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Sample records for hematopoietic cell growth factors

  1. Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Its Growth Factor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-16

    that both K15 and H5 were selectively retained by mature eosinophiles but not by other granulocytes. These results were obtained by the isolation of...Platelets M143 > 90% 40-60% neg neg neg K15 neutrophils: >90% >95% neg neg neg eosinophils : + H4 weakly + >90% neg neg + + H5 5-15% >95% 10-20% neg...down a band at 130KD from platelets and a complex of 140- 150KD/90-94KD from HEL cells. Because of the unusual reactivity and the possibility that the

  2. Transforming Growth Factor β Drives Hemogenic Endothelium Programming and the Transition to Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rui; Pinheiro, Philip; Joseph, Nicola; Peterkin, Tessa; Koth, Jana; Repapi, Emmanouela; Bonkhofer, Florian; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are self-renewing multipotent stem cells that generate mature blood lineages throughout life. They, together with hematopoietic progenitor cells (collectively known as HSPCs), emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the floor of the embryonic dorsal aorta by an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is required for HSPC specification and that it regulates the expression of the Notch ligand Jagged1a in endothelial cells prior to EHT, in a striking parallel with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The requirement for TGFβ is two fold and sequential: autocrine via Tgfβ1a and Tgfβ1b produced in the endothelial cells themselves, followed by a paracrine input of Tgfβ3 from the notochord, suggesting that the former programs the hemogenic endothelium and the latter drives EHT. Our findings have important implications for the generation of HSPCs from pluripotent cells in vitro.

  3. Bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells behavior with or without growth factors in trauma hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Mohanty, Sujata; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Rao, D. N.; Mishra, Pravas; Galwankar, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is the major leading cause of death after trauma. Up to 50% of early deaths are due to massive hemorrhage. Excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokine and hypercatecholamine induces hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) apoptosis, leading to multiorgan failure and death. However, still, result remains elusive for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) behavior in trauma HS (T/HS). Objectives: Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the in vitro HSCs behavior with or without recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) alone, and combination with rhEPO + rhGM-CSF + rhIL-3 (EG3) in T/HS patients. Methodology: Bone marrow (BM) aspirates (n = 14) were collected from T/HS patients, those survived on day 3. BM cells were cultured for HPCs: Colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E), burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E), and colony-forming unit-granulocyte, monocyte/macrophage colonies growth. HPCs were counted with or without rhEPO, rhGM-CSF, rhIL-3 alone, and combination with EG3 in T/HS patients. Results: BM HSCs growth significantly suppressed in T/HS when compared with control group (P < 0.05). In addition, CFU-E and BFU-E colony growth were increased with additional growth factor (AGF) (rhEPO, rhGM-CSF, and rhIL-3) as compared to baseline (without AGF) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Suppressed HPCs may be reactivated by addition of erythropoietin, GM-CSF, IL-3 alone and with combination in T/HS. PMID:27722113

  4. Proliferation and differentiation of highly enriched mouse hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells in response to defined growth factors

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct hematopoietic populations derived from normal bone marrow were analyzed for their response to defined growth factors. The Thy-1loT- B- G- M-population, composing 0.2% of bone marrow, is 370- fold enriched for pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. The two other populations, the Thy-1- T- B- G- M- and the predominantly mature Thy-1+ T+ B+ G+ M+ cells, lack stem cells. Thy-1loT- B- G- M- cells respond with a frequency of one in seven cells to IL-3 in an in vitro CFU-C assay, and give rise to many mixed colonies as expected from an early multipotent or pluripotent progenitor. The Thy-1- T- B- G- M- population also contains progenitor cells which responded to IL-3. However, colonies derived from Thy-1- T- B- G- M- cells are almost exclusively restricted to the macrophage/granulocyte lineages. This indicates that IL-3 can stimulate at least two distinct clonogenic early progenitor cells in normal bone marrow: multipotent Thy-1loT- B- G- M- cells and restricted Thy-1- T- B- G- M- cells. Thy-1loT- B- G- M- cells could not be stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte CSF (G-CSF) or IL-5 (Eosinophil-CSF). The hematopoietic precursors that react to these factors are enriched in the Thy-1- T- G- B- M- population. Thus, multipotent and restricted progenitors can be separated on the basis of the expression of the cell surface antigen Thy-1. PMID:3260264

  5. Mast Cell Growth Factor Enhances Multilineage Hematopoietic Recovery in Vivo Following Radiation-Induced Aplasia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    lymphocyte, monocyte, tributing to morbidity and mortality associated with hemato- eosinophil , and basophil numbers, as well as an increase in...factor (ligand for c-kit) administered in murine mast cell growth factor (c-kit figand) on colony vivo to mice either alone or in combination with granu

  6. Pleiotropic effects of transforming growth factor-β in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coomes, Stephanie M; Moore, Bethany B

    2010-12-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a pleiotropic cytokine with beneficial and detrimental effects posthematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. TGF-β is increased in specific sites postengraftment and can suppress immune responses and maintain peripheral tolerance. Thus, TGF-β may promote allograft acceptance. However, TGF-β is also the central pathogenic cytokine in fibrotic disease and likely promotes pneumonitis. Although TGF-β can enhance leukocyte recruitment and IgA production, it inhibits both innate and adaptive immune cell function and antiviral host defense posthematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. This review will focus on the current understanding of TGF-β biology and the numerous ways it can impact outcomes posttransplant.

  7. The hematopoietic growth factor "erythropoietin" enhances the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, M I; Kassem, L A; Yassin, N A; El Din, M A Gamal; Zekri, M; Attia, M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by cognitive dysfunction and by deposition of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. The study investigated the therapeutic effect of combined mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin on Alzheimer's disease. Five groups of mice were used: control group, Alzheimer's disease was induced in four groups by a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.8 mg kg(-1) lipopolysaccharide and divided as follows: Alzheimer's disease group, mesenchymal stem cells treated group by injecting mesenchymal stem cells into the tail vein (2 x 10(6) cells), erythropoietin treated group (40 microg kg(-1) b.wt.) injected intraperitoneally 3 times/week for 5 weeks and mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin treated group. Locomotor activity and memory were tested using open field and Y-maze. Histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical studies, morphometric measurements were examined in brain sections of all groups. Choline transferase activity, brain derived neurotrophic factor expression and mitochondrial swellings were assessed in cerebral specimens. Lipopolysaccharide decreased locomotor activity, memory, choline transferase activity and brain derived neurotrophic factor. It increased mitochondrial swelling, apoptotic index and amyloid deposition. Combined mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin markedly improved all these parameters. This study proved the effective role of mesenchymal stem cells in relieving Alzheimer's disease symptoms and manifestations; it highlighted the important role of erythropoietin in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Soluble factor cross-talk between human bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells enhances in vitro CFU-F and CFU-O growth and reveals heterogeneity in the mesenchymal progenitor cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    The homeostatic adult bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue wherein physical and biochemical interactions serve to maintain a balance between the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. To focus on soluble factor interactions occurring between mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells, a serum-free adhesion-independent culture system was developed that allows manipulation of the growth of both mesenchymal and hematopoietic human BM-derived progenitors and the balance between these compartments. Factorial experiments demonstrated a role for stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3) in the concomitant growth of hematopoietic (CD45+) and nonhematopoietic (CD45-) cells, as well as their derivatives. Kinetic tracking of IL-3alpha receptor (CD123) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression on a sorted CD45- cell population revealed the emergence of CD45-CD123+ cells capable of osteogenesis. Of the total fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-Fs) and osteoblast colony-forming units (CFU-O), approximately 24% of CFU-Fs and about 22% of CFU-Os were recovered from this population. Cell-sorting experiments demonstrated that the CD45+ cell population secreted soluble factors that positively affect the survival and proliferation of CFU-Fs and CFU-Os generated from the CD45- cells. Together, our results provide insight into the intercellular cytokine network between hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells and provide a strategy to mutually culture both mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells in a defined scalable bioprocess.

  9. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials.

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  11. Prophylactic pretreatment of mice with hematopoietic growth factors induces expansion of primitive cell compartments and results in protection against 5-fluorouracil-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    de Haan, G; Donte, B; Engel, C; Loeffler, M; Nijhof, W

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to expand the primitive and committed hematopoietic cell compartments in vivo in order to confer resistance of the blood cell forming system against the cytotoxic, cell cycle specific drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Possible chemoprotective effects of such a pretreatment could result from increased numbers of hematopoietic cells, present before 5-FU administration. In addition, we hypothesized that an enhanced number of primitive and progenitor calls would result in a reduced cycling activity, ie, 5-FU sensitivity, of these same cells, due to normal physiological feedback loops. Administration of stem cell factor (SCF) plus interleukin-11 (IL-11) to mice was shown to result in expansion of the various immature cell compartments in marrow and, in particular, spleen. The total body content of the primitive cobblestone area forming cells (CAFC)-day 28 was increased to 140%, whereas the more committed cells (CAFC-day 7, erythroid and granuloid progenitors) were increased to 500%. This in vivo expansion resulted in a decreased 5-FU sensitivity of the hematopoietic system. In particular, mice that had received 5-FU 24 hours after discontinuation of growth factor pretreatment showed significantly less toxicity of committed cell stages. Compared with mice not pretreated, it appeared that in pretreated mice, 24 hours after 5-FU administration, the absolute number, but also the fraction of surviving CAFC, was much higher in both marrow and spleen. This was caused by a decrease in the cycling activity of all primitive cell subsets. To explore the possible use of this finding in a chemotherapeutic setting, we determined the interval between two subsequent doses of 5-FU (160 mg/kg) that was required to prevent drug-induced mortality. When control mice received a second dose of 5-FU 7, 10, or 14 days after the first, respectively 0%, 20%, and 80% survived. In contrast, 40% and 100% of mice that received SCF + IL-11 before the first dose of 5-FU, survived a

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity after Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for five consecutive days starting within one hour post exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied using an in vitro culture system. Results IGF-1 protected 8 out of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation while only 2 out of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for five days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed up to six hours post irradiation. Compared with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers as well as hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 post-irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of non-irradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitors. Conclusions IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:23021438

  13. Sulfatase modifying factor 1-mediated fibroblast growth factor signaling primes hematopoietic multilineage development.

    PubMed

    Buono, Mario; Visigalli, Ilaria; Bergamasco, Roberta; Biffi, Alessandra; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2010-08-02

    Self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are balanced by the concerted activities of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Wnt, and Notch pathways, which are tuned by enzyme-mediated remodeling of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) activates the Sulf1 and Sulf2 sulfatases that remodel the HSPGs, and is mutated in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency. Here, we show that the FGF signaling pathway is constitutively activated in Sumf1(-/-) HSCs and hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs). These cells show increased p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase levels, which in turn promote beta-catenin accumulation. Constitutive activation of FGF signaling results in a block in erythroid differentiation at the chromatophilic erythroblast stage, and of B lymphocyte differentiation at the pro-B cell stage. A reduction in mature myeloid cells and an aberrant development of T lymphocytes are also seen. These defects are rescued in vivo by blocking the FGF pathway in Sumf1(-/-) mice. Transplantation of Sumf1(-/-) HSPCs into wild-type mice reconstituted the phenotype of the donors, suggesting a cell autonomous defect. These data indicate that Sumf1 controls HSPC differentiation and hematopoietic lineage development through FGF and Wnt signaling.

  14. Wnt3a Protein Reduces Growth Factor-Driven Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Serum-Free Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; Tüysüz, Nesrin; Rombouts, Elwin W. J. C.; ter Borg, Mariette N. D.; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Spanholtz, Jan; Cornelissen, Jan J.; ten Berge, Derk; Braakman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is a promising approach to improve insufficient engraftment after umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCB-SCT). Although culturing HSPC with hematopoietic cytokines results in robust proliferation, it is accompanied with extensive differentiation and loss of self-renewal capacity. Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating HSPC fate decisions in vivo and in promoting HSPC self-renewal by inhibition of differentiation, but the effects of Wnt on the ex vivo expansion of HSPC are controversial. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous Wnt3a protein suppresses rather than promotes the expansion of UCB-derived CD34+ cells in serum free expansion cultures. The reduced expansion was also observed in cultures initiated with Lin-CD34+CD38lowCD45RA-CD90+ cells which are highly enriched in HSC and was also observed in response to activation of beta-catenin signaling by GSK3 inhibition. The presence of Wnt3a protein during the culture reduced the frequency of multilineage CFU-GEMM and the long-term repopulation ability of the expanded HSPC. These data suggest that Wnt signaling reduces expansion of human HSPC in growth factor-driven expansion cultures by promoting differentiation of HSPC. PMID:25807521

  15. Psychosocial Factors and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Potential Biobehavioral Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer M.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.; Sahler, Olle Jane Z.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    While psychosocial factors are known to affect cancer progression via biobehavioral pathways in many patient populations, these relationships remain largely unexplored in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) patients. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature regarding psychosocial and endocrine/immune aspects of HCT, with an emphasis on exploring pathways that may mediate the associations between psychosocial factors and disease outcomes. These include the roles of catecholamines, glucocorticoids, inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), immune reconstitution and infectious susceptibility, as well as the new opportunities available in genomics research. We also discuss the implications for potential immunomodulating psychosocial interventions. Elucidating the biological pathways that account for the associations between psychosocial factors and clinical course could ultimately lead to improved outcomes for this psychologically and immunologically vulnerable population. PMID:23845514

  16. Growth factor plus preemptive ('just-in-time') plerixafor successfully mobilizes hematopoietic stem cells in multiple myeloma patients despite prior lenalidomide exposure.

    PubMed

    Costa, L J; Abbas, J; Hogan, K R; Kramer, C; McDonald, K; Butcher, C D; Littleton, A; Shoptaw, K; Kang, Y; Stuart, R K

    2012-11-01

    Lenalidomide is associated with suboptimal autologous hematopoietic stem cell (AHSC) mobilization. We hypothesized that growth factor plus preemptive plerixafor is an effective strategy for AHSC mobilization in multiple myeloma (MM) despite prior exposure to lenalidomide. We retrospectively reviewed patient characteristics and mobilization outcomes of 89 consecutive MM patients undergoing first mobilization with filgrastim or pegfilgrastim +/- preemptive plerixafor using a previously validated algorithm based on day 4 peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (PB-CD34+) and mobilization target. Outcomes were analyzed according to the extent of prior exposure to lenalidomide: no prior exposure (group A, n=40), 1- 4 cycles (group B, n=30) and >4 cycles (group C, n=19). Multivariate analysis yielded only age and number of cycles of lenalidomide as negatively associated, and mobilization with pegfilgrastim as positively associated with higher PB-CD34+. Only 45% of patients in group A required plerixafor vs 63% in groups B and 84% in C, P=0.01. A higher proportion of patients in group A (100%) met the mobilization target than in groups B (90%) or C (79%), P=0.008. All patients yielded at least 2 × 10(6) CD34+/kg. Growth factor mobilization with preemptive plerixafor is an adequate upfront mobilization strategy for MM patients regardless of prior exposure to lenalidomide.

  17. Transcription factor-mediated reprogramming toward hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Wataru; Rossi, Derrick J

    2015-01-01

    De novo generation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from renewable cell types has been a long sought-after but elusive goal in regenerative medicine. Paralleling efforts to guide pluripotent stem cell differentiation by manipulating developmental cues, substantial progress has been made recently toward HSC generation via combinatorial transcription factor (TF)-mediated fate conversion, a paradigm established by Yamanaka's induction of pluripotency in somatic cells by mere four TFs. This review will integrate the recently reported strategies to directly convert a variety of starting cell types toward HSCs in the context of hematopoietic transcriptional regulation and discuss how these findings could be further developed toward the ultimate generation of therapeutic human HSCs. PMID:25712209

  18. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis.

  19. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  20. Epidermal Growth Factor Regulates Hematopoietic Regeneration Following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Phuong L.; Himburg, Heather A.; Helms, Katherine; Russell, J. Lauren; Fixsen, Emma; Quarmyne, Mamle; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Deoliviera, Divino; Sullivan, Julie M.; Chao, Nelson J.; Kirsch, David G.; Chute, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms which regulate HSC regeneration following myelosuppressive injury are not well understood. We identified epidermal growth factor (EGF) to be highly enriched in the bone marrow (BM) serum of mice bearing deletion of Bak and Bax in Tie2+ cells (Tie2Cre;Bak1−/−;Baxfl/− mice), which displayed radioprotection of the HSC pool and 100% survival following lethal dose total body irradiation (TBI). BM HSCs from wild type mice expressed functional EGFR and systemic administration of EGF promoted the recovery of the HSC pool in vivo and the improved survival of mice following TBI. Conversely, administration of erlotinib, an EGFR antagonist, significantly decreased both HSC regeneration and mice survival following TBI. VavCre;EGFRfl/+ mice also demonstrated delayed recovery of BM stem/progenitor cells following TBI compared to VavCre;EGFR+/+ mice. Mechanistically, EGF reduced radiation-induced apoptosis of HSCs and mediated this effect via repression of the proapoptotic protein, PUMA. EGFR signaling regulates HSC regeneration following myelosuppressive injury. PMID:23377280

  1. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola; Gilbert, Ethel S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M; Sobocinski, Kathleen A; Horowitz, Mary M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Kingma, Douglas W; Travis, Lois B; Flowers, Mary E; Martin, Paul J; Deeg, H Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2009-05-14

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial.

  2. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Massolt, Elske T.; Effraimidis, Grigoris; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Visser, W. Edward; Peeters, Robin P.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects. Methods We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs). We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and IL-7 at baseline. Results BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001), while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003) and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028) were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017). In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion. Conclusion Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid

  3. Independent expression of human. alpha. or. beta. platelet-derived growth factor receptor cDNAs in a naive hematopoietic cell leads to functional coupling with mitogenic and chemotactic signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, T.; Pierce, J.H.; Fleming, T.P.; LaRochelle, W.J.; Ruggiero, M.; Aaronson, S.A. ); Greenberger, J.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Distinct genes encode {alpha} and {beta} platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors that differ in their abilities to be triggered by three dimeric forms of the PDGF molecule. The authors show that PDGF-receptor mitogenic function can be reconstituted in a naive hematopoietic cell line by introduction of expression vectors for either {alpha} or {beta} PDGF receptor cDNAs. Thus, each receptor is independently capable of coupling with mitogenic signal-transduction pathways inherently present in these cells. Activation of either receptor also resulted in chemotaxis, alterations in inositol lipid metabolism, and mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The magnitude of these functional responses correlated well with the binding properties of the different PDGF isoforms to each receptor. Thus, availability of specific PDGF isoforms and relative expression of each PDGF-receptor gene product are major determinants of the spectrum of known PDGF responses.

  4. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Damon, Lloyd E; Damon, Lauren E

    2009-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells can be mobilized out of the bone marrow into the blood for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis following high-dose therapy. Methods to improve mobilization efficiency and yields are rapidly emerging. Traditional methods include chemotherapy with or without myeloid growth factors. Plerixafor, a novel agent that disrupts the CXCR4-CXCL12 bond, the primary hematopoietic stem cell anchor in the bone marrow, has recently been US FDA-approved for mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Plerixafor and myeloid growth factors as single agents appear safe to use in family or volunteer hematopoietic stem cells donors. Plerixafor mobilizes leukemic stem cells and is not approved for use in patients with acute leukemia. Patients failing to mobilize adequate hematopoietic stem cells with myeloid growth factors can often be successfully mobilized with chemotherapy plus myeloid growth factors or with plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

  5. Hematopoietic Growth Factor support in the Elderly treated with Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rupolo, M; Berretta, M

    2013-10-09

    The 60% of tumors affected patients >65years of age and the future previsions are considering an amount of 70% after 2030. Elderly Patients presents multiple comorbidity, polipharmacy, and disability. Geriatric assessment helps physicians to take the best therapeutic decisions. Clinical conditions influence efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy. Prophylactic use of G-CSF after chemotherapy lowers the rate and length of severe neutropenia , and decreases the episodes of febrile neutropenia. Anemia is a hematologic condition associated with ageing , but is frequently associated to concomitant chronic disease. Stem cells display increasing resistance to erythropoietin in the elderly patients and this is connected with the onset of pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of this age . Anemia is a common adverse event in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Several of the symptoms associated with anemia, such as fatigue, syncope, palpitations and dyspnea, reduce patient activity and have a profound effect on the quality of life [QOL]. Considering the unfit or frail status of elderly patient the at home use of pegfilgrastim and weekly or three weekly erythropoietin administration could be preferred for this setting of patients that lack of specialized nursing care or facilities. Further studies, considering the several differences in health organizations in vary countries, could be held to state the real impact of the biosimilars in comparison to the long acting originators in the reduction of costs in this group of patients.

  6. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment.

  7. Induction of hematopoietic and endothelial cell program orchestrated by ETS transcription factor ER71/ETV2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Li, Daofeng; Yu, Yik Yeung Lawrence; Kang, Inyoung; Cha, Min-Ji; Kim, Ju Young; Park, Changwon; Watson, Dennis K; Wang, Ting; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-05-01

    The ETS factor ETV2 (aka ER71) is essential for the generation of the blood and vascular system, as ETV2 deficiency leads to a complete block in blood and endothelial cell formation and embryonic lethality in the mouse. However, the ETV2-mediated gene regulatory network and signaling governing hematopoietic and endothelial cell development are poorly understood. Here, we map ETV2 global binding sites and carry out in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and germ line and conditional knockout mouse studies to uncover mechanisms involved in the hemangiogenic fate commitment from mesoderm. We show that ETV2 binds to enhancers that specify hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages. We find that the hemangiogenic progenitor population in the developing embryo can be identified as FLK1(high)PDGFRα(-). Notably, these hemangiogenic progenitors are exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Importantly, ETV2 turns on other Ets genes, thereby establishing an ETS hierarchy. Consequently, the hematopoietic and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 is maintained partly by other ETS factors through an ETS switching mechanism. These findings highlight the critical role that transient ETV2 expression plays in the regulation of hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineage specification and stability.

  8. Cartography of hematopoietic stem cell commitment dependent upon a reporter for transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Koichi

    2007-06-01

    A hierarchical hematopoietic developmental tree has been proposed based on the result of prospective purification of lineage-restricted progenitors. For more detailed mapping for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) commitment, we tracked the expression of PU.1, a major granulocyte/monocyte (GM)- and lymphoid-related transcription factor, from the HSC to the myelolymphoid progenitor stages by using a mouse line harboring a knockin reporter for PU.1. This approach enabled us to find a new progenitor population committed to GM and lymphoid lineages within the HSC fraction. This result suggests that there should be another developmental pathway independent of the conventional one with myeloid versus lymphoid bifurcation, represented by common myeloid progenitors and common lymphoid progenitors, respectively. The utilization of the transcription factor expression as a functional marker might be useful to obtain cartography of the hematopoietic development at a higher resolution.

  9. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  10. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7683417

  11. Platelet-derived growth factor B-chain of hematopoietic origin is not necessary for granulation tissue formation and its absence enhances vascularization.

    PubMed

    Buetow, B S; Crosby, J R; Kaminski, W E; Ramachandran, R K; Lindahl, P; Martin, P; Betsholtz, C; Seifert, R A; Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F

    2001-11-01

    The hypothesis that wound repair is augmented by delivery of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets and macrophages is an attractive extrapolation from the known activities of PDGF in cell culture and in vivo. To test this hypothesis in mice, we prepared hematopoietic chimeras, in which the hematopoietic system of a normal adult mouse was replaced by the hematopoietic system of a PDGF B-chain -/- or +/+ donor. We initiated local granulation tissue formation either by implanting small surgical sponges to elicit a foreign body granulation tissue response, or by ligating the left common carotid to form an organized thrombus. We found that the absence of hematopoietic PDGF B-chain did not decrease the extent of granulation tissue or vascular lesion formation, and that the vascularization of both lesions increased by approximately 100%. We conclude that PDGF B-chain from cells of hematopoietic origin, including platelets and macrophages, is not important for granulation tissue formation, and that it reduces vascularization of granulation issue, probably through disabling of the short-range chemotactic gradients of PDGF that are important for recruiting pericytes/smooth muscle cells to the endothelium of new vessels.

  12. The transcription factor MEF/ELF4 regulates the quiescence of primitive hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lacorazza, H Daniel; Yamada, Takeshi; Liu, Yan; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Sivina, Mariela; Nunes, Juliana; Nimer, Stephen D

    2006-03-01

    The transcriptional circuitry that regulates the quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. We report that the transcription factor known as MEF (or ELF4), which is targeted by the t(X;21)(q26;q22) in acute myelogenous leukemia, regulates the proliferation of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells at steady state, controlling their quiescence. Mef null HSCs display increased residence in G0 with reduced 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in vivo and impaired cytokine-driven proliferation in vitro. Due to their increased HSC quiescence, Mef null mice are relatively resistant to the myelosuppressive effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, MEF plays an important role in the decision of stem/primitive progenitor cells to divide or remain quiescent by regulating their entry to the cell cycle.

  13. Hematopoietic Growth Factors and Glucocorticoids Synergize to Mimic the Effects of IL-1 on Granulocyte Differentiation and IL-1 Receptor Induction on Bone Marrow Cells In Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    eosinophilic cells. No specific IL-1 labeling was treated mice. We next evaluated whether the in vivo adminis- observed on erythroid cells. These results...granulopoiesis. Because the showed that most of the labeled cells belonged to the granu - administration of IL-1 induces an initial rapid mobilization of...and 16% of eosinophilic and mono- the differential expression of RB6-8C5 antigen on myeloid cytic cells exhibited a similar pattern of labeling with 7

  14. Murine embryonic stem cells secrete cytokines/growth modulators that enhance cell survival/anti-apoptosis and stimulate colony formation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Graham-Evans, Barbara; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2006-04-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1/CXCL12, released by murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, enhances survival, chemotaxis, and hematopoietic differentiation of murine ES cells. Conditioned medium (CM) from murine ES cells growing in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) was generated while the ES cells were in an undifferentiated Oct-4 expressing state. ES cell-CM enhanced survival of normal murine bone marrow myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM) subjected to delayed growth factor addition in vitro and decreased apoptosis of murine bone marrow c-kit(+)lin- cells. ES CM contained interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-10, IL-11, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF), oncostatin M, stem cell factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as a number of chemokines and other proteins, some of which are known to enhance survival/anti-apoptosis of progenitors. Irradiation of ES cells enhanced release of some proteins and decreased release of others. IL-6, FGF-9, and TNF-alpha, not detected prior to irradiation was found after ES cells were irradiated. ES cell CM also stimulated CFU-GM colony formation. Thus, undifferentiated murine ES cells growing in the presence of LIF produce/release a number of biologically active interleukins, CSFs, chemokines, and other growth modulatory proteins, results which may be of physiological and/or practical significance.

  15. Acquired factor VII deficiency in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Toor, A A; Slungaard, A; Hedner, U; Weisdorf, D J; Key, N S

    2002-03-01

    Acquired factor VII (FVII) deficiency in the absence of vitamin K deficiency, oral anticoagulant therapy, synthetic liver dysfunction, or DIC is rare, with only a handful of cases thus far reported. In the period from 1990 to 1996 we identified eight patients with acquired FVII deficiency, all of whom presented with prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT) in the first 2 weeks following stem cell transplantation (SCT). The mean plasma FVII clotting activity (FVII:c) was 22% (range 8-35%) with an approximately equivalent reduction in FVII antigen (FVII:Ag) level. Mean plasma levels of fibrinogen and factors II, V, IX, and X were normal. Protein C activity was significantly depressed in only one of the three patients in whom it was measured. Several patients experienced bleeding complications, and hemorrhage directly accounted for death in two cases. Veno-occlusive disease of the liver developed in three patients. We conclude that FVII deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged PT in patients who have recently undergone SCT. The mechanism of this acquired deficiency state remains to be defined.

  16. Hematopoietic expression of oncogenic BRAF promotes aberrant growth of monocyte-lineage cells resistant to PLX4720

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Dankort, David; Kang, Jing; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; McMahon, Martin; Leavitt, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of BRAF leading to expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein was recently identified in a high percentage of specific hematopoietic neoplasms in monocyte/histiocyte and mature B-cell lineages. Although BRAFV600E is a driver oncoprotein and pharmacological target in solid tumors such as melanoma, lung and thyroid cancer, it remains unknown whether BRAFV600E is an appropriate therapeutic target in hematopoietic neoplasms. To address this critical question, we generated a mouse model expressing inducible BRAFV600E in the hematopoietic system, and evaluated the efficacy of pathway-targeted therapeutics against primary hematopoietic cells. In this model, BRAFV600E expression conferred cytokine-independent growth to monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors leading to aberrant in vivo and in vitro monocyte/macrophage expansion. Furthermore, transplantation of BRAFV600E-expressing bone marrow cells promoted an in vivo pathology most notable for monocytosis in hematopoietic tissues and visceral organs. In vitro analysis revealed that MEK inhibition, but not RAF inhibition, effectively suppressed cytokine-independent clonal growth of monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors. However, combined RAF and PI3K inhibition effectively inhibited cytokine-independent colony formation, suggesting autocrine PI3K pathway activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that constitutively activated BRAFV600E drives aberrant proliferation of monocyte-lineage cells. This study supports the development of pathway-targeted therapeutics in the treatment of BRAFV600E-expressing hematopoietic neoplasms in the monocyte/histiocyte lineage. PMID:24152792

  17. Topical Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor for Oral Mucositis Induced by Intensive Chemotherapy with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Final Analysis of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Myeong Gyu; Lee, Hyun Jung; Koh, Youngil; Kwon, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Inho; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Byoung Kook; Oh, Jung Mi; Kim, Kyung Im; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) oral spray for oral mucositis (OM) induced by intensive chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this phase 2 study, patients were randomized to either rhEGF (50 microg/mL) or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. The primary endpoint was incidence of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grade ≥2 OM. A total of 138 patients were enrolled in this study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, rhEGF did not reduce the incidence of NCI grade ≥2 OM (p = 0.717) nor reduce its duration (p = 0.725). Secondary endpoints including the day of onset and duration of NCI grade ≥2 OM, the incidence of NCI grade ≥3 OM and its duration, and patient-reported quality of life were also similar between the two groups. In the per-protocol analysis, however, the duration of opioid analgesic use was shorter in the rhEGF group (p = 0.036), and recipients in the rhEGF group required a lower cumulative dose of opioid analgesics than those in the placebo group (p = 0.046), among patients with NCI grade ≥2 OM. Adverse events were mild and transient. This study found no evidence to suggest that rhEGF oral spray reduces the incidence of OM. However, further studies are needed to investigate the effect of rhEGF on OM-induced pain reduction after intensive chemotherapy. PMID:28045958

  18. [Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collection].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ines; Mazić, Sanja; Cepulić, Branka Golubić

    2009-01-01

    Summary. Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (PBSC) have numerous advatages in comparison with traditionally used bone marrow. PBSC collection by leukapheresis procedure is simpler and better tolerated than bone marrow harvest. PBCS are mobilized by myelosupressive chemotherapy or/and hematopoietic growth factors. Leukapheresis product contains PBSC along with lineage commited progenitors and precursors which contribute to faster hematopoietic recovery. In "poor mobilizers" options are large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) procedure or second generation of mobilising agents (pegfilgrastim, CXCR4 receptor antagonists). Total blood volume is processed 2-3 times in standard procedure compared to more than 3 times in LVL. LVL yields significantly higher numbers of CD34+ cells. Adverse effects of leukapheresis are electrolyte disbalance (hypocalcemia) caused by citrat administration and risk of bleeding due to trobocytopenia and heparin administration. PBSC collection and product quality control are regulated by national and international standards and recommendations.

  19. Distinct Stromal Cell Factor Combinations Can Separately Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Wohrer, Stefan; Knapp, David J.H.F.; Copley, Michael R.; Benz, Claudia; Kent, David G.; Rowe, Keegan; Babovic, Sonja; Mader, Heidi; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are identified by their ability to sustain prolonged blood cell production in vivo, although recent evidence suggests that durable self-renewal (DSR) is shared by HSC subtypes with distinct self-perpetuating differentiation programs. Net expansions of DSR-HSCs occur in vivo, but molecularly defined conditions that support similar responses in vitro are lacking. We hypothesized that this might require a combination of factors that differentially promote HSC viability, proliferation, and self-renewal. We now demonstrate that HSC survival and maintenance of DSR potential are variably supported by different Steel factor (SF)-containing cocktails with similar HSC-mitogenic activities. In addition, stromal cells produce other factors, including nerve growth factor and collagen 1, that can antagonize the apoptosis of initially quiescent adult HSCs and, in combination with SF and interleukin-11, produce >15-fold net expansions of DSR-HSCs ex vivo within 7 days. These findings point to the molecular basis of HSC control and expansion. PMID:24910437

  20. Short-term growth hormone treatment in children with Hurler syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, Lynda E.; Plog, Melissa; Schwender, James D.; Tolar, Jakub; Thomas, William; Orchard, Paul J.; Miller, Bradley S.; Petryk, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Summary Children with Hurler syndrome experience progressive growth failure after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The goal of this study was to review the safety and efficacy of growth hormone (GH) in eight children with Hurler syndrome who were treated at our institution with GH for short stature or GH deficiency between 2005 and 2008. The age at initiation of treatment with GH was 9.6 ± 2.3 years and time since HCT was 7.5 ± 1.5 years. Mean GH dose was 0.32 mg/kg/week. Baseline growth velocity was 3.5 ± 1.5 cm/yr (−2.6 ± 1.9 SDS) and increased to 5.2 ± 3.0 cm/yr (−0.1 ± 3.6 SDS) after 1 year of treatment. Of 6 patients with radiographic data there was 1 progression of scoliosis, 1 progression of kyphosis, and 1 progression of genu valgum. No patient discontinued treatment due to progression of skeletal disease. One patient discontinued GH due to slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Preliminary data suggest that one year GH treatment may modestly improve growth velocity in children with Hurler syndrome. PMID:19252529

  1. On hematopoietic stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Multipotential hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood-cell formation throughout life. Here, Metcalf considers the origin and heterogeneity of HSCs, their ability to self-generate, and their commitment to the various hematopoietic lineages.

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants.

  3. Factors associated with optimized tacrolimus dosing in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Allison R; Brown, Victoria T; McBride, Lauren D; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Bryk, Amy W

    2015-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to analyze the initial tacrolimus concentrations achieved in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients using the institutional dosing strategy of 1 mg IV daily initiated on day +5. The secondary objectives were to ascertain the tacrolimus dose, days of therapy, and dose changes necessary to achieve a therapeutic concentration, and to identify patient-specific factors that influence therapeutic dose. The relationships between the number of pre-therapeutic days and incidence of graft-versus-host disease and graft failure were delineated. Methods A retrospective chart review included adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell patients who received tacrolimus for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in 2012. Descriptive statistics, linear and logistic regression, and graphical analyses were utilized. Results Ninety-nine patients met the inclusion criteria. The first concentration was subtherapeutic (<10 ng/ml) in 97 patients (98%). The median number of days of tacrolimus needed to achieve a therapeutic trough was 10 with a median of two dose changes. The median therapeutic dose was 1.6 mg IV daily. Approximately 75% of patients became therapeutic on ≤2 mg IV tacrolimus daily. No relationship was found between therapeutic dose and any patient-specific factor tested, including weight. No relationship was found between the number of days of therapy required to achieve a therapeutic trough and incidence of graft-versus-host disease or graft failure. Conclusion An initial flat tacrolimus dose of 1 mg IV daily is a suboptimal approach to achieve therapeutic levels at this institution. A dose of 1.6 mg or 2 mg IV daily is a reasonable alternative to the current institutional practice. PMID:25802301

  4. [Hematopoietic growth factor EPO has neuro-protective and neuro-trophic effects--review].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo-Yan; Yang, Mo; Fok, Tai-Fai

    2005-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an acidic glycoprotein that was first detected as a hematopoietic factor and its synthesis is triggered in response to cellular hypoxia-sensing. EPO binds to type I cytokine receptors, which associate with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak2, and thereby activate Stat 5a/5b, Ras/MAPK, and PI3-K/Akt signaling pathways. The recent discovery shows that there is a specific EPO/EPO-receptor system in the central nervous system (CNS), independently of the haematopoietic system. Hypoxia and anemia can up-regulate EPO/EPOR expressions in the CNS. Further studies demonstrate that EPO has substantial neuro-protective effects and acts as a neurotrophic factor on central cholinergic neurons, influencing their differentiation and regeneration. EPO also exerts neuro-protective activities in different models of brain damage in vivo and in vitro, such as hypoxia, cerebral ischaemia and sub-arachnoid haemorrhage. EPO may also be involved in synaptic plasticity via the inhibition or stimulation of various neurotransmitters. Therefore, human recombinant EPO that activate its receptors in the central nervous system might be utilized in the future clinical practice involving neuroprotection and brain repair.

  5. Sindbis viral vectors target hematopoietic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Suzme, R; Tseng, J-C; Levin, B; Ibrahim, S; Meruelo, D; Pellicer, A

    2012-11-01

    Sindbis viral vectors target and inhibit the growth of various solid tumors in mouse models. However, their efficacy against blood cancer has not been well established. Here, we show that Sindbis vectors infect and efficiently trigger apoptosis in mouse BW5147 malignant hematopoietic T-cells, but only at low levels in human lymphoma and leukemia cells (Jurkat, Karpas, CEM, DHL and JB). The Mr 37/67 kD laminin receptor (LAMR) has been suggested to be the receptor for Sindbis virus. However, JB cells, which are infected by Sindbis at low efficiency, express high levels of LAMR, revealing that additional factors are involved in Sindbis tropism. To test the infectivity and therapeutic efficacy of Sindbis vectors against malignant hematopoietic cells in vivo, we injected BW5147 cells intraperitoneally into (C3HXAKR) F1 hybrid mice. We found that Sindbis vectors targeted the tumors and significantly prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We also tested the Sindbis vectors in a transgenic CD4-Rgr model, which spontaneously develop thymic lymphomas. However, infectivity in this model was less efficient. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sindbis vectors have the potential to target and kill hematopoietic malignancies in mice, but further research is needed to evaluate the mechanism underlining the susceptibility of human lymphoid malignancies to Sindbis therapy.

  6. Cancer cells. 3: Growth factors and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Feramisco, J.; Ozanne, B.; Stiles, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure of Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Expression of Normal and Variant mRNAs in Epdermoid Carcinoma Cells; Tyrosine Kinase Activity Associated with the v-erb-B Gene Product; Cloning and Characterization of Human Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor Gene Sequences in A431 Carcinoma Cells; Anti-oncogenes and the Suppression of Tumor Formation; and Normal Human sis/PDGF-2 Gene Expression Induces Cellular Transformation.

  7. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Mahadik, B.P.; Haba, S. Pedron; Skertich, L.J.; Harley, B.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body’s full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory. PMID:26232879

  8. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  9. Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells Have Distinct Dependence on Tcf1 and Lef1 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyang; Li, Fengyin; Xing, Shaojun; Zhao, Tianyan; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-05-20

    Hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells (HSCs and LSCs) have self-renewal ability to maintain normal hematopoiesis and leukemia propagation, respectively. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors are expressed in HSCs, and targeting both factors modestly expanded the size of the HSC pool due to diminished HSC quiescence. Functional defects of Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs in multi-lineage blood reconstitution was only evident under competitive conditions or when subjected to repeated regenerative stress. These are mechanistically due to direct positive regulation of Egr and Tcf3 by Tcf1 and Lef1, and significantly, forced expression of Egr1 in Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs restored HSC quiescence. In a preclinical CML model, loss of Tcf1/Lef1 did not show strong impact on leukemia initiation and progression. However, when transplanted into secondary recipients, Tcf1/Lef1-deficient LSCs failed to propagate CML. By induced deletion of Tcf1 and Lef1 in pre-established CML, we further demonstrated an intrinsic requirement for these factors in LSC self-renewal. When combined with imatinib therapy, genetic targeting of Tcf1 and Lef1 potently diminished LSCs and conferred better protection to the CML recipients. LSCs are therefore more sensitive to loss of Tcf1 and Lef1 than HSCs in their self-renewal capacity. The differential requirements in HSCs and LSCs thus identify Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors as novel therapeutic targets in treating hematological malignancies, and inhibition of Tcf1/Lef1-regulated transcriptional programs may thus provide a therapeutic window to eliminate LSCs with minimal side effect on normal HSC functions.

  10. Risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mani, S; Rybicki, L; Jagadeesh, D; Mossad, S B

    2016-05-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in recent times. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) confers increased risk for CDI because of prolonged hospital stay, immunosuppression, the need to use broad-spectrum antibiotics and a complex interplay of preparative regimen and GvHD-induced gut mucosal damage. Our study evaluated risk factors (RF) for recurrent CDI in HSCT recipients given the ubiquity of traditional RF for CDI in this population. Of the 499 allogeneic HSCT recipients transplanted between 2005 and 2012, 61 (12%) developed CDI within 6 months before transplant or 2 years after transplant and were included in the analysis. Recurrent CDI occurred in 20 (33%) patients. One year incidence of CDI recurrence was 31%. Multivariable analyses identified the number of antecedent antibiotics other than those used to treat CDI as the only significant RF for recurrence (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.09-3.52, P=0.025). Most recurrences occurred within 6 months of the first CDI, and the recurrence of CDI was associated with a trend for increased risk of mortality. This prompts the need for further investigation into secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent CDI.

  11. HEMORRHAGIC CYSTITIS AFTER ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION: RISK FACTORS, GRAFT SOURCE, AND SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Laura E.; Dasaraju, Sandhyarani; Cao, Qing; Cohn, Claudia S.; Reding, Mark; Bejanyan, Nelli; Trottier, Bryan; Rogosheske, John; Brunstein, Claudio; Warlick, Erica; Young, Jo Anne H.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Ustun, Celalettin

    2017-01-01

    Although hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), its risk factors and effects on survival are not well-known. We evaluated HC in a large cohort (n=1321, 2003 – 2012) receiving alloHCT from all graft sources, including umbilical cord blood (UCB). We compared HC patients with non-HC (control) patients and examined clinical variables at HC onset and resolution. Of these 1321 patients, 219 (16.6%) developed HC at a median of 22 days after alloHCT. BK viruria was detected in 90% of 109 tested HC patients. Median duration of HC was 27 days. At the time of HC diagnosis, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), fever, severe thrombocytopenia, and steroid use were more frequent than at the time of HC resolution. In univariate analysis, male sex, age <20 years, myeloablative conditioning with cyclophosphamide and acute GVHD were associated with HC. In multivariate analysis, HC was significantly more common in males and HLA-mismatched UCB graft recipients. Severe grade HC (grade III–IV) was associated with increased treatment-related mortality (TRM) but not with overall survival at 1 year. HC remains hazardous and therefore better prophylaxis and early interventions to limit its severity are still needed. PMID:26168069

  12. The Impact of Growth Hormone Therapy on the Apoptosis Assessment in CD34+ Hematopoietic Cells from Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Miłosz Piotr; Stecewicz, Iwona; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Paczkowska, Edyta; Rogińska, Dorota; Sobuś, Anna; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Gawrych, Elżbieta; Petriczko, Elżbieta; Walczak, Mieczysław; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2017-01-07

    Growth hormone (GH) modulates hematopoietic cell homeostasis and is associated with apoptosis control, but with limited mechanistic insights. Aim of the study was to determine whether GH therapeutic supplementation (GH-TS) could affect apoptosis of CD34+ cells enriched in hematopoietic progenitor cells of GH deficient (GHD) children. CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of 40 GHD children were collected before and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-TS and compared to 60 controls adjusted for bone age, sex, and pubertal development. Next, apoptosis assessment via different molecular techniques was performed. Finally, to comprehensively characterize apoptosis process, global gene expression profile was determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Results showed that GH-TS significantly reduced spontaneous apoptosis in CD34+ cells (p < 0.01) and results obtained using different methods to detect early and late apoptosis in analyzed cells population were consistent. GH-TS was also associated with significant downregulation of several members of TNF-alpha superfamily and other genes associated with apoptosis and stress response. Moreover, the significant overexpression of cyto-protective and cell cycle-associated genes was detected. These findings suggest that recombinant human GH has a direct anti-apoptotic activity in hematopoietic CD34+ cells derived from GHD subjects in course of GH-TS.

  13. The Impact of Growth Hormone Therapy on the Apoptosis Assessment in CD34+ Hematopoietic Cells from Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kawa, Miłosz Piotr; Stecewicz, Iwona; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Paczkowska, Edyta; Rogińska, Dorota; Sobuś, Anna; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Gawrych, Elżbieta; Petriczko, Elżbieta; Walczak, Mieczysław; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) modulates hematopoietic cell homeostasis and is associated with apoptosis control, but with limited mechanistic insights. Aim of the study was to determine whether GH therapeutic supplementation (GH-TS) could affect apoptosis of CD34+ cells enriched in hematopoietic progenitor cells of GH deficient (GHD) children. CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of 40 GHD children were collected before and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-TS and compared to 60 controls adjusted for bone age, sex, and pubertal development. Next, apoptosis assessment via different molecular techniques was performed. Finally, to comprehensively characterize apoptosis process, global gene expression profile was determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Results showed that GH-TS significantly reduced spontaneous apoptosis in CD34+ cells (p < 0.01) and results obtained using different methods to detect early and late apoptosis in analyzed cells population were consistent. GH-TS was also associated with significant downregulation of several members of TNF-alpha superfamily and other genes associated with apoptosis and stress response. Moreover, the significant overexpression of cyto-protective and cell cycle-associated genes was detected. These findings suggest that recombinant human GH has a direct anti-apoptotic activity in hematopoietic CD34+ cells derived from GHD subjects in course of GH-TS. PMID:28067847

  14. Changing Factors associated with Parent Activation after Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Pennarola, Brian W.; Rodday, Angie Mae; Bingen, Kristin; Schwartz, Lisa A.; Patel, Sunita K.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Mayer, Deborah K.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Guinan, Eva C.; Kupst, Mary Jo; Hibbard, Judith H.; Parsons, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify factors associated with parent activation in parents of children undergoing pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) in the 6 months following HSCT, and to address if their association with parent activation changes over time. Methods Measures for this analysis, including the Parent Patient Activation Measure (Parent-PAM), were completed by parents (N=198) prior to their child’s HSCT preparative regimen and again at 6 months post-HSCT. Clinical data were also collected. A repeated measures model was built to estimate the association between clinical and demographic factors and parent well-being on Parent-PAM scores. Interactions with time were considered to test for changing effects over time. Results Throughout the HSCT course, older parent age was associated with lower Parent-PAM scores (β=−0.29, p=0.02) and never being married was associated with higher scores (versus married, β=12.27, p=0.03). While higher parent emotional functioning scores were not associated with activation at baseline, they were important at 6 months (baseline: β=−0.002, p=0.96; interaction: β=0.14, p=0.03). At baseline longer duration of illness was associated with increased activation, but this effect diminished with time (baseline: β=3.29, p=0.0002; interaction: β=−2.40, p=0.02). Activation levels dropped for parents of children who went from private to public insurance (baseline: β=2.95, p=0.53; interaction: β=−13.82, p=0.004). Clinical events did not affect Parent-PAM scores. Conclusions Our findings reveal important changes in the factors associated with parent activation in the first 6 months after pediatric HSCT. These findings may reflect the emotional and financial toll of pediatric HSCT on parent activation. PMID:25519755

  15. Risk factor analysis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wen, Yu-Chuan; Huang, I-Anne; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Tsay, Pei-Kwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a clinically relevant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Currently, there is no established consensus regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Whether AIHA contributes to increased mortality is still somewhat controversial. We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of post-transplant AIHA in 265 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 17-year period. Onset of AIHA was calculated from the first documented detection of AIHA by either clinical symptoms or positive direct agglutinin test. Resolution of AIHA was defined as normalization of hemoglobin and biochemical markers of hemolysis with sustained transfusion independence. We identified 15 cases of AIHA after allo-HSCT (incidence rate, 6%). Ten (67%) of these patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test. Data were obtained for 9 boys and 6 girls after a median follow-up of 53 months (range 4–102). The median age was 5.1 years (range 0.5–15.4) at the time of HSCT and the median time to emergence was 149 days (range 42–273). No significant risk factor for post-transplant AIHA has emerged from our data to date. In the majority (14 of 15; 93%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with 12 of 15 (80%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. No splenectomy was performed in any of our patients. For various reasons, post-transplantation AIHA poses an extraordinary challenge to transplant physicians. Despite the advancements in diagnostic tools, therapeutic challenges remain due to the myriad interacting pathways in AIHA. PMID:27861376

  16. Risk factor analysis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wen, Yu-Chuan; Huang, I-Anne; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Tsay, Pei-Kwei

    2016-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a clinically relevant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Currently, there is no established consensus regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Whether AIHA contributes to increased mortality is still somewhat controversial.We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of post-transplant AIHA in 265 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 17-year period. Onset of AIHA was calculated from the first documented detection of AIHA by either clinical symptoms or positive direct agglutinin test. Resolution of AIHA was defined as normalization of hemoglobin and biochemical markers of hemolysis with sustained transfusion independence.We identified 15 cases of AIHA after allo-HSCT (incidence rate, 6%). Ten (67%) of these patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test. Data were obtained for 9 boys and 6 girls after a median follow-up of 53 months (range 4-102). The median age was 5.1 years (range 0.5-15.4) at the time of HSCT and the median time to emergence was 149 days (range 42-273). No significant risk factor for post-transplant AIHA has emerged from our data to date. In the majority (14 of 15; 93%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with 12 of 15 (80%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. No splenectomy was performed in any of our patients.For various reasons, post-transplantation AIHA poses an extraordinary challenge to transplant physicians. Despite the advancements in diagnostic tools, therapeutic challenges remain due to the myriad interacting pathways in AIHA.

  17. Geminin deletion increases the number of fetal hematopoietic stem cells by affecting the expression of key transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Karamitros, Dimitris; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Kotantaki, Panoraia; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Bähr-Ivacevic, Tomi; Benes, Vladimir; Lygerou, Zoi; Kioussis, Dimitris; Taraviras, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Balancing stem cell self-renewal and initiation of lineage specification programs is essential for the development and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. We have specifically ablated geminin in the developing murine hematopoietic system and observed profound defects in the generation of mature blood cells, leading to embryonic lethality. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) accumulated in the fetal liver following geminin ablation, while committed progenitors were reduced. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis identified key HSC transcription factors as being upregulated upon geminin deletion, revealing a gene network linked with geminin that controls fetal hematopoiesis. In order to obtain mechanistic insight into the ability of geminin to regulate transcription, we examined Hoxa9 as an example of a key gene in definitive hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that in human K562 cells geminin is associated with HOXA9 regulatory elements and its absence increases HOXA9 transcription similarly to that observed in vivo. Moreover, silencing geminin reduced recruitment of the PRC2 component SUZ12 to the HOXA9 locus and resulted in an increase in RNA polymerase II recruitment and H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), whereas the repressive marks H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 were reduced. The chromatin landscape was also modified at the regulatory regions of HOXA10 and GATA1. K562 cells showed a reduced ability to differentiate to erythrocytes and megakaryocytes upon geminin silencing. Our data suggest that geminin is indispensable for fetal hematopoiesis and regulates the generation of a physiological pool of stem and progenitor cells in the fetal hematopoietic system.

  18. Factors associated with improved outcomes after second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Neethu N; Jenkins, Lydia M; Cui, Haiyan; Jenkins, Craig; Anwer, Faiz; Yeager, Andrew M; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    A second allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is an important therapeutic consideration for patients relapsing after their first. We conducted a retrospective review of 41 pediatric patients with leukemia that underwent a second allo-HCT at our institution. Overall, 53.7 and 43.9 % of patients were alive and disease-free at 1 and 5 years, respectively, after the second allo-HCT. The factors affecting outcome by both univariate and multivariate analysis were interval between transplants and the use of a myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen prior to second transplant. Outcomes were inferior in patients who received their second transplant <6 months from their first HCT when compared to patients in whom the interval between HCTs was 6-12 or more than 12 months. Interval between HCTs was also significant when each type of leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) n = 21, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) n = 11, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) n = 7) was analyzed separately. In univariate analysis, use of the same donor and use of a matched sibling donor resulted in significant improved outcome. There was not a significant association between disease-free survival (DFS) and age, remission status, use of total body irradiation (TBI) before second HCT, or type of leukemia. Second allogeneic HCT can be a curative therapeutic option for leukemia patients relapsing after their first transplant. As more targeted therapies have become available, patients that relapse after first HCT are more likely to achieve remission. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be more candidates for second HCT with improved performance and remission status, ultimately leading to a better outcome with the second HCT.

  19. Platelet factor 4 promotes adhesion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and binds IL-8: novel mechanisms for modulation of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Nesmelova, Irina; Mayo, Kevin; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Pitchford, Simon; Slungaard, Arne

    2003-06-15

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule C-X-C chemokine that has weak chemotactic potency but strongly inhibits hematopoiesis through an unknown mechanism. We find that PF4 binds to human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with a median effective concentration of 1 microg/mL but not after exposure to chondroitinase ABC. PF4 enhances adhesion of HPCs to intact stroma. Committed progenitors also adhere avidly to immobilized PF4. This adhesion is time-dependent, requires metabolic activity, causes cytoskeletal rearrangement, and induces cell-cycle inhibition. Using extracellular acidification rate to indicate transmembrane signaling, we find that interleukin-8 (IL-8), but not PF4, activates CD34+ progenitors, and PF4 blocks IL-8-mediated activation. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that PF4 binds IL-8 with high (dissociation constant [Kd] = 42 nM) affinity. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of IL-8 and PF4 in solution confirms this interaction. We conclude that PF4 has the capacity to influence hematopoiesis through mechanisms not mediated by a classical high-affinity, 7-transmembrane domain chemokine receptor. Instead, PF4 may modulate the hematopoietic milieu both directly, by promoting progenitor adhesion and quiescence through interaction with an HPC chondroitin sulfate-containing moiety, and indirectly, by binding to or interfering with signaling caused by other, hematopoietically active chemokines, such as IL-8.

  20. Identification of key factors regulating self-renewal and differentiation in EML hematopoietic precursor cells by RNA-sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shan; Deng, Shuyun; Chen, Kenian; Wu, Jia Qian

    2014-11-11

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used clinically for transplantation treatment to rebuild a patient's hematopoietic system in many diseases such as leukemia and lymphoma. Elucidating the mechanisms controlling HSCs self-renewal and differentiation is important for application of HSCs for research and clinical uses. However, it is not possible to obtain large quantity of HSCs due to their inability to proliferate in vitro. To overcome this hurdle, we used a mouse bone marrow derived cell line, the EML (Erythroid, Myeloid, and Lymphocytic) cell line, as a model system for this study. RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) has been increasingly used to replace microarray for gene expression studies. We report here a detailed method of using RNA-Seq technology to investigate the potential key factors in regulation of EML cell self-renewal and differentiation. The protocol provided in this paper is divided into three parts. The first part explains how to culture EML cells and separate Lin-CD34+ and Lin-CD34- cells. The second part of the protocol offers detailed procedures for total RNA preparation and the subsequent library construction for high-throughput sequencing. The last part describes the method for RNA-Seq data analysis and explains how to use the data to identify differentially expressed transcription factors between Lin-CD34+ and Lin-CD34- cells. The most significantly differentially expressed transcription factors were identified to be the potential key regulators controlling EML cell self-renewal and differentiation. In the discussion section of this paper, we highlight the key steps for successful performance of this experiment. In summary, this paper offers a method of using RNA-Seq technology to identify potential regulators of self-renewal and differentiation in EML cells. The key factors identified are subjected to downstream functional analysis in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Endoglin expression level discriminates long-term hematopoietic from short-term clonogenic progenitor cells in the aorta

    PubMed Central

    Roques, Marion; Durand, Charles; Gautier, Rodolphe; Canto, Pierre-Yves; Petit-Cocault, Laurence; Yvernogeau, Laurent; Dunon, Dominique; Souyri, Michèle; Jaffredo, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    CD105 is an auxiliary receptor for the transforming growth factor beta superfamily, highly expressed on proliferating endothelial cells and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Because CD105 mRNA expression was reported in the developing aortic region, we further characterized its expression profile in the aorta and examined the hematopoietic potential of CD105+ cells. Aortic endothelial cells, intra-aortic hematopoietic cell clusters and the purified cell fraction enriched in progenitor/hematopoietic stem cell activity expressed CD105. Aortic hematopoietic short-term clonogenic progenitors were highly enriched in the CD105intermediate population whereas more immature long-term progenitors/hematopoietic stem cells are contained within the CD105high population. This places CD105 on the short list of molecules discriminating short-term versus long-term progenitors in the aorta. Furthermore, decreasing transforming growth factor beta signaling increases the number of clonogenic progenitors. This suggests that CD105 expression level defines a hierarchy among aortic hematopoietic cells allowing purification of clonogenic versus more immature hematopoietic progenitors, and that the transforming growth factor beta pathway plays a critical role in this process. PMID:22271899

  2. Hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor interacting protein is overexpressed in gastric cancer and promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yingying; Li, Ling; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yunjing; Liang, Yingchun; Lv, Jinjing; Fan, Zhongyi; Guo, Jing; Hong, Tian; Ji, Beibei; Ji, Quanbo; Mei, Guohui; Ding, Lihua; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Xiaojie; Ye, Qinong

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor interacting protein (HPIP) has been shown to play an important role in the development and progression of some cancers. However, the role of HPIP in gastric cancer (GC) is unclear. Here, we show that HPIP is upregulated in most GC patients and promotes GC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In GC patients, HPIP positively associates with tumor size and nodal metastasis, and negatively associates with tumor differentiation. Hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor interacting protein increases GC cell proliferation through activation of G1/S and G2/M cell cycle transitions, accompanied by a marked increase of the positive cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1. Hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor interacting protein enhances GC cell migration and invasion, and modulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which plays a key role in cancer cell migration and invasion. These data underscore the critical role of HPIP in GC cell proliferation and progression and suggest that HPIP inhibition may be a useful therapeutic strategy for GC treatment. PMID:26211905

  3. MicroRNA-30 inhibits antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 in mouse and human hematopoietic cells after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Hong; Ha, Cam T; Xiao, Mang

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that microRNA-30 (miR-30) expression was initiated by radiation-induced proinflammatory factor IL-1β and NFkB activation in mouse and human hematopoietic cells. However, the downstream effectors of miR-30 and its specific role in radiation-induced cell death are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated effects of radiation on miR-30 expression and activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway Bcl-2 family factors in in vivo mouse and in vitro human hematopoietic cells. CD2F1 mice and human CD34+ cells were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation. In addition to survival studies, mouse blood, bone marrow (BM) and spleen cells and human CD34+ cells were collected at 4 h, and 1, 3 and 4 days after irradiation to determine apoptotic and stress response signals. Our results showed that mouse serum miR-30, DNA damage marker γ-H2AX in BM, and Bim, Bax and Bak expression, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 and -7 activation in BM and/or spleen cells were upregulated in a radiation dose-dependent manner. Antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 was significantly downregulated, whereas Bcl-2 was less changed or unaltered in the irradiated mouse cells and human CD34+ cells. Furthermore, a putative miR-30 binding site was found in the 3' UTR of Mcl-1 mRNA. miR-30 directly inhibits the expression of Mcl-1 through binding to its target sequence, which was demonstrated by a luciferase reporter assay, and the finding that Mcl-1 was uninhibited by irradiation in miR-30 knockdown CD34+ cells. Bcl-2 expression was not affected by miR-30. Our data suggest miR-30 plays a key role in radiation-induced apoptosis through directly targeting Mcl-1in hematopoietic cells.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin D1 promoter by STAT5: its involvement in cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, I; Kitamura, T; Wakao, H; Tanaka, H; Hashimoto, K; Albanese, C; Downward, J; Pestell, R G; Kanakura, Y

    1999-01-01

    STAT5 is a member of a family of transcription factors that participate in the signal transduction pathways of many hormones and cytokines. Although STAT5 is suggested to play a crucial role in the biological effects of cytokines, its downstream target(s) associated with cell growth control is largely unknown. In a human interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line F-36P-mpl, the induced expression of dominant-negative (dn)-STAT5 and of dn-ras led to inhibition of IL-3-dependent cell growth, accompanying the reduced expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. Also, both constitutively active forms of STAT5A (1*6-STAT5A) and ras (H-rasG12V) enabled F-36P-mpl cells to proliferate without added growth factors. In NIH 3T3 cells, 1*6-STAT5A and H-rasG12V individually and cooperatively transactivated the cyclin D1 promoter in luciferase assays. Both dn-STAT5 and dn-ras suppressed IL-3-induced cyclin D1 promoter activities in F-36P-mpl cells. Using a series of mutant cyclin D1 promoters, 1*6-STAT5A was found to transactivate the cyclin D1 promoter through the potential STAT-binding sequence at -481 bp. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, STAT5 bound to the element in response to IL-3. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of dn-STAT5 on IL-3-dependent growth was restored by expression of cyclin D1. Thus STAT5, in addition to ras signaling, appears to mediate transcriptional regulation of cyclin D1, thereby contributing to cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells. PMID:10064602

  5. Muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are hematopoietic in origin

    PubMed Central

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Jackson, Kathyjo A.; Camargo, Fernando D.; Ferrari, Giuliana; Mavilio, Fulvio; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that mononuclear cells from murine skeletal muscle contain the potential to repopulate all major peripheral blood lineages in lethally irradiated mice, but the origin of this activity is unknown. We have fractionated muscle cells on the basis of hematopoietic markers to show that the active population exclusively expresses the hematopoietic stem cell antigens Sca-1 and CD45. Muscle cells obtained from 6- to 8-week-old C57BL/6-CD45.1 mice and enriched for cells expressing Sca-1 and CD45 were able to generate hematopoietic but not myogenic colonies in vitro and repopulated multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated C57BL/6-CD45.2 mice. These data show that muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are likely derived from the hematopoietic system and are a result not of transdifferentiation of myogenic stem cells but instead of the presence of substantial numbers of hematopoietic stem cells in the muscle. Although CD45-negative cells were highly myogenic in vitro and in vivo, CD45-positive muscle-derived cells displayed only very limited myogenic activity and only in vivo. PMID:11830662

  6. Dual requirement for the ETS transcription factors Fli-1 and Erg in hematopoietic stem cells and the megakaryocyte lineage

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Elizabeth A.; Loughran, Stephen J.; Baldwin, Tracey M.; Josefsson, Emma C.; Ellis, Sarah; Watson, Dennis K.; Nurden, Paquita; Metcalf, Donald; Hilton, Douglas J.; Alexander, Warren S.; Kile, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    Fli-1 and Erg are closely related members of the Ets family of transcription factors. Both genes are translocated in human cancers, including Ewing's sarcoma, leukemia, and in the case of Erg, more than half of all prostate cancers. Although evidence from mice and humans suggests that Fli-1 is required for megakaryopoiesis, and that Erg is required for normal adult hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regulation, their precise physiological roles remain to be defined. To elucidate the relationship between Fli-1 and Erg in hematopoiesis, we conducted an analysis of mice carrying mutations in both genes. Our results demonstrate that there is a profound genetic interaction between Fli-1 and Erg. Double heterozygotes displayed phenotypes more dramatic than single heterozygotes: severe thrombocytopenia, with a significant deficit in megakaryocyte numbers and evidence of megakaryocyte dysmorphogenesis, and loss of HSCs accompanied by a reduction in the number of committed hematopoietic progenitor cells. These results illustrate an indispensable requirement for both Fli-1 and Erg in normal HSC and megakaryocyte homeostasis, and suggest these transcription factors may coregulate common target genes. PMID:19666492

  7. Dual requirement for the ETS transcription factors Fli-1 and Erg in hematopoietic stem cells and the megakaryocyte lineage.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Elizabeth A; Loughran, Stephen J; Baldwin, Tracey M; Josefsson, Emma C; Ellis, Sarah; Watson, Dennis K; Nurden, Paquita; Metcalf, Donald; Hilton, Douglas J; Alexander, Warren S; Kile, Benjamin T

    2009-08-18

    Fli-1 and Erg are closely related members of the Ets family of transcription factors. Both genes are translocated in human cancers, including Ewing's sarcoma, leukemia, and in the case of Erg, more than half of all prostate cancers. Although evidence from mice and humans suggests that Fli-1 is required for megakaryopoiesis, and that Erg is required for normal adult hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regulation, their precise physiological roles remain to be defined. To elucidate the relationship between Fli-1 and Erg in hematopoiesis, we conducted an analysis of mice carrying mutations in both genes. Our results demonstrate that there is a profound genetic interaction between Fli-1 and Erg. Double heterozygotes displayed phenotypes more dramatic than single heterozygotes: severe thrombocytopenia, with a significant deficit in megakaryocyte numbers and evidence of megakaryocyte dysmorphogenesis, and loss of HSCs accompanied by a reduction in the number of committed hematopoietic progenitor cells. These results illustrate an indispensable requirement for both Fli-1 and Erg in normal HSC and megakaryocyte homeostasis, and suggest these transcription factors may coregulate common target genes.

  8. [Hematopoietic growth factors in primary and therapy-related bone marrow insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Hansen, B; Hippe, E; Jacobsen, G K; Johnsen, H E

    1992-06-08

    This investigation is retrospective and comprises 20 patients with bone-marrow insufficiency. During the period 1.4.1988-1.3.1991, these patients were treated with erythropoietin (Epo), the granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or the granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Thirteen patients had primary bone-marrow insufficiency: six had the myelodysplastic syndrome, three had primary myelofibrosis, two aplastic anemia and two myelomatosis. On account of dominating symptoms of anemia, five patients received Epo while eight received GM-CSF as part of an extensive clinical trial of this preparation. Seven patients with relapse of the haematological malignant disease had bone-marrow insufficiency and pancytopenia secondary to intensive chemotherapy/irradiation: four of these patients received GM-CSF and two received G-CSF with the object of increasing bone-marrow regeneration and to render further chemotherapy possible. One patient received GM-CSF with the object of improving bone-marrow function after autologous bone-marrow transplantation. Treatment with Epo for ten months combined with treatment with interferon for six months resulted in normalization of the haemoglobin concentration in one patient with bone-marrow insufficiency on account of primary myelofibrosis. Treatment with Epo for briefer periods in lower doses was without effect in four other patients with primary bone-marrow insufficiency. Treatment with GM-CSF and G-CSF resulted in neutrophil leukocytosis in 12 out of 15 patients (80%) and, in six out of 14 patients (43%), increased marrow cellularity was demonstrated by means of histological examination of the bone-marrow. One patient showed normal haemoglobin levels during treatment with GM-CSF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Hematopoietic growth factors support in the elderly cancer patients treated with antiblastic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rupolo, Maurizio; Lleshi, Arben; Cacopardo, Bruno; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2013-11-01

    The 60% of tumors affected patients >65years of age and the future previsions are considering an amount of 70% after 2030. Elderly Patients presents multiple comorbidity, polipharmacy, and disability. Geriatric assessment helps physicians to take the best therapeutic decisions. Clinical conditions influence efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy. Prophylactic use of G-CSF after chemotherapy lowers the rate and length of severe neutropenia , and decreases the episodes of febrile neutropenia. Anemia is a hematologic condition associated with ageing , but is frequently associated to concomitant chronic disease. Stem cells display increasing resistance to erythropoietin in the elderly patients and this is connected with the onset of pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of this age . Anemia is a common adverse event in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Several of the symptoms associated with anemia, such as fatigue, syncope, palpitations and dyspnea, reduce patient activity and have a profound effect on the quality of life [QOL]. Considering the unfit or frail status of elderly patient the at home use of peg-filgrastim and weekly or three weekly erythropoietin administration could be preferred for this setting of patients that lack of specialized nursing care or facilities. Further studies, considering the several differences in health organizations in vary countries, could be held to state the real impact of the biosimilars in comparison to the long acting originators in the reduction of costs in this group of patients.

  10. Ex vivo expansion of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Ann; Delaney, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Despite progress in our understanding of the growth factors that support the progressive maturation of the various cell lineages of the hematopoietic system, less is known about factors that govern the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and our ability to expand human HSPC numbers ex vivo remains limited. Interest in stem cell expansion has been heightened by the increasing importance of HSCs in the treatment of both malignant and nonmalignant diseases, as well as their use in gene therapy. To date, most attempts to ex vivo expand HSPCs have used hematopoietic growth factors but have not achieved clinically relevant effects. More recent approaches, including our studies in which activation of the Notch signaling pathway has enabled a clinically relevant ex vivo expansion of HSPCs, have led to renewed interest in this arena. Here we briefly review early attempts at ex vivo expansion by cytokine stimulation followed by an examination of our studies investigating the role of Notch signaling in HSPC self-renewal. We will also review other recently developed approaches for ex vivo expansion, primarily focused on the more extensively studied cord blood–derived stem cell. Finally, we discuss some of the challenges still facing this field. PMID:21436068

  11. Factors Associated With Parental Activation in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Pennarola, Brian W.; Rodday, Angie Mae; Mayer, Deborah K.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Davies, Stella M.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Patel, Sunita; Bingen, Kristin; Kupst, Mary Jo; Schwartz, Lisa; Guinan, Eva C.; Hibbard, Judith H.; Parsons, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation, the extension of self-efficacy into self-management, is an essential component of effective chronic care. In pediatric populations, caregiver activation is also needed for proper disease management. This study investigates the relationships between parental activation and other characteristics of parent–child dyads (N = 198) presenting for pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Parental activation concerning their child’s health was assessed using the Parent Patient Activation Measure (Parent-PAM), a modified version of the well-validated Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Using hierarchical linear regression and following the Belsky process model for determining parenting behaviors, a multivariate model was created for parental activation on behalf of their child that showed that the parent’s age, rating of their own general health, self-activation, and duration of the child’s illness were significantly related to Parent-PAM score. Our findings characterize a potentially distinct form of activation in a parent–child cohort preparing for a demanding clinical course. PMID:22203645

  12. The involvement of hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human spinal glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deliang; Wang, Li; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Xinjun; Xiong, Hui

    2016-05-01

    To date, hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein (HPIP), a co-repressor for the transcription factor PBX, has been involved into the initiation and onset in a wide variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HPIP-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the spinal glioblastoma have been under investigation. In the present study, spinal glioblastoma tissues, U87, and U251 cell lines were used and subjected to in vitro assays, such as RT-PCR, and Western blot. Here, in vitro assays revealed that HPIP mRNA and protein were highly expressed in five cases of spinal glioblastoma tissues, compared with non-tumor tissues. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrated HPIP promoted the U87 and U251 cell growth and regulated the G1/S phase transitions in U87 and U251 cell cycle, respectively, accompanied by the increased expression of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1. Furthermore, HPIP increased the expression of N-cadherin, Slug, and MMP2, and decreased the expression of E-cadherin. By contrast, knockdown of HPIP reversed HPIP-induced EMT biomarkers, migration, and invasion in U87 and U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings identified HPIP plays an important role in the progression and EMT of spinal glioblastoma, by which cell growth is improved. Thus, HPIP gene or protein could act as a useful target in the clinical practice.

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gurudutta, Gangenahalli

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are endowed with a distinct potential to bolster self-renewal and to generate progeny that differentiate into mature cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Both hematopoietic stem cells and mature cells have the same genome, but their gene expression is controlled by an additional layer of epigenetics such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, enabling each cell-type to acquire various forms and functions. Until recently, several studies have largely focussed on the transcription factors andniche factors for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which hematopoietic cells replicate and differentiate. Several lines of emerging evidence suggest that epigenetic modifications eventually result in a defined chromatin structure and an “individual” gene expression pattern, which play an essential role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Distinct epigenetic marks decide which sets of genes may be expressed and which genes are kept silent. Epigenetic mechanisms are interdependent and ensure lifelong production of blood and bone marrow, thereby contributing to stem cell homeostasis. The epigenetic analysis of hematopoiesis raises the exciting possibility that chromatin structure is dynamic enough for regulated expression of genes. Though controlled chromatin accessibility plays an essential role in maintaining blood homeostasis; mutations in chromatin impacts on the regulation of genes critical to the development of leukemia. In this review, we explored the contribution of epigenetic machinery which has implications for the ramification of molecular details of hematopoietic self-renewal for normal development and underlying events that potentially co-operate to induce leukemia. PMID:27426084

  14. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-02

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  15. Src family kinase mediated negative regulation of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization involves both intrinsic and microenvironmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Borneo, Jovencio; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Sims, Emily Catherine; Vemula, Sasidhar; Orschell, Christie M.; Yoder, Merv; Kapur, Reuben

    2007-01-01

    Objective The intracellular signals that contribute to G-CSF receptor induced stem cell mobilization are poorly characterized. Methods We show enhanced G-CSF induced mobilization of stem cells in mice deficient in the expression of Src family kinases (SFK−/−), which is associated with hypersensitivity of SFK−/− bone marrow cells to G-CSF as well as sustained activation of Stat3. Results A proteome map of the bone marrow fluid derived from wildtype and SFK−/− mice revealed a significant global reduction in the number of proteins in SFK−/− mice compared to controls, which was associated with elevated MMP-9 levels, reduced SDF-1 expression, and enhanced break down of VCAM-1. Transplantation of wildtype or SFK−/− stem cells into wildtype mice and treatment with G-CSF recapitulated the G-CSF induced increase in stem cell mobilization noted in SFK−/− non-transplanted mice; however, the increase was significantly less. G-CSF treatment of SFK−/− mice engrafted with wildtype stem cells also demonstrated a modest increase in stem cell mobilization compared to controls, however the observed increase was greatest in mice completely devoid of SFKs. Conclusions These data suggest an involvement of both hematopoietic intrinsic and microenvironmental factors in Src kinase mediated mobilization of stem cells and identify Src kinases as potential targets for modulating stem cell mobilization. PMID:17588471

  16. Pericytes, integral components of adult hematopoietic stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Sá da Bandeira, D; Casamitjana, J; Crisan, M

    2017-03-01

    The interest in perivascular cells as a niche for adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is significantly growing. In the adult bone marrow (BM), perivascular cells and HSCs cohabit. Among perivascular cells, pericytes are precursors of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. In situ, pericytes are recognised by their localisation to the abluminal side of the blood vessel wall and closely associated with endothelial cells, in combination with the expression of markers such as CD146, neural glial 2 (NG2), platelet derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), nestin (Nes) and/or leptin receptor (LepR). However, not all pericytes share a common phenotype: different immunophenotypes can be associated with distinct mesenchymal features, including hematopoietic support. In adult BM, arteriolar and sinusoidal pericytes control HSC behaviour, maintenance, quiescence and trafficking through paracrine effects. Different groups identified and characterized hematopoietic supportive pericyte subpopulations using various markers and mouse models. In this review, we summarize recent work performed by others to understand the role of the perivascular niche in the biology of HSCs in adults, as well as their importance in the development of therapies.

  17. Human parainfluenza virus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: risk factors, management, mortality, and changes over time.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Celalettin; Slabý, Jiří; Shanley, Ryan M; Vydra, Jan; Smith, Angela R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Young, Jo-Anne H

    2012-10-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are uncommon, yet high-risk pathogens after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). We evaluated 5178 pediatric and adult patients undergoing HCT between 1974 and 2010 to determine the incidence, risk factors, response to treatment, and outcome of HPIV infection as well as any change in frequency or character of HPIV infection over time. HPIV was identified in 173 patients (3.3%); type 3 was most common (66%). HPIV involved upper respiratory tract infection (URTI; 57%), lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI; 9%), and both areas of the respiratory tract (34%), at a median of 62 days after transplantation. In more recent years, HPIV has occurred later after HCT, whereas the proportion with nosocomial infection and mortality decreased. Over the last decade, HPIV was more common in older patients and in those receiving reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). RIC was a significant risk factor for later (beyond day +30). HPIV infections, and this association was strongest in patients with URTI. HCT using a matched unrelated donor (MURD), mismatched related donor (MMRD), age 10 to 19 years, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were all risk factors for HPIV infections. LRTI, early (<30 days), age 10 to 19 years, MMRD, steroid use, and coinfection with other pathogens were risk factors for mortality. The survival of patients with LRTI, especially very early infections, was poor regardless of ribavirin treatment. HPIV incidence remains low, but may have delayed onset associated with RIC regimens and improving survival. Effective prophylaxis and treatment for HPIV are needed.

  18. [Effects of blood serum from rats with combined radiation-thermal injury on the bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells growth].

    PubMed

    Ran, Xin-Ze; Su, Yong-Ping; Zheng, Huai-En; Guo, Chao-Hua; Liu, Du-Hu; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Ai, Guo-Ping

    2005-02-01

    To observe the effects of blood serum from rats with radiation injury, thermal injury and combined radiation-thermal lesions on growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells and the change of their serum cytokine levels, total body irradiation of rats was performed with 12 Gy gamma ray from a (60)Co source, and 30% total body surface area III degree thermal lesion on the back was inflicted with a 5 kW bromotungsten lamp. The blood serum from these animals was collected at 3, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after injury. Then the blood serum was added to the culture medium of erythrocyte progenitor cells (CFU-E, BFU-E) or granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM) at final concentration of 10 microg/ml. The results showed that the colony number of CFU-E, BFU-E and CFU-GM formed after addition of the blood serum from rats with thermal or combined radiation-thermal injury was significantly higher than that from normal rats at 3, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after injury and reached its peak value at 24 hours after injury (342.8, 261.6 and 228.4% respectively from burned rats, 252.4, 205.1 and 174.2% respectively from rats with combined radiation-thermal injury as compared with that of normal rats). However, a few CFU-E, BFU-E or CFU-GM formation was found after addition of the blood serum from irradiated rats. At the same time, the level of TNF alpha and IL-6 in serum of burn group and combined radiation-thermal injury group was markedly higher than that of normal group, even more higher than that of irradiation injury group (P < 0.01). It is concluded that the blood serum from rats with thermal lesion or combined radiation-thermal injury improves the growth of erythrocyte and granulocyte progenitor cells. On the contrary, the blood serum from the irradiated rats shows the inhibiting effects, definitely related to their serum cytokines changes.

  19. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  20. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  1. Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Risk Factors and Stratification, Prophylaxis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Giralt, Sergio A

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), can develop in a subset of patients, primarily after myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it also may occur after reduced-intensity conditioning. Severe VOD/SOS, typically characterized by multiorgan failure, has been associated with a mortality rate greater than 80%. Therefore, an accurate and prompt diagnosis of VOD/SOS is essential for early initiation of appropriate therapy to improve clinical outcomes. Moreover, some studies have support the use of prophylaxis for patients who are at high risk of developing VOD/SOS. This review summarizes risk factors associated with development of VOD/SOS, including pretransplantation patient characteristics and factors related to stem cell transplantation, that can facilitate patient stratification according to risk. The incidence of VOD/SOS, clinical features, and diagnostic criteria are reviewed. Data on emerging treatment strategies for patients with VOD/SOS are discussed in the context of recent treatment guidelines. Additionally, options for prophylaxis in individuals who are at increased risk are presented. Although historically only those patients with moderate to severe VOD/SOS have been treated, early therapy and prophylaxis may be appropriate for many patients and may have the potential to improve patients' outcomes and survival, including for those with nonsevere disease.

  2. Minor ABO-mismatches are risk factors for acute graft-versus-host disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ludajic, Katarina; Balavarca, Yesilda; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Fischer, Gottfried F; Faé, Ingrid; Kalhs, Peter; Pohlreich, David; Kouba, Michal; Dobrovolna, Marie; Greinix, Hildegard T

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the impact of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood group matching on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) of 154 patients matched at 10/10 HLA loci with unrelated donors. ABO and Rh, as potential risk factors, were modeled with the clinical outcome--acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD), relapse, treatment-related mortality (TRM), and overall survival (OS)--by simple, multiple, and competing risk analyses. We found that minor ABO-mismatches represent a significant risk factor for aGVHD (II-IV) with an estimated risk increase of almost 3-fold (hazard ratio [HR]=2.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43-5.95, P=.003), and even 4-fold for aGVHD (III-IV) (HR=4.24, 95% CI: 1.70-10.56, P=.002), but not for other transplant endpoints. No significant association of the Rh matching status with any of the HSCT endpoints was seen. These results suggest that ABO minor mismatches may play a role in aGvHD pathophysiology, possibly by providing the setting for T cell activation and antibody mediated damage. To decrease the risk of aGVHD, ABO matching should be considered in HSCT.

  3. Plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, a number of cell culture and preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired by controversy and remained dormant. This chapter provides a brief review of evidence for HSC plasticity including our findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse. These studies strongly support the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and may be the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body.

  4. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  5. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in children after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: incidence, risk factors, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Yoo, K H; Sung, K W; Koo, H H; Kwon, Y J; Kwon, M M; Park, H J; Park, B-K; Kim, Y Y; Park, J A; Im, H J; Seo, J J; Kang, H J; Shin, H Y; Ahn, H S

    2010-08-01

    Four hundred and sixty-seven hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) (217 autologous and 250 allogeneic HSCT) were performed in 374 children at four pediatric HSCT centers in Korea from January 2005 to December 2007. Among 467 transplants, veno-occlusive disease (VOD) developed in 72 transplants (15.4%) at a median of 10 days after HSCT. Multivariate analysis showed that BU or TBI-containing regimen (P=0.002), VOD prophylaxis without lipo-prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) (P=0.012), number of previous HSCT (P=0.014), and pretransplant serum ferritin (P=0.018) were independent risk factors for developing VOD. Mean serum ferritin levels were significantly higher in HSCT with VOD (2109.6+/-2842.5 ng/ml) than in HSCT without VOD (1315.9+/-1094.4 ng/ml) (P<0.001). The relative risk of death within 100 days of HSCT in transplants with VOD compared with transplants without VOD was 3.39 (confidence interval: 1.78-6.45). Our results suggest that lipo-PGE1 might have a protective effect against the development of VOD, and pretransplant serum ferritin could act as a risk factor for VOD. A larger prospective study is needed to confirm a possible role of lipo-PGE1 and iron chelation therapy in reducing the incidence of VOD.

  6. Relationships among symptoms, psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kenzik, Kelly; Huang, I-Chan; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Shenkman, Elizabeth; Wingard, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mediating effect of depressive symptoms on the relationship between physical symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors (HSCT); and to test a conceptual model of psychosocial factors, in addition to physical and psychological symptoms, that might contribute to HRQOL. Methods This is a secondary data analysis using subjects (N=662) identified from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research for HSCT survivors who were treated in 40 North American Medical Centers. Data were collected through mailed surveys, phone interviews, and medical records. We used structural equation modeling to test the mediating role of depressive symptoms on the relationship of physical symptoms with HRQOL. We also tested comprehensive pathways from physical symptoms to HRQOL by adding other psychosocial factors including optimism, coping, and social constraints. Results In the depressive symptom mediation analyses, physical symptoms had a stronger direct effect on physical HRQOL (b=−0.98, p<0.001) than depressive symptoms (b=0.23, p>0.05). Depressive symptoms were associated with mental HRQOL and mediated the relationship between physical symptoms and mental HRQOL. In the comprehensive pathway analyses, physical symptoms remained the most significant factor to be associated with physical HRQOL. In contrast, depressive symptoms had a direct effect (b=−0.76, p<0.001) on mental HRQOL and were a significant mediator. Psychosocial factors were directly associated with mental HRQOL and indirectly associated with mental HRQOL through depressive symptoms. Conclusion Physical symptoms are most strongly associated with physical HRQOL; while depressive symptoms and psychosocial factors impact mental HRQOL more than physical HRQOL. Interventions targeting physical/psychological symptoms and psychosocial factors may improve HRQOL of HSCT survivors. PMID:25193598

  7. CCR7 is involved in BCR-ABL/STAP-2-mediated cell growth in hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kaori; Iwakami, Masashi; Muromoto, Ryuta; Inagaki, Takuya; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki; Sekine, Yuichi; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-08-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a clonal disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and its oncogenic product, BCR-ABL, which activates multiple pathways involved in cell survival, growth promotion, and disease progression. We previously reported that in murine hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells, signal transducing adaptor protein-2 (STAP-2) binds to BCR-ABL and up-regulates BCR-ABL phosphorylation, leading to enhanced activation of its downstream signaling molecules. The binding of STAP-2 to BCR-ABL also influenced the expression levels of chemokine receptors, such as CXCR4 and CCR7. For the induction of CCR7 expression, signals mediated by the MAPK/ERK pathway were critical in Ba/F3 cells expressing BCR-ABL and STAP-2. In addition, STAP-2 cooperated with BCR-ABL to induce the production of CCR7 ligands, CCL19 and CCL21. Our results demonstrate a contribution of CCR7 to STAP-2-dependent enhancement of BCR-ABL-mediated cell growth in Ba/F3 cells.

  8. Genetic modification of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic cells with human coagulation factor IX-expressing plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sam, Mohammad Reza; Azadbakhsh, Azadeh Sadat; Farokhi, Farrah; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Sam, Sohrab; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Haddad-Mashadrizeh, Aliakbar; Delirezh, Nowruz; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2016-05-01

    Ex-vivo gene therapy of hemophilias requires suitable bioreactors for secretion of hFIX into the circulation and stem cells hold great potentials in this regard. Viral vectors are widely manipulated and used to transfer hFIX gene into stem cells. However, little attention has been paid to the manipulation of hFIX transgene itself. Concurrently, the efficacy of such a therapeutic approach depends on determination of which vectors give maximal transgene expression. With this in mind, TF-1 (primary hematopoietic lineage) and rat-bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were transfected with five hFIX-expressing plasmids containing different combinations of two human β-globin (hBG) introns inside the hFIX-cDNA and Kozak element and hFIX expression was evaluated by different methods. In BMSCs and TF-1 cells, the highest hFIX level was obtained from the intron-less and hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids respectively. The highest hFIX activity was obtained from the cells that carrying the hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids. BMSCs were able to produce higher hFIX by 1.4 to 4.7-fold increase with activity by 2.4 to 4.4-fold increase compared to TF-1 cells transfected with the same constructs. BMSCs and TF-1 cells could be effectively bioengineered without the use of viral vectors and hFIX minigene containing hBG introns could represent a particular interest in stem cell-based gene therapy of hemophilias.

  9. Analysis of factors affecting development of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with Hurler syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khanna, G; Van Heest, A E; Agel, J; Bjoraker, K; Grewal, S; Abel, S; Krivit, W; Peters, C; Orchard, P J

    2007-03-01

    Children with Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (MPSIH)) have skeletal, joint and soft tissue abnormalities that may persist or progress after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report our single center experience with development of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in 43 children with MPSIH after HSCT. Twenty-three children (59%) developed CTS following HSCT; 19 of the 39 children with enzyme activity in the normal or heterozygous range developed CTS (49%), whereas all four children with low heterozygous or absent enzyme activity developed CTS after HSCT. Fourteen of 19 related donor marrow recipients, eight of 19 of those receiving an unrelated donor graft and one of five unrelated cord blood recipients developed CTS. The mean age at surgical release was 4.8 years. With each year increase in age at HSCT, there was a 55% increased risk. Age and enzyme activity after HSCT were significant factors in the development of CTS. Transplantation by 2 years of age reduced the risk of developing CTS by 46%; higher enzyme activity led to a 78% reduction in the risk of developing CTS. However, children transplanted for MPSIH remain at risk for the development of CTS, and should be monitored on an ongoing basis by nerve conduction velocity testing.

  10. Factors associated with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gazourian, Lee; Rogers, Angela J.; Ibanga, Ruby; Weinhouse, Gerald L.; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Washko, George R.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Ho, Vincent T.

    2015-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a form of chronic graft vs. host disease (cGVHD) and a highly morbid pulmonary complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We assessed the prevalence and risk factors for BOS and cGVHD in a cohort of HSCT recipients, including those who received reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) HSCT. Between January 1, 2000 and June 30, 2010, all patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT at our institution (n = 1854) were retrospectively screened for the development of BOS by PFT criteria. We matched the BOS cases with two groups of control patients: (1) patients who had concurrent cGVHD without BOS and (2) those who developed neither cGVHD nor BOS. Comparisons between BOS patients and controls were conducted using t-test or Fisher’s exact tests. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to examine factors associated with BOS diagnosis. All statistical analyses were performed using SAS 9.2. We identified 89 patients (4.8%) meeting diagnostic criteria for BOS at a median time of 491 days (range: 48–2067) after HSCT. Eighty-six (97%) of our BOS cohort had extra-pulmonary cGVHD. In multivariate analysis compared to patients without cGVHD, patients who received busulfan-based conditioning, had unrelated donors, and had female donors were significantly more likely to develop BOS, while ATG administration was associated with a lower risk of BOS. Our novel results suggest that busulfan conditioning, even in RIC transplantation, could be an important risk factor for BOS and cGVHD. PMID:24375545

  11. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-08-17

    The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population.

  12. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population. PMID:27399214

  13. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplantation – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Salvino, Marco Aurélio; Ruiz, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous support of hematopoietic progenitor cells is an effective strategy to treat various hematologic neoplasms, such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells are the main source of support for autologous transplants, and collection of an adequate number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is a critical step in the autologous transplant procedure. Traditional strategies, based on the use of growth factors with or without chemotherapy, have limitations even when remobilizations are performed. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the most widely used agent for progenitor cell mobilization. The association of plerixafor, a C-X-C Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) inhibitor, to granulocyte colony stimulating factor generates rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A literature review was performed of randomized studies comparing different mobilization schemes in the treatment of multiple myeloma and lymphomas to analyze their limitations and effectiveness in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplant. This analysis showed that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte colony stimulating factor is well tolerated and results in a greater proportion of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or multiple myeloma reaching optimal CD34+ cell collections with a smaller number of apheresis compared the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor alone. PMID:26969772

  14. Reprogramming Human Endothelial to Hematopoietic Cells Requires Vascular Induction

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Vladislav M.; Lis, Raphael; Liu, Ying; Kedem, Alon; James, Daylon; Elemento, Olivier; Butler, Jason M.; Scandura, Joseph M.; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Generating engraftable human hematopoietic cells from autologous tissues promises new therapies for blood diseases. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells yields hematopoietic cells that poorly engraft. Here, we devised a method to phenocopy the vascular-niche microenvironment of hemogenic cells, thereby enabling reprogramming of human endothelial cells (ECs) into engraftable hematopoietic cells without transition through a pluripotent intermediate. Highly purified non-hemogenic human umbilical vein-ECs (HUVECs) or adult dermal microvascular ECs (hDMECs) were transduced with transcription factors (TFs), FOSB, GFI1, RUNX1, and SPI1 (FGRS), and then propagated on serum-free instructive vascular niche monolayers to induce outgrowth of hematopoietic colonies containing cells with functional and immunophenotypic features of multipotent progenitor cells (MPP). These reprogrammed ECs- into human-MPPs (rEC-hMPPs) acquire colony-forming cell (CFC) potential and durably engraft in immune-deficient mice after primary and secondary transplantation, producing long-term rEC-hMPP-derived myeloid (granulocytic/monocytic, erythroid, megakaryocytic) and lymphoid (NK, B) progeny. Conditional expression of FGRS transgenes, combined with vascular-induction, activates endogenous FGRS genes endowing rEC-hMPPs with a transcriptional and functional profile similar to self-renewing MPPs. Our approach underscores the role of inductive cues from vascular-niche in orchestrating and sustaining hematopoietic specification and may prove useful for engineering autologous hematopoietic grafts to treat inherited and acquired blood disorders. PMID:25030167

  15. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  16. Pleiotrophin regulates the expansion and regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Muramoto, Garrett G; Daher, Pamela; Meadows, Sarah K; Russell, J Lauren; Doan, Phuong; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Salter, Alice B; Lento, William E; Reya, Tannishtha; Chao, Nelson J; Chute, John P

    2010-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal is regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Although some of the pathways that regulate HSC self-renewal have been uncovered, it remains largely unknown whether these pathways can be triggered by deliverable growth factors to induce HSC growth or regeneration. Here we show that pleiotrophin, a neurite outgrowth factor with no known function in hematopoiesis, efficiently promotes HSC expansion in vitro and HSC regeneration in vivo. Treatment of mouse bone marrow HSCs with pleiotrophin caused a marked increase in long-term repopulating HSC numbers in culture, as measured in competitive repopulating assays. Treatment of human cord blood CD34(+)CDCD38(-)Lin(-) cells with pleiotrophin also substantially increased severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-repopulating cell counts in culture, compared to input and cytokine-treated cultures. Systemic administration of pleiotrophin to irradiated mice caused a pronounced expansion of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells in vivo, indicating that pleiotrophin is a regenerative growth factor for HSCs. Mechanistically, pleiotrophin activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in HSCs; antagonism of PI3K or Notch signaling inhibited pleiotrophin-mediated expansion of HSCs in culture. We identify the secreted growth factor pleiotrophin as a new regulator of both HSC expansion and regeneration.

  17. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  18. Is ABO mismatch another risk factor for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric thalassemic patients?

    PubMed

    Atay, Didem; Erbey, Fatih; Akcay, Arzu; Ozturk, Gulyuz

    2015-09-01

    The ABO incompatibility between donor and recipient is not considered a barrier to successful allogeneic HSCT. Nevertheless, conflicting data still exist about the influence of ABO incompatibility on transplant outcome in pediatric patients with thalassemia. Fifty-one children with beta-thalassemia major who underwent allogeneic HSCT were enrolled this study. Twenty-three of them (45%) received an ABO-incompatible transplant [minor ABO mismatch: six (26%), major ABO mismatch: fourteen (61%), and bidirectional mismatch: three (13%)]. In this study, ABO incompatibility did not significantly impair GVHD, VOD, neutrophil and platelet engraftment, TRM, OS and TFS. Particularly in major and bidirectional ABO-mismatched patients, a delayed erythroid recovery was recorded as compared to the group receiving an ABO-compatible graft (median time, 31 and 38 days vs. 19.5 days; p: 0.02 and p: 0.03). Median time to red cell transfusion independence was significantly longer in major ABO-incompatible patients (median time, 87 days vs. 32 days; p: 0.001). Therefore, whenever feasible, major ABO-mismatched donors should be avoided in HSCT recipients, to prevent delayed erythroid recovery with prolonged RBC transfusion needs and impaired quality of life.

  19. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  20. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y.; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44−/− mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26546504

  1. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles.

  2. Dynamic equilibrium of heterogeneous and interconvertible multipotent hematopoietic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Wendy; Zayas, Jennifer; Perez, Ruben; George, John; Jurecic, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Populations of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are quite heterogeneous and consist of multiple cell subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. Some of these subsets also appear to be interconvertible and oscillate between functionally distinct states. The multipotent hematopoietic cell line EML has emerged as a unique model to study the heterogeneity and interconvertibility of multipotent hematopoietic cells. Here we describe extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of EML cells which stems from the coexistence of multiple cell subsets. Each of these subsets is phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and displays distinct multilineage differentiation potential, cell cycle profile, proliferation kinetics, and expression pattern of HSC markers and some of the key lineage-associated transcription factors. Analysis of their maintenance revealed that on a population level all EML cell subsets exhibit cell-autonomous interconvertible properties, with the capacity to generate all other subsets and re-establish complete parental EML cell population. Moreover, all EML cell subsets generated during multiple cell generations maintain their distinct phenotypic and functional signatures and interconvertible properties. The model of EML cell line suggests that interconvertible multipotent hematopoietic cell subsets coexist in a homeostatically maintained dynamic equilibrium which is regulated by currently unknown cell-intrinsic mechanisms. PMID:24903657

  3. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Osteonecrosis in children after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: study of prevalence, risk factors and longitudinal changes using MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Leung, W-H; Deqing, P; Yang, J; Rochester, R; Britton, L; Neel, M D; Ness, K K; Kaste, S C

    2012-08-01

    Osteonecrosis after hematopoietic SCT (HCT) has seldom been addressed in pediatric populations. At our institution, since January 2002, children undergoing allogeneic HCT (alloHCT) receive yearly follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of hips and knees. To estimate the prevalence, longitudinal changes and associated risk factors for osteonecrosis after alloHCT, we reviewed MRs for children who underwent single alloHCT during the study period. We analyzed 149 of 344 patients who had post-HCT MR imaging performed (84 males; median age 11 years (range, 0.5-21 years)), median follow-up time was 32.6 months (range, 2.8-97.2 months). In all, 44 (29.5%) developed osteonecrosis of hips and/or knees; of those, 20 (45%) had at least 30% epiphyseal involvement. In 23 (52%), osteonecrosis lesions were identified in the first and in 43 (98%) by the third yearly scan. Knees were more frequently involved than hips; severity of osteonecrosis was greater in hips. Those who had pre-alloHCT osteonecrosis, two patients' hips and six patients' knees resolved completely; three patients' osteonecrosis lesions regressed after alloHCT. On risk factor analysis, age at time of alloHCT (P=0.051) and osteonecrosis identified by MRs before alloHCT (P=0.001) were the primary risk factors. This analysis shows that preventive strategies for osteonecrosis in this population should focus on measures to minimize risk factors before alloHCT.

  5. Production of minimally disturbed synchronous cultures of hematopoietic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Maureen; Eward, Kathryn Leigh; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Edward, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A method is describedforproducing sizable quantities of synchronously dividing, minimally disturbed mammalian cells. Cultures were grown immobilized on surfaces such that cell division within the population resulted in the continuous release of synchronous newborn cells. As judged by the quality and duration of synchronous growth, cell size distributions, and DNA compositions, newborn mouse L1210 cells grew with a very high level of synchrony without overt evidence of growth disturbances. The technology should be applicable to a variety of hematopoietic cells, as evidenced by similar results with human MOLT-4 and U937 cell lines.

  6. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    MIYAHARA, Daichi; OISHI, Isao; MAKINO, Ryuichi; KURUMISAWA, Nozomi; NAKAYA, Ryuma; ONO, Tamao; KAGAMI, Hiroshi; TAGAMI, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  7. Collection of more hematopoietic progenitor cells with large volume leukapheresis in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Desikan, K R; Jagannath, S; Siegel, D; Nelson, J; Bracy, D; Barlogie, B; Tricot, G

    1998-02-01

    Reinfusion of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after high dose chemotherapy accelerates hematopoietic recovery. Because of the relatively low content of hematopoietic progenitors in the peripheral blood even after mobilization, multiple leukapheresis procedures are necessary to reach the required target number of CD34 cells to ensure prompt engraftment post-transplantation. Our previous studies have shown that the highest proportions of hematopoietic progenitors cells (CD34) are collected during the first three days of apheresis, whereas peak levels of myeloma cells are observed during subsequent days. Therefore, large volume leukapheresis (LVL), defined as processing of greater than 3 blood volumes or a total of at least 15 liters, was explored in 23 myeloma patients, undergoing 91 procedures; 14 patients were mobilized with high dose cyclophosphamide (6g/m2) and hematopoietic growth factors and 9 with G-CSF only. CD34 yields were measured separately for the first and last two hours of collection. We observed no decrease in CD34 cells/kg during the last two hours of collection and when the LVL collections were compared to historical matched controls, mobilized with the same regimen, the median quantity of CD34 cells/kg/liter collected remained equivalent during all days of apheresis. When compared to G-CSF only, mobilization with high dose cyclophosphamide appeared to result in superior hematopoietic stem cell collections. Interestingly, the G-CSF group experienced a progressive decrease in platelets during consecutive days of LVL, while the opposite was seen in the cyclophosphamide group. LVL procedures were not associated with a higher complication rate than standard volume apheresis. We conclude that LVL procedures allow collection of more CD34 cell per session while not jeopardizing progenitor cell collections during subsequent sessions. Since more CD34 cells are collected, fewer days are required to attain the optimal target of progenitor cells

  8. Nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor stimulate clusterin gene expression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gutacker, C; Klock, G; Diel, P; Koch-Brandt, C

    1999-01-01

    Clusterin (apolipoprotein J) is an extracellular glycoprotein that might exert functions in development, cell death and lipid transport. Clusterin gene expression is elevated at sites of tissue remodelling, such as differentiation and apoptosis; however, the signals responsible for this regulation have not been identified. We use here the clusterin gene as a model system to examine expression in PC12 cells under the control of differentiation and proliferation signals produced by nerve growth factor (NGF) and by epidermal growth factor (EGF) respectively. NGF induced clusterin mRNA, which preceded neurite outgrowth typical of neuronal differentiation. EGF also activated the clusterin mRNA, demonstrating that both proliferation and differentiation signals regulate the gene. To localize NGF- and EGF-responsive elements we isolated the clusterin promoter and tested it in PC12 cell transfections. A 2.5 kb promoter fragment and two 1.5 and 0.3 kb deletion mutants were inducible by NGF and EGF. The contribution to this response of a conserved activator protein 1 (AP-1) motif located in the 0.3 kb fragment was analysed by mutagenesis. The mutant promoter was not inducible by NGF or EGF, which identifies the AP-1 motif as an element responding to both factors. Binding studies with PC12 nuclear extracts showed that AP-1 binds to this sequence in the clusterin promoter. These findings suggest that NGF and EGF, which give differential gene regulation in PC12 cells, resulting in neuronal differentiation and proliferation respectively, use the common Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/AP-1 signalling pathway to activate clusterin expression. PMID:10215617

  9. Hematopoietic stem cells are pluripotent and not just "hematopoietic".

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2013-06-01

    Over a decade ago, several preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability (often referred to as HSC plasticity) of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired in controversy and remained dormant for almost a decade. This commentary provides a concise review of evidence for HSC plasticity, including more recent findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse and clinical transplantation studies. There is strong evidence for the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and are the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body. Also discussed are some biological and experimental issues that need to be considered in the future investigation of HSC plasticity.

  10. Pituitary follicular cells produce basic fibroblast growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrara, N.; Schweigerer, L.; Neufeld, G.; Mitchell, R.; Gospodarowicz, D.

    1987-08-01

    Cultured monolayers of bovine pituitary follicular cells, which transport ions, contain high amounts of mitogenic activity for endothelial cells which, on the basis of gene expression analysis, heparin-Sepharose elution profile, bioassay, immunoblotting, radioimmunoassay, and radioreceptor assay, has been identified as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These data indicate that follicular cells may be a major source of bFGF in the pituitary gland. Considering that bFGF has been proposed to play a role in paracrine regulation of pituitary hormone secretion, the data also suggest that these cells may exert important local regulatory functions.

  11. Ongoing graft-versus-host disease is a risk factor for azoospermia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a survey of the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rovó, Alicia; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Chiodi, Sandra; Spinelli, Simonetta; Salooja, Nina; Sucak, Gülsan; Hunter, Ann; Kim, Tan Swee; Socié, Gérard; van Lint, Maria Teresa; Passweg, Jakob R; Arat, Mutlu; Badoglio, Manuela; Tichelli, André

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the degree of spermatogenesis defects in sperm analysis in long-term male survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in order to identify the risk factors related to potential infertility after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to provide data on longitudinal sperm recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here, the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation reports data of sperm analysis from 224 males who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median time between transplantation and sperm analysis was 63 months (8-275 months). At last sperm analysis, presence of any degree of spermatozoa was reported in 70 (31%) and complete azoospermia in 154 (69%) patients. In multivariate analysis, being conditioned with total body irradiation (RR 7.1; 95% CI: 3.4-14.8) and age over 25 years at transplantation (RR 2.4; 95% CI: 1.09-5.2) were significantly associated with higher risk for azoospermia. In patients not conditioned with total body irradiation, ongoing chronic graft-versus-host disease is the main adverse factor for sperm recovery (RR of 3.11; 95% CI: 1.02-9.47; P=0.045). Already established risk factors, such as total body irradiation and age older than 25 years at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, were seen to be the most relevant adverse risk factor for sperm production after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Furthermore, for the first time, ongoing graft-versus-host disease has been shown to be the most relevant adverse factor for sperm recovery, particularly in patients conditioned without total body irradiation. We also introduce a useful scoring system to predict the probability of male long-term survivors' azoospermia.

  12. Ongoing graft-versus-host disease is a risk factor for azoospermia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a survey of the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rovó, Alicia; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Chiodi, Sandra; Spinelli, Simonetta; Salooja, Nina; Sucak, Gülsan; Hunter, Ann; Kim, Tan Swee; Socié, Gérard; van Lint, Maria Teresa; Passweg, Jakob R.; Arat, Mutlu; Badoglio, Manuela; Tichelli, André

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the degree of spermatogenesis defects in sperm analysis in long-term male survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in order to identify the risk factors related to potential infertility after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to provide data on longitudinal sperm recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here, the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation reports data of sperm analysis from 224 males who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median time between transplantation and sperm analysis was 63 months (8–275 months). At last sperm analysis, presence of any degree of spermatozoa was reported in 70 (31%) and complete azoospermia in 154 (69%) patients. In multivariate analysis, being conditioned with total body irradiation (RR 7.1; 95% CI: 3.4–14.8) and age over 25 years at transplantation (RR 2.4; 95% CI: 1.09–5.2) were significantly associated with higher risk for azoospermia. In patients not conditioned with total body irradiation, ongoing chronic graft-versus-host disease is the main adverse factor for sperm recovery (RR of 3.11; 95% CI: 1.02–9.47; P=0.045). Already established risk factors, such as total body irradiation and age older than 25 years at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, were seen to be the most relevant adverse risk factor for sperm production after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Furthermore, for the first time, ongoing graft-versus-host disease has been shown to be the most relevant adverse factor for sperm recovery, particularly in patients conditioned without total body irradiation. We also introduce a useful scoring system to predict the probability of male long-term survivors’ azoospermia. PMID:22929982

  13. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  14. Hematopoietic progenitor cell regulation by CD4+CD25+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Urbieta, Maite; Barao, Isabel; Jones, Monica; Jurecic, Roland; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Blazar, Bruce R; Murphy, William J; Levy, Robert B

    2010-06-10

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) possess the capacity to modulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. We hypothesized that Tregs could regulate hematopoiesis based on cytokine effector molecules they can produce. The studies here demonstrate that Tregs can affect the differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. In vitro findings demonstrated the ability of Tregs to inhibit the differentiation of interleukin-3 (IL-3)/stem cell factor (colony-forming unit [CFU]-IL3)-driven progenitor cells. Inhibitory effects were mediated by a pathway requiring cell-cell contact, major histocompatibility complex class II expression on marrow cells, and transforming growth factor-beta. Importantly, depletion of Tregs in situ resulted in enhanced CFU-IL3 levels after bone marrow transplantation. Cotransplantation of CD4(+)FoxP3(+)(gfp) Tregs together with bone marrow was found to diminish CFU-IL3 responses after transplantation. To address the consequence of transplanted Tregs on differentiated progeny from these CFU 2 weeks after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, peripheral blood complete blood counts were performed and examined for polymorphonuclear leukocyte content. Recipients of cotransplanted Tregs exhibited diminished neutrophil counts. Together, these findings illustrate that both recipient and donor Tregs can influence hematopoietic progenitor cell activity after transplantation and that these cells can alter responses outside the adaptive and innate immune systems.

  15. Differential requirements for survivin in hematopoietic cell development.

    PubMed

    Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Xu, Yanfei; Keerthivasan, Ganesan; Wickrema, Amittha; Crispino, John D

    2005-08-09

    Although erythroid cells and megakaryocytes arise from a common progenitor, their terminal maturation follows very different paths; erythroid cells undergo cell-cycle exit and enucleation, whereas megakaryocytes continue to progress through the cell cycle but skip late stages of mitosis to become polyploid cells. In our efforts to identify genes that participate in this process, we discovered that survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family that also has an essential role in cytokinesis, is differentially expressed during erythroid versus megakaryocyte development. Erythroid cells express survivin throughout their maturation, whereas megakaryocytes express approximately 4-fold lower levels of survivin mRNA and no detectable protein. To investigate the role of survivin in these lineages, we overexpressed or knocked down survivin from mouse bone marrow cells and then examined erythroid and megakaryocyte development. These studies revealed that overexpression of survivin antagonized megakaryocyte growth, maturation, and polyploidization but had no effect on erythroid development. This block in polyploidization was accompanied by increased expression of p21 and decreased expression of megakaryocyte genes such as von Willebrand factor and beta(1)-tubulin. In contrast, a reduction in survivin expression interfered with the formation of erythroid cells but not megakaryocytes. Last, consistent with the requirement for survivin in the survival of proliferating cells, survivin-deficient hematopoietic progenitors failed to give rise to either erythroid or megakaryocytic colonies. Together, these studies show that whereas survivin expression is essential for megakaryocyte and erythroid progenitors, its down-regulation is required for terminal differentiation of megakaryocytes.

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions are regulated by Wnt antagonists: comparisons and current controversies.

    PubMed

    Cain, Corey J; Manilay, Jennifer O

    2013-01-01

    Wingless and int (Wnt) proteins are secreted proteins that are important for regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the bone marrow microenvironment in mice. The mechanisms by which Wnt signaling regulates these hematopoietic cell fate decisions are not fully understood. Secreted Wnt antagonists, which are expressed in bone and bone marrow stromal cells, either bind to Wnt ligands directly or block Wnt receptors and co-receptors to halt Wnt-mediated signal transduction in both osteolineage and hematopoietic cell types. Secreted frizzled related proteins-1 and -2, Wnt inhibitory factor-1, Dickkopf-1, and Sclerostin are Wnt antagonists that influence hematopoietic cell fate decisions in the bone marrow niche. In this review, we compare and contrast the roles of these Wnt antagonists and their effects on hematopoietic development in mice, and also discuss the clinical significance of targeting Wnt antagonists within the context of hematopoietic disease.

  17. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  18. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhang, Kaiming; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Yin, Yixia

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Schwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more significantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy. PMID:25206862

  19. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, JingJing; Zhang, ChengCheng

    2015-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would benefit clinical applications in several aspects, to improve patient survival, utilize cord blood stem cells for adult applications, and selectively propagate stem cell populations after genetic manipulation. In this review we summarize and discuss recent advances in the culture systems of mouse and human HSCs, which include stroma/HSC co-culture, continuous perfusion and fed-batch cultures, and those supplemented with extrinsic ligands, membrane transportable transcription factors, complement components, protein modification enzymes, metabolites, or small molecule chemicals. Some of the expansion systems have been tested in clinical trials. The optimal condition for ex vivo expansion of the primitive and functional human HSCs is still under development. An improved understanding of the mechanisms for HSC cell fate determination and the HSC culture characteristics will guide development of new strategies to overcome difficulties. In the future, development of a combination treatment regimen with agents that enhance self-renewal, block differentiation, and improve homing will be critical. Methods to enhance yields and lower cost during collection and processing should be employed. The employment of an efficient system for ex vivo expansion of HSCs will facilitate the further development of novel strategies for cell and gene therapies including genome editing.

  20. Hematopoiesis on cellulose ester membranes. XI. Induction of new bone and a hematopoietic microenvironment by matrix factors secreted by marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Knospe, W H; Husseini, S G; Fried, W

    1989-07-01

    Cellulose ester membranes (CEM) were coated with stromal cells from bone marrow (BM) or bone and implanted intraperitoneally (IP) in CAF1 mice for intervals of 1 to 6 months. Previous studies indicated that matrix factors [glycoproteins (GPs), proteoglycans (PGs), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)] were secreted by the regenerating stromal cells and adsorbed by the CEM. After 1 to 6 months, the CEMs were removed, scraped free of adherent cells, and irradiated in vitro with 40 Gy. The scraped and irradiated CEMs were then reimplanted IP or subcutaneously (SC) for periods of 1 to 6 months in secondary syngeneic murine hosts. They were then removed for histologic study. CEMs reimplanted in SC sites developed bone and hematopoiesis as early as 1 month after implantation. Maximum hematopoiesis and bone formation was observed after 3 months. CEMs coated during the initial implantation with bone-derived stromal cells contained more bone and hematopoietic cells than did CEMs coated with marrow-derived stromal cells after SC implementation. Neither the CEMs coated with bone stromal cells nor those coated with marrow stromal cells developed new bone or trilineal hematopoiesis after being implanted IP. A few CEMs contained small foci of granulopoiesis only. We conclude that noncellular matrix substances deposited on CEMs by bone, and to a lesser degree by marrow cells, can induce prestromal cells in the SC tissues to produce a microenvironment suitable for trilineal hematopoiesis.

  1. Epo and non-hematopoietic cells: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Ogunshola, Omolara O; Bogdanova, Anna Yu

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) circulates in plasma and controls the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood (Fisher. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 228:1-14, 2003). Epo is produced primarily in the adult kidney and fetal liver and was originally believed to play a role restricted to stimulation of early erythroid precursor proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and differentiation of the erythroid lineage. Early studies showed that mice with targeted deletion of Epo or the Epo receptor (EpoR) show impaired erythropoiesis, lack mature erythrocytes, and die in utero around embryonic day 13.5 (Wu et al. Cell 83:59-67, 1995; Lin et al. Genes Dev. 10:154-164, 1996). These animals also exhibited heart defects, abnormal vascular development as well as increased apoptosis in the brain suggesting additional functions for Epo signaling in normal development of the central nervous system and heart. Now, in addition to its well-known role in erythropoiesis, a diverse array of cells have been identified that produce Epo and/or express the Epo-R including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and cells of the central nervous system (Masuda et al. J Biol Chem. 269:19488-19493, 1994; Marti et al. Eur J Neurosci. 8:666-676, 1996; Bernaudin et al. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 19:643-651, 1999; Li et al. Neurochem Res. 32:2132-2141, 2007). Endogenously produced Epo and/or expression of the EpoR gives rise to autocrine and paracrine signaling in different organs particularly during hypoxia, toxicity, and injury conditions. Epo has been shown to regulate a variety of cell functions such as calcium flux (Korbel et al. J Comp Physiol B. 174:121-128, 2004) neurotransmitter synthesis and cell survival (Velly et al. Pharmacol Ther. 128:445-459, 2010; Vogel et al. Blood. 102:2278-2284, 2003). Furthermore Epo has neurotrophic effects (Grimm et al. Nat Med. 8:718-724, 2002; Junk et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 99:10659-10664, 2002), can induce an angiogenic phenotype in cultured

  2. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  3. ERG dependence distinguishes developmental control of hematopoietic stem cell maintenance from hematopoietic specification

    PubMed Central

    Taoudi, Samir; Bee, Thomas; Hilton, Adrienne; Knezevic, Kathy; Scott, Julie; Willson, Tracy A.; Collin, Caitlin; Thomas, Tim; Voss, Anne K.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Alexander, Warren S.; Pimanda, John E.; Hilton, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Although many genes are known to be critical for early hematopoiesis in the embryo, it remains unclear whether distinct regulatory pathways exist to control hematopoietic specification versus hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence and function. Due to their interaction with key regulators of hematopoietic commitment, particular interest has focused on the role of the ETS family of transcription factors; of these, ERG is predicted to play an important role in the initiation of hematopoiesis, yet we do not know if or when ERG is required. Using in vitro and in vivo models of hematopoiesis and HSC development, we provide strong evidence that ERG is at the center of a distinct regulatory program that is not required for hematopoietic specification or differentiation but is critical for HSC maintenance during embryonic development. We show that, from the fetal period, ERG acts as a direct upstream regulator of Gata2 and Runx1 gene activity. Without ERG, physiological HSC maintenance fails, leading to the rapid exhaustion of definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:21245161

  4. Dual control of cell growth by somatomedins and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, C D; Capone, G T; Scher, C D; Antoniades, H N; Van Wyk, J J; Pledger, W J

    1979-01-01

    Quiescent BALB/c 3T3 cells exposed briefly to a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) become "competent" to replicate their DNA but do not "progress" into S phase unless incubated with growth factors contained in platelet-poor plasma. Plasma from hypophysectomized rats is deficient in progression activity; it does not stimulate PDGF-treated competent cells to synthesize DNA, demonstrating that somatomedin C is required for progression. Various growth factors were tested for progression activity and competence activity by using BALB/c 3T3 tissue culture assays. Multiplication stimulating activity and other members of the somatomedin family of growth factors are (like somatomedin C) potent mediators of progression. Other mitogenic agents, such as fibroblast growth factor, are (like PDGF) potent inducers of competence. Growth factors with potent progression activity have little or no competence activity and vice versa. In contrast, simian virus 40 provides both competence and progression activity. Coordinate control of BALB/c 3T3 cell growth in vitro by competence factors and somatomedins may be a specific example of a common pattern of growth regulation in animal tissues. PMID:312500

  5. The hematopoietic defect in PNH is not due to defective stroma, but is due to defective progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Jun-ichi; Ware, Russell E; Burnette, Angela; Pendleton, Andrew L; Kitano, Kiyoshi; Hirota, Toshiyuki; Machii, Takashi; Kitani, Teruo; Smith, Clay A; Rosse, Wendell F

    2002-01-01

    Although paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is often associated with aplastic anemia (AA), the nature of the pathogenetic link between PNH and AA remains unclear. Moreover, the PIG-A mutation appears to be necessary but not sufficient for the development of PNH, suggesting other factors are involved. The ability of PNH marrow cells to form in vitro hematopoietic colonies and the ability of PNH marrow to generate stroma that could support hematopoiesis of normal or PNH marrow in cross culture were investigated. PNH marrow from both post-Ficoll and post-lineage depleted hematopoietic progenitor cells grew similarly significantly fewer colonies than normal marrow. Sorting of CD59(+) and CD59(-) CD34(+) CD38(-) cells from patients with PNH showed similarly impaired clonogenic efficiency, indicating that the hematopoietic defect in PNH does not directly relate to GPI-anchored protein expression. PNH marrow readily grew stroma similar to marrow from normal donors. Cross culture experiments revealed that PNH stroma appears to function normally in vitro; it can support growth of normal marrow cells as well as normal stroma does, but neither PNH nor normal stroma could support the growth of PNH marrow cells. The hematopoietic defect in PNH is not due to defective stroma, but is due to defective progenitor cell growth related to additional unknown factors.

  6. Extracellular vesicle miR-7977 is involved in hematopoietic dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells via poly(rC) binding protein 1 reduction in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Murata, Masaki; Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ono, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kawano, Yutaka; Miyanishi, Koji; Sawada, Norimasa; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The failure of normal hematopoiesis is observed in myeloid neoplasms. However, the precise mechanisms governing the replacement of normal hematopoietic stem cells in their niche by myeloid neoplasm stem cells have not yet been clarified. Primary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells induced aberrant expression of multiple hematopoietic factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 in mesenchymal stem cells even in non-contact conditions, and this abnormality was reverted by extracellular vesicle inhibition. Importantly, the transfer of myeloid neoplasm-derived extracellular vesicles reduced the hematopoietic supportive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of extracellular vesicle microRNA indicated that several species, including miR-7977 from acute myeloid leukemia cells, were higher than those from normal CD34+ cells. Remarkably, the copy number of miR-7977 in bone marrow interstitial fluid was elevated not only in acute myeloid leukemia, but also in myelodysplastic syndrome, as compared with lymphoma without bone marrow localization. The transfection of the miR-7977 mimic reduced the expression of the posttranscriptional regulator, poly(rC) binding protein 1, in mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, the miR-7977 mimic induced aberrant reduction of hematopoietic growth factors in mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in decreased hematopoietic-supporting capacity of bone marrow CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the reduction of hematopoietic growth factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 were reverted by target protection of poly(rC) binding protein 1, suggesting that poly(rC) binding protein 1 could be involved in the stabilization of several growth factors. Thus, miR-7977 in extracellular vesicles may be a critical factor that induces failure of normal hematopoiesis via poly(rC) binding protein 1 suppression. PMID:26802051

  7. Regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Vogler, Thomas Orion; Gadek, Katherine; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for self-renewal of skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and required for maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Satellite cells express high levels of FGF receptors 1 and 4, low levels of FGF receptor 3, and little or no detectable FGF receptor 2. Of the multiple FGFs that influence satellite cell function in culture, FGF2 and FGF6 are the only members that regulate satellite cell function in vivo by activating ERK MAPK, p38α/β MAPKs, PI3 kinase, PLCγ and STATs. Regulation of FGF signaling is complex in satellite cells, requiring Syndecan-4, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as well as ß1-integrin and fibronectin. During aging, reduced responsiveness to FGF diminishes satellite cell self-renewal, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and depletion of satellite cells. Mislocalization of ß1-integrin, reductions in fibronectin, and alterations in heparan sulfate content all contribute to reduced FGF responsiveness in satellite cells. How these cell surface proteins regulate satellite cell self-renewal is incompletely understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge, highlighting the role(s) for FGF signaling in skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell behavior, and age-induced muscle wasting. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The role of osteoblasts in regulating hematopoietic stem cell activity and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Neiva, K; Sun, Y-X; Taichman, R S

    2005-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are critical regulators of hematopoiesis. Osteoblasts are part of the stromal cell support system in bone marrow and may be derived from a common precursor. Several studies suggested that osteoblasts regulate hematopoiesis, yet the entire mechanism is not understood. It is clear, however, that both hematopoietic precursors and osteoblasts interact for the production of osteoclasts and the activation of resorption. We observed that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regulate osteoblastic secretion of various growth factors, and that osteoblasts express some soluble factors exclusively in the presence of HSCs. Osteoblasts and hematopoietic cells are closely associated with each other in the bone marrow, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between them to develop the HSC niche. One critical component regulating the niche is stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4 which regulates stem cell homing and, as we have recently demonstrated, plays a crucial role in facilitating those tumors which metastasize to bone. Osteoblasts produce abundant amounts of SDF-1 and therefore osteoblasts play an important role in metastasis. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of osteoblasts in marrow function in health and disease.

  9. FGF signaling specifies hematopoietic stem cells through its regulation of somitic Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonsung; Manegold, Jennifer E; Kim, Albert D; Pouget, Claire; Stachura, David L; Clements, Wilson K; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derive from hemogenic endothelial cells of the primitive dorsal aorta (DA) during vertebrate embryogenesis. The molecular mechanisms governing this unique endothelial to hematopoietic transition remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate a novel requirement for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in HSC emergence. This requirement is non-cell-autonomous, and acts within the somite to bridge the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that Wnt16 regulates the somitic expression of two Notch ligands, deltaC (dlc) and deltaD (dld), whose combined function is required for HSC fate. How Wnt16 connects to Notch function has remained an open question. Our current studies demonstrate that FGF signaling, via FGF receptor 4 (Fgfr4), mediates a signal transduction pathway between Wnt16 and Dlc, but not Dld, to regulate HSC specification. Our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling acts as a key molecular relay within the developmental HSC niche to instruct HSC fate. PMID:25428693

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  11. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  12. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  13. The regulation of hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mayani, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Evidence presented over the last few years indicates that the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment comprises not just one but a number of different cell populations. Based on HSCs’ proliferation and engraftment potential, it has been suggested that there are two classes of HSC, with long- and short-term engraftment potential. HSC heterogeneity seems to involve differentiation capacities as well, since it has been shown that some HSC clones are able to give rise to both myeloid and lymphoid progeny, whereas others are lymphoid deficient. It has been recognized that HSC function depends on intrinsic cell regulators, which are modulated by external signals. Among the former, we can include transcription factors and non-coding RNAs as well as epigenetic modifiers. Among the latter, cytokines and extracellular matrix molecules have been implicated. Understanding the elements and mechanisms that regulate HSC populations is of significant relevance both in biological and in clinical terms, and research in this area still has to face several complex and exciting challenges. PMID:27408695

  14. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  15. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F T; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, El Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-02-02

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression.

  16. Expression of ets family genes in hematopoietic-cells.

    PubMed

    Romanospica, V; Suzuki, H; Georgiou, P; Chen, S; Ascione, R; Papas, T; Bhat, N

    1994-03-01

    We have examined the expression of the ets family of transcription factors in different types of hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrate that several members of the ets gene family are expressed differentially in hematopoietic cells. During phorbol ester induced differentiation of HL60 cells, ETS2, PEA3, as well as GABPalpha and GABPbeta mRNAs are coordinately induced. During the activation of T-cells, ETS2 proteins are induced; however, the expression of the ETS1 and ERGB gene products are reduced. These results demonstrate that the regulation of ets family of genes is complex and depends on cell type. This observation leads to the conclusion that the regulation of ets target genes, will be dependent, in part, upon the type of ets genes expressed in each particular cell type.

  17. Growth Factor-Activated Stem Cell Circuits and Stromal Signals Cooperatively Accelerate Non-Integrated iPSC Reprogramming of Human Myeloid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tea Soon; Huo, Jeffrey S.; Peters, Ann; Talbot, C. Conover; Verma, Karan; Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Kaplan, Ian M.; Zambidis, Elias T.

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral conversion of skin or blood cells into clinically useful human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) occurs in only rare fractions (∼0.001%–0.5%) of donor cells transfected with non-integrating reprogramming factors. Pluripotency induction of developmentally immature stem-progenitors is generally more efficient than differentiated somatic cell targets. However, the nature of augmented progenitor reprogramming remains obscure, and its potential has not been fully explored for improving the extremely slow pace of non-integrated reprogramming. Here, we report highly optimized four-factor reprogramming of lineage-committed cord blood (CB) myeloid progenitors with bulk efficiencies of ∼50% in purified episome-expressing cells. Lineage-committed CD33+CD45+CD34− myeloid cells and not primitive hematopoietic stem-progenitors were the main targets of a rapid and nearly complete non-integrated reprogramming. The efficient conversion of mature myeloid populations into NANOG+TRA-1-81+ hiPSC was mediated by synergies between hematopoietic growth factor (GF), stromal activation signals, and episomal Yamanaka factor expression. Using a modular bioinformatics approach, we demonstrated that efficient myeloid reprogramming correlated not to increased proliferation or endogenous Core factor expressions, but to poised expression of GF-activated transcriptional circuits that commonly regulate plasticity in both hematopoietic progenitors and embryonic stem cells (ESC). Factor-driven conversion of myeloid progenitors to a high-fidelity pluripotent state was further accelerated by soluble and contact-dependent stromal signals that included an implied and unexpected role for Toll receptor-NFκB signaling. These data provide a paradigm for understanding the augmented reprogramming capacity of somatic progenitors, and reveal that efficient induced pluripotency in other cell types may also require extrinsic activation of a molecular framework that commonly regulates self

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell origin of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; Larue, Amanda C; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2010-07-01

    Connective tissue consists of "connective tissue proper," which is further divided into loose and dense (fibrous) connective tissues and "specialized connective tissues." Specialized connective tissues consist of blood, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. In both loose and dense connective tissues, the principal cellular element is fibroblasts. It has been generally believed that all cellular elements of connective tissue, including fibroblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and bone cells, are generated solely by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, a number of studies, including those from our laboratory based on transplantation of single hematopoietic stem cells, strongly suggested a hematopoietic stem cell origin of these adult mesenchymal tissues. This review summarizes the experimental evidence for this new paradigm and discusses its translational implications.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-02-02

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead.

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  1. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  2. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  3. Alloantigen presenting function of normal human CD34+ hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, D; Andrews, R G; Hansen, J A; Ryncarz, R; Faerber, M A; Anasetti, C

    1996-10-01

    The identification of the CD34 molecule, expressed almost exclusively on human hematopoietic stem cells and committed progenitors, and the development of CD34-specific monoclonal antibodies have made procurement of relatively pure populations of CD34+ marrow cells for autologous transplantation feasible. Characterization of the immunogenicity of CD34+ marrow cells may facilitate the design of successful strategies to use these cells for allogeneic transplantation. CD34+ marrow cells from normal volunteers were enriched to greater than 98% purity by immunoaffinity chromatography on column followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Purified CD34+ cells were tested for expression of HLA-DR and other accessory molecules, and function in hematopoietic colony growth and mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) assays. Greater than 95% CD34+ cells were positive for HLA-DR and 74% +/- 10% were highly positive for CD18, the common beta-chain of a leukointegrin family. CD34+/CD18- cells were small, agranular lymphocytes which contained the majority of precursors for colony-forming cells detected in long-term cultures. They produced almost no stimulation of purified T cells from HLA-DR-incompatible individuals in bulk MLC or in limiting dilution assay. In contrast, CD34+/CD18+ cells were large, were enriched for cells forming mixed colonies in short- but not long-term assays, and were capable of stimulating allogeneic T cells. CD86, a natural ligand for the T-cell activation molecule CD28, was coexpressed with CD18 in 6% +/- 3% of CD34+ cells. CD34+/CD86+ cells, but not CD34+/CD86- cells, exhibited strong alloantigen presenting function. Thus, pluripotent hematopoietic activity and alloantigen presenting function are attributes of distinct subsets of CD34+ marrow cells. CD34+/CD18- or CD34+/CD86- cells may be more effective than either the whole CD34+ population or unseparated marrow in engrafting allogeneic recipients and may also facilitate induction of tolerance.

  4. Interferon and tumor necrosis factor as humoral mechanisms coupling hematopoietic activity to inflammation and injury.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced hematopoiesis accompanies systemic responses to injury and infection. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by injured cells and interferons (IFNs) secreted by inflammatory cells is a co-product of the process of clearance of debris and removal of still viable but dysfunctional cells. Concomitantly, these cytokines induce hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) activity as an intrinsic component of the systemic response. The proposed scenario includes induction of HSPC activity by type I (IFNα/β) and II (IFNγ) receptors within the quiescent bone marrow niches rendering progenitors responsive to additional signals. TNFα converges as a non-selective stimulant of HSPC activity and both cytokines synergize with other growth factors in promoting differentiation. These physiological signaling pathways of stress hematopoiesis occur quite frequent and do not cause HSPC extinction. The proposed role of IFNs and TNFs in stress hematopoiesis commends revision of their alleged involvement in bone marrow failure syndromes.

  5. [Proteins support stem cells - use of protein therapeutics in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sara Christina; Stern, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has evolved from a largely experimental therapeutic approach three decades ago to a well-established therapy today for many malignant and non-malignant disorders of the hematopoietic and the immune system. Although it is per se a therapy by transmission of cells, protein therapeutics such as growth factors and antibodies are relevant in all phases of a HSCT and substantially contribute to the success of this often only curative treatment. This review discusses HSCT with a particular focus on the protein therapeutics involved. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization of stem cells to the peripheral blood, the polyclonal anti-T-cell globulin (ATG) and the monoclonal antibodies alemtuzumab and etanercept for prophylaxis and therapy of graft versus host disease (GvHD) are highlighted. Also rituximab, palivizumab and polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulins for treating infections in post-transplant patients are discussed. Since our understanding of cell surface receptors, cytokine and signaling pathways is increasing, there will emerge new targets for directed therapy by proteins in the future. They may have the potential to further improve the success and to widen theapplication of HSCT.

  6. CD133+ cell selection is an alternative to CD34+ cell selection for ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobari, L; Giarratana, M C; Pflumio, F; Izac, B; Coulombel, L; Douay, L

    2001-04-01

    CD133 is a new stem cell antigen that may provide an alternative to CD34 for the selection and expansion of hematopoietic cells for transplantation. This study compared the expansion capacities of CD133(+) and CD34(+) cells isolated from the same cord blood (CB) samples. After 14 days culture in stroma-free, serum-free medium in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), Flt3-1, megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the CD133(+) and CD34(+) fractions displayed comparable expansion of the myeloid compartment (CFC, LTC-IC, and E-LTC-IC). The expansion of CD133(+) CB cells was up to 1262-fold for total cells, 99-fold for CD34(+) cells, 109-fold for CD34(+) CD133(+) cells, 133-fold for CFU-GM, 14.5-fold for LTC-IC, and 7.5-fold for E-LTC-IC. Moreover, the expanded population was able to generate lymphoid B (CD19(+)), NK (CD56(+)), and T (CD4(+) CD8(+)) cells in liquid or fetal thymic organ cultures, while expression of the homing antigen CXCR4 was similar on expanded and nonexpanded CD133(+) or CD34(+) cells. Thus, the CD133(+) subset could be expanded in the same manner as the CD34(+) subset and conserved its multilineage capacity, which would support the relevance of CD133 for clinical hematopoietic selection.

  7. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  8. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-05

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  9. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  10. High-dose ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide: maximum tolerable doses, toxicities, and hematopoietic recovery after autologous stem cell reinfusion.

    PubMed

    Fields, K K; Elfenbein, G J; Perkins, J B; Janssen, W E; Ballester, O F; Hiemenz, J W; Zorsky, P E; Kronish, L E; Foody, M C

    1994-10-01

    We treated 115 patients in a phase I/II dose-escalation study of ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide (ICE) followed by autologous stem cell rescue. Patients treated had a variety of diagnoses, including breast cancer (high-risk stage II disease with eight or more positive nodes, stage III disease, and responsive metastatic disease), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, acute leukemia in first remission, and various solid tumors that were responsive to induction therapy. Patients received autologous bone marrow stem cells or peripheral blood stem cells primed by one of several methods. The maximum tolerated dose of ICE was determined to be ifosfamide 20,100 mg/m2, carboplatin 1,800 mg/m2, and etoposide 3,000 mg/m2 when administered as a 6-day regimen. The dose-limiting toxicities included acute renal failure, severe central nervous system toxicity, and "leaky capillary syndrome" with hypoalbuminemia, profound fluid overload, and pulmonary insufficiency. Analysis of hematologic recovery based on stem cell source and influence of hematopoietic growth factor administration was undertaken. Hematopoietic growth factor use significantly reduced neutrophil engraftment time for patients receiving bone marrow stem cells, with evidence of earlier recovery times for patients receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor compared with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Neutrophil recovery times varied based on the source of stem cells used, with the earliest engraftment times seen for patients receiving peripheral blood stem cells primed with cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Platelet recovery times were not statistically different for any of the subsets. In conclusion, the maximum tolerated dose of ICE has been defined, and the source of stem cells and the use of hematopoietic growth factors influence hematopoietic recovery.

  11. Increased levels of NOTCH1, NF-kappaB, and other interconnected transcription factors characterize primitive sets of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Oliveira, Lucila Habib B; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Viu Carrara, Rita de Cassia; Araujo, Amélia Goes; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; Bonini de Palma, Patrícia Vianna; Menezes, Camila C B O; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Zago, Marco Antonio

    2010-03-01

    As previously shown, higher levels of NOTCH1 and increased NF-kappaB signaling is a distinctive feature of the more primitive umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as compared to bone marrow (BM). Differences between BM and UCB cell composition also account for this finding. The CD133 marker defines a more primitive cell subset among CD34+ HSC with a proposed hemangioblast potential. To further evaluate the molecular basis related to the more primitive characteristics of UCB and CD133+ HSC, immunomagnetically purified human CD34+ and CD133+ cells from BM and UCB were used on gene expression microarrays studies. UCB CD34+ cells contained a significantly higher proportion of CD133+ cells than BM (70% and 40%, respectively). Cluster analysis showed that BM CD133+ cells grouped with the UCB cells (CD133+ and CD34+) rather than to BM CD34+ cells. Compared with CD34+ cells, CD133+ had a higher expression of many transcription factors (TFs). Promoter analysis on all these TF genes revealed a significantly higher frequency (than expected by chance) of NF-kappaB-binding sites (BS), including potentially novel NF-kappaB targets such as RUNX1, GATA3, and USF1. Selected transcripts of TF related to primitive hematopoiesis and self-renewal, such as RUNX1, GATA3, USF1, TAL1, HOXA9, HOXB4, NOTCH1, RELB, and NFKB2 were evaluated by real-time PCR and were all significantly positively correlated. Taken together, our data indicate the existence of an interconnected transcriptional network characterized by higher levels of NOTCH1, NF-kappaB, and other important TFs on more primitive HSC sets.

  12. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha})-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect.

  13. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doney, Kristine C; Mielcarek, Marco; Stewart, F Marc; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used to treat a single disease with multiorgan involvement or 2 separate diseases, the first requiring SOT and the second often a possible complication of SOT. Results of such serial transplants have been reported sporadically in the literature, usually as single case studies. Thirteen autologous and 27 allogeneic HCTs after SOT published previously are summarized. A more detailed review is provided for an additional 16 patients transplanted at a single institution, 8 of whom had autologous and 8 of whom had allogeneic HCT after SOT. Five of 8 autologous transplant recipients are alive a median of 4.6 years after HCT. Four of 8 allogeneic HCT recipients are alive a median of 8.7 years after HCT. In carefully selected patients, HCT after SOT is feasible and associated with a low incidence of either solid organ or hematopoietic cell rejection.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed. PMID:26731468

  15. DNA methylation profiling of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Begtrup, Amber Hogart

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark that is essential for properly functioning hematopoietic stem cells. Determining where functionally relevant DNA methylation marks exist in the genome is crucial to understanding the role that methylation plays in hematopoiesis. This chapter describes a method to profile DNA methylation by selectively enriching methylated DNA sequences that are bound in vitro by methyl-binding domain (MBD) proteins. The MBD-pulldown approach selects for DNA sequences that have the potential to be "read" by the endogenous machinery involved in epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, this approach is feasible with very small quantities of DNA, and is compatible with the use of any downstream high-throughput sequencing approach. This technique offers a reliable, simple, and powerful tool for exploration of the role of DNA methylation in hematopoietic stem cells.

  16. Inhibition of Nb2 T-lymphoma cell growth by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Rayhel, E J; Prentice, D A; Tabor, P S; Flurkey, W H; Geib, R W; Laherty, R F; Schnitzer, S B; Chen, R; Hughes, J P

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, a rat T lymphoma, in response to lactogens and interleukin-2. Prostaglandins may play an important role in the pathway through which TGF-beta exerts its inhibitory actions, because prostaglandin E2 also inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, and indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, reverses the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta on Nb2 cell proliferation. PMID:3262338

  17. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding interleukin 11, a stromal cell-derived lymphopoietic and hematopoietic cytokine.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, S R; Bennett, F; Calvetti, J A; Kelleher, K; Wood, C R; O'Hara, R M; Leary, A C; Sibley, B; Clark, S C; Williams, D A

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in close association with a complex network of cells loosely termed the hematopoietic microenvironment. Analysis of the mechanisms of microenvironmental regulation of hematopoiesis has been hindered by the complexity of the microenvironment as well as the heterogeneity of hematopoietic stem cells and early progenitor cells. We have established immortalized primate bone marrow-derived stromal cell lines to facilitate analysis of the interactions of hematopoietic cells with the microenvironment in a large animal species. One such line, PU-34, was found to produce a variety of growth factors, including an activity that stimulates the proliferation of an interleukin 6-dependent murine plasmacytoma cell line. A cDNA encoding the plasmacytoma stimulatory activity was isolated through functional expression cloning in mammalian cells. The nucleotide sequence contained a single long reading frame of 597 nucleotides encoding a predicted 199-amino acid polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of this cytokine, designated interleukin 11 (IL-11), did not display significant similarity with any other sequence in the GenBank data base. Preliminary biological characterization indicates that in addition to stimulating plasmacytoma proliferation, IL-11 stimulates the T-cell-dependent development of immunoglobulin-producing B cells and synergizes with IL-3 in supporting murine megakaryocyte colony formation. These properties implicate IL-11 as an additional multifunctional regulator in the hematopoietic microenvironment. Images PMID:2145578

  18. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  19. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  20. Stem cell growth factor receptor in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Hlavaty, Juraj; Meyer, Florian R.; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Gebhard, Christiane; Walter, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is considered the most common bone cancer in cats and dogs, with cats having a much better prognosis than dogs, since the great majority of dogs with osteosarcoma develop distant metastases. In search of a factor possibly contributing to this disparity, the stem cell growth factor receptor KIT was targeted, and the messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels of KIT were compared in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas, as well as in normal bone. The mRNA expression of KIT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was observed to be significantly higher in canine (n=14) than in feline (n=5) osteosarcoma samples (P<0.001). KIT protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which revealed that 21% of canine osteosarcoma samples did not exhibit KIT staining in their neoplastic cells, while in 14% of samples, a score of 1 (<10% positive tumour cells) was observed, and in 50% and 14% of samples, a score of 2 (10–50% positivity) and 3 (>50% positivity), respectively, was observed. By contrast, the cancer cells of all the feline bone tumour samples analysed were entirely negative for KIT. Notably, canine and feline osteocytes of healthy bone tissue lacked any KIT expression. These results could be the first evidence that KIT may be involved in the higher aggressiveness of canine osteosarcoma compared with feline osteosarcoma. PMID:27698817

  1. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  2. Elastase induces lung epithelial cell autophagy through placental growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Yeh, Cheng-Chang; Chang, Bei-En; Lu, Hsuan-Hsuan; Wang, Hao-Chien; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a devastating disease, which is associated with increasing mortality and morbidity. Therefore, there is a need to clearly define the COPD pathogenic mechanism and to explore effective therapies. Previous studies indicated that cigarette smoke (CS) induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung epithelial (LE) cells. Excessive ELANE/HNE (elastase, neutrophil elastase), a factor involved in protease-antiprotease imbalance and the pathogenesis of COPD, causes LE cell apoptosis and upregulates the expression of several stimulus-responsive genes. However, whether or not elastase induces autophagy in LE cell remains unknown. The level of PGF (placental growth factor) is higher in COPD patients than non-COPD controls. We hypothesize that elastase induces PGF expression and causes autophagy in LE cells. In this study, we demonstrated that porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) induced PGF expression and secretion in LE cells in vitro and in vivo. The activation of MAPK8/JNK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 8) and MAPK14/p38alpha MAPK signaling pathways was involved in the PGF mediated regulation of the TSC (tuberous sclerosis complex) pathway and autophagy in LE cells. Notably, PGF-induced MAPK8 and MAPK14 signaling pathways mediated the inactivation of MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), the upregulation of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β) and the increase of autophagosome formation in mice. Furthermore, the PPE-induced autophagy promotes further apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In summary, elastase-induced autophagy promotes LE cell apoptosis and pulmonary emphysema through the upregulation of PGF. PGF and its downstream MAPK8 and MAPK14 signaling pathways are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of emphysema and COPD. PMID:24988221

  3. Donor selection in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: knowns, unknowns, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Champlin, Richard E

    2013-02-01

    Multiple donors are generally available for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we discuss the factors that should be considered when selecting donors for this type of transplantation according to the currently available evidence. Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) increase the risk of graft failure and should be avoided whenever possible. Strategies to manage recipients with DSAs are discussed. One should choose a full haplotype mismatch rather than a better-matched donor and maximize the dose of infused hematopoietic cells. Donor age and sex are other important factors. Other factors, including predicted natural killer cell alloreactivity and consideration of noninherited maternal alleles, are more controversial. Larger studies are needed to further clarify the role of these factors for donor selection in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  4. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h and immunocytochemical staining of cell nuclei. After 6 days in culture in the absence of growth factors, nuclear BrdUrd incorporation was detected in 30% of fetal chromaffin cells, 1.5% of neonatal cells, and 0.1% of adult cells. Addition of 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II increased the fraction of BrdUrd-labeled nuclei to 50% of fetal, 20% of neonatal, and 2% of adult chromaffin cells. The ED50 value of IGF-I- and IGF-II-stimulated BrdUrd labeling in neonatal chromaffin cells was 0.3 nM and 0.8 nM, respectively. In neonatal and adult chromaffin cells, addition of 1 nM bFGF or 2 nM NGF stimulated nuclear BrdUrd incorporation to approximately the same level as 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II. However, the response to bFGF or NGF in combination with either IGF-I or IGF-II was more than additive, indicating that the combined effect of the IGFs and bFGF or NGF is synergistic. The degree of synergism was 2- to 4-fold in neonatal chromaffin cells and 10- to 20-fold in adult chromaffin cells compared with the effect of each growth factor alone. In contrast, the action of bFGF and NGF added together in the absence of IGFs was not synergistic or additive. IGF-II acted also as a survival factor on neonatal chromaffin cells and the cell survival was further improved when bFGF or NGF was added together with IGF-II. In conclusion, we propose that IGF-I and IGF-II act in synergy with bFGF and NGF to stimulate proliferation and survival of chromaffin cells during neonatal growth and adult maintenance of the adrenal medulla. Our findings may have implications for improving the survival of chromaffin cell implants in diseased human brain. PMID:8127879

  5. Thiazolidinediones enhance vascular endothelial growth factor expression and induce cell growth inhibition in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is known that thiazolidinediones are involved in regulating the expression of various genes, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ); VEGF is a prognostic biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the mRNA expression of VEGF and its receptors in human NSCLC cell lines, RERF-LC-AI, SK-MES-1, PC-14, and A549. These mRNA expressions were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. We also studied the effect of Je-11, a VEGF inhibitor, on the growth of these cells. Results In NSCLC cells, thiazolidinediones increased the mRNA expression of VEGF and neuropilin-1, but not that of other receptors such as fms-like tyrosine kinase and kinase insert domain receptor-1. Furthermore, the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 completely reversed this thiazolidinedione-induced increase in VEGF expression. Furthermore, the addition of VEGF inhibitors into the culture medium resulted in the reversal of thiazolidinedione-induced growth inhibition. Conclusions Our results indicated that thiazolidinediones enhance VEGF and neuropilin-1 expression and induce the inhibition of cell growth. We propose the existence of a pathway for arresting cell growth that involves the interaction of thiazolidinedione-induced VEGF and neuropilin-1 in NSCLC. PMID:20214829

  6. A Defined, Feeder-Free, Serum-Free System to Generate In Vitro Hematopoietic Progenitors and Differentiated Blood Cells from hESCs and hiPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Salvagiotto, Giorgia; Burton, Sarah; Daigh, Christine A.; Rajesh, Deepika; Slukvin, Igor I.; Seay, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Human ESC and iPSC are an attractive source of cells of high quantity and purity to be used to elucidate early human development processes, for drug discovery, and in clinical cell therapy applications. To efficiently differentiate pluripotent cells into a pure population of hematopoietic progenitors we have developed a new 2-dimentional, defined and highly efficient protocol that avoids the use of feeder cells, serum or embryoid body formation. Here we showed that a single matrix protein in combination with growth factors and a hypoxic environment is sufficient to generate from pluripotent cells hematopoietic progenitors capable of differentiating further in mature cell types of different lineages of the blood system. We tested the differentiation method using hESCs and 9 iPSC lines generated from different tissues. These data indicate the robustness of the protocol providing a valuable tool for the generation of clinical-grade hematopoietic cells from pluripotent cells. PMID:21445267

  7. Incidence, risk factors and clinical outcome of leukemia relapses with loss of the mismatched HLA after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crucitti, L; Crocchiolo, R; Toffalori, C; Mazzi, B; Greco, R; Signori, A; Sizzano, F; Chiesa, L; Zino, E; Lupo Stanghellini, M T; Assanelli, A; Carrabba, M G; Marktel, S; Marcatti, M; Bordignon, C; Corti, C; Bernardi, M; Peccatori, J; Bonini, C; Fleischhauer, K; Ciceri, F; Vago, L

    2015-05-01

    Genomic loss of the mismatched human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is a recently described mechanism of leukemia immune escape and relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we first evaluated its incidence, risk factors and outcome in 233 consecutive transplants from partially HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors (MMRD and MMUD, respectively). We documented 84 relapses, 23 of which with HLA loss. All the HLA loss relapses occurred after MMRD HSCT, and 20/23 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Upon MMRD HSCT, HLA loss variants accounted for 33% of the relapses (23/69), occurring later than their 'classical' counterparts (median: 307 vs 88 days, P<0.0001). Active disease at HSCT increased the risk of HLA loss (hazard ratio (HR): 10.16; confidence interval (CI): 2.65-38.92; P=0.001), whereas older patient ages had a protective role (HR: 0.16; CI: 0.05-0.46; P=0.001). A weaker association with HLA loss was observed for graft T-cell dose and occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. Outcome after 'classical' and HLA loss relapses was similarly poor, and second transplantation from a different donor appeared to provide a slight advantage for survival. In conclusion, HLA loss is a frequent mechanism of evasion from T-cell alloreactivity and relapse in patients with myeloid malignancies transplanted from MMRDs, warranting routine screening in this transplantation setting.

  8. Regulation of transferrin receptor expression at the cell surface by insulin-like growth factors, epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.J.; Kuck, L.; Faucher, M.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (rIGF-I) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts causes a marked increase in the binding of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin to cell surface receptors. This effect is very rapid and is complete within 5 minutes. The effect is transient with (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin binding returning to control values within 25 minutes. In contrast, PDGF and rIGF-I cause a prolonged stimulation of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin binding that could be observed up to 2 hours. The increase in the binding of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin caused by growth factors was investigated by analysis of the binding isotherm. EGF, PDGF and rIGF-I were found to increase the cell surface expression of transferrin receptors rather than to alter the affinity of the transferrin receptors. Furthermore, PDGF and rIGF-I stimulated the sustained uptake of (/sup 59/Fe) diferric transferrin by BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts. Thus, the effect of these growth factors to increase the cell surface expression of the transferrin receptor appears to have an important physiological consequence.

  9. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factors for autologous transplant in hematologic malignancies: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gabús, Raul; Borelli, Gabriel; Ferrando, Martín; Bódega, Enrique; Citrín, Estela; Jiménez, Constanza Olivera; Álvarez, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Hematology Service of Hospital Maciel published its experience with peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting for autologous stem cell transplantation using Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim). After mobilization with a mean filgrastim dose of 78 mcg/Kg, 4.7 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg were obtained by apheresis. Age above 50, multiple myeloma as underlying disease and a malignancy that was not in remission were identified as frequent characteristics among patients showing complex mobilization. Objective The aim of this study was to compare stem cell mobilization using different brands of filgrastim. Methods One hundred and fifty-seven mobilizations performed between 1997 and 2006 were analyzed. This retrospective analysis comparative two groups of patients: those mobilized with different brands of filgrastim (Group A) and those who received Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim) as mobilizing agent (Group B). A cluster analysis technique was used to identify four clusters of individuals with different behaviors differentiated by age, total dose of filgrastim required, number of apheresis and harvested CD34+ cells. Results The mean total dose of filgrastim administered was 105 mcg/Kg, the median number of apheresis was 2 procedures and the mean number of harvested stem cells was 4.98 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg. No significant differences were observed between Groups A and B regarding the number of apheresis, harvested CD34+ cells and number of mobilization failures, however the total dose of filgrastim was significantly lower in Group B. Conclusions Among other factors, the origin of the cytokine used as mobilizing agent is an element to be considered when evaluating CD34+ cell mobilization results. PMID:23049356

  10. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  11. Localization of hematopoietic cells in the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus).

    PubMed

    de Abreu Manso, Pedro Paulo; de Brito-Gitirana, Lycia; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2009-08-01

    Amphibians represent the first phylogenetic group to possess hematopoietic bone marrow. However, adult amphibian hematopoiesis has only been described in a few species and with conflicting data. Bone marrow, kidney, spleen, liver, gut, stomach, lung, tegument, and heart were therefore collected from adult Lithobates catesbeianus and investigated by light microscopy and immunohistochemical methods under confocal laser microscopy. Our study demonstrated active hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of vertebrae, femur, and fingers and in the kidney, but no hematopoietic activity inside other organs including the spleen and liver. Blood cells were identified as a heterogeneous cell population constituted by heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, monocytes, erythrocytic cells, lymphocytes, and their precursors. Cellular islets of the thrombocytic lineage occurred near sinusoids of the bone marrow. Antibodies against CD34, CD117, stem cell antigen, erythropoietin receptor, and the receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor identified some cell populations, and some circulating immature cells were seen in the bloodstream. Thus, on the basis of these phylogenetic features, we propose that L. catesbeianus can be used as an important model for hematopoietic studies, since this anuran exhibits hematopoiesis characteristics both of lower vertebrates (renal hematopoiesis) and of higher vertebrates (bone marrow hematopoiesis).

  12. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity: Biobehavioral influences on recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Cancer.gov

    Review of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and its potential “window of opportunity” during which interventions targeting stress-related behavioral factors can influence the survival, health, and well-being of recipients.

  13. Placental growth factor is a survival factor for tumor endothelial cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Adini, Avner; Kornaga, Tad; Firoozbakht, Farshid; Benjamin, Laura E

    2002-05-15

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-related factor, placental growth factor (PlGF),has been shown recently to play an important role in pathological VEGF-driven angiogenesis. In this study, we examine the effects of mPlGF/PlGF-2 overexpression in tumors grown from glioma cells containing a tetracycline-regulated mPlGF cDNA. Overexpression of mPlGF leads to increased tumor growth and vascular survival. When tetracycline is used to abruptly withdraw mPlGF overexpression, we see increased apoptosis in both vascular cells and macrophages. In addition, PlGF-2 induces survival gene expression and inhibits apoptosis in vitro. Thus, we propose that PlGF-2 contributes to tumor angiogenesis by providing increased survival function to endothelial cells and macrophages.

  14. Emergent Complications in the Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Munchel, Ashley; Chen, Allen; Symons, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only potentially curative option for a variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Despite advances in transplantation biology and immunology as well as in posttransplant management that have contributed to improved survival and decreased transplant-related mortality, hematopoietic cell transplantation does not come without significant risk of complications. When patients who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation present to the emergency department, it is important to consider a variety of therapy-related complications to optimize management and outcome. In this article, we use clinical cases to highlight some of the more common emergent complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:25411564

  15. Intestinal smooth muscle cell maintenance by basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M; Stelzner, Matthias; Reichardt, Holger M; Dunn, James C Y

    2008-08-01

    Intestinal tissue engineering is a potential therapy for patients with short bowel syndrome. Tissue engineering scaffolds that promote smooth muscle cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential toward the regeneration of functional smooth muscles for peristalsis and motility. Since basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can stimulate smooth muscle proliferation and angiogenesis, the delivery of bFGF was employed to stimulate proliferation and survival of primary intestinal smooth muscle cells. Two methods of local bFGF delivery were examined: the incorporation of bFGF into the collagen coating and the encapsulation of bFGF into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. Cell-seeded scaffolds were implanted into the omentum and were retrieved after 4, 14, and 28 days. The seeded cells proliferated from day 4 to day 14 in all implants; however, at 28 days, significantly higher density of implanted cells and blood vessels was observed, when 10 microg of bFGF was incorporated into the collagen coating of scaffolds as compared to scaffolds with either no bFGF or 1 microg of bFGF in collagen. Microsphere encapsulation of 1 microg of bFGF produced similar effects as 10 microg of bFGF mixed in collagen and was more effective than the delivery of 1 microg of bFGF by collagen incorporation. The majority of the implanted cells also expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Scaffolds coated with microsphere-encapsulated bFGF and seeded with smooth muscle cells may be a useful platform for the regeneration of the intestinal smooth muscle.

  16. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  17. Modulation of growth and differentiation of eosinophils from human peripheral blood CD34+ cells by IL5 and other growth factors.

    PubMed

    Shalit, M; Sekhsaria, S; Malech, H L

    1995-01-01

    Small numbers of CD34+ primitive hematopoietic progenitors are found in normal human peripheral blood. These cells differentiate to myeloid or lymphoid lineage under the influence of different growth factors. We investigated the effects of IL5 and other growth factors on the production of eosinophils from peripheral blood CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were enriched from normal donors by apheresis and positive selection using an affinity column and plated in agarose with different combinations of cytokines. At 14 days of growth a triple stain technique was used to identify eosinophil, monocyte, and neutrophil colonies. IL5 alone did not support colony growth from CD34+ cells. In contrast, GM-CSF and IL3 alone or together without added IL5 supported the generation of more than 50% pure eosinophil colonies. Addition of IL5 did not change the total number of colonies, but increased the fraction of pure eosinophil colonies to over 70%. Addition of G-CSF reduced the percentage of eosinophil colonies and increased the percentage of neutrophil colonies. Under the best conditions for eosinophil colony growth (IL3+GM-CSF+IL5), the addition of interferon-alpha or bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibited colony growth by 51 and 58%, respectively. Addition of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or dexamethasone had no effect on eosinophil colonies. Since IL5 alone did not support colony growth from CD34+ cells, we determined when IL5-responsive cells appeared in culture. Cells were grown initially with IL3 + GM-CSF in suspension, washed, and plated in agarose with IL5 alone. Only when progenitors were grown at least 3 days could IL5 serve as the single growth factor supporting pure eosinophil colony growth (47 colonies/10(4) cells plated at Day 3 and 134 colonies/10(4) cells at Day 7). We used neutralizing anti-IL5 antibodies to demonstrate that this late acting IL5 growth effect was specific, and that differentiation of eosinophils in the presence of IL3 + GM-CSF was IL5

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  19. Evaluation of expression profiles of hematopoietic stem cell, endothelial cell, and myeloid cell antigens in spontaneous and chemically induced hemangiosarcomas and hemangiomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Crabbs, Torrie A; Arnold, Lora L; Pennington, Karen L; Cook, Jon C; Malarkey, David E; Cohen, Samuel M

    2013-07-01

    It is unclear whether the process of spontaneous and chemically induced hemangiosarcoma and hemangioma formation in mice involves the transformation of differentiated endothelial cells (ECs) or recruitment of multipotential bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which show some degree of endothelial differentiation. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining for hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34), EC markers (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 [VEGFR2], CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen), and a myeloid lineage marker (CD14) was employed to better define the origin of hemangiosarcomas and hemangiomas in mice. Staining was negative for CD45, factor VIII-related antigen, and CD14 and positive for CD34, VEGFR2, and CD31, indicating that mouse hemangiosarcomas and hemangiomas are composed of cells derived from EPCs expressing CD34, VEGFR2, and CD31 but not factor VIII-related antigen. The lack of CD45 expression suggests that mouse vascular tumors may arise from EPCs that are at a stage later than hematopoietic stem cells. Since factor VIII-related antigen expression is known to occur later than CD31 expression in EPCs, our observations may indicate that these tumor cells are arrested at a stage prior to complete differentiation.  In addition, myeloid lineage cells do not appear to contribute to hemangiosarcoma and hemangioma formation in mice.

  20. Nerve growth factor is involved in the supportive effect by bone marrow--derived stromal cells of the factor-dependent human cell line UT-7.

    PubMed

    Auffray, I; Chevalier, S; Froger, J; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Gascan, H; Coulombel, L

    1996-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that murine MS-5 and SI/SI4 cell lines induce the proliferation of human factor-dependent UT-7 cells in the absence of normally required human cytokines and also stimulate the differentiation of CD34+/CD38-LTC-ICs. We report in this study that the effect of MS-5 cells on UT-7 cells can be completely explained by the synergistic action of nerve growth factor (NGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) produced by these murine stromal cells. Purified murine NGF was able to support short-term clone formation and long-term growth of UT-7 cells in suspension cultures as efficiently as rhu-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. NGF action was mediated through the TrkA receptor, in which messenger RNA (mRNA) was easily detected in UT-7 cells by Northern blot. MS-5 cells strongly expressed NGF mRNA in Northern blot, and direct implication of MS-5-derived NGF in the induction of UT-7 cells proliferation was demonstrated in inhibition assays with an anti-NGF monoclonal antibody (MoAb) that neutralized by 84% +/- 4.1% (n = 5) UT-7 clone formation. However, NGF did not act alone, and several arguments demonstrated the synergistic action of MS-5-derived SCF: (1) an anti-c-kit partially inhibited UT-7 cells clone formation in coculture assays, (2) SCF and NGF synergized in an H3-TdR incorporation assay, and (3) the stimulatory effect of 10x-concentrated MS-5 supernatant was completely inhibited by an anti-c-kit but not by an anti-NGF, and levels of soluble NGF (1.2 ng/mL) detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 10x supernatant of MS-5 cells cultures were below the biologically active concentrations. In contrast, although MS-5 cells also promoted the differentiation of very primitive CD34+/CD38- human stem cells both in colony assays and long-term cultures, we could not incriminate MS-5-derived NGF in the observed effect: an anti-NGF MoAb did not inhibit the synergistic effect of MS-5 cells in colony assays or long-term cultures nor did soluble

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Hah, Young-Sool; Jun, Jin-Su; Lee, Seong-Gyun; Park, Bong-Wook; Kim, Deok Ryong; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Ryoul; Byun, June-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in bone development and postnatal bone fracture repair. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) are primarily involved in angiogenesis. This study investigated the expression of VEGF isoforms, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 during the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells. In addition, the effect of exogenous VEGF on the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells was also examined. The expression of the VEGF isoforms (VEGF(121), VEGF(165), VEGF(189), and VEGF(206)), VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 was observed in the periosteal-derived cells. Administration of KRN633, a VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, decreased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity during the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells. However, the administration of VEGFR2 Kinase Inhibitor IV, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, did not affect the ALP activity. The addition of recombinant human VEGF(165) elevated the ALP activity and increased the calcium content in the periosteal-derived cells. Treating the periosteal-derived cells with recombinant human VEGF(165) resulted in an increase in Runx2 transactivation in the periosteal-derived cells. These results suggest that exogenous VEGF stimulates the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells and VEGF might act as an autocrine growth factor for the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells.

  2. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  3. ETS Transcription Factor ETV2/ER71/Etsrp in Hematopoietic and Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Sumanas, S; Choi, K

    2016-01-01

    Effective establishment of the hematopoietic and vascular systems is prerequisite for successful embryogenesis. The ETS transcription factor Etv2 has proven to be essential for hematopoietic and vascular development. Etv2 expression marks the onset of the hematopoietic and vascular development and its deficiency leads to an absolute block in hematopoietic and vascular development. Etv2 is transiently expressed during development and is mainly expressed in testis in adults. Consistent with its expression pattern, Etv2 is transiently required for the generation of the optimal levels of the hemangiogenic cell population. Deletion of this gene after the hemangiogenic progenitor formation leads to normal hematopoietic and vascular development. Mechanistically, ETV2 induces the hemangiogenic program by activating blood and endothelial cell lineage specifying genes and enhancing VEGF signaling. Moreover, ETV2 establishes an ETS hierarchy by directly activating other Ets genes, which in the face of transient Etv2 expression, presumably maintain blood and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 through an ETS switching mechanism. Current studies suggest that the hemangiogenic progenitor population is exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Any perturbation in the ETV2, VEGF, and FLK1 balance causing insufficient hemangiogenic progenitor cell generation would lead to defects in hematopoietic and endothelial cell development.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) autocrine enhance breast cancer cells survival.

    PubMed

    Tiong, Kai Hung; Tan, Boon Shing; Choo, Heng Lungh; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Hii, Ling-Wei; Tan, Si Hoey; Khor, Nelson Tze Woei; Wong, Shew Fung; See, Sze-Jia; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Rosli, Rozita; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-09-06

    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive tumor subtype with poor prognosis. The discovery of underlying mechanisms mediating tumor cell survival, and the development of novel agents to target these pathways, is a priority for patients with basal-like breast cancer. From a functional screen to identify key drivers of basal-like breast cancer cell growth, we identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) as a potential mediator of cell survival. We found that FGFR4 mediates cancer cell survival predominantly via activation of PI3K/AKT. Importantly, a subset of basal-like breast cancer cells also secrete fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), a canonical ligand specific for FGFR4. siRNA-mediated silencing of FGF19 or neutralization of extracellular FGF19 by anti-FGF19 antibody (1A6) decreases AKT phosphorylation, suppresses cancer cell growth and enhances doxorubicin sensitivity only in the FGFR4+/FGF19+ breast cancer cells. Consistently, FGFR4/FGF19 co-expression was also observed in 82 out of 287 (28.6%) primary breast tumors, and their expression is strongly associated with AKT phosphorylation, Ki-67 staining, higher tumor stage and basal-like phenotype. In summary, our results demonstrated the presence of an FGFR4/FGF19 autocrine signaling that mediates the survival of a subset of basal-like breast cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of this autocrine loop may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for future treatment of breast cancers.

  5. Foxo-mediated Bim transcription is dispensable for the apoptosis of hematopoietic cells that is mediated by this BH3-only protein.

    PubMed

    Herold, Marco J; Rohrbeck, Leona; Lang, Mathias J; Grumont, Raelene; Gerondakis, Steve; Tai, Lin; Bouillet, Philippe; Kaufmann, Thomas; Strasser, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The BH3-only protein Bim is a critical initiator of apoptosis in hematopoietic cells. Bim is upregulated in response to growth factor withdrawal and in vitro studies have implicated the transcription factor Foxo3a as a critical inducer. To test the importance of this regulation in vivo, we generated mice with mutated Foxo-binding sites within the Bim promoters (Bim(ΔFoxo/ΔFoxo)). Contrary to Bim-deficient mice, Bim(ΔFoxo/ΔFoxo) mice had a normal hematopoietic system. Moreover, cytokine-dependent haematopoietic cells from Bim(ΔFoxo/ΔFoxo) and wt mice died at similar rates. These results indicate that regulation of Bim by Foxo transcription factors is not critical for the killing of hematopoietic cells.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Survival Signaling Requires Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; Upadhyay, Awani; Ido, Liyana J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Identification of pro-cell survival signaling pathways has implications for cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disease. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor LET-23 (LET-23 EGFR) has a prosurvival function in counteracting excitotoxicity, and we identify novel molecular players required for this prosurvival signaling. uv1 sensory cells in the C. elegans uterus undergo excitotoxic death in response to activation of the OSM-9/OCR-4 TRPV channel by the endogenous agonist nicotinamide. Activation of LET-23 EGFR can effectively prevent this excitotoxic death. We investigate the roles of signaling pathways known to act downstream of LET-23 EGFR in C. elegans and find that the LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway, but not the IP3 receptor pathway, is required for efficient LET-23 EGFR activity in its prosurvival function. However, activation of LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway does not appear to be sufficient to fully mimic LET-23 EGFR activity. We screen for genes that are required for EGFR prosurvival function and uncover a role for phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes in EGFR prosurvival function. Finally, we show that exogenous application of phosphatidylcholine is sufficient to prevent some deaths in this excitotoxicity model. Our work implicates regulation of lipid synthesis downstream of EGFR in cell survival and death decisions. PMID:27605519

  7. Incidence, risk factors, and long-term outcomes of sclerotic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Jieun; Hamad, Nada; Shin, Elizabeth M; Michelis, Fotios V; Shanavas, Mohamed; Gupta, Vikas; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Messner, Hans A; Seftel, Matthew; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2014-11-01

    Sclerotic chronic graft-versus-host disease (sclGVHD) is associated with significant morbidity and a poor quality of life. We reviewed 502 patients diagnosed with chronic GVHD and analyzed the incidence and risk factors of sclGVHD and long-term outcomes and immunosuppressive therapy (IST) cessation in patients with sclGVHD. With a median onset at 18 months the cumulative incidence of sclGVHD was estimated at 22.6% at 5 years (95% confidence interval, 18.6% to 26.8%). Univariate and multivariate analysis identified 2 risk factors for sclGVHD: non-T cell depletion (hazard ratio [HR] 9.09, P < .001) and peripheral blood stem cell (HR 3.87, P < .001). Overall survival (OS) at 5 years was significantly better in the sclGVHD group (88.1%) compared with the non-sclGVHD group (62.7%; P < .001), as were nonrelapse mortality (7.3% versus 21.5% at 5 years) and relapse rates (9.1% versus 19.3% at 5 years). There was no difference in the rate of IST cessation at 5 years (44.8% versus 49.9%, P = .312), but there was a trend of longer IST duration in the sclGVHD group compared with the non-sclGVHD group (median 71.6 months versus 62.9 months). In conclusion, T cell depletion and graft source affect the risk of sclGVHD. SclGVHD did not adversely affect long-term outcomes or IST duration.

  8. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  9. Increased transduction efficiency of primary hematopoietic cells by physical colocalization of retrovirus and target cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, M; Moriwaki, K; Dilloo, D; Hoffmann, T; Kimbrough, S; Johnsen, H E; Brenner, M K; Heslop, H E

    1998-06-01

    Efficient gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells offers a number of potential therapeutic applications. However, the relatively low titer of retroviral supernatants and the requirement for cell division to ensure integration have meant that transduction efficiency has been low. We have modified a flowthrough approach to cell transduction and have been able consistently to increase gene transfer efficiency into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. We transduced CD34 cells with retroviral vectors encoding a truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) or neo. Retroviral supernatant was pulled through 0.2-micron polycarbonated membranes, followed by placement of cells on the filter. In the absence of cytokines, the transduction efficiency of CD34 cells with a NGFR vector was increased 3-11-fold over that obtained at an identical MOI in liquid culture to produce 11%-44% transduction. Furthermore, both Thy1+ and Thy1- subsets in a total CD34 population were transduced with similar efficiency, and transduction with a neo vector, as measured by G418 resistance in clonogenic assays, increased 1.5-5-fold. The mechanism by which gene transfer is improved may reflect colocalization of cells and retrovirus. Costaining of cells transduced on the filter with an NGFR retrovirus with both an NGFR antibody and a gp70 antibody that recognizes viral coat protein revealed high-level coexpression. The levels of in vitro gene transfer we obtain are equivalent to those observed when CD34 cells are cocultured in liquid culture with cytokines. However, culture with cytokines may commit CD34 cells to differentiation and has produced disappointingly low levels of subsequent in vivo gene transfer. Gene marking studies using distinguishable retroviral vectors will provide a means of learning whether the effects of flowthrough transduction genuinely enhance the efficiency of gene transfer to human marrow-repopulating cells.

  10. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-MET receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway: Diverse roles in modulating immune cell functions.

    PubMed

    Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Villalobos-Hernandez, Alberto; Bobbala, Diwakar; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling via the MET receptor is essential for embryonic development and tissue repair. On the other hand, deregulated MET signaling promotes tumor progression in diverse types of cancers. Even though oncogenic MET signaling remains the major research focus, the HGF-MET axis has also been implicated in diverse aspects of immune cell development and functions. In the presence of other hematopoietic growth factors, HGF promotes the development of erythroid, myeloid and lymphoid lineage cells and thrombocytes. In monocytes and macrophages responding to inflammatory stimuli, induction of autocrine HGF-MET signaling can contribute to tissue repair via stimulating anti-inflammatory cytokine production. HGF-MET signaling can also modulate adaptive immune response by facilitating the migration of Langerhans cells and dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. However, MET signaling has also been shown to induce tolerogenic dendritic cells in mouse models of graft-versus-host disease and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. HGF-MET axis is also implicated in promoting thymopoiesis and the survival and migration of B lymphocytes. Recent studies have shown that MET signaling induces cardiotropism in activated T lymphocytes. Further understanding of the HGF-MET axis in the immune system would allow its therapeutic manipulation to improve immune cell reconstitution, restore immune homeostasis and to treat immuno-inflammatory diseases.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  12. Effect of transforming growth factor-β1 on human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsuya; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Arima, Yasuo; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Akimaru, Koho; Tajiri, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the biological effects of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on intrahepatic cholan-giocarcinoma (ICC). METHODS: We investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on human ICC cell lines (HuCCT1, MEC, and HuH-28) by monitoring the influence of TGF-β1 on tumor growth and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in ICC cells. RESULTS: All three human ICC cell lines produced TGF-β1 and demonstrated accelerated growth in the presence of TGF-β1 with no apoptotic effect. Studies on HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced stimulation of the expression of TGF-β1, as well as a decrease in TGF-β1 mRNA expression induced by neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. These results indicate that TGF-β1 stimulates the production and function of TGF-β1 in an autocrine fashion. Further, IL-6 secretion was observed in all three cell lines and exhibited an inhibitory response to neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. Experiments using HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced acceleration of IL-6 protein expression and mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate a functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6. All three cell lines proliferated in the presence of IL-6. In contrast, TGF-β1 induced no growth effect in HuCCT1 in the presence of small interfering RNA against a specific cell surface receptor of IL-6 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. CONCLUSION: ICC cells produce TGF-β1 and confer a TGF-β1-induced growth effect in an autocrine fashion. TGF-β1 activates IL-6 production, and the functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6 contributes to ICC cell growth by TGF-β1. PMID:17072955

  13. Synergistic activation of cells by Epstein-Barr virus and B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is initiated by virus binding to the C3dg-C3d receptor CR2. Several workers have implicated this receptor in the control of B-cell activation by examining the effects of antibodies to CR2 and isolated C3d on B-cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here on the activating effects of irradiated EBV, which retains its capacity to bind to CR2 but loses its ability to function as a T-independent B-cell activator. EBV synergized with B-cell growth factor in the induction of uptake of tritiated thymidine by T cell-depleted leukocytes from seronegative donors but did not induce secretion of immunoglobulin. Synergism could be inhibited with an anti-viral antibody that inhibited binding of EBV to CR2. No similar synergism was found between EBV and recombinant interleukin 2, interleukin 1 alpha, or gamma interferon or with the lipid A fraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. EBV may thus initiate B-cell activation as it binds to CR2. Infectious virus may, under normal circumstances, induce the cell to make those growth factors necessary to support B-cell proliferation; the difficulty of transforming cells with transfected EBV DNA may in part reflect the absence of an activation event provided by intact virus as it attaches to CR2. The synergism of EBV and B-cell growth factor more clearly distinguishes the effects of B-cell growth factor from those of interleukin 1 and interleukin 2 in other models of B-cell activation. Thus, this may be a useful model for further delineation of unique effects of B-cell growth factor on B-cell function. PMID:3027404

  14. Parainfluenza virus type 3 Ab in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: factors influencing post-transplant Ab titers and associated outcomes.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Xie, H; Karron, R A; Thumar, B; Englund, J A; Leisenring, W M; Stevens-Ayers, T; Boeckh, M; Campbell, A P

    2014-09-01

    Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) can cause severe respiratory illness among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Factors associated with PIV-3-specific Ab level, and the association between PIV-3 Ab levels and clinical outcomes in HCT recipients who acquire PIV-3 infection, are unknown. We evaluated PIV-3-specific hemagglutination inhibition Ab levels and clinical outcomes among 172 patients with PIV-3 infection following HCT. In a multivariable linear regression model, high post-transplantation Ab levels were independently associated with higher pre-transplantation recipient titer (mean difference 0.38 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26, 0.50), P<0.001). Significant associations between pre-HCT Ab titers in both patients and donors and occurrence of lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) after HCT were not observed. In conclusion, low pre-transplantation titers are associated with low Ab levels after HCT. The relationship between PIV-3 Ab levels and outcomes remain uncertain. Further study is needed to prospectively evaluate the dynamics of PIV-3-specific Ab responses and the relative contribution of PIV-3-specific Ab to protection from infection acquisition and progression to LRD.

  15. Analysis of the variable factors influencing tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to oral administration after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Kimitaka; Ikesue, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Yamamoto-Taguchi, Nanae; Tsuchiya, Yuichi; Matsukawa, Kumi; Uchida, Mayako; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Akashi, Koichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to identify variable factors affecting tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to twice-daily oral administration in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (n = 73). The blood concentration/dose ratio of tacrolimus immediately before the change from continuous infusion (C/Div) was compared with that between 3 and 5 days after the change to oral administration (C/Dpo). Median (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) was 0.21 (range 0.04-0.58). Multiple regression analysis showed that concomitant use of oral itraconazole or voriconazole significantly increased the (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) of tacrolimus (p = 0.002), probably owing to the inhibition of enterohepatic cytochrome P450 3A4. In addition, 5 of 18 (28%) patients who had the lowest quartile (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) values developed acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), which was significantly higher than in others [5 of 55 (9%) patients, p = 0.045]. Although the switch from intravenous to oral administration at a ratio of 1:5 appeared to be appropriate, a lower conversion ratio was suitable in patients taking oral itraconazole or voriconazole. In patients whose blood concentration decreases after the switch, the development of GVHD should be monitored and tacrolimus dosage should be readjusted to maintain an appropriate blood concentration.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Isabel

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  17. Autocrine growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wimmel, A; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: The role of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in neuroendocrine tumour biology is currently unknown. We therefore examined the expression and biological significance of TGFβ signalling components in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract. Methods: Expression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors, Smads and Smad regulated proteins, was examined in surgically resected NET specimens and human NET cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and ELISA. Activation of TGFβ-1 dependent promoters was tested by transactivation assays. Growth regulation was evaluated by cell numbers, soft agar assays, and cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry. The role of endogenous TGFβ was assessed by a TGFβ neutralising antibody and stable transfection of a dominant negative TGFβR II receptor construct. Results: Coexpression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors TGFβR I and TGFβR II was detected in 67% of human NETs and in all three NET cell lines examined. NET cell lines expressed the TGFβ signal transducers Smad 2, 3, and 4. In two of the three cell lines, TGFβ-1 treatment resulted in transactivation of a TGFβ responsive reporter construct as well as inhibition of c-myc and induction of p21(WAF1) expression. TGFβ-1 inhibited anchorage dependent and independent growth in a time and dose dependent manner in TGFβ-1 responsive cell lines. TGFβ-1 mediated growth inhibition was due to G1 arrest without evidence of induction of apoptosis. Functional inactivation of endogenous TGFβ revealed the existence of an autocrine antiproliferative loop in NET cells. Conclusions: Neuroendocrine tumour cells of the gastroenteropancreatic tract are subject to paracrine and autocrine growth inhibition by TGFβ-1, which may account in part for the low proliferative index of this tumour entity. PMID:12912863

  18. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Korashon Lynn; Adair, Jennifer; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy remains a highly attractive treatment option for many disorders including hematologic conditions, immunodeficiencies including HIV/AIDS, and other genetic disorders like lysosomal storage diseases, among others. In this review, we discuss the successes, side effects, and limitations of current gene therapy protocols. In addition, we describe the opportunities presented by implementing ex vivo expansion of gene-modified HSCs, as well as summarize the most promising ex vivo expansion techniques currently available. We conclude by discussing how some of the current limitations of HSC gene therapy could be overcome by combining novel HSC expansion strategies with gene therapy. PMID:21999373

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Steward, Colin G

    2010-02-01

    Osteopetrosis is the generic name for a group of diseases caused by deficient formation or function of osteoclasts, inherited in either autosomal recessive or dominant fashion. Osteopetrosis varies in severity from a disease that may kill infants to an incidental radiological finding in adults. It is increasingly clear that prognosis is governed by which gene is affected, making detailed elucidation of the cause of the disease a critical component of optimal care, including the decision on whether hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is appropriate. This article reviews the characteristics and management of osteopetrosis.

  20. Stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds in craniofacial regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tollemar, Viktor; Collier, Zach J.; Mohammed, Maryam K.; Lee, Michael J.; Ameer, Guillermo A.; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Current reconstructive approaches to large craniofacial skeletal defects are often complicated and challenging. Critical-sized defects are unable to heal via natural regenerative processes and require surgical intervention, traditionally involving autologous bone (mainly in the form of nonvascularized grafts) or alloplasts. Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard of care in spite of the associated risk of donor site morbidity. Tissue engineering approaches represent a promising alternative that would serve to facilitate bone regeneration even in large craniofacial skeletal defects. This strategy has been tested in a myriad of iterations by utilizing a variety of osteoconductive scaffold materials, osteoblastic stem cells, as well as osteoinductive growth factors and small molecules. One of the major challenges facing tissue engineers is creating a scaffold fulfilling the properties necessary for controlled bone regeneration. These properties include osteoconduction, osetoinduction, biocompatibility, biodegradability, vascularization, and progenitor cell retention. This review will provide an overview of how optimization of the aforementioned scaffold parameters facilitates bone regenerative capabilities as well as a discussion of common osteoconductive scaffold materials. PMID:27239485

  1. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor/diphtheria toxin receptor expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vinante, F; Rigo, A; Papini, E; Cassatella, M A; Pizzolo, G

    1999-03-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is an EGF family member expressed by numerous cell types that binds to EGF receptor 1 (HER-1) or 4 (HER-4) inducing mitogenic and/or chemotactic activities. Membrane-bound HB-EGF retains growth activity and adhesion capabilities and the unique property of being the receptor for diphtheria toxin (DT). The interest in studying HB-EGF in acute leukemia stems from these mitogenic, chemotactic, and receptor functions. We analyzed the expression of HB-EGF in L428, Raji, Jurkat, Karpas 299, L540, 2C8, HL-60, U937, THP-1, ML-3, and K562 cell lines and in primary blasts from 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot and by the evaluation of sensitivity to DT. The release of functional HB-EGF was assessed by evaluation of its proliferative effects on the HB-EGF-sensitive Balb/c 3T3 cell line. HB-EGF was expressed by all myeloid and T, but not B (L428, Raji), lymphoid cell lines tested, as well as by the majority (8 of 12) of ex vivo AML blasts. Cell lines (except for the K562 cell line) and AML blasts expressing HB-EGF mRNA underwent apoptotic death following exposure to DT, thus demonstrating the presence of the HB-EGF molecule on their membrane. Leukemic cells also released a fully functional HB-EGF molecule that was mitogenic for the Balb/c 3T3 cell line. Factors relevant to the biology of leukemic growth, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3, and especially all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), upregulated HB-EGF mRNA in HL-60 or ML-3 cells. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced HB-EGF mRNA and acquisition of sensitivity to DT in one previously HB-EGF-negative leukemia case. Moreover, the U937 and Karpas 299 cell lines expressed HER-4 mRNA. This work shows that HB-EGF is a growth factor produced by primary leukemic cells and regulated by ATRA, 1alpha, 25-(OH)2D3, and GM-CSF.

  2. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and insulin-like growth factor on cultured cartilage cells from skate Raja porasa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingjun; Jin, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2003-12-01

    Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on cartilage cells from proboscis of skate, Raja porasa Günther, were investigated in this study. The cartilage cells were cultured in 20% FBS-supplemented MEM medium at 24°C. Twelve hours after culture initiation, the cartilage cells were treated with bFGF and IGF-II at different concentration combinations. It was found that 20 ng/ml of bFGF or 80 ng/ml of IGF-II was enough to have obvious stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. Test of bFGF and IGF-II together, revealed that 20 ng/ml of bFGF and 80 ng/ml of IGF-II together had the best stimulating effect on the growth and division of skate cartilage cells. The cartilage cells cultured could form a monolayer at day 7.

  3. Epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor receptors collaborate to induce multiple biological responses in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Accornero, P; Martignani, E; Miretti, S; Starvaggi Cucuzza, L; Baratta, M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this work was to explore whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) could increase the biological responses of a mammary epithelial cell line of bovine origin when added simultaneously. We also investigated a possible molecular mechanism underlying this cooperation. The development of mammary gland requires several circulating and locally produced hormones. Hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET), are expressed and temporally regulated during mammary development and differentiation. Epidermal growth factor receptor and its ligands have also been implicated in the growth and morphogenesis of the mammary epithelium. Both EGF and HGF seem to exert a morphogenic program in this tissue; therefore, we hypothesized that these cytokines could act cooperatively in bovine mammary epithelial cells. We have already shown that the bovine BME-UV cell line, a nontumorigenic mammary epithelial line, expresses both MET and EGF receptor. Simultaneous treatment with HGF and EGF elicited an increase in proliferation, dispersion, degradation of extracellular matrix, and motility. Following EGF treatment, BME-UV mammary cells exhibited an increase in MET expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Long-term treatment of BME-UV cells with HGF and EGF together increased the level of activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and protein kinase B signaling pathways when compared with HGF or EGF alone. These data outline a possible cooperative role of the EGF and HGF pathways and indicate that cross-talk between their respective receptors may modulate mammary gland development in the cow.

  4. Growth factor-dependent initiation of DNA replication in nuclei isolated from an interleukin 3-dependent murine myeloid cell line.

    PubMed

    Munshi, N C; Gabig, T G

    1990-01-01

    To study the proliferative response of hematopoietic cells to growth factors at the molecular level, we developed a cell-free system for growth factor-dependent initiation of genomic DNA replication. Nuclei were isolated from the IL-3-dependent cell line NFS/N1-H7 after a 10-h period of IL-3 deprivation. Cytosolic and membrane-containing subcellular fractions were prepared from proliferating NFS/N1-H7 cells. Nuclei from the nonproliferating cells (+/- IL-3) showed essentially no incorporation of [3H]thymidine during a 16-h incubation with a mixture of unlabeled GTP, ATP, UTP, CTP, dGTP, dATP, dCTP, and [3H]dTTP. When the combination of IL-3, a cytosolic fraction, and a membrane-containing fraction from proliferating cells was added to nuclei from nonproliferating cells, a burst of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA began after a 12-h lag period, attained a maximal rate at 16 h, and reached a level of 860 pmol thymidine/10(6) nuclei at 24 h (corresponding to replication of approximately 56% total mouse genomic DNA). This DNA synthesis was inhibited approximately 90% by the specific DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor aphidicolin. Deletion of a single cellular component or IL-3 from the system resulted in a marked reduction of DNA replication (-membrane, 80 +/- 4%; -cytosol, 90% +/- 4%; -IL-3, 74 +/- 7% inhibition). This model requires a growth factor (IL-3), a sedimentable cell fraction containing its receptor and possibly additional membrane-associated components, and a cytosolic fraction. It appears to recapitulate the molecular events required for progression from early G1 to S phase of the cell cycle induced by IL-3 binding to its receptor.

  5. Growth factor-dependent initiation of DNA replication in nuclei isolated from an interleukin 3-dependent murine myeloid cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, N C; Gabig, T G

    1990-01-01

    To study the proliferative response of hematopoietic cells to growth factors at the molecular level, we developed a cell-free system for growth factor-dependent initiation of genomic DNA replication. Nuclei were isolated from the IL-3-dependent cell line NFS/N1-H7 after a 10-h period of IL-3 deprivation. Cytosolic and membrane-containing subcellular fractions were prepared from proliferating NFS/N1-H7 cells. Nuclei from the nonproliferating cells (+/- IL-3) showed essentially no incorporation of [3H]thymidine during a 16-h incubation with a mixture of unlabeled GTP, ATP, UTP, CTP, dGTP, dATP, dCTP, and [3H]dTTP. When the combination of IL-3, a cytosolic fraction, and a membrane-containing fraction from proliferating cells was added to nuclei from nonproliferating cells, a burst of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA began after a 12-h lag period, attained a maximal rate at 16 h, and reached a level of 860 pmol thymidine/10(6) nuclei at 24 h (corresponding to replication of approximately 56% total mouse genomic DNA). This DNA synthesis was inhibited approximately 90% by the specific DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor aphidicolin. Deletion of a single cellular component or IL-3 from the system resulted in a marked reduction of DNA replication (-membrane, 80 +/- 4%; -cytosol, 90% +/- 4%; -IL-3, 74 +/- 7% inhibition). This model requires a growth factor (IL-3), a sedimentable cell fraction containing its receptor and possibly additional membrane-associated components, and a cytosolic fraction. It appears to recapitulate the molecular events required for progression from early G1 to S phase of the cell cycle induced by IL-3 binding to its receptor. Images PMID:2104881

  6. Gs signaling in osteoblasts and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Henry M

    2010-03-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein Gs is a major mediator of the actions of several G protein-coupled receptors that target cells of the osteoblast lineage. For this reason, we generated chimeric mice with normal host cells and cells derived from embryonic stem cells missing the gene encoding the alpha subunit of Gs. While the mutant cells contributed to cortical osteoblasts and to hematopoietic cells in the liver, the marrow space contained few if any osteoblasts or hematopoietic cells missing Gs. Subsequent studies using the Cre-lox approach to delete Gsalpha from early cells of the osteoblast lineage and from hematopoietic stem cells were performed. These studies demonstrated the crucial roles of Gsalpha in osteoblastic cells in regulating the differentiation of osteoblasts and in supporting B-cell development as well as the essential role for Gsalpha in hematopoietic stem cells in allowing the homing of these cells to the marrow.

  7. Imatinib alters cell viability but not growth factors levels in TM4 Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Atari-Hajipirloo, Somayeh; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Valizadeh, Nasim; Mahabadi, Sonya; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anticancer agent imatinib (IM) is a small molecular analog of ATP that inhibits tyrosine kinase activity of platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and stem cell factor (SCF) receptor in cancer cells. However these factors have a key role in regulating growth and development of normal Sertoli, Leydig and germ cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine cell viability, PDGF and SCF levels in mouse normal Sertoli cells exposed to IM. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM IM for 2, 4 or 6 days. The cell viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, One-Way ANOVA was performed. Results: IM showed significant decrease in Sertoli cell viability compared to control group (p=0.001). However, IM increased PDGF and SCF level insignificantly (p>0.05). Conclusion: Results suggested that IM treatment induced a dose dependent reduction of cell viability in Sertoli cells. It seems that treatment with this anticancer drug is involved in the fertility process. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of PDGF and SCF in this cell. PMID:27738659

  8. [Aspergillus galactomannan detection in allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rovira Tarrats, Montserrat; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge

    2003-09-01

    Invasive aspergillosis has become the leading cause of death after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is partially due to the lack of a prompt diagnosis. Recently the detection of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen by means an ELISA technique in serum has been described. The objective of this study was to validate its usefulness in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation setting.

  9. Modeling the effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 on human cell growth.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gemma M A; Shorten, Paul R; Wake, Graeme C; Guan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plays a key role in human growth and development. The interactions of IGF-1 with IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs) regulate IGF-1 function. Recent research suggests that a metabolite of IGF-1, cyclo-glycyl-proline (cGP), has a role in regulating IGF-1 homeostasis. A component of this interaction is believed to be the competitive binding of IGF-1 and cGP to IGFBPs. In this paper we describe a mathematical model of the interaction between IGF-1 and cGP on human cell growth. The model can be used to understand the interaction between IGF-1, IGFBPs, cGP and IGF-1 receptors along with the kinetics of cell growth. An explicit model of the known interactions between IGF-1, cGP, IGFBPs, IGF-1 receptors explained a large portion of the variance in cell growth (R(2) = 0.83). An implicit model of the interactions between IGF-1, cGP, IGFBPs, IGF-1 receptors that included a hypothesized feedback of cGP on IGF-1 receptors explained nonlinear features of interaction between IGF-1 and cGP not described by the explicit model (R(2) = 0.84). The model also explained the effect of IGFBP antibody on the interaction between cGP and IGF-1 (R(2) = 0.78). This demonstrates that the competitive binding of IGF-1 and cGP to IGFBPs plays a large role in the interaction between IGF-1 and cGP, but that other factors potentially play a role in the interaction between cGP and IGF-1. These models can be used to predict the complex interaction between IGF-1 and cGP on human cell growth and form a basis for further research in this field.

  10. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gehling, Ursula M; Willems, Marc; Schlagner, Kathleen; Benndorf, Ralf A; Dandri, Maura; Petersen, Jörg; Sterneck, Martina; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias; Hossfeld, Dieter K; Rogiers, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that liver cirrhosis is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples from 72 patients with liver cirrhosis of varying etiology were analyzed by flow cytometry. Identified progenitor cell subsets were immunoselected and used for functional assays in vitro. Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Progenitor cells with a CD133+/CD45+/CD14+ phenotype were observed in 61% of the patients. Between 1% and 26% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) displayed this phenotype. Furthermore, a distinct population of c-kit+ progenitor cells (between 1% and 38 % of the MNCs) could be detected in 91% of the patients. Additionally, 18% of the patients showed a population of progenitor cells (between 1% and 68% of the MNCs) that was characterized by expression of breast cancer resistance protein-1. Further phenotypic analysis disclosed that the circulating precursors expressed CXC chemokine receptor 4, the receptor for SDF-1. In line with this finding, elevated plasma levels of SDF-1 were present in all patients and were found to correlate with the number of mobilized CD133+ progenitor cells. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that in humans, liver cirrhosis leads to recruitment of various populations of hematopoietic progenitor cells that display markers of intrahepatic progenitor cells. PMID:20066741

  11. Role of polypeptide growth factors in phenotypic transformation of normal rat kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    van Zoelen, E.J.J.; van Oostwaard, T.M.J.; de Laat, S.W.

    1988-01-05

    A serum-free assay has been established for studying the role of polypeptide growth factors in inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. The process has been characterized by measuring the time course of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into confluent, quiescent NRK cultures stimulated by defined polypeptide growth factors, in combination with cell counting studies, increases in DNA content, and cell cycle analysis by means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. It is shown that none of the growth factors tested is able to induce loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth by itself, but strong synergism was observed when combinations of growth factors were tested. None of the above factors was found to be essential, however, since any combination of three of the above four growth factors strongly induced the process. Strong parallels were observed between the growth factor requirements for inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth under serum-free conditions and the requirements for induction of anchorage-independent proliferation under growth factor-defined assay conditions. This indicates that most likely the same cellular processes underlie these two aspects of phenotypic transformation, although data indicate that anchorage-independent proliferation may be a more restricted property of phenotypic transformation than loss of density dependence of proliferation. It is concluded that phenotypic transformation of NRK cells does not require specific polypeptide growth factors, but reflects the ability of these cells to respond to multiple growth factors.

  12. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  13. Generation of hematopoietic stem cells from human embryonic stem cells using a defined, stepwise, serum-free, and serum replacement-free monolayer culture method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Jung; Jung, Ji-Won; Ha, Hye-Yeong; Koo, Soo Kyung; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2017-01-01

    Background Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be expanded infinitely in vitro and have the potential to differentiate into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); thus, they are considered a useful source of cells for HSC production. Although several technical in vitro methods for engineering HSCs from pluripotent stem cells have been developed, clinical application of HSCs engineered from pluripotent stem cells is restricted because of the possibility of xenogeneic contamination resulting from the use of murine materials. Methods Human ESCs (CHA-hES15) were cultured on growth factor-reduced Matrigel-coated dishes in the mTeSR1 serum-free medium. When the cells were 70% confluent, we initiated HSC differentiation by three methods involving (1) knockout serum replacement (KSR), cytokines, TGFb1, EPO, and FLT3L; (2) KSR, cytokines, and bFGF; or (3) cytokines and bFGF. Results Among the three differentiation methods, the minimal number of cytokines without KSR resulted in the greatest production of HSCs. The optimized method resulted in a higher proportion of CD34+CD43+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and CD34+CD45+ HPCs compared to the other methods. In addition, the HSCs showed the potential to differentiate into multiple lineages of hematopoietic cells in vitro. Conclusion In this study, we optimized a two-step, serum-free, animal protein-free, KSR-free, feeder-free, chemically defined monolayer culture method for generation of HSCs and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from human ESCs.

  14. [Pegfilgrastim in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fernández Alvarez, R

    2010-12-01

    Pegylation implies progress in filgrastim therapy. The addition of one molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the drug's half-life by reducing renal excretion. A single dose of pegfilgrastim is equivalent to a daily administration of G-CSF for recovering from neutropenia after cancer chemotherapy. Pegfilgrastim is also useful to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have researched its efficacy in this context, in patients with myeloma or lymphoma. Outcomes suggest that it has an efficacy similar to daily G-CSF. In allogeneic donors, a single 12-mg dose of pegfilgrastim produces sufficient increase of CD34+ in peripheral blood, with acceptable toxicity. There is interest on the data about the various functional and biologic properties of hematopoietic stem cells mobilized with pegfilgrastim compared to G-CSF, and on the effect that these differences may have on the graft composition. The administration of a single dose of pegfilgrastim after autologous transplantation has been shown to shorten the time for leukocyte recovery in a manner similar to G-CSF

  15. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Féraud, Olivier; Valogne, Yannick; Melkus, Michael W.; Zhang, Yanyan; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Haddad, Rima; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Larbi, Aniya; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Divers, Dominique; Gobbo, Emilie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Louache, Fawzia; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process. PMID:26938212

  16. Intercellular propagation of individually programmed growth bursts in FRTL-5 cells. Implications for interpreting growth factor actions

    SciTech Connect

    Derwahl, M.; Studer, H.; Huber, G.; Gerber, H.; Peter, H.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Five methods are commonly used to quantify FRTL-5 cells' and other thyrocytes' growth in vitro and the impact of growth inhibiting or stimulating maneuvers: Total cell count, mitotic index, DNA measurement, total (3H)thymidine incorporation, and the fraction of (3H)thymidine labeled cells. All of them assess cell growth as though all cells were homogeneous with an identical response to growth factors. We demonstrate here that this assumption is not valid. Rather, some intrinsically growth-prone cells appear to pass a growth signal to neighboring cells so that variably sized colonies of synchronized cells within each cluster growing from monodispersed cells are formed. This is true for FRTL-5 cells growing in vitro in monolayers and in three-dimensional, collagen embedded spheroids. The pattern is the same when cell suspensions or collagen-embedded spheroids are implanted onto nude mice. Patches with alternating high and low growth become particularly prominent in the large tumor-like organoids grown from monodispersed cells in nude mice. The pattern much reminds of similar observations in growing intact thyroids. Since there is no significant correlation between the fraction of (3H)thymidine labeled cells and the size of two- or three-dimensional clusters in any experiment, growth of signal-spreading cells is assumed to occur in leaps and bounds. Growth velocity in each subclone of a cell population depends on the mean interval between bursts of replications and on the number of cells synchronized by cell-to-cell diffusion of the growth signal emanating from one dividing cell. Thus, growth-promoting and growth-inhibiting factors may not only act on the mean interval between successive growth bursts, but they may also change cell-to-cell spreading of growth signals.

  17. Colonization Rate and Risk Factors of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci among Patients Received Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, M.; Bazargani, A.; Ramzi, M.; Sedigh Ebrahim-Saraie, H.; Heidari, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are associated with increased mortality and health care costs. Enterococci have been recognized as a clinically important pathogen in hospitalized patients. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections cause significant morbidity and mortality among patients undergoing transplantation. Objective: To identify epidemiology of VRE colonization and related risk factors among patients with hematological malignancies after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 42 patients who underwent bone-marrow transplantation between July 2013 and March 2014. A stool sample was taken from each patient 3–5 days after transplantation and cultured on appropriate media. Suspected colonies of enterococci were detected to species level by their culture characteristics, biochemical reactions and molecular features. VRE were confirmed via phenotypic and genotypic methods. Results: VRE were detected in 14 (33%) of studied samples. 10 (71%) of the detected VRE isolates were identified as high level vancomycin-resistant E. faecium with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥256 μg/mL of vancomycin; 3 isolates were E. galinarum and 1 was E. casseliflavus with an MIC of 8–16 μg/mL. VanA was dominant phenotype and all VRE isolates with high-level of vancomycin resistance had vanA gene. VRE isolation was mostly observed in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than other diseases. Moreover, antibiotic prophylaxis and hospitalization were independent risk factors for acquisition of VRE after transplantation. Conclusion: We found high level of vancomycin-resistance in E. faecium isolates obtained from HSCT patients. The vancomycin-resistant isolates of E. faecium had vanA and/or simultaneously vanB genes. PMID:28078058

  18. Expansion and homing of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bari, Sudipto; Seah, Kevin Kwee Hong; Poon, Zhiyong; Cheung, Alice Man Sze; Fan, Xiubo; Ong, Shin-Yeu; Li, Shang; Koh, Liang Piu; Hwang, William Ying Khee

    2015-06-01

    The successful expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB) for transplantation could revolutionize clinical practice by improving transplantation-related outcomes and making available UCB units that have suboptimal cell doses for transplantation. New cytokine combinations appear able to promote HSPC growth with minimal differentiation into mature precursors and new agents, such as insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2, are being used in clinical trials. Molecules that simulate the HSPC niche, such as Notch ligand, have also shown promise. Further improvements have been made with the use of mesenchymal stromal cells, which have made possible UCB expansion without a potentially deleterious prior CD34/CD133 cell selection step. Chemical molecules, such as copper chelators, nicotinamide, and aryl hydrocarbon antagonists, have shown excellent outcomes in clinical studies. The use of bioreactors could further add to HSPC studies in future. Drugs that could improve HSPC homing also appear to have potential in improving engraftment times in UCB transplantation. Technologies to expand HSPC from UCB and to enhance the homing of these cells appear to have attained the goal of accelerating hematopoietic recovery. Further discoveries and clinical studies are likely to make the goal of true HSPC expansion a reality for many applications in future.

  19. Estrogens and Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Modulate Neoplastic Cell Growth in Human Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Domenico; Barbaro, Barbara; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Glaser, Shannon S.; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather; Marucci, Luca; Sterpetti, Paola; Ginanni-Corradini, Stefano; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Dostal, David E.; De Santis, Adriano; Attili, Adolfo F.; Benedetti, Antonio; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and IGF-1R (receptor) in human cholangiocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (HuH-28, TFK-1, Mz-ChA-1), evaluating the role of estrogens and IGF-1 in the modulation of neoplastic cell growth. ER-α, ER-β, IGF-1, and IGF-1R were expressed (immunohistochemistry) in all biopsies (18 of 18) of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. ER-α was expressed (Western blot) only by the HuH-28 cell line (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma), whereas ER-β, IGF-1, and IGF-1R were expressed in the three cell lines examined. In serum-deprived HuH-28 cells, serum readmission induced stimulation of cell proliferation that was inhibited by ER and IGF-1R antagonists. 17β-Estradiol and IGF-1 stimulated proliferation of HuH-28 cells to a similar extent to that of MCF7 (breast cancer) but greater than that of TFK-1 and Mz-ChA-1, inhibiting apoptosis and exerting additive effects. These effects of 17β-estradiol and IGF-1 were associated with enhanced protein expression of ER-α, phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2 and pAKT but with decreased expression of ER-β. Finally, transfection of IGF-1R anti-sense oligonucleotides in HuH-28 cells markedly decreased cell proliferation. In conclusion, human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas express receptors for estrogens and IGF-1, which cooperate in the modulation of cell growth and apoptosis. Modulation of ER and IGF-1R could represent a strategy for the management of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:16936263

  20. Cryopreservation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Watt, Suzanne M; Austin, Eric; Armitage, Sue

    2007-01-01

    To date, more than 25,000 hematopoietic transplants have been carried out across Europe for hematological disorders, the majority being for hematological malignancies. At least 70% of these are autologous transplants, the remaining 30% being allogeneic, which are sourced from related (70% of the allogeneic) or unrelated donors. Peripheral blood mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor is the major source of stem cells for transplantation, being used in approx 95% of autologous transplants and in approx 65% of allogeneic transplants. Other cell sources used for transplantation are bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. One crucial advance in the treatment of these disorders has been the development of the ability to cryopreserve hematopoietic stem cells for future transplantation. For bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, the majority of cryopreserved harvests come from autologous collections that are stored prior to a planned infusion following further treatment of the patient or at the time of a subsequent relapse. Other autologous harvests are stored as backup or "rainy day" harvests, the former specifically being intended to rescue patients who develop graft failure following an allogeneic transplant or who may require this transplant at a later date. Allogeneic bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood are less often cryopreserved than autologous harvests. This is in contrast to umbilical cord blood that may be banked for directed or sibling (related) hematopoietic stem cell transplants, for allogeneic unrelated donations, and for autologous donations. Allogeneic unrelated donations are of particular use for providing a source of hematopoietic stem cells for ethnic minorities, patients with rare human leukocyte antigen types, or where the patient urgently requires a transplant and cannot wait for the weeks to months required to prepare a bone marrow donor. There are currently more than 200,000 banked umbilical cord blood units registered with

  1. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liu-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  2. Distinct signaling programs control human hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Colin A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Miller, Paul H.; Pellacani, Davide; Beer, Philip A.; Sachs, Karen; Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, WeiJia; Humphries, R. Keith; Sauvageau, Guy; Zandstra, Peter W.; Bendall, Sean C.; Nolan, Garry P.; Hansen, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Several growth factors (GFs) that together promote quiescent human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion ex vivo have been identified; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these GFs regulate the survival, proliferation. and differentiation of human HSCs remain poorly understood. We now describe experiments in which we used mass cytometry to simultaneously measure multiple surface markers, transcription factors, active signaling intermediates, viability, and cell-cycle indicators in single CD34+ cord blood cells before and up to 2 hours after their stimulation with stem cell factor, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (5 GFs) either alone or combined. Cells with a CD34+CD38−CD45RA−CD90+CD49f+ (CD49f+) phenotype (∼10% HSCs with >6-month repopulating activity in immunodeficient mice) displayed rapid increases in activated STAT1/3/5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, AKT, CREB, and S6 by 1 or more of these GFs, and β-catenin only when the 5 GFs were combined. Certain minority subsets within the CD49f+ compartment were poorly GF-responsive and, among the more GF-responsive subsets of CD49f+ cells, different signaling intermediates correlated with the levels of the myeloid- and lymphoid-associated transcription factors measured. Phenotypically similar, but CD90−CD49f− cells (MPPs) contained lower baseline levels of multiple signaling intermediates than the CD90+CD49f+ cells, but showed similar response amplitudes to the same GFs. Importantly, we found activation or inhibition of AKT and β-catenin directly altered immediate CD49f+ cell survival and proliferation. These findings identify rapid signaling events that 5 GFs elicit directly in the most primitive human hematopoietic cell types to promote their survival and proliferation. PMID:27827829

  3. Distinct signaling programs control human hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Knapp, David J H F; Hammond, Colin A; Aghaeepour, Nima; Miller, Paul H; Pellacani, Davide; Beer, Philip A; Sachs, Karen; Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, WeiJia; Humphries, R Keith; Sauvageau, Guy; Zandstra, Peter W; Bendall, Sean C; Nolan, Garry P; Hansen, Carl; Eaves, Connie J

    2017-01-19

    Several growth factors (GFs) that together promote quiescent human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion ex vivo have been identified; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these GFs regulate the survival, proliferation. and differentiation of human HSCs remain poorly understood. We now describe experiments in which we used mass cytometry to simultaneously measure multiple surface markers, transcription factors, active signaling intermediates, viability, and cell-cycle indicators in single CD34(+) cord blood cells before and up to 2 hours after their stimulation with stem cell factor, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (5 GFs) either alone or combined. Cells with a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD45RA(-)CD90(+)CD49f(+) (CD49f(+)) phenotype (∼10% HSCs with >6-month repopulating activity in immunodeficient mice) displayed rapid increases in activated STAT1/3/5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, AKT, CREB, and S6 by 1 or more of these GFs, and β-catenin only when the 5 GFs were combined. Certain minority subsets within the CD49f(+) compartment were poorly GF-responsive and, among the more GF-responsive subsets of CD49f(+) cells, different signaling intermediates correlated with the levels of the myeloid- and lymphoid-associated transcription factors measured. Phenotypically similar, but CD90(-)CD49f(-) cells (MPPs) contained lower baseline levels of multiple signaling intermediates than the CD90(+)CD49f(+) cells, but showed similar response amplitudes to the same GFs. Importantly, we found activation or inhibition of AKT and β-catenin directly altered immediate CD49f(+) cell survival and proliferation. These findings identify rapid signaling events that 5 GFs elicit directly in the most primitive human hematopoietic cell types to promote their survival and proliferation.

  4. Hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gschweng, Eric; De Oliveira, Satiro; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) provide an attractive target for immunotherapy of cancer and leukemia by the introduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) directed against tumor-associated antigens. HSCs engraft for long-term blood cell production and could provide a continuous source of targeted anti-cancer effector cells to sustain remissions. T cells produced de novo from HSCs may continuously replenish anti-tumor T cells that have become anergic or exhausted from ex vivo expansion or exposure to the intratumoral microenvironment. In addition, transgenic T cells produced in vivo undergo allelic exclusion, preventing co-expression of an endogenous TCR that could mis-pair with the introduced TCR chains and blunt activity or even cause off-target reactivity. CAR-engineered HSCs may produce myeloid and natural killer cells in addition to T cells expressing the CAR, providing broader anti-tumor activity that arises quickly after transplant and does not solely require de novo thymopoiesis. Use of TCR- or CAR-engineered HSCs would likely require cytoreductive conditioning to achieve long-term engraftment, and this approach may be used in clinical settings where autologous HSC transplant is being performed to add a graft-versus-tumor effect. Results of experimental and preclinical studies performed to date are reviewed.

  5. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  6. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  7. Mutual effects of growth hormone and growth factors on avian skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Hodik, V; Mett, A; Halevy, O

    1997-10-01

    Chicken growth hormone (cGH) has been shown to affect chicken skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. This study describes the interactions of cGH with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Both cGH and bFGF induced cGH receptor (cGH-R) gene expression as well as that of the avian FGF receptor, FREK, when added at low concentrations to satellite cells. bFGF caused a rapid induction of cGH-R mRNA. Combinations of low levels of bFGF and cGH caused a further increase in receptor mRNA expression levels, relative to that caused by each peptide alone, and their effect on DNA synthesis was synergistic. However, combinations of cGH and bFGF at high concentrations decreased cGH-R and FREK mRNA levels and DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. These results imply that the mutual effects of bFGF and cGH on satellite cell proliferation are receptor-mediated and that each peptide regulates both receptors gene expression. IGF-I induced DNA synthesis in satellite cells but did not affect cGH-R gene expression at any of the concentrations tested. Coincubation of 3.5 ng/ml cGH and various concentrations of IGF-I did not significantly change DNA synthesis relative to the effect of cGH alone. However, combinations with high levels of cGH abolished it. Similar time-course (up to 6 hr) induction of DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells was observed in the presence of cGH or IGF-I, suggesting that cGH affects satellite cell proliferation in an IGF-I-independent manner.

  8. Expanded Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reselected for High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Demonstrate Islet Regenerative Functions.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Bell, Gillian I; Sherman, Stephen E; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Hess, David A

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) purified for high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi) ) stimulate islet regeneration after transplantation into mice with streptozotocin-induced β cell deletion. However, ALDH(hi) cells represent a rare progenitor subset and widespread use of UCB ALDH(hi) cells to stimulate islet regeneration will require progenitor cell expansion without loss of islet regenerative functions. Here we demonstrate that prospectively purified UCB ALDH(hi) cells expand efficiently under serum-free, xeno-free conditions with minimal growth factor supplementation. Consistent with the concept that ALDH-activity is decreased as progenitor cells differentiate, kinetic analyses over 9 days revealed the frequency of ALDH(hi) cells diminished as culture time progressed such that total ALDH(hi) cell number was maximal (increased 3-fold) at day 6. Subsequently, day 6 expanded cells (bulk cells) were sorted after culture to reselect differentiated progeny with low ALDH-activity (ALDH(lo) subset) from less differentiated progeny with high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) subset). The ALDH(hi) subset retained primitive cell surface marker coexpression (32.0% ± 7.0% CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, 37.0% ± 6.9% CD34(+) /CD133(+) cells), and demonstrated increased hematopoietic colony forming cell function compared with the ALDH(lo) subset. Notably, bulk cells or ALDH(lo) cells did not possess the functional capacity to lower hyperglycemia after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. However, transplantation of the repurified ALDH(hi) subset significantly reduced hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance, and increased islet-associated cell proliferation and capillary formation. Thus, expansion and delivery of reselected UCB cells that retain high ALDH-activity after short-term culture represents an improved strategy for the development of cellular therapies to enhance islet regeneration in situ.

  9. Depressed immunity and impaired proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Iversen, P O; Hjeltnes, N; Holm, B; Flatebo, T; Strom-Gundersen, I; Ronning, W; Stanghelle, J; Benestad, H B

    2000-09-15

    The bone marrow is supplied with both sensory and autonomic neurons, but their roles in regulating hematopoietic and immunocompetent cells are unknown. Leukocyte growth and activity in patients with stable and complete spinal cord injuries were studied. The innervation of the bone marrow below the injury level lacked normal supraspinal activity, that is, a decentralized bone marrow. Lymphocyte functions were markedly decreased in injured patients. Long-term colony formation of all hematopoietic cell lineages, including dendritic cells, by decentralized bone marrow cells was substantially reduced. It was concluded that nonspecific and adaptive lymphocyte-mediated immunity and growth of early hematopoietic progenitor cells are impaired in patients with spinal cord injuries. Possibly, this reflects cellular defects caused by the malfunctioning neuronal regulation of immune and bone marrow function.

  10. The transcription factor early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) promotes apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Miguel; Luna-Medina, Rosario; Pérez-Rendón, Arturo; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2003-01-01

    Early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) is an immediate early gene, which is rapidly activated in quiescent cells by mitogens or in postmitotic neurons after depolarization. EGR-1 has been involved in diverse biological functions such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Here we report that enforced expression of the EGR-1 gene induces apoptosis, as determined by flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick-end labelling (TUNEL) analysis, in murine Neuro2A cells. In accordance with this role of EGR-1 in cell death, antisense oligonucleotides increase cell viability in cells cultured in the absence of serum. This apoptotic activity of the EGR-1 appears to be mediated by p73, a member of the p53 family of proteins, since an increase in the amount of p73 is observed in clones stably expressing the EGR-1 protein. We also observed an increase in the transcriptional activity of the mdm2 promoter in cells overexpressing EGR-1, which is paralleled by a marked decrease in the levels of p53 protein, therefore excluding a role of this protein in mediating EGR-1-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that EGR-1 is an important factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. PMID:12755686

  11. Minimal Residual Disease as a Predictive Factor for Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in Adult Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First and Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Grubovikj, Rada M.; Alavi, Asif; Koppel, Ahrin; Territo, Mary; Schiller, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is potentially curative for patients with high-risk leukemia, but disease recurrence remains the leading cause of treatment failure. Our objective was to determine the impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) by any technique in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in morphologic first and second complete remission undergoing allo-SCT. Fifty nine patients were eligible for the study of 160 patients transplanted over ten years. For the MRD assessment we used multiparametric flow cytometry, cytogenetics and fluorescent in situ hybridization; 19 patients (32.2%) were identified as MRD positive. Patients with MRD had a consistently worse outcome over those without MRD, with 3-years leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 15.8% vs. 62.4% and overall survival (OS) of 17.5% vs. 62.3%. Relapse rate was significantly higher in MRD-positive patients; 3 years relapse rate in MRD-positive patients was 57.9% vs. 15.1% in MRD-negative patients. Detection of MRD in complete remission was associated with increased overall mortality (HR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.45–7.57; p = 0.0044) and relapse (HR = 5.26; 95% CI: 2.0–14.0; p = 0.001), even after controlling for other risk factors. Our study showed that for patients in morphologic complete remission the presence of MRD predicts for significantly increased risk of relapse and reduced LFS and OS. PMID:24213327

  12. The SKI proto-oncogene enhances the in vivo repopulation of hematopoietic stem cells and causes myeloproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Singbrant, Sofie; Wall, Meaghan; Moody, Jennifer; Karlsson, Göran; Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian; Russell, Megan R; Walkley, Carl R; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced a gene signature associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation, as well as hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has generally been assumed, the significant impact of SKI on hematopoiesis is independent of its ability to inhibit TGF-beta signaling. Instead, myeloid progenitors expressing SKI are partially dependent on functional hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Collectively our results demonstrate that SKI is an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell activity and its overexpression leads to myeloproliferative disease.

  13. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1(F22-24/F22-24)) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1(BRCA1/BRCA1)) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1(F22-24/5382insC)) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  14. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  15. Impaired hematopoietic progenitor cells in trauma hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhoi, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is the major cause of death during trauma. Mortality due to HS is about 50%. Dysfunction of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) has been observed during severe trauma and HS. HS induces the elevation of cytokines, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), peripheral blood HPCs, and circulating catecholamines, and decreases the expression of erythropoietin receptor connected with suppression of HPCs. Impaired HPCs may lead to persistent anemia and risk of susceptibility to infection, sepsis, and MOF. There is a need to reactivate impaired HPCs during trauma hemorrhagic shock.

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta as a differentiating factor for cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gawaziuk, J P; X; Sheikh, F; Cheng, Z-Q; Cattini, P A; Stephens, N L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of supercontractile smooth muscle cells, contributing to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways in asthmatic patients, is due to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In cultured smooth muscle cells starved by removal of 10% foetal bovine serum for 7 days, growth arrest was seen; 30% became elongated and demonstrated super contractility. Study of conditioned medium suggested that the differentiating factor was TGF-beta. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out on conditioned medium from the arrested cells. Two protein bands were identified as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and TGF-beta1. To determine second messenger signalling by SMAD2, Western blotting and confocal microscopy were employed. Conditioned medium from arrested cultures showed the presence of MMP-2 and TGF-beta1, as revealed by SDS-PAGE; 68- and 25-kDa bands were seen. Differentiation was confirmed by upregulation of marker proteins, smooth muscle type myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain kinase. Confirmation was obtained by downregulating these proteins with decorin treatment, which reduces the levels of active TGF-beta and an adenoviral dominant-negative vector coding for a mutated type II TGF-beta-receptor. Activation of second messenger signalling was demonstrated immunocytochemically by the presence of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD4. Transforming growth factor-beta is likely to be the differentiating factor responsible for the development of these supercontractile smooth muscle cells. The development of such cells in vivo after cessation of an asthmatic attack could contribute to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways seen in patients.

  17. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator is an essential regulator of murine hematopoietic stem cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Bryan L.; Eisinger-Mathason, Tzipora S.; Giannoukos, Dionysios N.; Shay, Jessica E.; Gohil, Mercy; Lee, David S.; Nakazawa, Michael S.; Sesen, Julie; Skuli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of the transcriptional response to low oxygen and play essential roles in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and disease. Recent studies have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow localize to a hypoxic niche and that HIF-1α promotes HSC adaptation to stress. Because the related factor HIF-2α is also expressed in HSCs, the combined role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HSC maintenance is unclear. To this end, we have conditionally deleted the HIF-α dimerization partner, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) in the hematopoietic system to ablate activity of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α and assessed the functional consequence of ARNT deficiency on fetal liver and adult hematopoiesis. We determined that ARNT is essential for adult and fetal HSC viability and homeostasis. Importantly, conditional knockout of both Hif-1α and Hif-2α phenocopied key aspects of these HSC phenotypes, demonstrating that the impact of Arnt deletion is primarily HIF dependent. ARNT-deficient long-term HSCs underwent apoptosis, potentially because of reduced B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) expression. Our results suggest that HIF activity may regulate HSC homeostasis through these prosurvival factors. PMID:25855602

  18. Tuberculosis in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Batista, Marjorie Vieira; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Literature on tuberculosis (TB) occurring in recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is scanty even in countries where TB is common. Most reports of TB in HSCT patients were from ASIA, in fact the TB incidence ranging from 0.0014 (USA) to 16% (Pakistan). There are few reports of TB diagnosis during the first two weeks after HSCT; most of cases described in the literature occurred after 90 days of HSCT, and the lung was the organ most involved. The mortality ranged from 0 to 50% and is higher in allogeneic HSCT than in autologous. There is no consensus regarding the screening with tuberculin skin test or QuantiFERON-TB gold, primary prophylaxis for latent TB, and whether the epidemiologic query should be emphasized in developing countries with high prevalence of TB. PMID:24363876

  19. [Origin of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Bone Marrow--Endothelial to Hematopoietic Transition (EHT)?].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Yuan, Yan; Chen, Tong

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to primitive hematopoiesis, during embryonic definitive hematopoiesis, it has been demonstrated that multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) arise from hemogenic endothelium, and the endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT) exists within the yolk sac, placenta, AGM, mouse head vascular and extraembryonic vessels. However, whether hemogenic endothelial cells contribute to blood cell development at other sites of definitive hematopoiesis, including fetal liver and bone marrow, remains largely unknown. Recently, more and more researches showed that hematopoiesis within bone marrow had a close relationship with vascular endothelium development, too. This review summarizes the mechanism of EHT during embryo development, and discuss whether EHT exists in adult hematopoiesis.

  20. Isolation and analysis of hematopoietic stem cells from the placenta.

    PubMed

    Gekas, Christos; E Rhodes, Katrin; K A Mikkola, Hanna

    2008-06-24

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the ability to self-renew and generate all cell types of the blood lineages throughout the lifetime of an individual. All HSCs emerge during embryonic development, after which their pool size is maintained by self-renewing cell divisions. Identifying the anatomical origin of HSCs and the critical developmental events regulating the process of HSC development has been complicated as many anatomical sites participate during fetal hematopoiesis. Recently, we identified the placenta as a major hematopoietic organ where HSCs are generated and expanded in unique microenvironmental niches (Gekas, et al 2005, Rhodes, et al 2008). Consequently, the placenta is an important source of HSCs during their emergence and initial expansion. In this article, we show dissection techniques for the isolation of murine placenta from E10.5 and E12.5 embryos, corresponding to the developmental stages of initiation of HSCs and the peak in the size of the HSC pool in the placenta, respectively. In addition, we present an optimized protocol for enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of placental tissue into single-cell suspension for use in flow cytometry or functional assays. We have found that use of collagenase for single-cell suspension of placenta gives sufficient yields of HSCs. An important factor affecting HSC yield from the placenta is the degree of mechanical dissociation prior to, and duration of, enzymatic treatment. We also provide a protocol for the preparation of fixed-frozen placental tissue sections for the visualization of developing HSCs by immunohistochemistry in their precise cellular niches. As hematopoietic specific antigens are not preserved during preparation of paraffin embedded sections, we routinely use fixed frozen sections for localizing placental HSCs and progenitors.

  1. FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Demet; Youn, Hyewon; Nalbant, S Isil; Sharma, Savitha; Cobos, Everardo; Beale, Elmus G; Du, Yang; Williams, Simon C

    2005-01-01

    Background Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid differentiation in the murine EML hematopoietic stem cell line. Results One identified clone encoded a previously unidentified protein of 541 amino acids that contains an amino terminal signal sequence but no other characterized domains. This protein is a member of family of related proteins that has been named family with sequence similarity 20 (FAM20) with three members (FAM20A, FAM20B and FAM20C) in mammals. Evolutionary comparisons revealed the existence of a single FAM20 gene in the simple vertebrate Ciona intestinalis and the invertebrate worm Caenorhabditis elegans and two genes in two insect species, Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Six FAM20 family members were identified in the genome of the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes and five members in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The mouse Fam20a protein was ectopically expressed in a mammalian cell line and found to be a bona fide secreted protein and efficient secretion was dependent on the integrity of the signal sequence. Expression analysis revealed that the Fam20a gene was indeed differentially expressed during hematopoietic differentiation and that the other two family members (Fam20b and Fam20c) were also expressed during hematcpoiesis but that their mRNA levels did not vary significantly. Likewise FAM20A was expressed in more limited set of human tissues than the other two family members. Conclusions The FAM20 family represents a new family of secreted proteins with potential functions in regulating differentiation and function of

  2. DNMT3A and TET2 compete and cooperate to repress lineage-specific transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Su, Jianzhong; Jeong, Mira; Ko, Myunggon; Huang, Yun; Park, Hyun Jung; Guzman, Anna; Lei, Yong; Huang, Yung-Hsin; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the epigenetic modifiers DNMT3A and TET2 non-randomly co-occur in lymphoma and leukemia despite their epistasis in the methylation-hydroxymethylation pathway. Using Dnmt3a and Tet2 double knock-out (DKO) mice in which malignancy development is accelerated, we show that the DKO methylome reflects regions of independent, competitive and cooperative activity. Expression of lineage-specific transcription factors, including the erythroid regulator Klf1 is upregulated in DKO HSCs. DNMT3A and TET2 both repress Klf1 suggesting a model of cooperative inhibition by the epigenetic modifiers. These data demonstrate a dual role for TET2 in promoting and inhibiting HSC differentiation, loss of which, along with DNMT3A, obstructs differentiation leading to transformation. PMID:27428748

  3. High-grade cytomegalovirus antigenemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Asano-Mori, Y; Oshima, K; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Nakagawa, M; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Hangaishi, A; Motokura, T; Chiba, S; Kurokawa, M; Hirai, H; Kanda, Y

    2005-11-01

    Clinical impact of high-grade (HG) cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has not been clarified. Therefore, in order to investigate the risk factors and outcome for HG-CMV antigenemia, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 154 Japanese adult patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the first time from 1995 to 2002 at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Among 107 patients who developed positive CMV antigenemia at any level, 74 received risk-adapted preemptive therapy with ganciclovir (GCV), and 17 of these developed HG-antigenemia defined as > or = 50 positive cells per two slides. The use of systemic corticosteroids at > or = 0.5 mg/kg/day at the initiation of GCV was identified as an independent significant risk factor for HG-antigenemia. Seven of the 17 HG-antigenemia patients developed CMV disease, with a cumulative incidence of 49.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the low-grade antigenemia patients (4%, P<0.001). However, overall survival was almost equivalent in the two groups. In conclusion, the development of HG-antigenemia appeared to depend on the profound immune suppression of the recipient. Although CMV disease frequently developed in HG-antigenemia patients, antiviral therapy could prevent a fatal outcome.

  4. Rat Prolactinoma cell growth regulation by Epidermal Growth Factor receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Vlotides, George; Siegel, Emily; Donangelo, Ines; Gutman, Shiri; Ren, Song-Guang; Melmed, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulates pituitary development, hormone synthesis and cell proliferation. Although ErbB receptor family members are expressed in pituitary tumors, effects of EGF signaling on pituitary tumors are not known. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot confirmed EGFR and p185c-neu protein expression in GH3 lacto-somatotroph but not in ACTH-secreting AtT20 pituitary tumor cells. EGF (5 nM) selectively enhanced baseline (~ 4-fold) and serum-induced (> 6-fold) PRL mRNA levels, while gefitinib, an EGFR antagonist, suppressed serum-induced cell proliferation and Pttg1 expression, blocked PRL gene expression, and reversed EGF-mediated somatotroph-lactotroph phenotype switching. Downstream EGFR signaling by ERK, but not PI3K or PKC, mediated the gefitinib-response. Tumors in athymic mice implanted sc with GH3 cells resulted in weight gain accompanied by increased serum PRL, GH and IGF-I levels. Gefitinib decreased tumor volumes and peripheral hormone levels by ~ 30% and restored normal mouse body weight patterns. Mice treated with gefitinib exhibited decreased tumor tissue ERK1/2 phosphorylation and downregulated tumor PRL and Pttg1 mRNA abundance. These results show that EGFR inhibition controls tumor growth and PRL secretion in experimental lacto-somatotroph tumors. EGFR inhibitors could therefore be useful for control of PRL secretion and tumor load in prolactinomas resistant to dopaminergic treatment, or for those prolactinomas undergoing rare malignant transformation. PMID:18676863

  5. Divergent functions of hematopoietic transcription factors in lineage priming and differentiation during erythro-megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimkin, Maxim; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Mishra, Tejaswini; Morrissey, Christapher S; Wu, Weisheng; Keller, Cheryl A; Blobel, Gerd A; Lee, Dongwon; Beer, Michael A; Hardison, Ross C; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2014-12-01

    Combinatorial actions of relatively few transcription factors control hematopoietic differentiation. To investigate this process in erythro-megakaryopoiesis, we correlated the genome-wide chromatin occupancy signatures of four master hematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, and FLI1) and three diagnostic histone modification marks with the gene expression changes that occur during development of primary cultured megakaryocytes (MEG) and primary erythroblasts (ERY) from murine fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We identified a robust, genome-wide mechanism of MEG-specific lineage priming by a previously described stem/progenitor cell-expressed transcription factor heptad (GATA2, LYL1, TAL1, FLI1, ERG, RUNX1, LMO2) binding to MEG-associated cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in multipotential progenitors. This is followed by genome-wide GATA factor switching that mediates further induction of MEG-specific genes following lineage commitment. Interaction between GATA and ETS factors appears to be a key determinant of these processes. In contrast, ERY-specific lineage priming is biased toward GATA2-independent mechanisms. In addition to its role in MEG lineage priming, GATA2 plays an extensive role in late megakaryopoiesis as a transcriptional repressor at loci defined by a specific DNA signature. Our findings reveal important new insights into how ERY and MEG lineages arise from a common bipotential progenitor via overlapping and divergent functions of shared hematopoietic transcription factors.

  6. Divergent functions of hematopoietic transcription factors in lineage priming and differentiation during erythro-megakaryopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimkin, Maxim; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Wu, Weisheng; Keller, Cheryl A.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Lee, Dongwon; Beer, Michael A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial actions of relatively few transcription factors control hematopoietic differentiation. To investigate this process in erythro-megakaryopoiesis, we correlated the genome-wide chromatin occupancy signatures of four master hematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, and FLI1) and three diagnostic histone modification marks with the gene expression changes that occur during development of primary cultured megakaryocytes (MEG) and primary erythroblasts (ERY) from murine fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We identified a robust, genome-wide mechanism of MEG-specific lineage priming by a previously described stem/progenitor cell-expressed transcription factor heptad (GATA2, LYL1, TAL1, FLI1, ERG, RUNX1, LMO2) binding to MEG-associated cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in multipotential progenitors. This is followed by genome-wide GATA factor switching that mediates further induction of MEG-specific genes following lineage commitment. Interaction between GATA and ETS factors appears to be a key determinant of these processes. In contrast, ERY-specific lineage priming is biased toward GATA2-independent mechanisms. In addition to its role in MEG lineage priming, GATA2 plays an extensive role in late megakaryopoiesis as a transcriptional repressor at loci defined by a specific DNA signature. Our findings reveal important new insights into how ERY and MEG lineages arise from a common bipotential progenitor via overlapping and divergent functions of shared hematopoietic transcription factors. PMID:25319996

  7. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-dependent smooth muscle cell phenotype modulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in normal blood vessels exist in a highly differentiate state characterized by expression of SMC-specific contractile proteins (“contractile phenotype”). Following blood vessel injury in vivo or when cultured in vitro in the presence of multiple growth factors, SMC undergo a phenotype switch characterized by the loss of contractile markers and appearance of expression of non-muscle proteins (“proliferative phenotype”). While a number of factors have been reported to modulate this process, its regulation remains uncertain. Here we show that induction of SMC FGF signaling inhibits TGFβ signaling and converts contractile SMCs to the proliferative phenotype. Conversely, inhibition of SMC FGF signaling induces TGFβ signaling converting proliferating SMCs to the contractile phenotype, even in the presence of various growth factors in vitro or vascular injury in vivo. The importance of this signaling cross-talk is supported by in vivo data that show that an SMC deletion of a pan-FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α (fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 alpha) in mice profoundly reduces neointima formation and vascular remodelling following carotid artery ligation. These results demonstrate that FGF-TGFβ signaling antagonism is the primary regulator of the SMC phenotype switch. Manipulation of this cross-talk may be an effective strategy for treatment of SMC-proliferation related diseases. PMID:27634335

  8. Age-related changes of healthy bone marrow cell signaling in response to growth factors provide insight into low risk MDS.

    PubMed

    Kornblau, Steven M; Cohen, Aileen C; Soper, David; Huang, Ying-Wen; Cesano, Alessandra

    2013-08-20

    Background Single Cell Network Profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based assay that quantifiably and simultaneously measures changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to in vitro extracellular modulators at the single cell level. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells that occurs in elderly subjects and is characterized by dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. The functional responsiveness of MDS bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells, including functionally distinct myeloid and erythroid precursor subsets, to hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) and the relationship of modulated signaling to disease characteristics is poorly understood. Methods SCNP was used first to examine the effects of age on erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF)-induced signaling in myeloid, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), and CD34 expressing cell subsets in healthy BM (n=15). SCNP was then used to map functional signaling profiles in low risk (LR) MDS (n=7) for comparison to signaling in samples from healthy donors and to probe signaling associations within clinically defined subgroups. Results In healthy BM samples, signaling responses to HGF were quite homogeneous (i.e. tightly regulated) with age-dependent effects observed in response to EPO but not to GCSF. Despite the relatively small number of samples assayed in the study, LR MDS could be classified into distinct subgroups based on both cell subset frequency and signaling profiles. Conclusion As a correlate of underlying genetic abnormalities, signal transduction analyses may provide a functional and potentially clinically relevant classification of MDS. Further evaluation in a larger cohort is warranted. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  9. Fetal stromal niches enhance human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic differentiation and globin switch.

    PubMed

    Lee, King Yiu; Fong, Benny Shu Pan; Tsang, Kam Sze; Lau, Tze Kin; Ng, Pak Cheung; Lam, Audrey Carmen; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Wang, Chi Chiu; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Li, Chi Kong; Li, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis during mammalian embryonic development has been perceived as a migratory phenomenon, from the yolk sac blood island to the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), and subsequently, the fetal bone marrow. In this study, we investigated the effects of primary stromal cells from fetal hematopoietic niches and their conditioned media (CM), applied singly or in sequential orders, on induction of human embryonic stem cells, H1, H9, and H14 lines, to hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrated that stromal support of FL, AGM + FL, and AGM + FL + fetal bone marrow significantly increased the proliferation of embryoid bodies (EB) at day 18 of hematopoietic induction in the presence of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, and Flt-3 ligand. AGM + FL also increased hematopoietic colony-forming unit (CFU) formation. CM did not enhance EB proliferation but CM of FL and AGM + FL significantly increased the density of total CFU and early erythroid (burst-forming unit) progenitors. Increased commitment to the hematopoietic lineage was demonstrated by enhanced expressions of CD45, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-globins in CFU at day 32, compared with EB at day 18. CM of FL significantly increased these globin expressions, indicating enhanced switches from embryonic to fetal and adult erythropoiesis. Over 50% and 10% of cells derived from CFU expressed CD45 and beta-globin proteins, respectively. Expressions of hematopoietic regulatory genes (Bmi-1, β-Catenin, Hox B4, GATA-1) were increased in EB or CFU cultures supported by FL or sequential CM. Our study has provided a strategy for derivation of hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem cells under the influence of primary hematopoietic niches and CM, particularly the FL.

  10. Increased presence of anti-HLA antibodies early after allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation compared with bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Valérie; Aupérin, Anne; Tayebi, Hakim; Chabod, Jacqueline; Saas, Philippe; Michalet, Mauricette; François, Sylvie; Garban, Frédéric; Giraud, Christine; Tramalloni, Dominique; Oubouzar, Nadia; Blaise, Didier; Kuentz, Matthieu; Robinet, Eric; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2002-08-15

    We have recently shown that the use of allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (PBHSCT), as compared with bone marrow transplantation (BMT), is associated with increased titers of antibodies (Abs) directed against red blood cell ABO antigens. To further evaluate the influence of a G-CSF-mobilized PBHSCT graft on alloimmune Ab responses, we examined the frequency of anti-HLA Abs after transplantation in the setting of the same randomized study, comparing PBHSCT with BMT in adults. Anti-HLA Ab presence was determined by complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay (CDC) and flow cytometry in the recipient before and 30 days after transplantation as well as in the donor before graft donation. The use of PBHSCT was significantly associated with increased detection of anti-HLA immunoglobulin G (IgG) Abs early after transplantation as evidenced by flow cytometry (11 of 24 versus 4 of 27 transplant recipients, P =.03) and, less so, by CDC (5 of 24 versus 1 of 27 transplant recipients, P =.09). The difference between PBHSCT and BMT was further heightened when analysis was restricted to anti-HLA IgG Ab-negative donor/recipient pairs. In such a setting, early anti-HLA Ab was never detected after BMT but was repeatedly detected after PBHSCT (flow cytometry, 6 of 18 versus 0 of 17 transplant recipients, P =.02; CDC, 4 of 23 versus 0 of 26 transplant recipients, P =.04). Importantly, the PBHSCT-associated increase in anti-HLA Ab detection was observed despite a reduction in the median number of platelet-transfusion episodes per patient in PBHSC transplant versus BM transplant recipients (3 platelet-transfusion episodes [range, 1-21] in PBHSCT group vs 6 platelet-transfusion episodes [range, 3-33] in the BMT group; P =.02). In conclusion, this study strongly suggests that G-CSF-mobilized PBHSCT results in an increased incidence of circulating anti-HLA Abs and further confirms that the use of such a

  11. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  12. Dexamethasone facilitates erythropoiesis in murine embryonic stem cells differentiating into hematopoietic cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Anand S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Mishra, Rangnath; Lane, Thomas A.; Carrier, Ewa . E-mail: assrivastava@ucsd.edu

    2006-07-28

    Differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells are increasingly emerging as an important source of hematopoietic progenitors with a potential to be useful for both basic and clinical research applications. It has been suggested that dexamethasone facilitates differentiation of ES cells towards erythrocytes but the mechanism responsible for sequential expression of genes regulating this process are not well-understood. Therefore, we in vitro induced differentiation of murine ES cells towards erythropoiesis and studied the sequential expression of a set of genes during the process. We hypothesized that dexamethasone-activates its cognate nuclear receptors inducing up-regulation of erythropoietic genes such as GATA-1, Flk-1, Epo-R, and direct ES cells towards erythropoietic differentiation. ES cells were cultured in primary hematopoietic differentiation media containing methyl-cellulose, IMDM, IL-3, IL-6, and SCF to promote embryoid body (EB) formation. Total RNA of day 3, 5, and 9-old EBs was isolated for gene expression studies using RT-PCR. Cells from day 9 EBs were subjected to secondary differentiation using three different cytokines and growth factors combinations: (1) SCF, EPO, dexamethasone, and IGF; (2) SCF, IL-3, IL-6, and TPO; and (3) SCF IL-3, IL-6, TPO, and EPO. Total RNA from day 12 of secondary differentiated ES cells was isolated to study the gene expression pattern during this process. Our results demonstrate an up-regulation of GATA-1, Flk-1, HoxB-4, Epo-R, and globin genes ({alpha}-globin, {beta}H-1 globin, {beta}-major globin, {epsilon} -globin, and {zeta}-globin) in the 9-day-old EBs, whereas, RNA from 5-day-old EBs showed expression of HoxB-4, {epsilon}-globin, {gamma}-globin, {beta}H1-globin, and Flk-1. Three-day-old EBs showed only HoxB-4 and Flk-1 gene expression and lacked expression of all globin genes. These findings indicate that erythropoiesis-specific genes are activated later in the course of differentiation. Gene expression studies on the

  13. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  14. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  15. Decreased IRF8 Expression in Aging Hematopoietic Progenitor/Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stirewalt, Derek L.; Choi, Yongjae Edward; Sharpless, Norman E.; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Cronk, Michelle R.; Yukawa, Michi; Larson, Eric B.; Wood, Brent L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Radich, Jerald P.; Heimfeld, Shelly

    2008-01-01

    To determine how aging impacts gene expression in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), human CD34+ cells from bone marrow (BMCD34+) and mobilized stem cell products (PBCD34+38-) were examined using microarray-based expression profiling. The age-associated expression changes in CD34+ cells were then compared to age-associated expression changes in murine HSCs. Interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) was the only gene with age-associated expression changes in all analyses, decreasing its expression in human CD34+ cells and murine HSCs. Microarray-based expression profiling found that IRF8 expression also decreased with aging in human T-cells, suggesting that the effects of aging on IRF8 expression may extend to more differentiated populations of hematopoietic cells. Quantitative-RT/PCR studies confirmed that IRF8 mRNA expression decreased with aging in additional samples of BMCD34+, PBCD34+38-, and T-cells, and IRF8 protein expression was found to decrease with aging and to correlate with mRNA levels in PBCD34+ cells. The results suggest that IRF8 may be a novel biomarker of aging for hematopoietic cells. Given that inactivation of IRF8 causes CML-like syndromes in mice and decreased IRF8 expression occurs in human hematopoietic malignancies, it will be critical to determine if decreased IRF8 expression plays a role in the increased incidence of hematopoietic malignancies in older adults. PMID:18596738

  16. Hematopoietic factor-induced synthesis of von Willebrand factor by the Dami human megakaryoblastic cell line and by normal human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S M; Chandrasekhar, C

    1991-01-01

    Identification of hemopoietic factors and the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate the various stages of megakaryocyte development and platelet protein expression has been hampered by the lack of a purified, self-renewing, and responsive biological assay system. Previously, the human megakaryocytic Dami cell line has been shown to differentiate in response to phorbol ester by increasing the expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins Ib, IIb/IIIa, and the platelet protein, von Willebrand Factor (vWF). In this report, we demonstrate that this cell line is a suitable model for investigating the effects of specific cytokines and hemopoietic factors on the terminal differentiation of megakaryocytes as measured by the stimulated biosynthesis of vWF in serum-free culture. Although a low concentration (10 U/ml) of purified recombinant interleukin 3 (IL-3) had no effect, a higher concentration (100 U/ml) stimulated a three- to four fold increase in vWF synthesis. Purified thrombopoiesis-stimulating factor (TSF) alone induced a two- to threefold increase, and when used in combination with 10 U/ml IL-3, TSF induced a synergistic five- to sixfold increase in vWF synthesis. Recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) and human interleukin 6 (IL-6) each induced a twofold increase in vWF, and each acted additively with 10 U/ml IL-3. IL-3 and TSF stimulated similar increases in vWF expression by human megakaryocytes contained in nonadherent bone marrow preparations. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the Dami cell line as a serum-free culture system in which to study the direct effects of purified humoral factors on megakaryocyte and platelet protein synthesis during megakaryocyte maturation.

  17. The Effects of Soluble Growth Factors on Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Inside of Fibrin Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Willerth, Stephanie M.; Faxel, Tracy E.; Gottlieb, David I.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the effects of different growth factors on the survival and differentiation of murine embryonic stem cell derived neural progenitor cells (ESNPCs) seeded inside of fibrin scaffolds. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were cultured for 8 days in suspension, retinoic acid was applied for the final 4 days to induce ESNPC formation, and then the EBs were seeded inside of 3 dimensional (3D) fibrin scaffolds. Scaffolds were cultured in the presence of media containing different doses of the following growth factors: neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-AA), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and sonic hedgehog (Shh). The cell phenotypes were characterized using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemistry after 14 days of culture. Cell viability was also assessed at this time point. Shh (10 ng/mL) and NT-3 (25 ng/mL) produced the largest fractions of neurons and oligodendrocytes while PDGF (2 and 10 ng/mL) and bFGF (10 ng/mL) produced an increase in cell viability after 14 days of culture. Combinations of growth factors were tested based on the results of the individual growth factor studies to determine their effect on cell differentiation. The incorporation of ESNPCs and growth factors into fibrin scaffolds may serve as potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI). PMID:17585170

  18. Use of stem cells and growth factors in rotator cuff tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Engin; Hindocha, Sandip; Khan, Wasim S

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we analysed the role of stem cell and growth factor therapy on rotator cuff tendon repair. The injury to the rotator cuff tendons can be sustained in numerous ways and generally causes significant pain and disability to the affected individual. Following surgical repair of ruptured rotator cuff tendons re-rupture rates can be as high as 20-60%. In order to augment this repair process and to decrease the re-rupture rates tissue engineering methods can be used. These include the use of stem cells and growth factors. Mesenchymal stem cells are stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of connective tissue cell types and can therefore be utilised in repairing tendons. So far there has only been one human study using stem cells in rotator cuff tendon repair. This study has produced a positive result but consisted of only 14 patients and lacks a control group for comparison. Similar work has also been done using growth factors. Both individual and combination growth factor therapy have been used to improve rotator cuff tendon repair. However, the results so far have been disappointing with growth factors. For the purpose of future studies better techniques should be explored with regards to the delivery of stem cells and growth factors as well as the possibility of combining growth factor and stem cell therapy to improve repair rates.

  19. Angiopoietin-like proteins stimulate ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Ge, Guangtao; Xie, Kathleen; Tong, Wei; Hug, Christopher; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-02-01

    Successful ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would greatly benefit the treatment of disease and the understanding of crucial questions of stem cell biology. Here we show, using microarray studies, that the HSC-supportive mouse fetal liver CD3(+) cells specifically express the proteins angiopoietin-like 2 (Angptl2) and angiopoietin-like 3 (Angptl3). We observed a 24- or 30-fold net expansion of long-term HSCs by reconstitution analysis when we cultured highly enriched HSCs for 10 days in the presence of Angptl2 or Angptl3 together with saturating levels of other growth factors. The coiled-coil domain of Angptl2 was capable of stimulating expansion of HSCs. Furthermore, angiopoietin-like 5, angiopoietin-like 7 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 also supported expansion of HSCs in culture.

  20. The Transcription Factor ARID3a is Important for In Vitro Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors1

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Michelle L.; Mishra, Meenu; Frank, Mark Barton; Guthridge, Joel M.; Webb, Carol F.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the transcription factor ARID3a is expressed in a subset of human hematopoietic progenitor stem cells in both healthy individuals and in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Numbers of ARID3a+ lupus hematopoietic stem progenitor cells were associated with increased production of autoreactive antibodies when those cells were introduced into humanized mouse models. Although ARID3a/Bright knockout mice died in utero, they exhibited decreased numbers of hematopoietic stem cells and erythrocytes, indicating ARID3a is functionally important for hematopoiesis in mice. To explore the requirement for ARID3a for normal human hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell progenitors from human cord blood were subjected to both inhibition and over-expression of ARID3a in vitro. Inhibition of ARID3a resulted in decreased B lineage cell production accompanied by increases in cells with myeloid lineage markers. Over-expression of ARID3a inhibited both myeloid and erythroid differentiation. In addition, inhibition of ARID3a in hematopoietic stem cells resulted in altered expression of transcription factors associated with hematopoietic lineage decisions. These results suggest that appropriate regulation of ARID3a is critical for normal development of both myeloid and B lineage pathways. PMID:26685208

  1. The pros and cons of split-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone rather than a single high dose for hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization in small children (< 15 kg) with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Etienne; Piguet, Christophe; Auvrignon, Anne; Rubie, Hervé; Deméocq, François; Kanold, Justyna

    2006-07-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells were mobilized in 34 children with solid tumors weighing < or = 15 kg using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone at the doses of 10, 20 or 2 x 12 microg/kg/day. The mobilization with 2 x 12 microg/kg/day was more efficient than that with 10 mg/kg/day. Although the superiority of the split-dose compared to the single, high daily dose (20 microg/kg/day) was not statistically significant, our results suggest that the 2 x 12 microg/kg/day regimen is interesting.

  2. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  3. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  4. Growth Factor-Dependent Proliferation of the Pancreatic β-cell Line βTC-tet: An Assay for β-cell Mitogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Milo-Landesman, Dalit

    2002-01-01

    The ability to expand normal pancreatic islet β cells in culture would significantly advance the prospects of cell therapy for diabetes. A number of growth factors can stimulate limited islet cell replication, however other factors may exist which are more effective β-cell-specific mitogens. The search for novel β-cell growth factors has been hampered by the lack of a β-cell-specific proliferation assay. We developed a simple and sensitive assay for β-cell growth factors based on a conditionally-transformed mouse β-cell line (βTC-tet). These cells express the SV40 T antigen (Tag) oncoprotein under control of the tetracycline (Tc) operon regulatory system. In the presence of Tc, Tag expression is tightly shut off and the cells undergo complete growth arrest. Here we show that the growth-arrested cells can proliferate in response to growth factors in the absence of Tag. Using this assay, a number of growth factors previously shown to be mitogenic to a mixed islet cell population were found to induce proliferation of pure β cells. We conclude that growth-arrested βTC-tet cells can be employed in a survey of factors from various sources for identifying novel factors with β-cell mitogenic activity. PMID:11900281

  5. Characterization of hematopoietic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, Eva; Cramer, Christopher; Xia, Xiujin; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Slakey, Douglas P; Chiu, Ernest; Newsome, Edward R; Alt, Eckhard U; Izadpanah, Reza

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal and hematopoietic tissues are important reservoirs of adult stem cells. The potential of tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into cells of mesodermal and ectodermal lineages has been reported previously. We examined the hypothesis that adherent adipose tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are capable of generating cells with hematopoietic characteristics. When cultured in differentiation media, clonally isolated ASCs develop into cells with hematopoietic attributes. The hematopoietic differentiated cells (HD) express early hematopoietic (c-kit, PROM1, CD4) as well as monocyte/macrophage markers (CCR5, CD68, MRC1, CD11b, CSF1R). Additionally, HD cells display functional characteristics of monocyte/macrophages such as phagocytosis and enzymatic activity of α-Naphthyl Acetate Esterase. HD cells are also responsive to stimulation by IL-4 and LPS as shown by increased CD14 and HLA-DRB1 expressions and release of IL-2, IL10, and TNF. Taken together, this study characterizes the potential of ASCs to generate functional macrophages in vitro, and therefore paves way for their possible use in cell therapy applications.

  6. Production of human glucocerebrosidase in mice after retroviral gene transfer into multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, P.H.; Fink, J.K.; Brady, R.O.; Perry, L.K.; Karlsson, S. )

    1989-11-01

    The human glucocerebrosidase (GC) gene has been transferred efficiently into spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cells, and production of human GC RNA and protein has been achieved in transduced CFU-S colonies. High-titer retroviral vectors containing the human GC cDNA were constructed. Four vectors were compared with respect to gene-transfer efficiency into CFU-S progenitors. One vector (G vector) required high concentrations of interleukins 3 and 6 during stimulation and coculture for efficient transduction of CFU-S progenitors. The remaining three vectors (NTG, GTN, and GI vectors) transduced these progenitors at infection frequencies approaching 100% using low concentrations of hematopoietic growth factors to simulate cell division prior to and during the infection. Vectors using the viral long terminal repeat enhancer/promoter to drive the human GC cDNA produced high levels of human GC RNA in the progeny of CFU-S progenitors after gene transfer. All three vectors producing human GC RNA in CFU-S colonies can generate human GC as detected by immunochemical analysis of CFU-S colonies. The capacity of the viral long terminal repeat and the internal thymidine kinase promoter to direct synthesis of RNA in transduced bone marrow and spleen cells 5 months after bone marrow transplantation reflected the performance of these promoters in NTG-transduced CFU-S colonies.

  7. Nerve growth factor modulate proliferation of cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyu; Li, Zhongguo; Qiu, Liangxiu; Zhao, Changsong; Hu, Zhulin

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF. MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570 nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did. Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  8. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  9. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  10. Repression of vascular endothelial growth factor A in glioblastoma cells using engineered zinc finger transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Andrew W; Zhang, Lei; Urnov, Fyodor; Dent, Carolyn; Jouvenot, Yann; Zhong, Xiaohong; Rebar, Edward J; Jamieson, Andrew C; Zhang, H Steven; Tan, Siyuan; Case, Casey C; Pabo, Carl O; Wolffe, Alan P; Gregory, Philip D

    2003-12-15

    Angiogenic factors are necessary for tumor proliferation and thus are attractive therapeutic targets. In this study, we have used engineered zinc finger protein (ZFP) transcription factors (TFs) to repress expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in human cancer cell lines. We create potent transcriptional repressors by fusing a designed ZFP targeted to the VEGF-A promoter with either the ligand-binding domain of thyroid hormone receptor alpha or its viral relative, vErbA. Moreover, this ZFP-vErbA repressor binds its intended target site in vivo and mediates the specific deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 at the targeted promoter, a result that emulates the natural repression mechanism of these domains. The potential therapeutic relevance of ZFP-mediated VEGF-A repression was addressed using the highly tumorigenic glioblastoma cell line U87MG. Despite the aberrant overexpression of VEGF-A in this cell line, engineered ZFP TFs were able to repress the expression of VEGF-A by >20-fold. The VEGF-A levels observed after ZFP TF-mediated repression were comparable to those of a nonangiogenic cancer line (U251MG), suggesting that the degree of repression obtained with the ZFP TF would be sufficient to suppress tumor angiogenesis. Thus, engineered ZFP TFs are shown to be potent regulators of gene expression with therapeutic promise in the treatment of disease.

  11. Growth factor and ultrasound-assisted bioreactor synergism for human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thakurta, Sanjukta Guha; Budhiraja, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound at 5.0 MHz was noted to be chondro-inductive, with improved SOX-9 gene and COL2A1 protein expression in constructs that allowed for cell-to-cell contact. To achieve tissue-engineered cartilage using macroporous scaffolds, it is hypothesized that a combination of ultrasound at 5.0 MHz and transforming growth factor-β3 induces human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to chondrocytes. Expression of miR-145 was used as a metric to qualitatively assess the efficacy of human mesenchymal stem cell conversion. Our results suggest that in group 1 (no transforming growth factor-β3, no ultrasound), as anticipated, human mesenchymal stem cells were not efficiently differentiated into chondrocytes, judging by the lack of decrease in the level of miR-145 expression. Human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes in group 2 (transforming growth factor-β3, no ultrasound) and group 3 (transforming growth factor-β3, ultrasound) with group 3 having a 2-fold lower miR-145 when compared to group 2 at day 7, indicating a higher conversion to chondrocytes. Transforming growth factor-β3–induced chondrogenesis with and without ultrasound stimulation for 14 days in the ultrasound-assisted bioreactor was compared and followed by additional culture in the absence of growth factors. The combination of growth factor and ultrasound stimulation (group 3) resulted in enhanced COL2A1, SOX-9, and ACAN protein expression when compared to growth factor alone (group 2). No COL10A1 protein expression was noted. Enhanced cell proliferation and glycosaminoglycan deposition was noted with the combination of growth factor and ultrasound stimulation. These results suggest that ultrasound at 5.0 MHz could be used to induce chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25610590

  12. Major complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Afessa, Bekele; Peters, Steve G

    2006-06-01

    Tens of thousands of patients undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually, 15 to 40% of whom are admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary complications are the most life threatening conditions that develop in HSCT recipients. Both infectious and noninfectious complications occur more frequently in allogeneic HSCT. The management of HSCT recipients requires knowledge of their immune status, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, and early treatment. During the pre-engraftment phase (0 to 30 days after transplant), the most prevalent pathogens causing infection are bacteria and Candida species and, if the neutropenia persists, Aspergillus species. The early post-engraftment phase (30 to 100 days) is characterized by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jiroveci, and Aspergillus infections. During the late posttransplant phase (> 100 days), allogeneic HSCT recipients are at risk for CMV, community-acquired respiratory virus, and encapsulated bacterial infections. Antigen and polymerase chain reaction assays are important for the diagnosis of CMV and Aspergillus infections. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and peri-engraftment respiratory distress syndrome occur in both allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients, usually during the first 30 days. Bronchiolitis obliterans occurs exclusively in allogeneic HSCT recipients with graft versus host disease. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome occurs at any time following transplant. Bronchoscopy is usually helpful for the diagnosis of the infectious pulmonary complications and DAH.

  13. Unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry and the role of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank

    PubMed Central

    Beom, Su-Hee; Kim, Eung Jo; Kim, Miok

    2016-01-01

    Background The hematopoietic stem cell bank has been actively recruiting registrants since 1994. This study systematically reviews its operations and outcomes over the last 20 years. Methods Retrospective data on a total of 47,711 registrants were reviewed. Relevant data were processed using PASW Statistics for Windows, version 18.0. Results As of 2013, the Korean Network for Organ Sharing database contained 265,307 registrants. Of these, 49,037 (18%) registrants committed to hematopoietic cell donation from 1994 to 2013. Fifty-seven percent of the registrants were men, and 43% were women. The reasons for opting out of the registry included refusal to donate (70%), family refusal (28%), and others (2%). The donation willingness of registrants was significantly higher than those who refused to receive a mail to confirm their continued enrollment (χ2=6.103, P=0.013). The bank successfully coordinated a total of 512 donors among newly matched donors from 1995 to 2013, of which the bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell accounted for 40.8% and 59.2% of the total donations, respectively. Conclusion Our recruitment activities focus on promoting voluntary registration and the importance of updating personal contact information. We expect that these data may be useful for diverse studies and demonstrate the positive impacts on the donation program. PMID:27382555

  14. All hematopoietic stem cells engraft in submyeloablatively irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Forgacova, Katarina; Savvulidi, Filipp; Sefc, Ludek; Linhartova, Jana; Necas, Emanuel

    2013-05-01

    Significant controversy exists regarding the impact of hematopoietic stroma damage by irradiation on the efficiency of engraftment of intravenously transplanted stem cells. It was previously demonstrated that in normal syngenic mice, all intravenously transplanted donor stem cells, present in the bone marrow, compete equally with those of the host. In this study, we comprehensively compared the blood cell production derived from transplanted donor stem cells with that from the host stem cells surviving various doses of submyeloablative irradiation. We compared the partial chimerism resulting from transplantation with theoretical estimates that assumed transplantation efficiencies ranging from 100% to 20%. The highest level of consensus between the experimental and the theoretical results was 100% for homing and engraftment (ie, the utilization of all transplanted stem cells). These results point to a very potent mechanism through which intravenously administered hematopoietic stem cells are captured from circulation, engraft in the hematopoietic tissue, and contribute to blood cell production in irradiated recipients. The damage done to hematopoietic stroma and to the trabecular bone by submyeloablative doses of ionizing radiation does not negatively affect the homing and engraftment mechanisms of intravenously transplanted hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells.

  15. Influencing hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells using soluble heparin and heparan sulfate saccharides.

    PubMed

    Holley, Rebecca J; Pickford, Claire E; Rushton, Graham; Lacaud, Georges; Gallagher, John T; Kouskoff, Valerie; Merry, Catherine L R

    2011-02-25

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) encompass some of the most abundant macromolecules on the surface of almost every cell type. Heparan sulfate (HS) chains provide a key interaction surface for the binding of numerous proteins such as growth factors and morphogens, helping to define the ability of a cell to respond selectively to environmental cues. The specificity of HS-protein interactions are governed predominantly by the order and positioning of sulfate groups, with distinct cell types expressing unique sets of HS epitopes. Embryos deficient in HS-synthesis (Ext1(-/-)) exhibit pre-gastrulation lethality and lack recognizable organized mesoderm and extraembryonic tissues. Here we demonstrate that embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from Ext1(-/-) embryos are unable to differentiate into hematopoietic lineages, instead retaining ESC marker expression throughout embryoid body (EB) culture. However hematopoietic differentiation can be restored by the addition of soluble heparin. Consistent with specific size and composition requirements for HS:growth factor signaling, chains measuring at least 12 saccharides were required for partial rescue of hematopoiesis with longer chains (18 saccharides or more) required for complete rescue. Critically N- and 6-O-sulfate groups were essential for rescue. Heparin addition restored the activity of multiple signaling pathways including bone morphogenic protein (BMP) with activation of phospho-SMADs re-established by the addition of heparin. Heparin addition to wild-type cultures also altered the outcome of differentiation, promoting hematopoiesis at low concentrations, yet inhibiting blood formation at high concentrations. Thus altering the levels of HS and HS sulfation within differentiating ESC cultures provides an attractive and accessible mechanism for influencing cell fate.

  16. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Yi, Ho-Keun; Nam, Sang-Yun; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2009-07-17

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor directly stimulates tumour cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Devery, Aoife M; Wadekar, Rekha; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Jiang, Yanyan; Ryan, Anderson J

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key stimulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF signals primarily through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase whose expression is found predominantly on endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of VEGFR2 expression in NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells and tissue sections were stained for VEGFR2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine the activation and inhibition of VEGFR2 and its downstream signalling pathways. Five-day proliferation assays were carried out in the presence or absence of VEGF. IHC analysis of NSCLC demonstrated tumour cell VEGFR2 expression in 20% of samples. Immunoblot analysis showed expression of VEGFR2 protein in 3/8 NSCLC cell lines that correlated with VEGFR2 mRNA expression levels. VEGF-dependent VEGFR2 activation was apparent in NSCLC cells, and was associated with increased tumor cell proliferation. Cediranib treatment or siRNA against VEGFR2 inhibited VEGF-dependent increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity using cediranib was more effective than inhibition of AKT (MK2206) or MEK (AZD6244) for overcoming VEGFR2-driven cell proliferation. VEGF treatment did not affect cell survival following treatment with radiation, cisplatin, docetaxel or gemcitabine. Our data suggest that a subset of NSCLC tumour cells express functional VEGFR2 which can act to promote VEGF-dependent tumour cell growth. In this tumour subset, therapies targeting VEGFR2 signalling, such as cediranib, have the potential to inhibit both tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hönig, M; Schulz, A; Friedrich, W

    2011-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by their presentation with life threatening infections in the first months of life. The clinical presentation and the therapeutic outcome is influenced by multiple factors: the genetic defect, infectious complications, the presence of maternal T cells the development of Omenn syndrome, as well as non-immunological signs and symptoms of the disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to date is the only established curative option and allows long-term cure of the disease. Therapeutic objectives of HSCT in SCID clearly differ from those in malignant or hematological disease. Disease specific aspects and their influence on the therapeutic strategy in SCID will be discussed in this review.

  20. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  1. Growth factor- and cytokine-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Peplow, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are resident in the bone marrow blood sinusoids and circulate in the peripheral circulation. They mobilize from the bone marrow after vascular injury and home to the site of injury where they differentiate into endothelial cells. Activation and mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone marrow is induced via the production and release of endothelial progenitor cell-activating factors and includes specific growth factors and cytokines in response to peripheral tissue hypoxia such as after acute ischemic stroke or trauma. Endothelial progenitor cells migrate and home to specific sites following ischemic stroke via growth factor/cytokine gradients. Some growth factors are less stable under acidic conditions of tissue ischemia, and synthetic analogues that are stable at low pH may provide a more effective therapeutic approach for inducing endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and promoting cerebral neovascularization following ischemic stroke. PMID:25317152

  2. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: report of two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Fangusaro, J; Klopfenstein, K; Groner, J; Hammond, S; Altura, R A

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are benign neoplasms histologically composed of lymphocytes, histiocytes, macrophages, foam cells, and plasma cells among a spindle-shaped stroma. Their etiology and potential for metastatic spread is controversial. Numerous predisposing factors have been suggested, including preceding infections, radiotherapy, and local trauma. We present two cases of pseudotumors that developed in children following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These are the first cases after hematopoietic transplant reported in the literature. As these neoplasms are difficult to diagnose and are often confused with highly aggressive tumors, our cases demonstrate that a high index of suspicion for such lesions must be maintained when evaluating masses in post transplant patients.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes in vitro mitral valve interstitial cell repair through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Gotlieb, Avrum I

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 both promote repair in valve interstitial cell (VIC) injury models; however, the relationship between TGF-β and FGF-2 in wound repair are not well understood. VIC confluent monolayers were wounded by mechanical injury and incubated separately or in combination with FGF-2, neutralizing antibody to FGF-2, neutralizing antibody to TGF-β, and betaglycan antibody for 24 hours after wounding. Phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3) was localized at the wound edge (WE) and at the monolayer away from the WE. Down-regulation of pSmad2/3 protein expression via small-interfering RNA transfection was performed. The extent of wound closure was monitored for up to 96 hours. FGF-2 incubation resulted in a significant increase in nuclear pSmad2/3 staining at the WE. Neutralizing antibody to TGF-β alone or with FGF-2 present resulted in a similar significant decrease in pSmad2/3. Neutralizing antibody to FGF-2 alone or with FGF-2 present showed a similar significant decrease in pSmad2/3; however, significantly more staining was observed than treatment with neutralizing antibody to TGF-β. Incubation with betaglycan antibody inhibited FGF-2-mediated pSmad2/3 signaling. Wound closure corresponded with pSmad2/3 staining at the WE. Down-regulation of pSmad2/3 via small-interfering RNA transfection significantly reduced the extent to which FGF-2 promoted wound closure. Fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes in vitro VIC wound repair, at least in part, through the TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling pathway.

  4. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Ramsahai, Shweta; Kim, Bak C.; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2004-02-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological and cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, including muscle, bone, skin, liver, and neuronal cells, we advanced a hypothesis that some of the space-caused disorders might be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia (β-thalassemia) and spaceflight (hindlimb suspension unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, the β-thalassemic mice were successfully transplanted with isologous HSCs, resulting in chimerism of hemoglobin species and alleviation of the hemoglobinopathy. In the case of HSCT for muscle loss, β-galactosidase-marked HSCs, which were prepared from β-galactosidase-transgenic mice, were detected by the X-gal wholemount staining procedure in the hindlimbs of unloaded mice following transplantation. Histochemical and physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. To investigate HSCT for immunodeficiency, β-galactosidase-transformed Escherichia coli was used as the reporter bacteria, and infected to control and the hindlimb suspended mice. Results of the X-gal stained tissues indicated that the HSCT could help eliminate the E. coli infection. In an effort to facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs has been optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated release of platelet-derived growth factor from cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a 30,000-Mr glycoprotein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). It is also a potent vasoconstrictor. In the present study, we found that the macrophage-derived polypeptide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), releases a factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) that is mitogenic for SMC. Postculture medium from TNF-stimulated EC induced a 90% increase in mitogenesis is compared with controls. This effect was half-maximal at a TNF dose of 114 pM, reflected a 2.5-fold increase in PDGF-specific mRNA synthesis, and peaked at 15 h of TNF stimulation. Mitogenic activity was completely abrogated by preincubation of postculture medium with antibody to platelet PDGF. Stimulation of EC with IL-1 (60-240 pM) led to the release of similar mitogenic activity. Thus, in addition to its effects on the hemostatic and adhesive properties of EC, TNF also promotes release of PDGF, which may serve to modulate proliferation of vascular SMC during wound healing, inflammation, and atherogenesis. PMID:3598461

  6. Molecular pathology of myelodysplastic syndromes: biology of medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells (review).

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Abe, Shinya; Suzuki, Shiho; Umeda, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been defined as a disease entity based on clinical features and morphological findings. Despite similarities in clinical manifestations, genetic abnormalities occurring in hematopoietic cells are heterogeneous among the syndromes. However, recent investigations have revealed that there are common biological events in the bone marrow of MDS cases. Most notably, excessive apoptosis of hematopoietic cells was observed to be induced by the bone marrow microenvironment. The apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors, suggesting that medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells play a role in the pathology of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, in the bone marrow microenvironment are predominantly paracrine mediators of apoptosis. Regarding autocrine stimulation mechanisms, it has recently been shown that the deregulation of ribosomal protein is capable of initiating a stress response in the hematopoietic cell through a p53-mediated signaling pathway. Thus, both the stromal cells of the bone marrow microenvironment and hematopoietic cells themselves possess a common and characteristic biology in this heterogeneous disease entity.

  7. Of birds and mice: hematopoietic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2005-01-01

    For many years it has been assumed that the ontogeny of the mammalian hematopoietic system involves sequential transfers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generated in the yolk sac blood islands, to successive hematopoietic organs as these become active in the embryo (fetal liver, thymus, spleen and eventually bone marrow). Very little was known about early events related to hematopoiesis that could take place during the 4.5 day gap separating the appearance of the yolk sac blood islands and the stage of a fully active fetal liver. Experiments performed in birds documented that the yolk sac only produce erythro-myeloid precursors that become extinct after the emergence of a second wave of intra-embryonic HSCs from the region neighbouring the dorsal aorta. The experimental approaches undertaken over the last ten years in the murine model, which are reviewed here, led to the conclusion that the rules governing avian hematopoietic development basically apply to higher vertebrates.

  8. Altered growth factor sensitivity in EL2 rat fibroblasts: influence of this biological characteristic on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, P; Testa, E P; Testa, U; Liboi, E

    1989-06-01

    Extensive evidence indicate that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) play a key role in the stimulation of the 3T3 fibroblast replication: in this connection, PDGF and EGF act as a competence and a progression factor, respectively. We have previously demonstrated that EGF alone leads density-arrested EL2 rat fibroblasts to synthesize DNA and proliferate in serum-free cultures. Here, we have analyzed the role of EGF in the control of EL2 cell proliferation. Our data show a dose-related effect of EGF on DNA synthesis and cell growth, with maximal stimulation for both parameters at 20 ng/ml. On the other hand, autocrine production of PDGF or PDGF-like substances by EL2 cells is seemingly excluded by experiments with anti-PDGF serum or medium conditioned by EL2 fibroblasts. EGF binding studies show that EL2 cells possess high affinity EGF receptors, at a density level 3 to 4-fold higher than other fibroblastic lines. In addition, EL2 cells show a normal down-regulation of EGF receptors, following exposure to EGF, but PDGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) and bombesin have not decreased the affinity of EGF receptor for its ligand. Moreover, in EL2 cells, the EGF is able to induce the synthesis of putative intracellular regulatory proteins that govern the PDGF-induced competence in 3T3 cells. Our data indicate that EGF in EL2 cells may act as both a competence and a progression factor, via induction of the mechanisms, regulated in other cell lines by cooperation between different growth factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Concise review: hematopoietic stem cells and tissue stem cells: current concepts and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-10-01

    The term hematopoietic stem cells has at times been used to include a miscellany of precursor cells ranging from multipotential self-generating cells to lineage-restricted progenitors with little capacity for self-generation. It is probable that the stem cells of other tissues also vary widely in their multipotentiality and proliferative capacity. This review questions several dogmas regarding the self-generative capacity of various hematopoietic cells, the single episodic origin of hematopoietic cells, and the irreversible nature of progressive mature cell formation in individual hematopoietic lineages. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficient-SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Brigida, Immacolata; Ferrua, Francesca; Cappelli, Barbara; Chiesa, Robert; Marktel, Sarah; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a highly attractive strategy for many types of inherited disorders of the immune system. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has been the target of several clinical trials based on the use of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells engineered with retroviral vectors. The introduction of a low intensity conditioning regimen has been a crucial factor in achieving stable engrafment of hematopoietic stem cells and therapeutic levels of ADA-expressing cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that gene therapy for ADA-SCID has favorable safety profile and is effective in restoring normal purine metabolism and immune functions. Stem cell gene therapy combined with appropriate conditioning regimens might be extended to other genetic disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  11. Growth factor regulation of sugar uptake in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inman, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Mouse EGF stimulates the uptake of 2-deoxygluclose (dGIc), a non-metabolized glucose analogue, into cultured mouse 3T3 fibroblasts (Clone 1) 2 to 4 fold, and EGF dependent Balb/MK-1 epidermal kerotinocytes, 5 to 8 fold. Initial stimulation is detected at 15 minutes. Maximal effects are seen at 2 hours with 10 ng/ml EGF. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled EGF to cells is rapid and complete by 2 hours at 37/sup 0/C. Antibodies which specifically inhibit /sup 125/I-labeled EGF binding to cells inhibit EGF stimulation as much as 85%. Human platelet derived TGF-..beta.. stimulates dGlc uptake up to 5 fold. Maximum effects are seen with 1 ng/ml TGF-..beta.. within 2 hours and stimulation is detected 30 minutes after exposure to 0.1 ng/ml, the minimum effective concentration. TGF-..beta.., like EGF, stimulates sugar transport into Balb/MK-1 cells without additional factors. However, neither stimulates uptake in a 3T3 variant, NR-6, which is EGF-receptor negative. The co-addition of EGF and/or PDGF enhances TGF-..beta.. stimulation. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled TGF-..beta.. is nearly complete by 1 hour at 37/sup 0/C, but continues to increase for as long as 4 hours after addition. Antibodies which inhibit EGF binding have no effect on TGF-..beta.. binding, but they block TGF-..beta.. stimulation of hexose uptake. It is concluded from these results that the TGF-..beta.. receptor is distinct from the EGF receptor, and that although TGF-..beta.. stimulation of dGLc uptake does not require exogenously added EGF, it does require an active or available EGF receptor kinase system.

  12. Poor Growth, Thyroid Dysfunction and Vitamin D Deficiency Remain Prevalent Despite Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kasiani C; Howell, Jonathan C.; Wallace, Gregory; Dandoy, Christopher; El-Bietar, Javier; Lane, Adam; Davies, Stella M.; Jodele, Sonata; Rose, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloablative conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are known to affect endocrine function, but little is known regarding reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We retrospectively reviewed 114 children and young adults after single RIC HSCT. Analysis was grouped by age (<2y and ≥2y), and diagnosis (HLH/XLP, other immune disorders, metabolic/genetic disorders). All groups displayed short stature by mean height adjusted Z-score (HAZ) before −1.29 and after HSCT (HAZ −1.38, p=0.47). After HSCT, younger children with HLH/XLP grew better (HAZ −3.41 vs −1.65, p= 0.006), while older subjects had worsening (HAZ −0.8 vs −1.01, p= 0.06). Those with steroid therapy beyond standard GVHD prophylaxis were shorter than those without (p 0.04). After HSCT, older subjects with HLH/XLP became thinner with mean BMI Z-score of 1.20 vs. 0.64, p=0.02, likewise in metabolic/genetic disorders (BMI-Z= 0.59 vs. −0.99, p<0.001). BMI increased among younger children in these same groups. Thyroid function was abnormal in 24% (18/76). 25-OH vitamin D levels, were insufficient in 73% (49/65), with low bone mineral density in 8 of 19 evaluable subjects. Despite RIC, children and young adults still have significant late endocrine effects. Further research is required to compare post-transplant endocrine effects after RIC to standard chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26974276

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus Requires Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling To Enter and Initiate the Early Steps in the Establishment of Latency in CD34(+) Human Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Heon; Collins-McMillen, Donna; Buehler, Jason C; Goodrum, Felicia D; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2017-03-01

    The establishment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency and persistence relies on the successful infection of hematopoietic cells, which serve as sites of viral persistence and contribute to viral spread. Here, using blocking antibodies and pharmacological inhibitors, we document that HCMV activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) mediates viral entry into CD34(+) human progenitor cells (HPCs), resulting in distinct cellular trafficking and nuclear translocation of the virus compared to that in other immune cells, such as we have documented in monocytes. We argue that the EGFR allows HCMV to regulate the cellular functions of these replication-restricted cells via its signaling activity following viral binding. In addition to regulating HCMV entry/trafficking, EGFR signaling may also shape the early steps required for the successful establishment of viral latency in CD34(+) cells, as pharmacological inhibition of EGFR increases the transcription of lytic IE1/IE2 mRNA while curbing the expression of latency-associated UL138 mRNA. EGFR signaling following infection of CD34(+) HPCs may also contribute to changes in hematopoietic potential, as treatment with the EGFR kinase (EGFRK) inhibitor AG1478 alters the expression of the cellular hematopoietic cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) in HCMV-infected cells but not in mock-infected cells. These findings, along with our previous work with monocytes, suggest that EGFR likely serves as an important determinant of HCMV tropism for select subsets of hematopoietic cells. Moreover, our new data suggest that EGFR is a key receptor for efficient viral entry and that the ensuing signaling regulates important early events required for successful infection of CD34(+) HPCs by HCMV.IMPORTANCE HCMV establishes lifelong persistence within the majority of the human population without causing overt pathogenesis in healthy individuals. Despite this, reactivation of HCMV

  14. Salvage Second Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Laura C.; Saad, Ayman; Zhong, Xiaobo; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Freytes, Cesar O.; Marks, David I.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bird, Jennifer M.; Holmberg, Leona; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kumar, Shaji; Lill, Michael; Meehan, Kenneth R.; Saber, Wael; Schriber, Jeffrey; Tay, Jason; Vogl, Dan T.; Wirk, Baldeep; Savani, Bipin N.; Gale, Robert P.; Vesole, David H.; Schiller, Gary J.; Abidi, Muneer; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Nishihori, Taiga; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Vose, Julie M.; Moreb, Jan S.; Drobyski, William; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Ghobadi, Armin; Holland, H. Kent; Nath, Rajneesh; To, L. Bik; Maiolino, Angelo; Kassim, Adetola A.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Landau, Heather; Schouten, Harry C.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mikhael, Joseph; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Stiff, Patrick J.; Gibson, John; Lonial, Sagar; Krishnan, Amrita; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hari, Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) as initial therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) improves survival. However, data to support this approach for relapsed/progressive disease after initial AHCT (AHCT1) are limited. Using Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data, we report the outcomes of 187 patients who underwent a second AHCT (AHCT2) for the treatment of relapsed/progressive MM. Planned tandem AHCT was excluded. Median age at AHCT2 was 59 years (range, 28 to 72), and median patient follow-up was 47 months (range, 3 to 97). Nonrelapse mortality after AHCT2 was 2% at 1 year and 4% at 3 years. Median interval from AHCT1 to relapse/progression was 18 months, and median interval between transplantations was 32 months. After AHCT2, the incidence of relapse/progression at 1 and 3 years was 51% and 82%, respectively. At 3 years after AHCT2, progression-free survival was 13%, and overall survival was 46%. In multivariate analyses, those relapsing ≥36 months after AHCT1 had superior progression-free (P = .045) and overall survival (P = .019). Patients who underwent AHCT2 after 2004 had superior survival (P = .026). AHCT2 is safe and feasible for disease progression after AHCT1. In this retrospective study, individuals relapsing ≥36 months from AHCT1 derived greater benefit from AHCT2 compared with those with a shorter disease-free interval. Storage of an adequate graft before AHCT1 will ensure that the option of a second autologous transplantation is retained for patients with relapsed/progressive MM. PMID:23298856

  15. The effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ferensztajn-Rochowiak, Ewa; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-04-01

    Lithium has been used in modern psychiatry for more than 65 years, constituting a cornerstone for the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. A number of biological properties of lithium have been discovered, including its hematological, antiviral and neuroprotective effects. In this article, a systematic review of the effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells is presented. The beneficial effects of lithium on the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and growth factors have been reported since 1970s. Lithium improves homing of stem cells, the ability to form colonies and HSC self-renewal. Lithium also exerts a favorable influence on the proliferation and maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Studies on the effect of lithium on neurogenesis have indicated an increased proliferation of progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and enhanced mitotic activity of Schwann cells. This may be connected with the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of lithium, reflected in an improvement in synaptic plasticity promoting cell survival and inhibiting apoptosis. In clinical studies, lithium treatment increases cerebral gray matter, mainly in the frontal lobes, hippocampus and amygdala. Recent findings also suggest that lithium may reduce the risk of dementia and exert a beneficial effect in neurodegenerative diseases. The most important mediators and signaling pathways of lithium action are the glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Recently, to study of bipolar disorder pathogenesis and the mechanism of lithium action, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) obtained from bipolar patients have been used.

  16. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promote Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells to Neural Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Min; Cao, Peipei; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Sun, Yuyu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Cui, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were the most widely used seed cells in the field of neural regeneration and bone tissue engineering, due to their easily isolation, lack of ethical controversy, low immunogenicity and low rates of transplantation rejection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. DPSCs were cultured in neural differentiation medium containing NGF and bFGF alone or combination for 7 days. Then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed using western blot and RT-PCR. Our study revealed that bFGF and NGF increased neural differentiation of DPSCs synergistically, compared with bFGF and NGF alone. The levels of Nestin, MAP-2, βIII-tubulin and GFAP were the most highest in the DPSCs + bFGF + NGF group. Our results suggested that bFGF and NGF signifiantly up-regulated the levels of Sirt1. After treatment with Sirt1 inhibitor, western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining showed that neural genes and protein markers had markedly decreased. Additionally, the ERK and AKT signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs stimulated with bFGF + NGF. These results suggested that manipulation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathway may be associated with the differentiation of bFGF and NGF treated DPSCs. Our date provided theoretical basis for DPSCs to treat neurological diseases and repair neuronal damage.

  17. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liu-lin; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Ting-hua

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews. PMID:27212919

  18. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured primary human mesothelial cells by specific growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, E.W.; Gerwin, B.I.; Harris, C.C.; Roberts, A.B.; Sporn, M.B.; Lechner, J.F.

    1988-08-01

    Monolayer cultures of human mesothelial cells made quiescent by serum deprivation are induced to undergo one round of DNA synthesis by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), or transforming growth factor type beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). This one-time stimulation is independent of other serum components. The kinetics for induction of DNA synthesis observed for PDGF, EGF, and TGF-beta 1 are all similar to one another, with a peak of DNA synthesis occurring 24-36 h after the addition of the growth factors. Repetitive rounds of DNA synthesis and cell division do not ensue after addition of PDGF, EGF, or TGF-beta 1 alone or in combination; however, in media supplemented with chemically denatured serum, each of these factors is capable of sustaining continuous replication of mesothelial cells. Stimulation of growth by PDGF and TGF-beta 1 is unusual for an epithelial cell type, and indicates that mesothelial cells have growth regulatory properties similar to connective tissue cells.

  19. Transforming growth factor beta1 regulates melanocyte proliferation and differentiation in mouse neural crest cells via stem cell factor/KIT signaling.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tamihiro; Soma, Yoshinao; Kawa, Yoko; Ito, Masaru; Yamasaki, Emiko; Watabe, Hidenori; Hosaka, Eri; Yajima, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kayoko; Mizoguchi, Masako

    2002-03-01

    Stem cell factor is essential to the migration and differentiation of melanocytes during embryogenesis based on the observation that mutations in either the stem cell factor gene, or its ligand, KIT, result in defects in coat pigmentation in mice. Stem cell factor is also required for the survival of melanocyte precursors while they are migrating towards the skin. Transforming growth factor beta1 has been implicated in the regulation of both cellular proliferation and differentiation. NCC-melb4, an immortal cloned cell line, was cloned from a mouse neural crest cell. NCC-melb4 cells provide a model to study the specific stage of differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes. They also express KIT as a melanoblast marker. Using the NCC-melb4 cell line, we investigated the effect of transforming growth factor beta1 on the differentiation and proliferation of immature melanocyte precursors. Immunohistochemically, NCC-melb4 cells showed transforming growth factor beta1 expression. The anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody inhibited the cell growth, and downregulated the KIT protein and mRNA expression. To investigate further the activation of autocrine transforming growth factor beta1, NCC-melb4 cells were incubated in nonexogenous transforming growth factor beta1 culture medium. KIT protein decreased with anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that in NCC-melb4 cells, transforming growth factor beta1 promotes melanocyte precursor proliferation in autocrine and/or paracrine regulation. We further investigated the influence of transforming growth factor beta1 in vitro using a neural crest cell primary culture system from wild-type mice. Anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody decreased the number of KIT positive neural crest cell. In addition, the anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody supplied within the wild-type neural crest explants abolished the growth of the neural

  20. Antibacterial Resistance in Patients with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Sehnaz; Akova, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at substantial risk of bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections depending on the time elapsed since transplantation, presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and the degree of immunosuppression. Infectious complications in HSCT recipients are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Bacterial infections constitute the major cause of infectious complications, especially in the early post-transplant period. The emergence of antibacterial resistance complicates the management of bacterial infections in this patient group. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in this group of patients have attracted considerable interest and may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Empirical antibacterial therapy in patients with HSCT and febrile neutropenia has a critical role for survival and should be based on local epidemiology. This review attempts to provide an overview of risk factors and epidemiology of emerging resistant bacterial infections and their management in HSCT recipients. PMID:28101308

  1. Veno-occlusive disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Elisabeth C

    2012-10-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that affects the liver, as well as other organs. Although mild cases resolve on their own, severe cases of VOD carry a high mortality rate. The diagnosis usually is clinically based, with nonspecific signs such as weight gain, ascites, hepatomegaly, right upper quadrant abdominal pain, and elevated serum bilirubin. Although studies are ongoing, no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for VOD exist to date. Therefore, supportive care is a critical part of the treatment plan. Oncology nurses should be familiar with the risk factors and clinical signs of VOD so that patients can be monitored closely for its occurrence. Accurate and timely recognition of VOD is crucial for appropriate treatment.

  2. Antagonizing Retinoic Acid Receptors Increases Myeloid Cell Production by Cultured Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Geoffrey; Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cunningham, Alan; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Activities of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)α and RARγ are important to hematopoiesis. Here, we have investigated the effects of receptor selective agonists and antagonists on the primitive human hematopoietic cell lines KG1 and NB-4 and purified normal human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Agonizing RARα (by AGN195183) was effective in driving neutrophil differentiation of NB-4 cells and this agonist synergized with a low amount (10 nM) of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to drive monocyte differentiation of NB-4 and KG1 cells. Treatment of cultures of human HSCs (supplemented with stem cell factor ± interleukin 3) with an antagonist of all RARs (AGN194310) or of RARα (AGN196996) prolonged the lifespan of cultures, up to 55 days, and increased the production of neutrophils and monocytes. Slowing down of cell differentiation was not observed, and instead, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells had expanded in number. Antagonism of RARγ (by AGN205728) did not affect cultures of HSCs. Studies of CV-1 and LNCaP cells transfected with RAR expression vectors and a reporter vector revealed that RARγ and RARβ are activated by sub-nM all-trans retinoic acid (EC50-0.3 nM): ~50-fold more is required for activation of RARα (EC50-16 nM). These findings further support the notion that the balance of expression and activity of RARα and RARγ are important to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion and differentiation.

  3. Fusion-derived epithelial cancer cells express hematopoietic markers and contribute to stem cell and migratory phenotype in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Mallika; Mathur, Sandeep R; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2013-09-01

    For a long time, the external milieu of cancer cells was considered to be of secondary importance when compared with its intrinsic properties. That has changed now as the microenvironment is considered to be a major contributing factor toward the progression of tumor. In this study, we show that in human and mouse epithelial ovarian carcinoma and mouse lung carcinoma, the interaction between tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and epithelial cancer cells results in their fusion. Intriguingly, even after the fusion event, cancer cells retain the expression of the pan-hematopoietic marker (CD45) and various markers of hematopoietic lineage, including those of hematopoietic stem cells, indicating that the hematopoietic genome is not completely reprogrammed. This observation may have implications on the bone marrow contribution to the cancer stem cell population. Interestingly, it was seen that in both cancer models, the expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was largely contributed to by the fused compartment of cancer cells. We hypothesize that the superior migratory potential gained by the cancer cells due to the fusion helps in its dissemination to various secondary organs upon activation of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis. We are the first to report the presence of a hemato-epithelial cancer compartment, which contributes to stem cell markers and CXCR4 in epithelial carcinoma. This finding has repercussions on CXCR4-based therapeutics and opens new avenues in discovering novel molecular targets against fusion and metastasis.

  4. Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, P M; De Vito, P; Fraziano, M; Mattioli, P; Luly, P; Di Nardo, P

    2002-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular homeostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, and vasorelaxant activities. ANF shows antimitogenic effects in different cell types acting through R(2) receptor. Excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells is a common phenomenon in diseases such as atherosclerosis, but the role of growth factors in the mechanism which modulate this process has yet to be clarified. The potential antimitogenic role of ANF on the cell growth induced by growth factors appears very intriguing. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of ANF on rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells proliferation induced by known mitogens and the mechanism involved. Our data show that ANF, at physiological concentration range, inhibits RASM cell proliferation induced by known mitogens such as PDGF and insulin, and the effect seems to be elicited through the modulation of phosphatidic acid (PA) production and MAP kinases involvement.

  5. Children's lived experiences of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Manookian, Arpi; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Asadi, Monireh

    2014-09-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a valuable treatment in many life-threatening pediatric disorders, a large number of children who receive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are faced with a variety of physical and psychological problems throughout this process. In this study, we explored the lived experiences of these children during their treatment to provide a better understanding of their main concerns, emotions, and expectations. The participants were six children, aged between 6 and 17 years, who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Data were collected through individual, in-depth, and semistructured interviews. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, the findings revealed that the children experienced "transplantation rejoicing" in this "difficult passage", which was associated with "deepening of family ties". Awareness of these experiences, feelings, and concerns can help in the development of more professional interventions to provide children with holistic care during their hospitalization.

  6. Elevated Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Induced Endothelial Cell Death in High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, Alisa Morss; Zhu, Han; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) concentrations are elevated in diabetes. Both of these factors correlate with diabetic vasculopathy and endothelial cell apoptosis, yet their combined effects have not been measured. We have previously shown that the angiogenic growth factor fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), which is generally protective against endothelial cell death, is similarly elevated in high glucose conditions. We therefore investigated the effect of TNFα on endothelial cell death under normal and elevated glucose conditions, with a particular focus on FGF-2. Porcine aortic endothelial cells were cultured in 5 and 30 mM glucose and stimulated with TNFα, together with FGF-2 or a neutralizing FGF-2 antibody. Cell death was measured via cell counts or an annexin apoptotic assay, and cell cycle phase was determined by propidium iodide labeling. TNFα-induced endothelial cell death increased for cells in high glucose, and cell death was enhanced with increasing FGF-2 exposure and negated by a neutralizing FGF-2 antibody. Endothelial cells were most susceptible to TNFα-induced cell death when stimulated with FGF-2 18 h prior to TNFα, corresponding to cell entry into S phase of the proliferative cycle. The FGF-2 associated increase in TNFα-induced cell death was negated by blocking cell entry into S phase. Endothelial cell release of FGF-2 in high glucose leads to cell cycle progression, which makes cells more susceptible to TNFα-induced cell death. These data suggest that growth factor outcomes in high glucose depend on secondary mediators such as cytokines and stimulation cell cycle timing. PMID:18446810

  7. POEMS Syndrome (Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal Gammopathy and Skin Changes) Treated with Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Carlos; Pérez de León, José Antonio; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Pérez-Cano, Ramón; Hernández, Tomás Martín

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: POEMS syndrome Symptoms: General malaise • pretibial edemas • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: POEMS syndrome is a rare systemic pathology of paraneoplastic origin that is associated with plasma cell dyscrasia. It is characterized by the presence of sensorimotor polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, skin changes, and other systemic manifestations. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is unknown but over-production of vascular endothelial growth factor is probably responsible for most of the more characteristic symptoms. There is no standard treatment for POEMS syndrome and no randomized controlled clinical trials of treatment exist in the available literature. High-dose melphalan with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be considered for younger patients with widespread osteosclerotic lesions, and for patients with rapidly progressive neuropathy. Case Report: This is the case of a 62-year-old Caucasian man who was admitted to our center presenting pretibial edema accompanied by significant weight loss and difficulty walking. POEMS criteria were present and an immunofixation test confirmed the presence of a monoclonal plasmaproliferative disorder. After autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the monoclonal component disappeared and the patient’s clinical status improved markedly. Conclusions: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following high-dose melphalan is an effective therapy for younger patients with widespread osteosclerotic lesions in POEMS syndrome. PMID:25726020

  8. Proteolytic enzyme levels are increased during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization in human donors but do not predict the number of mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    van Os, R; van Schie, M L J; Willemze, R; Fibbe, W E

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicate that functional, mature neutrophils are essential for interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced stem cell mobilization. To study a possible role of neutrophils in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced hematopoietic mobilization, we assessed the number of circulating CD34+ cells in healthy allogeneic stem cell donors on days 3, 4, and 5 of mobilization for comparison with the number of peripheral blood neutrophils and the plasma levels of IL-8, Flt3 ligand (FL), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). Thirty-seven of 45 donors required 1 day of apheresis to obtain 5 x 10(6) CD34+/kg recipient body weight (high responders), the remaining 8 donors required 1 extra day of apheresis on day 6 (low responders). On day 5, CD34+ numbers in the blood were significantly highe in high responders (116 x 10(3) +/- 10.4/ml) than in low responders (54.1 x 10(3) +/- 10.3, p < 0.001). In all donors, MMP-9 and HNE levels were increased compared to nonmobilized individuals, but in high responders, plasma MMP-9 levels on days 3-5 of mobilization were substantially higher than in low responders (p < or = 0.02 for MMP-9 and p = 0.89, p = 0.05 and p = 0.52 for HNE on days 3, 4, and 5, respectively). These results are in accordance with the hypothesis that neutrophils play a role in G-CSF-induced mobilization through the release of proteases such as MMP-9 and elastase. No change in plasma levels of IL-8 or Flt3 ligand was observed, suggesting that these cytokines do not play a role in stem cell mobilization. However, because stem cell numbers could not be predicted by proteolytic enzyme levels and/or neutrophil numbers, other undefined factors may be more important.

  9. NLRP1 inflammasome activation induces pyroptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Seth L.; Gerlic, Motti; Metcalf, Donald; Preston, Simon; Pellegrini, Marc; O’Donnell, Joanne A.; McArthur, Kate; Baldwin, Tracey M.; Chevrier, Stephane; Nowell, Cameron J.; Cengia, Louise H.; Henley, Katya J.; Collinge, Janelle E.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Hilton, Douglas J.; Alexander, Warren S.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Croker, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    Cytopenias are key prognostic indicators of life-threatening infection, contributing to immunosuppression and mortality. Here we define a role for Caspase-1-dependent death, known as pyroptosis, in infection-induced cytopenias by studying inflammasome activation in hematopoietic progenitor cells. The NLRP1a inflammasome is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells and its activation triggers their pyroptotic death. Active NLRP1a induced a lethal systemic inflammatory disease that was driven by Caspase-1 and IL-1β but was independent of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and ameliorated by IL-18. Surprisingly, in the absence of IL-1β-driven inflammation, active NLRP1a triggered pyroptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting in leukopenia in the steady state. During periods of hematopoietic stress induced by chemotherapy or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, active NLRP1a caused prolonged cytopenia, bone marrow hypoplasia and immunosuppression. Conversely, NLRP1-deficient mice showed enhanced recovery from chemotherapy and LCMV infection, demonstrating that NLRP1 acts as a cellular sentinel to alert Caspase-1 to hematopoietic and infectious stress. PMID:23219391

  10. Whole-transcriptome analysis of endothelial to hematopoietic stem cell transition reveals a requirement for Gpr56 in HSC generation.

    PubMed

    Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Vink, Chris S; de Pater, Emma; van der Linden, Reinier; Marks-Bluth, Jonathon; van der Sloot, Anthon; van den Hout, Mirjam; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; van Schaick-Solernó, M Lucila; Delwel, Ruud; Pimanda, John E; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2015-01-12

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generated via a natural transdifferentiation process known as endothelial to hematopoietic cell transition (EHT). Because of small numbers of embryonal arterial cells undergoing EHT and the paucity of markers to enrich for hemogenic endothelial cells (ECs [HECs]), the genetic program driving HSC emergence is largely unknown. Here, we use a highly sensitive RNAseq method to examine the whole transcriptome of small numbers of enriched aortic HSCs, HECs, and ECs. Gpr56, a G-coupled protein receptor, is one of the most highly up-regulated of the 530 differentially expressed genes. Also, highly up-regulated are hematopoietic transcription factors, including the "heptad" complex of factors. We show that Gpr56 (mouse and human) is a target of the heptad complex and is required for hematopoietic cluster formation during EHT. Our results identify the processes and regulators involved in EHT and reveal the surprising requirement for Gpr56 in generating the first HSCs.

  11. Whole-transcriptome analysis of endothelial to hematopoietic stem cell transition reveals a requirement for Gpr56 in HSC generation

    PubMed Central

    Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Vink, Chris S.; de Pater, Emma; van der Linden, Reinier; Marks-Bluth, Jonathon; van der Sloot, Anthon; van den Hout, Mirjam; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; van Schaick-Solernó, M. Lucila; Delwel, Ruud; Pimanda, John E.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generated via a natural transdifferentiation process known as endothelial to hematopoietic cell transition (EHT). Because of small numbers of embryonal arterial cells undergoing EHT and the paucity of markers to enrich for hemogenic endothelial cells (ECs [HECs]), the genetic program driving HSC emergence is largely unknown. Here, we use a highly sensitive RNAseq method to examine the whole transcriptome of small numbers of enriched aortic HSCs, HECs, and ECs. Gpr56, a G-coupled protein receptor, is one of the most highly up-regulated of the 530 differentially expressed genes. Also, highly up-regulated are hematopoietic transcription factors, including the “heptad” complex of factors. We show that Gpr56 (mouse and human) is a target of the heptad complex and is required for hematopoietic cluster formation during EHT. Our results identify the processes and regulators involved in EHT and reveal the surprising requirement for Gpr56 in generating the first HSCs. PMID:25547674

  12. Phospholipase C-epsilon augments epidermal growth factor-dependent cell growth by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sanguk; Hong, Won-Pyo; Choi, Jang Hyun; Yi, Kye Sook; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2008-01-04

    The down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is critical for the termination of EGF-dependent signaling, and the dysregulation of this process can lead to oncogenesis. In the present study, we suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of EGF receptor down-regulation by phospholipase C-epsilon. The overexpression of PLC-epsilon led to an increase in receptor recycling and decreased the down-regulation of the EGF receptor in COS-7 cells. Adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) was identified as a novel binding protein that associates with the PLC-epsilon RA2 domain independently of Ras. The interaction of PLC-epsilon with AP2 was responsible for the suppression of EGF receptor down-regulation, since a perturbation in this interaction abolished this effect. Enhanced EGF receptor stability by PLC-epsilon led to the potentiation of EGF-dependent growth in COS-7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of PLC-epsilon in mouse embryo fibroblast cells elicited a severe defect in EGF-dependent growth. Our results indicated that PLC-epsilon could promote EGF-dependent cell growth by suppressing receptor down-regulation.

  13. The hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Hodgkin's disease: questions and controversies.

    PubMed

    Fleury, J; Legros, M; Cure, H; Tortochaux, J; Condat, P; Dionet, C; Travade, P; Belembaogo, E; Tavernier, F; Kwiatkowski, F

    1994-11-01

    Most patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) are cured with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. However, half of those with advanced stage disease (IIIB, IV) do not respond adequately to treatment or relapse. Salvage therapy used in such cases gives from 10% to 50% complete remission but only 10% long term survival. The results of bone marrow transplantation reported in acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma encouraged some authors to develop this new therapeutic strategy in Hodgkin's disease. In the early 1980's promising results were achieved when refractory and relapsed patients were selected to receive myeloablative therapy followed by bone marrow transplantation. Today, high dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is used more and more often in poor prognosis Hodgkin's disease. After a review of the literature concerning the results of transplantation in Hodgkin's disease, we develop the numerous problems associated with this procedure which remain to be solved such as: the optimal indication, the timing of HSCT, the type of graft, the conditioning regimen, the place of radiotherapy and the optimal use of hematopoietic growth factors. We conclude with future prospects.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor receptors support murine hematopoietic progenitor function in the early stages of engraftment.

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Kaplan, Ofer; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family receptors/ligands are important participants in hematopoietic homeostasis, in particular as essential negative expansion regulators of differentiated clones. As a prominent injury cytokine, TNF-alpha has been traditionally considered to suppress donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function after transplantation. We monitored the involvement of TNF receptors (TNF-R) 1 and 2 in murine hematopoietic cell engraftment and their inter-relationship with Fas. Transplantation of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells (BMC) from TNF receptor-deficient mice into wild-type recipients showed defective early engraftment and loss of durable hematopoietic contribution upon recovery of host hematopoiesis. Consistently, cells deficient in TNF receptors had reduced competitive capacity as compared to wild-type progenitors. The TNF receptors were acutely upregulated in bone marrow (BM)-homed donor cells (wild-type) early after transplantation, being expressed in 60%-75% of the donor cells after 6 days. Both TNF receptors were detected in fast cycling, early differentiating progenitors, and were ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive progenitors with long-term reconstituting potential (lin(-)c-kit(+) stem cell antigen (SCA)-1(+)). BM-homed donor cells were insensitive to apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha and Fas-ligand and their combination, despite reciprocal inductive cross talk between the TNF and Fas receptors. The engraftment supporting effect of TNF-alpha is attributed to stimulation of progenitors through TNF-R1, which involves activation of the caspase cascade. This stimulatory effect was not observed for TNF-R2, and this receptor did not assume redundant stimulatory function in TNFR1-deficient cells. It is concluded that TNF-alpha plays a tropic role early after transplantation, which is essential to successful progenitor engraftment.

  15. Requirement of Stat3 but not Stat1 activation for epidermal growth factor receptor- mediated cell growth In vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Grandis, J R; Drenning, S D; Chakraborty, A; Zhou, M Y; Zeng, Q; Pitt, A S; Tweardy, D J

    1998-01-01

    Stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by ligand(s) leads to activation of signaling molecules including Stat1 and Stat3, two members of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) protein family. Activation of Stat1 and Stat3 was constitutive in transformed squamous epithelial cells, which produce elevated levels of TGF-alpha, and was enhanced by the addition of exogenous TGF-alpha. Targeting of Stat3 using antisense oligonucleotides directed against the translation initiation site, resulted in significant growth inhibition. In addition, cells stably transfected with dominant negative mutant Stat3 constructs failed to proliferate in vitro. In contrast, targeting of Stat1 using either antisense or dominant-negative strategies had no effect on cell growth. Thus, TGF-alpha/EGFR-mediated autocrine growth of transformed epithelial cells is dependent on activation of Stat3 but not Stat1. PMID:9769331

  16. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  17. Optimization of gene transfer into primitive human hematopoietic cells of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood using low-dose cytokines and comparison of a gibbon ape leukemia virus versus an RD114-pseudotyped retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Johannes C M; Liu, B L; Goldman, A I; Buckley, S M; Chrudimsky, K S

    2002-07-20

    Primitive human hematopoietic cells in granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood (MPB) are more difficult to transduce compared to cells from umbilical cord blood. Based on the hypothesis that MPB cells may require different stimulation for efficient retroviral infection, we compared several culture conditions known to induce cycling of primitive hematopoietic cells. MPB-derived CD34(+) cells were stimulated in the presence or absence of the murine fetal liver cell line AFT024 in trans-wells with G-CSF, stem cell factor (SCF), and thrombopoietin (TPO) (G/S/T; 100 ng/ml) or Flt3-L, SCF, interleukin (IL)-7, and TPO (F/S/7/T; 10-20 ng/ml), and transduced using a GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Compared to cultures without stroma, the presence of AFT024 increased the number of transduced colony-forming cells (CFC) by 3.5-fold (with G/S/T), long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) by 4.6-fold (with F/S/7/T), and nonobese diabetic/severe immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID)-repopulating cells (SRC) by 6.8-fold (with F/S/7/T). Similar numbers of long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) and SRC could be transduced using AFT024-conditioned medium (AFT-CM) or a defined medium that had been supplemented with factors identified in AFT-CM. Finally, using our best condition based on transduction with the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV)-pseudotyped vector, we demonstrate a 33-fold higher level of gene transfer (p < 0.001) in SRC using an RD114-pseudotyped vector. In summary, using an optimized protocol with low doses of cytokines, and transduction with an RD114 compared to a GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vector, the overall number of transduced cells in NOD/SCID mice could be improved 144-fold, with a gene-transfer efficiency in SRC of 16.3% (13.3-19.9; n = 6).

  18. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  19. Involvement of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF1) Stimulation of Proliferation of a Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) plays an important role in mammary gland development and lactation in part by stimulating proliferation of the milk-producing epithelial cells. In this study, we used the bovine mammary epithelial cell line MAC-T cells as a model to understand the mechanism by whi...

  20. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Carol Ann Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  1. Diet-induced obesity promotes myelopoiesis in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Kanakadurga; DelProposto, Jennifer; Lee Morris, David; Zamarron, Brian; Mergian, Taleen; Maley, Nidhi; Cho, Kae Won; Geletka, Lynn; Subbaiah, Perla; Muir, Lindsey; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Nien-Kai Lumeng, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an activated macrophage phenotype in multiple tissues that contributes to tissue inflammation and metabolic disease. To evaluate the mechanisms by which obesity potentiates myeloid activation, we evaluated the hypothesis that obesity activates myeloid cell production from bone marrow progenitors to potentiate inflammatory responses in metabolic tissues. High fat diet-induced obesity generated both quantitative increases in myeloid progenitors as well as a potentiation of inflammation in macrophages derived from these progenitors. In vivo, hematopoietic stem cells from obese mice demonstrated the sustained capacity to preferentially generate inflammatory CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages after serial bone marrow transplantation. We identified that hematopoietic MyD88 was important for the accumulation of CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophage accumulation by regulating the generation of myeloid progenitors from HSCs. These findings demonstrate that obesity and metabolic signals potentiate leukocyte production and that dietary priming of hematopoietic progenitors contributes to adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:25161889

  2. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Effect of Epidermal Growth Factor on Cell-Cell Adhesion in Epithelial Cell Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Notbohm, J.; Kim, J.-H.; Asthagiri, A.R.; Ravichandran, G.

    2012-01-01

    The effect that growth factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) have on cell-cell adhesion is of interest in the study of cellular processes such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Because cell-cell adhesions cannot be measured directly, we use three-dimensional traction force microscopy to measure the tractions applied by clusters of MCF-10A cells to a compliant substrate beneath them before and after stimulating the cells with EGF. To better interpret the results, a finite element model, which simulates a cluster of individual cells adhered to one another and to the substrate with linear springs, is developed to better understand the mechanical interaction between the cells in the experiments. The experiments and simulations show that the cluster of cells acts collectively as a single unit, indicating that cell-cell adhesion remains strong before and after stimulation with EGF. In addition, the experiments and model emphasize the importance of three-dimensional measurements and analysis in these experiments. PMID:22455915

  3. Hematopoietic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2008-01-15

    The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses-survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years.

  4. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  5. Hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) is a growth factor for human, ovine and porcine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Amphoux-Fazekas, T; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1996-03-01

    Hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) provokes in murine erythroleukemia cells (MELC) a commitment to terminal differentiation leading to the activation of the expression of hemoglobin. HMBA has been tested also in other cells from colon cancer, melanoma or lung cancer. However it has not yet been tested in the thyroid. We demonstrate in this paper that HMBA in kinetics and concentration-response experiments increases the proliferation of human thyroid cells isolated from Graves'-Basedow patients. It also acts like a growth factor for ovine and porcine thyroid cells, respectively, from the OVNIS line and the ATHOS line. This molecule which is a differentiating factor in the MELC system and a growth factor in human thyroid cell cultures represents a potential to get human thyroid cell lines expressing specialized functions.

  6. Changes in human bone marrow fat content associated with changes in hematopoietic stem cell numbers and cytokine levels with aging.

    PubMed

    Tuljapurkar, Sonal R; McGuire, Timothy R; Brusnahan, Susan K; Jackson, John D; Garvin, Kevin L; Kessinger, Margaret A; Lane, Judy T; O' Kane, Barbara J; Sharp, John G

    2011-11-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging, including anemias, reduced responses to hematopoietic stress and myelodysplasias. This investigation tested the hypothesis that increased bone marrow (BM) fat content in humans with age was associated with decreased numbers of side population (SP) hematopoietic stem cells, and this decrease correlated with changes in cytokine levels. BM was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur removed at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100 subjects). In addition, BM from cadavers (N = 36), with no evidence of hip disease, was evaluated for fat content. Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle, and cellularity and lipid content determined. Marrow cells were stained with Hoechst dye and SP profiles were acquired. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 were measured using ELISA. Fat content in the BM of human subjects and cadavers increased with age. The numbers of SP stem cells in BM as well as plasma IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels decreased in correlation with increased BM fat. IL-6 had no relationship to changes in marrow fat. These data suggest that increased BM fat may be associated with a decreased number of SP stem cells and IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels with aging. These data further raise a more general question as to the role of adipose cells in the regulation of tissue stem cells.

  7. Ex vivo expansion and long-term hematopoietic reconstitution ability of sorted CD34+CD59+ cells from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Han, Bing; Wu, Yong-Ji; Zhong, Yu-ping; Sun, Wan-ling

    2010-07-01

    Autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) remains difficult so far. To expand residual normal CD34(+)CD59(+) cells isolated from patients with PNH and observe the long-term hematopoietic reconstruction ability of the expanded cells both ex vivo and in vivo, CD34(+)CD59(+) cells from 13 PNH patients and CD34(+) cells from 11 normal controls were separated from bone marrow mononuclear cells first by immunomagnetic microbeads and then by flow cytometry autoclone sorting. The cells were then cultivated under different conditions. The long-term hematopoietic supporting ability of expanded CD34(+)CD59(+) cells was evaluated by long-term culture in semi-solid medium in vitro and long-term engraftment in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice in vivo. The best combination of hematopoietic growth factors for ex vivo expansion was SCF + IL-3 + IL-6 + FL + Tpo + Epo. The most suitable time for harvest was on day 7. CD34(+)CD59(+) PNH cells retained strong colony-forming capacity even after expansion. The survival rate, complete blood cell count recovery on day 90, and human CD45 expression in different organs were similar between the irradiated SCID mice transplanted with expanded CD34(+)CD59(+) PNH cells and those with normal CD34(+) cells (P > 0.05) both in primary and secondary transplantation. These data provided a new potential way of managing PNH with ABMT.

  8. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in gallbladder cancer cells leads to decreased growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Ili, Carmen; Brebi, Priscilla; Alvarez, Hector; Roa, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an aggressive neoplasm associated with late diagnosis, unsatisfactory treatment and poor prognosis. Previous work showed that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is increased in this malignancy. This matricellular protein plays an important role in various cellular processes and its involvement in the tumorigenesis of several human cancers has been demonstrated. However, the precise function of CTGF expression in cancer cells is yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the CTGF expression in gallbladder cancer cell lines, and its effect on cell viability, colony formation and in vitro cell migration. CTGF expression was evaluated in seven GBC cell lines by Western blot assay. Endogenous CTGF expression was downregulated by lentiviral shRNA directed against CTGF mRNA in G-415 cells, and the effects on cell viability, anchorage-independent growth and migration was assessed by comparing them to scrambled vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of CTGF resulted in significant reduction in cell viability, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth (P < 0.05). An increased p27 expression was observed in G-415 cells with loss of CTGF function. Our results suggest that high expression of this protein in gallbladder cancer may confer a growth advantage for neoplastic cells. PMID:23593935

  9. Hematopoietic cell transplantation: a curative option for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen have the potential to further reduce regimen related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments, such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimen may enable the safe use of alternate source of stem cells such as unrelated matched donors and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment.

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor plays a dual role in regulating skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gal-Levi, R; Leshem, Y; Aoki, S; Nakamura, T; Halevy, O

    1998-03-12

    The role of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, c-met, in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells was studied in primary cultures of chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells and a myogenic C2 cell line. HGF mRNA was expressed mainly in the myotubes of both cultures. The addition of conditioned medium derived from those cultures had a scattering effect on the canine kidney epithelial cell line, MDCK. In contrast, c-met mRNA levels decreased during cell differentiation of C2 and primary satellite cells. Application of exogenous HGF to chicken myoblasts resulted in their enhanced DNA synthesis. Among several growth factors, HGF was the first to induce DNA synthesis in quiescent satellite cells, thereby driving them into the cell cycle. Ectopic expression of chicken HGF in primary satellite cells suppressed the activation of muscle-regulatory gene reporter constructs MCK-CAT, MRF4-CAT, MEF2-CAT and 4Rtk-CAT, as well as the gene expression of MyoD and myogenin, and MHC protein expression. Ectopic MyoD reversed HGF's inhibitory effect on MCK transactivation. These data suggest that HGF inhibits cell differentiation by inhibiting the activity of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/E protein heterodimers, thus inhibiting myogenic determination factor activity and subsequent muscle-specific protein expression. During muscle growth and regeneration, HGF plays a dual role in satellite-cell myogenesis, affecting both the proliferation and differentiation of these cells in a paracrine fashion.

  11. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  12. EBV Lymphoproliferative Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW EBV reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT). Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. RECENT FINDINGS During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped to identify high-risk patients and to diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (EBV-CTL) response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third party EBV-CTLs. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy and remains a challenge. SUMMARY EBV reactivation is a significant complication after SCT. Continued improvements in risk-stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV associated diseases. Current approaches use Rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV-CTL to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes. PMID:25159713

  13. CD34+ hematopoietic precursors are present in human decidua and differentiate into natural killer cells upon interaction with stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Paola; Vitale, Chiara; Montaldo, Elisa; Conte, Romana; Cantoni, Claudia; Fulcheri, Ezio; Darretta, Valeria; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the main lymphoid population in the maternal decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. Decidual NK (dNK) cells display a unique functional profile and play a key role in promoting tissue remodeling, neoangiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, little information exists on their origin and development. Here we discovered CD34+ hematopoietic precursors in human decidua (dCD34+). We show that dCD34+ cells differ from cord blood- or peripheral blood-derived CD34+ precursors. The expression of IL-15/IL-2 receptor common β-chain (CD122), IL-7 receptor α-chain (CD127), and mRNA for E4BP4 and ID2 transcription factors suggested that dCD34+ cells are committed to the NK cell lineage. Moreover, they could undergo in vitro differentiation into functional (i.e., IL-8– and IL-22–producing) CD56brightCD16−KIR+/− NK cells in the presence of growth factors or even upon coculture with decidual stromal cells. Their NK cell commitment was further supported by the failure to undergo myeloid differentiation in the presence of GM-CSF. Our findings strongly suggest that decidual NK cells may directly derive from CD34+ cell precursors present in the decidua upon specific cellular interactions with components of the decidual microenvironment. PMID:21248224

  14. The Role of Tumor Cell-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bennewith, Kevin L.; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M.; Graves, Edward E.; Erler, Janine T.; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted subcutaneously. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by PET imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed co-localization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19179545

  15. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion in human meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, J C; Hsiao, Y Y; Teng, L J; Shun, C T; Chen, C T; Goldman, C K; Kao, M C

    1999-02-01

    Previously, we induced vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular permeability factor (VEGF/VPF) secretion in glioma cell lines by using physiologic concentrations of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). We hypothesized that VEGF/VPF might enhance the blood supply required for the unregulated growth of tumors, and that it acts as the central mediator of tumor angiogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether the expression of VEGF/VPF by meningiomas is regulated by growth factors or sex hormones. By means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of CH-157MN meningioma cell supernatants, we demonstrated that EGF and bFGF similarly induce VEGF secretion by CH-157MN meningioma cells. At the maximum concentrations of EGF (50 ng/mL) and bFGF (50 ng/mL) used in this study, VEGF secretion was induced to 140% to 160% above baseline constitutive secretion. PDGF-BB homodimer did not enhance VEGF secretion significantly. Estradiol (up to 10(-7) mol/L), progesterone (up to 10(-5) mol/L), or testosterone (up to 10(-5) mol/L) did not stimulate or inhibit VEGF secretion in CH-157MN meningioma cells (p > 0.05). Furthermore, we demonstrated that dexamethasone decreased VEGF secretion to 32% of baseline constitutive secretion. This might explain the effect of corticosteroids in alleviating peritumoral brain edema in meningiomas. These results suggest that VEGF secretion in CH-157MN meningioma cells is mainly regulated by growth factors and corticosteroids, but not by sex hormones. Understanding the regulation of VEGF/VPF secretion in meningiomas might contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy.

  16. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  17. Interactions between stromal cell--derived keratinocyte growth factor and epithelial transforming growth factor in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj-Elliott, M; Poulsom, R; Pender, S L; Wathen, N C; MacDonald, T T

    1998-01-01

    Immune reactions in the gut are associated with increased epithelial cell proliferation. Here we have studied the role of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; FGF7) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) in the epithelial cell hyperplasia seen in explants of fetal human small intestine after activation of lamina propria T cells with the superantigen Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). After the addition of SEB to the explants there is a 10-fold increase in KGF mRNA by 72 h of culture. KGF transcripts were abundant in the lamina propria using in situ hybridization and the culture supernatants contained elevated amounts of KGF protein. SEB had no direct effect on KGF mRNA and protein production by cultured lamina propria mesenchymal cells, but both were upregulated by TNF-alpha. Accompanying the increase in KGF there was also an increase in TGF-alpha precursor proteins in the culture supernatants and the phosphorylated form of the EGFR receptor was also detected in the tissue. Increased TGF-alpha precursor proteins were also detected in the supernatants of control explants stimulated with KGF alone. The direct addition of KGF and TGF-alpha enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and antibodies against KGF and TGF-alpha partially inhibited SEB-induced crypt hyperplasia. These results suggest molecular cross-talk between the KGF/KGFR and the TGF-alpha/EGFR in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia. PMID:9788959

  18. Requirement of soluble factors produced by bone marrow stromal cells on the growth of novel established human myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shingo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Megumi; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yasukawa, Kiyotaka; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Tsuboi, Isao; Aizawa, Shin

    2003-03-01

    The growth of myeloma cells is believed to be mediated by functional interactions between tumor cells and the marrow environment involving the action of several cytokines. We report on the establishment and characterization of a new human myeloma cell line (TAB1) that can be long-term maintained in the presence of conditioned medium of bone marrow stromal cells (BMCM) and a BMCM independent variant, C2-2. Both cell lines have plasma cell morphology and express plasma cell antigens (CD38, PCA-1 and immunoglobulin kappa light chain). In the absence of BMCM, TAB1 cells undergoing apoptosis were observed. Among the adherent molecules tested, these cells expressed VLA-4, ICAM-1 and H-CAM, but not VLA-5, suggesting that these were mostly immature plasmacytes. Introduction with exogenous IL-6 and/or GM-CSF, which were detected in BMCM, partially supported the proliferation of TAB1 cells. Treatment with anti-IL-6 antibody partially inhibited the proliferation of TAB1 cells cultured with BMCM. These findings strongly suggest that TAB1 required at least two or more factors on their growth in vitro; IL-6 was one of the factors necessary for cell growth. Further studies are required to clarify the precise molecules which support TAB1 cell growth in combination with IL-6, however, TAB1 and its variant C2-2 cells may offer an attractive model to unravel novel molecular mechanisms involved in bone marrow stroma-dependent growth of myeloma cells.

  19. Lack of neurogenesis in the adult rat cerebellum after Purkinje cell degeneration and growth factor infusion.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Piercesare; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2006-05-01

    Although constitutive neurogenesis exclusively occurs in restricted regions of the adult mammalian brain, resident progenitors can be isolated from many different CNS sites, and neuronal neogeneration can be stimulated in vivo by injury or infusion of growth factors. To ask whether latent compensatory mechanisms, which may be exploited to promote repair processes, are present throughout the CNS, we examined the neurogenic potentialities of the adult rat cerebellum in normal conditions, following injury, and after infusion of growth factors. Degeneration of Purkinje cells was induced by intracerebroventricular administration of the toxin saporin, conjugated to anti-p75 antibodies. In addition, epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, or FGF8, were infused for 2 weeks to either intact or injured animals. In all conditions, proliferating cells were identified from bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. In the unmanipulated cerebellum there were rare dividing cells, mainly represented by NG2-positive presumptive oligodendrocyte precursors. Mitotic activity was strongly enhanced in cortical areas with Purkinje cell degeneration, being mostly sustained by microglia, plus minor fractions of NG2-expressing cells, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In contrast, growth factor infusion had a weak effect on both intact and injured cerebella. In all experimental conditions, we never found any BrdU-positive cells coexpressing distinctive markers for immature or differentiated cerebellar neurons. Therefore, although some progenitor cells reside in the adult cerebellum, the local environment, either intact or injured, does not provide efficient cues to direct their differentiation towards neuronal phenotypes. In addition, neurogenic potentialities cannot be induced or boosted by the application of growth factors which are effective in other CNS regions.

  20. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  1. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength. PMID:24963862

  2. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  3. Sulfs are regulators of growth factor signaling for satellite cell differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Langsdorf, Aliete; Do, Anh-Tri; Kusche-Gullberg, Marion; Emerson, Charles P; Ai, Xingbin

    2007-11-15

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are required during muscle regeneration for regulating extracellular signaling pathways. HSPGs interact with growth factors and receptors through heparan sulfate (HS) chains. However, the regulatory mechanisms that control HS sulfation to affect the growth factor-dependent proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells are yet unknown. Here we report the essential functions of extracellular HS 6-O-endosulfatases (Sulfs) during muscle regeneration. We show that quiescent and activated satellite cells differentially express mouse Sulf1 (MSulf1) and MSulf2. MSulfs are not required for the formation of skeletal muscles and satellite cells, but they have redundant, essential roles to promote muscle regeneration, as MSulf double mutant mice exhibit delayed myogenic differentiation and prolonged Pax7 expression after cardiotoxin-induced skeletal muscle injury, while single MSulf knockouts regenerate normally. HS structural analysis demonstrates that Sulfs are regulatory HS-modifying enzymes that control HS 6-O-desulfation of activated satellite cells. Mechanistically, we show that MSulfs repress FGF2 signaling in activated satellite cells, leading us to propose that MSulfs are growth factor signaling sensors to control the proliferation to differentiation switch of satellite cells to initiate differentiation during regeneration. Our results establish Sulfs as essential regulators of HS-dependent growth factor signaling in the adult muscle stem cell niche.

  4. Homing in hematopoietic stem cells: focus on regulatory role of CXCR7 on SDF1a/CXCR4 axis.

    PubMed

    Asri, Amir; Sabour, Javid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) form a rare population of multipotent stem cells, which give rise to all hematopoietic lineages. HSCs home to bone marrow niches and circulate between blood and bone marrow. Many factors, especially SDF1a, affect the circulation of HSCs, but these have not been fully recognized. SDF1a has been shown to bind CXCR7 in addition to CXCR4 and can also function as SDF1a/CXCR4 modulator. CXCR7 plays a role in HSCs homing via SDF1a gradient and is a mediator of CXCR4/SDF1a axis. This review describes the current concepts and questions concerning CXCR7/CXCR4/SDF1a axis as an important key in hematopoietic stem cells homing with particular emphasis on CXCR7 receptor. Homing of HSCs is an essential step for successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  5. Transforming growth factor type. beta. can act as a potent competence factor for AKR-2B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goustin, A.S.; Nuttall, G.A.; Leof, E.B.; Ranganathan, G.; Moses, H.L. )

    1987-10-01

    Transforming growth factor type {beta} (TGF{beta}) is a pleiotropic regulator of cell growth with specific high-affinity cell-surface receptors on a large number of cells; its mechanism of action, however, is poorly defined. In this report, the authors utilized the mouse fibroblast line AKR-2B to explore the question of the temporal requirements during the cell cycle in regard to both the growth inhibitory and the growth stimulatory action of TGF{beta}. The results indicate that AKR-2B cells are most sensitive to the inhibitory action of TGF{beta} during early to mid-G{sub 1}. In addition, TGF{beta} need be present only briefly in order to exert its inhibitory effect on EGF-induced DNA synthesis. Likewise, the stimulatory effect of TGF{beta} in the absence of EGF requires only an equally brief exposure to TGF{beta}. Use of homogeneous {sup 125}I-labeled TGF{beta} in a cell-binding assay demonstrates that TGF{beta} bound to cell-surface receptors can readily exchange into the culture medium, helping to rule out the possibility that persistent receptor-bound TGF{beta} is the source of a continuous stimulus. The data indicate that TGF{beta} exposure induces a stable state in the cell similar to but distinct from the state of competence induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF).

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-05-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class-based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Vermylen, C; Cornu, G

    1997-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only therapy able to cure sickle cell anemia at the present time. So far, transplantations have been undertaken in approximatively 140 sickle cell patients all over the world, with good results. The selection of patients for transplantation remains a subject of dilemma because of the unpredictable course of the disease and the lack of valuable prognostic markers. The selection criteria accepted so far concern young patients under the age of 16, with a morbid course of the disease and having a HLA-compatible sibling. In Belgium, patients going back to their country of origin were also considered for transplantation. For 100 patients who underwent transplantation in Europe, the current Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival, event-free survival, and disease-free survival rates are 90%, 79%, and 81%, respectively. Benefits and side effects are analyzed.

  8. Decitabine maintains hematopoietic precursor self-renewal by preventing repression of stem cell genes by a differentiation inducing stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenbo; Negrotto, Soledad; Gu, Xiaorong; Mahfouz, Reda; Ng, Kwok Peng; Ebrahem, Quteba; Copelan, Edward; Singh, Harinder; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2010-01-01

    The cytosine analogue decitabine alters hematopoietic differentiation. For example, decitabine treatment increases self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells. The mechanisms underlying decitabine induced shifts in differentiation are poorly understood, but likely relate to the ability of decitabine to deplete the chromatin-modifying enzyme DNA methyl-transferase 1 (DNMT1) that plays a central role in transcription repression. HOXB4 is a transcription factor that promotes hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. In hematopoietic precursors induced to differentiate by the lineage-specifying transcription factor Pu.1, or by the cytokine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), there is rapid repression of HOXB4 and other stem cell genes. Depletion of DNMT1 using shRNA or decitabine prevents HOXB4 repression by Pu.1 or G-CSF, and maintains hematopoietic precursor self-renewal. In contrast, depletion of DNMT1 by decitabine six hours after the differentiation stimulus, that is, after repression of HOXB4 has occurred, augments differentiation. Therefore, DNMT1 is required for the early repression of stem cell genes that occurs in response to a differentiation stimulus, providing a mechanistic explanation for the observation that decitabine can maintain or increase hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal in the presence of a differentiation stimulus. Using decitabine to deplete DNMT1 after this early repression phase does not impair progressive differentiation. PMID:20501800

  9. Nanofiber Expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, F; Allahverdi, A; Nasiri, H; Azad, M; Kalantari, N; Soleimani, M; Zare-Zardini, H

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was the ex vivo expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood hematopoietic stem cells on biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds. Materials and Methods CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were separated from umbilical cord blood using MidiMacs (positive selection) system by means of monocolonal antibody CD133 (microbeads); subsequently, flowcytometry method was done to assess the purity of separated cells. Isolated cells were cultured on plate (2 Dimensional) and fibronectin conjugated polyethersulfon nanofiber scaffold, simultaneously (3 Dimensional). Colony assay test was performed to show colonization ability of expanded cells. Results Cell count analysis revealed that expansion of hematopoietic stem cells in 2dimensional (2D) environment was greater than 3dimensional (3D) condition (p= 0.01). Assessment of stem cell- phenotype after expansions was performed by flowcytometric analysis which is showed that the maintenance of CD133 marker in expanded cells in 3 dimensional condition were higher than expanded cells in 2 dimensional condition (p=0.01). Moreover, colony assay test was performed before and after of expansion to show colonization ability of expanded cells both in 3D and 2D culture and results revealed more ability of 3D culture compared with 2D culture (p= 0.03). Conclusion The results of current study confirmed that umbilical cord blood CD133+ haematopoietic stem cells are able to expand on fibronectin conjugated polyethersulfon scaffold. These findings indicated that 3D is a proper and valuable cell culture system for hematopoietic stem cells expansion, compared to 2D in invitro situation. PMID:26985349

  10. The transcription factor HIF-1α plays a critical role in the growth factor-dependent regulation of both aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Julian J.; Bui, Thi; Gruber, Michaela; Gordan, John D.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Covello, Kelly L.; Simon, M. Celeste; Thompson, Craig B.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells are believed to have a cell-intrinsic ability to increase glucose metabolism in response to hypoxia. Here we show that the ability of hematopoietic cells to up-regulate anaerobic glycolysis in response to hypoxia is dependent on receptor-mediated signal transduction. In the absence of growth factor signaling, hematopoietic cells fail to express hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (Hif-1α) mRNA. Growth factor-deprived hematopoietic cells do not engage in glucose-dependent anabolic synthesis and neither express Hif-1α mRNA nor require HIF-1α protein to regulate cell survival in response to hypoxia. However, HIF-1α is adaptive for the survival of growth factor-stimulated cells, as suppression of HIF-1α results in death when growing cells are exposed to hypoxia. Growth factor-dependent HIF-1α expression reprograms the intracellular fate of glucose, resulting in decreased glucose-dependent anabolic synthesis and increased lactate production, an effect that is enhanced when HIF-1α protein is stabilized by hypoxia. Together, these data suggest that HIF-1α contributes to the regulation of growth factor-stimulated glucose metabolism even in the absence of hypoxia. PMID:17437992

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Megakaryocytes Induced from Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Murine and Nonhuman Primate Models.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Qin, Meng; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yanan; Shen, Bin; Ren, Zhihua; Ding, Xinxin; Dai, Wei; Jiang, Yongping

    2017-03-01

    Because of a lack of platelet supply and a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved platelet growth factor, megakaryocytes have emerged as an effective substitute for alleviating thrombocytopenia. Here, we report the development of an efficient two-stage culture system that is free of stroma, animal components, and genetic manipulations for the production of functional megakaryocytes from hematopoietic stem cells. Safety and functional studies were performed in murine and nonhuman primate models. One human cryopreserved cord blood CD34(+) cell could be induced ex vivo to produce up to 1.0 × 10(4) megakaryocytes that included CD41a(+) and CD42b(+) cells at 82.4% ± 6.1% and 73.3% ± 8.5% (mean ± SD), respectively, yielding approximately 650-fold higher cell numbers than reported previously. Induced human megakaryocytic cells were capable of engrafting and producing functional platelets in the murine xenotransplantation model. In the nonhuman primate model, transplantation of primate megakaryocytic progenitors increased platelet count nadir and enhanced hemostatic function with no adverse effects. In addition, primate platelets were released in vivo as early as 3 hours after transplantation with autologous or allogeneic mature megakaryocytes and lasted for more than 48 hours. These results strongly suggest that large-scale induction of functional megakaryocytic cells is applicable for treating thrombocytopenic blood diseases in the clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:897-909.

  12. Hematopoietic stem cells burn fat to prevent exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valerie; de Thé, Hugues

    2012-10-05

    Ito et al. (2012) recently report in Nature Medicine that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) regulated by PPARδ controls asymmetric division in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This metabolic mechanism prevents HSC exhaustion and is downstream of the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML, suggesting therapeutic implications for HSC function and disease.

  13. Broadening the indications for hematopoietic stem cell genetic therapies.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2013-09-05

    The use of recombinant retroviral vectors to effect corrective genetic therapies in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has long been predicted to revolutionize medicine. Two recent papers in Science now show that this technology could be considered as effective as, and perhaps superior to, allogeneic HSC transplants in some rare diseases.

  14. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease.

  15. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  16. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  17. Bcl11a Deficiency Leads to Hematopoietic Stem Cell Defects with an Aging-like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Luc, Sidinh; Huang, Jialiang; McEldoon, Jennifer L; Somuncular, Ece; Li, Dan; Rhodes, Claire; Mamoor, Shahan; Hou, Serena; Xu, Jian; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-09-20

    B cell CLL/lymphoma 11A (BCL11A) is a transcription factor and regulator of hemoglobin switching that has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for sickle cell disease and thalassemia. In the hematopoietic system, BCL11A is required for B lymphopoiesis, yet its role in other hematopoietic cells, especially hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains elusive. The extensive expression of BCL11A in hematopoiesis implicates context-dependent roles, highlighting the importance of fully characterizing its function as part of ongoing efforts for stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that BCL11A is indispensable for normal HSC function. Bcl11a deficiency results in HSC defects, typically observed in the aging hematopoietic system. We find that downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6), and the ensuing cell-cycle delay, correlate with HSC dysfunction. Our studies define a mechanism for BCL11A in regulation of HSC function and have important implications for the design of therapeutic approaches to targeting BCL11A.

  18. Sustained telomere erosion due to increased stem cell turnover during triple autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Thomas; Kneer, Harald; König, Jochem; Herrmann, Markus; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres cap chromosomal ends and are shortened throughout a lifetime. Additional telomere erosion has been documented during conventional chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Previous studies of stem cell transplantation reported variable amounts of telomere shortening with inconsistent results regarding the persistence of telomere shortening. Here we have prospectively studied telomere length and proliferation kinetics of hematopoietic cells in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients who underwent a four-course high-dose chemotherapy protocol combined with triple autologous stem cell transplantation. We observed sustained telomere shortening in hematopoietic cells after triple stem cell transplantation with prolonged stem cell replication during the first year after stem cell transplantation.

  19. Acidic fibroblast growth factor modulates Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, E A; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1988-01-01

    Alteration of human endothelial cells may increase their susceptibility to staphylococcal invasion and thus may contribute to the development of intravascular staphylococcal disease. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, a potent regulator of endothelial cell function, had a significant effect on Staphylococcus aureus infection of cultured human endothelial cells. Three of four S. aureus strains had diminished adherence to endothelial cells when the latter were grown in the presence of acidic fibroblast growth factor (P less than 0.05). The diminished adherence was time dependent, maximal at 72 h, and independent of the initial bacterial inoculum. A twofold enhancement of S. aureus adherence was observed when endothelial cells were pretreated with heparitinase. Adherence was unaffected by endothelial cell activation by interleukin-1 or endotoxin. Thus, acidic fibroblast growth factor exerted a protective effect, deterring S. aureus adherence to cultured endothelial cells. Endothelial cell heparan sulfate was also directly involved in the adherence process. Subtle modulations of endothelial cells can significantly affect the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and then infect these cells. Similar alterations may contribute to the ability of S. aureus to infect endovascular tissue in vivo. PMID:3259546

  20. Death of serum-free mouse embryo cells caused by epidermal growth factor deprivation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Serum-free mouse embryo (SFME) cells, derived in medium in which serum is replaced with growth factors and other supplements, are proastroblasts that are acutely dependent on epidermal growth factor (EGF) for survival. Ultrastructurally, an early change found in SFME cells deprived of EGF was a loss of polysomes which sedimentation analysis confirmed to be a shift from polysomes to monosomes. The ribosomal shift was not accompanied by decreased steady-state level of cytoplasmic actin mRNA examined as an indicator of cellular mRNA level. With time the cells became small and severely degenerate and exhibited nuclear morphology characteristic of apoptosis. Genomic DNA isolated from cultures undergoing EGF deprivation-dependent cell death exhibited a pattern of fragmentation resulting from endonuclease activation characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis or programmed cell death. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that cultures in the absence of EGF contained almost exclusively G1-phase cells. Some of the phenomena associated with EGF deprivation of SFME cells are similar to those observed upon NGF deprivation of nerve cells in culture, suggesting that these neuroectodermal-derived cell types share common mechanisms of proliferative control involving peptide growth factor-dependent survival. PMID:2016341

  1. Hematopoietic overexpression of the transcription factor Erg induces lymphoid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Catherine L.; Metcalf, Donald; Henley, Katya J.; Kruse, Elizabeth A.; Di Rago, Ladina; Mifsud, Sandra; Alexander, Warren S.; Kile, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor encoded by the E-twenty-six (ETS)-related gene, ERG, is an essential regulator of hematopoietic stem cell function and a potent human oncoprotein. Enforced expression of ERG in murine hematopoietic cells leads to the development of a well-characterized lymphoid leukemia and a less well-defined non lymphoid disease. To clarify the latter, we generated murine bone marrow chimeras with enforced Erg expression in engrafted hematopoietic progenitor cells. As expected, these mice developed lymphoid leukemia. However, the previously reported non lymphoid disease that developed was shown to be a uniform, transplantable leukemia with both erythroid and megakaryocytic characteristics. In vivo, this disease had the overall appearance of an erythroleukemia, with an accumulation of immature erythroblasts that infiltrated the bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lung. However, when stimulated in vitro, leukemic cell clones exhibited both erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation, suggesting that transformation occurred in a bipotential progenitor. Thus, in mice, Erg overexpression induces the development of not only lymphoid leukemia but also erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia. PMID:22936051

  2. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin.

  3. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin. PMID:27535453

  4. Pak2 regulates hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yi; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Staser, Karl; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Park, Su-Jung; Hahn, Seongmin; Cooper, Scott; Sun, Zejin; Jiang, Li; Yang, XianLin; Yuan, Jin; Kosoff, Rachelle; Sandusky, George; Srour, Edward F.; Chernoff, Jonathan; Clapp, Wade

    2015-01-01

    p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), a serine/threonine kinase, has been previously shown to be essential for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment. However, Pak2 modulation of long-term hematopoiesis and lineage commitment remain unreported. Utilizing a conditional Pak2 knock out (KO) mouse model, we found that disruption of Pak2 in HSCs induced profound leukopenia and a mild macrocytic anemia. Although loss of Pak2 in HSCs leads to less efficient short- and long-term competitive hematopoiesis than wild type (WT) cells, it does not affect HSC self-renewal per se. Pak2 disruption decreased the survival and proliferation of multi-cytokine stimulated immature progenitors. Loss of Pak2 skewed lineage differentiation toward granulocytopoiesis and monocytopoiesis in mice as evidenced by 1) a three to six-fold increase in the percentage of peripheral blood granulocytes and a significant increase in the percentage of granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) in mice transplanted with Pak2-disrupted BM; 2) Pak2-disrupted BM and c-kit+ cells yielded higher numbers of more mature subsets of granulocyte-monocyte colonies and polymophonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), respectively, when cultured in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Pak2 disruption resulted respectively in decreased and increased gene expression of transcription factors JunB and c-Myc, which may suggest underlying mechanisms by which Pak2 regulates granulocyte-monocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, Pak2 disruption led to 1) higher percentage of CD4+CD8+ double positive T cells and lower percentages of CD4+CD8− or CD4−CD8+ single positive T cells in thymus and 2) decreased numbers of mature B cells and increased numbers of Pre-Pro B cells in BM, suggesting defects in lymphopoiesis. PMID:25586960

  5. Cartilage tissue engineering: Role of mesenchymal stem cells along with growth factors & scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Gugjoo, M. B.; Amarpal; Sharma, G. T.; Aithal, H. P.; Kinjavdekar, P.

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury poses a major challenge for both the patient and orthopaedician. Articular cartilage defects once formed do not regenerate spontaneously, rather replaced by fibrocartilage which is weaker in mechanical competence than the normal hyaline cartilage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) along with different growth factors and scaffolds are currently incorporated in tissue engineering to overcome the deficiencies associated with currently available surgical methods and to facilitate cartilage healing. MSCs, being readily available with a potential to differentiate into chondrocytes which are enhanced by the application of different growth factors, are considered for effective repair of articular cartilage after injury. However, therapeutic application of MSCs and growth factors for cartilage repair remains in its infancy, with no comparative clinical study to that of the other surgical techniques. The present review covers the role of MSCs, growth factors and scaffolds for the repair of articular cartilage injury. PMID:28139532

  6. Insulin-like growth factor I induces migration and invasion of human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Ya-Wei; Yao, Lei; Tosato, Giovanna; Rudikoff, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable form of cancer characterized by accumulation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. During the course of this disease, tumor cells cross endothelial barriers and home to the bone marrow. In latter stages, myeloma cells extravasate through blood vessels and may seed a variety of organs. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is one of several growth factors shown to promote the growth of MM cells. In the current study, we have assessed the ability of IGF-I to serve additionally as a chemotactic factor affecting the mobility and invasive properties of these cells. Results indicate that IGF-I promotes transmigration through vascular endothelial cells and bone marrow stromal cell lines. Analysis of endogenous signaling pathways revealed that protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmicro (PKD/PKCmicro) and RhoA were both activated in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)-dependent manner. Inhibition of PI-3K, PKCs, or Rho-associated kinase by pharmacologic inhibitors abrogated migration, whereas mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Akt, and p70S6 kinase inhibitors had no effect. These results suggest that IGF-I promotes myeloma cell migration by activation of PI-3K/PKCmicro and PI-3K/RhoA pathways independent of Akt. The identification of IGF-I as both a proliferative and migratory factor provides a rational basis for the development of targeted therapeutic strategies directed at IGF-I in the treatment of MM.

  7. Progress and obstacles towards generating hematopoietic stem cells from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungmin; Dykstra, Brad; Sackstein, Robert; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to provide an inexhaustible source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that could be used in disease modeling and in clinical applications such as transplantation. Although the goal of deriving definitive HSCs from PSCs has not been achieved, recent studies indicate that progress is being made. This review will provide information on the current status of deriving HSCs from PSCs, and will highlight existing challenges and obstacles. Recent findings Recent strides in HSC generation from PSCs has included derivation of developmental intermediates, identification of transcription factors and small molecules that support hematopoietic derivation, and the development of strategies to recapitulate niche-like conditions. Summary Despite considerable progress in defining the molecular events driving derivation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from PSCs, the generation of robust transplantable HSCs from PSCs remains elusive. We propose that this goal can be facilitated by better understanding of the regulatory pathways governing HSC identity, development of HSC supportive conditions, and examining the marrow homing properties of PSC-derived HSCs. PMID:26049752

  8. Mom Knows Best: Imprinted Control of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Lopez, Juana; Cancelas, Jose A

    2016-02-04

    The mechanisms by which imprinted loci control activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are not known. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Qian et al. (2016) demonstrate that non-coding RNAs expressed by the maternal-imprinted locus Dlk1-Gtl2 maintain HSC self-renewal through the inhibition of PI3K-mTOR signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic activity.

  9. Embryonic Stem Cell Growth Factors Regulate eIF2α Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Kyle; Brooks, Hunter A.; Propson, Nicholas E.; Thomson, James A.; Kimble, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and transcription factors are well known to regulate pluripotent stem cells, but less is known about translational control in stem cells. Here, we use embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to investigate a connection between ESC growth factors and eIF2α-mediated translational control (eIF2α phosphorylation promotes protein expression from mRNAs with upstream open-reading frames, or uORFs). We find abundant phosphorylated P-eIF2α (P-eIF2α) in both pluripotent mouse and human ESCs, but little P-eIF2α in ESCs triggered to differentiate. We show that the growth factors LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor) and BMP4 (bone morphogenic protein 4) both maintain P-eIF2α in mESCs, but use distinct mechanisms: LIF inhibits an eIF2α phosphatase whereas BMP4 activates an eIF2α kinase. The mRNAs encoding the pluripotency factors Nanog and c-Myc possess uORFs while Oct4 mRNA does not. We find that salubrinal, a chemical that increases eIF2α phosphorylation, promotes Nanog and c-Myc expression, but not Oct4 expression. These experiments connect ESC growth factors to eIF2α phosphorylation and suggest a chemical substitute for LIF to enhance Nanog and c-Myc expression. PMID:26406898

  10. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  11. Transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) is an anti-adhesive protein regulating the invasive growth of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Pirjo; Lammi, Johanna; Soikkeli, Johanna; Saksela, Olli; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Hölttä, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    Melanoma is a malignancy characterized by high invasive/metastatic potential, with no efficient therapy after metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the invasive/metastatic tendency is therefore important. Our genome-wide gene expression analyses revealed that human melanoma cell lines WM793 and especially WM239 (vertical growth phase and metastatic cells, respectively) overexpress the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein transforming growth factor β induced (TGFBI). In adhesion assays, recombinant TGFBI was strongly anti-adhesive for both melanoma cells and skin fibroblasts. TGFBI further impaired the adhesion of melanoma cells to the adhesive ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen-I, and laminin, known to interact with it. Unexpectedly, WM239 cells migrated/invaded more effectively in three-dimensional collagen-I and Matrigel cultures after knockdown of TGFBI by shRNA expression. However, in the physiological subcutaneous microenvironment in nude mice, after TGFBI knockdown, these cells showed markedly impaired tumor growth and invasive capability; the initially formed small tumors later underwent myxoid degeneration and completely regressed. By contrast, the expanding control tumors showed intense TGFBI staining at the tumor edges, co-localizing with the fibrillar fibronectin/tenascin-C/periostin structures that characteristically surround melanoma cells at invasion fronts. Furthermore, TGFBI was found in similar fibrillar structures in clinical human melanoma metastases as well, co-localizing with fibronectin. These data imply an important role for TGFBI in the ECM deposition and invasive growth of melanoma cells, rendering TGFBI a potential target for therapeutic interventions.

  12. Control by fibroblast growth factor of differentiation in the BC3H1 muscle cell line

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) expression by polypeptide growth factors has been examined in the clonal mouse muscle BC3H1 cell line. After arrest of cell growth by exposure to low concentrations of serum, BC3H1 cells accumulate high levels of muscle- specific proteins including CPK. The induction of this enzyme is reversible in the presence of high concentrations of fetal calf serum, which cause quiescent, differentiated cells to reenter the cell cycle. Under these conditions, the rate of CPK synthesis is drastically reduced. We show in the present communication that either pituitary- derived fibroblast growth factor (FGF) or brain-derived FGF are as effective as serum in repressing the synthesis of CPK when added to quiescent, differentiated cells. The decrease in the rate of synthesis of CPK occurs within 22 h after the addition of pituitary FGF to the cells. Pituitary FGF had very little effect, if any, on the rate CPK degradation. The overall rate of protein synthesis and the pattern of synthesis of the major polypeptides made by these cells was not altered by the addition of FGF. Although pituitary FGF was mitogenic for BC3H1 cells, the rate of cell growth was not absolutely correlated with the extent of repression of CPK. Brain-derived FGF fully repressed CPK induction under conditions where it showed no significant mitogenic activity. These results show that the expression of a muscle-specific protein, CPK, can be controlled by a single defined polypeptide growth factor in fully differentiated cultures, and that initiation of cell division is not required for their regulation to take place. PMID:3988800

  13. Do androgens influence hair growth by altering the paracrine factors secreted by dermal papilla cells?

    PubMed

    Randall, V A; Hibberts, N A; Thornton, M J; Merrick, A E; Hamada, K; Kato, S; Jenner, T J; de Oliveira, I; Messenger, A G

    2001-01-01

    Androgens regulate many aspects of human hair growth in both sexes. After puberty they transform tiny vellus follicles in many areas, e.g. the face, to terminal ones producing long, thick, pigmented hairs. In genetically predisposed individuals, androgens also cause the reverse transformation of terminal scalp follicles into vellus ones, causing balding. In the current hypothesis for androgen action, androgens control most follicular cells indirectly acting via the mesenchyme-derived dermal papilla which regulates many aspects of follicular activity. In this model androgens binding to androgen receptors in dermal papilla cells alter their production of regulatory molecules which influence other follicular components; these molecules may be soluble paracrine factors and/or extracellular matrix proteins. This hypothesis is supported by immunohistochemical localisation of androgen receptors in dermal papilla cell nuclei and the demonstrations that androgen receptor content and testosterone metabolism patterns of cultured dermal papilla cells from various body sites reflect hair growth in androgen-insensitivity syndromes. The next question is whether androgens alter the paracrine factors secreted by dermal papilla cells. Cultured dermal papilla cells do release soluble, proteinaceous factors into their media which stimulate the growth of keratinocytes and other dermal papilla cells. This mitogenic potential can cross species from humans to rodents. Importantly, testosterone in vitro stimulates the mitogenic potential of beard cells, but in contrast inhibits production by balding scalp cells reflecting their in vivo androgenic responses. Since androgens in vitro do alter the secretion of paracrine factors the current focus lies in identifying specific factors produced, e.g. IGF-I and stem cell factor (SCF), using ELISA and RT-PCR, and comparing their expression in cells from follicles with varying responses to androgens in vivo or under androgen stimulation in vitro

  14. Chondrogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells using combined growth factors for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Michela; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Leigheb, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Andrea E; Cannas, Mario

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether growth factors (FGF-2, FGF-4 and FGF-6) used alone or in combination with TGFβ2 are able to increase the proliferation and induce the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to chondrocytes, with a view to using them in cartilage tissue engineering. Cells cultured in monolayer, used to test the activity of the growth factors on cell proliferation, showed that a combination of FGFs with TGFβ2 increases cell proliferation compared to cells cultured in control medium or in the presence of growth factors alone. The chondrogenic potential, evaluated in three-dimensional (3D) cell aggregates, showed that FGF-2 and FGF-6, when used in combination with TGFβ2 increased the size and glycosaminoglycan content of the cell aggregates without increasing cell number. Extracellular matrix (ECM) also showed higher collagen type II immunoreactivity, which was particularly evident in an area similar to a germinative pole that was observed only in pellets cultured with FGF-2 and FGF-6 combined with TGFβ2, or in pellets cultured with FGF-2 alone. Moreover, the RT-PCR assay has highlighted an increased expression of collagen type II and Sox9, used as gene markers for chondrogenesis. We can conclude that combinations of FGF-2 or FGF-6 with TGFβ2 may provide a novel tool to induce the differentiation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells for applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

  15. Reduction of Nup107 attenuates the growth factor signaling in the senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Decreased expression of Nup107 in aged cells and organs. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 results in impaired nuclear translocation of p-ERK. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 affects downstream effectors of ERK signaling. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 inhibits cell proliferation of oligodendroglioma cells. -- Abstract: Hypo-responsiveness to growth factors is a fundamental feature of cellular senescence. In this study, we found markedly decreased level of Nup107, a key scaffold protein in nuclear pore complex assembly, in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as well as in organs of aged mice. Depletion of Nup107 by specific siRNA in young human diploid fibroblasts prevented the effective nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, and decreased the expression of c-Fos in consequence. The disturbances in ERK signaling in Nup107 depleted cells closely mirror the similar changes in senescent cells. Knockdown of Nup107 in anaplastic oligodendroglioma cells caused cell death, rather than growth retardation, indicating a greater sensitivity to Nup107 depletion in cancer cells than in normal cells. These findings support the notion that Nup107 may contribute significantly to the regulation of cell fate in aged and transformed cells by modulating nuclear trafficking of signal molecules.

  16. Control of human glioma cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Merzak, A.; McCrea, S.; Koocheckpour, S.; Pilkington, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    Factors involved in the control of the biological properties of gliomas, the major form of brain tumour in man, are poorly documented. We investigated the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in the control of proliferation of human glioma cell lines as well as normal human fetal brain cells. The data presented show that TGF-beta 1 exerts a growth-inhibitory action on both human fetal brain cells and three cell lines derived from human glioma of different grades of malignancy. In addition, this growth-inhibitory effect is dose dependent and serum independent. Since TGF-beta 1 is known to be involved in the control of cell migration during ontogenesis and oncogenesis, we investigated the role of this factor in the motile and invasive behaviour that characterises human gliomas in vivo. TGF-beta 1 was found to elicit a strong stimulation of migration and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro. In combination with recent data showing an inverse correlation between TGF-beta 1 expression in human gliomas and survival, these findings may suggest that TGF-beta 1 plays an important role in the malignant progression of gliomas in man. A study of the molecular mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative action and the invasion-promoting action of TGF-beta 1 may help to identify new targets in therapy for brain tumours. A combined antiproliferative and anti-invasive therapy could be envisaged. Images Figure 3 PMID:8054266

  17. Dietary restriction improves repopulation but impairs lymphoid differentiation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells in early aging

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Duozhuang; Tao, Si; Chen, Zhiyang; Koliesnik, Ievgen Oleksandrovich; Calmes, Philip Gerald; Hoerr, Verena; Han, Bing; Gebert, Nadja; Zörnig, Martin; Löffler, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) improves health, delays tissue aging, and elongates survival in flies and worms. However, studies on laboratory mice and nonhuman primates revealed ambiguous effects of DR on lifespan despite improvements in health parameters. In this study, we analyzed consequences of adult-onset DR (24 h to 1 yr) on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. DR ameliorated HSC aging phenotypes, such as the increase in number of HSCs and the skewing toward myeloid-biased HSCs during aging. Furthermore, DR increased HSC quiescence and improved the maintenance of the repopulation capacity of HSCs during aging. In contrast to these beneficial effects, DR strongly impaired HSC differentiation into lymphoid lineages and particularly inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid progenitors, resulting in decreased production of peripheral B lymphocytes and impaired immune function. The study shows that DR-dependent suppression of growth factors and interleukins mediates these divergent effects caused by DR. Supplementation of insulin-like growth factor 1 partially reverted the DR-induced quiescence of HSCs, whereas IL-6/IL-7 substitutions rescued the impairment of B lymphopoiesis exposed to DR. Together, these findings delineate positive and negative effects of long-term DR on HSC functionality involving distinct stress and growth signaling pathways. PMID:26951333

  18. Acute Kidney Injury in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mohit; Manu, Gurusidda; Kwatra, Shivani; Owusu, Osei-Tutu

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective treatment strategy for lymphoproliferative disorders and bone marrow failure states including aplastic anemia and thalassemia. However, its use has been limited by the increased treatment related complications, including acute kidney injury (AKI) with an incidence ranging from 20% to 73%. AKI after HSCT has been associated with an increased risk of mortality. The incidence of AKI reported in recipients of myeloablative allogeneic transplant is considerably higher in comparison to other subclasses mainly due to use of cyclosporine and development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in allogeneic groups. Acute GVHD is by itself a major independent risk factor for the development of AKI in HSCT recipients. The other major risk factors are sepsis, nephrotoxic medications (amphotericin B, acyclovir, aminoglycosides, and cyclosporine), hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), marrow infusion toxicity, and tumor lysis syndrome. The mainstay of management of AKI in these patients is avoidance of risk factors contributing to AKI, including use of reduced intensity-conditioning regimen, close monitoring of nephrotoxic medications, and use of alternative antifungals for prophylaxis against infection. Also, early identification and effective management of sepsis, tumor lysis syndrome, marrow infusion toxicity, and hepatic SOS help in reducing the incidence of AKI in HSCT recipients. PMID:27885340

  19. Predictors for severe cardiac complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Kanda, Y; Nakagawa, M; Asano-Mori, Y; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Imai, Y; Hangaishi, A; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Hirai, H

    2004-05-01

    The value of pre-transplant factors for predicting the development of cardiac complications after transplantation has been inconsistent among studies. We analyzed the impact of pre-transplant factors on the incidence of severe cardiac complications in 164 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We identified eight patients (4.8%) who experienced grade III or IV cardiac complications according to the Bearman criteria. Seven died of cardiac causes a median of 3 days after the onset of cardiac complications. On univariate analysis, both the cumulative dose of anthracyclines and the use of anthracyclines within 60 days before transplantation affected the incidence of severe cardiac complications (P=0.0091 and 0.011). The dissociation of heart rate and body temperature, which reflects "relative tachycardia", was also associated with a higher incidence of cardiac complications (P=0.024). None of the variables obtained by electrocardiography or echocardiography were useful for predicting cardiac complications after transplantation, although the statistical power might not be sufficient to detect the usefulness of ejection fraction. On a multivariate analysis, the cumulative dose of anthracyclines was the only independent significant risk factor for severe cardiac complications. We conclude that the cumulative dose of anthracyclines is the most potent predictor of cardiac complications and the administration of anthracyclines should be avoided within two months before transplantation.

  20. Chimeric Aptamer-Gelatin Hydrogels as an Extracellular Matrix Mimic for Loading Cells and Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Battig, Mark R.; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R.; Duncan, Katelyn L.; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to synthesize materials to recapitulate critical functions of biological systems for a variety of applications such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a chimeric hydrogel as a promising extracellular matrix (ECM) mimic using gelatin, a nucleic acid aptamer and polyethylene glycol (PEG). This hydrogel had a macroporous structure that was highly permeable for fast molecular transport. Despite its high permeability, it could strongly sequester and sustainably release growth factors with high bioactivity. Notably, growth factors retained in the hydrogel could maintain ~50% bioactivity during a 14-day release test. It also provided cells with effective binding sites, which led to high efficiency of cell loading into the macroporous hydrogel matrix. When cells and growth factors were co-loaded into the chimeric hydrogel, living cells could still be observed by day 14 in a static serum-reduced culture condition. Thus, this chimeric aptamer-gelatin hydrogel constitutes a promising biomolecular ECM mimic for loading cells and growth factors. PMID:26791559

  1. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling.

  2. Critical early events in hematopoietic cell seeding and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2005-01-01

    Durable hematopoietic stem cell engraftment requires efficient homing to and seeding in the recipient bone marrow. Dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms by retrospective analysis of functional engraftment studies imposes severe limitations on the understanding of the early stages of this process. We have established an experimental approach for in vivo functional imaging of labeled cells at the level of recipient bone marrow in real time. The adhesive interaction of hematopoietic cells with the bone marrow stroma evolves as the most important early event. Adhesion to the marrow, rather than the vascular endothelium, determines the efficiency of both homing and seeding, and is absolutely essential to maintain cell viability in the marrow. Seeding and engraftment may be improved either by bypassing homing or by localized transplant of a large number of cells in a relatively small marrow space. There is functional redundancy in the molecular pathways that mediate the cell-stroma interaction, such that blockage of a single pathway has only minor effect on homing and seeding. We hypothesize that successfully seeding-engrafting cells undergo extensive phenotypic changes as a consequence of interaction with the stroma, without engaging in rapid proliferation. Surprisingly, Fas-ligand appears to promote hematopoietic cell engraftment by immunomodulatory and trophic effects.

  3. Epidermal growth factor controls smooth muscle alpha-isoactin expression in BC3H1 cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet- derived growth factor, and insulin on the differentiation of a mouse vascular smooth muscle-like cell line, the BC3H1 cells. On the basis of cell morphology and smooth muscle alpha-isoactin synthesis, we demonstrate that EGF at physiological concentrations prevents the differentiation of these cells, whereas platelet-derived growth factor has no apparent effect. The induction of alpha-isoactin synthesis by serum deprivation is inhibited by EGF in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal effect at 3-5 ng/ml and a maximal inhibition at approximately 30 ng/ml. Northern analysis also shows that EGF blocks the accumulation of alpha-isoactin mRNA normally observed during cell differentiation. Addition of EGF to differentiated cells results in a repression of alpha-isoactin synthesis, a stimulation of beta- and gamma-isoactin synthesis, and the stabilization of the nonmuscle isoactins. The synthesis of creatine phosphokinase, a muscle-specific noncontractile protein, is also regulated by EGF in a similar fashion. Modulation by EGF of alpha-isoactin expression is not affected by aphidicolin and is therefore independent of its mitogenic effect on these cells. Insulin is not required for observation of the EGF- dependent effects but instead seems to promote differentiation. Our results show that EGF can replace serum in controlling the differentiation of BC3H1 cells. PMID:3279054

  4. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  5. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in fetal lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Westlake, V J; Jolly, R D; Jones, B R; Mellor, D J; Machon, R; Zanjani, E D; Krivit, W

    1995-06-05

    Hematopoietic cells from the liver of normal 45-48-day-old fetal lambs (Hb type AA) were transplanted intraperitoneally into 58-60-day-old recipient fetuses (Hb type BB). The recipient fetuses resulted from mating homozygous ceroid-lipofuscinosis affected males with heterozygous, phenotypically normal, females. The sex of the donor fetus was also recorded. At age 2 1/2 months the recipient lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis were diagnosed by histopathology of brain biopsies. Monitoring of blood and bone marrow cells showed that an average of 9% of blood cells in ceroid-lipofuscinosis affected recipients were of donor origin. No differences were evident in the clinical course of disease, brain weight, or histopathology of organs between transplanted and non-transplanted lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Under the conditions of this experiment, transplantation of fetal hematopoietic cells was not beneficial.

  6. [Bone and Stem Cells. Bone marrow microenvironment niches for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    In bone marrow, the special microenvironments known as niches control proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) . However, the identity and functions of the niches has been a subject of longstanding debate. Although it has been reported previously that osteoblasts lining the bone surface act as HSC niches, their precise role in HSC maintenance remains unclear. On the other hand, the adipo-osteogenic progenitors with long processes, termed CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, which preferentially express the chemokine CXCL12, stem cell factor (SCF) , leptin receptor and PDGF receptor-β were identified in the bone marrow. Recent studies revealed that endothelial cells of bone marrow vascular sinuses and CAR cells provided niches for HSCs. The identity and functions of various other candidate HSC niche cells, including nestin-expressing cells and Schwann cells would also be discussed in this review.

  7. FHL2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell functions under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yu; Wang, Xiaoqin; Li, LiPing; Fan, Rong; Chen, Ju; Zhu, Tongyu; Li, Wen; Jiang, Yanwen; Mittal, Nupur; Wu, Wenshu; Peace, David; Qian, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    FHL2, a member of the four and one half LIM domain protein family, is a critical transcriptional modulator. Here, we identify FHL2 as a critical regulator of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is essential for maintaining HSC self-renewal under regenerative stress. We find that Fhl2 loss has limited effects on hematopoiesis under homeostatic conditions. In contrast, Fhl2-null chimeric mice reconstituted with Fhl2-null bone marrow cells developed abnormal hematopoiesis with significantly reduced numbers of HSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), red blood cells and platelets as well as hemoglobin levels. In addition, HSCs displayed a significantly reduced self-renewal capacity and were skewed toward myeloid lineage differentiation. We find that Fhl2 loss reduces both HSC quiescence and survival in response to regenerative stress, probably as a consequence of Fhl2-loss-mediated down-regulation of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)-inhibitors, including p21(Cip) and p27(Kip1). Interestingly, FHL2 is regulated under control of a tissue specific promoter in hematopoietic cells and it is down-regulated by DNA hypermethylation in the leukemia cell line and primary leukemia cells. Furthermore, we find that down-regulation of FHL2 frequently occurs in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, raising a possibility that FHL2 down-regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. PMID:25179730

  8. The Involvment of Hematopoietic-Specific PLC -β2 in Homing and Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Suszynska, Malwina; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-12-01

    Migration and bone marrow (BM) homing of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) is regulated by several signaling pathways, and here we provide evidence for the involvement in this process of hematopoietic-specific phospholipase C-β2 (PLC-β2). This enzyme is involved in release of intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recently we reported that PLC-β2 promotes mobilization of HSPCs from BM into peripheral blood (PB), and this effect is mediated by the involvement of PLC-β2 in the release of proteolytic enzymes from granulocytes and its role in disintegration of membrane lipid rafts. Here we report that, besides the role of PLC-β2 in the release of HSPCs from BM niches, PLC-β2 regulates the migration of HSPCs in response to chemotactic gradients of BM homing factors, including SDF-1, S1P, C1P, and ATP. Specifically, HSPCs from PLC-β2-KO mice show impaired homing and engraftment in vivo after transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. This decrease in migration of HSPCs can be explained by impaired calcium release in PLC-β2-KO mice and a high baseline level of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an enzyme that negatively regulates cell migration.

  9. Comparison of melatonin with growth factors in promoting precursor cells proliferation in adult mouse subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, secreted mainly by the pineal gland, plays roles in various physiological functions including protecting cell death. We showed in previous study that the proliferation and differentiation of precursor cells from the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) can be modulated by melatonin via the MT1 melatonin receptor. Since melatonin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) share some signaling pathway components, we investigated whether melatonin can promote the proliferation of precursor cells from the adult mouse SVZ via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase /mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathways in comparison with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Melatonin-induced ERK/MAPK pathways compared with EGF were measured by using in vitro and vivo models. We used neurosphere proliferation assay, immunocytochemistry, and immuno-blotting to analyze significant differences between melatonin and growth factor treatment. We also used specific antagonist and inhibitors to confirm the exactly signaling pathway including luzindole and U0126. We found that significant increase in proliferation was observed when two growth factors (EGF+bFGF) and melatonin were used simultaneously compared with EGF + bFGF or compared with melatonin alone. In addition, the present result suggested the synergistic effect occurred of melatonin and growth factors on the activating the ERK/MAPK pathway. This study exhibited that melatonin could act as a trophic factor, increasing proliferation in precursor cells mediated through the melatonin receptor coupled to ERK/MAPK signaling pathways. Understanding the mechanism by which melatonin regulates precursor cells may conduct to the development of novel strategies for neurodegenerative disease therapy. PMID:28275319

  10. In vivo demonstration of cell types in bone that harbor epidermal growth factor receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau-Doize, B.; Lai, W.H.; Warshawsky, H.; Bergeron, J.J.

    1988-08-01

    The binding and internalization of (/sup 125/I)iodoepidermal growth factor (EGF) by bone cells of the rat was demonstrated in situ by quantitative radioautography. Specific binding sites were observed on a cell profile enriched in endocytic components, including lysosome-like structures, a rough endoplasmic reticulum-rich cell profile, and a cell profile that histologically resembles an undifferentiated precursor cell. By the criteria of gel filtration and precipitability by trichloroacetic acid, most of the bound (/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF was considered intact. By morphological criteria none of the cell profiles that bound (/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF corresponded to fully formed osteoclasts or osteoblasts. The endocytic cell was found in the epiphyseal plate between the invading capillary and the transverse and longitudinal cartilage septa as well as near osteoclasts in the zone of mixed spicules. The rough endoplasmic reticulum-rich cell was present in vacated chondrocyte lacunae of the epiphyseal plate close to the metaphysis, and the poorly differentiated cell was observed between the mixed spicules of the metaphysis. Similar cell types were also found in the alveolar bone surrounding the incisors. These cells may be the origin of established bone cell lines that harbor high concentrations of EGF receptors and may also be responsible for the humoral hypercalcemia in response to the reported actions of injected EGF or transforming growth factor-alpha as well as that of malignancy.

  11. A Prospective Study of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Type 1 Gaucher Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lecourt, Séverine; Mouly, Enguerran; Freida, Delphine; Cras, Audrey; Ceccaldi, Raphaël; Heraoui, Djazia; Chomienne, Christine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Arnulf, Bertrand; Porcher, Raphael; Caillaud, Catherine; Vanneaux, Valérie; Belmatoug, Nadia; Larghero, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA) deficiency leading to hematological and skeletal manifestations. Mechanisms underlying these symptoms have not yet been elucidated. In vivo, bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have important role in the regulation of bone mass and in the support of hematopoiesis, thus representing potential candidate that could contribute to the disease. GBA deficiency may also directly impair hematopoietic stem/progenitors cells (HSPCs) intrinsic function and induce hematological defect. In order to evaluate the role of BM stem cells in GD pathophysiology, we prospectively analyzed BM-MSCs and HSPCs properties in a series of 10 patients with type 1 GD. GBA activity was decreased in all tested cell subtypes. GD-MSCs had an impaired growth potential, morphological and cell cycle abnormalities, decreased capacities to differentiate into osteoblasts. Moreover, GD-MSCs secreted soluble factors that stimulated osteoclasts resorbing activities. In vitro and in vivo primitive and mature hematopoiesis were similar between patients and controls. However, GD-MSCs had a lower hematopoietic supportive capacity than those from healthy donors. These data suggest that BM microenvironment is altered in GD and that MSCs are key components of the manifestations observed in GD. PMID:23935976

  12. Accelerating immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacologic agents are effective against some pathogens, but they are costly and can be associated with significant toxicities. Thus, many groups have investigated adoptive T-cell transfer as a means of hastening immune reconstitution and preventing and treating viral infections. This review discusses the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been explored. PMID:25505959

  13. Purification and partial sequence analysis of human T-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R J; Kutny, R M; Chowdhry, V

    1983-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody directed against human T-cell growth factor (TCGF) from the JURKAT cell line was used for affinity column purification of the factor. Bound TCGF was eluted nearly quantitatively at low pH, and the recovered factor appeared homogeneous by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The molecule is markedly hydrophobic, with a high content of leucine. A single NH2-terminal sequence of 36 residues was obtained by automated Edman degradation, further supporting the homogeneity of the material. Thus, significant quantities of purified TCGF have been prepared in a single step, making possible detailed analysis of its molecular structure and biological role. Images PMID:6604277

  14. Hepatocyte growth factor incorporated chitosan nanoparticles augment the differentiation of stem cell into hepatocytes for the recovery of liver cirrhosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Short half-life and low levels of growth factors in the niche of injured microenvironment necessitates the exogenous and sustainable delivery of growth factors along with stem cells to augment the regeneration of injured tissues. Methods Here, recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was incorporated into chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) by ionic gelation method and studied for its morphological and physiological characteristics. Cirrhotic mice received either hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) or mesenchymal stemcells (MSC) with or without HGF incorporated chitosan nanoparticles (HGF-CNP) and saline as control. Biochemical, histological, immunostaining and gene expression assays were carried out using serum and liver tissue samples. One way analysis of variance was used for statics application Results Serum levels of selected liver protein and enzymes were significantly increased in the combination of MSC and HGF-CNP (MSC+HGF-CNP) treated group. Immunopositive staining for albumin (Alb) and cytokeratin 18 (CK18), and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for Alb, alpha fetoprotein (AFP), CK18, cytokeratin 19 (CK19) ascertained that MSC-HGF-CNP treatment could be an effective combination to repopulate liver parenchymal cells in the liver cirrhosis. Zymogram and western blotting for matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP9) revealed that MMP2 actively involved in the fibrolysis of cirrhotic tissue. Immunostaining for alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and type I collagen showed decreased expression in the MSC+HGF-CNP treatment. These results indicated that HGF-CNP enhanced the differentiation of stem cells into hepatocytes and supported the reversal of fibrolysis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Conclusion Bone marrow stem cells were isolated, characterized and transplanted in mice model. Biodegradable biopolymeric nanoparticles were prepared with the pleotrophic protein molecule and it worked well for the differentiation of stem

  15. Nur77 is differentially modified in PC12 cells upon membrane depolarization and growth factor treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Hazel, T G; Misra, R; Davis, I J; Greenberg, M E; Lau, L F

    1991-01-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 can be induced by growth factors to undergo proliferation and neuronal differentiation. These cells also have excitable membranes that can be depolarized by neurotransmitters or elevated levels of extracellular KCl. Treatment of PC12 cells with growth factors or membrane-depolarizing agents rapidly activates the expression of specific genes whose products are thought to mediate the subsequent biological responses. One such gene, nur77, is a member of the steroid and thyroid hormone receptor gene superfamily. We have identified the Nur77 protein and shown that it is synthesized rapidly and transiently in PC12 cells following stimulation, has a short half-life of 30 to 40 min, and is located in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Nur77 is posttranslationally modified, primarily by phosphorylation on serine residues. Phosphopeptide analysis reveals that Nur77 is modified differently upon membrane depolarization than after treatment with growth factors. We hypothesize that the activity of Nur77 is regulated by both differential gene expression and posttranslational modification and that these modes of regulation contribute to distinct downstream responses specific to membrane depolarization and growth factor treatment. Images PMID:1645447

  16. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Growth Factors and Cells for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Tiffany N.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    The controlled delivery of growth factors and cells within biomaterial carriers can enhance and accelerate functional bone formation. The carrier system can be designed with preprogrammed release kinetics to deliver bioactive molecules in a localized, spatiotemporal manner most similar to the natural wound healing process. The carrier can also act as an extracellular matrix-mimicking substrate for promoting osteoprogenitor cellular infiltration and proliferation for integrative tissue repair. This review discusses the role of various regenerative factors involved in bone healing and their appropriate combinations with different delivery systems for augmenting bone regeneration. The general requirements of protein, cell and gene therapy are described, with elaboration on how the selection of materials, configurations and processing affects growth factor and cell delivery and regenerative efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo applications for bone tissue engineering. PMID:22342771

  17. Sgk3 links growth factor signaling to maintenance of progenitor cells in the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Laura; Okada, Hitoshi; Pasolli, Hilda Amalia; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick Itie; Mak, Tak W; Fuchs, Elaine

    2005-08-15

    Tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor signaling influences proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Hair follicles undergo cycles of proliferation and apoptotic regression, offering an excellent paradigm to study how this transition is governed. Several factors are known to affect the hair cycle, but it remains a mystery whether Akt kinases that are downstream of growth factor signaling impact this equilibrium. We now show that an Akt relative, Sgk (serum and glucocorticoid responsive kinase) 3, plays a critical role in this process. Hair follicles of mice lacking Sgk3 fail to mature normally. Proliferation is reduced, apoptosis is increased, and follicles prematurely regress. Maintenance of the pool of transiently amplifying matrix cells is impaired. Intriguingly, loss of Sgk3 resembles the gain of function of epidermal growth factor signaling. Using cultured primary keratinocytes, we find that Sgk3 functions by negatively regulating phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase signaling. Our results reveal a novel and important function for Sgk3 in controlling life and death in the hair follicle.

  18. Cell-permeable iron inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling and tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Devika; Saluja, Manju; Modi, Shrey; Venkatachalam, Annapoorna; Schnettler, Erica; Roy, Sabita; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and metastasis. Hypoxia in tumors drives this angiogenic response by stabilizing Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF) and target genes like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). HIF stability is regulated by Prolylhydroxylases (PHD)-mediated modification. Iron is an important cofactor in regulating the enzymatic activity of PHDs. Reducing intracellular iron, for instance, mimics hypoxia and induces a pro-angiogenic response. It is hypothesized that increasing the intracellular iron levels will have an opposite, anti-angiogenic effect. We tested this hypothesis by perturbing iron homeostasis in endothelial cells using a unique form of iron, Ferric Ammonium Citrate (FAC). FAC is a cell-permeable form of iron, which can passively enter into cells bypassing the transferrin receptor mediated uptake of transferrin-bound iron. Our studies show that FAC does not decrease the levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in endothelial cells but inhibits the autocrine stimulation of VEGF-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) system by blocking receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. FAC inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation and sprouting. Finally, systemic administration of FAC inhibits VEGF and tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our studies show that cell-permeable iron attenuates VEGFR-2 mediated signaling and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. PMID:27589831

  19. The Use of Growth Factors and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Kanitkar, Medha; Tailor, Hiteshkumar D; Khan, Wasim S

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is an exciting and upcoming branch of tissue engineering with application in the field of orthopaedics. The most commonly used type of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), can be easily isolated from bone marrow or synovium and cultured in vitro. Newer techniques using tissue engineering to regenerate musculoskeletal tissue by using biomimetic materials are now being studied. These osteoconductive three dimensional constructs seeded with MSCs are highly porous, biodegradable and biomechanically stable scaffolds which do not evoke an immunogenic host cell response. Research has shown the importance of growth factors in guiding and modulating the differentiation of MSCs in order to obtain the required cell type. Gene-based delivery systems have aided the delivery of sustained quantities of these growth factors. The evidence from growth factor enhanced tissue engineering studies for tissue healing looks very positive. This is a multi-disciplinary approach that integrates molecular, biochemical and clinical techniques with developmental and engineering processes. Initial studies indicate an immense potential for cell based strategies to enhance current orthopaedic approaches in skeletal tissue reconstruction. Ultimately, there is a need for randomised controlled trials on human populations to apply these findings to a clinical setting. Nevertheless, stem cell based tissue engineering in orthopaedics shows a promising future. PMID:21886692

  20. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  1. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, N N; Savani, B N; Shaw, B E; Abraham, A A; Ahmed, I A; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, K S; Basak, G W; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, T K; Greinix, H T; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, B K; Hayashi, R J; Jacobsohn, D A; Kamble, R T; Kasow, K A; Khera, N; Lazarus, H M; Malone, A K; Lupo-Stanghellini, M T; Margossian, S P; Muffly, L S; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, J R; Wirk, B; Wood, W A; Yong, A; Duncan, C N; Flowers, M E D; Majhail, N S

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients.

  2. The embryonic origins of hematopoietic stem cells: a tale of hemangioblast and hemogenic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Bollerot, Karine; Pouget, Claire; Jaffredo, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    The developmental origin of hematopoietic stem cells has been for decades the subject of great interest. Once thought to emerge from the yolk sac, hematopoietic stem cells have now been shown to originate from the embryonic aorta. Increasing evidence suggests that hematopoietic stem cells are produced from an endothelial intermediate designated by the authors as hemangioblast or hemogenic endothelium. Recently, the allantois in the avian embryo and the placenta in the mouse embryo were shown to be a site of hematopoietic cell production/expansion and thus appear to play a critical role in the formation of the hematopoietic system. In this review we shall give an overview of the data obtained from human, mouse and avian models on the cellular origins of the hematopoietic system and discuss some aspects of the molecular mechanisms controlling hematopoietic cell production.

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for CD3δ deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Nufar; Takada, Hidetoshi; Law, Jason; Cowan, Morton J; Gil, Juana; Regueiro, Jose; Lopez de Sabando, Diego Plaza; Lopez-Granados, Eduardo; Dalal, Jignesh; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Manfred, Hoenig; Hanson, I. Celine; Grunebaum, Eyal; Shearer, William T; Roifman, Chaim M.

    2012-01-01

    Background CD3δ deficiency is a fatal form of severe combined immunodeficiency which can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The presence of a thymus loaded with T cell progenitors in these patients may require special considerations in choosing the regimen of conditioning and the type of HSCT. Objectives To study the outcome of CD3δ deficiency using various modalities of stem cell transplantation. Methods We analyzed data on 13 patients with CD3δ deficiency who underwent HSCT in 7 centers. HSCT was performed using different sources of donor stem cells as well as various conditioning regimens. Results Two patients who received stem cells from matched related donors and survived, both needed substantial conditioning in order to engraft. Only one of six other patients who received a related mismatched donor (MMRD) transplant survived, two of them had no conditioning while the others received various combinations of conditioning regimens. Three other patients received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor (MUD), survived and enjoyed full immune reconstitution. Two other patients received unrelated cord blood without conditioning. One of them has had a partial but stable engraftment, while the other engrafted well but is only 12 months after HSCT. We also report here for the first time that patients with CD3δ deficiency can present with typical features of Omenn syndrome. Conclusions HSCT is a successful treatment for patients with CD3δ deficiency. The small number of patients in this report prevent definitive statements on the importance of survival factors, but several are suggested: 1) HLA matched donor transplants are associated with superior reconstitution and survival than mismatched donor transplants; 2) substantial conditioning appears necessary; 3) early diagnosis and absence of opportunistic infections. PMID:21757226

  4. Recent advances in cardiac regeneration: Stem cell, biomaterial and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Cheraghi, Mostafa; Namdari, Mehrdad; Negahdari, Babak; Eatemadi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Myocardial infarction has been reported to be responsible for about 7.3 million deaths each year globally. Present treatments for myocardial infarction have been more palliative rather than curative. Over the past few years, stem cells have demonstrated its potency in regenerating damaged cardiac tissue, especially after myocardial infarction. However, limited short half-life of the protein and cell therapy and low transplanted cell survival rate as demonstrated via several clinical trials have lead to development of more potent and novel delivery systems like biomaterial delivery system and the use of various growth factors. In this review, we will be enumerating and discussing the recent advances in cardiac regeneration with focus on stem cell, biomaterial and growth factors.

  5. ATF4 plays a pivotal role in the development of functional hematopoietic stem cells in mouse fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunze; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Dan; Dong, Fang; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Weili; Pang, Yakun; Wang, Yajie; Mu, Xiaohuan; Ni, Yanli; Li, Zhuan; Xu, Huiyu; Hao, Sha; Wang, Xiaochen; Ma, Shihui; Wang, Qian-fei; Xiao, Guozhi; Yuan, Weiping; Liu, Bing; Cheng, Tao

    2015-11-19

    The fetal liver (FL) serves as a predominant site for expansion of functional hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during mouse embryogenesis. However, the mechanisms for HSC development in FL remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) significantly impaired hematopoietic development and reduced HSC self-renewal in FL. In contrast, generation of the first HSC population in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region was not affected. The migration activity of ATF4(-/-) HSCs was moderately reduced. Interestingly, the HSC-supporting ability of both endothelial and stromal cells in FL was significantly compromised in the absence of ATF4. Gene profiling using RNA-seq revealed downregulated expression of a panel of cytokines in ATF4(-/-) stromal cells, including angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Addition of Angptl3, but not VEGFA, partially rescued the repopulating defect of ATF4(-/-) HSCs in the culture. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay in conjunction with silencing RNA-mediated silencing and complementary DNA overexpression showed transcriptional control of Angptl3 by ATF4. To summarize, ATF4 plays a pivotal role in functional expansion and repopulating efficiency of HSCs in developing FL, and it acts through upregulating transcription of cytokines such as Angptl3 in the microenvironment.

  6. Cellular glycosylation affects Herceptin binding and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Diluka; Spector, Alexander F.; Lomax-Browne, Hannah; Azimi, Tayebeh; Ramesh, Bala; Loizidou, Marilena; Welch, Hazel; Dwek, Miriam V.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in protein glycosylation are a key feature of oncogenesis and have been shown to affect cancer cell behaviour perturbing cell adhesion, favouring cell migration and metastasis. This study investigated the effect of N-linked glycosylation on the binding of Herceptin to HER2 protein in breast cancer and on the sensitivity of cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DXR) and growth factors (EGF and IGF-1). The interaction between Herceptin and recombinant HER2 protein and cancer cell surfaces (on-rate/off-rate) was assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance biosensor revealing an increase in the accessibility of HER2 to Herceptin following deglycosylation of cell membrane proteins (deglycosylated cells Bmax: 6.83 Hz; glycosylated cells Bmax: 7.35 Hz). The sensitivity of cells to DXR and to growth factors was evaluated using an MTT assay. Maintenance of SKBR-3 cells in tunicamycin (an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation) resulted in an increase in sensitivity to DXR (0.1 μM DXR P < 0.001) and a decrease in sensitivity to IGF-1 alone and to IGF-1 supplemented with EGF (P < 0.001). This report illustrates the importance of N-linked glycosylation in modulating the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic and biological treatments and highlights the potential of glycosylation inhibitors as future combination treatments for breast cancer. PMID:28223691

  7. [Autotransplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Correale, J; Campestri, R; Koziner, B

    1999-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease exhibiting great clinical variability. For control of its primary and secondary progressive variants, treatment has met with limited success. In recent years, increasing experience has been gained with the administration of high dose chemotherapy supported by the autologous infusion of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), in some instances depleted of T cells. The European and International Registry of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Autoimmune Diseases include 43 MS patients. BEAM was the most frequently used conditioning therapy. Treatment related mortality was 7%. The actuarial disease free survival and the overall projected survival at 38 months were 85% and 90% respectively. The inclusion of an increasing number of MS patients into these treatment programs and the growing submission of cases to the Registries will provide useful information to determine if the initial enthusiasm generated by this approach for the control of primary and secondary progressive forms of MS is justified.

  8. [Research progress on visual observations of hematopoietic stem cell homing].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Yao; Chen, Tong

    2014-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an important mean for clinical treatment to many of hematological diseases, malignant diseases, hereditary diseases and autoimmune diseases. Whether the implanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can home to bone marrow (BM) smoothly and reconstitute the hematopoiesis is the key to successful HSCT. With the cognition of HSC homing mechanism, the visual observation of HSC homing to BM is attracting more and more attention and helps to clarify the micro-dialogue between HSC and BM microenvironment. In recent years, with the development of imaging technology, confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and two-photon microscope are able to make 3D reconstruction and real-time observation of the tissue or cells. Researches on HSC homing process visibly become reality. In this article the methods of visual research and their application in HSC homing observation are reviewed.

  9. INHIBITION OF RHABDOMYOSARCOMA CELL AND TUMOR GROWTH BY TARGETING SPECIFICITY PROTEIN (Sp) TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Pathi, Satya; Kim, Kyounghyun; Chen, Candy; Crose, Lisa; Linardic, Corinne; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 are highly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. In tissue arrays of RMS tumor cores from 71 patients, 80% of RMS patients expressed high levels of Sp1 protein, whereas low expression of Sp1 was detected in normal muscle tissue. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) tolfenamic acid (TA) inhibited growth and migration of RD and RH30 RMS cell lines and also inhibited tumor growth in vivo using a mouse xenograft (RH30 cells) model. The effects of TA were accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes in RMS cells and tumors, and the role of Sp protein downregulation in mediating inhibition of RD and RH30 cell growth and migration was confirmed by individual and combined knockdown of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins by RNA interference. TA treatment and Sp knockdown in RD and RH30 cells also showed that four genes that are emerging as individual drug targets for treating RMS, namely c-MET, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), PDGFRα and CXCR4, are also Sp-regulated genes. These results suggest that NSAIDs such as TA may have potential clinical efficacy in drug combinations for treating RMS patients. PMID:22815231

  10. The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Vargis, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Cristen B.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-30

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function that occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. As a result, up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  12. The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression

    DOE PAGES

    Vargis, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Cristen B.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; ...

    2014-01-30

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. As a result, up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  13. Heparan sulfate inhibits hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell migration and engraftment in mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    PubMed

    Watson, H Angharad; Holley, Rebecca J; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Wilkinson, Fiona L; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Wynn, Robert F; Wraith, J Edmond; Merry, Catherine L R; Bigger, Brian W

    2014-12-26

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I Hurler (MPSI-H) is a pediatric lysosomal storage disease caused by genetic deficiencies in IDUA, coding for α-l-iduronidase. Idua(-/-) mice share similar clinical pathology with patients, including the accumulation of the undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate (HS), and dermatan sulfate (DS), progressive neurodegeneration, and dysostosis multiplex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective treatment for Hurler patients, but reduced intensity conditioning is a risk factor in transplantation, suggesting an underlying defect in hematopoietic cell engraftment. HS is a co-receptor in the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) migration to the bone marrow (BM), but the effect of HS alterations on HSPC migration, or the functional role of HS in MPSI-H are unknown. We demonstrate defective WT HSPC engraftment and migration in Idua(-/-) recipient BM, particularly under reduced intensity conditioning. Both intra- but especially extracellular Idua(-/-) BM HS was significantly increased and abnormally sulfated. Soluble heparinase-sensitive GAGs from Idua(-/-) BM and specifically 2-O-sulfated HS, elevated in Idua(-/-) BM, both inhibited CXCL12-mediated WT HSPC transwell migration, while DS had no effect. Thus we have shown that excess overly sulfated extracellular HS binds, and sequesters CXCL12, limiting hematopoietic migration and providing a potential mechanism for the limited scope of HSCT in Hurler disease.

  14. Secretion of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in co-culture of four cell types in cerebrospinal fluid-containing medium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sanjiang; Zhuang, Minghua; Wu, Rui

    2012-12-25

    The present study co-cultured human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells in complete culture medium-containing cerebrospinal fluid. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor secretion in the supernatant of co-cultured cells. Results showed that the number of all cell types reached a peak at 7-10 days, and the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor peaked at 9 days. Levels of secreted nerve growth factor were four-fold higher than brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was three-fold higher than glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Increasing concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (10%, 20% and 30%) in the growth medium caused a decrease of neurotrophic factor secretion. Results indicated co-culture of human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells improved the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The reduction of cerebrospinal fluid extravasation at the transplant site after spinal cord injury is beneficial for the survival and secretion of neurotrophic factors from transplanted cells.

  15. Contribution of hydrolase and phosphatase domains in soluble epoxide hydrolase to vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Ami; Sakamoto, Koichi; Suzuki, Sachiko; Imaoka, Susumu

    2009-12-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is an important pharmacological target because it metabolizes potent bioactive substrates, epoxyeicosatrienoinc acids (EETs) and other lipid epoxide. EETs have a variety of biological functions including angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. However, the regulation and physiological function of sEH is not well understood. In this study, we found that hypoxia significantly suppressed the expression of sEH in mouse liver and a human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B. Hypoxia promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells or carcinoma cells. Knockdown of sEH in Hep3B cells induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and cell growth, both of which were suppressed by overexpression of sEH. sEH has phosphatase activity as well as epoxide hydrolase (EH) activity. We prepared mutant clones which lacking EH or phosphatase activity using the amino acid change Asp335Ser or Asp9Ala, respectively. The effects of WT sEH on cell growth were lost by mutation of either the EH domain or phosphatase domain. However, mutation of the phosphatase domain but not EH domain did not influence the expression of VEGF. These results suggest that sEH plays an important role in the physiology of cells including proliferation and that the epoxide hydrolase and phosphatase domains of sEH have different biological functions.

  16. Expression of Thy-1 on human hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of Thy-1 on hematopoietic cells from human fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), and bone marrow (BM) was studied with a novel anti-Thy- 1 antibody, 5E10. Specificity of 5E10 for human Thy-1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of a 25-35-kD molecule, and the sequence of a cDNA that was cloned by immunoselection of COS cells transfected with a cDNA library derived from a 5E10+ cell line. Two- and three-color immunofluorescence staining experiments revealed that the Thy-1 expression is restricted to, an average, 1-4% of FL, CB, and BM cells, and binding to these cell types is essentially restricted to a very small subset of lymphoid cells and approximately 25% of CD34+ cells. Thy-1+ CD34+ cells were further characterized as CD38lo/CD45RO+/CD45RA- /CD71lo/c-kit(lo) and rhodamine 123dull. When CD34+ cells were sorted on the basis of Thy-1 expression, the majority of clonogenic cells were recovered in the CD34+Thy-1- fraction, whereas the majority of cells capable of producing myeloid colonies after 5-8 wk of long-term culture (long-term culture initiating cells) were recovered in the Thy-1+CD34+ fraction. In addition to CD34+ cells, Thy-1 was found to be expressed on a variable, very small number (< 1%) of CD34- mononuclear cells in BM, CB, and peripheral blood that were further characterized as CD3+ CD4+ lymphocytes. The restricted expression of Thy-1 on primitive hematopoietic cells is in agreement with a previous report (Baum et al., 1992. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 89:2804) in which Thy-1 expression was used to enrich for primitive hematopoietic cells from fetal tissue. Compared with those previous studies, we found Thy-1 expression on a larger proportion of CD34+ cells (25% in our study vs. 5% in Baum et al.) and furthermore performed studies on Thy-1 expression on CD34+ cells from CB, FL, and BM in relation to markers that are known to be differentially expressed on hematopoietic cells. Taken together our results indicate that Thy-1-specific antibody

  17. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blaber, E A; Dvorochkin, N; Torres, M L; Yousuf, R; Burns, B P; Globus, R K; Almeida, E A C

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(-6.72), CSF2(-3.30), CD90(-3.33), PTPRC(-2.79), and GDF15(-2.45), but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow-blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

  18. Biomechanical force induces the growth factor production in human periodontal ligament-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Kenta; Honjo, Ken-Ichi; Adachi, Tetsuya; Oseko, Fumishige; Mazda, Osam; Kanamura, Narisato; Kita, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Although many reports have been published on the functional roles of periodontal ligament (PDL)