard; Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Hematology. 493.851 Section 493.851 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.851 Standard; Hematology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  18. 42 CFR 493.851 - Standard; Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Hematology. 493.851 Section 493.851 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.851 Standard; Hematology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  19. 42 CFR 493.851 - Standard; Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Hematology. 493.851 Section 493.851 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.851 Standard; Hematology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  20. 42 CFR 493.851 - Standard; Hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Hematology. 493.851 Section 493.851 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.851 Standard; Hematology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  1. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Cantin, R Y; Poole, A; Ryan, J F

    1986-10-01

    The increasing use of intravenous and inhalation sedation in the dental office has the potential of increasing the incidence of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in susceptible subjects. The object of this article is to present two cases of MH and to discuss its pathophysiology, its clinical picture, and its management in the light of the current literature. Stringent screening procedures should be adopted and maintained in order to channel suspected cases to appropriate centers for expert consultation and management. It is further advocated that a program of education for patients and their families be instituted, as it is an essential prerequisite of effective prophylaxis. PMID:2946013

  2. Skylab experiment results: Hematology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate specific aspects of man's immunologic and hematologic systems that might be altered by or respond to the space flight environment. Biochemical functions investigated included cytogenetic damage to blood cells, immune resistance to disease, regulation of plasma and red cell volumes, metabolic processes of the red blood cell, and physicochemical aspects of red blood cell function. Measurements of hematocrit value showed significant fluctuations postflight, reflecting observed changes in red cell mass and plasma volume. The capacity of lymphocytes to respond to an in vitro mitogenic challenge was repressed postflight, and appeared to be related to mission duration. Most other deviations from earth function in these systems were minor or transient.

  3. Malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an uncommon, life-threatening pharmacogenetic disorder of the skeletal muscle. It presents as a hypermetabolic response in susceptible individuals to potent volatile anesthetics with/without depolarizing muscle relaxants; in rare cases, to stress from exertion or heat stress. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MHS) is inherited as an autosomally dominant trait with variable expression and incomplete penetrance. It is known that the pathophysiology of MH is related to an uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes resulting in hypermetabolism of the skeletal muscle. In most cases, defects in the ryanodine receptor are responsible for the functional changes of calcium regulation in MH, and more than 300 mutations have been identified in the RYR1 gene, located on chromosome 19q13.1. The classic signs of MH include increase of end-tidal carbon dioxide, tachycardia, skeletal muscle rigidity, tachycardia, hyperthermia and acidosis. Up to now, muscle contracture test is regarded as the gold standard for the diagnosis of MHS though molecular genetic test is used, on a limited basis so far to diagnose MHS. The mortality of MH is dramatically decreased from 70-80% to less than 5%, due to an introduction of dantrolene sodium for treatment of MH, early detection of MH episode using capnography, and the introduction of diagnostic testing for MHS. This review summarizes the clinically essential and important knowledge of MH, and presents new developments in the field. PMID:23198031

  4. PET/CT in paediatric malignancies - An update.

    PubMed

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological practice. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as paediatric malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:27688605

  5. PET/CT in paediatric malignancies - An update

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological practice. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as paediatric malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:27688605

  6. PET/CT in paediatric malignancies - An update

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological practice. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as paediatric malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia.

  7. Second primary malignancies among patients with myeloma-related-diseases in the KMF database.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Satoru; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Nakatani, Eiji; Kida, Toru; Ohta, Kensuke; Kaneko, Hidemi; Yagi, Hideo; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Fuchida, Shin-Ichi; Nakaya, Aya; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuroda, Junya; Kamitsuji, Yuri; Uoshima, Nobuhiko; Adachi, Yoko; Tsudo, Mitsuru; Shimazaki, Chihiro; Nomura, Shosaku; Hino, Masayuki; Matsumura, Itaru; Taniwaki, Masashi; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of second primary malignancies (SPMs) in Japanese patients with myeloma or myeloma-related diseases was studied by using the Kansai Myeloma Forum (KMF) database registered from November 2012 to March 2015. We studied 1,571 cases. Hematologic malignancies were documented in 10 patients, and solid tumors in 36 during this period. The cumulative 5-year incidence was estimated to be 1.0% for hematological malignancies and 3.7% for solid tumors. In the patients with smoldering myeloma or MGUS without treatment, solid tumors but not hematologic malignancies developed, though the cumulative incidence of each malignancy did not differ significantly from that in patients receiving treatment. Although statistical analysis showed that treatment with melphalan, bortezomib, lenalidomide, or thalidomide had no effect on the occurrence of hematological malignancies, lenalidomide administration was more frequent in the patients with solid tumors. To evaluate the SPMs in myeloma or myeloma-related diseases more accurately, accumulation of a larger number of patients and longer observation are needed. PMID:27498726

  8. Hematologic effects of heavy metal poisoning.

    PubMed

    Ringenberg, Q S; Doll, D C; Patterson, W P; Perry, M C; Yarbro, J W

    1988-09-01

    Heavy metal poisoning can cause a variety of hematologic disorders. Exposure to heavy metals is ubiquitous in the industrial environment and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of many types of anemia. The heavy metals most commonly associated with hematologic toxicity are arsenic and its derivative arsine, copper, gold, lead, and zinc. A few distinctive clinical features characterize the hematologic manifestations of many occult heavy metal poisonings. These features have a limited differential diagnosis. A knowledge of these clinical features can assist the astute clinician in making the correct diagnosis.

  9. Use of antifungal drugs in hematology

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Marcio

    2012-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease represents a major complication in hematological patients. Antifungal agents are frequently used in hematologic patients for different purposes. In neutropenic patients, antifungal agents may be used as prophylaxis, as empiric or preemptive therapy, or to treat an invasive fungal disease that has been diagnosed. The hematologist must be familiar with the epidemiology, diagnostic tools and strategies of antifungal use, as well as the pharmacologic proprieties of the different antifungal agents. In this paper the principal antifungal agents used in hematologic patients will be discussed as will the clinical scenarios where these agents have been used. PMID:23125547

  10. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Ahmed Tipu, Salman; Ishtiaq, Sundas

    2013-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor of the pleura and peritoneum with limited knowledge of its natural history. The incidence has increased in the past two decades but still it is a rare tumor. Etiology of all forms of mesothelioma is strongly associated with industrial pollutants, of which asbestos is the principal carcinogen. Mesothelioma is an insidious neoplasm arising from mesothelial surfaces i.e., pleura (65%-70%), peritoneum (30%), tunica vaginalis testis, and pericardium (1%-2%). The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, due to a long latent period between onset and symptoms and the common and nonspecific clinical presentation. The definite diagnosis can only be established by diagnostic laparoscopy or open surgery along with biopsy to obtain histological examination and immunocytochemical analysis. Different treatment options are available but Surgery can achieve a complete or incomplete resection and Radical resection is the preferred treatment. Chemotherapy has an important role in palliative treatment. Photodynamic therapy is also an option under trial. Patients who successfully underwent surgical resection had a considerably longer median survival as well as a significantly higher 5-year survival. Source of Data/Study Selection: The data were collected from case reports, cross-sectional studies, Open-label studies and phase –II trials between 1973-2012. Data Extraction: Web sites and other online resources of American college of surgeons, Medline, NCBI and Medscape resource centers were used to extract data. Conclusion: Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor with limited knowledge of its natural history. The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, so level of index of suspicion must be kept high. PMID:24550969

  11. Hematologic values of captive Mexican wolves.

    PubMed

    Drag, M D

    1991-11-01

    Hematologic reference values were determined for a captive population of 11 Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Wolf pups from 4 to 24 weeks old had progressive age-related increases in PCV, hemoglobin concentration, mean cell volume, and RBC counts similar to those seen in domestic dog pups (C familiaris). Hematologic indices in wolves older than 24 weeks were comparable to those of the adult domestic dog; however, PCV, hemoglobin concentration, and RBC counts were higher.

  12. Hematologic responses to hypobaric hyperoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, E. C.; Adams, J. D.; Williams, W. T.; Duncan, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the effects of hypoxia, activity, and G forces on human hematopoiesis in an attempt to elucidate these phenomena more precisely. Eight subjects were exposed to an atmosphere of 100% O2 at 258 mm Hg for 30 days, and thereafter immediately exposed to transverse G forces, simulating the Gemini flights' reentry profile. All subjects displayed a significant continuous decline in red cell mass during the exposure period, as measured by the carbon monoxide-dilution method. The Cr51 method also indicated a decline in red blood corpuscle mass. The decrease in red cell mass was due to suppression of erythropoiesis and to hemolysis. After exposure to hyperoxia, all subjects exhibited elevated plasma hemoglobin levels, decreased reticulocyte counts, and decreased red cell survivals. CO production rates and urine erythropoietin levels were unchanged. Two hours after termination of exposure to hyperoxia, all subjects exhibited increased reticulocyte counts which were sustained for longer than two weeks. The progressive decrease in red cell mass was promptly arrested on return to ground level atmospheres. Within 116 days after exposure to hyperoxia, the hematologic parameters of all eight subjects had returned to control levels.

  13. Invasive Aspergillosis in Hematological Patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hematological patients, although its outcome has been improving. Prolonged and profound neutropenia in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukemia and stem cell transplantation is a major risk factor for IA. Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease and corticosteroid use are also at high risk. Management in a protective environment with high efficiency particular air (HEPA) filter is generally recommended to prevent aspergillosis in patients with prolonged and profound neutropenia. Antifungal prophylaxis against Aspergillus species should be considered in patients with past history of aspergillosis or colonization of Aspergillus species, at facilities with high incidence of IA and those without a protective environment. Early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment is important to improve outcome. Imaging studies such as computed tomography and biomarkers such as galactomannan antigen and β-D-glucan are useful for early diagnosis. Empirical antifungal treatment based on persistent or recurrent fever during neutropenia despite broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is generally recommended in high-risk patients. Alternatively, a preemptive treatment strategy has recently been proposed in the context of progress in the early diagnosis of IA based on the results of imaging studies and biomarkers. Voriconazole is recommended for initial therapy for IA. Liposomal amphotericin B is considered as alternative initial therapy. Combination antifungal therapy of echinocandin with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B could be a choice for refractory cases. PMID:27251320

  14. Pleiotropic roles of Notch signaling in normal, malignant, and developmental hematopoiesis in the human

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Guezguez, Borhane; Lee, Jung Bok; Hopkins, Claudia I; Bhatia, Mickie

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved across species and plays an important role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. It has been implicated in several different hematopoietic processes including early hematopoietic development as well as adult hematological malignancies in humans. This review focuses on recent developments in understanding the role of Notch signaling in the human hematopoietic system with an emphasis on hematopoietic initiation from human pluripotent stem cells and regulation within the bone marrow. Based on recent insights, we summarize potential strategies for treatment of human hematological malignancies toward the concept of targeting Notch signaling for fate regulation. PMID:25252682

  15. [Malignant hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Metterlein, T; Schuster, F; Graf, B M; Anetseder, M

    2014-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare hereditary, mostly subclinical myopathy. Trigger substances, such as volatile anesthetic agents and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine can induce a potentially fatal metabolic increase in predisposed patients caused by a dysregulation of the myoplasmic calcium (Ca) concentration. Mutations in the dihydropyridine ryanodine receptor complex in combination with the trigger substances are responsible for an uncontrolled release of Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This leads to activation of the contractile apparatus and a massive increase in cellular energy production. Exhaustion of the cellular energy reserves ultimately results in local muscle cell destruction and subsequent cardiovascular failure. The clinical picture of MH episodes is very variable. Early symptoms are hypoxia, hypercapnia and cardiac arrhythmia whereas the body temperature rise, after which MH is named, often occurs later. Decisive for the course of MH episodes is a timely targeted therapy. Following introduction of the hydantoin derivative dantrolene, the previously high mortality of fulminant MH episodes could be reduced to well under 10 %. An MH predisposition can be detected using the invasive in vitro contracture test (IVCT) or mutation analysis. Few elaborate diagnostic procedures are in the developmental stage. PMID:25384957

  16. Epigenetics in Cancer: A Hematological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Maximilian; Kim, Tae Kon; Zeidan, Amer M.; Prebet, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, we have known that epigenetic regulation is disrupted in cancer. Recently, an increasing body of data suggests epigenetics might be an intersection of current cancer research trends: next generation sequencing, immunology, metabolomics, and cell aging. The new emphasis on epigenetics is also related to the increasing production of drugs capable of interfering with epigenetic mechanisms and able to trigger clinical responses in even advanced phase patients. In this review, we will use myeloid malignancies as proof of concept examples of how epigenetic mechanisms can trigger or promote oncogenesis. We will also show how epigenetic mechanisms are related to genetic aberrations, and how they affect other systems, like immune response. Finally, we will show how we can try to influence the fate of cancer cells with epigenetic therapy. PMID:27723796

  17. The cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R

    2016-06-01

    The skin is often the herald of an underlying systemic illness, and gastrointestinal malignancies can present in numerous ways in the skin. Paraneoplastic phenomenon, such as acanthosis nigricans and tripe palm, may be the first indicator of a gastrointestinal malignancy. In addition, gastrointestinal cancers can metastasize to the skin, as described in the well-known Sister Mary Joseph's nodule. Inflammatory systemic conditions such as dermatomyositis and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis can be associated with underlying malignancy. Finally, in numerous genetic syndromes with underlying malignancies, such as Muir-Torre, recognition of the skin signs leads to early diagnosis and screening. PMID:27178686

  18. Immunotherapy of hematological cancers: PD-1 blockade for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of immunological checkpoints has been successfully employed for the treatment of various solid neoplasms including melanoma, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. A recent study indicates that the vast majority of patients with advanced, heavily pretreated Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) also respond to a monoclonal antibody targeting programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1). Thus, checkpoint blockers may soon become part of our therapeutic armamentarium against hematological tumors. This would be particularly important as it would spare (at least some) patients the deleterious toxic effects of combinatorial chemotherapies and bone marrow transplantation. We anticipate that the realm of immunotherapy will eventually conquer vast portions of the territory that now belongs to hematological malignancies. PMID:26155425

  19. The emerging importance of ribosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Raiser, David M; Narla, Anupama; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-03-01

    More than a decade has passed since the initial identification of ribosomal protein gene mutations in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a hematologic disorder that became the founding member of a class of diseases known as ribosomopathies. In these diseases, genetic abnormalities that result in defective ribosome biogenesis cause strikingly tissue-specific phenotypes in patients, specifically bone marrow failure, craniofacial abnormalities and skeletal defects. Several animal models and numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated that the p53 pathway is central to the ribosomopathy phenotype. Additionally, there is mounting evidence of a link between the dysregulation of components of the translational machinery and the pathology of various malignancies. The importance of the role of ribosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders is becoming clearer, and elucidation of the underlying mechanisms could have broad implications for both basic cellular biology and clinical intervention strategies. PMID:23863123

  20. Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in hematology and oncology--guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party in Haematology and Oncology of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology (AGIHO).

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, M; Böhme, A; Buchheidt, D; Cornely, O; Donhuijsen, K; Einsele, H; Enzensberger, R; Hebart, H; Heussel, C P; Horger, M; Hof, H; Karthaus, M; Krüger, W; Maschmeyer, G; Penack, O; Ritter, J; Schwartz, S

    2012-04-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies. Establishing a definite diagnosis of IFI in immunocompromised patients is particularly challenging and time consuming, but delayed initiation of antifungal treatment increases mortality. The limited overall outcome has led to the strategy of initiating either 'empirical' or 'preemptive' antifungal therapy before the final diagnosis. However, diagnostic procedures have been vastly improved in recent years. Particularly noteworthy is the introduction of newer imaging techniques and non-culture methods, including antigen-based assays, metabolite detection and molecular detection of fungal DNA from body fluid samples. Though varying widely in cancer patients, the risk of IFI is highest in those with allogeneic stem cell transplantation and those with acute leukemia. The AGIHO presents recommendations for the diagnosis of IFIs with risk-adapted screening concepts for febrile episodes in patients with haemato-oncological disorders.

  1. Seasonal variations in red deer (Cervus elaphus) hematology related to antler growth and biometrics measurements.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-López, Enrique; Landete-Castillejos, Tomás; Estevez, Jose Antonio; Ceacero, Francisco; Gallego, Laureano; García, Andrés Jose

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to relate seasonal hematology changes with the rest of physiological variations suffered by red deer, such as antler and biometrics cycle, and to assess the relationship between hematology and the effort performed in antler development. Blood samples were taken from 21 male red deer every 4 weeks during 18 months. Samples were analyzed for the main hematological parameters. Simultaneously, biometrics measurements were taken, such as antler length, body weight, body condition score, testicular diameter (TD), and thoracic and neck girth. All the blood cell types (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets) showed seasonal variations, increasing as antler cleaning approached, as did hematocrit and hemoglobin. The final size of antlers was negatively related to leukocyte count, nonlymphoid leukocyte count, red cell distribution width, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, and TD, whereas it was positively related to body condition during antler growth. Huge seasonal variations in some hematological values have been found to be related to changes in antler and biometrics measurements. Since these variations are even greater than the caused by deer handling, they should be taken into account when evaluating hematology in deer populations.

  2. Telomeres, stem cells, and hematology

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are highly dynamic structures that adjust the cellular response to stress and growth stimulation based on previous cell divisions. This critical function is accomplished by progressive telomere shortening and DNA damage responses activated by chromosome ends without sufficient telomere repeats. Repair of critically short telomeres by telomerase or recombination is limited in most somatic cells, and apoptosis or cellular senescence is triggered when too many uncapped telomeres accumulate. The chance of the latter increases as the average telomere length decreases. The average telomere length is set and maintained in cells of the germ line that typically express high levels of telomerase. In somatic cells, the telomere length typically declines with age, posing a barrier to tumor growth but also contributing to loss of cells with age. Loss of (stem) cells via telomere attrition provides strong selection for abnormal cells in which malignant progression is facilitated by genome instability resulting from uncapped telomeres. The critical role of telomeres in cell proliferation and aging is illustrated in patients with 50% of normal telomerase levels resulting from a mutation in one of the telomerase genes. Here, the role of telomeres and telomerase in human biology is reviewed from a personal historical perspective. PMID:18263784

  3. [Current methods for preparing samples on working with hematology analyzers].

    PubMed

    Tsyganova, A V; Pogorelov, V M; Naumova, I N; Kozinets, G I; Antonov, V S

    2011-03-01

    The paper raises a problem of preparing samples in hematology. It considers whether the preanalytical stage is of importance in hematological studies. The use of disposal vacuum blood collection systems is shown to solve the problem in the standardization of a blood sampling procedure. The benefits of the use of close tube hematology analyzers are also considered. PMID:21584966

  4. A hematologic survey of captive waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shave, H.J.; Howard, V.

    1976-01-01

    Hematologic parameters were studied in giant Canada geese (Branta canadensis maxima), mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos) and various species of diving ducks at seasonal intervals throughout the year. Highest values for packed cell volume, hemoglobin content and erythrocyte counts were found in the winter and pre-nesting periods. Mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin varied inversely with these values.

  5. Trogocytic intercellular membrane exchanges among hematological tumors.

    PubMed

    LeMaoult, Joel; Caumartin, Julien; Daouya, Marina; Switala, Magdalena; Rebmann, Vera; Arnulf, Bertrand; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is the transfer of plasma membrane fragments and the molecules they contain between one donor and one acceptor/acquirer cell. Through trogocytosis, acceptor cells temporarily display and use cell-surface molecules they do not express themselves, but borrow from other cells. Here, we investigated whether liquid tumors possessed a trogocytic capability, if immune escape molecules could be acquired by tumor cells, transferred between cells of the same tumor, and if this could benefit the tumor as a whole.For this, we investigated trogocytosis in hematological cell lines and freshly isolated hematological tumor cells. We demonstrate that hematological tumor lines possess a trogocytic capability that allows them to capture membranes that contain the immune-inhibitory molecule HLA-G from allogeneic as well as from autologous sources. We further show that freshly isolated hematological tumor cells also possess these capabilities. This work reports for the first time the trogocytic capabilities of liquid tumor cells and introduces the notion of immune escape strategy sharing among tumor cells through trogocytosis of membrane-bound immune-inhibitory molecules. PMID:25887663

  6. Allo HSCT Using RIC for Hematological Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; Myeloproliferative Syndromes; Hematological Diseases

  7. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

  8. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children.

  9. Musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Ezzat, Yasser; Sayed, Safaa; El-Mardenly, Ghada; Hammam, Waleed

    2010-02-01

    To detect and describe the incidence of musculoskeletal manifestations in different malignant diseases as well as their relation to the treatment received whether by chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Sixty patients with different malignant diseases were included in this study, 45 with solid tumors and 15 patients with hematological malignancy. The mean age was 46.55 +/- 11.04 years and the mean disease duration was 2 +/- 0.75 years. The patients were fully examined for any rheumatologic involvement, laboratory investigations were performed as well as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry study for bone densitometry. Treatment strategies were assessed including the chemotherapeutics, radiation therapy, and/or surgery. Myalgias and arthralgias were the most frequent followed by flexor tenosynovitis, frozen shoulder, and fibromyalgia syndrome. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy was seen in five patients, cutaneous vasculitis in two patients as well as arthritis. Osteonecrosis was present in one of the lunate carpal bones of a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.67%) and receiving high dose steroids. Rheumatoid factor was positive in four patients, three of which had hepatitis C virus positivity and cryoglobulins. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was negative in all the studied patients. The bone mineral density was significantly reduced in the patients with malignancy compared to the control. Mild to moderate osteoporosis was present, being more evident in the spine and forearm. The bone loss was higher in those with solid tumors and even more obvious in those receiving aromatase inhibitors. Musculoskeletal manifestations occurring during malignancies and following the treatment represent a significant percentage of symptoms and signs which may raise a clue to differential diagnosis.

  10. Patients’ Reflections on Communication in the Second-Opinion Hematology-Oncology Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Sullivan, Amy; Back, Anthony L.; Alexander, Stewart C.; Matsuyama, Robin K.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The nature of communication between patients and their second-opinion hematology consultants may be very different in these one-time consultations than for those that are within long-term relationships. This study explored patients’ perceptions of their second-opinion hematology oncology consultation to investigate physician-patient communication in malignant disease at a critical juncture in cancer patients’ care and decision-making. METHODS In-depth telephone interviews with a subset of 20 patients from a larger study, following their subspecialty hematology consultations. RESULTS Most patients wanted to contribute to the consultation agenda, but were unable to do so. Patients sought expert and honest advice delivered with empathy, though most did not expect the consultant to directly address their emotions. They wanted the physician to apply his/her knowledge to the specifics of their individual cases, and were disappointed and distrustful when physicians cited only general prognostic statistics. In contrast, physicians’ consideration of the unique elements of patients’ cases, and demonstrations of empathy and respect made patients’ feel positively about the encounter, regardless of the prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients provided concrete recommendations for physician and patient behaviors to enhance the consultation. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS Consideration of these recommendations may result in more effective communication and increased patient satisfaction with medical visits. PMID:19135824

  11. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  12. Primary aldosteronism and malignant adrenocortical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Salassa, T. M.; Weeks, R. E.; Northcutt, R. C.; Carney, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Our experience indicates that although adrenal carcinoma is not a common cause of primary aldosteronism, 4 to 5% of patients in a single large series may have a malignant adrenocortical tumor. The magnitude of the hypokalemia and the hyperaldosteronuria tends to be greater in patients with malignant tumors, but these patients cannot be clearly separated from those with benign tumors or hyperplasia on this basis. Patients who have malignant tumors may have no chemical evidence of adrenocortical dysfunction other than excessive aldosterone secretion. Finally, a good response to spironolactone for months does not exclude adrenal carcinoma as the cause of primary aldosteronism. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1179589

  13. Hematologic disease in pregnancy: the obstetrician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicole A; Economy, Katherine E

    2011-04-01

    Pregnancy can be a time of significantly increased morbidity and mortality in women with hematologic disease. With careful planning and preparation, most women can be cared for safely, resulting in a healthy mother and child. Management concerns in each trimester are reviewed, with a particular focus on labor and delivery planning and common obstetric complications. Diagnostic testing and the use of medications in pregnancy and lactation are discussed in detail. PMID:21444038

  14. Impaired T cell responsiveness to interleukin-6 in hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Jose F; Bhimji, Alyajahan; Kumar, Deepali; Kaul, Rupert; Pavan, Rhea; Schuh, Andre; Seftel, Matthew; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Gupta, Vikas; Humar, Atul; Husain, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMI) are among the most devastating complications following chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with high mortality rates. Yet, the molecular basis for human susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis (IA) and mucormycosis remain poorly understood. Herein, we aimed to characterize the immune profile of individuals with hematological malignancies (n = 18) who developed IMI during the course of chemotherapy or HSCT, and compared it to that of hematological patients who had no evidence of invasive fungal infection (n = 16). First, we measured the expression of the pattern recognition receptors pentraxin 3, dectin-1, and Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 in peripheral blood of chemotherapy and HSCT recipients with IMI. Compared to hematological controls, individuals with IA and mucormycosis had defective expression of dectin-1; in addition, patients with mucormycosis had decreased TLR2 and increased TLR4 expression. Since fungal recognition via dectin-1 favors T helper 17 responses and the latter are highly dependent on activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, we next used phospho-flow cytometry to measure the phosphorylation of the transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3 in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-6, respectively. While IFN-γ/STAT1 signaling was similar between groups, naïve T cells from patients with IA, but not those with mucormycosis, exhibited reduced responsiveness to IL-6 as measured by STAT3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, IL-6 increased Aspergillus-induced IL-17 production in culture supernatants from healthy and hematological controls but not in patients with IA. Altogether, these observations suggest an important role for dectin-1 and the IL-6/STAT3 pathway in protective immunity against Aspergillus.

  15. Recurrence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Blanco, Leticia; García-Prada, Hilario; Santamarina, Susana; Jiménez-Treviño, Luis; Bobes, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare idiosyncratic reaction associated with the use of neuroleptics that has an incidence of 0.02 to 3% among patients taking these drugs. This is a very serious complication with a mortality rate that reaches 10-20%. It is therefore very important to have high clinical suspicion and use appropriate criteria to objectify this clinical picture early, stopping the medication causing the picture and to avoid the subsequent complications as much as possible that would be responsible for both its mortality and sequels. We present that case of an 81-year old woman who was admitted to the Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (PHU) for a depressive episode with psychotic symptoms who developed a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) when Haloperidol was introduced. After its suspension and subsequent clinical recovery, antipsychotic treatment with Risperidone was reintroduced and she suffered a recurrence of NMS. Finally, significant improvement was achieved with several sessions of electroshock therapy (EST).

  16. Rheumatic Diseases and Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    BOJINCA, Violeta; JANTA, Iustina

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are many studies which demonstrate a higher risk for malignancy in patients with rheumatic diseases. There have been a number of possible explanations for the differences in the risk of certain malignancies in patients with rheumatic disease, compared with general population, but a clear mechanism is difficult to identify. Rheumatoid syndromes may be associated with malignancy as paraneoplastic conditions, which can antedate the neoplasm diagnosis. On the other hand, autoimmune rheumatic diseases have a higher risk of malignancy by themselves or because of the immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:23482881

  17. Verification and quality control of routine hematology analyzers.

    PubMed

    Vis, J Y; Huisman, A

    2016-05-01

    Verification of hematology analyzers (automated blood cell counters) is mandatory before new hematology analyzers may be used in routine clinical care. The verification process consists of several items which comprise among others: precision, accuracy, comparability, carryover, background and linearity throughout the expected range of results. Yet, which standard should be met or which verification limit be used is at the discretion of the laboratory specialist. This paper offers practical guidance on verification and quality control of automated hematology analyzers and provides an expert opinion on the performance standard that should be met by the contemporary generation of hematology analyzers. Therefore (i) the state-of-the-art performance of hematology analyzers for complete blood count parameters is summarized, (ii) considerations, challenges, and pitfalls concerning the development of a verification plan are discussed, (iii) guidance is given regarding the establishment of reference intervals, and (iv) different methods on quality control of hematology analyzers are reviewed. PMID:27161194

  18. Causes of death due to hematological and non-hematological cancers in 57 US patients with type 1 Gaucher Disease who were never treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Neal J; Lee, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) have increased risk of developing myeloma, other hematological cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma, and other solid tumors. Patient awareness of the GD1-cancer association causes anxiety and fear. Little is known about cancer as a cause of death in GD1, especially in patients never treated with GD1-specific therapies. Consequently, the effect of treatment on cancer mortality in GD1 patients is difficult to evaluate. In this review, starting with a population of 184 GD1 cases never treated, we annotate and analyze the causes of death of 57 GD1 patients who died of cancer. The proportional mortality ratio (PMR) for all malignancies in patients with GD1 is 1.57 (p = 0.0002), but it is much higher for myeloma (PMR = 9.66) and other hematological cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma, and kidney cancer (PMR = ≍4). However, deaths from colorectal and pancreatic cancers were not more frequent than expected, and deaths from lung, breast, gynecological, and prostate cancer occurred less than anticipated. Herein, we discuss whether GD1 is truly a hereditary cancer syndrome and the problem of comorbidities and cancer risk assessment, and we speculate as to whether the variability in death by cancer type might be attributable to biochemical sequelae of tumor cell and macrophage/stromal cell GBA1 mutation affecting signals for metastasis, the process most closely associated with cancer mortality.

  19. Hematological abnormalities in severe anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Allison L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Statland, Barbara; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of hematologic abnormalities in adults with severe anorexia nervosa. We report the first major analysis of hematologic dysfunction in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 53 men and women with severe anorexia nervosa, admitted between October 2008 and December 2010 for medical stabilization to our center, which has a national referral base. Patients were predominantly female (89 %), with a median age of 28 years (range 17-65), and were hospitalized for a median duration of 15 days (I.Q.R. 9-29). Nadir body mass index during hospitalization was markedly low at 12.4 kg/m(2) (range 8.4-15.7), and the mean discharge BMI was 13.8 kg/m(2) (range 10.2-16.8). 83 % of patients were anemic (hematocrit <37 %), with only 3 (6 %) having iron deficiency. 79 % were leukopenic (WBC < 4.5 k/μL), 29 % were neutropenic (ANC < 1.0 k/μL), 25 % were thrombocytopenic (platelets < 150 k/μL), and 17 % of patients developed thrombocytosis (platelets > 400 k/μL) during their hospitalization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had resolved their neutropenia by discharge. Marked hematologic deficiencies are often present in patients with severe anorexia nervosa, generally attributed to starvation-mediated gelatinous marrow transformation which resolves with proper nutritional rehabilitation. Improved provider awareness of this association may reduce unnecessary testing and costly treatment interventions.

  20. Laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with hematologic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, J L; Lefor, A T; Steers, J; Heyman, M; Graham, S M; Imbembo, A L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors review their initial experience with laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with hematologic diseases. Efficacy, morbidity, and mortality of the technique are presented, and other patient recovery parameters are discussed. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. Laparoscopic splenectomy is performed infrequently and data regarding its safety and efficacy are scarce. Factors such as a high level of technical difficulty, the potential for sudden, severe hemorrhage, and slow accrual of operative experience due to a relatively limited number of procedures are responsible. The potential patient benefits from the development of a minimally invasive form of splenectomy are significant. METHODS. Clinical follow-up, a prospective longitudinal database, and review of medical records were analyzed for all patients referred for elective splenectomy for hematologic disease from March 1992 to March 1995. RESULTS. Laparoscopic splenectomy was attempted in 43 patients and successfully completed in 35 (81%). Therapeutic platelet response to splenectomy occurred in 82% of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura and hematocrit level increased in 60% of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia undergoing successful laparoscopic splenectomy. The morbidity rate was 11.6% (5 of 43 patients), and the mortality rate was 4.7% (2 of 43 patients). Return of gastrointestinal function occurred in patients 23.1 hours after laparoscopic splenectomy and 76 hours after conversion to open splenectomy (p < 0.05). Mean length of stay was 2.7 days after laparoscopic splenectomy and 6.8 days after conversion to open splenectomy (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION. Laparoscopic splenectomy may be performed with efficacy, morbidity, and mortality rates comparable to those of open splenectomy for hematologic diseases, and it appears to retain other patient benefits of laparoscopic surgery. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8678613

  1. Hematology of healthy Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Harr, K.E.; Murphy, D.; Walsh, M.T.; Nolan, E.C.; Bonde, R.K.; Pate, M.G.; Deutsch, C.J.; Edwards, H.H.; Clapp, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hematologic analysis is an important tool in evaluating the general health status of free-ranging manatees and in the diagnosis and monitoring of rehabilitating animals. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostically important hematologic analytes in healthy manatees (Trichechus manatus) and to assess variations with respect to location (free ranging vs captive), age class (small calves, large calves, subadults, and adults), and gender. Methods: Blood was collected from 55 free-ranging and 63 captive healthy manatees. Most analytes were measured using a CELL-DYN 3500R; automated reticulocytes were measured with an ADVIA 120. Standard manual methods were used for differential leukocyte counts, reticulocyte and Heinz body counts, and plasma protein and fibrinogen concentrations. Results: Rouleaux, slight polychromasia, stomatocytosis, and low numbers of schistocytes and nucleated RBCs (NRBCs) were seen often in stained blood films. Manual reticulocyte counts were higher than automated reticulocyte counts. Heinz bodies were present in erythrocytes of most manatees. Compared with free-ranging manatees, captive animals had slightly lower MCV, MCH, and eosinophil counts and slightly higher heterophil and NRBC counts, and fibrinogen concentration. Total leukocyte, heterophil, and monocyte counts tended to be lower in adults than in younger animals. Small calves tended to have higher reticulocyte counts and NRBC counts than older animals. Conclusions: Hematologic findings were generally similar between captive and free-ranging manatees. Higher manual reticulocyte counts suggest the ADVIA detects only reticulocytes containing large amounts of RNA. Higher reticulocyte and NRBC counts in young calves probably reflect an increased rate of erythropoiesis compared with older animals. ?? 2009 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Nanopharmacology in translational hematology and oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Braicu, Cornelia; Irimie, Alexandra; Craciun, Lucian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have displayed considerable promise for safely delivering therapeutic agents with miscellaneous therapeutic properties. Current progress in nanotechnology has put forward, in the last few years, several therapeutic strategies that could be integrated into clinical use by using constructs for molecular diagnosis, disease detection, cytostatic drug delivery, and nanoscale immunotherapy. In the hope of bringing the concept of nanopharmacology toward a viable and feasible clinical reality in a cancer center, the present report attempts to present the grounds for the use of cell-free nanoscale structures for molecular therapy in experimental hematology and oncology. PMID:25092977

  3. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  4. The Mediating Role of Mental Adjustment in the Relationship between Perceived Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Hematological Cancer Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchun; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Rong; Yao, Kun; Liu, Zhuogang

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a particularly common psychological disorder that affects cancer patients. Diagnosed with hematological malignancies constitute a serious unpredictable and uncontrollable medical stress situation and patients are susceptible to suffer from depressive symptoms. The aims of the study were to explore the correlation between perceived stress and depressive symptoms in patients with hematological malignancies, and assess the mediating role of mental adjustment between these variables. Methods A single center, cross-sectional study was performed by convenience sampling between July 2013 and April 2014 in a hospital of China. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Mini-Mental Adjustment Scale, as well as questions about demographic and clinical factors was distributed to 300 hematological cancer patients. Completed questionnaires were received from 227 inpatients. Results The results showed that perceived stress was positively correlated with depressive symptoms. The mental adjustment significantly mediated the relationship between perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Among hematological cancer patients perceived stress may be a risk factor for depressive symptoms, whereas positive coping style might be protective against depressive symptoms. Results showed that medical managers could support the development of mental adjustment in the patients to alleviate psychological disorders. PMID:26587991

  5. Principles of analytical validation of next-generation sequencing based mutational analysis for hematologic neoplasms in a CLIA-certified laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Singh, Rajesh R; Routbort, Mark J; Patel, Keyur P; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy based on mutational profiles is the current standard of practice for the management of patients with hematologic malignancies. Next-generation sequencing (NGS)- based analysis has been adopted by clinical laboratories for high-throughput mutational profiling of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms. The technology is fairly novel and complex, hence both validation and test implementation in a CLIA-certified laboratory differ substantially from traditional sequencing platforms. Recently, organizations such as the American College of Medical Genetics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and College of American Pathologists have published principles and guidelines for NGS test development to ensure standardization of testing across institutions. Summarized here are the recommendations from these organizations as they pertain to targeted NGS-based testing of hematologic malignancies ('liquid tumors'), with particular emphasis on myeloid neoplasms.

  6. Splenectomy in hematologic disorders. The ever-changing indications.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, M C; Jones, R E; McGehee, R; Mitchener, J S; Sandusky, W R; Hess, C E

    1988-01-01

    A comparison between a series of splenectomies performed at the University of Virginia Medical Center for hematologic disorders between 1946 and 1962 (Series I) and 1963 and 1982 (Series II) is presented. Four hundred splenectomies (20 per year) were performed between 1963 and 1982 compared with 94 (5.5 per year) between 1946 and 1962. Also noted in Series II was a sharp decline in the number performed each year between 1974 and 1983. The major factor responsible for these observations was the evolution of the staging laparotomy for malignant lymphomas, particularly Hodgkin's disease, and the decline in the average annual incidence of staging laparotomies since 1974. Staging laparotomy currently is rarely done for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Also contributing to the changes noted was an increase in the total number but subsequent fall in the annual incidence of splenectomy for hereditary spherocytosis, idiopathic hypersplenism, and myeloproliferative disorders in Series II. The average number of splenectomies for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura increased from 1.1 per year in Series I to 3.6 per year in Series II; the annual incidence during the study period of Series II, however, remained constant. The total number of splenectomies for hairy cell leukemia and Felty's syndrome increased from zero in Series I to 12 and 17, respectively, in Series II, whereas the number of miscellaneous reasons dropped from 29 (1.7 per year) in Series I to 15 (0.75 per year) in Series II. The mortality rate in Series I was 6.3% compared with 4.0% in Series II. No deaths occurred in Series II after 1979. Indications for splenectomy in Series II were for diagnostic purposes in 3.2%, therapeutic in 56.5%, staging in 39.5%, and restaging in 0.8%. Accessory spleens were found in 49 (12.5%) in Series II. PMID:3377568

  7. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer ... in malignant mesothelioma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed ...

  8. Hematological reference ranges among healthy Ugandans.

    PubMed Central

    Tugume, S B; Piwowar, E M; Lutalo, T; Mugyenyi, P N; Grant, R M; Mangeni, F W; Pattishall, K; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    1995-01-01

    Reference values are essential for the interpretation of hematologic data in clinical practice and research studies. Symptom-free human immunodeficiency virus antibody-negative Ugandan adults (183 subjects, aged 15 to 74 years, 37.7% women and 62.3% men) were studied to establish hematological reference ranges. The central 95% areas under the distribution curves were 1,453 to 4,448 cells per microliters for the absolute lymphocyte count, 559 to 2,333 cells per microliters for the absolute CD4 count, 253 to 1,396 cells per microliters for the absolute CD8 count, and 0.68 to 4.4 for the CD4/CD8 ratio. Women had significantly higher mean absolute lymphocyte counts (2,826 versus 2,568/microliters), absolute CD4 counts (1,425 versus 1,154/microliters) and absolute CD4/CD8 ratios (2.58 versus 1.88) than did men. These reference ranges differ from those reported for populations outside Africa. PMID:7697535

  9. Systemic Sclerosis and Malignancy: A Review of Current Data.

    PubMed

    Zeineddine, Nabil; Khoury, Lara El; Mosak, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with increased risk of malignancy. The organ systems most commonly affected are the lungs, the breasts and the hematological system. Risk factors predisposing a SSc patient for development of malignancy are not well defined, and the pathogenic basis of the association is yet to be explained. The incidence of malignancies in SSc patients is variable from one report to another, but most importantly, questions regarding the role of immunosuppressive therapies and the effect of autoantibodies have weak or sometimes contradictory answers in most of the currently available literature and physicians have no available guidelines to screen their SSc patients for malignancies. The lack of a concretely defined high-risk profile and the absence of malignancy screening guidelines tailored for SSc patients raise the importance of the need for more studies on the association of SSc and cancer and should incite rheumatology colleges to develop specific recommendations for the clinician to follow while approaching patients with SSc. PMID:27540435

  10. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy: An Update on Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common finding typically found in patients with advanced stage cancers. We aimed to provide an updated review on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of malignancy-related hypercalcemia. We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science for original articles, case reports, and case series articles focused on hypercalcemia of malignancy published from 1950 to December 2014. Hypercalcemia of malignancy usually presents with markedly elevated calcium levels and therefore, usually severely symptomatic. Several major mechanisms are responsible for the development of hypercalcemia of malignancy including parathyroid hormone-related peptide-mediated humoral hypercalcemia, osteolytic metastases-related hypercalcemia, 1,25 Vitamin D-mediated hypercalcemia, and parathyroid hormone-mediated hypercalcemia in patients with parathyroid carcinoma and extra parathyroid cancers. Diagnosis should include the history and physical examination as well as measurement of the above mediators of hypercalcemia. Management includes hydration, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, denosumab, and in certain patients, prednisone and cinacalcet. Patients with advanced underlying kidney disease and refractory severe hypercalcemia should be considered for hemodialysis. Hematology or oncology and palliative care specialists should be involved early to guide the options of cancer targeted therapies and help the patients and their closed ones with the discussion of comfort-oriented care. PMID:26713296

  11. Systemic Sclerosis and Malignancy: A Review of Current Data

    PubMed Central

    Zeineddine, Nabil; Khoury, Lara El; Mosak, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with increased risk of malignancy. The organ systems most commonly affected are the lungs, the breasts and the hematological system. Risk factors predisposing a SSc patient for development of malignancy are not well defined, and the pathogenic basis of the association is yet to be explained. The incidence of malignancies in SSc patients is variable from one report to another, but most importantly, questions regarding the role of immunosuppressive therapies and the effect of autoantibodies have weak or sometimes contradictory answers in most of the currently available literature and physicians have no available guidelines to screen their SSc patients for malignancies. The lack of a concretely defined high-risk profile and the absence of malignancy screening guidelines tailored for SSc patients raise the importance of the need for more studies on the association of SSc and cancer and should incite rheumatology colleges to develop specific recommendations for the clinician to follow while approaching patients with SSc. PMID:27540435

  12. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  13. 21 CFR 864.8625 - Hematology quality control mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hematology quality control mixture. 864.8625... quality control mixture. (a) Identification. A hematology quality control mixture is a device used to... parameters such as white cell count (WBC), red cell count (RBC), platelet count (PLT), hemoglobin,...

  14. The expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in patients with hematological cancers: a cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gedik, Habip

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in patients with hematological malignancies. Methods In this retrospective study, the expenditures related to use of antifungal drugs for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients with hematological malignancies between November 2010 and November 2012 were analyzed. Expenditures of antifungal drugs were calculated by converting the price billed to the Republic of Turkey Social Security Institution per patient using the US dollar ($) exchange rate. Results We retrospectively analyzed the expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in 282 febrile episodes of 126 neutropenic patients. Voriconazole (VOR), caspofungin, and liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) were administered as a first-line antifungal therapy to treat 72 febrile episodes of 65 neutropenic patients, 45 febrile episodes of 37 neutropenic patients, and 34 febrile episodes of 32 neutropenic patients, respectively. The expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs per febrile neutropenic episode were $3,857.85 for VOR; $15,783.34 for caspofungin, and $21,561.02 for L-AmB, respectively. The expenditure related to the use of posaconazole (POS) was $32,167.39 per patient for primary or secondary prophylaxis. Conclusion Improving conditions in the patient’s room, choosing pre-emptive antifungal treatment instead of empirical antifungal treatment, switching to tablet form of VOR after initiation of its intravenous form, secondary prophylaxis with VOR against invasive aspergillosis, primary prophylaxis with POS in high-risk patients, and choosing less L-AmB as being an alternative to other antifungal drugs, may reduce expenditures related to the use of antifungal drugs in the treatment of invasive fungal infections during febrile neutropenic episodes of patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26622185

  15. Therapeutic radiation and the potential risk of second malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Sophia C; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Ng, Andrea; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-06-15

    Radiation has long been associated with carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, it is an important part of multimodality therapy for many malignancies. It is critical to assess the risk of secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after radiation treatment. The authors reviewed the literature with a focus on radiation and associated SMNs for primary hematologic, breast, gynecologic, and pediatric tumors. Radiation appeared to increase the risk of SMN in all of these; however, this risk was found to be associated with age, hormonal influences, chemotherapy use, environmental influences, genetic predisposition, infection, and immunosuppression. The risk also appears to be altered with modern radiotherapy techniques. Practitioners of all specialties who treat cancer survivors in follow-up should be aware of this potential risk. Cancer 2016;122:1809-21. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  16. Nelarabine in the Treatment of Refractory T-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Roecker, Andrew M.; Stockert, Amy; Kisor, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Nelarabine is a nucleoside analog indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) that is refractory or has relapsed after treatment with at least two chemotherapy regimens. After being first synthesized in the late 1970s and receiving FDA approval in 2005, the appropriate use of nelarabine for refractory hematologic malignancies is still being elucidated. Nelarabine is the prodrug of 9-β-D-arabinofuranosylguanine (ara-G) which when phosphorylated intracellularly to ara-G triphosphate (ara-GTP), preferentially accumulates in cancerous T-cells. Dose-dependent toxicities, including neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, have been documented and may, in turn, limit the ability to appropriately treat the diagnosed malignancy. This article will summarize the pharmacologic properties of nelarabine and will address the current place in therapy nelarabine holds based upon the results of the available clinical trials to date. PMID:21151585

  17. Therapeutic radiation and the potential risk of second malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Sophia C; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Ng, Andrea; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-06-15

    Radiation has long been associated with carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, it is an important part of multimodality therapy for many malignancies. It is critical to assess the risk of secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after radiation treatment. The authors reviewed the literature with a focus on radiation and associated SMNs for primary hematologic, breast, gynecologic, and pediatric tumors. Radiation appeared to increase the risk of SMN in all of these; however, this risk was found to be associated with age, hormonal influences, chemotherapy use, environmental influences, genetic predisposition, infection, and immunosuppression. The risk also appears to be altered with modern radiotherapy techniques. Practitioners of all specialties who treat cancer survivors in follow-up should be aware of this potential risk. Cancer 2016;122:1809-21. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26950597

  18. Repeat Transplantation for Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancies Following Prior Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-03

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Myeloid Sarcoma; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

  19. Central Nervous System Disease in Hematological Malignancies: Historical Perspective and Practical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Thiel, Eckhard

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) 5-year survival rates are approaching 90% in children and 50% in adults who are receiving contemporary risk-directed treatment protocols. Current efforts focus not only on further improving cure rate but also on patient quality of life. Hence, all protocols decrease or limit the use of cranial irradiation as central nervous system (CNS)-directed therapy, even in patients with high-risk presenting features, such as the presence of leukemia cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (even resulting from traumatic lumbar puncture), adverse genetic features, T-cell immunophenotype, and a large leukemia-cell burden. Current strategies for CNS-directed therapy involve effective systemic chemotherapy (eg, dexamethasone, high-dose methotrexate, intensive asparaginase, ifosfamide) and early intensification and optimization of intrathecal therapy. Options under investigation for the treatment of relapsed or refractory CNS leukemia in ALL patients include thiotepa and intrathecal liposomal cytarabine. CNS involvement in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is associated with young age, advanced stage, number of extranodal sites, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and International Prognostic Index score. Refractory CNS lymphoma in patients with NHL carries a poor prognosis, with a median survival of 2 to 6 months; the most promising treatment, autologous stem cell transplant, can extend median survival from 10 to 26 months. CNS prophylaxis is required during the initial treatment of NHL subtypes that carry a high risk of CNS relapse, such as B-cell ALL, Burkitt’s lymphoma, and lymphoblastic lymphoma. The use of CNS prophylaxis in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is controversial because of the low risk of CNS relapse (~5%) in this population. In this article, we review current and past practice of intrathecal therapy in ALL and NHL and the risk-models that aim to identify predictors of CNS relapse in NHL. PMID:19660680

  20. Sirolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing GVHD in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing HSCT

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Myelofibrosis; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. New prospects for drug development: the hedgehog pathway revealed. Focus on hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Agustin; Velez, Michel; Barahona, Luz J; Swords, Ronan; Lekakis, Lazaros

    2013-05-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a critical regulator of vertebrate embryonic development and is involved in the function of processes such as stem cell maintenance and differentiation, tissue polarity and cell proliferation. Given how critical these functions are, it is not surprising that mutations in Hh pathway components are often implicated in the tumorigenesis of a variety of human cancers. Promotion of tumor growth has recently been shown by activated Hh signaling in the tumor itself, as well as by pathway activation within surrounding cells comprising the tumor microenvironment. Targeted disruption of various Hh pathway proteins has been successfully employed as an anticancer strategy with several synthetic Hh antagonists now available. Here, the molecular basis of Hh signaling, the therapeutic rationales for targeting this pathway and the current status of Hh pathway inhibitors in the clinic are reviewed.

  2. 78 FR 5186 - Clinical Flow Cytometry in Hematologic Malignancies; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... event before, test your connection at https://collaboration.fda.gov/common/help/en/support/meeting_test... malfunctions, injuries and deaths related to the use of such reagents to the FDA (62 FR 62260, November 21... ASRs together in the form of reagent panels (``cocktails'') creating devices that went beyond...

  3. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  4. 3-AP and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Ipilimumab or Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Hematologic Malignancies After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

  6. The Impact of Chemotherapy on Hepatitis B Antibody Titer in Patients with Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Yağcı, Münci; Suyanı, Elif; Kızıl Çakar, Merih

    2015-09-01

    Amaç: Bu çalışmada, hematolojik malignite nedeniyle kemoterapi alan hastalarda kemoterapinin Anti HBs antikor titresi üzerine olan etkisinin incelenmesi amaçlanmıştır. Gereç ve Yöntemler: Çeşitli hematolojik malignite tanısı ile kemoterapi alan ve hem kemoterapi öncesi hem de kemoterapi tamamlandıktan sonraki Anti HBs antikor titresi mevcut olan toplan 75 hasta retrospektif olarak incelendi. Bulgular: Hastaların ortanca yaşı 52 (16-78) olup 49’u (%65) erkek ve 26’sı (%35) kadın idi. Kemoterapi sonrası ortanca Anti HBs antikor titresinde kemoterapi öncesine göre anlamlı düşme saptandı [68 (range: 0-1000) vs. 100 (range: 6,2-1000)] (p=0,001). Alt grup analizi yapıldığında, kemoterapi sonrası ortanca Anti HBs antikor titresindeki azalmanın özellikle akut lösemi hastalarında [110 (range: 6,2-1000) vs. 67.8 (range: 0-1000)] (p=0,003) ve yoğun kemoterapi alan hastalarda [97,2 (range: 6,2-1000) vs. 71 (range: 0-1000)] (p=0,036) olduğu gözlendi. Ayrıca ortanca Anti HBs antikor titresindeki azalma erkek cinsiyette daha belirgin idi (p<0,001). Kemoterapi öncesi Anti Hbs antikor titresi düşük olan ve yine Anti HBc antikoru negatif olan dokuz hastada kemoterapi sonrası Anti HBs antikoru negatifleşti. Sonuç: Anti HBs antikor titresinde kemoterapi sonrasında azalma görülmüştür ve bu azalma akut lösemi hastalarında, erkek hastalarda ve yoğun kemoterapi alan hastalarda daha belirgin olarak saptanmıştır.

  7. Study Evaluating AMD3100 for Transplantation of Sibling Donor Stem Cells in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-09

    Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute; Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute; Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Multiple Myeloma; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  8. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(1;19)(q23;p13.3); E2A-PBX1 (TCF3-PBX1); B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; DS Stage II Plasma Cell Myeloma; DS Stage III Plasma Cell Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  9. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Bioengineering targeted nanodrugs for hematologic malignancies: An innovation in pediatric oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vinu

    Chemotherapy for pediatric cancers employs combinations of highly toxic drugs. This has achieved 5-year survival rates exceeding 90% in children treated for leukemia -- the most prominent form of pediatric cancer. However, delayed onset of harmful side effects in more than 60% of survivors result in death or low quality of life post therapy. This is primarily due to the non-specific effect of drugs on healthy dividing cells in a growing child. Nanomedicine has advanced tremendously to improve adult cancer therapy, but as yet has had minimal impact in pediatric oncology. There is a pressing need for innovative therapeutic strategies that can reduce life-threatening side effects caused by conventional chemotherapy in the clinic. Targeting chemotherapeutic agents specifically to leukemia cells may alleviate treatment-related toxicity in children. The research objective of this dissertation is to bioengineer and advance preclinically a novel nanotherapeutic approach that can specifically target and deliver drugs into leukemic cells. Dexamethasone (Dex) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs in treating pediatric leukemia. For the first part in this study, we encapsulated Dex in polymeric NPs and validated its anti-leukemic potential in vitro and in vivo. NPs with an average diameter of 110 nm were assembled from an amphiphilic block copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly-caprolactone (PCL) bearing pendant cyclic ketals (ECT2). The blank NPs were nontoxic to cultured cells in vitro and to mice in vivo. Encapsulation of Dex into the NPs (Dex-NP) did not compromise the bioactivity of the drug. Dex-NPs induced glucocorticoid phosphorylation and showed cytotoxicity similar to free drug when treated with leukemic cells. Studies using NPs labeled with fluorescent dyes revealed leukemic cell surface binding and internalization. In vivo biodistribution studies showed NP accumulation in the liver and spleen with subsequent clearance of particles with time. In a preclinical model of leukemia, Dex-NPs significantly improved the quality of life and survival of mice compared to the group treated with free Dex. In the second section, we demonstrate, that doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline commonly used in pediatric leukemia therapy) when encapsulated within 80 nm sized NPs and modified with targeting ligands against CD19 (a B-lymbhoblast antigen, CD19-DOX-NPs) can be delivered in a CD19-specific manner to leukemic cells. The CD19-DOX-NPs were internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis and imparted cytotoxicity in a CD19-dependent manner in CD19 positive (CD19+) leukemic cells. Leukemic mice treated with CD19-DOX-NPs survived significantly longer and manifested a higher degree of agility indicating reduced apparent systemic toxicity during treatment compared to mice treated with free DOX. This study for the first time shows the efficacy of polymeric NPs to target and deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in pediatric oncology and suggests that targeted nanotherapy can potentially improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapy and reduce treatment-related side effects in children.

  11. Mismatched Family Member Donor Transplantation for Children and Young Adults With High Risk Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-03

    Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic (ALL); Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute(AML); Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic(CML); Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML); Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal Nocturnal (PNH); Hodgkin Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin (NHL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

  12. Rechallenging With Intrathecal Methotrexate After Developing Subacute Neurotoxicity in Children With Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Badke, Colleen; Fleming, Amy; Iqbal, Asneha; Khilji, Ohmed; Parhas, Sophia; Weinstein, Joanna; Morgan, Elaine; Hijiya, Nobuko

    2016-04-01

    Methotrexate is associated with neurologic side effects. It is recommended that patients who developed neurotoxicity be rechallenged with methotrexate, but little is known about the safety of this approach. We performed a chart review to identify patients who received high-dose or intrathecal (IT) methotrexate. Twenty-one of 298 patients (7%) experienced neurologic symptoms attributed to methotrexate treatment in the premaintenance phase. Seventeen of these patients were rechallenged with IT methotrexate and 13 (76%) had no further neurotoxic events. No patients rechallenged during maintenance (n = 9) experienced recurrence of neurotoxic events. It is safe to rechallenge with IT methotrexate in maintenance.

  13. Ascorbic acid serum levels are reduced in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Huijskens, Mirelle J.A.J.; Wodzig, Will K.W.H.; Walczak, Mateusz; Germeraad, Wilfred T.V.; Bos, Gerard M.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that patients treated with chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have highly significant reduced serum ascorbic acid (AA) levels compared to healthy controls. We recently observed in in vitro experiments that growth of both T and NK cells from hematopoietic stem cells is positively influenced by AA. It might be of clinical relevance to study the function and recovery of immune cells after intensive treatment, its correlation to AA serum levels and the possible effect of AA supplementation. PMID:27014565

  14. A Two-Step Approach to Reduced Intensity Bone Marrow Transplant for Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mastocytosis; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Methoxyamine and Fludarabine Phosphate in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Vorinostat, Tacrolimus, and Methotrexate in Preventing GVHD After Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Intraocular Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Secondary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Deferasirox in Treating Iron Overload Caused By Blood Transfusions in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1994-08-04

    This report summaries progress made during the time interval between November 1, 1993 and October 31, 1994 and briefly describes studies on the metabolism of antibodies targeting B cell antigens, retention of labeled antibodies by human B cell lymphocytes, and tissue distribution of Chloramine T and tyramine cellobiose labeled antibodies in mice harboring a human erythroleukemia tumor transplant.

  1. Panuveal malignant mesenchymoma.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, J; Neudorfer, M; Ron, N; Anteby, I; Lazar, M; Rosenmann, E

    1995-09-01

    Intraocular malignant mesenchymal tumors are very rare, and only a few case reports of such primary and metastatic tumors have been reported. We report a case of a malignant mesenchymoma involving the entire uveal tract. A 21-year-old woman presented with a tumor on the whole iris of the right eye, which caused intractable glaucoma. Upon enucleation of the eye, a very anaplastic tumor was found to occupy the whole uveal tract; its features were compatible with a tumor of mesenchymal origin, including rhabdomyosarcomatous and liposarcomatous characteristics. Choroidal osteoma was a coincidental finding. The histologic findings of the tumor were of two types of malignant mesenchymal tumors, and therefore the diagnosis of malignant mesenchymoma was made. This is to our knowledge the first tumor of its kind to be reported intraocularly. PMID:7668945

  2. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  3. [Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in onco-hematology. PICC line in onco-hematology].

    PubMed

    Kabsy, Y; Baudin, G; Vinti, H; Novellas, S; Mannone, L; Chevallier, P; Mounier, N

    2010-09-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have the advantage of limiting the risk of accidents during installation and are easy to remove. Its use in oncology remains debated because of possible infectious complications. We analyzed 52 PICC in patients with hematological tumor from Nice Hospital. An installation failure was noted in 5.8% of cases. After a follow-up of 15 months, the complication rate was 26.9%, mainly mechanical complications: obstruction (13.5%) or accidental removal (9.6%). The organic complications such as infection or thrombophlebitis represented 3.8%. The median duration was 26 days [2-291]. The longest duration was associated with PICC for chemotherapy (median: 58 days). Frequent blood samples (above: 2 week) were associated with lower duration (median: 23 days). In conclusion, PICC represent a simple and effective alternative to intra-venous central devices in onco-hematology. However, physicians have to focus on short-course treatment.

  4. Functional-genetic dissection of HDAC dependencies in mouse lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Geoffrey M; Mehdipour, Parinaz; Cluse, Leonie A; Falkenberg, Katrina J; Wang, Eric; Roth, Mareike; Santoro, Fabio; Vidacs, Eva; Stanley, Kym; House, Colin M; Rusche, James R; Vakoc, Christopher R; Zuber, Johannes; Minucci, Saverio; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2015-11-19

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACis) have demonstrated activity in hematological and solid malignancies. Vorinostat, romidepsin, belinostat, and panobinostat are Food and Drug Administration-approved for hematological malignancies and inhibit class II and/or class I HDACs, including HDAC1, 2, 3, and 6. We combined genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate whether suppression of individual or multiple Hdacs phenocopied broad-acting HDACis in 3 genetically distinct leukemias and lymphomas. Individual Hdacs were depleted in murine acute myeloid leukemias (MLL-AF9;Nras(G12D); PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia [APL] cells) and Eµ-Myc lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, Hdac3-depleted cells were selected against in competitive assays for all 3 tumor types. Decreased proliferation following Hdac3 knockdown was not prevented by BCL-2 overexpression, caspase inhibition, or knockout of Cdkn1a in Eµ-Myc lymphoma, and depletion of Hdac3 in vivo significantly reduced tumor burden. Interestingly, APL cells depleted of Hdac3 demonstrated a more differentiated phenotype. Consistent with these genetic studies, the HDAC3 inhibitor RGFP966 reduced proliferation of Eµ-Myc lymphoma and induced differentiation in APL. Genetic codepletion of Hdac1 with Hdac2 was pro-apoptotic in Eµ-Myc lymphoma in vitro and in vivo and was phenocopied by the HDAC1/2-specific agent RGFP233. This study demonstrates the importance of HDAC3 for the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cells, suggesting that HDAC3-selective inhibitors could prove useful for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that codepletion of Hdac1 with Hdac2 mediates a robust pro-apoptotic response. Our integrated genetic and pharmacological approach provides important insights into the individual or combinations of HDACs that could be prioritized for targeting in a range of hematological malignancies. PMID:26447190

  5. [Asbestos and malignant pleural mesothelioma: molecular, cellular and physiopathological aspects].

    PubMed

    Mohr, Steve; Keith, Gérard; Rihn, Bertrand

    2005-11-01

    Asbestos is known as mutagenic and carcinogenic for human and is responsible for many pulmonary diseases including asbestosis, bronchogenic carcinoma and malignant pleural mesothelioma. Occupational exposure to asbestos is involved in 70-80% of all malignant pleural mesothelioma. The later presents a growing challenge for both researcher and clinician. The diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma is difficult and the current treatments did not show significant improvement of the survival. The increasing incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma, its gravity and its human, social and financial consequences are of high concern in public health. In this paper we summarize the so far knowledge on cellular, molecular and pathophysiological events involved in genesis and development of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Finally, the paper also report recent data sourced from the study of malignant pleural mesothelioma transcriptome using high-throughput technologies such as gene expression array. These data should improve the accuracy of mesothelioma diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Nurses’ Health Study Contributions on the Epidemiology of Less Common Cancers: Endometrial, Ovarian, Pancreatic, and Hematologic

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Mollie E.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Bao, Ying; Crous-Bou, Marta; Wolpin, Brian M.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contributions of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to epidemiologic knowledge of endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. Methods. We reviewed selected NHS publications from 1976 to 2016, including publications from consortia and other pooled studies. Results. NHS studies on less common cancers have identified novel risk factors, such as a reduced risk of endometrial cancer in women of advanced age at last birth, and have clarified or prospectively confirmed previously reported associations, including an inverse association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer. Through biomarker research, the NHS has furthered understanding of the pathogenesis of rare cancers, such as the role of altered metabolism in pancreatic cancer risk and survival. NHS investigations have also demonstrated the importance of the timing of exposure, such as the finding of a positive association of early life body fatness, but not of usual adult body mass index, with non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk. Conclusions. Evidence from the NHS has informed prevention strategies and contributed to improved survival from less common but often lethal malignancies, including endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. PMID:27459458

  7. Malignant lymphoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zapater, E; Bagán, J V; Carbonell, F; Basterra, J

    2010-03-01

    Malignant lymphomas represent approximately 5% of all malignant neoplasms of the head and neck area. They are classically divided into two subgroups, Hodgkin's lymphomas (HLs) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). We describe the clinical characteristics of head and neck lymphomas and the methods to establish the diagnosis. The World Health Organization classification of lymphoid tissues describes more than 50 different histological types, and we analyse the most common staging system for lymphomas, the Ann Arbor staging system. Finally, the different therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:20374502

  8. Whole Pelvic Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hymel, Rockne; Jones, Guy C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a major role in the treatment of gynecological malignancies. There is increasing interest in the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and its application to treat gynecological malignancies. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art use of IMRT for gynecological malignancies and report how it is being used alone as well as in combination with chemotherapy in both the adjuvant and definitive settings. Based on dosimetric and clinical evidence, IMRT can reduce gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematological toxicities compared with 3D conformal radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. We discuss how these attributes of IMRT may lead to improvements in disease outcomes by allowing for dose escalation of radiation therapy, intensification of chemotherapy, and limiting toxicity-related treatment breaks. Currently accruing trials investigating pelvic IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancers are discussed. PMID:25600840

  9. [Pitfalls and challenges of the preanalytical phase in hematology].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Adriana; Bargetzi, Mario; Huber, Andreas; Cantoni, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    In the last few decades we have seen a significant decrease in the rates of analytical errors in clinical laboratories. The test performances have improved, new parameters have been introduced, as well as internal and external quality controls have been used for the monitoring of accuracy. Currently available evidence demonstrates that the pre- and post-analytical steps show higher error rates (up to 70 % of all errors) than the analytical phase. Recognition of the weak points of the preanalytical phase and search for appropriate solutions in case of discrepancies will finally help to lead to the correct therapeutic strategy. In order to avoid problems in the preanaytical phase in hematology it is very important to consider some essential issues. The patients must be identified in appropriate form, the blood collection for the requested tests must be made using the appropriate tubes in the specified sequence and the samples must be transported to the lab at the right temperature and on time to be analysed. In case of special tests additional information for the lab is very important for the interpretation of the results. In case of unexpected results the lab should contact the responsible physician in order to look for an adequate explanation for the abnormal findings. With help of several cases of the daily haematology routine we want to point out some preanalytical problems.

  10. Primary Malignant Tumours of Bone Following Previous Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Patton, J. T.; Sommerville, S. M. M.; Grimer, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Destructive bone lesions occurring in patients who have previously had a malignancy are generally assumed to be a metastasis from that malignancy. We reviewed 60 patients with a previous history of malignancy, who presented with a solitary bone lesion that was subsequently found to be a new and different primary sarcoma of bone. These second malignancies occurred in three distinct groups of patients: (1) patients with original tumours well known to be associated with second malignancies (5%); (2) patients whose second malignancies were likely to be due to the previous treatment of their primary malignancy (40%); (3) patients in whom there was no clearly defined association between malignancies (55%). The purpose of this study is to emphasise the necessity for caution in assuming the diagnosis of a metastasis when a solitary bone lesion is identified following a prior malignancy. Inappropriate biopsy and treatment of primary bone sarcomas compromises limb salvage surgery and can affect patient mortality. PMID:18414590

  11. Hemostasis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L; Biggerstaff, J; Amirkhosravi, A

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the hemostatic system is involved in the growth and spread of malignant disease. There is an increased incidence of thromboembolic disease in patients with cancers and hemostatic abnormalities are extremely common in such patients. Antihemostatic agents have been successfully used to treat a variety of experimental tumors, and several clinical trials in humans have been initiated. Although metastasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, intravascular coagulation activation and peritumor fibrin deposition seem to be important. The mechanisms by which hemostatic activation facilitates the malignant process remain to be completely elucidated. Of central importance may be the presence on malignant cells of tissue factor and urokinase receptor. Recent studies have suggested that these proteins, and others, may be involved at several stages of metastasis, including the key event of neovascularization. Tissue factor, the principal initiator of coagulation, may have additional roles, outside of fibrin formation, that are central to the biology of some solid tumors.

  12. Hemostasis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L; Biggerstaff, J; Amirkhosravi, A

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the hemostatic system is involved in the growth and spread of malignant disease. There is an increased incidence of thromboembolic disease in patients with cancers and hemostatic abnormalities are extremely common in such patients. Antihemostatic agents have been successfully used to treat a variety of experimental tumors, and several clinical trials in humans have been initiated. Although metastasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, intravascular coagulation activation and peritumor fibrin deposition seem to be important. The mechanisms by which hemostatic activation facilitates the malignant process remain to be completely elucidated. Of central importance may be the presence on malignant cells of tissue factor and urokinase receptor. Recent studies have suggested that these proteins, and others, may be involved at several stages of metastasis, including the key event of neovascularization. Tissue factor, the principal initiator of coagulation, may have additional roles, outside of fibrin formation, that are central to the biology of some solid tumors. PMID:9579631

  13. Malignancy-Associated Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka-Dąbrowa, Agata; Hannam, Simon; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol and triglycerides, important lipid constituents of cell, are essential to carry out several vital physiological functions. Lipids might be associated with cancers because they play a key role in the maintenance of cell integrity. The pathway for cholesterol synthesis may also produce various tumorigenic compounds and cholesterol serves as a precursor for the synthesis of many sex hormones linked to increased risk of various cancers. In some malignant diseases, blood cholesterol undergoes early and significant changes. The mechanism for the link between cancer and cholesterol remains controversial. The dates from studies are confusing because both hypolipidemia and hypercholesterolemia might be connected with malignancy. Not only cancers but also antineoplastic therapies have an influence on lipid profile. There are also dates suggesting that antihyperlipemic drugs might nfluenced malignancy. PMID:21660223

  14. Surveillance for gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashish K; Laird-Fick, Heather S; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are notorious for frequently progressing to advanced stages even in the absence of serious symptoms, thus leading to delayed diagnoses and dismal prognoses. Secondary prevention of GI malignancies through early detection and treatment of cancer-precursor/premalignant lesions, therefore, is recognized as an effective cancer prevention strategy. In order to efficiently detect these lesions, systemic application of screening tests (surveillance) is needed. However, most of the currently used non-invasive screening tests for GI malignancies (for example, serum markers such as alpha-fetoprotein for hepatocellular carcinoma, and fecal occult blood test, for colon cancer) are only modestly effective necessitating the use of highly invasive endoscopy-based procedures, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy for screening purposes. Even for hepatocellular carcinoma where non-invasive imaging (ultrasonography) has become a standard screening tool, the need for repeated liver biopsies of suspicious liver nodules for histopathological confirmation can’t be avoided. The invasive nature and high-cost associated with these screening tools hinders implementation of GI cancer screening programs. Moreover, only a small fraction of general population is truly predisposed to developing GI malignancies, and indeed needs surveillance. To spare the average-risk individuals from superfluous invasive procedures and achieve an economically viable model of cancer prevention, it’s important to identify cohorts in general population that are at substantially high risk of developing GI malignancies (risk-stratification), and select suitable screening tests for surveillance in these cohorts. We herein provide a brief overview of such high-risk cohorts for different GI malignancies, and the screening strategies that have commonly been employed for surveillance purpose in them. PMID:22969223

  15. Assessing Safety of Pneumatic Tube System (PTS) for Patients with Very Low Hematologic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Koroglu, Mustafa; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Berber, Ilhami; Nizam, Ilknur; Yagar, Yavuz; Kayis, Seyit Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Preventive interventions save lives during the process of chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies, when a hematology laboratory can ensure accurate results. The use of a pneumatic tube system (PTS) is associated with measurement errors and unnecessary transfusions. The aim of this study was to evaluate pre-analytical errors associated with transportation method (PTS versus hand-delivered) and to investigate whether there are unnecessary transfusion events in pancytopenia leukemia patients with very low hematological parameters. Material/Methods A total of 140 paired blood collections were performed for hemogram and biochemistry assays. Paired EDTA and serum gel blood samples were collected from 58 cases with acute leukemia on different days. For each pair, one sample was hand-delivered by a courier (Group 1) while the other sample was transported through a PTS (Group 2). Results The hand-delivered method showed that some platelet transfusions were unnecessary for different thrombocyte cut-off values. Calculated unnecessary platelet (PLT) transfusion ratios when using PTS (PLT <30×103/μL, 16.3%; PLT <25×103/μL, 16.4%; PLT <20×103/μL, 80.3%; PLT <15×103/μL, 48.6%; and PLT <10×103/μL, 150.0%) were found to be statistically significant (p=0.002, p=0.046, p<0.000, p=0.028, and p<0.000, respectively). In contrast, for RBC transfusion ratios, although the ratios were high in Group 2, we found no significant difference between the two groups; (HGB <8.0 g/dL, 23.3%; HGB <9.0 g/dL, 25.0%, HGB<10.0 g/dL, 19.3%) and (p=0.002, p=0.085, p<0.160, and p=0.235, respectively). Conclusions Although our results cannot be universally applied, physicians should be careful, skeptical, and suspicious of transfusion decisions in hematology clinics and consider potential analytical and pre-analytical errors in cases of severe cytopenia when using PTS. PMID:27097101

  16. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe dos Santos; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  17. Common emergencies in cancer medicine: hematologic and gastrointestinal syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.; Carter, I. K.; Leslie, W. T.; Sutton, F.

    1992-01-01

    A myriad of both primary and secondary hematologic and gastrointestinal system-related clinical problems may exist in the cancer patient. This review outlines a standard approach to the prompt diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for these clinical issues. PMID:1602515

  18. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Hematopoietic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the ocular findings in patients with hematopoietic malignancy with optic nerve involvement and abducens nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of all cases of hematopoietic cancer with ophthalmic involvements seen in the Department of Ophthalmology of the National Center for Global Health and Medicine between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Results. Eight patients with hematopoietic cancer with optic nerve invasion or abducens nerve palsy were studied. The primary diseases were 3 cases of multiple myeloma, 1 case of acute lymphocytic leukemia, 1 case of follicular lymphoma, and 3 cases of AIDS-related lymphoma. Six cases had optic nerve invasion, 2 cases had abducens nerve palsy, and 1 case had optic nerve invasion of both eyes. The median visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 0.885 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units. The final visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 1.25 logMAR units, and that of those with sixth-nerve palsy was −0.1 logMAR units. Six cases died during the five-year follow-up period. An ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic cancer, especially AIDS-related lymphoma, was associated with poor prognosis. Conclusion. Because ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic malignancy has a poor prognosis, an early diagnosis of the cancers by the ophthalmologic findings by ophthalmologists could improve the prognosis. PMID:27375913

  19. Quality and safety in pediatric hematology/oncology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brigitta U

    2014-06-01

    Many principles of quality of care and patient safety are at the foundation of pediatric hematology/oncology. However, we still see too many errors, continue to have problems with communication, and the culture in many of our areas is still one of worrying about retribution when mentioning a problem. This review explores why specialists in pediatric hematology/oncology should be leaders in the field of quality and safety in healthcare.

  20. Hematological and hemorheological effects of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Baskurt, O.K.; Levi, E.; Caglayan, S.; Dikmenoglu, N.; Kutman, M.N. )

    1990-07-01

    Selected hematological parameters and erythrocyte deformability indexes for 16 young male military students were compared before and after a period of exposure to heavy pollution. These students lived in Ankara, which has a serious air pollution problem. The mean sulfur dioxide levels measured at a station proximal to the campus where the students lived were 188 micrograms/m3 and 201 micrograms/m3 during first and second measurements, respectively. During the period between the two measurements, the mean sulfur dioxide level was 292 micrograms/m3. Significant erythropoiesis was indicated by increased erythrocyte counts and hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Methemoglobin percentage was increased to 2.37 +/- 0.49% (mean +/- standard error) from 0.51 +/- 0.23%. Sulfhemoglobinemia was present in six subjects after the period of pollution, but it was not present in any student prior to this period. Significant increases in erythrocyte deformability indexes were observed after the period of pollution, i.e., from 1.13 +/- 0.01 to 1.21 +/0 0.02, implying that erythrocytes were less flexible, which might impair tissue perfusion.

  1. Five hematologic tests and treatments to question.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Lisa K; Bering, Harriet; Carson, Kenneth R; Haynes, Adam E; Kleinerman, Judith; Kukreti, Vishal; Ma, Alice; Mueller, Brigitta U; O'Brien, Sarah H; Panepinto, Julie A; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Rajasekhar, Anita; Sarode, Ravi; Wood, William A

    2014-12-01

    Choosing Wisely® is a medical stewardship initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation in collaboration with professional medical societies in the United States. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) released its first Choosing Wisely® list in 2013. Using the same evidence-based methodology as in 2013, ASH has identified 5 additional tests and treatments that should be questioned by clinicians and patients under specific, indicated circumstances. The ASH 2014 Choosing Wisely® recommendations include: (1) do not anticoagulate for more than 3 months in patients experiencing a first venous thromboembolic event in the setting of major, transient risk factors for venous thromboembolism; (2) do not routinely transfuse for chronic anemia or uncomplicated pain crises in patients with sickle cell disease; (3) do not perform baseline or surveillance computed tomography scans in patients with asymptomatic, early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (4) do not test or treat for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia if the clinical pretest probability of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is low; and (5) do not treat patients with immune thrombocytopenia unless they are bleeding or have very low platelet counts. PMID:25696917

  2. Five hematologic tests and treatments to question.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Lisa K; Bering, Harriet; Carson, Kenneth R; Haynes, Adam E; Kleinerman, Judith; Kukreti, Vishal; Ma, Alice; Mueller, Brigitta U; O'Brien, Sarah H; Panepinto, Julie A; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Rajasekhar, Anita; Sarode, Ravi; Wood, William A

    2014-12-01

    Choosing Wisely(®) is a medical stewardship initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation in collaboration with professional medical societies in the United States. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) released its first Choosing Wisely(®) list in 2013. Using the same evidence-based methodology as in 2013, ASH has identified 5 additional tests and treatments that should be questioned by clinicians and patients under specific, indicated circumstances. The ASH 2014 Choosing Wisely(®) recommendations include: (1) do not anticoagulate for more than 3 months in patients experiencing a first venous thromboembolic event in the setting of major, transient risk factors for venous thromboembolism; (2) do not routinely transfuse for chronic anemia or uncomplicated pain crises in patients with sickle cell disease; (3) do not perform baseline or surveillance computed tomography scans in patients with asymptomatic, early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (4) do not test or treat for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia if the clinical pretest probability of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is low; and (5) do not treat patients with immune thrombocytopenia unless they are bleeding or have very low platelet counts. PMID:25472968

  3. Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support

    PubMed Central

    Calvino, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems. PMID:19674592

  4. Parvovirus-B19 and hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Aytaç Elmas, Selin

    2010-12-01

    Parvovirus-B19 (PV-B19) is a member of Parvoviridae, which is one of the smallest DNA viruses. PV-B19-associated diseases usually serve as a good representation of the balance of virus, host response and the immune system. The diseases manifested with PV-B19 are erythema infectiosum, which is common in children, hydrops fetalis, transient pure red cell aplasia in patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, arthralgia - mostly observed in women, and chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Cytopenia (bicytopenia, monocytopenia or pancytopenia) may also accompany the diseases mentioned above. On the other hand, there are many diseases, including neurologic, vasculitic, hepatic, rheumatoid, nephritic, autoimmune, myocardial, and others in which the mechanisms of the diseases are not clear, which may be associated with PV-B19. The virus may manifest with unexpected and unexplained clinical pictures and lead to misdiagnosis. Therefore, hematologic disorders in any unestablished clinical diagnosis should be investigated for PV-B19 infection. However, serologic examination for PV-B19 diagnosis is not sufficient in immunocompromised status. The virus can be determined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the serum or tissue samples. Supportive therapy, blood transfusion and immunoglobulin are the conventional therapeutic interventions for PV-B19 today. Vaccination studies are under examination. PMID:27263735

  5. "Malignant Cutaneous Ulcer".

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Kotwal, Sumedha

    2016-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive malignancy and the rich vascular supply enables it to metastasize early via haematogenous route. Skin lesions are a late manifestation of the disease. Clinicians should be aware of cutaneous presentation of RCC while evaluating a case of unknown primary with skin lesions. PMID:27651705

  6. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Carter M; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A; Choi, Bryan D; Fecci, Peter E; Sampson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  7. Short- and long-term outcomes in onco-hematological patients admitted to the intensive care unit with classic factors of poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Etienne; Cour, Martin; Jahandiez, Vincent; Grateau, Adeline; Baudry, Thomas; Hernu, Romain; Simon, Marie; Robert, Jean-Michel; Michallet, Mauricette; Argaud, Laurent

    2016-04-19

    Although the overall mortality of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with hematological malignancy has decreased over the years, some groups of patients still have low survival rates. We performed a monocentric retrospective study including all patients with hematological malignancy in a ten-year period, to identify factors related to the outcome for the whole cohort and for patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), neutropenia, or those requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). A total of 418 patients with acute leukemia (n=239; 57%), myeloma (n=69; 17%), and lymphoma (n=53; 13%) were studied. Day-28 and 1-year mortality were 49% and 72%, respectively. The type of disease was not associated with outcome. The disease status was independentlty associated with 1-year mortality only. Independent predictors of day-28 mortality were IMV, renal replacement therapy (RRT), and performance status. For allogeneic HSCT recipients (n=116), neutropenic patients (n=124) and patients requiring IMV (n=196), day-28 and 1-year mortality were 52%, 54%, 74% and 81%, 78%, 87%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that IMV and RRT for allogeneic HSCT recipients, performance status and IMV for neutropenic patients, and RRT for patients requiring IMV were independently associated with short-term mortality (p<0.05).These results suggest that IMV is the strongest predictor of mortality in hematological patients admitted to ICUs, whereas allogeneic HSCT and neutropenia do not worsen their short-term outcome. PMID:26968953

  8. Short- and long-term outcomes in onco-hematological patients admitted to the intensive care unit with classic factors of poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Etienne; Cour, Martin; Jahandiez, Vincent; Grateau, Adeline; Baudry, Thomas; Hernu, Romain; Simon, Marie; Robert, Jean-michel; Michallet, Mauricette; Argaud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Although the overall mortality of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with hematological malignancy has decreased over the years, some groups of patients still have low survival rates. We performed a monocentric retrospective study including all patients with hematological malignancy in a ten-year period, to identify factors related to the outcome for the whole cohort and for patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), neutropenia, or those requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). A total of 418 patients with acute leukemia (n=239; 57%), myeloma (n=69; 17%), and lymphoma (n=53; 13%) were studied. Day-28 and 1-year mortality were 49% and 72%, respectively. The type of disease was not associated with outcome. The disease status was independentlty associated with 1-year mortality only. Independent predictors of day-28 mortality were IMV, renal replacement therapy (RRT), and performance status. For allogeneic HSCT recipients (n=116), neutropenic patients (n=124) and patients requiring IMV (n=196), day-28 and 1-year mortality were 52%, 54%, 74% and 81%, 78%, 87%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that IMV and RRT for allogeneic HSCT recipients, performance status and IMV for neutropenic patients, and RRT for patients requiring IMV were independently associated with short-term mortality (p<0.05). These results suggest that IMV is the strongest predictor of mortality in hematological patients admitted to ICUs, whereas allogeneic HSCT and neutropenia do not worsen their short-term outcome. PMID:26968953

  9. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript in your browser. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  10. De Novo Malignancy Post Liver Transplantation: A Single Center, Population Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Hemant; Berman, Kenneth; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Slaven, James; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A Joseph; Chalasani, Naga; Ghabril, Marwan

    2013-01-01

    Background With the growing numbers of liver transplant recipients, it is increasingly important to understand the risks of de novo malignancy after liver transplantation. Aim To characterize the incidence of de novo malignancy after liver transplantation compared to a control non-transplant population. Methods We studied 534 Indiana state residents undergoing liver transplantation at our center between 1997 and 2004, followed through August 2010 The incidence and predictors of malignancy were determined. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of cancer in our cohort was compared to age, gender and period matched state population using the Indiana State Cancer Registry. Results After a mean follow up of 5.7 ± 3.2 years, 73 patients (13.7%) developed 80 cancers, with 5 and 10 year incidence rates of 11.7%, and 24.8%, respectively. These included 24 (30%) skin, 16 (20%) hematologic and 40 (50%) solid tumors. The most common solid cancers were aerodigestive. Compared to matched state population, liver transplant recipients had significantly higher incidence of all cancers (SIR:3.1, 95%CI:2.9–3.2), skin (melanoma) (SIR:5.8, 95%CI:4.7–7.0), hematologic (SIR:7.1, 95%CI:6.3–8.0), and solid (SIR:2.7, 95%CI:2.5–2.8) tumors. Conclusion There is a significantly increased risk of de novo malignancies after liver transplantation, highlighting the need for surveillance strategies in this population. PMID:23808800

  11. Npm1 is a haploinsufficient suppressor of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sportoletti, Paolo; Grisendi, Silvia; Majid, Samia M; Cheng, Ke; Clohessy, John G; Viale, Agnes; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2008-04-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene has been heavily implicated in cancer pathogenesis both as a putative proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor gene. NPM1 is the most frequently mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), while deletion of 5q, where NPM1 maps, is frequent in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We have previously shown that mice heterozygous for Npm1 (Npm1+/-) develop a hematologic syndrome with features of human MDS. Here we analyzed Npm1+/- mutants to determine their susceptibility to cancer. Npm1+/- mice displayed a greater propensity to develop malignancies compared with Npm1+/+ mice. The Npm1+/- cohort frequently developed hematologic malignancies of both myeloid and lymphoid origin with myeloid malignancies displaying the highest incidence. Malignant cells retained the wild-type allele with normal localization and expression of Npm1 at the protein level, suggesting that complete Npm1 loss is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis. Our results conclusively demonstrate that Npm1 acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in the hematopoietic compartment.

  12. Metabolic syndrome in patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Annaloro, Claudio; Airaghi, Lorena; Saporiti, Giorgia; Onida, Francesco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2012-08-01

    The term metabolic syndrome (MS) defines a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, formerly known as syndrome X. There is some debate about the diagnostic criteria; but the most widely accepted framework is that defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, which requires the simultaneous occurrence of at least three of abdominal obesity, arterial hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertrigliceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The prevalence of MS increases with age and varies depending on genetic factors. An abnormally high prevalence has been observed in patients with heterogeneous conditions, such as solid organ transplant recipients, AIDS patients and long-term cancer survivors. As some of the pathogenetic factors possibly involved include cyclosporine A, corticosteroids and cancer chemoradiotherapy, it is possible that MS may also be a complication in hematological patients. Some of the characteristics of MS have been reported with a certain frequency in thalassemia patients, and are mainly attributed to iron overload. Impaired hemostasis is a feature of MS rather than a factor predisposing to its development. In oncohematology, an abnormally high prevalence of MS features has been observed in survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In addition to corticosteroid- and cancer therapy-related hypogonadism, hypothyroidism and defective growth hormone incretion are other factors related to the development of MS. Moreover, the highest frequency of MS is observed in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Pediatric patients and allogeneic HSCT recipients have been the subject of foremost investigations; but adult patients and autologous HSCT recipients have also been studied more recently. A wide range of factors may contribute to the development of MS in HSCT recipients. Unfortunately, the real entity of the problem is far from clear because of the retrospective design of

  13. Virtual microscopy:applications to hematology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szu-Hee

    2005-01-01

    Virtual microscopy is the simulation of microscopy over a computer network. A virtual slide is a giant digital image file of a glass slide that can be displayed, panned, zoomed, and focused in a virtual slide viewer on a computer screen. Virtual slides represent a revolutionary advance over glass slides. They are easy to file, store, retrieve, annotate, and mark and can be preserved indefinitely. Furthermore, they are easy to duplicate and distribute and can be integrated into electronic patient records. Large virtual slides can be readily transmitted to users over a standard broadband connection. With the recent introduction of viewers that can focus virtual slides, virtual microscopy can simulate all the functions of real microscopy. Virtual microscopy has significant advantages over real microscopy in education and in proficiency testing. In education, virtual microscopy enables "anytime, anywhere" learning and has been favorably received by students and teachers. In proficiency surveys, all users view the same image, virtual slides are easy to distribute, and the slides do not deteriorate. Potential applications for hematology proficiency surveys include blood and bone marrow morphology, differential cell counts, cytochemistry and immunocytochemistry, detection of malarial parasites, and other tests. Virtual microscopy enables proficiency surveys of critical clinical parameters, such as the bone marrow blast count, and implementation of "locate and identify" exercises. It is conceivable that with the next generation of technological developments, virtual microscopy can be extended to diagnostic applications. Important goals are to minimize slide file size without loss of relevant detail, to establish diagnostic equivalence, and to automate virtual slide capture with high throughput for integration into laboratory information systems. Key factors that will drive implementation include user-friendliness, cost, data storage requirements, and throughput speed

  14. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  15. Metastatic malignant chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W B; Mankin, H J

    1996-12-01

    A case of malignant chondroblastoma with metastases is reported. The patient initially presented with a lytic lesion in his left pubic ramus. He was treated with curettage, but the lesion recurred 3 years later. After repeated curettage, radiation therapy, and the late development of multiple bone and soft-tissue metastases, he succumbed to his disease 13 years after diagnosis. The surgical pathology from each of his several procedures was reviewed. Although no definite malignant transformation was apparent, a metastatic deposit curetted 3 months prior to death showed some increase in mitotic activity. Flow cytometry of specimens from the patient's first local recurrence and a late distant metastasis was performed and revealed the interval development of a minor aneuploid peak between the two samples. This fatal chondroblastoma is the only one in our series of 80 patients treated over the past 25 years. PMID:9001683

  16. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Mayhall, Kim; Maxwell, Nicole M.; Kandil, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Both intracellular and extracellular Nampt (iNampt and eNampt) levels are increased in several human malignancies and some studies demonstrate increased iNampt in more aggressive/invasive tumors and in tumor metastases. Several different molecular targets have been identified that promote carcinogenesis following iNampt overexpression, including SirT1, CtBP, and PARP-1. Additionally, eNampt is elevated in several human cancers and is often associated with a higher tumor stage and worse prognoses. Here we review the roles of Nampt in malignancy, some of the known mechanisms by which it promotes carcinogenesis, and discuss the possibility of employing Nampt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:24386506

  17. Lymphoscintigraphy in malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, C.G.; Norman, J.; Cruse, C.W.; Reintgen, D.S.; Clark, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The development and rationale for the use of lymphoscintigraphy in the preoperative evaluation of patients with malignant melanoma being considered for elective lymph node dissection is reviewed. This overview is updated by an analysis of 135 patients with early stage malignant melanoma involving the head, neck, shoulders, and trunk at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida (Tampa, FL). High discordancy rates (overall, 41%) were seen between drainage patterns predicted from historical anatomical guidelines and those revealed by the lymphoscintigraphic examination. The high discordancy rate was most pronounced in the head (64%) and the neck (73%). Surgical management was changed in 33% of the patients, overall. A preoperative lymphoscintigram is recommended for all patients with melanoma with head, neck, and truncal lesions evaluated for elective lymph node dissection as the lymphatic drainage patterns are often unpredictable and variable.

  18. Asbestos-related malignancy.

    PubMed

    Talcott, J A; Antman, K H

    1988-01-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. A description of the processes through which compensation claims for asbestos-associated malignancies are evaluated illustrates for physicians the legal system's approach to possible injury from toxic substances. The differences between scientific and legal reasoning about the causes of diseases with long latency

  19. Asbestos-related malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, J.A.; Antman, K.H.

    1988-05-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. 179 references.

  20. Hematological and liver toxicity of anti-tuberculosis drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirlohi, Maryam-Sadat; Ekrami, Alireza; Shirali, Saeed; Ghobeishavi, Mehdi; Pourmotahari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, and anti-tuberculosis drugs can cause severe adverse reactions. The aim of this study was to determine hematological and biochemical changes and associated risk factors in smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients undergoing treatment with standard protocols. Methods In a descriptive study, a total of 40 tuberculosis patients aged between 15–60 years were collected from hospitals in Khuzestan Province (Iran) from March 2013 to March 2014. The patients were treated with drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide) during the initial two months, followed by isoniazid and rifampicin for the next four to six months. Activities of liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and ALP) and hematological parameters were recorded before and after treatment. Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and Wilcoxon test by SPSS 16. Results After using drug treatments, hematological parameters (RBC, Hb, HCT, MCV, MCH, and MCHC), except platelet count, were changed significantly (p ≤ 0.001). Liver enzyme activities (ALT, AST, and ALP) were decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) after treatment. Conclusion In this study, changes of hematological and biochemical parameters have been observed in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. It can be concluded that the anti-tuberculosis treatment is associated with changes of hematological parameters and liver enzymes. PMID:27790357

  1. The American Society of Hematology: a success at age 50.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Ernst R; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The American Society of Hematology (ASH) turns 50 years old in 2008, and we have much to celebrate. Over those years the Society established its principles: to promote both the art and science of hematology and to hold a high-quality Educational Meeting. ASH membership has grown from a few hundred curious attendees at a planning meeting in 1957 to more than 15,000 members today, and the annual meeting has grown from a scientific session of 5 papers at the planning meeting to more than 500 oral presentations and nearly 2,500 poster presentations at the 2007 meeting. The modern ASH promotes cutting-edge science, sponsors research by scholars from all over the globe, helps train the next generation of clinician-scientists, lobbies Congress and several other governmental agencies on behalf of its clinician and scientist members, and publishes the foremost scholarly journal in the field of hematology, Blood, designed to provide its readership with timely reviews, expert opinion on clinical hematology, practice-changing clinical trials, and insightful basic science. The next 50 years of ASH are likely to see many profound changes, but one thing is almost certain-our dedication to fostering clinical and scientific excellence in hematology will continue as the Society's raison d'etre.

  2. Application of J-Aggregate Monolayers in Silica Encapsulated SERS Nanoprobes for Immunophenotyping of B-cell Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Byron

    Immunophenotyping is indispensable in studying B-cell malignancies as the cell surface markers on malignant cells provide critical information for the diagnosis, treatment decisions and prognosis of the disease. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) nanoprobes as an alternative optical label have been explored as they may overcome limitations of fluorescent labels through their naturally sharper spectral bands and resistance to photobleaching. In this project, we demonstrate the successful labelling of lymphoma cells with rituximab-anti-CD20 functionalized silica-encapsulated J-aggregate SERS gold nanoparticles -- these particles represent the brightest of their kind thus far. Additionally, we demonstrate that the Raman signal on cells labelled with our particles is not affected by treatment with two hematological stains: hematoxylin and methylene blue; although two others: Giemsa and eosin mask the Raman spectra with intense fluorescence. These results support the potential of simultaneously using hematological stains with SERS nanoprobes for visualizing B-cells.

  3. A Quasi-Experimental Study Analyzing the Effectiveness of Portable High-Efficiency Particulate Absorption Filters in Preventing Infections in Hematology Patients during Construction

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Gülden; Coşkun, Belgin; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Öztürk, Bengi; Gündüz, Mehmet; Atilla, Erden; Arslan, Önder; Özcan, Muhit; Demirer, Taner; İlhan, Osman; Konuk, Nahide; Balık, İsmail; Gürman, Günhan; Akan, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The increased risk of infection for patients caused by construction and renovation near hematology inpatient clinics is a major concern. The use of high-efficiency particulate absorption (HEPA) filters can reduce the risk of infection. However, there is no standard protocol indicating the use of HEPA filters for patients with hematological malignancies, except for those who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This quasi-experimental study was designed to measure the efficacy of HEPA filters in preventing infections during construction. Materials and Methods: Portable HEPA filters were placed in the rooms of patients undergoing treatment for hematological malignancies because of large-scale construction taking place near the hematology clinic. The rates of infection during the 6 months before and after the installation of the portable HEPA filters were compared. A total of 413 patients were treated during this 1-year period. Results: There were no significant differences in the antifungal prophylaxis and treatment regimens between the groups. The rates of infections, clinically documented infections, and invasive fungal infections decreased in all of the patients following the installation of the HEPA filters. When analyzed separately, the rates of invasive fungal infections were similar before and after the installation of HEPA filters in patients who had no neutropenia or long neutropenia duration. HEPA filters were significantly protective against infection when installed in the rooms of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, patients who were undergoing consolidation treatment, and patients who were neutropenic for 1-14 days. Conclusion: Despite the advent of construction and the summer season, during which environmental Aspergillus contamination is more prevalent, no patient or patient subgroup experienced an increase in fungal infections following the installation of HEPA filters. The protective effect of HEPA

  4. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Nunes, Adauto L V; Rameh-de-Albuquerque, Luciana C; Sant'Anna, Sávio S; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    The hyacinth macaw (Anodorhyncus hyacinthinus), considered the largest psittacine bird species in the world, is an endangered species, with a remaining population of approximately 6500 birds in the wild. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to verify differences related to sex, samples from 29 hyacinth macaws (14 males, 15 females) were obtained from birds apprehended from illegal wildlife trade and subsequently housed at the Sorocaba Zoo, Brazil. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Compared with published reference values, differences were found in mean concentrations of total red blood cell count, corpuscular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin level, total white blood cell count, aspartate aminotransferase level, creatine kinase concentration, alkaline phosphatase concentration, and phosphorus level. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this endangered species in captivity or rehabilitation centers.

  5. Environmentally-Induced Malignancies: An In Vivo Model to Evaluate the Health Impact of Chemicals in Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Pallavicini

    2001-05-04

    Occupational and environmental exposure to organic ligands, solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls are linked with increased risk of hematologic malignancies. DOE facilities and waste sites in the U.S. are contaminated with mixtures of potentially hazardous chemicals such as metals, organic ligands, solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and radioactive isotopes. A major goal of this project was to establish linkage between chemical/radiation exposure and induction of genomic damage in target populations with the capability to undergo transformation.

  6. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (≥5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=−0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve

  7. Anesthesia in the pregnant patient with hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lorraine; Farber, Michaela K; Camann, William R

    2011-04-01

    The management of patients with hematologic disorders in pregnancy involves a multidisciplinary approach involving specialists from hematology, obstetrics, and anesthesiology. Whereas regional anesthesia has led to a decline in maternal morbidity and mortality, the presence of uncorrected coagulopathy or the use of anticoagulant or antithrombotic medications pose a special risk for the rare complication of an epidural hematoma after neuraxial anesthesia. This article briefly reviews the common principles of anesthesia for obstetric patients, provides an obstetric anesthesiologist's perspective on the implications of regional anesthesia in obstetrics, and enhances communication between the specialties. PMID:21444039

  8. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and lymphoid malignancies in Dominica: a seroprevalence study.

    PubMed

    Adedayo, Olayinka A; Shehu, Sani M

    2004-12-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in certain regions of the world where it is associated with lymphoid malignancies. Herein we aim to describe the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 in lymphoid malignancies in Dominica. We carried out a 10-year retrospective study of histologically proven hematologic malignancies and HTLV-1 seropositivity at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Dominica. Ninety-eight cases were reviewed (59% males, 41% females), ranging in age from 3 to 91 years. HTLV-1 was seropositive in 38.6% (31/80) of all hematologic malignancies. Three of 6 cases of Hodgkin disease (50%), 16 of 36 (44.4%) of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 3 out of 8 unclassified lymphomas (37.5%) were seropositive; all 6 cases (100%) of acute adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) were seropositive. One case each of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloproliferative disorder was seropositive. HTLV-1-seropositive lymphomas presented at a younger age than did seronegative cases. Thus, HTLV-1 is significantly associated with lymphoid malignancies in Dominica, and further studies are needed before a causal relationship with Hodgkin disease can be established.

  9. Guidelines on the use of intravenous immune globulin for hematologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David; Ali, Kaiser; Blanchette, Victor; Brouwers, Melissa; Couban, Stephen; Radmoor, Paula; Huebsch, Lothar; Hume, Heather; McLeod, Anne; Meyer, Ralph; Moltzan, Catherine; Nahirniak, Susan; Nantel, Stephen; Pineo, Graham; Rock, Gail

    2007-04-01

    Canada's per capita use of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) grew by approximately 115% between 1998 and 2006, making Canada one of the world's highest per capita users of IVIG. It is believed that most of this growth is attributable to off-label usage. To help ensure IVIG use is in keeping with an evidence-based approach to the practice of medicine, the National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products of Canada (NAC) and Canadian Blood Services convened a panel of national experts to develop an evidence-based practice guideline on the use of IVIG for hematologic conditions. The mandate of the expert panel was to review evidence regarding use of IVIG for 18 hematologic conditions and formulate recommendations on IVIG use for each. A panel of 13 clinical experts and 1 expert in practice guideline development met to review the evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations for the use of IVIG. The primary sources used by the panel were 3 recent evidence-based reviews. Recommendations were based on interpretation of the available evidence and where evidence was lacking, consensus of expert clinical opinion. A draft of the practice guideline was circulated to hematologists in Canada for feedback. The results of this process were reviewed by the expert panel, and modifications to the draft guideline were made where appropriate. This practice guideline will provide the NAC with a basis for making recommendations to provincial and territorial health ministries regarding IVIG use management. Specific recommendations for routine use of IVIG were made for 7 conditions including acquired red cell aplasia; acquired hypogammaglobulinemia (secondary to malignancy); fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; hemolytic disease of the newborn; HIV-associated thrombocytopenia; idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura; and posttransfusion purpura. Intravenous immune globulin was not recommended for use, except under certain life-threatening circumstances, for 8 conditions

  10. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  11. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  12. MicroRNAs in B-cells: from normal differentiation to treatment of malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Sara Correia; Laursen, Maria Bach; Bødker, Julie Støve; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Falgreen, Steffen; Schmitz, Alexander; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkaer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in a wide range of biological processes. They are fundamental to the normal development of cells, and evidence suggests that the deregulation of specific miRNAs is involved in malignant transformation due to their function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. We know that miRNAs are involved in the development of normal B-cells and that different B-cell subsets express specific miRNA profiles according to their degree of differentiation. B-cell-derived malignancies contain transcription signatures reminiscent of their cell of origin. Therefore, we believe that normal and malignant B-cells share features of regulatory networks controlling differentiation and the ability to respond to treatment. The involvement of miRNAs in these processes makes them good biomarker candidates. B-cell malignancies are highly prevalent, and the poor overall survival of patients with these malignancies demands an improvement in stratification according to prognosis and therapy response, wherein we believe miRNAs may be of great importance. We have critically reviewed the literature, and here we sum up the findings of miRNA studies in hematological cancers, from the development and progression of the disease to the response to treatment, with a particular emphasis on B-cell malignancies. PMID:25622103

  13. 78 FR 63997 - Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating Committee; Urology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating Committee; Urology Subcommittee Workshop SUMMARY: The Urology Subcommittee of the Kidney, Urologic.... Tamara Bavendam, Co-Chair, Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating...

  14. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES ALTERS HEMATOLOGIC INDICES IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Descriptions of changes in hematological indices have contested the premise that the biological effects of suspended particulate matter (PM) are restricted to the lung. Employing approximately 40 hematologic parameters reflecting blood cells, chemistries, mediators, and coagulati...

  15. Hypercalcemia of malignancy and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Hillel; Glezerman, Ilya G

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy affects up to one in five cancer patients during the course of their disease. It is associated with both liquid malignancies, commonly multiple myeloma, leukemia, and non-Hodgkins lymphoma and solid cancers, particularly breast and renal carcinomas as well as squamous cell carcinomas of any organ. The clinical manifestations of hypercalcemia are generally constitutional in nature and not specific to the inciting malignancy. Such physical manifestations can range from malaise to lethargy and confusion. Constipation and anorexia are common. Acute kidney injury is likely the most frequently encountered manifestation of end organ damage. Symptomatology is closely linked to both the absolute elevation of serum calcium levels and the rapidity of calcium rise. The majority of cases are humoral in etiology and related to parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Approximately 20% of cases are the result of direct bone metastasis with extra-renal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) and ectopic parathyroid hormone production likely accounting for less than 1% of cases. The diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy is confirmed either by an elevated PTHrP or by an evidence of bone metastasis in the appropriate clinical setting. Treatment is predicated on the patient's symptoms and absolute serum calcium level. Interventions are aimed at lowering the serum calcium concentration by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing urinary calcium excretion, the former accomplished via bisphosphonate therapy and the latter with aggressive hydration. Novel therapies for refractory disease include denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand, and the calcimimetic cinacalcet. Finally, anti-PTHrP antibodies have been successfully deployed in animal models of disease. Despite the efficacy of the above therapies, hypercalcemia of malignancy portends an ominous prognosis, indicating advanced and often refractory

  16. Pleural malignancies including mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, G

    1995-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is caused almost exclusively by occupational exposure to asbestos. During the past few years, however, increasing evidence has mounted that background exposure to asbestos could be sufficient to cause mesothelioma. Treatment of malignant mesothelioma remains a big problem. Some new approaches are on their way, and the most exciting ones are local immunotherapy in very early cases. Some success has been reported with local interferon treatment. As for treatment of metastatic pleural disease, the main purpose is symptomatic relief of dyspnea caused by fluid accumulation. The best way to achieve a lasting palliation is pleurodesis, and the most common way to do this, is by chemical means. The drug of choice in the United States has for many years been tetracycline, but since injectable tetracycline is no longer available, some substitute must be found. The substance that will "win" is not yet clear, but the two leading contestants are talc and doxycycline. Bleomycin also has its supporters, and a dark horse is quinacrine, which although not easily available in the United States, has been used in many European centers for decades. PMID:9363074

  17. Malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Boutin, C; Schlesser, M; Frenay, C; Astoul, P

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has risen for some decades and is expected to peak between 2010 and 2020. Up to now, no single treatment has been proven to be effective and death usually occurs within about 12-17 months after diagnosis. Perhaps because of this poor prognosis, early screening has incited little interest. However, certain forms may have a better prognosis when diagnosed early and treated by multimodal therapy or intrapleural immunotherapy. Diagnosis depends foremost on histological analysis of samples obtained by thoracoscopy. This procedure allows the best staging of the pleural cavity with an attempt to detect visceral pleural involvement, which is one of the most important prognostic factors. Although radiotherapy seems necessary and is efficient in preventing the malignant seeding after diagnostic procedures in patients, there has been no randomized phase III study showing the superiority of any treatment compared with another. However, for the early-stage disease (stage I) a logical therapeutic approach seems to be neoadjuvant intrapleural treatment using cytokines. For more advanced disease (stages II and III) resectability should be discussed with the thoracic surgeons and a multimodal treatment combining surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy should be proposed for a randomized controlled study. Palliative treatment is indicated for stage IV. In any case, each patient should be enrolled in a clinical trial.

  18. 78 FR 69324 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Hematological Disorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... revise the criteria in the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate cases involving... the Federal eRulemaking portal at http://www.regulations.gov , or in person, during regular business... hematological disorders. For example: \\1\\ (50 FR 50068) \\2\\ We published some revisions to the...

  19. Hematological Adverse Events in Clozapine-Treated Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbino-Rosen, Ginny; Roofeh, David; Tompkins, D. Andrew; Feryo, Doug; Nusser, Laurie; Kranzler, Harvey; Napolitano, Barbara; Frederickson, Anne; Henderson, Inika; Rhinewine, Joe; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively examine rates of hematological adverse events (HAEs) in psychiatrically ill, hospitalized children treated with clozapine. Method: Clozapine treatment was administered in an open-label fashion using a flexible titration schedule, and data from weekly complete blood counts was obtained. The rate of neutropenia and…

  20. C-src Enriched Serum Microvesicles Are Generated in Malignant Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

    PubMed Central

    Zendrini, Andrea; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Caimi, Luigi; Ricotta, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are immunosecretory disorders that can lead to hematological malignancies such as Multiple Myeloma (MM). MM accounts for 15% of all hematologic cancers, and those diagnosed with MM typically become severely ill and have a low life expectancy. Monoclonal immunoglobulin Free Light Chains (FLC) are present in the serum and urine of many patients with plasma cell diseases. The biological differences between monoclonal FLCs, produced under malignant or benign dyscrasias, has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we show that endothelial and heart muscle cell lines internalize kappa and lambda FLCs. After internalization, FLCs are rerouted in the extracellular space via microvesicles and exosomes that can be re-internalized in contiguous cells. Only FLCs secreted from malignant B Lymphocytes were carried in Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src positive vesicles. In both MM and AL Amyloidosis patients we observed an increase in microvesicle and exosome production. Isolated serum vesicles from MM, AL Amyloidosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients contained FLCs. Furthermore MM and AL amyloidosis vesicles were strongly positive for Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src compared to MGUS and control patients. These are the first data implying that FLCs reroute via microvesicles in the blood stream, and also suggest a potential novel mechanism of c-src activation in plasma cell dyscrasia. PMID:23940647

  1. Immunization practices in acute lymphocytic leukemia and post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant in Canadian Pediatric Hematology/Oncology centers.

    PubMed

    Top, Karina A; Pham-Huy, Anne; Price, Victoria; Sung, Lillian; Tran, Dat; Vaudry, Wendy; Halperin, Scott A; De Serres, Gaston

    2016-04-01

    There are no Canadian immunization guidelines for children treated for malignancy. Guidelines do exist for patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), but they provide broad timeframes for initiating vaccination; there is no standard schedule. The optimal approach to immunization in these populations is unclear. We sought to describe immunization practices at Canadian Pediatric Hematology/Oncology centers. A 43-item online questionnaire was distributed to the 16 programs in the C(17) research network of pediatric hematology/oncology centers to capture information on timing and criteria for immunization of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and those who have undergone HSCT. At each center, 1-2 physicians or pharmacists completed the survey to reflect center-wide immunization practices. Responses were received from 11/16 (69%) programs; 11 respondents reported on practices for patients with ALL and 9 reported on practices for patients who are post-HSCT. In 5/11 ALL programs (45%) re-immunization is recommended routinely after chemotherapy, starting 3-6 months post-chemotherapy. In HSCT programs, timing of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV) varied from 3 months post-HSCT (4 programs) to 12 months post-HSCT (4 programs). Live vaccines were administered 24 months post-HSCT in 8/9 programs. All HSCT programs considered graft-versus-host-disease and 7 considered discontinuation of immunosuppression in immunization decisions. Pediatric hematology/oncology programs were divided in regards to re-immunization of patients with ALL post-chemotherapy. After HSCT, timing of PCV administration varied, with 4 programs initiating immunization later than Canadian guidelines recommend (3-9 months post-HSCT). These findings suggest a need to standardize immunization practices in these populations.

  2. [A combined consecutive therapy with fosfomycin and sulbactam/cefoperazone for bacterial infections associated with hematological diseases].

    PubMed

    Misawa, S; Tsuda, S; Taniwaki, M; Horiike, S; Ariyama, Y; Hirakawa, K; Ueda, Y; Kaneko, H; Nakao, M; Kashima, K

    1995-04-01

    A combination antibacterial therapy with fosfomycin (FOM) and sulbactam/cefoperazone (SBT/CPZ) was applied to 78 patients with severe infections associated with hematological diseases. In this protocol, FOM was followed by SBT/CPZ and each drug was administered for 1 hour intravenously and consecutively. Among 72 evaluable patients, 43 patients had acute leukemia, myeloblastic or lymphoblastic, 22 had malignant lymphoma, 3 had multiple myeloma, and 4 had other hematological diseases as underlying diseases. Bacterial infections diagnosed were sepsis in 21 patients, suspected sepsis in 47, and other infections in 4. The overall efficacy rate of this treatment was 72.2%, and those for individual infections were 66.7% for sepsis, 74.5% for suspected sepsis, and 75.0% for other infectious diseases. Among 22 bacteria separated from patients with sepsis, 78.6% (11/14 strains) were eradicated by this treatment. This protocol was also effective in 57.1% (8/14) of patients whose granulocyte count was less than 100/mm3 during the course of treatment as well as in 83.3% (15/18) of patients with granulocyte count over 500/mm3. There was no difference in effectiveness between those patients to whom G-CSF was administered and those to whom it was not (17/24, 70.8% vs 35/48, 72.9%). As an adverse reaction, a transient increase of GOT and/or GPT was observed in 2 patients (2.8%). The consecutive administration treatment of FOM and SBT/CPZ is thus an effective and safe regimen for the treatment of patients with hematological diseases complicated by severe infections.

  3. Novel immunotherapies in lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Matsuki, Eri; Brentjens, Renier J.; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The success of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies provided proof-of-principle for exploiting the immune system therapeutically. Since the FDA approval of rituximab in 1997, several novel strategies that harness the ability of T cells to target cancer cells have emerged. Reflecting on the promising clinical efficacy of these novel immunotherapy approaches, the FDA has recently granted ‘breakthrough’ designation to three novel treatments with distinct mechanisms. First, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is promising for the treatment of adult and paediatric relapsed and/or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Second, blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody, is now approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia-chromosome-negative relapsed and/or refractory B-precursor ALL. Finally, the monoclonal antibody nivolumab, which targets the PD-1 immune-checkpoint receptor with high affinity, is used for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma following treatment failure with autologous-stem-cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin. Herein, we review the background and development of these three distinct immunotherapy platforms, address the scientific advances in understanding the mechanism of action of each therapy, and assess the current clinical knowledge of their efficacy and safety. We also discuss future strategies to improve these immunotherapies through enhanced engineering, biomarker selection, and mechanism-based combination regimens. PMID:26525683

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of Gram-negative bacilli causing blood stream infection in patients with malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Fawzia E.; Bukhari, Elham E.; Badr, Mona; Alrabiaa, Abdulkarim A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the epidemiology, risk factors, and antibiotic resistance of Gram negative bacteria (GNB) in patients with hematologic or solid organ malignancies. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 61 episodes of GNB bacteremia occurring in 56 patients with malignancy admitted to the Oncology Units in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period from January 2013 to October 2015. Data were retrieved from the computerized database of the microbiology laboratory and the patient’s medical records. Results: Hematological malignancies accounted for 30 (54%) and solid tumors accounted for 26 (46%). The most common hematological malignancies were leukemia 23 (77%), followed by lymphoma 6 (20%). Among solid tumors, colorectal cancer 9 (34.6) and breast cancer 6 (23%) were the most common. The most predominant pathogen was Escherichia coli (E. coli) (29.5%) followed by Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (18%). The extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producers rate of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumonia was (34.6%). Imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa/A. baumannii was high (52.4%). The multi-resistant organisms rate was (43.5%). Risk factors associated with the bacteremia were ICU admission (32.1%), post-surgery (23.2%), and placement of central line (21.4%). The overall 30-day mortality rate of the studied population was high (32.1%). Conclusion: In light of the high resistant rate among the GNB isolated from malignancy patients from our institution, careful selection of antimicrobial treatment based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing is recommended. PMID:27570854

  5. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ingall, T J; Tennant, C

    1986-11-01

    The neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a relatively rare but potentially fatal complication of the use of major tranquillizers; mortality may be as high as 20%. The syndrome is manifest by the onset of hyperpyrexia, muscular rigidity and tremor, impaired consciousness and autonomic dysfunction. The pathophysiology is thought to be by way of dopamine receptor blockade. The syndrome is managed by cessation of the neuroleptic medication, by supportive measures and by instituting treatment with one or more of a number of specific drugs whose use is based on theoretical considerations rather than empirical evidence of efficacy; these drugs include anticholinergics, L-dopa, bromocriptine amantidine and dantrolene sodium. Although not proven, early recognition and treatment may reduce both the mortality and the longer term morbidity of this syndrome. PMID:3773831

  6. Primary pineal malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cedeño Diaz, Oderay Mabel; Leal, Roberto García; La Cruz Pelea, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Primary pineal malignant melanoma is a rare entity, with only thirteen cases reported in the world literature to date. We report a case of a 70-year-old man, who consulted with gait disturbance of six months duration, associated in the last month with dizziness, visual abnormalities and diplopia. No other additional melanocytic lesions were found elsewhere. The magnetic resonance showed a 25 mm expansive mass in the pineal gland that was associated with hydrocephaly, ventricular and transependimary oedema. The lesion was partially excised by a supracerebellar infratentorial approach. The histological examination revealed a melanoma. The patient received radiation therapy, but died of disease 16 weeks later. We herein review the literature on this rare tumour and comment on its clinical, radiological and histopathological features and differential diagnosis. PMID:24765293

  7. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  8. Impact of length of cryopreservation and origin of cord blood units on hematologic recovery following cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurita, N; Frassoni, F; Chiba, S; Podestà, M

    2015-06-01

    As the history of the cord blood banking system has lengthened, the number of cord blood units (CBUs) cryopreserved for years has increased. The global expansion of cord blood banking resulted in active international exchange of CBUs. To determine whether long-term cryopreservation and international shipment of CBUs affect the quality of the units and outcome after transplantation, we retrospectively analyzed the quality of 95 CBUs and the hematologic recovery of 127 patients with hematological malignancy following single-unit cord blood transplantation. Of the 127 CBUs used to transplant, 42 units were cryopreserved for long periods (5-11.8 years), and 44 units were shipped from distant countries. We found that length of cryopreservation and origin of CBUs did not affect the ratio of viable total-nucleated cells after thawing. Also, neutrophil engraftment was not affected by long-term cryopreservation (> 5 years) or origin (from distant countries), (hazard ratio, 0.91 and 1.2; P=0.65 and 0.41; respectively). The number of CD34(+) cells before freezing (> 1.4 cells/kg recipient) was the only factor that enhanced neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.8; P<0.01). This suggests that length of cryopreservation and origin need not be prioritized over the CD34(+) cell dose when selecting CBUs.

  9. Molecular and clinical profiles of syndecan-1 in solid and hematological cancer for prognosis and precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Mohamed R.; Nagpal, Poonam; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Prabhu, Sathyen A.; Gliksman, Matthew; Tai, Betty; Hatipoglu, Ahmet; Goy, Andre; Suh, K. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (SDC1, CD138) is a key cell surface adhesion molecule essential for maintaining cell morphology and interaction with the surrounding microenvironment. Deregulation of SDC1 contributes to cancer progression by promoting cell proliferation, metastasis, invasion and angiogenesis, and is associated with relapse through chemoresistance. SDC1 expression level is also associated with responses to chemotherapy and with prognosis in multiple solid and hematological cancers, including multiple myeloma and Hodgkin lymphoma. At the tissue level, the expression levels of SDC1 and the released extracellular domain of SDC1 correlate with tumor malignancy, phenotype, and metastatic potential for both solid and hematological tumors in a tissue-specific manner. The SDC1 expression profile varies among cancer types, but the differential expression signatures between normal and cancer cells in epithelial and stromal compartments are directly associated with aggressiveness of tumors and patient's clinical outcome and survival. Therefore, relevant biomarkers of SDC signaling may be useful for selecting patients that would most likely respond to a particular therapy at the time of diagnosis or perhaps for predicting relapse. In addition, the reciprocal expression signature of SDC between tumor epithelial and stromal compartments may have synergistic value for patient selection and the prediction of clinical outcome. PMID:26293675

  10. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Followed by Allogeneic Lymphocyte Infusion for Refractory Hematologic Malignancy—an Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    BALLEN, KAREN K.; COLVIN, GERALD; PORTER, DAVID; QUESENBERRY, PETER J.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is curative for certain cancers, but the high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy used in conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens may lead to severe toxicity. In our initial study, we treated 25 patients with refractory cancers with 100 cGy total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic, non mobilized peripheral blood cells. Eighteen patients received sibling and 7 patients received unrelated cord blood stem cells. None of the 13 patients with solid tumors achieved donor chimerism or had a sustained response. Twelve patients with hematologic malignancies were treated, 1 received a cord blood transplant and 11 received sibling donor cells. Nine of these 11 patients achieved donor chimerism, ranging from 5% to 100%. Four patients had sustained complete remission of their cancers, and 2 are long-term survivors. The development of chimerism correlated with total previous myelotoxic chemotherapy (p < 0.001). This technique is now being extended into the haploidentical setting. PMID:15291347

  11. The malignant primate?

    PubMed

    de Grouchy, J

    1991-01-01

    Speciation and carcinogenesis result from genomic instability at the gametic or at the somatic levels. After an infinity of trials they occur, by chromosome rearrangements, in single individuals or in single cells and evolve by similar chromosomal or clonal evolutions. Loss of heterozygosity for the first event is essential in both processes: in evolution, a chromosomal rearrangement, a pericentric inversion or a Robertsonian fusion, must become homozygous to ensure a reproductive barrier for a new species; Knudson's two-event sequence is a similar situation in cancer. Position effect is equally important: we have shown overexpression of the SOD1 gene in the orangutan phylum probably by an intrachromosomal rearrangement; the t(9;22) in CML acts by typical position effect. Parental imprinting underlies the evolution of genome function and the unset of certain cancers. Evolution and malignancy are interweaved by viruses and oncogenes since the dawn of life. Cancer uses its intelligence to expand and to destroy the other tissues, using subtle metabolic pathways and a variety of tricks to metastasize other cells. It always wins but saws the branch on which it sits. Mankind also grows exponentially, killing thousands of other species, poisoning the oceans and soft waters, polluting the atmosphere, all for his egoistic needs. Man also travels and metastasizes other Earths. He modifies his genome or that of other species, and develops new technologies for his reproduction. He can destroy the planet in an eyeblink. To be or not to be the malignant primate, that will be the dilemma for the 21st Century. PMID:1809219

  12. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK) Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Cornillon, Amelie; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Cayrefourcq, Laure; Panabieres, Catherine; Vilches, Carlos; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Hicheri, Yosr; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA(+)RO(+) phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA(+)RO(-) phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA(+)RO(+) cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias.

  13. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK) Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Cornillon, Amelie; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Cayrefourcq, Laure; Panabieres, Catherine; Vilches, Carlos; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Hicheri, Yosr; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA+RO+ phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA+RO− phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA+RO+ cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias. PMID:26629531

  14. Targeting autophagy to fight hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Alexandre; Robert, Guillaume; Auberger, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Macroautophagy, referred hereafter to as autophagy is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process for the degradation and recycling of macromolecules, bulk cytoplasm and dammaged organelles. Autophagy is activated under stress conditions induced by nutrient deprivation, hypoxia and drug treatments. Morphologically, autophagic cells are characterized by the accumulation of double membrane cytoplasmic vesicules called autophagosomes that surrounds cytoplasmic proteins and/or organelles. Autophagosomes next fuse with lysosomes to generate autolysosomes, the structures in which the retained constituents are digested before recycling into the cytoplasm. In this context, autophagy promotes cell survival under adverse conditions. In contrast, under certain circumstances autophagic cells may engage a specific mode of cell death called type II cell death or autophagic cell death (ACD). Considering the strategic positionnement of this process at the crossroads of cell death and survival, it is not surprising that defects in autophagy have been linked to a plethora of human diseases, including hematopoietic malignancies. Finally, autophagy induction is repressed by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and favored by the adenosine-monophosphate activated-protein kinase (AMPK). In the present review, we focus on the functions of autophagy in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and discuss the opportunity to target the AMPK/mTOR pathways as a new therapeutic strategy to fight hematopoietic malignancies with a special emphasis on Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML).

  15. Acquired somatic ATRX mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome associated with alpha thalassemia (ATMDS) convey a more severe hematologic phenotype than germline ATRX mutations.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P; Higgs, Douglas R; Fisher, Chris A; Gibbons, Richard J

    2004-03-15

    Acquired somatic mutations in ATRX, an X-linked gene encoding a chromatin-associated protein, were recently identified in 4 patients with the rare subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with thalassemia (ATMDS). Here we describe a series of novel point mutations in ATRX detected in archival DNA samples from marrow and/or blood of patients with ATMDS by use of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a technique sensitive to low-level mosaicism. Two of the new mutations result in changes in amino acids altered in previously described pedigrees with germ line ATRX mutations (ATR-X syndrome), but the hematologic abnormalities were much more severe in the patients with ATMDS than in the corresponding constitutional cases. In one ATMDS case where DNA samples from several time points were available, the proportion of ATRX-mutant subclones correlated with changes in the amount of hemoglobin H. This study strengthens the link between acquired, somatic ATRX mutations and ATMDS, illustrates how molecular defects associated with MDS and other hematologic malignancies masked by somatic mosaicism may be detected by DHPLC, and shows that additional factors increase the severity of the hematologic phenotype of ATRX mutations in ATMDS.

  16. Cardiovascular and Hematological Medicine in 2013 - Advances and Insights.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2012-12-11

    Welcome to the first issue of Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry (CHAMC) for 2013. I hope everyone has had an enjoyable holiday season and I want to wish everyone a wonderful New Year. As you know, our journal (CHAMC) aims to cover the latest and outstanding developments in medicinal chemistry, rational drug design for the discovery of novel cardiovascular and hematological Agents and discusses such therapies in clinical practice. Each issue contains a series of timely in-depth reviews, original research articles and drug clinical trial studies written by leaders in the field covering a range of current topics in cardiovascular and hematological sciences. I feel that CHAMC is an essential journal for every medicinal chemist, clinician and healthcare provider who wishes to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments in cardiovascular and hematological drug discovery and their clinical uses. In the coming issues of the journal, we will discuss several important topics pertinent to chemists and clinicians in the cardiovascular and hematology fields such as curcumin and resveratrol as alternative medicinal agents against metabolic syndrome, interrelationship between chronic kidney disease and risk of cardiovascular diseases and effects of direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, on arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease among others. The journal also delves into hot topics such as genetic testing and personalized medicine, use of literature-based discovery to identify novel therapeutic approaches, pharmacologic mechanism and clinical relevance of P2Y12 inhibitors and intracoronary injection of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, abciximab, as adjuvant therapy in primary coronary intervention. Cardiovascular medicine and hematology are both very dynamic fields with rapid advances and we will continue to work to keep you up to date on new advances and therapies. I would also take this

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary axis remains intact after interferon-alpha treatment in hematologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, M; Koskinen, P; Remes, K; Viikari, J; Irjala, K

    1997-09-01

    Many endocrinologic disturbances have been reported during and after interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) treatment. These disturbances have often been caused by autoantibodies. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate whether IFN-alpha causes hormonal changes and if it is necessary to search for such disturbances routinely. Ten patients with hematologic malignancies were examined before and after 4 months of IFN-alpha treatment. Pituitary function was tested by hypothalamic releasing hormones (thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, growth hormone-releasing hormone, GHRH, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, GnRH). The adrenal glands were tested with the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) test. The human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test was performed on the men (n = 4). The IFN treatment was well tolerated, and no long-term hormonal side effects were found. The testosterone/sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) index tended to improve. There were no significant differences between the hormone responses before and after IFN-alpha treatment. We conclude that the hypothalamic-pituitary axis remains intact after IFN-alpha treatment. There is no need to follow patients endocrinologically if the patients are not predisposed by autoantibodies.

  18. Primary Malignant Melanoma in the Pineal Region

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old male patient had 5-month history of gait disturbance and memory impairment. His initial brain computed tomography scan showed 3.5×2.8 cm sized mass with high density in the pineal region. The tumor was hypointense on T2 weighted magnetic resonance images and hyperintense on T1 weighted magnetic resonance images with heterogenous enhancement of central portion. The tumor was totally removed via the occipital transtentorial approach. Black mass was observed in the operation field, and after surgery, histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Whole spine magnetic resonance images and whole body 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography could not demonstrate the primary site of this melanoma. Scrupulous physical examination of his skin and mucosa was done and dark pigmented lesion on his left leg was found, but additional studies including magnetic resonance images and skin biopsy showed negative finding. As a result, final diagnosis of primary pineal malignant melanoma was made. He underwent treatment with the whole brain radiotherapy and extended local boost irradiation without chemotherapy. His preoperative symptoms were disappeared, and no other specific neurological deficits were founded. His follow-up image studies showed no recurrence or distant metastasis until 26 weeks after surgery. Primary pineal malignant melanomas are extremely rare intracranial tumors, and only 17 cases have been reported since 1899. The most recent case report showed favorable outcome by subtotal tumor resection followed by whole brain and extended local irradiation without chemotherapy. Our case is another result to prove that total tumor resection with radiotherapy can be the current optimal treatment for primary malignant melanoma in the pineal region. PMID:25628812

  19. [Raynaud's phenomenon - first sign of malignancy: case report].

    PubMed

    Sutić, Anamarija; Gračanin, Gudelj; Morović-Vergles, Jadranka

    2014-06-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common phenomenon in the general population. It most commonly occurs in healthy individuals, in whom there is no associated illness or any other cause of Raynaud's phenomenon (primary or idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon). Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon is common with rheumatic diseases (systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, primary Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease, etc.), occlusive vascular diseases, hematologic disorders, use of vibrating tools and use of some medications, and rarely with malignancy. We report on a patient who presented with a three-week history of painful Raynaud's attacks, which was the reason for seeking assistance of internists in emergency clinic. Upon admission to the hospital and diagnostic work-up, adenocarcinoma of the lung was found. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-dsDNA antibodies, anticardiolipin IgM and IgG antibodies were present in a lower titer. It is known that rheumatoid factor or ANA characteristic of rheumatic disease are often present in patients with paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes, which can lead to wrong conclusions about the possible systemic connective tissue diseases and ultimately delay the correct diagnosis. The first appearance of Raynaud's phenomenon as an isolated symptom in people older than 50, with painful signs of ischemia, as in our patient, or the occurrence of asymmetric grasping fingers, especially in men, regardless of the presence of RF, ANA, anti-dsDNA or other autoantibodies, requires broader diagnostic evaluation for malignancy.

  20. [Malignant Pleural Mesotheliomas].

    PubMed

    Biancosino, C; Redwan, B; Krüger, M; Eberlein, M; Bölükbas, S

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM) are very aggressive tumors, which originate from the mesothelial cells of the pleural surface. The main risk factor associated with MPM is exposure to asbestos. The latency period between asbestos exposure and MPM can be 30-60 years. Clinical symptoms and signs are often nonspecifc. The diagnosis of MPM requires an adequate tissue specimen for pathological examination, and video assisted thoracoscopic surgey (VATS) is associated with the highest diagnostic yield. MPM are histologically classified into epitheloid, sacromatoid and biphasic (mixed) sub-types. Accurate staging with invasive tests, if needed, is an important step before an interdisciplinary team can decide on an optimal (multi-modal) treatment approach. A multi-modal treatment approach (surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy) is superior to all approaches relying only on a single modality, if the patient qualifies for it from an oncological and functional standpoint. The goal of the surgical therapy is to achieve macroscopic complete resection. There are two competing surgical approaches and philosophies: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and radical pleurectomy (RP). Over the last years a paradigm shift from EPP to RP occurred and RP is now often the preferred surgical option. PMID:27612329