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Sample records for hematopoietic microenvironment origin

  1. Effects of the bone marrow microenvironment on hematopoietic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Askmyr, Maria; Quach, Julie; Purton, Louise E

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow (BM) is contained within the bone cavity and is the main site of hematopoiesis, the continuous development of blood cells from immature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The bone marrow consists of developing hematopoietic cells and non-hematopoietic cells, the latter collectively termed the bone marrow microenvironment. These non-hematopoietic cells include cells of the osteoblast lineage, adipocytes and endothelial cells. For many years these bone marrow microenvironment cells were predicted to play active roles in regulating hematopoiesis, and recent studies have confirmed such roles. Importantly, more recent data has indicated that cells of the BM microenvironment may also contribute to hematopoietic diseases. In this review we provide an overview of the roles of the data suggesting that the cells of the bone marrow microenvironment may play an active role in the initiation and progression of hematopoietic malignancy.

  2. Inflamm-Aging of Hematopoiesis, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kovtonyuk, Larisa V.; Fritsch, Kristin; Feng, Xiaomin; Manz, Markus G.; Takizawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoietic and immune cells are continuously generated by hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) through highly organized process of stepwise lineage commitment. In the steady state, HSCs are mostly quiescent, while HPCs are actively proliferating and contributing to daily hematopoiesis. In response to hematopoietic challenges, e.g., life-threatening blood loss, infection, and inflammation, HSCs can be activated to proliferate and engage in blood formation. The HSC activation induced by hematopoietic demand is mediated by direct or indirect sensing mechanisms involving pattern recognition receptors or cytokine/chemokine receptors. In contrast to the hematopoietic challenges with obvious clinical symptoms, how the aging process, which involves low-grade chronic inflammation, impacts hematopoiesis remains undefined. Herein, we summarize recent findings pertaining to functional alternations of hematopoiesis, HSCs, and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the processes of aging and inflammation and highlight some common cellular and molecular changes during the processes that influence hematopoiesis and its cells of origin, HSCs and HPCs, as well as the BM microenvironment. We also discuss how age-dependent alterations of the immune system lead to subclinical inflammatory states and how inflammatory signaling might be involved in hematopoietic aging. Our aim is to present evidence supporting the concept of “Inflamm-Aging,” or inflammation-associated aging of hematopoiesis. PMID:27895645

  3. Bone marrow adipocytes as negative regulators of the hematopoietic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Naveiras, Olaia; Nardi, Valentina; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Fahey, Frederic; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoblasts and endothelium constitute functional niches that support hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in mammalian bone marrow (BM) 1,2,3 . Adult BM also contains adipocytes, whose numbers correlate inversely with the hematopoietic activity of the marrow. Fatty infiltration of hematopoietic red marrow follows irradiation or chemotherapy and is a diagnostic feature in biopsies from patients with marrow aplasia 4. To explore whether adipocytes influence hematopoiesis or simply fill marrow space, we compared the hematopoietic activity of distinct regions of the mouse skeleton that differ in adiposity. By flow cytometry, colony forming activity, and competitive repopulation assay, HSCs and short-term progenitors are reduced in frequency in the adipocyte-rich vertebrae of the mouse tail relative to the adipocyte-free vertebrae of the thorax. In lipoatrophic A-ZIP/F1 “fatless” mice, which are genetically incapable of forming adipocytes8, and in mice treated with the PPARγ inhibitor Bisphenol-A-DiGlycidyl-Ether (BADGE), which inhibits adipogenesis9, post-irradiation marrow engraftment is accelerated relative to wild type or untreated mice. These data implicate adipocytes as predominantly negative regulators of the bone marrow microenvironment, and suggest that antagonizingmarrow adipogenesis may enhance hematopoietic recovery in clinical bone marrow transplantation. PMID:19516257

  4. Muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are hematopoietic in origin

    PubMed Central

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Jackson, Kathyjo A.; Camargo, Fernando D.; Ferrari, Giuliana; Mavilio, Fulvio; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that mononuclear cells from murine skeletal muscle contain the potential to repopulate all major peripheral blood lineages in lethally irradiated mice, but the origin of this activity is unknown. We have fractionated muscle cells on the basis of hematopoietic markers to show that the active population exclusively expresses the hematopoietic stem cell antigens Sca-1 and CD45. Muscle cells obtained from 6- to 8-week-old C57BL/6-CD45.1 mice and enriched for cells expressing Sca-1 and CD45 were able to generate hematopoietic but not myogenic colonies in vitro and repopulated multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated C57BL/6-CD45.2 mice. These data show that muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are likely derived from the hematopoietic system and are a result not of transdifferentiation of myogenic stem cells but instead of the presence of substantial numbers of hematopoietic stem cells in the muscle. Although CD45-negative cells were highly myogenic in vitro and in vivo, CD45-positive muscle-derived cells displayed only very limited myogenic activity and only in vivo. PMID:11830662

  5. Deficiency of lipid phosphatase SHIP enables long-term reconstitution of hematopoietic inductive bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Olin D; Lu, Jiayun; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Zhong, Jia; Zhao, Li; Pivarnik, Gregory; Mondal, Subhanjan; Chai, Li; Silberstein, Leslie E; Luo, Hongbo R

    2013-05-28

    A dysfunctional bone marrow (BM) microenvironment is thought to contribute to the development of hematologic diseases. However, functional replacement of pathologic BM microenvironment through BM transplantation has not been possible. Furthermore, the study of hematopoietic inductive BM microenvironment is hampered by the lack of a functional nonhematopoietic reconstitution system. Here, we show that a deficiency of SH2-containing inositol-5'-phosphatase-1 (SHIP) in a nonhematopoietic host microenvironment enables its functional reconstitution by wild-type donor cells. This microenvironment reconstitution normalizes hematopoiesis in peripheral blood and BM and alleviates pathology of spleen and lung in the SHIP-deficient recipients. SHIP-deficient BM contains a significantly smaller population of multipotent stromal cells with distinct properties, which may contribute to the reconstitution by wild-type cells. We further demonstrate that it is the nonhematopoietic donor cells that are responsible for the reconstitution. Thus, we have established a nonhematopoietic BM microenvironment reconstitution system to functionally study specific cell types in hematopoietic niches.

  6. Hyaluronan Expressed by the Hematopoietic Microenvironment Is Required for Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis*

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Valentina; Serobyan, Naira; Iizuka, Shinji; Schraufstatter, Ingrid; de Ridder, Audrey; Povaliy, Tatiana; Wacker, Valentina; Itano, Naoki; Kimata, Koji; Orlovskaja, Irina A.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of hyaluronan (HA) to the regulatory network of the hematopoietic microenvironment was studied using knock-out mice of three hyaluronan synthase genes (Has1, Has2, and Has3). The number of hematopoietic progenitors was decreased in bone marrow and increased in extramedullary sites of Prx1-Cre;Has2flox/flox;Has1−/−;Has3−/− triple knock-out (tKO) mice as compared with wild type (WT) and Has1−/−;Has3−/− double knock-out (dKO) mice. In line with this observation, decreased hematopoietic activity was observed in long term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) from tKO mice, whereas the formation of the adherent layer and generation of hematopoietic cells in WT and dKO cultures was not different. 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) was used to pharmacologically inhibit the production of HA in LTBMC. Treatment with 4MU inhibited HA synthesis, decreased expression of HAS2 and HAS3, and eliminated hematopoiesis in LTBMC, and this effect was alleviated by the addition of exogenous HA. Exogenous HA also augmented the cell motility in LTBMC, which correlated with the HA-stimulated production of chemokines and growth factors. Conditioned media from HA-induced LTBMC enhanced the chemotaxis of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in response to SDF-1. Exposure of endothelial cells to 4MU decreased their ability to support HSPC rolling and adhesion. In addition, migration of transplanted HSPC into the marrow of 4MU-pretreated mice was lower than in untreated mice. Collectively, the results suggest that HA depletion reduces the ability of the microenvironment to support HSPC, and confirm a role for HA as a necessary regulatory element in the structure of the hematopoietic microenvironment. PMID:22654110

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell origin of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; Larue, Amanda C; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2010-07-01

    Connective tissue consists of "connective tissue proper," which is further divided into loose and dense (fibrous) connective tissues and "specialized connective tissues." Specialized connective tissues consist of blood, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. In both loose and dense connective tissues, the principal cellular element is fibroblasts. It has been generally believed that all cellular elements of connective tissue, including fibroblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and bone cells, are generated solely by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, a number of studies, including those from our laboratory based on transplantation of single hematopoietic stem cells, strongly suggested a hematopoietic stem cell origin of these adult mesenchymal tissues. This review summarizes the experimental evidence for this new paradigm and discusses its translational implications.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell–Derived Cancer–Associated Fibroblasts Are Novel Contributors to the Pro-Tumorigenic Microenvironment12

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lindsay T.; Russell, Dayvia L.; Kelly, Ryan R.; Xiong, Ying; Motamarry, Anjan; Patel, Risha K.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Watson, Patricia M.; Turner, David P.; Watson, Dennis K.; Soloff, Adam C.; Findlay, Victoria J.; LaRue, Amanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the tumor microenvironment is critical toward improving the effectiveness of cancer therapeutics. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types of the tumor microenvironment, playing an important role in tumor progression. Multiple origins for CAFs have been proposed including resident fibroblasts, adipocytes, and bone marrow. Our laboratory previously identified a novel hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) origin for CAFs; however, the functional roles of HSC-derived CAFs (HSC-CAFs) in tumor progression have not yet been examined. To test the hypothesis that HSC-CAFs promote tumor progression through contribution to extracellular matrix (ECM) and paracrine production of pro-angiogenic factors, we developed a method to isolate HSC-CAFs. HSC-CAFs were profiled on the basis of their expression of hematopoietic and fibroblastic markers in two murine tumor models. Profiling revealed production of factors associated with ECM deposition and remodeling. Functional in vivo studies showed that co-injection of HSC-CAFs with tumor cells resulted in increased tumor growth rate and significantly larger tumors than tumor cells alone. Immunohistochemical studies revealed increased blood vessel density with co-injection, demonstrating a role for HSC-CAFs in tumor vascularization. Mechanistic in vitro studies indicated that HSC-CAFs play a role in producing vascular endothelial growth factor A and transforming growth factor–β1 in endothelial tube formation and patterning. In vitro and in vivo findings suggest that HSC-CAFs are a critical component of the tumor microenvironment and suggest that targeting the novel HSC-CAF may be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26025666

  9. In vivo hematopoietic Myc activation directs a transcriptional signature in endothelial cells within the bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Katharina; Vilne, Baiba; da Costa, Olivia Prazeres; Rudelius, Martina; Peschel, Christian; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cancer pathogenesis involves tumor-intrinsic genomic aberrations and tumor-cell extrinsic mechanisms such as failure of immunosurveillance and structural and functional changes in the microenvironment. Using Myc as a model oncogene we established a conditional mouse bone marrow transduction/transplantation model where the conditional activation of the oncoprotein Myc expressed in the hematopoietic system could be assessed for influencing the host microenvironment. Constitutive ectopic expression of Myc resulted in rapid onset of a lethal myeloproliferative disorder with a median survival of 21 days. In contrast, brief 4-day Myc activation by means of the estrogen receptor (ER) agonist tamoxifen did not result in gross changes in the percentage/frequency of hematopoietic lineages or hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) subsets, nor did Myc activation significantly change the composition of the non-hematopoietic microenvironment defined by phenotyping for CD31, ALCAM, and Sca-1 expression. Transcriptome analysis of endothelial CD45- Ter119- cells from tamoxifen-treated MycER bone marrow graft recipients revealed a gene expression signature characterized by specific changes in the Rho subfamily pathway members, in the transcription-translation-machinery and in angiogenesis. In conclusion, intra-hematopoietic Myc activation results in significant transcriptome alterations that can be attributed to oncogene-induced signals from hematopoietic cells towards the microenvironment, e. g. endothelial cells, supporting the idea that even pre-leukemic HSPC highjack components of the niche which then could protect and support the cancer-initiating population. PMID:26308666

  10. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-06-12

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide.

  11. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-01-01

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide. PMID:25916827

  12. [Bone and Stem Cells. Bone marrow microenvironment niches for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    In bone marrow, the special microenvironments known as niches control proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) . However, the identity and functions of the niches has been a subject of longstanding debate. Although it has been reported previously that osteoblasts lining the bone surface act as HSC niches, their precise role in HSC maintenance remains unclear. On the other hand, the adipo-osteogenic progenitors with long processes, termed CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, which preferentially express the chemokine CXCL12, stem cell factor (SCF) , leptin receptor and PDGF receptor-β were identified in the bone marrow. Recent studies revealed that endothelial cells of bone marrow vascular sinuses and CAR cells provided niches for HSCs. The identity and functions of various other candidate HSC niche cells, including nestin-expressing cells and Schwann cells would also be discussed in this review.

  13. Role of neuropeptide Y in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Min, Woo-Kie; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or neurotransmitters in the bone marrow microenvironment has been known to regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions such as self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we demonstrated that NPY deficient mice have significantly reduced HSC numbers and impaired bone marrow regeneration due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Moreover, NPY treatment prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not restore bone marrow dysfunction in spite of NPY injection. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) secreted by NPY-mediated Y1 receptor stimulation in macrophages plays a key role in neuroprotection and HSC survival in the bone marrow. Therefore, this study reveals a new role of NPY in bone marrow HSC microenvironment, and provides an insight into the therapeutic application of this neuropeptide.

  14. Modeling the Pro-inflammatory Tumor Microenvironment in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Predicts a Breakdown of Hematopoietic-Mesenchymal Communication Networks

    PubMed Central

    Enciso, Jennifer; Mayani, Hector; Mendoza, Luis; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    Lineage fate decisions of hematopoietic cells depend on intrinsic factors and extrinsic signals provided by the bone marrow microenvironment, where they reside. Abnormalities in composition and function of hematopoietic niches have been proposed as key contributors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) progression. Our previous experimental findings strongly suggest that pro-inflammatory cues contribute to mesenchymal niche abnormalities that result in maintenance of ALL precursor cells at the expense of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we propose a molecular regulatory network interconnecting the major communication pathways between hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) within the BM. Dynamical analysis of the network as a Boolean model reveals two stationary states that can be interpreted as the intercellular contact status. Furthermore, simulations describe the molecular patterns observed during experimental proliferation and activation. Importantly, our model predicts instability in the CXCR4/CXCL12 and VLA4/VCAM1 interactions following microenvironmental perturbation due by temporal signaling from Toll like receptors (TLRs) ligation. Therefore, aberrant expression of NF-κB induced by intrinsic or extrinsic factors may contribute to create a tumor microenvironment where a negative feedback loop inhibiting CXCR4/CXCL12 and VLA4/VCAM1 cellular communication axes allows for the maintenance of malignant cells. PMID:27594840

  15. On the origin of hematopoietic stem cells: progress and controversy.

    PubMed

    Boisset, Jean-Charles; Robin, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) are responsible for the production and replenishment of all blood cell types during the entire life of an organism. Generated during embryonic development, HSCs transit through different anatomical niches where they will expand before colonizing in the bone marrow, where they will reside during adult life. Although the existence of HSCs has been known for more than fifty years and despite extensive research performed in different animal models, there is still uncertainty with respect to the precise origins of HSCs. We review the current knowledge on embryonic hematopoiesis and highlight the remaining questions regarding the anatomical and cellular identities of HSC precursors.

  16. Metabolic origins of spatial organization in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Akkari, Leila; Thompson, Craig B.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Xavier, Joao B.

    2017-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic diversity of cells within tumors is a major obstacle for cancer treatment. Because of the stochastic nature of genetic alterations, this intratumoral heterogeneity is often viewed as chaotic. Here we show that the altered metabolism of cancer cells creates predictable gradients of extracellular metabolites that orchestrate the phenotypic diversity of cells in the tumor microenvironment. Combining experiments and mathematical modeling, we show that metabolites consumed and secreted within the tumor microenvironment induce tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to differentiate into distinct subpopulations according to local levels of ischemia and their position relative to the vasculature. TAMs integrate levels of hypoxia and lactate into progressive activation of MAPK signaling that induce predictable spatial patterns of gene expression, such as stripes of macrophages expressing arginase 1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor, C type 1 (MRC1). These phenotypic changes are functionally relevant as ischemic macrophages triggered tube-like morphogenesis in neighboring endothelial cells that could restore blood perfusion in nutrient-deprived regions where angiogenic resources are most needed. We propose that gradients of extracellular metabolites act as tumor morphogens that impose order within the microenvironment, much like signaling molecules convey positional information to organize embryonic tissues. Unearthing embryology-like processes in tumors may allow us to control organ-like tumor features such as tissue repair and revascularization and treat intratumoral heterogeneity. PMID:28246332

  17. The embryonic origins of hematopoietic stem cells: a tale of hemangioblast and hemogenic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Bollerot, Karine; Pouget, Claire; Jaffredo, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    The developmental origin of hematopoietic stem cells has been for decades the subject of great interest. Once thought to emerge from the yolk sac, hematopoietic stem cells have now been shown to originate from the embryonic aorta. Increasing evidence suggests that hematopoietic stem cells are produced from an endothelial intermediate designated by the authors as hemangioblast or hemogenic endothelium. Recently, the allantois in the avian embryo and the placenta in the mouse embryo were shown to be a site of hematopoietic cell production/expansion and thus appear to play a critical role in the formation of the hematopoietic system. In this review we shall give an overview of the data obtained from human, mouse and avian models on the cellular origins of the hematopoietic system and discuss some aspects of the molecular mechanisms controlling hematopoietic cell production.

  18. Expression of human bone-related proteins in the hematopoietic microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Long, M W; Williams, J L; Mann, K G

    1990-01-01

    Given the intimate relationship between bone and bone marrow, we hypothesized that the human bone marrow may function as a source (or reservoir) of bone-forming progenitor cells. We observed a population of cells within the bone marrow which produce bone-specific or bone-related proteins. The production of these proteins was developmentally regulated in human long-term bone marrow cell cultures; the bone protein-producing cells (BPPC) are observed under serum-free, short-term culture conditions, respond to bone-related and not hematopoietic growth factors, and are derived from a population of low-density, nonadherent, My10-negative (or low My10 density), marrow cells (My10 is an antigen found on most hematopoietic progenitor cells). Cultivation of marrow-derived BPPC in secondary, serum-containing cultures results in their differentiation into osteoblastlike cells. At this stage of development, BPPC produce an extracellular matrix which incorporates both bone-related proteins and radiolabeled calcium. Human bone marrow BPPC thus represent a newly described cell phenotype important to both bone and hematopoietic cell biology. Images PMID:2243119

  19. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Salvati, Annamaria; Serio, Bianca; Pesapane, Ada; Ricci, Patrizia; Gorrasi, Anna; Santi, Anna Li; Hoyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Ragno, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM microenvironment. uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88-92). We previously reported the involvement of soluble uPAR in HSC mobilization. We now investigate its possible role in HSC homing and engraftment. We show similar levels of circulating full-length suPAR in healthy donors and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients before and after the pre-transplant conditioning regimen. By contrast, levels of circulating DIIDIII-suPAR in AML patients are higher as compared to controls and significantly decrease after the conditioning. We found that suPAR and uPAR84-95, a uPAR-derived peptide which mimics active DIIDIII-suPAR, induce a significant increase in Long Term Culture (LTC)-Initiating Cells (ICs) and in the release of clonogenic progenitors from LTCs of CD34+ HSCs. Further, suPAR increases adhesion and survival of CD34+ KG1 AML cells, whereas uPAR84-95 increases their proliferation. Thus, circulating DIIDIII-suPAR, strongly increased in HSC mobilization, is indeed down-regulated by pre-transplant conditioning, probably to favour HSC homing. BM full-length suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR may be involved in HSC lodgement within the BM by contributing to a suitable microenvironment. PMID:27517491

  20. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in an In Vitro Leukemia-Induced Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Vernot, Jean-Paul; Bonilla, Ximena; Rodriguez-Pardo, Viviana; Vanegas, Natalia-Del Pilar

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the cell interactions occurring in the leukemic microenvironment and their functional consequences for the different cell players has therapeutic relevance. By co-culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with the REH acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cell line, we have established an in vitro leukemic niche for the functional evaluation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC, CD34+ cells). We showed that the normal homeostatic control exerted by the MSC over the HSPC is considerably lost in this leukemic microenvironment: HSPC increased their proliferation rate and adhesion to MSC. The adhesion molecules CD54 and CD44 were consequently upregulated in HSPC from the leukemic niche. Consequently, with this adhesive phenotype, HSPC showed less Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-directed migration. Interestingly, multipotency was severely affected with an important reduction in the absolute count and the percentage of primitive progenitor colonies. It was possible to simulate most of these HSPC alterations by incubation of MSC with a REH-conditioned medium, suggesting that REH soluble factors and their effect on MSC are important for the observed changes. Of note, these HSPC alterations were reproduced when primary leukemic cells from an ALL type B (ALL-B) patient were used to set up the leukemic niche. These results suggest that a general response is induced in the leukemic niche to the detriment of HSPC function and in favor of leukemic cell support. This in vitro leukemic niche could be a valuable tool for the understanding of the molecular events responsible for HSPC functional failure and a useful scenario for therapeutic evaluation. PMID:28216566

  1. Studies on the organization and regeneration of bone marrow: origin, growth, and differentiation of endocloned hematopoietic colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertsen, R.H.; Weiss, L.

    1983-04-01

    Hematopoietic colonies were studied by light microscopy in the marrow of alternate fraction x-irradiated mice (C576J/B1) to investigate the microenvironmental organization of marrow and identify early hematopoietic cell-stromal cell interactions. Undifferentiated colonies (UC) were detected at 3 days postirradiation, showed a marked predilection for bone surfaces, and disappeared as differentiated colonies developed. Some UC occurred along marrow arteries. Neutrophilic granulocyte colonies (GC) occurred in all areas at 3 days but grew rapidly only subosteally. Few eosinophilic colonies (GCe) occurred. Erythrocytic colonies (EC) appeared at 4 days as dispersed populations of motile cells within a localized area of marrow; these tended to proliferate initially in intermediate and central marrow zones. Macrophage colonies (M phi C) of two ''subtypes'' were detected, peaking in relative frequency at 4 days. These appeared active in stromal repair and monocytopoiesis. Megakaryocyte colonies (MC) originated along bone and differentiated away from bone. These results were interpreted as evidence that in x-irradiated marrow: (1) hematopoietic microenvironments (HMs) for stem-cell proliferation and commitment to differentiation, with the possible exception of HMs determining erythroid differentiation, occur in endosteal and periarterial regions; (2) a proliferative and/or chemotactic stimulus to erythroid progenitors exists in intermediate and central marrow regions; and (3) some subosteal regions may exclude erythropoiesis, or preferentially support nonerythroid differentiation. Elaborate associations occurred between macrophages and early UC, GC, and EC, but not MC hematopoietic cells. UC and GC often associated with osteoclasts. Reticular and other fibroblastic cells associated with the cells of all colony types.

  2. [Origin of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Bone Marrow--Endothelial to Hematopoietic Transition (EHT)?].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Yuan, Yan; Chen, Tong

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to primitive hematopoiesis, during embryonic definitive hematopoiesis, it has been demonstrated that multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) arise from hemogenic endothelium, and the endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT) exists within the yolk sac, placenta, AGM, mouse head vascular and extraembryonic vessels. However, whether hemogenic endothelial cells contribute to blood cell development at other sites of definitive hematopoiesis, including fetal liver and bone marrow, remains largely unknown. Recently, more and more researches showed that hematopoiesis within bone marrow had a close relationship with vascular endothelium development, too. This review summarizes the mechanism of EHT during embryo development, and discuss whether EHT exists in adult hematopoiesis.

  3. p19INK4d Controls Hematopoietic Stem Cells in a Cell-Autonomous Manner during Genotoxic Stress and through the Microenvironment during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hilpert, Morgane; Legrand, Céline; Bluteau, Dominique; Balayn, Natalie; Betems, Aline; Bluteau, Olivier; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Louache, Fawzia; Gonin, Patrick; Debili, Najet; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William; Gilles, Laure; Raslova, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are characterized by the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to reconstitute the entire hematopoietic compartment. Thrombopoietin maintains adult HSCs in a quiescent state through the induction of cell cycle inhibitors p57Kip2 and p19INK4d. Using the p19INK4d−/− mouse model, we investigated the role of p19INK4d in basal and stress-induced hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that p19INK4d is involved in the regulation of HSC quiescence by inhibition of the G0/G1 cell cycle transition. Under genotoxic stress conditions, the absence of p19INK4d in HSCs leads to accelerated cell cycle exit, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptosis when cells progress to the S/G2-M stages of the cell cycle. Moreover, p19INK4d controls the HSC microenvironment through negative regulation of megakaryopoiesis. Deletion of p19INK4d results in megakaryocyte hyperproliferation and increased transforming growth factor β1 secretion. This leads to fibrosis in the bone marrow and spleen, followed by loss of HSCs during aging. PMID:25458892

  4. Characterization of an atypical γ-secretase complex from hematopoietic origin

    PubMed Central

    Placanica, Lisa; Chien, Jennifer W.; Li, Yue-Ming

    2010-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a widely expressed multi-subunit enzyme complex which is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and hematopoietic malignancies through its aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Notch1, respectively. While γ-secretase has been extensively studied, there is a dearth of information surrounding the activity, composition, and function of γ-secretase expressed in distinct cellular populations. Here we show that endogenous γ-secretase complexes of hematopoietic origin are distinct from epithelial derived γ-secretase complexes. Hematopoietic γ-secretase has reduced activity for APP and Notch1 processing compared to epithelial γ-secretase. Characterization of the active complexes with small molecule affinity probes reveals that hematopoietic γ-secretase has an atypical subunit composition with significantly altered subunit stoichiometry. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these discrete complexes exhibit cell-line specific substrate selectivity suggesting a possible mechanism of substrate regulation. These data underscore the need for studying endogenous γ-secretase to fully understand of the biology of γ-secretase and its complexity as a molecular target for the development of disease therapeutics. PMID:20178366

  5. Hematopoiesis on cellulose ester membranes. XI. Induction of new bone and a hematopoietic microenvironment by matrix factors secreted by marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Knospe, W H; Husseini, S G; Fried, W

    1989-07-01

    Cellulose ester membranes (CEM) were coated with stromal cells from bone marrow (BM) or bone and implanted intraperitoneally (IP) in CAF1 mice for intervals of 1 to 6 months. Previous studies indicated that matrix factors [glycoproteins (GPs), proteoglycans (PGs), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)] were secreted by the regenerating stromal cells and adsorbed by the CEM. After 1 to 6 months, the CEMs were removed, scraped free of adherent cells, and irradiated in vitro with 40 Gy. The scraped and irradiated CEMs were then reimplanted IP or subcutaneously (SC) for periods of 1 to 6 months in secondary syngeneic murine hosts. They were then removed for histologic study. CEMs reimplanted in SC sites developed bone and hematopoiesis as early as 1 month after implantation. Maximum hematopoiesis and bone formation was observed after 3 months. CEMs coated during the initial implantation with bone-derived stromal cells contained more bone and hematopoietic cells than did CEMs coated with marrow-derived stromal cells after SC implementation. Neither the CEMs coated with bone stromal cells nor those coated with marrow stromal cells developed new bone or trilineal hematopoiesis after being implanted IP. A few CEMs contained small foci of granulopoiesis only. We conclude that noncellular matrix substances deposited on CEMs by bone, and to a lesser degree by marrow cells, can induce prestromal cells in the SC tissues to produce a microenvironment suitable for trilineal hematopoiesis.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Origin of BRAFV600E Mutations in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F.; Melnick, Ari M.; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells—all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal, Migration and Development, As Well As Their Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ludin, Aya; Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Golan, Karin; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Itkin, Tomer; Medaglia, Chiara; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Ledergor, Guy; Kollet, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Blood forming, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) mostly reside in the bone marrow in a quiescent, nonmotile state via adhesion interactions with stromal cells and macrophages. Quiescent, proliferating, and differentiating stem cells have different metabolism, and accordingly different amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, ROS is not just a byproduct of metabolism, but also plays a role in stem cell state and function. Recent Advances: ROS levels are dynamic and reversibly dictate enhanced cycling and myeloid bias in ROShigh short-term repopulating stem cells, and ROSlow quiescent long-term repopulating stem cells. Low levels of ROS, regulated by intrinsic factors such as cell respiration or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activity, or extrinsic factors such as stem cell factor or prostaglandin E2 are required for maintaining stem cell self-renewal. High ROS levels, due to stress and inflammation, induce stem cell differentiation and enhanced motility. Critical Issues: Stem cells need to be protected from high ROS levels to avoid stem cell exhaustion, insufficient host immunity, and leukemic transformation that may occur during chronic inflammation. However, continuous low ROS production will lead to lack of stem cell function and opportunistic infections. Ultimately, balanced ROS levels are crucial for maintaining the small stem cell pool and host immunity, both in homeostasis and during stress situations. Future Directions: Deciphering the signaling pathway of ROS in HSC will provide a better understanding of ROS roles in switching HSC from quiescence to activation and vice versa, and will also shed light on the possible roles of ROS in leukemia initiation and development. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1605–1619. PMID:24762207

  8. Hair follicle: a reliable source of recipient origin after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y C; Liu, H M; Chen, P S; Chen, Y J; Lyou, J Y; Hu, H Y; Yi, M F; Lin, J S; Tzeng, C-H

    2007-11-01

    Blood, buccal swab and hair follicles are among the most commonly used sources for forensic science, parentage testing and personal identification. A total of 29 patients who have had a sustained engraftment from 15 months to 21.5 years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) without rejection, relapse or chronic GVHD involving oral mucosa were enrolled for a chimerism study. PCR-amplified short tandem repeat analyses were conducted per patient every 3 months for at least three consecutive times. The results for blood were all donor type except one who had a mixed chimerism, 14.5 years after receiving a transplant for lymphoma. As for buccal swab, mixed chimerism ranging from 10 to 96% donor origin was noted for 28 recipients except the one who had mixed chimerism of blood and retained total recipient type. In contrast, hair follicles were 100% recipient type for the entire group. It is concluded that the hair follicle is devoid of adult stem cell plasticity and may serve as a reliable source of recipient's origin when pre-transplant DNA fingerprinting or reference DNA is not available for people who have successfully received allogeneic HSCT while in need of a personal identification.

  9. The role of population origin and microenvironment in seedling emergence and early survival in Mediterranean maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton).

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno-Palomar, Natalia; Revuelta-Eugercios, Bárbara; Zavala, Miguel A; Alía, Ricardo; González-Martínez, Santiago C

    2014-01-01

    Understanding tree recruitment is needed to forecast future forest distribution. Many studies have reported the relevant ecological factors that affect recruitment success in trees, but the potential for genetic-based differences in recruitment has often been neglected. In this study, we established a semi-natural reciprocal sowing experiment to test for local adaptation and microenvironment effects (evaluated here by canopy cover) in the emergence and early survival of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton), an emblematic Mediterranean forest tree. A novel application of molecular markers was also developed to test for family selection and, thus, for potential genetic change over generations. Overall, we did not find evidence to support local adaptation at the recruitment stage in our semi-natural experiment. Moreover, only weak family selection (if any) was found, suggesting that in stressful environments with low survival, stochastic processes and among-year climate variability may drive recruitment. Nevertheless, our study revealed that, at early stages of recruitment, microenvironments may favor the population with the best adapted life strategy, irrespectively of its (local or non-local) origin. We also found that emergence time is a key factor for seedling survival in stressful Mediterranean environments. Our study highlights the complexity of the factors influencing the early stages of establishment of maritime pine and provides insights into possible management actions aimed at environmental change impact mitigation. In particular, we found that the high stochasticity of the recruitment process in stressful environments and the differences in population-specific adaptive strategies may difficult assisted migration schemes.

  10. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: Monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American Genogroup M

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enzmann, P.-J.; Kurath, G.; Fichtner, D.; Bergmann, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  11. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American genogroup M.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, P J; Kurath, G; Fichtner, D; Bergmann, S M

    2005-09-23

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe.

  12. The Role of Population Origin and Microenvironment in Seedling Emergence and Early Survival in Mediterranean Maritime Pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton)

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaíno-Palomar, Natalia; Revuelta-Eugercios, Bárbara; Zavala, Miguel A.; Alía, Ricardo; González-Martínez, Santiago C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding tree recruitment is needed to forecast future forest distribution. Many studies have reported the relevant ecological factors that affect recruitment success in trees, but the potential for genetic-based differences in recruitment has often been neglected. In this study, we established a semi-natural reciprocal sowing experiment to test for local adaptation and microenvironment effects (evaluated here by canopy cover) in the emergence and early survival of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton), an emblematic Mediterranean forest tree. A novel application of molecular markers was also developed to test for family selection and, thus, for potential genetic change over generations. Overall, we did not find evidence to support local adaptation at the recruitment stage in our semi-natural experiment. Moreover, only weak family selection (if any) was found, suggesting that in stressful environments with low survival, stochastic processes and among-year climate variability may drive recruitment. Nevertheless, our study revealed that, at early stages of recruitment, microenvironments may favor the population with the best adapted life strategy, irrespectively of its (local or non-local) origin. We also found that emergence time is a key factor for seedling survival in stressful Mediterranean environments. Our study highlights the complexity of the factors influencing the early stages of establishment of maritime pine and provides insights into possible management actions aimed at environmental change impact mitigation. In particular, we found that the high stochasticity of the recruitment process in stressful environments and the differences in population-specific adaptive strategies may difficult assisted migration schemes. PMID:25286410

  13. The bone marrow microenvironment is similarly impaired in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients with early and late poor graft function.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Wang, Y-T; Hu, Y; Han, W; Chang, Y-J; Zhang, X-H; Jiang, Z-F; Huang, X-J

    2016-02-01

    Poor graft function (PGF), including early and late PGF, is a serious complication following allotransplant. We recently reported that bone marrow microenvironment abnormalities may occur in cases of late PGF. Whether these abnormalities occur in early PGF remains unknown. To answer this question, we performed a nested case-control study comparing cellular elements of the bone marrow microenvironment in 10 subjects with early PGF, 30 subjects with late PGF and 40 subjects without PGF. Bone marrow endosteal cells, perivascular cells and endothelial cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and by hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining in situ. Subjects with early and late PGF had similar abnormalities in these cell types compared with transplant recipients without PGF. However, none of the aforementioned elements of the bone marrow microenvironment were significantly different between early and late PGF patients. Our data suggest that similar abnormalities in the bone marrow microenvironment may occur in early and late PGF post allotransplant. Cellular approaches, such as the administration of mesenchymal stem cells, promise to be beneficial therapeutic strategies in patients with early or late PGF.

  14. Stromal Fibroblasts in Colorectal Liver Metastases Originate From Resident Fibroblasts and Generate an Inflammatory Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Lars; Goumas, Freya A.; Affeldt, Marianne; Sandtner, Susanne; Gehling, Ursula M.; Brilloff, Silke; Walter, Jessica; Karnatz, Nadia; Lamszus, Katrin; Rogiers, Xavier; Broering, Dieter C.

    2007-01-01

    Cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts (CAFs) are the main cellular constituents of reactive stroma in primary and metastatic cancer. We analyzed phenotypical characteristics of CAFs from human colorectal liver metastases (CLMs) and their role in inflammation and cancer progression. CAFs displayed a vimentin+, α-smooth-muscle actin+, and Thy-1+ phenotype similar to resident portal-located liver fibroblasts (LFs). We demonstrated that CLMs are inflammatory sites showing stromal expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine related to invasion and angiogenesis. In vitro analyses revealed a striking induction of IL-8 expression in CAFs and LFs by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The effect of TNF-α on CAFs is inhibited by the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor parthenolide. Conditioned medium of CAFs and LFs similarly stimulated the migration of DLD-1, Colo-678, HuH7 carcinoma cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Pretreatment of CAFs with TNF-α increased the chemotaxis of Colo-678 colon carcinoma cells by conditioned medium of CAFs; however, blockage of IL-8 activity showed no inhibitory effect. In conclusion, these data raise the possibility that the majority of CAFs in CLM originate from resident LFs. TNF-α-induced up-regulation of IL-8 via nuclear factor-κB in CAFs is an inflammatory pathway, potentially permissive for cancer invasion that may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:17916596

  15. Epithelial Tumors Originate in Tumor Hotspots, a Tissue-Intrinsic Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Emiko; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors are caused by uncontrolled proliferation of transformed mutant cells that have lost the ability to maintain tissue integrity. Although a number of causative genetic backgrounds for tumor development have been discovered, the initial steps mutant cells take to escape tissue integrity and trigger tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we show through analysis of conserved neoplastic tumor-suppressor genes (nTSGs) in Drosophila wing imaginal disc epithelia that tumor initiation depends on tissue-intrinsic local cytoarchitectures, causing tumors to consistently originate in a specific region of the tissue. In this “tumor hotspot” where cells constitute a network of robust structures on their basal side, nTSG-deficient cells delaminate from the apical side of the epithelium and begin tumorigenic overgrowth by exploiting endogenous Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling activity. Conversely, in other regions, the “tumor coldspot” nTSG-deficient cells are extruded toward the basal side and undergo apoptosis. When the direction of delamination is reversed through suppression of RhoGEF2, an activator of the Rho family small GTPases, and JAK/STAT is activated ectopically in these coldspot nTSG-deficient cells, tumorigenesis is induced. These data indicate that two independent processes, apical delamination and JAK/STAT activation, are concurrently required for the initiation of nTSG-deficient-induced tumorigenesis. Given the conservation of the epithelial cytoarchitecture, tumorigenesis may be generally initiated from tumor hotspots by a similar mechanism. PMID:27584724

  16. The inflammatory microenvironment in MDS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Qian, Yaqin; Eksioglu, Erika; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Wei, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a collection of pre-malignancies characterized by impaired proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and a tendency to evolve into leukemia. Among MDS's pathogenic mechanisms are genetic, epigenetic, apoptotic, differentiation, and cytokine milieu abnormalities. Inflammatory changes are a prominent morphologic feature in some cases, with increased populations of plasma cells, mast cells, and lymphocytes in bone marrow aspirates. Accumulating evidence suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment contributes to MDS disease pathology, with microenvironment alterations and abnormality preceding, and facilitating clonal evolution in MDS patients. In this review, we focus on the inflammatory changes involved in the pathology of MDS, with an emphasis on immune dysfunction, stromal microenvironment, and cytokine imbalance in the microenvironment as well as activation of innate immune signaling in MDS patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of MDS pathophysiology will be beneficial to the development of molecular-targeted therapies in the future.

  17. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia of Donor Cell Origin Developing 17 Years after Allogenic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Pilar; Alvarez, J. Carlos; Garrido, Pilar; Lorente, J. Antonio; Palacios, Jorge; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Donor cell leukaemia (DCL) is a rare complication of allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We report the case of a female patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), FAB type M3, who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) type M5 of donor origin 17 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her HLA-matched sister. Morphology and immunophenotyping showed differences with the initial leukaemia, and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis confirmed donor-type haematopoiesis. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) showed an 11q23 deletion. Given that the latency period between transplant and development of leukaemia was the longest reported to date, we discuss the mechanisms underlying delayed leukaemia onset. PMID:23675279

  18. On hematopoietic stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Multipotential hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood-cell formation throughout life. Here, Metcalf considers the origin and heterogeneity of HSCs, their ability to self-generate, and their commitment to the various hematopoietic lineages.

  19. [Bone and Stem Cells. Intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Various kinds of cell types, such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal cells, have been reported to exist in the bone marrow and communicate with each other. Although there have been many previous studies about bone marrow microenvironment, most of them were analyzed by conventional methods such as histological analysis and flow cytometry. These methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular dynamics in vivo . That's why we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. Here we show the latest data and the detailed methodology of intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment, and also discuss its further application.

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor B-chain of hematopoietic origin is not necessary for granulation tissue formation and its absence enhances vascularization.

    PubMed

    Buetow, B S; Crosby, J R; Kaminski, W E; Ramachandran, R K; Lindahl, P; Martin, P; Betsholtz, C; Seifert, R A; Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F

    2001-11-01

    The hypothesis that wound repair is augmented by delivery of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets and macrophages is an attractive extrapolation from the known activities of PDGF in cell culture and in vivo. To test this hypothesis in mice, we prepared hematopoietic chimeras, in which the hematopoietic system of a normal adult mouse was replaced by the hematopoietic system of a PDGF B-chain -/- or +/+ donor. We initiated local granulation tissue formation either by implanting small surgical sponges to elicit a foreign body granulation tissue response, or by ligating the left common carotid to form an organized thrombus. We found that the absence of hematopoietic PDGF B-chain did not decrease the extent of granulation tissue or vascular lesion formation, and that the vascularization of both lesions increased by approximately 100%. We conclude that PDGF B-chain from cells of hematopoietic origin, including platelets and macrophages, is not important for granulation tissue formation, and that it reduces vascularization of granulation issue, probably through disabling of the short-range chemotactic gradients of PDGF that are important for recruiting pericytes/smooth muscle cells to the endothelium of new vessels.

  1. Targeting hypoxia in the leukemia microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Juliana; Zeng, Zhihong; Konopleva, Marina; Wilson, William R

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment regulates survival and maintenance of normal hematopoietic stem cells. Within the endosteal niche, hypoxia has an essential role in maintenance of the primitive quiescent hematopoietic stem cell. We and others have demonstrated that in the context of hematologic malignancies the BM is highly hypoxic, and that progression of the disease is associated with expansion of hypoxic niches and stabilization of the oncogenic HIF-1α. This review will provide an overview of the normal and leukemic BM microenvironment with a special emphasis on pathological hypoxia including the development of hypoxia-activated prodrugs and their applicability in hematological malignancies. PMID:24490034

  2. Formation of gullies on Mars: Link to recent climate history and insolation microenvironments implicate surface water flow origin

    PubMed Central

    Head, James W.; Marchant, David R.; Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.

    2008-01-01

    Features seen in portions of a typical midlatitude Martian impact crater show that gully formation follows a geologically recent period of midlatitude glaciation. Geological evidence indicates that, in the relatively recent past, sufficient snow and ice accumulated on the pole-facing crater wall to cause glacial flow and filling of the crater floor with debris-covered glaciers. As glaciation waned, debris-covered glaciers ceased flowing, accumulation zones lost ice, and newly exposed wall alcoves continued as the location for limited snow/frost deposition, entrapment, and preservation. Analysis of the insolation geometry of this pole-facing crater wall, and similar occurrences in other craters at these latitudes on Mars, shows that they are uniquely favored for accumulation of snow and ice, and a relatively more rapid exposure to warmer summer temperatures. We show that, after the last glaciation, melting of residual snow and ice in alcoves could have formed the fluvial channels and sedimentary fans of the gullies. Recent modeling shows that top-down melting can occur in these microenvironments under conditions similar to those currently observed on Mars, if small amounts of snow or frost accumulate in alcoves and channels. Accumulation and melting is even more favored in the somewhat wetter, relatively recent geological past of Mars, after the period of active glaciation. PMID:18725636

  3. Formation of gullies on Mars: link to recent climate history and insolation microenvironments implicate surface water flow origin.

    PubMed

    Head, James W; Marchant, David R; Kreslavsky, Mikhail A

    2008-09-09

    Features seen in portions of a typical midlatitude Martian impact crater show that gully formation follows a geologically recent period of midlatitude glaciation. Geological evidence indicates that, in the relatively recent past, sufficient snow and ice accumulated on the pole-facing crater wall to cause glacial flow and filling of the crater floor with debris-covered glaciers. As glaciation waned, debris-covered glaciers ceased flowing, accumulation zones lost ice, and newly exposed wall alcoves continued as the location for limited snow/frost deposition, entrapment, and preservation. Analysis of the insolation geometry of this pole-facing crater wall, and similar occurrences in other craters at these latitudes on Mars, shows that they are uniquely favored for accumulation of snow and ice, and a relatively more rapid exposure to warmer summer temperatures. We show that, after the last glaciation, melting of residual snow and ice in alcoves could have formed the fluvial channels and sedimentary fans of the gullies. Recent modeling shows that top-down melting can occur in these microenvironments under conditions similar to those currently observed on Mars, if small amounts of snow or frost accumulate in alcoves and channels. Accumulation and melting is even more favored in the somewhat wetter, relatively recent geological past of Mars, after the period of active glaciation.

  4. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  5. Genomic sequence of infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) KLV-2010-01 originating from the first Korean outbreak in cultured Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Kim, H K; Nguyen, V G; Park, B K; Choresca, C H; Shin, S P; Han, J E; Jun, J W; Park, S C

    2012-02-01

    Due to the need to track and monitor genetic diversity, the genome of the infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) strain KLV-2010-01 in cultured Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp that originated from the first Korean outbreak in 2010 was sequenced and analyzed. The genome, with a length of 3914 nucleotides, was sequenced from the Korean IHHNV. The genome encoded three large and overlapping open reading frames: ORF1 (NS-1) of 2001 bp, ORF2 (NS-2) of 1092 bp and ORF3 (capsid protein) of 990 bp. The overall organization, size and predicted amino acid sequence of the three ORFs in Korean IHHNV were highly similar to those of members of the infectious IHHNV group, and the most closely related strains were IHHNVs described from Ecuador and Hawaii. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis showed that the Korean IHHNV was clustered with lineage III in the infectious IHHNV group and was most similar to IHHNV isolates from Ecuador, China and Taiwan.

  6. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin.

  7. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin. PMID:27535453

  8. Determining Toxoplasma high-risk autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients by systematic pre-transplant PCR screening of stem cell originated buffy coat.

    PubMed

    Caner, Ayşe; Dönmez, Ayhan; Döşkaya, Mert; Değirmenci, Aysu; Tombuloğlu, Murat; Cağirgan, Seçkin; Guy, Edward; Francis, Janet; Soyer, Nur Akad; Gürüz, Yüksel

    2012-12-01

    The diagnosis of Toxoplasma infection or disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients is achieved mainly by PCR screening; however screening did not find wide field of use in practice due to costly expenditures of PCR. This study aimed to determine patients at high risk of Toxoplasma infection or disease before transplantation by stem cell originated buffy coat PCR and subsequently to screen them. Buffy coats collected from 12 autologous and 18 allogeneic HSCT patients' donors were investigated by PCR before transplantation. After transplantation, blood and sera collected at fixed time intervals were screened by two PCR methods and serological assays. Screening results first time assessed a toxoplasmosis incidence level as 25% in autologous HSCT patients and increased incidence level in allogeneic HSCT patients to 22%. Importantly, buffy coat PCR was first time performed before transplantation, to determine the risk of toxoplasmosis. Buffy coat PCR results showed that four patients were at high risk of toxoplasmosis before transplantation. After transplantation, these patients experienced toxoplasmosis. In conclusion, for the determination of patients at risk of toxoplasmosis, clinicians should consider buffy coat PCR in combination with serology before transplantation. After transplantation, PCR screening can be initiated in high risk patients upon clinical suspicion.

  9. Hematopoietic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2008-01-15

    The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses-survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years.

  10. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  11. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y.; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44−/− mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26546504

  12. The CLL cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    Cross talk between CLL cells and accessory stromal cells in specialized tissue microenvironments, such as the secondary lymphoid organs, favors CLL progression by promoting malignant B cell growth and drug resistance. Disrupting the cross talk between CLL cells and their milieu is an attractive, novel strategy for treating CLL patients. This chapter summarizes current knowledge about cellular and molecular interactions between CLL cells and their supportive tissue microenvironment and the therapeutic targets that are emerging, focusing on the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis and small molecule inhibitors that are targeting the B cell receptor-associated kinases SYK, BTK, and PI3Kδ. Clinically relevant aspects of these new therapeutics will be discussed, along with an outlook into future biologically oriented therapeutic strategies. The rapid progress in dissecting the CLL microenvironment and the promising early results of these new targeted treatments in CLL indicate that CLL has become a role model for microenvironment-dependent cancers.

  13. The Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Monlish, Darlene A.; Bhatt, Sima T.; Schuettpelz, Laura G.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern recognition receptors that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns and host-derived damage-associated molecular patterns. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed. PMID:27733853

  14. Bone microenvironment signals in osteosarcoma development.

    PubMed

    Alfranca, Arantzazu; Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Tornin, Juan; Abarrategi, Ander; Amaral, Teresa; de Alava, Enrique; Menendez, Pablo; Garcia-Castro, Javier; Rodriguez, Rene

    2015-08-01

    The bone is a complex connective tissue composed of many different cell types such as osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells, among others. The interaction between them is finely balanced through the processes of bone formation and bone remodeling, which regulates the production and biological activity of many soluble factors and extracellular matrix components needed to maintain the bone homeostasis in terms of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Osteosarcoma (OS) emerges in this complex environment as a result of poorly defined oncogenic events arising in osteogenic lineage precursors. Increasing evidence supports that similar to normal development, the bone microenvironment (BME) underlies OS initiation and progression. Here, we recapitulate the physiological processes that regulate bone homeostasis and review the current knowledge about how OS cells and BME communicate and interact, describing how these interactions affect OS cell growth, metastasis, cancer stem cell fate and therapy outcome.

  15. Immunotherapeutic modulation of the suppressive liver and tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tim; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Weiss, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    The liver is an immunologically unique organ, consisting of resident hematopoietic and parenchymal cells which often contribute to a relatively tolerant microenvironment. It is also becoming increasingly clear that tumor-induced immunosuppression occurs via many of the same cellular mechanisms which contribute to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment. Myeloid cells, consisting of dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), have been implicated in providing a tolerogenic liver environment and immune dysfunction within the tumor microenvironment which can favor tumor progression. As we increase our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved for each phenotypic and/or functionally distinct leukocyte subset, immunotherapeutic strategies can be developed to overcome the inherent barriers to the development of improved strategies for the treatment of liver disease and tumors. In this review, we discuss the principal myeloid cell-based contributions to immunosuppression that are shared between the liver and tumor microenvironments. We further highlight immune-based strategies shown to modulate immunoregulatory cells within each microenvironment and enhance anti-tumor responses. PMID:21241810

  16. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Casina; Vargas, Geoffrey; Le Pape, François; Clézardin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow. PMID:27782035

  17. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions are regulated by Wnt antagonists: comparisons and current controversies.

    PubMed

    Cain, Corey J; Manilay, Jennifer O

    2013-01-01

    Wingless and int (Wnt) proteins are secreted proteins that are important for regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the bone marrow microenvironment in mice. The mechanisms by which Wnt signaling regulates these hematopoietic cell fate decisions are not fully understood. Secreted Wnt antagonists, which are expressed in bone and bone marrow stromal cells, either bind to Wnt ligands directly or block Wnt receptors and co-receptors to halt Wnt-mediated signal transduction in both osteolineage and hematopoietic cell types. Secreted frizzled related proteins-1 and -2, Wnt inhibitory factor-1, Dickkopf-1, and Sclerostin are Wnt antagonists that influence hematopoietic cell fate decisions in the bone marrow niche. In this review, we compare and contrast the roles of these Wnt antagonists and their effects on hematopoietic development in mice, and also discuss the clinical significance of targeting Wnt antagonists within the context of hematopoietic disease.

  19. Consequences of irradiation on bone and marrow phenotypes, and its relation to disruption of hematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Green, Danielle E.; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2014-01-01

    The rising levels of radiation exposure, specifically for medical treatments and accidental exposures, have added great concern for the long term risks of bone fractures. Both the bone marrow and bone architecture are devastated following radiation exposure. Even sub-lethal doses cause a deficit to the bone marrow microenvironment, including a decline in hematopoietic cells, and this deficit occurs in a dose dependent fashion. Certain cell phenotypes though are more susceptible to radiation damage, with mesenchymal stem cells being more resilient than the hematopoietic stem cells. The decline in total bone marrow hematopoietic cells is accompanied with elevated adipocytes into the marrow cavity, thereby inhibiting hematopoiesis and recovery of the bone marrow microenvironment. Poor bone marrow is also associated with a decline in bone architectural quality. Therefore, the ability to maintain the bone marrow microenvironment would hinder much of the trabecular bone loss caused by radiation exposure, ultimately decreasing some comorbidities in patients exposed to radiation. PMID:24607941

  20. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  1. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  2. Crystalline calcium carbonate and hydrogels as microenvironment for stem cells.

    PubMed

    Astachov, Liliana; Nevo, Zvi; Aviv, Moran; Vago, Razi

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell development and fate decisions are dictated by the microenvironment in which the stem cell is embedded. Among the advanced goals of tissue engineering is the creation of a microenvironment that will support the maintenance and differentiation of the stem cell--based on embryonic and adult stem cells as potent, cellular sources--for a variety of clinical applications. This review discusses some of the approaches used to create regulatory and instructive microenvironments for the directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using three-dimensional crystalline calcium carbonate biomaterials of marine origin combined with a hydrated gel based on hyaluronan.

  3. Microenvironment and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Michio; Itasaka, Satoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Dependency on tumor oxygenation is one of the major features of radiation therapy and this has led many radiation biologists and oncologists to focus on tumor hypoxia. The first approach to overcome tumor hypoxia was to improve tumor oxygenation by increasing oxygen delivery and a subsequent approach was the use of radiosensitizers in combination with radiation therapy. Clinical use of some of these approaches was promising, but they are not widely used due to several limitations. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is activated by hypoxia and induces the expression of various genes related to the adaptation of cellular metabolism to hypoxia, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells and angiogenesis, and so forth. HIF-1 is a potent target to enhance the therapeutic effects of radiation therapy. Another approach is antiangiogenic therapy. The combination with radiation therapy is promising, but several factors including surrogate markers, timing and duration, and so forth have to be optimized before introducing it into clinics. In this review, we examined how the tumor microenvironment influences the effects of radiation and how we can enhance the antitumor effects of radiation therapy by modifying the tumor microenvironment. PMID:23509762

  4. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  5. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G.; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S.; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A.; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C.; Krishnakumar, P.K.; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Anna Maria; Bisson, William H.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be considered. Disruptive chemicals may also contribute to multiple stages of tumor development through effects on the tumor microenvironment. In turn, the tumor microenvironment consists of a complex interaction among blood vessels that feed the tumor, the extracellular matrix that provides structural and biochemical support, signaling molecules that send messages and soluble factors such as cytokines. The tumor microenvironment also consists of many host cellular effectors including multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cell precursors, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and innate immune cells. Carcinogens can influence the tumor microenvironment through effects on epithelial cells, the most common origin of cancer, as well as on stromal cells, extracellular matrix components and immune cells. Here, we review how environmental exposures can perturb the tumor microenvironment. We suggest a role for disrupting chemicals such as nickel chloride, Bisphenol A, butyltins, methylmercury and paraquat as well as more traditional carcinogens, such as radiation, and pharmaceuticals, such as diabetes medications, in the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Further studies interrogating the role of chemicals and their mixtures in dose-dependent effects on the tumor microenvironment could have important general mechanistic implications for the etiology and prevention of tumorigenesis. PMID:26106136

  6. Reprogramming Human Endothelial to Hematopoietic Cells Requires Vascular Induction

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Vladislav M.; Lis, Raphael; Liu, Ying; Kedem, Alon; James, Daylon; Elemento, Olivier; Butler, Jason M.; Scandura, Joseph M.; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Generating engraftable human hematopoietic cells from autologous tissues promises new therapies for blood diseases. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells yields hematopoietic cells that poorly engraft. Here, we devised a method to phenocopy the vascular-niche microenvironment of hemogenic cells, thereby enabling reprogramming of human endothelial cells (ECs) into engraftable hematopoietic cells without transition through a pluripotent intermediate. Highly purified non-hemogenic human umbilical vein-ECs (HUVECs) or adult dermal microvascular ECs (hDMECs) were transduced with transcription factors (TFs), FOSB, GFI1, RUNX1, and SPI1 (FGRS), and then propagated on serum-free instructive vascular niche monolayers to induce outgrowth of hematopoietic colonies containing cells with functional and immunophenotypic features of multipotent progenitor cells (MPP). These reprogrammed ECs- into human-MPPs (rEC-hMPPs) acquire colony-forming cell (CFC) potential and durably engraft in immune-deficient mice after primary and secondary transplantation, producing long-term rEC-hMPP-derived myeloid (granulocytic/monocytic, erythroid, megakaryocytic) and lymphoid (NK, B) progeny. Conditional expression of FGRS transgenes, combined with vascular-induction, activates endogenous FGRS genes endowing rEC-hMPPs with a transcriptional and functional profile similar to self-renewing MPPs. Our approach underscores the role of inductive cues from vascular-niche in orchestrating and sustaining hematopoietic specification and may prove useful for engineering autologous hematopoietic grafts to treat inherited and acquired blood disorders. PMID:25030167

  7. The Role of the Bone Marrow Stromal Compartment in the Hematopoietic Response to Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nombela-Arrieta, César; Isringhausen, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Continuous production of blood cells unfolds within a complex three-dimensional tissue scaffold established by highly organized stromal cell networks of mesenchymal, neural, and vascular origin inside bone marrow (BM) cavities. Collectively, stromal cells have been shown to serve two principal roles; first as primary participants of bone remodeling and metabolism and second as master regulators of different stages of blood cell development and production. Indeed, ample evidence demonstrates that stromal cells can sense and integrate systemic signals to shape hematopoietic responses and that these regulatory mechanisms are subverted in multiple pathologic conditions. Microbial infections are stressors that elicit potent inflammatory reactions and induce substantial alterations of hematopoietic output. Whether the cellular components of the BM stromal microenvironment are targeted by infections and participate in infection-induced hematopoiesis has not been investigated in sufficient detail to date. In this manuscript, we provide a succinct updated overview of the different cell populations that are currently known to form BM stroma. We discuss experimental evidence demonstrating that different stromal components are actively damaged or functionally altered by pathogens and/or ensuing inflammatory signals and review how these effects are known to contribute to the hematologic manifestations observed during infections. PMID:28163704

  8. Expansion of CD133+ Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells on a Biocompatible Microwells

    PubMed Central

    Soufizomorrod, Mina; Soleimani, Masoud; Hajifathali, Abbas; Mohammadi, Majid Mossahebi; Abroun, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord Blood (UCB) as a source of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor cells (HSPCs) used for Umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). The main obstacle in application of this source as an appropriate source of HSPCs is low volume of this product. So ex vivo expansion of these cells in a microenvironment which mimic body condition is important. In current study we designed biocompatible microwells in which collagene type I is coated by softlitography method. Our findings designated that in 3-Dimensional (3D) microenvironment CD133+ UCB derived HSC expanded significantly compared to 2-Dimensional (2D) microenvironment. PMID:24505514

  9. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. In vivo imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    The function of hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia stem cells depends on their interaction with complex microenvironment within the bone marrow. Conventional methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of live imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular interaction. Intravital two-photon imaging is the ideal method to understand the nature of bone marrow because of visualizing the cellular dynamics in vivo and observing the bone marrow long time. Here we show the latest reports about bone marrow microenvironment by intravital imaging, and also discuss its further application.

  10. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  11. Molecular pathology of myelodysplastic syndromes: biology of medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells (review).

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Abe, Shinya; Suzuki, Shiho; Umeda, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been defined as a disease entity based on clinical features and morphological findings. Despite similarities in clinical manifestations, genetic abnormalities occurring in hematopoietic cells are heterogeneous among the syndromes. However, recent investigations have revealed that there are common biological events in the bone marrow of MDS cases. Most notably, excessive apoptosis of hematopoietic cells was observed to be induced by the bone marrow microenvironment. The apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors, suggesting that medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells play a role in the pathology of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, in the bone marrow microenvironment are predominantly paracrine mediators of apoptosis. Regarding autocrine stimulation mechanisms, it has recently been shown that the deregulation of ribosomal protein is capable of initiating a stress response in the hematopoietic cell through a p53-mediated signaling pathway. Thus, both the stromal cells of the bone marrow microenvironment and hematopoietic cells themselves possess a common and characteristic biology in this heterogeneous disease entity.

  12. Functional anatomy of the thymic microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, M D

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a review of our current understanding of the nature of the thymic microenvironment, after briefly considering the major role of the gland. The epithelial cells and their products are of fundamental importance, and other cells of the macrophage series are implicated in most functional events. The embryological origin of the epithelium is still not clear, although disease conditions would suggest a single origin. Immigration and emigration of thymocytes is considered, and also the passage of antigens into the gland. The events within the thymus are under the control of the CNS acting through the innervation or via hormonal pathways. Both of these areas are considered in detail, especially thymic hormone origins, functions and interactions. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 11 PMID:1769884

  13. Dynamic microenvironments: the fourth dimension.

    PubMed

    Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-11-14

    The extracellular space, or cell microenvironment, choreographs cell behavior through myriad controlled signals, and aberrant cues can result in dysfunction and disease. For functional studies of human cell biology or expansion and delivery of cells for therapeutic purposes, scientists must decipher this intricate map of microenvironment biology and develop ways to mimic these functions in vitro. In this Perspective, we describe technologies for four-dimensional (4D) biology: cell-laden matrices engineered to recapitulate tissue and organ function in 3D space and over time.

  14. Mutual Interference between Cytomegalovirus and Reconstitution of Protective Immunity after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reddehase, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a therapy option for aggressive forms of hematopoietic malignancies that are resistant to standard antitumoral therapies. Hematoablative treatment preceding HCT, however, opens a “window of opportunity” for latent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) by releasing it from immune control with the consequence of reactivation of productive viral gene expression and recurrence of infectious virus. A “window of opportunity” for the virus represents a “window of risk” for the patient. In the interim between HCT and reconstitution of antiviral immunity, primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, initially low amounts of reactivated virus can expand exponentially, disseminate to essentially all organs, and cause multiple organ CMV disease, with interstitial pneumonia (CMV-IP) representing the most severe clinical manifestation. Here, I will review predictions originally made in the mouse model of experimental HCT and murine CMV infection, some of which have already paved the way to translational preclinical research and promising clinical trials of a preemptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease. Specifically, the mouse model has been pivotal in providing “proof of concept” for preventing CMV disease after HCT by adoptive transfer of preselected, virus epitope-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cells bridging the critical interim. However, CMV is not a “passive antigen” but is a pathogen that actively interferes with the reconstitution of protective immunity by infecting bone marrow (BM) stromal cells that otherwise form niches for hematopoiesis by providing the structural microenvironment and by producing hematopoietically active cytokines, the hemopoietins. Depending on the precise conditions of HCT, reduced homing of transplanted hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells to infected BM stroma and impaired colony growth and lineage differentiation can lead to “graft failure.” In consequence, uncontrolled virus spread

  15. Nanomedicine as a potent strategy in melanoma tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pautu, Vincent; Leonetti, Daniela; Lepeltier, Elise; Clere, Nicolas; Passirani, Catherine

    2017-02-20

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Despite considerable progresses in clinical treatment with the discovery of BRAF or MEK inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, the durability of response to treatment is often limited to the development of acquired resistance and systemic toxicity. The limited success of conventional treatment highlights the importance of understanding the role of melanoma tumor microenvironment in tumor developement and drug resistance. Nanoparticles represent a promising strategy for the development of new cancer treatments able to improve the bioavailability of drugs and increase their penetration by targeting specifically tumors cells and/or tumor environment. In this review, we will discuss the main influence of tumor microenvironment in melanoma growth and treatment outcome. Furthermore, third generation loaded nanotechnologies represent an exciting tool for detection, treatment, and escape from possible mechanism of resistance mediated by tumor microenvironment, and will be highlighted in this review.

  16. Tumor microenvironment-associated modifications of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Jean-Philippe; Lucier, Jean-François; Nwilati, Hanad; Thibault, Philippe; Garneau, Daniel; Gendron, Daniel; Durand, Mathieu; Couture, Sonia; Lapointe, Elvy; Prinos, Panagiotis; Klinck, Roscoe; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Chabot, Benoit; Abou-Elela, Sherif

    2014-02-01

    Pre-mRNA alternative splicing is modified in cancer, but the origin and specificity of these changes remain unclear. Here, we probed ovarian tumors to identify cancer-associated splicing isoforms and define the mechanism by which splicing is modified in cancer cells. Using high-throughput quantitative PCR, we monitored the expression of splice variants in laser-dissected tissues from ovarian tumors. Surprisingly, changes in alternative splicing were not limited to the tumor tissues but were also found in the tumor microenvironment. Changes in the tumor-associated splicing events were found to be regulated by splicing factors that are differentially expressed in cancer tissues. Overall, ∼20% of the alternative splicing events affected by the down-regulation of the splicing factors QKI and RBFOX2 were altered in the microenvironment of ovarian tumors. Together, our results indicate that the tumor microenvironment undergoes specific changes in alternative splicing orchestrated by a limited number of splicing factors.

  17. Therapeutic targets in malignant glioblastoma microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Zagzag, David; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2009-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that the tissue microenvironment can suppress cancer and that microenvironment disruption is required for cancer growth and progression. Distortion of the microenvironment by tumor cells can promote growth, recruit nonmalignant cells that provide physiological resources, and facilitate invasion. Compared with the variable routes taken by cells to become cancers, the response of normal tissue to cancer is relatively consistent such that controlling cancer may be more readily achieved indirectly via the microenvironment. Here, we discuss 3 ideas about how the microenvironment, consisting of a vasculature, inflammatory cells, immune cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix, might provide therapeutic targets in glioblastoma (GBM) in the context of radiotherapy (RT): (1) viable therapeutic targets exist in the GBM microenvironment, (2) RT alters the microenvironment of tissues and tumors; and (3) a potential benefit may be achieved by targeting the microenvironments induced by RT.

  18. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce nitric oxide synthase-dependent differentiation of CD11b+ cells that expedite hematopoietic recovery.

    PubMed

    Trento, Cristina; Marigo, Ilaria; Pievani, Alice; Galleu, Antonio; Dolcetti, Luigi; Wang, Chun-Yin; Serafini, Marta; Bronte, Vincenzo; Dazzi, Francesco

    2017-02-09

    Bone marrow microenvironment is fundamental for hematopoietic homeostasis. Numerous efforts have been made to reproduce or manipulate its activity to facilitate engraftment after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but clinical results remain unconvincing. This probably reflects the complexity of the hematopoietic niche. Recent data have demonstrated the fundamental role of stromal and myeloid cells in regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and mobilization in the bone marrow. In this study we unveil a novel interaction by which bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce the rapid differentiation of CD11b+ myeloid cells from bone marrow progenitors. Such an activity requires the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2. Importantly, the administration of these mesenchymal stromal cells-educated CD11b+ cells accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution in bone marrow transplant recipients. We conclude that the liaison between mesenchymal stromal cells and myeloid cells is fundamental in hematopoietic homeostasis and suggests that it can be harnessed in clinical transplantation.

  20. [Research progress on visual observations of hematopoietic stem cell homing].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Yao; Chen, Tong

    2014-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an important mean for clinical treatment to many of hematological diseases, malignant diseases, hereditary diseases and autoimmune diseases. Whether the implanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can home to bone marrow (BM) smoothly and reconstitute the hematopoiesis is the key to successful HSCT. With the cognition of HSC homing mechanism, the visual observation of HSC homing to BM is attracting more and more attention and helps to clarify the micro-dialogue between HSC and BM microenvironment. In recent years, with the development of imaging technology, confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and two-photon microscope are able to make 3D reconstruction and real-time observation of the tissue or cells. Researches on HSC homing process visibly become reality. In this article the methods of visual research and their application in HSC homing observation are reviewed.

  1. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding interleukin 11, a stromal cell-derived lymphopoietic and hematopoietic cytokine.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, S R; Bennett, F; Calvetti, J A; Kelleher, K; Wood, C R; O'Hara, R M; Leary, A C; Sibley, B; Clark, S C; Williams, D A

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in close association with a complex network of cells loosely termed the hematopoietic microenvironment. Analysis of the mechanisms of microenvironmental regulation of hematopoiesis has been hindered by the complexity of the microenvironment as well as the heterogeneity of hematopoietic stem cells and early progenitor cells. We have established immortalized primate bone marrow-derived stromal cell lines to facilitate analysis of the interactions of hematopoietic cells with the microenvironment in a large animal species. One such line, PU-34, was found to produce a variety of growth factors, including an activity that stimulates the proliferation of an interleukin 6-dependent murine plasmacytoma cell line. A cDNA encoding the plasmacytoma stimulatory activity was isolated through functional expression cloning in mammalian cells. The nucleotide sequence contained a single long reading frame of 597 nucleotides encoding a predicted 199-amino acid polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of this cytokine, designated interleukin 11 (IL-11), did not display significant similarity with any other sequence in the GenBank data base. Preliminary biological characterization indicates that in addition to stimulating plasmacytoma proliferation, IL-11 stimulates the T-cell-dependent development of immunoglobulin-producing B cells and synergizes with IL-3 in supporting murine megakaryocyte colony formation. These properties implicate IL-11 as an additional multifunctional regulator in the hematopoietic microenvironment. Images PMID:2145578

  2. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  3. PTEN action in leukemia dictated by the tissue microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Miething, Cornelius; Scuoppo, Claudio; Bosbach, Benedikt; Appelmann, Iris; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Wu, Gang; Lintault, Laura; Auer, Martina; Premsrirut, Prem K.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hicks, James; Benveniste, Helene; Speicher, Michael R.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    PTEN encodes a lipid phosphatase that is underexpressed in many cancers owing to deletions, mutations or gene silencing1–3. PTEN dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3), thereby opposing the activity of class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) that mediate growth and survival factors signaling through PI3K effectors such as AKT and mTOR2. To determine whether continued PTEN inactivation is required to maintain malignancy, we generated an RNAi-based transgenic mouse model that allows tetracycline-dependent regulation of PTEN in a time- and tissue-specific manner. Postnatal PTEN knockdown in the hematopoietic compartment produced highly disseminated T-cell leukemia (T-ALL). Surprisingly, reactivation of PTEN mainly reduced T-ALL dissemination but had little effect on tumor load in hematopoietic organs. Leukemia infiltration into the intestine was dependent on CCR9 G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, which was amplified by PTEN loss. Our results suggest that in the absence of PTEN, GPCRs may play an unanticipated role in driving tumor growth and invasion in an unsupportive environment. They further reveal that the role of PTEN loss in tumor maintenance is not invariant and can be influenced by the tissue microenvironment, thereby producing a form of intratumoral heterogeneity that is independent of cancer genotype. PMID:24805236

  4. Generation of axolotl hematopoietic chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, David; Scott, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Wound repair is an extremely complex process that requires precise coordination between various cell types including immune cells. Unfortunately, in mammals this usually results in scar formation instead of restoration of the original fully functional tissue, otherwise known as regeneration. Various animal models like frogs and salamanders are currently being studied to determine the intracellular and intercellular pathways, controlled by gene expression, that elicit cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration of cells during regenerative healing. Now, the necessary genetic tools to map regenerative pathways are becoming available for the axolotl salamander, thus allowing comparative studies between scarring and regeneration. Here, we describe in detail three methods to produce axolotl hematopoietic cell-tagged chimeras for the study of hematopoiesis and regeneration. PMID:26366424

  5. Targeting microenvironment in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew; Wei, Han; Lu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    During development of a novel treatment for cancer patients, the tumor microenvironment and its interaction with the tumor cells must be considered. Aspects such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), secreted factors, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the host immune response, and tumor-associated microphages (TAM) are critical for cancer progression and metastasis. Additionally, signaling pathways such as the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) can promote further cytokine release in the tumor environment, and impact tumor progression greatly. Importantly, cytokine overexpression has been linked to drug resistance in cancers and is therefore an attractive target for combinational therapies. Specific inhibitors of cytokines involved in signaling between tumor cells and the microenvironment have not been studied in depth and have great potential for use in personalized medicines. Together, the interactions between the microenvironment and tumors are critical for tumor growth and promotion and should be taken into serious consideration for future novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27270649

  6. Concise review: hematopoietic stem cells and tissue stem cells: current concepts and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-10-01

    The term hematopoietic stem cells has at times been used to include a miscellany of precursor cells ranging from multipotential self-generating cells to lineage-restricted progenitors with little capacity for self-generation. It is probable that the stem cells of other tissues also vary widely in their multipotentiality and proliferative capacity. This review questions several dogmas regarding the self-generative capacity of various hematopoietic cells, the single episodic origin of hematopoietic cells, and the irreversible nature of progressive mature cell formation in individual hematopoietic lineages. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  7. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  8. First steps to define murine amniotic fluid stem cell microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, E.; Piccoli, M.; Franzin, C.; Spiro, G.; Donà, S.; Dedja, A.; Schiavi, F.; Taschin, E.; Bonaldo, P.; Braghetta, P.; De Coppi, P.; Pozzobon, M.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell niche refers to the microenvironment where stem cells reside in living organisms. Several elements define the niche and regulate stem cell characteristics, such as stromal support cells, gap junctions, soluble factors, extracellular matrix proteins, blood vessels and neural inputs. In the last years, different studies demonstrated the presence of cKit+ cells in human and murine amniotic fluid, which have been defined as amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells. Firstly, we characterized the murine cKit+ cells present both in the amniotic fluid and in the amnion. Secondly, to analyze the AFS cell microenvironment, we injected murine YFP+ embryonic stem cells (ESC) into the amniotic fluid of E13.5 wild type embryos. Four days after transplantation we found that YFP+ sorted cells maintained the expression of pluripotency markers and that ESC adherent to the amnion were more similar to original ESC in respect to those isolated from the amniotic fluid. Moreover, cytokines evaluation and oxygen concentration analysis revealed in this microenvironment the presence of factors that are considered key regulators in stem cell niches. This is the first indication that AFS cells reside in a microenvironment that possess specific characteristics able to maintain stemness of resident and exogenous stem cells. PMID:27845396

  9. Reprogramming Malignant Cancer Cells toward a Benign Phenotype following Exposure to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo Orazio

    2017-01-01

    The embryonic microenvironment is well known to be non-permissive for tumor development because early developmental signals naturally suppress the expression of proto-oncogenes. In an analogous manner, mimicking an early embryonic environment during embryonic stem cell culture has been shown to suppress oncogenic phenotypes of cancer cells. Exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells harbor substances that mirror the content of the cells of origin and have been reported to reprogram hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells via horizontal transfer of mRNA and proteins. However, the possibility that these embryonic stem cells-derived exosomes might be the main effectors of the anti-tumor effect mediated by the embryonic stem cells has not been explored yet. The present study aims to investigate whether exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells can reprogram malignant cancer cells to a benign stage and reduce their tumorigenicity. We show that the embryonic stem cell-conditioned medium contains factors that inhibit cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrate that exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells display anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects, and decrease tumor size in a xenograft model. These exosomes are also able to transfer their cargo into target cancer cells, inducing a dose-dependent increase in SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog proteins, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity. This study shows for the first time that human embryonic stem cell-derived exosomes play an important role in the tumor suppressive activity displayed by human embryonic stem cells. PMID:28068409

  10. Reprogramming Malignant Cancer Cells toward a Benign Phenotype following Exposure to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Abdouh, Mohamed; Arena, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo Orazio

    2017-01-01

    The embryonic microenvironment is well known to be non-permissive for tumor development because early developmental signals naturally suppress the expression of proto-oncogenes. In an analogous manner, mimicking an early embryonic environment during embryonic stem cell culture has been shown to suppress oncogenic phenotypes of cancer cells. Exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells harbor substances that mirror the content of the cells of origin and have been reported to reprogram hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells via horizontal transfer of mRNA and proteins. However, the possibility that these embryonic stem cells-derived exosomes might be the main effectors of the anti-tumor effect mediated by the embryonic stem cells has not been explored yet. The present study aims to investigate whether exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells can reprogram malignant cancer cells to a benign stage and reduce their tumorigenicity. We show that the embryonic stem cell-conditioned medium contains factors that inhibit cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrate that exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells display anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects, and decrease tumor size in a xenograft model. These exosomes are also able to transfer their cargo into target cancer cells, inducing a dose-dependent increase in SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog proteins, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity. This study shows for the first time that human embryonic stem cell-derived exosomes play an important role in the tumor suppressive activity displayed by human embryonic stem cells.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants.

  12. The spleen microenvironment influences disease transformation in a mouse model of KITD816V-dependent myeloproliferative neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pelusi, Natalie; Kosanke, Maike; Riedt, Tamara; Rösseler, Corinna; Seré, Kristin; Li, Jin; Gütgemann, Ines; Zenke, Martin; Janzen, Viktor; Schorle, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Activating mutations leading to ligand-independent signaling of the stem cell factor receptor KIT are associated with several hematopoietic malignancies. One of the most common alterations is the D816V mutation. In this study, we characterized mice, which conditionally express the humanized KITD816V receptor in the adult hematopoietic system to determine the pathological consequences of unrestrained KIT signaling during blood cell development. We found that KITD816V mutant animals acquired a myeloproliferative neoplasm similar to polycythemia vera, marked by a massive increase in red blood cells and severe splenomegaly caused by excessive extramedullary erythropoiesis. Moreover, we found mobilization of stem cells from bone marrow to the spleen. Splenectomy prior to KITD816V induction prevented expansion of red blood cells, but rapidly lead to a state of aplastic anemia and bone marrow fibrosis, reminiscent of post polycythemic myeloid metaplasia, the spent phase of polycythemia vera. Our results show that the extramedullary hematopoietic niche microenvironment significantly influences disease outcome in KITD816V mutant mice, turning this model a valuable tool for studying the interplay between functionally abnormal hematopoietic cells and their microenvironment during development of polycythemia vera-like disease and myelofibrosis. PMID:28128288

  13. TopBP1 Governs Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Survival in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Li, Dantong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Tao; Fu, Cong; Jing, Changbin; Jia, Xiaoe; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Xin; Dong, Mei; Deng, Min; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Wenge; Peng, Jinrong; Wan, Fengyi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Pan, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis, nascent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to and reside in proliferative hematopoietic microenvironment for transitory expansion. In this process, well-established DNA damage response pathways are vital to resolve the replication stress, which is deleterious for genome stability and cell survival. However, the detailed mechanism on the response and repair of the replication stress-induced DNA damage during hematopoietic progenitor expansion remains elusive. Here we report that a novel zebrafish mutantcas003 with nonsense mutation in topbp1 gene encoding topoisomerase II β binding protein 1 (TopBP1) exhibits severe definitive hematopoiesis failure. Homozygous topbp1cas003 mutants manifest reduced number of HSPCs during definitive hematopoietic cell expansion, without affecting the formation and migration of HSPCs. Moreover, HSPCs in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (an equivalent of the fetal liver in mammals) in topbp1cas003 mutant embryos are more sensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. Mechanistically, subcellular mislocalization of TopBP1cas003 protein results in ATR/Chk1 activation failure and DNA damage accumulation in HSPCs, and eventually induces the p53-dependent apoptosis of HSPCs. Collectively, this study demonstrates a novel and vital role of TopBP1 in the maintenance of HSPCs genome integrity and survival during hematopoietic progenitor expansion. PMID:26131719

  14. Hedgehog and retinoid signaling alters multiple myeloma microenvironment and generates bortezomib resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Salvador; Hernandez, Daniela; Chang, Yu-ting; Gocke, Christian B.; McCray, Megan; Varadhan, Ravi; Matsui, William H.; Jones, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between multiple myeloma (MM) cells and the BM microenvironment play a critical role in bortezomib (BTZ) resistance. However, the mechanisms involved in these interactions are not completely understood. We previously showed that expression of CYP26 in BM stromal cells maintains a retinoic acid–low (RA-low) microenvironment that prevents the differentiation of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells. Since a low secretory B cell phenotype is associated with BTZ resistance in MM and retinoid signaling promotes plasma cell differentiation and Ig production, we investigated whether stromal expression of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP26 modulates BTZ sensitivity in the BM niche. CYP26-mediated inactivation of RA within the BM microenvironment prevented plasma cell differentiation and promoted a B cell–like, BTZ-resistant phenotype in human MM cells that were cocultured on BM stroma. Moreover, paracrine Hedgehog secretion by MM cells upregulated stromal CYP26 and further reinforced a protective microenvironment. These results suggest that crosstalk between Hedgehog and retinoid signaling modulates BTZ sensitivity in the BM niche. Targeting these pathological interactions holds promise for eliminating minimal residual disease in MM. PMID:27775549

  15. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  16. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Graeff, Annette H.; Nitschke, Roland; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche) and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche) harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients. PMID:26696752

  17. Hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gschweng, Eric; De Oliveira, Satiro; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) provide an attractive target for immunotherapy of cancer and leukemia by the introduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) directed against tumor-associated antigens. HSCs engraft for long-term blood cell production and could provide a continuous source of targeted anti-cancer effector cells to sustain remissions. T cells produced de novo from HSCs may continuously replenish anti-tumor T cells that have become anergic or exhausted from ex vivo expansion or exposure to the intratumoral microenvironment. In addition, transgenic T cells produced in vivo undergo allelic exclusion, preventing co-expression of an endogenous TCR that could mis-pair with the introduced TCR chains and blunt activity or even cause off-target reactivity. CAR-engineered HSCs may produce myeloid and natural killer cells in addition to T cells expressing the CAR, providing broader anti-tumor activity that arises quickly after transplant and does not solely require de novo thymopoiesis. Use of TCR- or CAR-engineered HSCs would likely require cytoreductive conditioning to achieve long-term engraftment, and this approach may be used in clinical settings where autologous HSC transplant is being performed to add a graft-versus-tumor effect. Results of experimental and preclinical studies performed to date are reviewed.

  18. Fas transduces dual apoptotic and trophic signals in hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Farkas, Daniel L; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-12-01

    Stem cells and progenitors are often required to realize their differentiation potential in hostile microenvironments. The Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) interaction is a major effector pathway of apoptosis, which negatively regulates the expansion of differentiated hematopoietic cells. The involvement of this molecular interaction in the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is not well understood. In the murine syngeneic transplant setting, both Fas and FasL are acutely upregulated in bone marrow-homed donor cells; however, the Fas(+) cells are largely insensitive to FasL-induced apoptosis. In heterogeneous populations of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells and progenitors isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation, trimerization of the Fas receptor enhanced the clonogenic activity. Inhibition of caspases 3 and 8 did not affect the trophic signals mediated by Fas, yet it efficiently blocked the apoptotic pathways. Fas-mediated tropism appears to be of physiological significance, as pre-exposure of donor cells to FasL improved the radioprotective qualities of hematopoietic progenitors, resulting in superior survival of myeloablated hosts. Under these conditions, the activity of long-term reconstituting cells was not affected, as determined in sequential secondary and tertiary transplants. Dual caspase-independent tropic and caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling place the Fas receptor at an important junction of activation and death. This regulatory mechanism of hematopoietic homeostasis activates progenitors to promote the recovery from aplasia and converts into a negative regulator in distal stages of cell differentiation. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  19. The tale of early hematopoietic cell seeding in the bone marrow niche.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Farkas, Daniel L; Askenasy, Nadir

    2006-02-01

    Since introduction of the notion of a "niche" that hosts engraftment and activity of hematopoietic cells, there is a massive effort to discover its structure and decipher its function. Our understanding of the niche is continuously changing with reinterpretation of traditional concepts and apprehension of new insights into the biology of hematopoietic cell homing, seeding, and engraftment. Here we discuss some of the early events in hematopoietic stem cell seeding and engraftment and propose a perspective based on visualization of labeled bone marrow cells in real time in vivo. Primary seeding of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow niches evolves as a complex and dynamic process; however, it follows discrete topological and chronological patterns. Initial seeding occurs on the endosteal surface of the marrow, which includes heterogeneous niches for primary seeding. Several days after transplantation the endosteal niches become more restrictive, hosting primarily mitotically quiescent cells, and gradual centripetal migration is accompanied by engagement in proliferation and differentiation. The hematopoietic niches evolve as heterogeneous three-dimensional microenvironments that are continuously changing over time.

  20. Bone Marrow Microenvironment Modulation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Blake S; Slone, William L; Thomas, Patrick; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Angel, Peggi M; Walsh, Callee M; Cantrell, Pamela S; Rellick, Stephanie L; Martin, Karen H; Simpkins, James W; Gibson, Laura F

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment regimens have dramatically improved the survival of ALL patients. However, chemoresistant minimal residual disease (MRD) that persists following cessation of therapy contributes to aggressive relapse. The bone marrow microenvironment (BMM) is an established “site of sanctuary” for ALL as well as myeloid lineage hematopoietic disease, with signals in this unique anatomical location contributing to drug resistance. Several models have been developed to recapitulate the interactions between the BMM and ALL cells. However, many in vitro models fail to accurately reflect the level of protection afforded to the most resistant sub-set of leukemic cells during co-culture with BMM elements. Pre-clinical in vivo models have advantages, but can be costly, and are often not fully informed by optimal in vitro studies. In the current report we describe an innovative extension of 2D co-culture wherein ALL cells uniquely interact with bone marrow derived stromal cells. Tumor cells in this model bury beneath primary human bone marrow derived stromal cells or osteoblasts, termed “phase dim” (PD) ALL, and exhibit a unique phenotype characterized by altered metabolism, distinct protein expression profiles, increased quiescence, and pronounced chemotherapy resistance. Investigation focused on the PD subpopulation may more efficiently inform pre-clinical design and investigation of MRD and relapse that arises from BMM supported leukemic tumor cells. PMID:26407636

  1. Transcriptomic Microenvironment of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Yohan; Sazonova, Olga; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Bastien, Nathalie; Conti, Massimo; Pagé, Sylvain; Trahan, Sylvain; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Background: Tissues surrounding tumors are increasingly studied to understand the biology of cancer development and identify biomarkers.Methods: A unique geographic tissue sampling collection was obtained from patients that underwent curative lobectomy for stage I pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Tumor and nontumor lung samples located at 0, 2, 4, and 6 cm away from the tumor were collected. Whole-genome gene expression profiling was performed on all samples (n = 5 specimens × 12 patients = 60). Analyses were carried out to identify genes differentially expressed in the tumor compared with adjacent nontumor lung tissues at different distances from the tumor as well as to identify stable and transient genes in nontumor tissues with respect to tumor proximity.Results: The magnitude of gene expression changes between tumor and nontumor sites was similar with increasing distance from the tumor. A total of 482 up- and 843 downregulated genes were found in tumors, including 312 and 566 that were consistently differentially expressed across nontumor sites. Twenty-nine genes induced and 34 knocked-down in tumors were also identified. Tumor proximity analyses revealed 15,700 stable genes in nontumor lung tissues. Gene expression changes across nontumor sites were subtle and not statistically significant.Conclusions: This study describes the transcriptomic microenvironment of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent nontumor lung tissues collected at standardized distances relative to the tumor.Impact: This study provides further insights about the molecular transitions that occur from normal tissue to lung adenocarcinoma and is an important step to develop biomarkers in nonmalignant lung tissues. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 389-96. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Catalog of gene expression in adult neural stem cells and their in vivo microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Cecilia; Wirta, Valtteri; Meletis, Konstantinos; Wikstroem, Lilian; Carlsson, Leif; Frisen, Jonas; Lundeberg, Joakim . E-mail: joakim.lundeberg@biotech.kth.se

    2006-06-10

    Stem cells generally reside in a stem cell microenvironment, where cues for self-renewal and differentiation are present. However, the genetic program underlying stem cell proliferation and multipotency is poorly understood. Transcriptome analysis of stem cells and their in vivo microenvironment is one way of uncovering the unique stemness properties and provides a framework for the elucidation of stem cell function. Here, we characterize the gene expression profile of the in vivo neural stem cell microenvironment in the lateral ventricle wall of adult mouse brain and of in vitro proliferating neural stem cells. We have also analyzed an Lhx2-expressing hematopoietic-stem-cell-like cell line in order to define the transcriptome of a well-characterized and pure cell population with stem cell characteristics. We report the generation, assembly and annotation of 50,792 high-quality 5'-end expressed sequence tag sequences. We further describe a shared expression of 1065 transcripts by all three stem cell libraries and a large overlap with previously published gene expression signatures for neural stem/progenitor cells and other multipotent stem cells. The sequences and cDNA clones obtained within this framework provide a comprehensive resource for the analysis of genes in adult stem cells that can accelerate future stem cell research.

  3. Combining Intravital Fluorescent Microscopy (IVFM) with Genetic Models to Study Engraftment Dynamics of Hematopoietic Cells to Bone Marrow Niches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; Zollman, Amy; Carlesso, Nadia

    2017-03-21

    Increasing evidence indicates that normal hematopoiesis is regulated by distinct microenvironmental cues in the BM, which include specialized cellular niches modulating critical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions(1)(,)(2). Indeed, a more detailed picture of the hematopoietic microenvironment is now emerging, in which the endosteal and the endothelial niches form functional units for the regulation of normal HSC and their progeny(3)(,)(4)(,)(5). New studies have revealed the importance of perivascular cells, adipocytes and neuronal cells in maintaining and regulating HSC function(6)(,)(7)(,)(8). Furthermore, there is evidence that cells from different lineages, i.e. myeloid and lymphoid cells, home and reside in specific niches within the BM microenvironment. However, a complete mapping of the BM microenvironment and its occupants is still in progress. Transgenic mouse strains expressing lineage specific fluorescent markers or mice genetically engineered to lack selected molecules in specific cells of the BM niche are now available. Knock-out and lineage tracking models, in combination with transplantation approaches, provide the opportunity to refine the knowledge on the role of specific "niche" cells for defined hematopoietic populations, such as HSC, B-cells, T-cells, myeloid cells and erythroid cells. This strategy can be further potentiated by merging the use of two-photon microscopy of the calvarium. By providing in vivo high resolution imaging and 3-D rendering of the BM calvarium, we can now determine precisely the location where specific hematopoietic subsets home in the BM and evaluate the kinetics of their expansion over time. Here, Lys-GFP transgenic mice (marking myeloid cells)(9) and RBPJ knock-out mice (lacking canonical Notch signaling)(10) are used in combination with IVFM to determine the engraftment of myeloid cells to a Notch defective BM microenvironment.

  4. CD34+ hematopoietic precursors are present in human decidua and differentiate into natural killer cells upon interaction with stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Paola; Vitale, Chiara; Montaldo, Elisa; Conte, Romana; Cantoni, Claudia; Fulcheri, Ezio; Darretta, Valeria; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the main lymphoid population in the maternal decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. Decidual NK (dNK) cells display a unique functional profile and play a key role in promoting tissue remodeling, neoangiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, little information exists on their origin and development. Here we discovered CD34+ hematopoietic precursors in human decidua (dCD34+). We show that dCD34+ cells differ from cord blood- or peripheral blood-derived CD34+ precursors. The expression of IL-15/IL-2 receptor common β-chain (CD122), IL-7 receptor α-chain (CD127), and mRNA for E4BP4 and ID2 transcription factors suggested that dCD34+ cells are committed to the NK cell lineage. Moreover, they could undergo in vitro differentiation into functional (i.e., IL-8– and IL-22–producing) CD56brightCD16−KIR+/− NK cells in the presence of growth factors or even upon coculture with decidual stromal cells. Their NK cell commitment was further supported by the failure to undergo myeloid differentiation in the presence of GM-CSF. Our findings strongly suggest that decidual NK cells may directly derive from CD34+ cell precursors present in the decidua upon specific cellular interactions with components of the decidual microenvironment. PMID:21248224

  5. Bone Niches, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, and Vessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tamma, Roberto; Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) is a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are localized in both the endosteum, in the so-called endosteal niche, and close to thin-walled and fenestrated sinusoidal vessel in the center of BM, in the so-called vascular niche. HSCs give rise to all types of mature blood cells through a process finely controlled by numerous signals emerging from the bone marrow niches where HSCs reside. This review will focus on the description of the role of BM niches in the control of the fate of HSCs and will also highlight the role of the BM niches in the regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Moreover, alterations of the signals in niche microenvironment are involved in many aspects of tumor progression and vascularization and further knowledge could provide the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28098778

  6. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  7. Effects of erythropoietin on the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    McGee, S J; Havens, A M; Shiozawa, Y; Jung, Y; Taichman, R S

    2012-02-01

    It has been well established that blood and bone share a unique, regulatory relationship with one another, though the specifics of this relationship still remain unanswered. Erythropoietin (Epo) is known primarily for its role as a hematopoietic hormone. However, after the discovery of Epo receptor outside the hematopoietic tissues, Epo has been avidly studied for its possible nonhematopoietic effects. It has been proposed that Epo interacts with bone both directly, by activating bone marrow stromal cells, and indirectly, through signaling pathways on hematopoietic stem cells. Yet, the role of Epo in regulating skeletal maintenance and regeneration remains controversial. Here, we review the current state of knowledge pertaining to the effects of Epo on the skeleton.

  8. Engineering biomolecular microenvironments for cell instructive biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Catarina A; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2014-06-01

    Engineered cell instructive microenvironments with the ability to stimulate specific cellular responses are a topic of high interest in the fabrication and development of biomaterials for application in tissue engineering. Cells are inherently sensitive to the in vivo microenvironment that is often designed as the cell "niche." The cell "niche" comprising the extracellular matrix and adjacent cells, influences not only cell architecture and mechanics, but also cell polarity and function. Extensive research has been performed to establish new tools to fabricate biomimetic advanced materials for tissue engineering that incorporate structural, mechanical, and biochemical signals that interact with cells in a controlled manner and to recapitulate the in vivo dynamic microenvironment. Bioactive tunable microenvironments using micro and nanofabrication have been successfully developed and proven to be extremely powerful to control intracellular signaling and cell function. This Review is focused in the assortment of biochemical signals that have been explored to fabricate bioactive cell microenvironments and the main technologies and chemical strategies to encode them in engineered biomaterials with biological information.

  9. The combined influence of substrate elasticity and ligand density on the viability and biophysical properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji S; Harley, Brendan A C

    2012-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity to give rise to all blood and immune cells in the body. HSCs are housed in a specialized microenvironment known as the stem cell niche, which provides intrinsic and extrinsic signals to regulate HSC fate: quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization, homing, and apoptosis. These niches provide a complex, three dimensional (3D) microenvironment consisting of cells, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and ECM-bound or soluble biomolecules that provides cellular, structural, and molecular signals that regulate HSC fate decisions. In this study, we examined the decoupled effects of substrate elasticity, construct dimensionality, and ligand concentration on the biophysical properties of primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) using homologous series of two and three dimensional microenvironments. Microenvironments were chosen to span the range of biophysical environments presented physiologically within the bone marrow, ranging from soft marrow and adipose tissue (<1 kPa), to surrounding cell membranes (1-3 kPa), to developing osteoid (>30 kPa). We additionally investigated the influence of collagen ligand density on HSPC biophysical parameters and compared these behaviors to those observed in HSPCs grown in culture on stiff glass substrates. This work suggests the potential for substrate stiffness and ligand density to directly affect the biophysical properties of primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells at the single cell level and that these parameters may be critical design criteria for the development of artificial HSC niches.

  10. Activated macrophages in the tumour microenvironment – dancing to the tune of TLR and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, Simon; Escorcio-Correia, Monica; Soper, Robin; Schultheiss, Anne; Hagemann, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    A large number of variables have been identified which appear to influence macrophage phenotype within the tumour microenvironment. These include reciprocal chemical and physical interactions with tumour cells and with non-malignant cells of the tumour microenvironment, tissue oxygen tension, and the origin and prior experience of the particular macrophage population. In this review we outline the key evidence for these influences and consider how macrophage phenotype is acquired and the relevance of the TLR/NF-κB pathway. PMID:19662665

  11. Hyaluronan Is Required for Generation of Hematopoietic Cells during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, Ingrid U.; Serobyan, Naira; Loring, Jeanne; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia K.

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an important component of the microenvironment in bone marrow, but its role in regulation of the development of hematopoietic cells is not well understood. To address the role of HA in regulation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation into the hematopoietic lineage, we screened for genes encoding components of the HA pathway. Using gene arrays, we found that HA synthases and HA receptors are expressed in both undifferentiated and differentiating hESCs. Enzymatic degradation of HA resulted in decreased numbers of hematopoietic progenitors and lower numbers of CD45+ cells generated in HA-deprived embryoid bodies (EBs). In addition, deprivation of HA resulted in the inhibition of generation of CD31+ cells, stromal fibroblast-like cells and contracting myocytes in EBs. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry revealed that HA deprivation did not influence the dynamics of OCT4 expression, but decreased the expression of BRY, an early mesoderm marker, and BMP2, a later mesoderm marker in differentiating EBs. In addition, the endoderm markers α-FP and SOX17 were decreased, whereas the expression of the ectoderm markers GFAP and FGF5 was higher in HA-deprived cultures. Our findings indicate that endogenously produced HA contributes to the network that regulates the differentiation of hESC and the generation of mesodermal lineage in general and hematopoietic cells specifically. PMID:20861924

  12. Aging promotes neoplastic disease through effects on the tissue microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Doratiotto, Silvia; Sini, Marcella; Fanti, Maura; Cadoni, Erika; Serra, Monica; Laconi, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the complex relationship between aging and cancer will provide important tools for the prevention and treatment of neoplasia. In these studies, the hypothesis was tested that aging may fuel carcinogenesis via alterations imposed in the tissue microenvironment. Preneoplastic hepatocytes isolated from liver nodules were orthotopically injected into either young or old syngeneic rats and their fate was followed over time using the dipeptidyl-peptidase type IV (DPPIV) system to track donor-derived-cells. At 3 months post-Tx, the mean size of donor-derived clusters was 11±3 cells in young vs. 42±8 in old recipients. At 8 months post-Tx, no visible lesion were detected in any of 21 young recipients, while 17/18 animals transplanted at old age displayed hepatic nodules, including 7 large tumors. All tumors expressed the DPPIV marker enzyme, indicating that they originated from transplanted cells. Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was common in liver of 18-month old animals, while it was a rare finding in young controls. Finally, both mRNA and IL6 protein were found to be increased in the liver of aged rats compared to young controls. These results are interpreted to indicate that the microenvironment of the aged liver promotes the growth of pre-neoplastic hepatocytes. PMID:27929382

  13. Fusion-derived epithelial cancer cells express hematopoietic markers and contribute to stem cell and migratory phenotype in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Mallika; Mathur, Sandeep R; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2013-09-01

    For a long time, the external milieu of cancer cells was considered to be of secondary importance when compared with its intrinsic properties. That has changed now as the microenvironment is considered to be a major contributing factor toward the progression of tumor. In this study, we show that in human and mouse epithelial ovarian carcinoma and mouse lung carcinoma, the interaction between tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and epithelial cancer cells results in their fusion. Intriguingly, even after the fusion event, cancer cells retain the expression of the pan-hematopoietic marker (CD45) and various markers of hematopoietic lineage, including those of hematopoietic stem cells, indicating that the hematopoietic genome is not completely reprogrammed. This observation may have implications on the bone marrow contribution to the cancer stem cell population. Interestingly, it was seen that in both cancer models, the expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was largely contributed to by the fused compartment of cancer cells. We hypothesize that the superior migratory potential gained by the cancer cells due to the fusion helps in its dissemination to various secondary organs upon activation of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis. We are the first to report the presence of a hemato-epithelial cancer compartment, which contributes to stem cell markers and CXCR4 in epithelial carcinoma. This finding has repercussions on CXCR4-based therapeutics and opens new avenues in discovering novel molecular targets against fusion and metastasis.

  14. Erythropoietin couples erythropoiesis, B-lymphopoiesis, and bone homeostasis within the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Singbrant, Sofie; Russell, Megan R; Jovic, Tanja; Liddicoat, Brian; Izon, David J; Purton, Louise E; Sims, Natalie A; Martin, T John; Sankaran, Vijay G; Walkley, Carl R

    2011-05-26

    Erythropoietin (Epo) has been used in the treatment of anemia resulting from numerous etiologies, including renal disease and cancer. However, its effects are controversial and the expression pattern of the Epo receptor (Epo-R) is debated. Using in vivo lineage tracing, we document that within the hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineage, expression of Epo-R is essentially restricted to erythroid lineage cells. As expected, adult mice treated with a clinically relevant dose of Epo had expanded erythropoiesis because of amplification of committed erythroid precursors. Surprisingly, we also found that Epo induced a rapid 26% loss of the trabecular bone volume and impaired B-lymphopoiesis within the bone marrow microenvironment. Despite the loss of trabecular bone, hematopoietic stem cell populations were unaffected. Inhibition of the osteoclast activity with bisphosphonate therapy blocked the Epo-induced bone loss. Intriguingly, bisphosphonate treatment also reduced the magnitude of the erythroid response to Epo. These data demonstrate a previously unrecognized in vivo regulatory network coordinating erythropoiesis, B-lymphopoiesis, and skeletal homeostasis. Importantly, these findings may be relevant to the clinical application of Epo.

  15. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the CXCR4-CXCL12 Axis--Untapped Potential in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Scala, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the CXC-chemokine receptor-4 pathway plays a role in cancer cell homing and metastasis, and thus represents a potential target for cancer therapy. The homeostatic microenvironment chemokine CXCL12 binds the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, activating divergent signals on multiple pathways, such as ERK1/2, p38, SAPK/JNK, AKT, mTOR, and the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK). An activating mutation in CXCR4 is responsible for a rare disease, WHIM syndrome (warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis), and dominant CXCR4 mutations have also been reported in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. The CXCR4-CXCL12 axis regulates the hematopoietic stem cell niche--a property that has led to the approval of the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor (AMD3100) for mobilization of hematopoietic precursors. In preclinical models, plerixafor has shown antimetastatic potential in vivo, offering proof of concept. Other antagonists are in preclinical and clinical development. Recent evidence demonstrates that inhibiting CXCR4 signaling restores sensitivity to CTLA-4 and PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, creating a new line for investigation. Targeting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis thus offers the possibility of affecting CXCR4-expressing primary tumor cells, modulating the immune response, or synergizing with other targeted anticancer therapies.

  16. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  17. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  18. Hematopoietic Processes in Eosinophilic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brittany M; Sehmi, Roma

    2017-01-24

    Airway eosinophilia is a hallmark of allergic asthma and understanding mechanisms that promote increases in lung eosinophil numbers is important for effective pharmaco-therapeutic development. It has become evident that expansion of hemopoietic compartments in the bone marrow promotes differentiation and trafficking of mature eosinophils to the airways. Hematopoietic progenitor cells egress the bone marrow and home to the lungs, where in-situ differentiative processes within the tissue provide an ongoing source of pro-inflammatory cells. In addition, hematopoietic progenitor cells in the airways can respond to locally-derived alarmins, to produce a panoply of cytokines thereby themselves acting as effector pro-inflammatory cells that potentiate type 2 responses in eosinophilic asthma. In this review, we will provide evidence for these findings and discuss novel targets for modulating eosinophilopoietic processes, migration and effector function of precursor cells.

  19. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  20. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in fetal lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Westlake, V J; Jolly, R D; Jones, B R; Mellor, D J; Machon, R; Zanjani, E D; Krivit, W

    1995-06-05

    Hematopoietic cells from the liver of normal 45-48-day-old fetal lambs (Hb type AA) were transplanted intraperitoneally into 58-60-day-old recipient fetuses (Hb type BB). The recipient fetuses resulted from mating homozygous ceroid-lipofuscinosis affected males with heterozygous, phenotypically normal, females. The sex of the donor fetus was also recorded. At age 2 1/2 months the recipient lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis were diagnosed by histopathology of brain biopsies. Monitoring of blood and bone marrow cells showed that an average of 9% of blood cells in ceroid-lipofuscinosis affected recipients were of donor origin. No differences were evident in the clinical course of disease, brain weight, or histopathology of organs between transplanted and non-transplanted lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Under the conditions of this experiment, transplantation of fetal hematopoietic cells was not beneficial.

  1. Lysyl Oxidase and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Hsia, Shih-Min; Shieh, Tzong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of oxidases contains a group of extracellular copper-dependent enzymes that catalyze the cross-linking of collagen and elastin by oxidation, thus maintaining the rigidity and structural stability of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Aberrant expression or activation of LOX alters the cellular microenvironment, leading to many diseases, including atherosclerosis, tissue fibrosis, and cancer. Recently, a number of studies have shown that LOX is overexpressed in most cancers and that it is involved in the regulation of tumor progression and metastasis. In contrast, a few reports have also indicated the tumor-suppressing role of LOX. In this short review, we discuss recent research on the correlations between LOX and cancer. Further, the role of LOX in tumor microenvironment remodeling, tumorigenesis, and metastasis and the underlying mechanisms have also been elucidated. PMID:28036074

  2. Advances in understanding the leukaemia microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Konopleva, Marina

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic interactions between leukaemic cells and cells of the bone marrow are a feature of haematological malignancies. Two distinct microenvironmental niches in the bone marrow, the 'osteoblastic (endosteal)' and 'vascular' niches, provide a sanctuary for subpopulations of leukaemic cells to evade chemotherapy-induced death and allow acquisition of drug resistance. Key components of the bone marrow microenvironment as a home for normal haematopoietic stem cells and the leukaemia stem cell niches, and the molecular pathways critical for microenvironment/leukaemia interactions via cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules as well as hypoxic conditions, are described in this review. Finally, the genetic abnormalities of leukaemia-associated stroma are discussed. Further understanding of the contribution of the bone marrow niche to the process of leukaemogenesis may provide new targets that allow destruction of leukaemia stem cells without adversely affecting normal stem cell self-renewal.

  3. Dynamic Reciprocity in the Wound Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Gregory S.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Bornstein, Paul; Herman, Ira M.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we define dynamic reciprocity (DR) as an ongoing, bidirectional interaction amongst cells and their surrounding microenvironment. In the review, we posit that DR is especially meaningful during wound healing as the DR-driven biochemical, biophysical and cellular responses to injury play pivotal roles in regulating tissue regenerative responses. Such cell-extracellular matrix interactions not only guide and regulate cellular morphology, but cellular differentiation, migration, proliferation, and survival during tissue development, including e.g. embryogenesis, angiogenesis, as well as during pathologic processes including cancer diabetes, hypertension and chronic wound healing. Herein, we examine DR within the wound microenvironment while considering specific examples across acute and chronic wound healing. This review also considers how a number of hypotheses that attempt to explain chronic wound pathophysiology, which may be understood within the DR framework. The implications of applying the principles of dynamic reciprocity to optimize wound care practice and future development of innovative wound healing therapeutics are also briefly considered. PMID:21362080

  4. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH), increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  5. Medulloblastoma—Biology and Microenvironment: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Tiara; Grossman, Robert G.; Ahmed, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a cancer of the cerebellum and the most common primary pediatric malignancy of the central nervous system. Classified as a primitive neural ectoderm tumor; it is thought to arise from granule cell precursors in the cerebellum. The standard of care consists of surgery, chemotherapy and age-dependent radiation therapy. Despite aggressive multimodality therapy; approximately 30% of MB patients remain incurable. Moreover, for long-term survivors, the treatment related sequelae are often debilitating. Side effects include cerebellar mutism, sterility, neurocognitive deficits, and a substantial risk of developing secondary cancers. In a quest for more effective and targeted therapies, scientists have begun to investigate the biological events that not only initiate but also sustain the malignant phenotype in MB. Of particular interest is, the role of the tumor microenvironment in tumor pathogenesis. This review seeks to highlight several key processes observed in cancer biology, particularly the involvement of the tumor microenvironment, with relevant examples from MB. PMID:22742590

  6. Defined three-dimensional microenvironments boost induction of pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Okawa, Yuya; Ranga, Adrian; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Tabata, Yoji; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), numerous approaches have been explored to improve the original protocol, which is based on a two-dimensional (2D) cell-culture system. Surprisingly, nothing is known about the effect of a more biologically faithful 3D environment on somatic-cell reprogramming. Here, we report a systematic analysis of how reprogramming of somatic cells occurs within engineered 3D extracellular matrices. By modulating microenvironmental stiffness, degradability and biochemical composition, we have identified a previously unknown role for biophysical effectors in the promotion of iPSC generation. We find that the physical cell confinement imposed by the 3D microenvironment boosts reprogramming through an accelerated mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and increased epigenetic remodelling. We conclude that 3D microenvironmental signals act synergistically with reprogramming transcription factors to increase somatic plasticity.

  7. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Michael S. Yu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0555 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...peptide (CMP) as a collagen targeting agents that will allow imaging of invasive PCa. Since CMP binds to unstructured collagens more readily, it is

  8. Role of PTEN in the Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    3Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry , College of Medicine; 4Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine; 5Center...7Department of Biochemistry , Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Center, 8McGill Center for Bioinformatics, 11Department of Oncology, McGill... Biochemistry Tumor Microenvironment Program The Ohio State University 810 Biomedical Research Tower 460 W. 12th Ave. Columbus, OH 43210 Telephone: 614

  9. Analyzing the Tumor Microenvironment by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Young, Yoon Kow; Bolt, Alicia M; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Mann, Koren K

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an essential tool for studying the tumor microenvironment. It allows us to quickly quantify and identify multiple cell types in a heterogeneous sample. A brief overview of flow cytometry instrumentation and the appropriate considerations and steps in building a good flow cytometry staining panel are discussed. In addition, a lymphoid tissue and solid tumor leukocyte infiltrate flow cytometry staining protocol and an example of flow cytometry data analysis are presented.

  10. Probing the tumor microenvironment: collection and induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James K.; Padgen, Michael R.; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Gertler, Frank; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2012-03-01

    The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, is under development as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a hydrogel blend that contains growth factors or other chemicals to be delivered to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel will swell and release these entrapped molecules, forming a gradient. Validation of the device has been performed in vitro using epidermal growth factor (EGF) and MenaINV, a highly invasive, rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In both 2-D and 3-D environments, cells migrated toward the gradient of EGF released from the device. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of White Leghorn chicken eggs is being utilized to grow xenograft tumors that will be used for ex vivo cell collection. Device optimization is being performed for in vivo use as a tool to collect the invasive cell population. Preliminary cell collection experiments in vivo were performed using a mouse model of breast cancer. As a second application, the device is being explored as a delivery vehicle for chemicals that induce controlled changes in the tumor microenvironment. H2O2 was loaded in the device and generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells near the device outlet. In the future, other induction targets will be explored, including hypoglycemia and the manipulation of extracellular matrix stiffness.

  11. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  12. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  13. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Féraud, Olivier; Valogne, Yannick; Melkus, Michael W.; Zhang, Yanyan; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Haddad, Rima; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Larbi, Aniya; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Divers, Dominique; Gobbo, Emilie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Louache, Fawzia; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process. PMID:26938212

  14. Hematopoietic Progenitors from Early Murine Fetal Liver Possess Hepatic Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Satish; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2008-01-01

    Bipotential hepatoblasts differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes during liver development. It is believed that hepatoblasts originate from endodermal tissue. Here, we provide evidence for the presence of hepatic progenitor cells in the hematopoietic compartment at an early stage of liver development. Flow cytometric analysis showed that at early stages of liver development, approximately 13% of CD45+ cells express Δ-like protein-1, a marker of hepatoblasts. Furthermore, reverse transcriptase-PCR data suggest that many hepatic genes are expressed in these cells. Cell culture experiments confirmed the hepatic differentiation potential of these cells with the loss of the CD45 marker. We observed that both hematopoietic activity in Δ-like protein-1+ cells and hepatic activity in CD45+ cells were high at embryonic day 10.5 and declined thereafter. Clonal analysis revealed that the hematopoietic fraction of fetal liver cells at embryonic day 10.5 gave rise to both hepatic and hematopoietic colonies. The above results suggest a common source of these two functionally distinct cell lineages. In utero transplantation experiments confirmed these results, as green fluorescent protein-expressing CD45+ cells at the same stage of development yielded functional hepatocytes and hematopoietic reconstitution. Since these cells were unable to differentiate into cytokeratin-19-expressing cholangiocytes, we distinguished them from hepatoblasts. This preliminary study provides hope to correct many liver diseases during prenatal development via transplantation of fetal liver hematopoietic cells. PMID:18988804

  15. Sinusoidal ephrin receptor EPHB4 controls hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyeongil; Salvucci, Ombretta; Weigert, Roberto; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Henkemeyer, Mark; Poulos, Michael G.; Butler, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow. Stress signals from cancer and other conditions promote HSPC mobilization into circulation and subsequent homing to tissue microenvironments. HSPC infiltration into tissue microenvironments can influence disease progression; notably, in cancer, HSPCs encourage tumor growth. Here we have uncovered a mutually exclusive distribution of EPHB4 receptors in bone marrow sinusoids and ephrin B2 ligands in hematopoietic cells. We determined that signaling interactions between EPHB4 and ephrin B2 control HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. In mice, blockade of the EPHB4/ephrin B2 signaling pathway reduced mobilization of HSPCs and other myeloid cells to the circulation. EPHB4/ephrin B2 blockade also reduced HSPC infiltration into tumors as well as tumor progression in murine models of melanoma and mammary cancer. These results identify EPHB4/ephrin B2 signaling as critical to HSPC mobilization from bone marrow and provide a potential strategy for reducing cancer progression by targeting the bone marrow. PMID:27820703

  16. Connexin-43 in the osteogenic BM niche regulates its cellular composition and the bidirectional traffic of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Nieto, Daniel; Li, Lina; Kohler, Anja; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Ishikawa, Eri; Sengupta, Amitava; Madhu, Malav; Arnett, Jorden L.; Santho, Rebecca A.; Dunn, Susan K.; Fishman, Glenn I.; Gutstein, David E.; Civitelli, Roberto; Barrio, Luis C.; Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Connexin-43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein involved in control of cell proliferation, differentiation and migration, has been suggested to have a role in hematopoiesis. Cx43 is highly expressed in osteoblasts and osteogenic progenitors (OB/P). To elucidate the biologic function of Cx43 in the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM) and its influence in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, we studied the hematopoietic function in an in vivo model of constitutive deficiency of Cx43 in OB/P. The deficiency of Cx43 in OB/P cells does not impair the steady state hematopoiesis, but disrupts the directional trafficking of HSC/progenitors (Ps) between the bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB). OB/P Cx43 is a crucial positive regulator of transstromal migration and homing of both HSCs and progenitors in an irradiated microenvironment. However, OB/P Cx43 deficiency in nonmyeloablated animals does not result in a homing defect but induces increased endosteal lodging and decreased mobilization of HSC/Ps associated with proliferation and expansion of Cxcl12-secreting mesenchymal/osteolineage cells in the BM HM in vivo. Cx43 controls the cellular content of the BM osteogenic microenvironment and is required for homing of HSC/Ps in myeloablated animals. PMID:22498741

  17. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-08-17

    The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population.

  18. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population. PMID:27399214

  19. Hypoxia and Metabolic Properties of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The effect of redox signaling on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is not clearly understood. Recent Advances: A growing body of evidence suggests that adult HSCs reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment or niche during homeostasis. It was recently shown that primitive HSCs in the bone marrow prefer to utilize anaerobic glycolysis to meet their energy demands and have lower rates of oxygen consumption and lower ATP levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (Hif-1α) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism. With hundreds of downstream target genes and crosstalk with other signaling pathways, it regulates various aspects of metabolism from the oxidative stress response to glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Hif-1α is highly expressed in HSCs, where it regulates their function and metabolic phenotype. However, the regulation of Hif-1α in HSCs is not entirely understood. The homeobox transcription factor myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Meis1) is expressed in the most primitive HSCs populations, and it is required for primitive hematopoiesis. Recent reports suggest that Meis1 is required for normal adult HSC function by regulating the metabolism and redox state of HSCs transcriptionally through Hif-1α and Hif-2α. Critical Issues: Given the profound effect of redox status on HSC function, it is critical to fully characterize the intrinsic, and microenvironment-related mechanisms of metabolic and redox regulation in HSCs. Future Directions: Future studies will be needed to elucidate the link between HSC metabolism and HSC fates, including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1891–1901. PMID:23621582

  20. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K.; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P.; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:28000662

  1. Lamins regulate cell trafficking and lineage maturation of adult human hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Won; Spinler, Kyle R.; Swift, Joe; Chasis, Joel A.; Mohandas, Narla; Discher, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as nucleated erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, reside preferentially in adult marrow microenvironments whereas other blood cells readily cross the endothelial barrier into the circulation. Because the nucleus is the largest organelle in blood cells, we hypothesized that (i) cell sorting across microporous barriers is regulated by nuclear deformability as controlled by lamin-A and -B, and (ii) lamin levels directly modulate hematopoietic programs. Mass spectrometry-calibrated intracellular flow cytometry indeed reveals a lamin expression map that partitions human blood lineages between marrow and circulating compartments (P = 0.00006). B-type lamins are highly variable and predominate only in CD34+ cells, but migration through micropores and nuclear flexibility in micropipette aspiration both appear limited by lamin-A:B stoichiometry across hematopoietic lineages. Differentiation is also modulated by overexpression or knockdown of lamins as well as retinoic acid addition, which regulates lamin-A transcription. In particular, erythroid differentiation is promoted by high lamin-A and low lamin-B1 expression whereas megakaryocytes of high ploidy are inhibited by lamin suppression. Lamins thus contribute to both trafficking and differentiation. PMID:24191023

  2. Innate immunity as orchestrator of bone marrow homing for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Kim, ChiHwa; Ratajczak, Janina; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The first step that precedes hematopoietic transplantation is elimination of pathological hematopoiesis by administration of myeloablative doses of radiochemotherapy. This eliminates hematolymphopoietic cells and at the same time damages hematopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). The damage of BM tissue leads to activation of complement cascade (CC), and bioactive CC cleavage fragments modulate several steps of BM recovery after transplantation of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs). Accordingly, C3 cleavage fragments (soluble C3a/desArgC3a and solid phase iC3b) and generation of soluble form of C5b-C9 also known as membrane attack complex (MAC) as well as release of antimicrobial cationic peptides from stromal cells (cathelicidin or LL-37 and beta-2 defensin) promote homing of HSPCs. To support this, C3 cleavage fragments and antimicrobial cationic peptides increase homing responsiveness of transplanted HSPCs to stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) gradient. Furthermore, damaged BM cells release several other chemoattractants for HSPCs such as bioactive lipids sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) and chemotactic purines (ATP and UTP). In this chapter, we will discuss the current view on homing of transplanted HSPCs into BM that in addition to SDF-1 is orchestrated by CC, antimicrobial cationic peptides, and several other prohoming factors. We also propose modulation of CC as a novel strategy to optimize/accelerate homing of HSPCs.

  3. Tunneling nanotubes mediate the transfer of stem cell marker CD133 between hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Doreen; Scheinpflug, Julia; Karbanová, Jana; Freund, Daniel; Bornhäuser, Martin; Corbeil, Denis

    2016-11-01

    Deciphering all mechanisms of intercellular communication used by hematopoietic progenitors is important, not only for basic stem cell research, but also in view of their therapeutic relevance. Here, we investigated whether these cells can produce the thin F-actin-based plasma membrane protrusions referred to as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), which are known to bridge cells over long distances without contact with the substratum and transfer cargo molecules along them in various biological processes. We found that human primary CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and leukemic KG1a cells develop such structures upon culture on primary mesenchymal stromal cells or specific extracellular-matrix-based substrata. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed that cell dislodgement is the primary mechanism responsible for TNT biogenesis. Surprisingly, we found that, among various cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, only the stem cell antigen CD133 is transferred between cells. It is selectively and directionally transported along the surface of TNTs in small clusters, such as cytoplasmic phospho-myosin light chain 2, suggesting that the latter actin motor protein might be implicated in this process. Our data provide new insights into the biology of hematopoietic progenitors that can contribute to our understanding of all facets of intercellular communication in the bone marrow microenvironment under healthy or cancerous conditions.

  4. Androgen, Estrogen and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    binding protein-5 expression. Xu C, Graf LF, Fazli L, Coleman IM, Mauldin DE, Li D, Nelson PS, Gleave M, Plymate SR, Cox ME, Torok-Storb BJ, Knudsen BS...Meeting presentations: Xu C, Graf LF, Fazli L, Nelson PS, Plymate SR, Cox ME, Torok-Storb BJ, Knudsen BS (2007) Androgen-regulation of the Bone...Marrow Microenvironment targets IGFBP-5. Innovative Minds in Prostate Cancer Today (IMPaCT). Atlanta, Georgia. P8-7. Xu C, Graf LF, Fazli L

  5. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  6. Immune suppressive mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Munn, David H; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Effective immunotherapy, whether by checkpoint blockade or adoptive cell therapy, is limited in most patients by a key barrier: the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Suppression of tumor-specific T cells is orchestrated by the activity of a variety of stromal myeloid and lymphoid cells. These often display inducible suppressive mechanisms that are triggered by the same anti-tumor inflammatory response that the immunotherapy intends to create. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of how the immunosuppressive milieu develops and persists is critical in order to harness the full power of immunotherapy of cancer.

  7. Plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, a number of cell culture and preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired by controversy and remained dormant. This chapter provides a brief review of evidence for HSC plasticity including our findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse. These studies strongly support the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and may be the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body.

  8. Ott1(Rbm15) has pleiotropic roles in hematopoietic development

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Glen D.; Mercher, Thomas; Shigematsu, Hirokazu; Williams, Ifor R.; Cullen, Dana E.; Akashi, Koichi; Bernard, Olivier A.; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2007-01-01

    OTT1(RBM15) was originally described as a 5′ translocation partner of the MAL(MKL1) gene in t(1,22)(p13;q13) infant acute mega karyocytic leukemia. OTT1 has no established physiological function, but it shares homology with the spen/Mint/SHARP family of proteins defined by three amino-terminal RNA recognition motifs and a carboxyl-terminal SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog carboxyl-terminal) domain believed to act as a transcriptional repressor. To define the role of OTT1 in hematopoiesis and help elucidate the mechanism of t(1,22) acute megakaryocytic leukemia pathogenesis, a conditional allele of Ott1 was generated in mice. Deletion of Ott1 in adult mice caused a loss of peripheral B cells due to a block in pro/pre-B differentiation. There is myeloid and megakaryocytic expansion in spleen and bone marrow, an increase in the Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ compartment that includes hematopoietic stem cells, and a shift in progenitor fate toward granulocyte differentiation. These data show a requirement for Ott1 in B lymphopoiesis, and inhibitory roles in the myeloid, megakaryocytic, and progenitor compartments. The ability of Ott1 to affect hematopoietic cell fate and expansion in multiple lineages is a novel attribute for a spen family member and delineates Ott1 from other known effectors of hematopoietic development. It is plausible that dysregulation of Ott1-dependent hematopoietic developmental pathways, in particular those affecting the megakaryocyte lineage, may contribute to OTT1-MAL-mediated leukemogenesis. PMID:17376872

  9. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; López-Contreras, Andrés J.; Martínez, Dolores; Cañamero, Marta; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Isern, Joan; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Méndez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative stress during embryonic development influences ageing and predisposition to disease in adults. A protective mechanism against replicative stress is provided by the licensing of thousands of origins in G1 that are not necessarily activated in the subsequent S-phase. These ‘dormant' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our results indicate that hematopoietic progenitors are particularly sensitive to replication stress, and full origin licensing ensures their correct differentiation and functionality. PMID:26456157

  10. Tumor archaeology: tracking leukemic evolution to its origins.

    PubMed

    Dick, John E

    2014-05-28

    Unearthing of the BRAF mutation in self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells reveals an unexpected origin for hairy cell leukemia-a mature B cell malignancy-and a potential new therapeutic target (Chung et al., this issue).

  11. The influence of the microenvironment on the malignant phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C. C.; Bissell, M. J.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. As tissue becomes cancerous, there are reciprocal interactions between neoplastic cells, adjacent normal cells such as stroma and endothelium, and their microenvironments. The current dominant paradigm wherein multiple genetic lesions provide both the impetus for, and the Achilles heel of, cancer might be inadequate to understand cancer as a disease process. In the following brief review, we will use selected examples to illustrate the influence of the microenvironment in the evolution of the malignant phenotype. We will also discuss recent studies that suggest novel therapeutic interventions might be derived from focusing on microenvironment and tumor cells interactions.

  12. Cytokine receptors and hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Robb, L

    2007-10-15

    Colony-stimulating factors and other cytokines signal via their cognate receptors to regulate hematopoiesis. In many developmental systems, inductive signalling determines cell fate and, by analogy with this, it has been postulated that cytokines, signalling via their cognate receptors, may play an instructive role in lineage specification in hematopoiesis. An alternative to this instructive hypothesis is the stochastic or permissive hypothesis. The latter proposes that commitment to a particular hematopoietic lineage is an event that occurs independently of extrinsic signals. It predicts that the role of cytokines is to provide nonspecific survival and proliferation signals. In this review, we look at the role of cytokine receptor signalling in hematopoiesis and consider the evidence for both hypotheses. Data from experiments that genetically manipulate receptor gene expression in vitro or in vivo are reviewed. Experiments in which cytokine receptors were installed in multipotential cells showed that, in some cases, stimulation with the cognate ligand could lead to alterations in lineage output. The creation of genetically manipulated mouse strains demonstrated that cytokine receptors are required for expansion and survival of single lineages but did not reveal a role in lineage commitment. We conclude that hematopoietic differentiation involves mainly stochastic events, but that cytokine receptors also have some instructive role.

  13. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Greco, Raffaella; Bondanza, Attilio; Vago, Luca; Moiola, Lucia; Rossi, Paolo; Furlan, Roberto; Martino, Gianvito; Radaelli, Marta; Martinelli, Vittorio; Carbone, Maria Rosaria; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Assanelli, Andrea; Bernardi, Massimo; Corti, Consuelo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Bonini, Chiara; Vezzulli, Paolo; Falini, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2014-03-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is a rare neurological autoimmune disorder characterized by a poor prognosis. Immunosuppression can halt disease progression, but some patients are refractory to multiple treatments, experiencing frequent relapses with accumulating disability. Here we report on durable clinical remissions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in 2 patients suffering from severe forms of the disease. Immunological data evidenced disappearance of the pathogenic antibodies and regeneration of a naive immune system of donor origin. These findings correlated with evident clinical and radiological improvement in both patients, warranting extended clinical trials to investigate this promising therapeutic option.

  14. Comparison of hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Yang, Shao-Guang; Xing, Wen; Lu, Shi-Hong; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Hong-Ying; Chi, Ying; Ma, Feng-Xia; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) shift from fetal liver and spleen to bone marrow at neonatal stages and this movement may be due to inductive signals from different microenvironments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursors of stromal cells in bone marrow microenvironments such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Some researchers speculated that fetal bone marrow before birth might be not perfectly suit HSC growth. However, it is still lack of direct evidence to prove this hypothesis. This study was aimed to compare the hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow MSC in vitro. Adult bone marrow MSC (ABM-MSC) were isolated from three healthy donors and fetal bone marrow MSC (FBM-MSC) were isolated from three fetuses between gestations of 19 to 20 weeks. After irradiation, MSC were co-cultured with CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood in long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. The colony number of colony forming cells (CFC) was counted and the phenotypic changes of co-cultured CD34(+) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine expressions in both kinds of MSC were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that ABM-MSC had a stronger hematopoietic supportive capacity than FBM-MSC. Both of them enhanced the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into myeloid lineages. Cytokines were expressed differently in ABM-MSC and FBM-MSC. It is concluded that ABM-MSC possess more potential application in some treatments than FBM-MSC, especially in hematopoietic reconstitution.

  15. Reticle storage in microenvironments with extreme clean dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettel, Astrid; Glüer, Detlev; Honold, Alfred

    2012-11-01

    Haze formation on the patterned metal surface of reticles is a known problem for IC manufacturers that can impact device yield and increase operational costs due to the need for more frequent cleaning of the reticles. Storage of reticles in an ultraclean environment can reduce haze formation and reduce operational costs. We examined the contamination levels of a new type of reticle stocker that stores reticles in microenvironments which are continuously purged with extreme clean dry air (XCDA). Each microenvironment consists of twelve vertically stacked reticle storage slots which can be opened at any slot. The design of the microenvironment includes an XCDA supply that provides a homogeneous horizontal flow of XCDA between the reticles. Figure 1. Reduction of contamination levels inside the storage microenvironment as a function of XCDA flow rate. As shown in Fig. 1, continuous XCDA purge reduces the contaminant levels inside the microenvironment. The amount of reduction depends on the XCDA purge flow rate and the chemical species. Volatile organic substances can be reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. Humidity is reduced less because the plastic material of the storage microenvironment incorporates water in its matrix and can release moisture to the extremely dry atmosphere. Chemical filters applied to mini- or microenvironments typically reduce the contaminant levels only by 95-99% and do not reduce the humidity. To pick and place reticles, the reticle storage microenvironment must be opened. The transient contaminant levels inside the empty microenvironment show an increase at the moment when the microenvironment is opened. Under the given conditions, the microenvironment returns to equilibrium levels with a time constant of 105 seconds (see Fig. 2). Similar dynamic response was measured for IPA and acetone. Figure 2. Transient humidity when the storage microenvironment was opened for reticle handling. The impact of handling on reticles stored inside

  16. Hematopoietic stem cells are pluripotent and not just "hematopoietic".

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2013-06-01

    Over a decade ago, several preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability (often referred to as HSC plasticity) of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired in controversy and remained dormant for almost a decade. This commentary provides a concise review of evidence for HSC plasticity, including more recent findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse and clinical transplantation studies. There is strong evidence for the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and are the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body. Also discussed are some biological and experimental issues that need to be considered in the future investigation of HSC plasticity.

  17. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  18. Tracking the elusive fibrocyte: Identification and characterization of collagen producing hematopoietic lineage cells during murine wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hirotaka; Rennert, Robert C.; Rodrigues, Melanie; Sorkin, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Januszyk, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrocytes are a unique population of circulating cells reported to exhibit characteristics of both hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells, and play an important role in wound healing. However putative fibrocytes have been found to lose expression of hematopoietic surface markers such as CD45 during differentiation, making it difficult to track these cells in vivo with conventional methodologies. In this study, to distinguish hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells without surface markers, we took advantage of the gene vav 1, which is expressed solely on hematopoietic cells but not on other cell types, and established a novel transgenic mouse, in which hematopoietic cells are irreversibly labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and non-hematopoietic cells with red fluorescent protein (RFP). Use of single-cell transcriptional analysis in this mouse model revealed two discrete types of collagen I (Col I) expressing cells of hematopoietic lineage recruited into excisional skin wounds. We confirmed this finding on a protein level, with one subset of these Col I synthesizing cells being CD45+ and CD11b+, consistent with the traditional definition of a fibrocyte, while another was CD45− and Cd11b−, representing a previously unidentified population. Both cell types were found to initially peak, then reduce post-healing, consistent with a disappearance from the wound site and not a loss of identifying surface marker expression. Taken together we have unambiguously identified two cells of hematopoietic origin that are recruited to the wound site and deposit collagen, definitively confirming the existence and natural time-course of fibrocytes in cutaneous healing. PMID:24446236

  19. Radiation and the Microenvironment - Tumorigenesis andTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Park, Catherine; Wright, Eric G.

    2005-10-01

    Radiation rapidly and persistently alters the soluble and insoluble components of the tissue microenvironment. This affects the cell phenotype, tissue composition and the physical interactions and signaling between cells. These alterations in the microenvironment can contribute to carcinogenesis and alter the tissue response to anticancer therapy. Examples of these responses and their implications are discussed with a view to therapeutic intervention.

  20. Role of tumor microenvironment in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maonan; Zhao, Jingzhou; Zhang, Lishen; Wei, Fang; Lian, Yu; Wu, Yingfeng; Gong, Zhaojian; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhou, Jianda; Cao, Ke; Li, Xiayu; Xiong, Wei; Li, Guiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Guo, Can

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a complex and dynamic process, consisting of three stages: initiation, progression, and metastasis. Tumors are encircled by extracellular matrix (ECM) and stromal cells, and the physiological state of the tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely connected to every step of tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that the vital components of the TME are fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, neuroendocrine cells, adipose cells, immune and inflammatory cells, the blood and lymphatic vascular networks, and ECM. This manuscript, based on the current studies of the TME, offers a more comprehensive overview of the primary functions of each component of the TME in cancer initiation, progression, and invasion. The manuscript also includes primary therapeutic targeting markers for each player, which may be helpful in treating tumors. PMID:28382138

  1. Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology have brought new approaches to cancer diagnosis and therapy. While enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) promotes nanoparticle (NP) extravasation, the abnormal tumor vasculature, high interstitial pressure and dense stroma structure limit homogeneous intratumoral distribution of NP and compromise their imaging and therapeutic effect. Moreover, heterogeneous distribution of NP in nontumor-stroma cells damages the nontumor cells, and interferes with tumor-stroma crosstalk. This can lead to inhibition of tumor progression, but can also paradoxically induce acquired resistance and facilitate tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Overall, the tumor microenvironment plays a crucial, yet controversial role in regulating NP distribution and their biological effects. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the stroma barriers for NP extravasation, and discuss the consequential effects of NP distribution in stroma cells. We also highlight design considerations to improve NP delivery and propose potential combinatory strategies to overcome acquired resistance induced by damaged stroma cells. PMID:25895870

  2. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  3. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  4. Diverse macrophages polarization in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Inmoo

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are traditional innate immune cells that play critical roles in the clearance of pathogens and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Accumulating evidence proves that macrophages affect cancer initiation and malignancy. Macrophages can be categorized into two extreme subsets, classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages based on their distinct functional abilities in response to microenvironmental stimuli. In a tumor microenvironment, tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are considered to be of the polarized M2 phenotype that enhances tumor progression and represent a poor prognosis. Furthermore, TAMs enhance tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression by secreting a series of cytokines, chemokines, and proteases. The regulation of macrophage polarization is considered to be a potential future therapy for cancer management.

  5. How the avian model has pioneered the field of hematopoietic development.

    PubMed

    Jaffredo, Thierry; Yvernogeau, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    The chicken embryo has a long history as a key model in developmental biology. Because of its distinctive developmental characteristics, it has contributed to major breakthroughs in the field of hematopoiesis. Among these, the discovery of B lymphocytes and the three rounds of thymus colonization; the embryonic origin of hematopoietic stem cells and the traffic between different hematopoietic organs; and the existence of two distinct endothelial cell lineages one angioblastic, restricted to endothelial cell production, and another, hemangioblastic, able to produce both endothelial and hematopoietic cells, should be cited. The avian model has also contributed to substantiate the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition associated with aortic hematopoiesis and the existence of the allantois as a hematopoietic organ. Because the immune system develops relatively late in aves, the avian embryo is used to probe the tissue-forming potential of mouse tissues through mouse-into-chicken chimeras, providing insights into early mouse development by circumventing the lethality associated with some genetic strains. Finally, the avian embryo can be used to investigate the differentiation potential of human ES cells in the context of a whole organism. The combinations of classic approaches with the development of powerful genetic tools make the avian embryo a great and versatile model.

  6. Targeting SDF-1 in multiple myeloma tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bouyssou, Juliette M C; Ghobrial, Irene M; Roccaro, Aldo M

    2016-09-28

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a type of B-cell malignancy that remains incurable to date. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays a crucial role in MM progression. The chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) is an important actor of the BM microenvironment that has the ability to regulate numerous processes related to its malignant transformation during MM development. The activity of SDF-1 is mainly mediated by its specific receptor CXCR4, which is expressed at the surface of MM cells and various other BM cell types. Current treatments available for MM patients mainly target tumor cells but have limited effects on the BM microenvironment. In this context, SDF-1 and CXCR4 represent ideal targets for the normalization of the MM-supportive BM microenvironment. The present review focuses on the activity of SDF-1 in the MM BM microenvironment and the current efforts carried out to target the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis for treatment of MM.

  7. Reconstitution of a metastatic-resistant tumor microenvironment with cancer-associated fibroblasts enables metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takuya; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tumor microenvironment is critical for metastasis to occur. Subcutaneous xenografts of tumors in immunodeficient mice are usually encapsulated and rarely metastasize as opposed to orthotopic tumors which metastasize if the original tumor was metastatic. In the present report, we were able to reconstitute a metastatic tumor microenvironment by subcutaneously co-transplanting a human cervical cancer cell line and human cervical cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), in athymic mice, which resulted in lymph node metastasis in 40% of the animals. In contrast, no metastasis occurred from the cervical cancer without CAFs. These results suggest that CAFs can overcome an anti-metastatic tumor environment and are a potential target to prevent metastasis. PMID:28103135

  8. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants. PMID:27600067

  9. Hierarchal Autophagic Divergence of Hematopoietic System*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan; Zhang, Suping; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Lin, Weiwei; Song, Lin; Fang, Yixuan; Wang, Zhijian; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Zhang, Xueguang; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is integral to hematopoiesis and protects against leukemogenesis. However, the fundamentals of the required molecular machinery have yet to be fully explored. Using conditional mouse models to create strategic defects in the hematopoietic hierarchy, we have shown that recovery capacities in stem cells and somatic cells differ if autophagy is impaired or flawed. An in vivo Atg7 deletion in hematopoietic stem cells completely ablates the autophagic response, leading to irreversible and ultimately lethal hematopoiesis. However, while no adverse phenotype is manifested in vivo by Atg7-deficient myeloid cells, they maintain active autophagy that is sensitive to brefeldin A, an inhibitor targeting Golgi-derived membranes destined for autophagosome formation in alternative autophagy. Removing Rab9, a key regulatory protein, in alternative autophagy, disables autophagy altogether in Atg7-deficient macrophages. Functional analysis indicates that ATG7-dependent canonical autophagy is physiologically active in both hematopoietic stem cells and in terminally differentiated hematopoietic cells; however, only terminally differentiated cells such as macrophages are rescued by alternative autophagy if canonical autophagy is ineffective. Thus, it appears that hematopoietic stem cells rely solely on ATG7-dependent canonical autophagy, whereas terminally differentiated or somatic cells are capable of alternative autophagy in the event that ATG7-mediated autophagy is dysfunctional. These findings offer new insight into the transformational trajectory of hematopoietic stem cells, which in our view renders the autophagic machinery in stem cells more vulnerable to disruption. PMID:26245898

  10. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Li; Chen, Ying-Ge

    2015-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect). Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT) and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment. PMID:25685782

  11. The Role of Chemoattractant Receptors in Shaping the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yi; Yoshimura, Teizo; Chen, Keqiang; Gong, Wanghua; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Ye; Yao, Xiaohong; Bian, Xiuwu; Wang, Ji Ming

    2014-01-01

    Chemoattractant receptors are a family of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) initially found to mediate the chemotaxis and activation of immune cells. During the past decades, the functions of these GPCRs have been discovered to not only regulate leukocyte trafficking and promote immune responses, but also play important roles in homeostasis, development, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. Accumulating evidence indicates that chemoattractant GPCRs and their ligands promote the progression of malignant tumors based on their capacity to orchestrate the infiltration of the tumor microenvironment by immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal cells. This facilitates the interaction of tumor cells with host cells, tumor cells with tumor cells, and host cells with host cells to provide a basis for the expansion of established tumors and development of distant metastasis. In addition, many malignant tumors of the nonhematopoietic origin express multiple chemoattractant GPCRs that increase the invasiveness and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, GPCRs and their ligands constitute targets for the development of novel antitumor therapeutics. PMID:25110692

  12. Enhancing the solubility of calcium phosphate ceramics by calcium salt infiltration for the purpose of hematopoietic stem cell culturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinghao

    The hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been unquestionably important to therapies that involve blood and immune system replacement. However, the in-vitro culture and the expansion of HSCs inhibit their application. This work aims to develop a composite biodegradable 3D scaffold that would simulate key aspects of the in-vivo microenvironment (niche) in which expansion of the hematopoietic stem cells takes place in human bone marrow. Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been chosen as a scaffold material because of its biocompatibility and the ability to create an osteogenic scaffold and thereby simulate trabecular bone that is known to be important to the HSC niche in bone marrow. It is hypothesized that the use of a Ca-rich HA scaffold will create a three dimensional, protective environment for HSCs and further promote their in-vitro expansion by releasing Ca ions into the culture medium. The first part of this study examined the processing of Ca-rich HA and the release of calcium ions into saline over time. The Ca-rich phase was introduced into the HA by an infiltration process and has been shown to release calcium into the culture medium over 42 days. The second part of this study examined the effect of the scaffold material on the fate of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS), a well-known endothelial progenitor model. The results showed, for the first time, that at least some HUVEC cells have hematopoietic potential and that the scaffold promoted differentiation down the hematopoietic cell lineage. This is thought to be due to hemangioblast character in the HUVEC cells which is also shared by HSCs. Finally the effects of the scaffold on the in-vitro co-culture of an osteoblast cell line and primary human bone marrow derived HSCs was studied. The infiltrated scaffolds were shown to stimulate the HSC population to differentiate down the hematopoietic lineage and also showed greater potential to differentiate down the HSC lineage in consequent CFU assays.

  13. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Biomaterials and Emerging Anticancer Therapeutics: Engineering the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment is increasingly recognized to play key roles in cancer, and biomaterials provide a means to engineer microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo to study and manipulate cancer. In vitro cancer models using 3D matrices recapitulate key elements of the tumor microenvironment and have revealed new aspects of cancer biology. Cancer vaccines based on some of the same biomaterials have, in parallel, allowed for the engineering of durable prophylactic and therapeutic anticancer activity in preclinical studies, and some of these vaccines have moved to clinical trials. The impact of biomaterials engineering on cancer treatment is expected to further increase in importance in the years to come. PMID:26694936

  15. The dominance of the microenvironment in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roskelley, Calvin D.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    That cancer development is a multistep process, driven in large part by genetic change, is well established. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that, prior to its emergence, the tumorigenic phenotype must overcome the suppressive effects of the surrounding microenvironment. Because the microenvironment is tissue-specific, cancer in each organ must develop unique strategies to overcome these normal epigenetic suppressors. Surprisingly, the induction of glandularity during the earliest stages of ovarian carcinoma development produces a microenvironment that has much in common with the normal mammary gland. This phenotypic convergence may explain why similar genetic and epigenetic changes appear to play a role in breast and ovarian tumor progression. PMID:12027581

  16. JAM-B regulates maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Frontera, Vincent; Bardin, Florence; Obrados, Elodie; Adams, Susanne; Chabannon, Christian; Schiff, Claudine; Mancini, Stephane J C; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2011-10-27

    In adult mammals, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) and are maintained in a quiescent and undifferentiated state through adhesive interactions with specialized microenvironmental niches. Although junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is expressed by HSCs, its function in adult hematopoiesis remains elusive. Here, we show that HSCs adhere to JAM-B expressed by BM stromal cells in a JAM-C dependent manner. The interaction regulates the interplay between HSCs and BM stromal cells as illustrated by the decreased pool of quiescent HSCs observed in jam-b deficient mice. We further show that this is probably because of alterations of BM stromal compartments and changes in SDF-1α BM content in jam-b(-/-) mice, suggesting that JAM-B is an active player in the maintenance of the BM stromal microenvironment.

  17. Vav1 promotes lung cancer growth by instigating tumor-microenvironment cross-talk via growth factor secretion.

    PubMed

    Sebban, Shulamit; Farago, Marganit; Rabinovich, Shiran; Lazer, Galit; Idelchuck, Yulia; Ilan, Lena; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2014-10-15

    Vav1 is a signal transducer that functions as a scaffold protein and a regulator of cytoskeleton organization in the hematopoietic system, where it is exclusively expressed. Recently, Vav1 was shown to be involved in diverse human cancers, including lung cancer. We demonstrate that lung cancer cells that abnormally express Vav1 secrete growth factors in a Vav1-dependent manner. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Vav1 depletion results in a marked reduction in the expression of colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF1), a hematopoietic growth factor. The association between Vav1 expression and CSF1 was further supported by signal transduction experiments, supporting involvement of Vav1 in regulating lung cancer secretome. Blocking of ERK phosphorylation, led to a decrease in CSF1 transcription, thus suggesting a role for ERK, a downstream effector of Vav1, in CSF1 expression. CSF1-silenced cells exhibited reduced focus formation, proliferation abilities, and growth in NOD/SCID mice. CSF1-silenced H358 cells resulted in significantly smaller tumors, showing increased fibrosis and a decrease in tumor infiltrating macrophages. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung tumors revealed a positive correlation between Vav1 and CSF1 expression, which was associated with tumor grade. Additional results presented herein suggest a potential cross-talk between cancer cells and the microenvironment controlled by CSF1/Vav1 signaling pathways.

  18. Vav1 promotes lung cancer growth by instigating tumor-microenvironment cross-talk via growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Lazer, Galit; Idelchuck, Yulia; Ilan, Lena; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Vav1 is a signal transducer that functions as a scaffold protein and a regulator of cytoskeleton organization in the hematopoietic system, where it is exclusively expressed. Recently, Vav1 was shown to be involved in diverse human cancers, including lung cancer. We demonstrate that lung cancer cells that abnormally express Vav1 secrete growth factors in a Vav1-dependent manner. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Vav1 depletion results in a marked reduction in the expression of colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF1), a hematopoietic growth factor. The association between Vav1 expression and CSF1 was further supported by signal transduction experiments, supporting involvement of Vav1 in regulating lung cancer secretome. Blocking of ERK phosphorylation, led to a decrease in CSF1 transcription, thus suggesting a role for ERK, a downstream effector of Vav1, in CSF1 expression. CSF1-silenced cells exhibited reduced focus formation, proliferation abilities, and growth in NOD/SCID mice. CSF1-silenced H358 cells resulted in significantly smaller tumors, showing increased fibrosis and a decrease in tumor infiltrating macrophages. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung tumors revealed a positive correlation between Vav1 and CSF1 expression, which was associated with tumor grade. Additional results presented herein suggest a potential cross-talk between cancer cells and the microenvironment controlled by CSF1/Vav1 signaling pathways. PMID:25313137

  19. Investigating the interaction between hematopoietic stem cells and their niche during embryonic development: optimizing the isolation of fetal and newborn stem cells from liver, spleen, and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Williams, Brenda; Nilsson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in a particular microenvironment termed a "niche." Within the niche, a number of critical molecules and supportive cell types have been identified to play key roles in modulating adult HSC quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and reconstitution. However, unlike in the adult bone marrow (BM), the components of stem cell niches, as well as their interactions with fetal HSC during different stages of embryonic development, are poorly understood. During embryogenesis, hematopoietic development migrates through multiple organs, each with different cellular and molecular components and hence each with a potentially unique HSC niche. As a consequence, isolating fetal HSC from each organ at the time of hematopoietic colonization is fundamental for assessing and understanding both HSC function and their interactions with specific microenvironments. Herein, we describe methodologies for harvesting cells as well as the purification of stem and progenitors from fetal and newborn liver, spleen, and BM at various developmental stages following the expansion of hematopoiesis in the fetal liver at E14.5.

  20. Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Epidemiologic studies have shown associations between air pollution concentrations measured at central-site ambient monitors and adverse health outcomes. Using central-site concentrations as exposure surrogates, however, can lead to exposure errors due to time spent in various indoor and outdoor microenvironments (ME) with pollutant concentrations that can be substantially different from central-site concentrations. These exposure errors can introduce bias and incorrect confidence intervals in health effect estimates, which diminish the power of such studies to establish correct conclusions about the exposure and health effects association. The significance of this issue was highlighted in the National Research Council (NRC) Report “Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter”, which recommends that EPA address exposure error in health studies. To address this limitation, we developed MicroTrac, an automated classification model that estimates time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from personal global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded boundaries of buildings (e.g., home, work, school). MicroTrac has several innovative design features: (1) using GPS signal quality to account for GPS signal loss inside certain buildings, (2) spatial buffering of building boundaries to account for the spatial inaccuracy of the GPS device, and (3) temporal buffering of GPS positi

  1. Targeting the Metabolic Microenvironment of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kate M.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation of aerobic glycolysis by tumor cells in 1924 by Otto Warburg, and subsequent innovation of imaging glucose uptake by tumors in patients with PET-CT has incited a renewed interest in the altered metabolism of tumors. As tumors grow in situ, a fraction of it is further away from their blood supply, leading to decreased oxygen concentrations (hypoxia), which induces the hypoxia response pathways of HIF1α, mTOR and UPR. In normal tissues, these responses mitigate hypoxic stress and induce neo-angiogenesis. In tumors, these pathways are dysregulated and lead to decreased perfusion and exacerbation of hypoxia as a result of immature and chaotic blood vessels. Hypoxia selects for a glycolytic phenotype and resultant acidification of the tumor microenvironment, facilitated by upregulation of proton transporters. Acidification selects for enhanced metastatic potential and reduced drug efficacy through ion trapping. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of pre-clinical and clinical drugs under development for targeting aerobic glycolysis, acidosis, hypoxia and hypoxia-response pathways. Hypoxia and acidosis can be manipulated, providing further therapeutic benefit for cancers that feature these common phenotypes. PMID:22959024

  2. The Tumor Microenvironment in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric W.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Hicks, Philip D.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease, ranking sixth among all cancers in mortality. Despite incremental advances in diagnostics and therapeutics, esophageal cancer still carries a poor prognosis, and thus there remains a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease. There is accumulating evidence that a comprehensive understanding of the molecular composition of esophageal cancer requires attention to not only tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment, which contains diverse cell populations, signaling factors, and structural molecules that interact with tumor cells and support all stages of tumorigenesis. In esophageal cancer, environmental exposures can trigger chronic inflammation, which leads to constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that promote survival and proliferation. Anti-tumor immunity is attenuated by cell populations such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as immune checkpoints like programmed death-1 (PD-1). Other immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages can have other pro-tumorigenic functions, including the induction of angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete growth factors and alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a tumor niche and enhance tumor cell migration and metastasis. Further study of how these TME components relate to the different stages of tumor progression in each esophageal cancer subtype will lead to development of novel and specific TME-targeting therapeutic strategies, which offer considerable potential especially in the setting of combination therapy. PMID:26923327

  3. Isolation and analysis of hematopoietic stem cells from the placenta.

    PubMed

    Gekas, Christos; E Rhodes, Katrin; K A Mikkola, Hanna

    2008-06-24

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the ability to self-renew and generate all cell types of the blood lineages throughout the lifetime of an individual. All HSCs emerge during embryonic development, after which their pool size is maintained by self-renewing cell divisions. Identifying the anatomical origin of HSCs and the critical developmental events regulating the process of HSC development has been complicated as many anatomical sites participate during fetal hematopoiesis. Recently, we identified the placenta as a major hematopoietic organ where HSCs are generated and expanded in unique microenvironmental niches (Gekas, et al 2005, Rhodes, et al 2008). Consequently, the placenta is an important source of HSCs during their emergence and initial expansion. In this article, we show dissection techniques for the isolation of murine placenta from E10.5 and E12.5 embryos, corresponding to the developmental stages of initiation of HSCs and the peak in the size of the HSC pool in the placenta, respectively. In addition, we present an optimized protocol for enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of placental tissue into single-cell suspension for use in flow cytometry or functional assays. We have found that use of collagenase for single-cell suspension of placenta gives sufficient yields of HSCs. An important factor affecting HSC yield from the placenta is the degree of mechanical dissociation prior to, and duration of, enzymatic treatment. We also provide a protocol for the preparation of fixed-frozen placental tissue sections for the visualization of developing HSCs by immunohistochemistry in their precise cellular niches. As hematopoietic specific antigens are not preserved during preparation of paraffin embedded sections, we routinely use fixed frozen sections for localizing placental HSCs and progenitors.

  4. CD47 update: a multifaceted actor in the tumour microenvironment of potential therapeutic interest.

    PubMed

    Sick, E; Jeanne, A; Schneider, C; Dedieu, S; Takeda, K; Martiny, L

    2012-12-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitous 50 kDa five-spanning membrane receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. This receptor, also known as integrin-associated protein, mediates cell-to-cell communication by ligation to transmembrane signal-regulatory proteins SIRPα and SIRPγ and interacts with integrins. CD47 is also implicated in cell-extracellular matrix interactions via ligation with thrombospondins. Furthermore, CD47 is involved in many and diverse cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation, adhesion and migration. It also plays a key role in many immune and cardiovascular responses. Thus, this multifaceted receptor might be a central actor in the tumour microenvironment. Solid tumours are composed of not only cancer cells that actively proliferate but also other cell types including immune cells and fibroblasts that make up the tumour microenvironment. Tumour cell proliferation is strongly sustained by continuous sprouting of new vessels, which also represents a gate for metastasis. Moreover, infiltration of inflammatory cells is observed in most neoplasms. Much evidence has accumulated indicating that infiltrating leukocytes promote cancer progression. Given its ubiquitous expression on all the different cell types that compose the tumour microenvironment, targeting CD47 could represent an original therapeutic strategy in the field of oncology. We present a current overview of the biological effects associated with CD47 on cancer cells and stromal cells.

  5. Ionizing radiation and hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Marusyk, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    Somatic evolution, which underlies tumor progression, is driven by two essential components: (1) diversification of phenotypes through heritable mutations and epigenetic changes and (2) selection for mutant clones which possess higher fitness. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) is highly associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis. This link is traditionally attributed to causation of oncogenic mutations through the mutagenic effects of irradiation. On the other hand, potential effects of irradiation on altering fitness and increasing selection for mutant clones are frequently ignored. Recent studies bring the effects of irradiation on fitness and selection into focus, demonstrating that IR exposure results in stable reductions in the fitness of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. These reductions of fitness are associated with alteration of the adaptive landscape, increasing the selective advantages conferred by certain oncogenic mutations. Therefore, the link between irradiation and carcinogenesis might be more complex than traditionally appreciated: while mutagenic effects of irradiation should increase the probability of occurrence of oncogenic mutations, IR can also work as a tumor promoter, increasing the selective expansion of clones bearing mutations which become advantageous in the irradiation-altered environment, such as activated mutations in Notch1 or disrupting mutations in p53. PMID:20676038

  6. De novo AML exhibits greater microenvironment dysregulation compared to AML with myelodysplasia-related changes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Pereira, João Kleber Novais; de Melo Campos, Paula; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara T Olalla; Favaro, Patricia

    2017-01-13

    The interaction between the bone marrow microenvironment and malignant hematopoietic cells can result in the protection of leukemia cells from chemotherapy in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We, herein, characterized the changes in cytokine expression and the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in patients with MDS, AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (MRC), a well-recognized clinical subtype of secondary AML, and de novo AML. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of MDS-MSC on T lymphocyte proliferation and no significant differences in any of the cytokines tested. AML-MSC inhibited T-cell proliferation only at a very low MSC/T cell ratio. When compared to the control, AML-MRCderived MSC presented a significant increase in IL6 expression, whereas de novo AML MSC presented a significant increase in the expression levels of VEGFA, CXCL12, RPGE2, IDO, IL1β, IL6 and IL32, followed by a decrease in IL10 expression. Furthermore, data indicate that IL-32 regulates stromal cell proliferation, has a chemotactic potential and participates in stromal cell crosstalk with leukemia cells, which could result in chemoresistance. Our results suggest that the differences between AML-MRC and de novo AML also extend into the leukemic stem cell niche and that IL-32 can participate in the regulation of the bone marrow cytokine milieu.

  7. De novo AML exhibits greater microenvironment dysregulation compared to AML with myelodysplasia-related changes

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Pereira, João Kleber Novais; de Melo Campos, Paula; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara T. Olalla; Favaro, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the bone marrow microenvironment and malignant hematopoietic cells can result in the protection of leukemia cells from chemotherapy in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We, herein, characterized the changes in cytokine expression and the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in patients with MDS, AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (MRC), a well-recognized clinical subtype of secondary AML, and de novo AML. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of MDS-MSC on T lymphocyte proliferation and no significant differences in any of the cytokines tested. AML-MSC inhibited T-cell proliferation only at a very low MSC/T cell ratio. When compared to the control, AML-MRCderived MSC presented a significant increase in IL6 expression, whereas de novo AML MSC presented a significant increase in the expression levels of VEGFA, CXCL12, RPGE2, IDO, IL1β, IL6 and IL32, followed by a decrease in IL10 expression. Furthermore, data indicate that IL-32 regulates stromal cell proliferation, has a chemotactic potential and participates in stromal cell crosstalk with leukemia cells, which could result in chemoresistance. Our results suggest that the differences between AML-MRC and de novo AML also extend into the leukemic stem cell niche and that IL-32 can participate in the regulation of the bone marrow cytokine milieu. PMID:28084439

  8. Hydrogels in Healthcare: From Static to Dynamic Material Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Chelsea M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in hydrogel design have revolutionized the way biomaterials are applied to address biomedical needs. Hydrogels were introduced in medicine over 50 years ago and have evolved from static, bioinert materials to dynamic, bioactive microenvironments, which can be used to direct specific biological responses such as cellular ingrowth in wound healing or on-demand delivery of therapeutics. Two general classes of mechanisms, those defined by the user and those dictated by the endogenous cells and tissues, can control dynamic hydrogel microenvironments. These highly tunable materials have provided bioengineers and biological scientists with new ways to not only treat patients in the clinic but to study the fundamental cellular responses to engineered microenvironments as well. Here, we provide a brief history of hydrogels in medicine and follow with a discussion of the synthesis and implementation of dynamic hydrogel microenvironments for healthcare-related applications. PMID:23929381

  9. Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model helps track air quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    MicroTrac is a model that uses global positioning system (GPS) data to estimate time of day and duration that people spend in different microenvironments (e.g., indoors and outdoors at home, work, school).

  10. Role of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells traffic into the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ.

    PubMed

    Mendt, Mayela; Cardier, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) plays an essential role in the homing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to bone marrow (BM). It is not known whether SDF-1 may also regulate the homing of HSPCs to the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Here, we investigated the possible role of SDF-1 in attracting HSPCs to the liver during experimental EMH induced by the hematopoietic mobilizers G-CSF, AMD3100 and phenylhydrazine (PHZ). Mice treated with G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ showed a significant increase in the expression of SDF-1 in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) microenvironments. Liver from mice treated with the hematopoietic mobilizers showed HSPCs located adjacent to the LSEC microenvironments, expressing high levels of SDF-1. An inverse relationship was found between the hepatic SDF-1 levels and those in the BM. In vitro, LSEC monolayers induced the migration of HSPCs, and this effect was significantly reduced by AMD3100. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence showing that SDF-1 expressed by LSEC can be a major player in the recruitment of HSPCs to the liver during EMH induced by hematopoietic mobilizers.

  11. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor micro-environment induces a form of “accelerated aging,” which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy (“self-eating”) in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy “fuel” and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a “mutagenic motor” and allows cancer cells to buffer—at a distance—exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of “accelerated host aging” in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively “cutting off the fuel supply” for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:21654190

  12. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  13. Fish Oil–Rich Diet Promotes Hematopoiesis and Alters Hematopoietic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ping; Cheng, Lu; Han, Mu-tian; Zhang, Miao-miao; Shao, Qi-xiang; Xu, Hua-xi

    2015-01-01

    The self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow are essential to replenish all blood cell types, but how this process is influenced by diet remains largely unclear. Here we show that a diet rich in fish oils promotes self-renewal of HSCs and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Chronic intake of a fish oil–rich diet increases the abundance of HSCs, alters the hematopoietic microenvironment, and, intriguingly, induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) in the bone marrow. Pointing to a direct effect of fish oil on MMP12 expression, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce the expression of MMP12 in a dose-dependent manner in bone marrow cells. Importantly, down-regulation of MMP12 activity using an MMP12-specific inhibitor attenuates diet-induced myelopoiesis in both bone marrow and spleen. Thus, a fish oil–rich diet promotes hematopoiesis in the bone marrow and spleen, in part via the activity of MMP12. Taken together, these data provide new insights into diet-mediated regulation of hematopoiesis. PMID:26061726

  14. CXCR4/CXCL12 axis counteracts hematopoietic stem cell exhaustion through selective protection against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanyan; Dépond, Mallorie; He, Liang; Foudi, Adlen; Kwarteng, Edward Owusu; Lauret, Evelyne; Plo, Isabelle; Desterke, Christophe; Dessen, Philippe; Fujii, Nobutaka; Opolon, Paule; Herault, Olivier; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Joulin, Virginie; Louache, Fawzia; Wittner, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo self-renewal to maintain hematopoietic homeostasis for lifetime, which is regulated by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 are critical factors supporting quiescence and BM retention of HSCs. Here, we report an unknown function of CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in the protection of HSCs against oxidative stress. Disruption of CXCR4 receptor in mice leads to increased endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in p38 MAPK activation, increased DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis leading to marked reduction in HSC repopulating potential. Increased ROS levels are directly responsible for exhaustion of the HSC pool and are not linked to loss of quiescence of CXCR4-deficient HSCs. Furthermore, we report that CXCL12 has a direct rescue effect on oxidative stress-induced HSC damage at the mitochondrial level. These data highlight the importance of CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in the regulation of lifespan of HSCs by limiting ROS generation and genotoxic stress. PMID:27886253

  15. Epigenetic and in vivo comparison of diverse MSC sources reveals an endochondral signature for human hematopoietic niche formation

    PubMed Central

    Etchart, Nathalie; Thomas, Daniel; Hofmann, Nicole A.; Fruehwirth, Margareta; Sinha, Subarna; Chan, Charles K.; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Seo, Eun-Young; Wearda, Taylor; Hartwig, Udo F.; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Trajanoski, Slave; Lin, Qiong; Wagner, Wolfgang; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Andreeff, Michael; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Majeti, Ravindra; Strunk, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a rapid expansion in clinical trials using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from a variety of tissues. However, despite similarities in morphology, immunophenotype, and differentiation behavior in vitro, MSCs sourced from distinct tissues do not necessarily have equivalent biological properties. We performed a genome-wide methylation, transcription, and in vivo evaluation of MSCs from human bone marrow (BM), white adipose tissue, umbilical cord, and skin cultured in humanized media. Surprisingly, only BM-derived MSCs spontaneously formed a BM cavity through a vascularized cartilage intermediate in vivo that was progressively replaced by hematopoietic tissue and bone. Only BM-derived MSCs exhibited a chondrogenic transcriptional program with hypomethylation and increased expression of RUNX3, RUNX2, BGLAP, MMP13, and ITGA10 consistent with a latent and primed skeletal developmental potential. The humanized MSC–derived microenvironment permitted homing and maintenance of long-term murine SLAM+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as well as human CD34+/CD38−/CD90+/CD45RA+ HSCs after cord blood transplantation. These studies underscore the profound differences in developmental potential between MSC sources independent of donor age, with implications for their clinical use. We also demonstrate a tractable human niche model for studying homing and engraftment of human hematopoietic cells in normal and neoplastic states. PMID:25406351

  16. [Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collection].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ines; Mazić, Sanja; Cepulić, Branka Golubić

    2009-01-01

    Summary. Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (PBSC) have numerous advatages in comparison with traditionally used bone marrow. PBSC collection by leukapheresis procedure is simpler and better tolerated than bone marrow harvest. PBCS are mobilized by myelosupressive chemotherapy or/and hematopoietic growth factors. Leukapheresis product contains PBSC along with lineage commited progenitors and precursors which contribute to faster hematopoietic recovery. In "poor mobilizers" options are large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) procedure or second generation of mobilising agents (pegfilgrastim, CXCR4 receptor antagonists). Total blood volume is processed 2-3 times in standard procedure compared to more than 3 times in LVL. LVL yields significantly higher numbers of CD34+ cells. Adverse effects of leukapheresis are electrolyte disbalance (hypocalcemia) caused by citrat administration and risk of bleeding due to trobocytopenia and heparin administration. PBSC collection and product quality control are regulated by national and international standards and recommendations.

  17. Estimating the number of hematopoietic or lymphoid stem cells giving rise to clonal chromosome aberrations in blood T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Kodama, Y; Ohtaki, K; Itoh, M; Awa, A A; Cologne, J; Kusunoki, Y; Nakamura, N

    2004-03-01

    Quantifying the proliferative capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells in humans is important for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Obtaining appropriate data is difficult, however, because the experimental tools are limited. We hypothesized that tracking clonal descendants originating from hematopoietic stem cells would be possible if we used clonal chromosome aberrations as unique tags of individual hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Using FISH, we screened 500 blood T lymphocytes from each of 513 atomic bomb survivors and detected 96 clones composed of at least three cells with identical aberrations. The number of clones was inversely related to their population size, which we interpreted to mean that the progenitor cells were heterogeneous in the number of progeny that they could produce. The absolute number of progenitor cells contributing to the formation of the observed clones was estimated as about two in an unexposed individual. Further, scrutiny of ten clones revealed that lymphocyte clones could originate roughly equally from hematopoietic stem cells or from mature T lymphocytes, thereby suggesting that the estimated two progenitor cells are shared as one hematopoietic stem cell and one mature T cell. Our model predicts that one out of ten people bears a non- aberrant clone comprising >10% of the total lymphocytes, which indicates that clonal expansions are common and probably are not health-threatening.

  18. The Effects of Zoledronic Acid in the Bone and Vasculature Support of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Soki, Fabiana N.; Li, Xin; Berry, Janice; Koh, Amy; Sinder, Benjamin P.; Qian, Xu; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Taichman, Russell S.; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are maintained in a tightly regulated bone microenvironment constituted by a rich milieu of cells. Bone cells such as osteoblasts are associated with niche maintenance as regulators of the endosteal microenvironment. Bone remodeling also plays a role in HSC mobilization although it is poorly defined. The effects of zoledronic acid (ZA), a potent bisphosphonate that inhibits bone resorption, were investigated on bone marrow cell populations focusing on HSCs, and the endosteal and vascular niches in bone. ZA treatment significantly increased bone volume and HSCs in both young and adult mice (4 week and 4 month old, respectively). ZA increased vessel numbers with no overall change in vascular volume in bones of young and had no effect on vasculature in adult mice. Since both young and adult mice had increased HSCs and bone mass with differing vasculature responses, this suggests that ZA indirectly supports HSCs via the osteoblastic niche and not the vascular niche. Additionally, gene expression in Lin- cells demonstrated increased expression of self-renewal-related genes Bmi1 and Ink4a suggesting a role of ZA in the modulation of cell commitment and differentiation toward a long-term self-renewing cell. Genes that support the osteoblastic niche, BMP2 and BMP6 were also augmented in ZA treated mice. In conclusion, ZA-induced HSC expansion occurs independent of the vascular niche via indirect modulation of the osteoblastic niche. PMID:22833499

  19. XactMice: humanizing mouse bone marrow enables microenvironment reconstitution in a patient-derived xenograft model of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morton, J. Jason; Bird, Gregory; Keysar, Stephen B.; Astling, David P.; Lyons, Traci R; Anderson, Ryan T.; Glogowska, Magdalena J.; Estes, Patricia; Eagles, Justin R.; Le, Phuong N.; Gan, Gregory; McGettigan, Brett; Fernandez, Pamela; Padilla-Just, Nuria; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Song, John I.; Bowles, Daniel W.; Schedin, Pepper; Tan, Aik-Choon; Roop, Dennis R.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of cancer cell lines have led to the development of direct patient derived xenograft (PDX) models. However, the interplay between the implanted human cancer cells and recruited mouse stromal and immune cells alters the tumor microenvironment and limits the value of these models. To overcome these constraints, we have developed a technique to expand human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and use them to reconstitute the radiation-depleted bone marrow of a NOD/SCID/IL2rg−/− (NSG) mouse on which a patient’s tumor is then transplanted (XactMice). The human HSPCs produce immune cells that home into the tumor and help replicate its natural microenvironment. Despite previous passage on nude mice, the expression of epithelial, stromal, and immune genes in XactMice tumors aligns more closely to that of the patient tumor than to those grown in non-humanized mice – an effect partially facilitated by human cytokines expressed by both the HSPC progeny and the tumor cells. The human immune and stromal cells produced in the XactMice can help recapitulate the microenvironment of an implanted xenograft, reverse the initial genetic drift seen after passage on non-humanized mice, and provide a more accurate tumor model to guide patient treatment. PMID:25893296

  20. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. TLR-mediated albuminuria needs TNFα-mediated cooperativity between TLRs present in hematopoietic tissues and CD80 present on non-hematopoietic tissues in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Khullar, Bhavya; Oswal, Neelam; Banoth, Balaji; Joshi, Prashant; Ravindran, Balachandran; Panda, Subrat; Basak, Soumen; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Sopory, Shailaja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transient albuminuria induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in mice through engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is widely studied as a partial model for some forms of human nephrotic syndrome (NS). In addition to TLRs, CD80 has been shown to be essential for PAMP-mediated albuminuria. However, the mechanistic relationships between TLRs, CD80 and albuminuria remain unclear. Here, we show that albuminuria and CD80-uria induced in mice by many TLR ligands are dependent on the expression of TLRs and their downstream signalling intermediate MyD88 exclusively in hematopoietic cells and, conversely, on CD80 expression exclusively in non-hematopoietic cells. TNFα is crucial for TLR-mediated albuminuria and CD80-uria, and induces CD80 expression in cultured renal podocytes. IL-10 from hematopoietic cells ameliorates TNFα production, albuminuria and CD80-uria but does not prevent TNFα-mediated induction of podocyte CD80 expression. Chitohexaose, a small molecule originally of parasite origin, mediates TLR4-dependent anti-inflammatory responses, and blocks TLR-mediated albuminuria and CD80-uria through IL-10. Thus, TNFα is a prominent mediator of renal CD80 induction and resultant albuminuria in this model, and small molecules modulating TLR-mediated inflammatory activation might have contributory or adjunct therapeutic potential in some contexts of NS development. PMID:27125280

  2. Exosome mediated communication within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Singh, Amit; Mattheolabakis, George; Suresh, Megha; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-12-10

    It is clear that exosomes (endosome derived vesicles) serve important roles in cellular communication both locally and distally and that the exosomal process is abnormal in cancer. Cancer cells are not malicious cells; they are cells that represent 'survival of the fittest' at its finest. All of the mutations, abnormalities, and phenomenal adaptations to a hostile microenvironment, such as hypoxia and nutrient depletion, represent the astute ability of cancer cells to adapt to their environment and to intracellular changes to achieve a single goal - survival. The aberrant exosomal process in cancer represents yet another adaptation that promotes survival of cancer. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, but more importantly, the content of cancer cells is distinct. An illustrative distinction is that exosomes derived from cancer cells contain more microRNA than healthy cells and unlike exosomes released from healthy cells, this microRNA can be associated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) which is required for processing mature and biologically active microRNA. Cancer derived exosomes have the ability to transfer metastatic potential to a recipient cell and cancer exosomes function in the physical process of invasion. In this review we conceptualize the aberrant exosomal process (formation, content selection, loading, trafficking, and release) in cancer as being partially attributed to cancer specific differences in the endocytotic process of receptor recycling/degradation and plasma membrane remodeling and the function of the endosome as a signaling entity. We discuss this concept and, to advance comprehension of exosomal function in cancer as mediators of communication, we detail and discuss exosome biology, formation, and communication in health and cancer; exosomal content in cancer; exosomal biomarkers in cancer; exosome mediated communication in cancer metastasis, drug resistance, and interfacing with the immune system; and

  3. The human chorion contains definitive hematopoietic stem cells from the fifteenth week of gestation.

    PubMed

    Muench, Marcus O; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Gormley, Matthew; Gutierrez, Alan G; Ponder, Kathryn L; Fomin, Marina E; Beyer, Ashley I; Stolp, Haley; Qi, Zhongxia; Fisher, Susan J; Bárcena, Alicia

    2017-04-15

    We examined the contribution of the fetal membranes, amnion and chorion, to human embryonic and fetal hematopoiesis. A population of cells displaying a hematopoietic progenitor phenotype (CD34(++) CD45(low)) of fetal origin was present in the chorion at all gestational ages, associated with stromal cells or near blood vessels, but was absent in the amnion. Prior to 15 weeks of gestation, these cells lacked hematopoietic in vivo engraftment potential. Differences in the chemokine receptor and β1 integrin expression profiles of progenitors between the first and second trimesters suggest that these cells had gestationally regulated responses to homing signals and/or adhesion mechanisms that influenced their ability to colonize the stem cell niche. Definitive hematopoietic stem cells, capable of multilineage and long-term reconstitution when transplanted in immunodeficient mice, were present in the chorion from 15-24 weeks gestation, but were absent at term. The second trimester cells also engrafted secondary recipients in serial transplantation experiments. Thus, the human chorion contains functionally mature hematopoietic stem cells at mid-gestation.

  4. Stage-specific roles for CXCR4 signaling in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in the process of bone marrow repopulation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Okabe, Motohito; Suzuki, Sachie; Maeyama, Yoshihiro; Iimura, Yasuaki; Onodera, Masafumi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation has proven beneficial for various intractable diseases, but it remains unclear how hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) home to the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, initiate hematopoietic reconstitution, and maintain life-long hematopoiesis. The use of newly elucidated molecular determinants for overall HSPC engraftment should benefit patients. Here, we report that modification of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (Cxcr4) signaling in murine HSPCs does not significantly affect initial homing/lodging events, but leads to alteration in subsequent BM repopulation kinetics, with observations confirmed by both gain- and loss-of-function approaches. By using C-terminal truncated Cxcr4 as a gain-of-function effector, we demonstrated that signal augmentation likely led to favorable in vivo repopulation of primitive cell populations in BM. These improved features were correlated with enhanced seeding efficiencies in stromal cell cocultures and altered ligand-mediated phosphorylation kinetics of extracellular signal-regulated kinases observed in Cxcr4 signal-augmented HSPCs in vitro. Unexpectedly, however, sustained signal enhancement even with wild-type Cxcr4 overexpression resulted in impaired peripheral blood (PB) reconstitution, most likely by preventing release of donor hematopoietic cells from the marrow environment. We thus conclude that timely regulation of Cxcr4/CXCR4 signaling is key in providing donor HSPCs with enhanced repopulation potential following transplantation, whilst preserving the ability to release HSPC progeny into PB for improved transplantation outcomes.

  5. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Vermylen, C; Cornu, G

    1997-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only therapy able to cure sickle cell anemia at the present time. So far, transplantations have been undertaken in approximatively 140 sickle cell patients all over the world, with good results. The selection of patients for transplantation remains a subject of dilemma because of the unpredictable course of the disease and the lack of valuable prognostic markers. The selection criteria accepted so far concern young patients under the age of 16, with a morbid course of the disease and having a HLA-compatible sibling. In Belgium, patients going back to their country of origin were also considered for transplantation. For 100 patients who underwent transplantation in Europe, the current Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival, event-free survival, and disease-free survival rates are 90%, 79%, and 81%, respectively. Benefits and side effects are analyzed.

  7. Metastasis genetics, epigenetics, and the tumor microenvironment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KISS1 is a member of a family of genes known as metastasis suppressors, defined by their ability to block metastasis without blocking primary tumor development and growth. KISS1 re-expression in multiple metastatic cell lines of diverse cellular origin suppresses metastasis; yet, still allows comple...

  8. Liver regeneration microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma for prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanmin; Zhang, Lisheng

    2017-01-01

    Research on liver cancer prevention and treatment has mainly focused on the liver cancer cells themselves. Currently, liver cancers are no longer viewed as only collections of genetically altered cells but as aberrant organs with a plastic stroma, matrix, and vasculature. Improving the microenvironment of the liver to promote liver regeneration and repair by affecting immune function, inflammation and vasculature can regulate the dynamic imbalance between normal liver regeneration and repair and abnormal liver regeneration, thus improving the microenvironment of liver regeneration for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer. This review addresses the basic theory of the liver regeneration microenvironment, including the latest findings on immunity, inflammation and vasculature. Attention is given to the potential design of molecular targets in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In an effort to improve the liver regeneration microenvironment of HCC, researchers have extensively utilized the enhancement of immunity, anti-inflammation and the vasculature niche, which are discussed in detail in this review. In addition, the authors summarize the latest pro-fibrotic transition characteristics of the vascular niche and review potential cell therapies for liver disease. PMID:27655683

  9. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  10. The First Tianjin, China Forum on Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Evan T.; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Although it is well recognized that the tumor microenvironment plays a key role in regulating tumor progression the mechanisms through which this occurs need to be defined. Current international research activities towards defining the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression were the subject of the 1st Tianjin Forum on Tumor Microenvironment held at Nankai University in Tianjin, China, July 2 to 4, 2010. The importance of variety of processes, such as inflammation and angiogenesis, in the role of tumor progression were described for multiple tumor types including breast, prostate, and hepatic cancers as well as the process of bone metastasis. Identification of novel signaling pathways that impact both angiogenesis and bone remodeling were presented. Several themes emerged from this meeting including that (1) tumor cells modify the microenvironment to enhance their own survival and progression; (2) targeting host factors, in addition to targeting tumor cells, will have important therapeutic effects; and (3) host cells distribution within the tumor has both prognostic and therapeutic significance. Several priorities for future research were defined including use of a systems biology approach to define the role of host factors in tumor progression; defining the importance of targeting both arms of the bone remodeling process for therapy of bone metastasis and determining how different cell subsets contribute to microenvironment-mediated regulation of tumor progression. PMID:21224351

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gurudutta, Gangenahalli

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are endowed with a distinct potential to bolster self-renewal and to generate progeny that differentiate into mature cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Both hematopoietic stem cells and mature cells have the same genome, but their gene expression is controlled by an additional layer of epigenetics such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, enabling each cell-type to acquire various forms and functions. Until recently, several studies have largely focussed on the transcription factors andniche factors for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which hematopoietic cells replicate and differentiate. Several lines of emerging evidence suggest that epigenetic modifications eventually result in a defined chromatin structure and an “individual” gene expression pattern, which play an essential role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Distinct epigenetic marks decide which sets of genes may be expressed and which genes are kept silent. Epigenetic mechanisms are interdependent and ensure lifelong production of blood and bone marrow, thereby contributing to stem cell homeostasis. The epigenetic analysis of hematopoiesis raises the exciting possibility that chromatin structure is dynamic enough for regulated expression of genes. Though controlled chromatin accessibility plays an essential role in maintaining blood homeostasis; mutations in chromatin impacts on the regulation of genes critical to the development of leukemia. In this review, we explored the contribution of epigenetic machinery which has implications for the ramification of molecular details of hematopoietic self-renewal for normal development and underlying events that potentially co-operate to induce leukemia. PMID:27426084

  12. Galectin-3 in bone tumor microenvironment: a beacon for individual skeletal metastasis management.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kosei; Kho, Dong Hyo; Yanagawa, Takashi; Zimel, Melissa; Heath, Elisabeth; Hogan, Victor; Raz, Avraham

    2016-06-01

    The skeleton is frequently a secondary growth site of disseminated cancers, often leading to painful and devastating clinical outcomes. Metastatic cancer distorts bone marrow homeostasis through tumor-derived factors, which shapes different bone tumor microenvironments depending on the tumor cells' origin. Here, we propose a novel insight on tumor-secreted Galectin-3 (Gal-3) that controls the induction of an inflammatory cascade, differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and bone marrow cells, resulting in bone destruction and therapeutic failure. In the approaching era of personalized medicine, the current treatment modalities targeting bone metastatic environments are provided to the patient with limited consideration of the cancer cells' origin. Our new outlook suggests delivering individual tumor microenvironment treatments based on the expression level/activity/functionality of tumor-derived factors, rather than utilizing a commonly shared therapeutic umbrella. The notion of "Gal-3-associated bone remodeling" could be the first step toward a specific personalized therapy for each cancer type generating a different bone niche in patients afflicted with non-curable bone metastasis.

  13. Retinoic Acid Receptor γ Regulates B and T Lymphopoiesis via Nestin-Expressing Cells in the Bone Marrow and Thymic Microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Chacko; Nota, Celeste; Fletcher, Jessica L; Maluenda, Ana C; Green, Alanna C; Purton, Louise E

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin A has essential but largely unexplained roles in regulating lymphopoiesis. We have previously shown that retinoic acid receptor (RAR) γ-deficient mice have hematopoietic defects, some phenotypes of which were microenvironment induced. Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment cells identified by either their expression of nestin (Nes) or osterix (Osx) have previously been shown to have roles in regulating lymphopoiesis. We therefore conditionally deleted Rarγ in Nes- or Osx-expressing microenvironment cells. Osx cell-specific deletion of Rarγ had no impact on hematopoiesis. In contrast, deletion of Rarγ in Nes-expressing cells resulted in reductions in peripheral blood B cells and CD4(+) T cells, accompanied by reductions of immature PreB cells in BM. The mice lacking Rarγ in Nes-expressing cells also had smaller thymi, with reductions in double-negative 4 T cell precursors, accompanied by reduced numbers of both TCRβ(low) immature single-positive CD8(+) cells and double-positive T cells. In the thymus, Nes expression was restricted to thymic stromal cells that expressed cerebellar degeneration-related Ag 1 and lacked expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule. These cells expressed platelet-derived growth factor α and high transcript levels of Rars, Cxcl12, and stem cell factor (Scf). Short-term treatment of mice with all-trans retinoic acid resulted in increased PreB lymphopoiesis in BM and an increase in thymic double-negative 4 T cells, inverse to that observed upon Nes cell-specific deletion of Rarγ. Collectively, these studies show that RARγ is a regulator of B and T lymphopoiesis via Nes-expressing cells in the BM and thymic microenvironments, respectively.

  14. Osteoblasts Are the Centerpiece of the Metastatic Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is comprised of diverse stromal cell populations in addition to tumor cells. Increasing evidence now clearly supports the role of microenvironment stromal cells in tumor progression and metastasis, yet the regulatory mechanisms and interactions among tumor and stromal cells remain to be elucidated. Bone metastasis is the major problem in many types of human malignancies including prostate, breast and lung cancers, and the biological basis of bone metastasis let alone curative approaches are largely undetermined. Among the many types of stromal cells in bone, osteoblasts are shown to be an important player. In this regard, osteoblasts are a key target cell type in the development of bone metastasis, but there are currently no drugs or therapeutic approaches are available that specifically target osteoblasts. This review paper summarizes the current knowledge on osteoblasts in the metastatic tumor microenvironment, aiming to provide clues and directions for future research endeavor. PMID:28029019

  15. microRNA-mediated regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jonathan; Shahi, Payam; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment includes cells such as fibroblasts, immune cells, endothelial cells, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM), proteases, and cytokines. Together, these components participate in a complex crosstalk with neoplastic tumor cells that affects growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and have recently emerged as important players involved in regulating multiple aspects of cancer biology and the tumor microenvironment. Differential miRNA expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartments of tumors compared with normal tissue suggests that miRNAs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the diverse roles of miRNAs involved in tumor microenvironment regulation and underscores the importance of miRNAs within multiple cell types that contribute to the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24036551

  16. Pi (Spleen)-deficiency syndrome in tumor microenvironment is the pivotal pathogenesis of colorectal cancer immune escape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Gang; Lin, Xiao-Chang; Diao, Jian-Xin; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Li, Kun

    2016-10-01

    Cancer immunoediting consists of three sequential phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape. For colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the adenoma dysplastic progression may represent an equilibrium phase and the cancer stage as escape phase. Immune system eliminates transformed enterocytes by destroying them at first, sculpts them at the same time and selects the variants subsequently that are no longer recognized and insensitive to immune effectors, and finally induces immunosuppressive state within the tumor microenvironment that facilitates immune escape and tumor outgrowth. Immunosuppression and inflammation are the two crucial features of Pi (Spleen)-deficiency. Classic quotations, immune evidence and clinical observations suggest that Spleen (but not other organs) deficiency is the key pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) microenvironment. Weakness of old age, immunosuppressive cytokines from chronic inflammation, tumor-derived immunosuppressive factors and surrendered immune cells-regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) constitutes CRC microenvironment of Pi-deficiency. Furthermore, excess in superficiality, such as phlegm stagnation, blood stasis and toxin accumulation are induced by chronic inflammation on the basis of asthenia in origin, an immunosuppressive state. Great masters of Chinese medicine emphasize that strengthen Pi is the chief therapeutic principle for CRC which receives good therapeutic effects. So, Pi-deficiency based syndrome is the pivotal pathogenesis of tumor microenvironment. The immunosuppressive microenvironment facilitates immune escape which play an important role in the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. There are some signs that strengthen Pi based treatment has potential capacity to ameliorate tumor environment. It might be a novel starting point to explore the mechanism of strengthen Pi based therapy in the prevention and treatment of CRC through regulation of

  17. Immunosuppression associated with chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to cancer development via multiple mechanisms. One potential mechanism is that chronic inflammation can generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that allows advantages for tumor formation and progression. The immunosuppressive environment in certain chronic inflammatory diseases and solid cancers is characterized by accumulation of proinflammatory mediators, infiltration of immune suppressor cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways in effector T cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of how immunosuppression contributes to cancer and how proinflammatory mediators induce the immunosuppressive microenvironment via induction of immunosuppressive cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways. PMID:26354776

  18. The Tumour Microenvironment after Radiotherapy: Mechanisms of Resistance and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Paget, James T. E.; Khan, Aadil A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focussed on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how they may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. Subsequently, we highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  19. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doney, Kristine C; Mielcarek, Marco; Stewart, F Marc; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used to treat a single disease with multiorgan involvement or 2 separate diseases, the first requiring SOT and the second often a possible complication of SOT. Results of such serial transplants have been reported sporadically in the literature, usually as single case studies. Thirteen autologous and 27 allogeneic HCTs after SOT published previously are summarized. A more detailed review is provided for an additional 16 patients transplanted at a single institution, 8 of whom had autologous and 8 of whom had allogeneic HCT after SOT. Five of 8 autologous transplant recipients are alive a median of 4.6 years after HCT. Four of 8 allogeneic HCT recipients are alive a median of 8.7 years after HCT. In carefully selected patients, HCT after SOT is feasible and associated with a low incidence of either solid organ or hematopoietic cell rejection.

  20. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  1. Epigenomics in hematopoietic transplantation: novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Engel, Nicole; Rank, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a high risk but curative treatment option for leukemia, myelodysplasia and other hematological malignancies. After high dose radio- or chemo-therapy, recipient's hematopoiesis is replaced by a new immunosystem and residual malignant cells are eliminated by the graft-versus-leukemia reaction. The benefit of this immunological effect is limited by the most frequent complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: graft-versus-host disease. In addition to their well-known anti-tumor activity, epigenetic drugs mediate immunotolerance without reducing alloreactivity or even enhance graft-versus-leukemia effect without inducing graft-versus-host disease by regulating cytokine release, increasing the circulating number of regulatory T cells and interacting with natural killer cells. We focus on the use of epigenetic drugs in the allogeneic transplantation setting in relation to their anti-tumor and immunomodulatory potential.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed. PMID:26731468

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-02-02

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead.

  4. DNA methylation profiling of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Begtrup, Amber Hogart

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark that is essential for properly functioning hematopoietic stem cells. Determining where functionally relevant DNA methylation marks exist in the genome is crucial to understanding the role that methylation plays in hematopoiesis. This chapter describes a method to profile DNA methylation by selectively enriching methylated DNA sequences that are bound in vitro by methyl-binding domain (MBD) proteins. The MBD-pulldown approach selects for DNA sequences that have the potential to be "read" by the endogenous machinery involved in epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, this approach is feasible with very small quantities of DNA, and is compatible with the use of any downstream high-throughput sequencing approach. This technique offers a reliable, simple, and powerful tool for exploration of the role of DNA methylation in hematopoietic stem cells.

  5. Studies of the Tumor Microenvironment in Pathogenesis of Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    of Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shahab Asgharzadeh, M D CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Los Angeles...2012 - 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Studies of the Tumor Microenvironment in Pathogenesis of Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The NBL-Tag neuroblastoma tumors were assessed for presence of macrophages and their role in promoting tumor growth

  6. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure has been developed to extend atomic oxygen modeling capability to include shadowing and reflections. The model uses average exposure conditions established by the direct exposure model and extends the application of these conditions to treat surfaces of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  7. Microenvironments and microscale productivity of cyanobacterial desert crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    We used microsensors to characterize physicochemical microenvironments and photosynthesis occurring immediately after water saturation in two desert soil crusts from southeastern Utah, which were formed by the cyanobacteria Microcoleus vaginatus Gomont, Nostoc spp., and Scytonema sp. The light fields within the crusts presented steep vertical gradients in magnitude and spectral composition. Near-surface light-trapping zones were formed due to the scattering nature of the sand particles, but strong light attenuation resulted in euphotic zones only ca. 1 mm deep, which were progressively enriched in longer wavelengths with depth. Rates of gross photosynthesis (3.4a??9.4 mmol O2A?ma??2A?ha??1) and dark respiration (0.81a??3.1 mmol Oa??2A?ma??2A?ha??1) occurring within 1 to several mm from the surface were high enough to drive the formation of marked oxygen microenvironments that ranged from oxygen supersaturation to anoxia. The photosynthetic activity also resulted in localized pH values in excess of 10, 2a??3 units above the soil pH. Differences in metabolic parameters and community structure between two types of crusts were consistent with a successional pattern, which could be partially explained on the basis of the microenvironments. We discuss the significance of high metabolic rates and the formation of microenvironments for the ecology of desert crusts, as well as the advantages and limitations of microsensor-based methods for crust investigation.

  8. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  9. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  10. Microenvironment-derived factors driving metastatic plasticity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Isabella S.; Heilmann, Silja; Kansler, Emily R.; Zhang, Yan; Zimmer, Milena; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Bowman, Robert L.; Simon-Vermot, Theresa; Fennell, Myles; Garippa, Ralph; Lu, Liang; Lee, William; Hollmann, Travis; Xavier, Joao B.; White, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular plasticity is a state in which cancer cells exist along a reversible phenotypic spectrum, and underlies key traits such as drug resistance and metastasis. Melanoma plasticity is linked to phenotype switching, where the microenvironment induces switches between invasive/MITFLO versus proliferative/MITFHI states. Since MITF also induces pigmentation, we hypothesize that macrometastatic success should be favoured by microenvironments that induce a MITFHI/differentiated/proliferative state. Zebrafish imaging demonstrates that after extravasation, melanoma cells become pigmented and enact a gene expression program of melanocyte differentiation. We screened for microenvironmental factors leading to phenotype switching, and find that EDN3 induces a state that is both proliferative and differentiated. CRISPR-mediated inactivation of EDN3, or its synthetic enzyme ECE2, from the microenvironment abrogates phenotype switching and increases animal survival. These results demonstrate that after metastatic dissemination, the microenvironment provides signals to promote phenotype switching and provide proof that targeting tumour cell plasticity is a viable therapeutic opportunity. PMID:28181494

  11. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    malignancies. However, a subset of localized cancers resist genotoxic treatments, and most advanced cancers treated with such therapies eventually progress...NF-κB, and found the physical interaction between these molecules when cells are exposed to genotoxicity . We anticipate that targeting such a key...PCa medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, microenvironment, DNA damage, genotoxicity , stroma, secretion, therapy resistance, outcome. 16

  12. Screening the Cellular Microenvironment: A Role for Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Warrick, Jay W.; Murphy, William L.; Beebe, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular microenvironment is an increasingly discussed topic in cell biology as it has been implicated in the progression of cancer and the maintenance of stem cells. The microenvironment of a cell is an organized combination of extracellular matrix (ECM), cells, and interstitial fluid that influence cellular phenotype through physical, mechanical, and biochemical mechanisms. Screening can be used to map combinations of cells and microenvironments to phenotypic outcomes in a way that can help develop more predictive in vitro models and to better understand phenotypic mechanisms from a systems biology perspective. This paper examines microenvironmental screening in terms of outcomes and benefits, key elements of the screening process, challenges for implementation, and a possible role for microfluidics as the screening platform. To assess microfluidics for use in microenvironmental screening, examples and categories of micro-scale and microfluidic technology are highlighted. Microfluidic technology shows promise for simultaneous control of multiple parameters of the microenvironment and can provide a base for scaling advanced cell-based experiments into automated high-throughput formats. PMID:20190880

  13. Nurture versus nature: the microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jan A

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsic factors such as genetic lesions, anti-apoptotic proteins, and aberrant signaling networks within leukemia cells have long been the main focus of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) research. However, over the past decade, it became increasingly clear that external signals from the leukemia microenvironment make pivotal contributions to disease progression in CLL and other B-cell malignancies. Consequently, increasing emphasis is now placed on exploring and targeting the CLL microenvironment. This review highlights critical cellular and molecular pathways of CLL-microenvironment cross-talk. In vitro and in vivo models for studying the CLL microenvironment are discussed, along with their use in searching for therapeutic targets and in drug testing. Clinically, CXCR4 antagonists and small-molecule antagonists of B cell receptor (BCR)-associated kinases (spleen tyrosine kinase [Syk], Bruton's tyrosine kinase [Btk], and PI3Kδ) are the most advanced drugs for targeting specific interactions between CLL cells and the miocroenvironment. Preclinical and first clinical evidence suggests that high-risk CLL patients can particularly benefit from these alternative agents. These findings indicate that interplay between leukemia-inherent and environmental factors, nature and nurture determines disease progression in CLL.

  14. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  15. Tributyltin alters the bone marrow microenvironment and suppresses B cell development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amelia H; Wu, Ting Hua; Bolt, Alicia M; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Mann, Koren K; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2017-04-07

    Organotins are industrial chemicals and agricultural pesticides, and they contaminate both outdoor and indoor environments. Organotins are detectable in human sera at biologically active concentrations and are immuno-and neuro-toxicants. Triphenyltin, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) and promote adipogenesis. TBT also has been shown to suppress osteogenesis; osteoblasts not only support bone homeostasis but also support B lymphopoiesis. In addition, developing B cells are highly sensitive to exogenous insults. Thus, we hypothesized that bone marrow B cells may be negatively affected by TBT exposure both directly, through activation of apoptosis, and indirectly, through alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment. TBT activated apoptosis in developing B cells at environmentally relevant concentrations (as low as 80 nM) in vitro, via a mechanism that is distinct from that induced by high dose (μM) TBT and that requires p53. TBT suppressed the proliferation of hematopoietic cells in an ex vivo bone marrow model. Concurrent treatment of stromal cells and B cells or pretreatment of stromal cells with TBT induced adipogenesis in the stromal cells and reduced the progression of B cells from the early pro B (Hardy fraction B) to the pre B stage (Hardy fraction D). In vivo, TBT induced adipogenesis in bone marrow, reduced "aging-sensitive" AA4+CD19+ B cells in bone marrow, and reduced splenic B cell numbers. Immunosenescence and osteoporosis are adverse health effects of aging, we postulate that TBT exposure may mimic, and possibly intensify, these pathologies.

  16. Syngeneic Transplants with Modified Chimeric Hematopoietic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hemann, Michael

    2015-08-03

    This protocol describes strategies to rapidly transduce tumor cells ex vivo and then transplant modified cells into immunocompetent-recipient mice. Inherent in the definition of a bona fide murine hematopoietic malignancy, unlike a myelo- or lympho-proliferative disease, is the ability to transplant tumors and give rise to a malignancy in recipient animals. This characteristic of hematopoietic disease makes these tumors a tractable model for examining the role of specific genes in tumor growth, dissemination, or therapeutic response. Additionally, because of the systemic nature of hematopoietic malignancies, transplanted tumors are frequently pathologically indistinguishable from donor malignancies-allowing one to perform decisive therapy studies on large cohorts of transplant recipients. Finally, following ex vivo manipulation, transplanted tumors can be made chimeric for the presence of defined retrovirally induced alterations. Thus, these malignancies can be made to resemble genetically heterogeneous human tumors that are in the process of acquiring new capabilities. In these experiments, fluorescent markers serve as a surrogate marker for the expression of a defined alteration, and the change in the percentage of fluorescent cells in a tumor population over time or in response to therapy can be used to gauge the impact of specific alterations on tumor behavior.

  17. Sindbis viral vectors target hematopoietic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Suzme, R; Tseng, J-C; Levin, B; Ibrahim, S; Meruelo, D; Pellicer, A

    2012-11-01

    Sindbis viral vectors target and inhibit the growth of various solid tumors in mouse models. However, their efficacy against blood cancer has not been well established. Here, we show that Sindbis vectors infect and efficiently trigger apoptosis in mouse BW5147 malignant hematopoietic T-cells, but only at low levels in human lymphoma and leukemia cells (Jurkat, Karpas, CEM, DHL and JB). The Mr 37/67 kD laminin receptor (LAMR) has been suggested to be the receptor for Sindbis virus. However, JB cells, which are infected by Sindbis at low efficiency, express high levels of LAMR, revealing that additional factors are involved in Sindbis tropism. To test the infectivity and therapeutic efficacy of Sindbis vectors against malignant hematopoietic cells in vivo, we injected BW5147 cells intraperitoneally into (C3HXAKR) F1 hybrid mice. We found that Sindbis vectors targeted the tumors and significantly prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We also tested the Sindbis vectors in a transgenic CD4-Rgr model, which spontaneously develop thymic lymphomas. However, infectivity in this model was less efficient. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sindbis vectors have the potential to target and kill hematopoietic malignancies in mice, but further research is needed to evaluate the mechanism underlining the susceptibility of human lymphoid malignancies to Sindbis therapy.

  18. Emergent Complications in the Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Munchel, Ashley; Chen, Allen; Symons, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only potentially curative option for a variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Despite advances in transplantation biology and immunology as well as in posttransplant management that have contributed to improved survival and decreased transplant-related mortality, hematopoietic cell transplantation does not come without significant risk of complications. When patients who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation present to the emergency department, it is important to consider a variety of therapy-related complications to optimize management and outcome. In this article, we use clinical cases to highlight some of the more common emergent complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:25411564

  19. How Do Mesenchymal Stem Cells Influence or Are Influenced by Microenvironment through Extracellular Vesicles Communication?

    PubMed Central

    Dostert, Gabriel; Mesure, Benjamin; Menu, Patrick; Velot, Émilie

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in cell therapy and tissue engineering thanks to their self-renewal, their multipotency, and their immunomodulatory properties that make them an attractive tool for regenerative medicine. A large part of MSCs positive effects is due to their secretion products which participate in creating a favorable microenvironment and closely relate these cells to other cell types. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) belong to cellular secretions. They are produced by cells continuously or after stimulation (e.g., calcium flux, cellular stress) and act in tissue homeostasis and intercellular communication. The understanding of the role of EVs is growing, more particularly their impact on cell migration, differentiation, or immunomodulation. EVs derived from MSCs show these interesting properties that may be considered in therapeutics, although they can have adverse effects by facilitating cancer propagation. Moreover, MSC behavior may also be influenced (proliferation, differentiation) by EVs derived from other donor cells. The aim of this mini review is to summarize the two-way communication between MSCs and other cell types, and how they can affect each other with their microenvironment through EVs. On the one hand, the manuscript presents the influence of MSC-derived EVs on diverse recipient cells and on the other hand, the effects of EVs derived from various donor cells on MSCs. The discrepancies between cancer cells and MSCs communication according to the sources of MSCs but also the tumor origins are also mentioned. PMID:28224125

  20. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  1. Omentum and bone marrow: how adipocyte-rich organs create tumour microenvironments conducive for metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Gusky, H. Chkourko; Diedrich, J.; MacDougald, O. A.; Podgorski, I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A number of clinical studies have linked adiposity with increased cancer incidence, progression and metastasis, and adipose tissue is now being credited with both systemic and local effects on tumour development and survival. Adipocytes, a major component of benign adipose tissue, represent a significant source of lipids, cytokines and adipokines, and their presence in the tumour microenvironment substantially affects cellular trafficking, signalling and metabolism. Cancers that have a high predisposition to metastasize to the adipocyte-rich host organs are likely to be particularly affected by the presence of adipocytes. Although our understanding of how adipocytes influence tumour progression has grown significantly over the last several years, the mechanisms by which adipocytes regulate the meta-static niche are not well-understood. In this review, we focus on the omentum, a visceral white adipose tissue depot, and the bone, a depot for marrow adipose tissue, as two distinct adipocyte-rich organs that share common characteristic: they are both sites of significant metastatic growth. We highlight major differences in origin and function of each of these adipose depots and reveal potential common characteristics that make them environments that are attractive and conducive to secondary tumour growth. Special attention is given to how omental and marrow adipocytes modulate the tumour microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis, affecting immune cells and altering metabolism to support growth and survival of metastatic cancer cells. PMID:27432523

  2. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  3. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  4. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F T; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, El Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-02-02

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression.

  5. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration After Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in a Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Jonathan; Krueger, Sarah A.; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Torma, John T.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian; Madlambayan, Gerard J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the recruitment of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within tumor microenvironment after radiation therapy (RT) in a murine, heterotopic tumor model. Methods and Materials: Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with 30 Gy given as 2 fractions over 2 days. Tumors were imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measured daily with digital calipers. The HSPC and myelomonocytic cell content was assessed via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. Functionality of tumor-associated HSPCs was verified in vitro using colony-forming cell assays and in vivo by rescuing lethally irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Results: Irradiation significantly reduced tumor volumes and tumor regrowth rates compared with nonirradiated controls. The number of CD133{sup +} HSPCs present in irradiated tumors was higher than in nonirradiated tumors during all stages of regrowth. CD11b{sup +} counts were similar. PET/CT imaging and growth rate analysis based on standardized uptake value indicated that HSPC recruitment directly correlated to the extent of regrowth and intratumor cell activity after irradiation. The BM-derived tumor-associated HSPCs successfully formed hematopoietic colonies and engrafted irradiated mice. Finally, targeted treatment with a small animal radiation research platform demonstrated localized HSPC recruitment to defined tumor subsites exposed to radiation. Conclusions: Hypofractionated irradiation resulted in a pronounced and targeted recruitment of BM-derived HSPCs, possibly as a mechanism to promote tumor regrowth. These data indicate for the first time that radiation therapy regulates HSPC content within regrowing tumors.

  6. Transplanted hematopoietic cells seed in clusters in recipient bone marrow in vivo.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Zorina, Tatiana; Farkas, Daniel L; Shalit, Itamar

    2002-01-01

    The process of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) seeding in recipient bone marrow (BM) early after transplantation is not fully characterized. In vivo tracking of HSPCs, labeled with PKH dyes, through an optical window surgically implanted on the mouse femur revealed that transplanted cells cluster in the recipient BM. Within the first day after intravenous injection, 86 +/- 6% of the cells seeded in clusters (p < 0.001 versus scattered cells) in the endosteal surfaces of the epiphyses. The primary clusters were formed by concomitant seeding of 6-10 cells over an area of approximately 70 microm, and secondarily injected cells did not join the already existing clusters but formed new clusters. Major antigen-disparate HSPCs participated in formation of the primary clusters, and T lymphocytes were also incorporated. After 4 to 5 days, some cellular clusters were observed in the more central regions of the BM, where the brightness of PKH fluorescence decreased, indicating cellular division. These later clusters were classified as secondary, assuming that the mechanisms of migration in the BM might be different from those of primary seeding. Some clusters remained in the periphery of the BM and retained bright fluorescence, indicating cellular quiescence. The number of brightly fluorescent cells in the clusters decreased exponentially to two to three cells after 24 days (p < 0.001). The data suggest that the hematopoietic niche is a functional unit of the BM stromal microenvironment that hosts seeding of a number of transplanted cells, which form a cluster. This may be the site where auxiliary non-HSPC cells, such as T lymphocytes, act in support of HSPC engraftment.

  7. ERG dependence distinguishes developmental control of hematopoietic stem cell maintenance from hematopoietic specification

    PubMed Central

    Taoudi, Samir; Bee, Thomas; Hilton, Adrienne; Knezevic, Kathy; Scott, Julie; Willson, Tracy A.; Collin, Caitlin; Thomas, Tim; Voss, Anne K.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Alexander, Warren S.; Pimanda, John E.; Hilton, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Although many genes are known to be critical for early hematopoiesis in the embryo, it remains unclear whether distinct regulatory pathways exist to control hematopoietic specification versus hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence and function. Due to their interaction with key regulators of hematopoietic commitment, particular interest has focused on the role of the ETS family of transcription factors; of these, ERG is predicted to play an important role in the initiation of hematopoiesis, yet we do not know if or when ERG is required. Using in vitro and in vivo models of hematopoiesis and HSC development, we provide strong evidence that ERG is at the center of a distinct regulatory program that is not required for hematopoietic specification or differentiation but is critical for HSC maintenance during embryonic development. We show that, from the fetal period, ERG acts as a direct upstream regulator of Gata2 and Runx1 gene activity. Without ERG, physiological HSC maintenance fails, leading to the rapid exhaustion of definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:21245161

  8. Lentiviral-mediated RNAi inhibition of Sbds in murine hematopoietic progenitors impairs their hematopoietic potential

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, Amy S.; Gregory, Alyssa D.; Woloszynek, Jill R.; Liu, Fulu

    2007-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, multilineage hematopoietic dysfunction, and metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. Bone marrow dysfunction is present in nearly all patients with SDS, with neutropenia being the most common abnormality. The majority of patients with SDS have mutations in the Shwachman Bodian Diamond syndrome (SBDS) gene. We have developed a strategy to examine the consequences of lentiviral-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) of Sbds on hematopoiesis. Here, we report that both Sbds RNA and protein expression can be efficiently inhibited in primary murine hematopoietic cells using lentiviral-mediated RNAi. Inhibition of Sbds results in a defect in granulocytic differentiation in vitro and impairs myeloid progenitor generation in vivo. In addition, short-term hematopoietic engraftment was impaired, which is due in part to reduced homing of hematopoietic progenitors to the bone marrow. Finally, we show that inhibition of Sbds is associated with a decrease in circulating B lymphocytes, despite evidence of normal B lymphopoiesis. These data provide the first evidence that loss of Sbds is sufficient to induce abnormalities in hematopoiesis. PMID:17638857

  9. Regulation of hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Riether, C; Schürch, C M; Ochsenbein, A F

    2015-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare, multipotent cells that generate via progenitor and precursor cells of all blood lineages. Similar to normal hematopoiesis, leukemia is also hierarchically organized and a subpopulation of leukemic cells, the leukemic stem cells (LSCs), is responsible for disease initiation and maintenance and gives rise to more differentiated malignant cells. Although genetically abnormal, LSCs share many characteristics with normal HSCs, including quiescence, multipotency and self-renewal. Normal HSCs reside in a specialized microenvironment in the bone marrow (BM), the so-called HSC niche that crucially regulates HSC survival and function. Many cell types including osteoblastic, perivascular, endothelial and mesenchymal cells contribute to the HSC niche. In addition, the BM functions as primary and secondary lymphoid organ and hosts various mature immune cell types, including T and B cells, dendritic cells and macrophages that contribute to the HSC niche. Signals derived from the HSC niche are necessary to regulate demand-adapted responses of HSCs and progenitor cells after BM stress or during infection. LSCs occupy similar niches and depend on signals from the BM microenvironment. However, in addition to the cell types that constitute the HSC niche during homeostasis, in leukemia the BM is infiltrated by activated leukemia-specific immune cells. Leukemic cells express different antigens that are able to activate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. It is well documented that activated T cells can contribute to the control of leukemic cells and it was hoped that these cells may be able to target and eliminate the therapy-resistant LSCs. However, the actual interaction of leukemia-specific T cells with LSCs remains ill-defined. Paradoxically, many immune mechanisms that evolved to activate emergency hematopoiesis during infection may actually contribute to the expansion and differentiation of LSCs, promoting leukemia progression. In this review, we

  10. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplantation Can Normalize Thyroid Function in a Cystinosis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V.; Van Der Smissen, P.; Rocca, C. J.; Liao, X. H.; Refetoff, S.; Pierreux, C. E.; Cherqui, S.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most frequent and earliest endocrine complication in cystinosis, a multisystemic lysosomal storage disease caused by defective transmembrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS gene). We recently demonstrated in Ctns−/− mice that altered thyroglobulin biosynthesis associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, combined with defective lysosomal processing, caused hypothyroidism. In Ctns−/− kidney, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation provides long-term functional and structural protection. Tissue repair involves transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes from HSCs differentiated as F4/80 macrophages into deficient kidney tubular cells, via tunneling nanotubes that cross basement laminae. Here we evaluated the benefit of HSC transplantation for cystinotic thyroid and investigated the underlying mechanisms. HSC engraftment in Ctns−/− thyroid drastically decreased cystine accumulation, normalized the TSH level, and corrected the structure of a large fraction of thyrocytes. In the thyroid microenvironment, HSCs differentiated into a distinct, mixed macrophage/dendritic cell lineage expressing CD45 and major histocompatibility complex II but low CD11b and F4/80. Grafted HSCs closely apposed to follicles and produced tunneling nanotube-like extensions that crossed follicular basement laminae. HSCs themselves further squeezed into follicles, allowing extensive contact with thyrocytes, but did not transdifferentiate into Nkx2.1-expressing cells. Our observations revealed significant differences of basement lamina porosity between the thyroid and kidney and/or intrinsic macrophage invasive properties once in the thyroid microenvironment. The contrast between extensive thyrocyte protection and low HSC abundance at steady state suggests multiple sequential encounters and/or remanent impact. This is the first report demonstrating the potential of HSC transplantation to correct thyroid disease and supports a major multisystemic benefit

  11. Angiogenin Defines Heterogeneity at the Core of the Hematopoietic Niche.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Marianna; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Successful hematopoietic regeneration demands preservation of stemness while enabling expansion and differentiation into blood lineages. Now, Silberstein et al. (2016) and Goncalves et al. (2016) identify a ribonuclease secreted by proximal niche cells that simultaneously drives quiescence of HSCs and proliferation of myeloid progenitors and dramatically enhances hematopoietic recovery after HSC transplantation.

  12. [Aspergillus galactomannan detection in allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rovira Tarrats, Montserrat; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge

    2003-09-01

    Invasive aspergillosis has become the leading cause of death after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is partially due to the lack of a prompt diagnosis. Recently the detection of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen by means an ELISA technique in serum has been described. The objective of this study was to validate its usefulness in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation setting.

  13. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1(F22-24/F22-24)) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1(BRCA1/BRCA1)) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1(F22-24/5382insC)) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  14. Quantitative Multiscale Cell Imaging in Controlled 3D Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Welf, Erik S.; Driscoll, Meghan K.; Dean, Kevin M.; Schäfer, Claudia; Chu, Jun; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Fiolka, Reto

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment determines cell behavior, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood because quantitative studies of cell signaling and behavior have been challenging due to insufficient spatial and/or temporal resolution and limitations on microenvironmental control. Here we introduce microenvironmental selective plane illumination microscopy (meSPIM) for imaging and quantification of intracellular signaling and submicrometer cellular structures as well as large-scale cell morphological and environmental features. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by showing that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment regulate the transition of melanoma cells from actin-driven protrusion to blebbing, and we present tools to quantify how cells manipulate individual collagen fibers. We leverage the nearly isotropic resolution of meSPIM to quantify the local concentration of actin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling on the surfaces of cells deep within 3D collagen matrices and track the many small membrane protrusions that appear in these more physiologically relevant environments. PMID:26906741

  15. Assembly of complex cell microenvironments using geometrically docked hydrogel shapes

    PubMed Central

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W.; Parsa, Hesam; Chin, Curtis D.; Schneider, Jesse; Linkov, Gary; Sia, Samuel K.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Cellular communities in living tissues act in concert to establish intricate microenvironments, with complexity difficult to recapitulate in vitro. We report a method for docking numerous cellularized hydrogel shapes (100–1,000 µm in size) into hydrogel templates to construct 3D cellular microenvironments. Each shape can be uniquely designed to contain customizable concentrations of cells and molecular species, and can be placed into any spatial configuration, providing extensive compositional and geometric tunability of shape-coded patterns using a highly biocompatible hydrogel material. Using precisely arranged hydrogel shapes, we investigated migratory patterns of human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells. We then developed a finite element gradient model predicting chemotactic directions of cell migration in micropatterned cocultures that were validated by tracking ∼2,500 individual cell trajectories. This simple yet robust hydrogel platform provides a comprehensive approach to the assembly of 3D cell environments. PMID:23487790

  16. Bioengineering paradigms for cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Gu, Zhizhan; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process underlying diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. The classical understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration has been based on in vitro studies on two-dimensional substrates. More recently, mounting evidence from intravital studies has shown that during metastasis, tumor cells must navigate complex microenvironments in vivo, including narrow, pre-existing microtracks created by anatomical structures. It is becoming apparent that unraveling the mechanisms of confined cell migration in this context requires a multi-disciplinary approach through integration of in vivo and in vitro studies, along with sophisticated bioengineering techniques and mathematical modeling. Here, we highlight such an approach that has led to discovery of a new model for cell migration in confined microenvironments (i.e., the Osmotic Engine Model).

  17. Microenvironment and endocrine resistance in breast cancer: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Recouvreux, Sol; Sampayo, Rocío; Bessone, María Inés Díaz; Simian, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women around the world. Seventy five percent of these patients have tumors that are estrogen receptor positive and as a consequence receive endocrine therapy. However, about one third eventually develop resistance and cancer reappears. In the last decade our vision of cancer has evolved to consider it more of a tissue-related disease than a cell-centered one. This editorial argues that we are only starting to understand the role the tumor microenvironment plays in therapy resistance in breast cancer. The development of new therapeutic strategies that target the microenvironment will come when we clearly understand this extremely complicated scenario. As such, and as a scientific community, we have extremely challenging work ahead. We share our views regarding these matters. PMID:26677432

  18. Innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Thomas F; Schreiber, Hans; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Most tumor cells express antigens that can mediate recognition by host CD8+ T cells. Cancers that are detected clinically must have evaded antitumor immune responses to grow progressively. Recent work has suggested two broad categories of tumor escape based on cellular and molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. One major subset shows a T cell–inflamed phenotype consisting of infiltrating T cells, a broad chemokine profile and a type I interferon signature indicative of innate immune activation. These tumors appear to resist immune attack through the dominant inhibitory effects of immune system–suppressive pathways. The other major phenotype lacks this T cell–inflamed phenotype and appears to resist immune attack through immune system exclusion or ignorance. These two major phenotypes of tumor microenvironment may require distinct immunotherapeutic interventions for maximal therapeutic effect. PMID:24048123

  19. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  20. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  1. The critical role of the bone microenvironment in cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Casimiro, Sandra; Guise, Theresa A; Chirgwin, John

    2009-10-30

    Bone metastatic disease is a late-stage event of many common cancers, such as those of prostate and breast. It is incurable and causes severe morbidity. Tumor and bone interact in a vicious cycle, where tumor-secreted factors stimulate bone cells, which in turn release growth factors and cytokines that act back on the tumor cells. Within the vicious cycle are many potential therapeutic targets for novel treatment of bone metastatic disease. Therapeutic strategies can be oriented to inhibit bone cells (osteoclasts and osteoblasts) or tumor responses to factors enriched in the bone microenvironment. Many publications, especially from pre-clinical animal models, show that this approach, especially combination treatments, can reduce tumor burden and tumor-derived bone lesions. This supports a novel paradigm: tumor growth can be effectively inhibited by targeting the bone and its microenvironment rather than the tumor itself alone.

  2. Pulsation-limited oxygen diffusion in the tumour microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, Edoardo; Stella, Sabrina; Chignola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is central to tumour evolution, growth, invasion and metastasis. Mathematical models of hypoxia based on reaction-diffusion equations provide seemingly incomplete descriptions as they fail to predict the measured oxygen concentrations in the tumour microenvironment. In an attempt to explain the discrepancies, we consider both the inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen-consuming cells in solid tumours and the dynamics of blood flow in the tumour microcirculation. We find that the low-frequency oscillations play an important role in the establishment of tumour hypoxia. The oscillations interact with consumption to inhibit oxygen diffusion in the microenvironment. This suggests that alpha-blockers–a class of drugs used to treat hypertension and stress disorders, and known to lower or even abolish low-frequency oscillations of arterial blood flow –may act as adjuvant drugs in the radiotherapy of solid tumours by enhancing the oxygen effect.

  3. Microsphere cytometry to interrogate microenvironment-dependent cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Ertsås, Henriette Christie; Nolan, Garry P; LaBarge, Mark A; Lorens, James B

    2017-02-20

    Microenvironmental cues comprising surface-mediated and soluble factors control cellular signaling mechanisms underlying normal cellular responses that define homeostatic and diseased cell states. In order to measure cell signaling in single adherent cells, we developed a novel microsphere-based flow cytometry approach. Single normal or neoplastic cells were adhered to uniform microspheres that display mimetic-microenvironments comprising surface combinations of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the presence of soluble agonists/antagonists. Temporal signaling responses were measured with fluorophore-conjugated antibodies that recognize response-dependent epitopes by multiparametric flow cytometry. Using this approach we demonstrate that microenvironment-mimetic combinations of growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins generate distinct cellular signal networks that reveal unique cell signatures in normal and patient biopsy-derived neoplastic cells.

  4. Metabolomics Analyses of Cancer Cells in Controlled Microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Avizonis, Daina; St-Pierre, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex and heterogeneous milieu in which cancer cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to fuel their growth. Cancer cell lines grown in vitro using traditional culture methods represent key experimental models to gain a mechanistic understanding of tumor biology. This protocol describes the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to assess metabolic changes in cancer cells grown under varied levels of oxygen and nutrients that may better mimic the tumor microenvironment. Intracellular metabolite changes, metabolite uptake and release, as well as stable isotope ((13)C) tracer analyses are done in a single experimental setup to provide an integrated understanding of metabolic adaptation. Overall, this chapter describes some essential tools and methods to perform comprehensive metabolomics analyses.

  5. Pulsation-limited oxygen diffusion in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, Edoardo; Stella, Sabrina; Chignola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is central to tumour evolution, growth, invasion and metastasis. Mathematical models of hypoxia based on reaction-diffusion equations provide seemingly incomplete descriptions as they fail to predict the measured oxygen concentrations in the tumour microenvironment. In an attempt to explain the discrepancies, we consider both the inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen-consuming cells in solid tumours and the dynamics of blood flow in the tumour microcirculation. We find that the low-frequency oscillations play an important role in the establishment of tumour hypoxia. The oscillations interact with consumption to inhibit oxygen diffusion in the microenvironment. This suggests that alpha-blockers–a class of drugs used to treat hypertension and stress disorders, and known to lower or even abolish low-frequency oscillations of arterial blood flow –may act as adjuvant drugs in the radiotherapy of solid tumours by enhancing the oxygen effect. PMID:28045083

  6. [Research Progress on Gene Expression Abnormality of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells in Myelodysplastic Syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ma, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal disease involving one or more series of hematopoietic cells. Its pathogenesis is still unclear. No effective targeted drug is available to prevent this disease progression. MDS originates in hematopoietic stem cells. Recent researches found that the complex abnormal gene expression occurred in bone marrow CD34⁺ cells plays a key role in development of MDS. Some of these genes are closely related with the patient's prognosis and survival, such as DLK1, ribosomal transcripts gene, Toll-like receptors gene, EPA-1 and interferon-stimulated genes. Due to heterogeneity of this disease, abnormal gene expression profiles in bone marrow CD34⁺ cells are closely associated with particular FAB or cytogenetic subtypes. To elucidate the pathogenesis of MDS and investigate its therapeutic target, this article reviews progress of researches on abnormal gene expression profiles of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in low-risk, high-risk patients and MDS patients who carry common cytogenetic abnormalities.

  7. ATF4 plays a pivotal role in the development of functional hematopoietic stem cells in mouse fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunze; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Dan; Dong, Fang; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Weili; Pang, Yakun; Wang, Yajie; Mu, Xiaohuan; Ni, Yanli; Li, Zhuan; Xu, Huiyu; Hao, Sha; Wang, Xiaochen; Ma, Shihui; Wang, Qian-fei; Xiao, Guozhi; Yuan, Weiping; Liu, Bing; Cheng, Tao

    2015-11-19

    The fetal liver (FL) serves as a predominant site for expansion of functional hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during mouse embryogenesis. However, the mechanisms for HSC development in FL remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) significantly impaired hematopoietic development and reduced HSC self-renewal in FL. In contrast, generation of the first HSC population in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region was not affected. The migration activity of ATF4(-/-) HSCs was moderately reduced. Interestingly, the HSC-supporting ability of both endothelial and stromal cells in FL was significantly compromised in the absence of ATF4. Gene profiling using RNA-seq revealed downregulated expression of a panel of cytokines in ATF4(-/-) stromal cells, including angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Addition of Angptl3, but not VEGFA, partially rescued the repopulating defect of ATF4(-/-) HSCs in the culture. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay in conjunction with silencing RNA-mediated silencing and complementary DNA overexpression showed transcriptional control of Angptl3 by ATF4. To summarize, ATF4 plays a pivotal role in functional expansion and repopulating efficiency of HSCs in developing FL, and it acts through upregulating transcription of cytokines such as Angptl3 in the microenvironment.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species Limit the Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Rahul; Krishnan, Shyam; Roy, Sushmita; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Kumar, Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Aging of organ and abnormal tissue regeneration are recurrent problems in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This is most crucial in case of high-turnover tissues, like bone marrow (BM). Using reciprocal transplantation experiments in mouse, we have shown that self-renewal potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and BM cellularity are markedly influenced with the age of the recipient mice rather than donor mice. Moreover, accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BM stromal cells compared to HSPC compartment, in time-dependent manner, suggests that oxidative stress is involved in suppression of BM cellularity by affecting microenvironment in aged mice. Treatment of these mice with a polyphenolic antioxidant curcumin is found to partially quench ROS, thereby rescues stromal cells from oxidative stress-dependent cellular injury. This rejuvenation of stromal cells significantly improves hematopoietic reconstitution in 18-month-old mice compared to age control mice. In conclusion, this study implicates the role of ROS in perturbation of stromal cell function upon aging, which in turn affects BM's reconstitution ability in aged mice. Thus, a rejuvenation therapy using curcumin, before HSPC transplantation, is found to be an efficient strategy for successful marrow reconstitution in older mice. PMID:27140293

  9. α-Tocopherol induces hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell expansion and ERK1/2-mediated differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Barbosa, Christiano M V; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Lungato, Lisandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Moraes, Andrea Aparecida F S; Miranda, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira

    2011-12-01

    Tocopherols promote or inhibit growth in different cell types. In the hematopoietic system, the radioprotective property of tocopherols is thought to act through the expansion of primitive hematopoietic cells. However, the mechanisms activated by tocopherols and which HPs are affected remain poorly understood. To better address these questions, mice were treated with α-tocopherol, and its effects were investigated in the BM microenvironment. α-Tocopherol induced increased proliferation in HSC/HP cells, leading to BM hyperplasia. In addition, differentiation to the granulocytic/monocytic lineage was enhanced by α-tocopherol treatment. α-Tocopherol treatment resulted in decreased basal phosphorylation of ERK1/2, PKC, and STAT-5 in HSC/HP cells. In contrast, α-tocopherol enhanced ERK1/2 activation in response to IL-3 stimulation in HSC/HP cells without altering the expression of IL-3Rs. Moreover, α-tocopherol-induced differentiation and ERK1/2 activation were abolished in mice pretreated with a MEK inhibitor (PD98059); however, pretreatment with PD98059 did not reduce the α-tocopherol-mediated increase in HSC/HP cells but instead, further enhanced their proliferation. Therefore, α-tocopherol induces expansion of HSC/HP cells by a nonidentified intracellular pathway and granulocytic/monocytic differentiation through ERK1/2 activation.

  10. A Prospective Study of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Type 1 Gaucher Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lecourt, Séverine; Mouly, Enguerran; Freida, Delphine; Cras, Audrey; Ceccaldi, Raphaël; Heraoui, Djazia; Chomienne, Christine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Arnulf, Bertrand; Porcher, Raphael; Caillaud, Catherine; Vanneaux, Valérie; Belmatoug, Nadia; Larghero, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA) deficiency leading to hematological and skeletal manifestations. Mechanisms underlying these symptoms have not yet been elucidated. In vivo, bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have important role in the regulation of bone mass and in the support of hematopoiesis, thus representing potential candidate that could contribute to the disease. GBA deficiency may also directly impair hematopoietic stem/progenitors cells (HSPCs) intrinsic function and induce hematological defect. In order to evaluate the role of BM stem cells in GD pathophysiology, we prospectively analyzed BM-MSCs and HSPCs properties in a series of 10 patients with type 1 GD. GBA activity was decreased in all tested cell subtypes. GD-MSCs had an impaired growth potential, morphological and cell cycle abnormalities, decreased capacities to differentiate into osteoblasts. Moreover, GD-MSCs secreted soluble factors that stimulated osteoclasts resorbing activities. In vitro and in vivo primitive and mature hematopoiesis were similar between patients and controls. However, GD-MSCs had a lower hematopoietic supportive capacity than those from healthy donors. These data suggest that BM microenvironment is altered in GD and that MSCs are key components of the manifestations observed in GD. PMID:23935976

  11. Modulation of the Tumor Microenvironment for Cancer Treatment: A Biomaterials Approach

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, Isaac M.; Blanka, Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are complex tissues that consist of stromal cells, such as fibroblasts, immune cells and mesenchymal stem cells, as well as non-cellular components, in addition to neoplastic cells. Increasingly, there is evidence to suggest that these non-neoplastic cell components support cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and that their ablation or reprogramming can inhibit tumor growth. Our understanding of the activities of different parts of the tumor stroma in advancing cancer has been improved by the use of scaffold and matrix-based 3D systems originally developed for regenerative medicine. Additionally, drug delivery systems made from synthetic and natural biomaterials deliver drugs to kill stromal cells or reprogram the microenvironment for tumor inhibition. In this article, we review the impact of 3D tumor models in increasing our understanding of tumorigenesis. We also discuss how different drug delivery systems aid in the reprogramming of tumor stroma for cancer treatment. PMID:25695337

  12. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    peptides may result in an efficient probe for breast tumor imaging and therapy . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carcinoma-associated fibroblast; phage display...In Vivo Phage Display PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Erkki Ruoslahti CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute...COVERED 01 July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  13. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with in Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Vivo Phage Display PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kazuki N. Sugahara, M.D., Ph.D...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0174 5c...cells and the matrix. The goal of our group is to make technical improvements in our phage display system, and find peptides that target carcinoma

  14. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Sun, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Seattle Institute for Biomedical and Clinical Research Seattle, WA 98108-1532 REPORT DATE: August 2015 TYPE OF...NUMBERSeattle Institute for Biomedical and Clinical Research 1660 S Columbian Way, S-151F Seattle, WA 98108-1532 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...in clinical settings of PCa medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, microenvironment, DNA damage, genotoxicity, stroma, secretion, therapy

  15. Tumour microenvironment factors shaping the cancer metabolism landscape

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit metabolic alterations that distinguish them from healthy tissues and make their metabolic processes susceptible to pharmacological targeting. Although typical cell-autonomous features of cancer metabolism have been emerging, it is increasingly appreciated that extrinsic factors also influence the metabolic properties of tumours. This review highlights evidence from the recent literature to discuss how conditions within the tumour microenvironment shape the metabolic character of tumours. PMID:28006817

  16. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  17. Lifetime-based sensing:  influence of the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Draxler, S; Lippitsch, M E

    1996-03-01

    The influence of the microenvironment on the fluorescence behavior of indicator molecules is investigated. A model is developed to describe the fluorescence decay of indicator molecules in a nonuniform medium. Its consequences for fluorescence lifetime-based chemical sensors are discussed and verified in two examples, namely, a pH sensor using a pyrene compound in a hydrogel and a ruthenium complex for oxygen sensing embedded in a polystyrene membrane.

  18. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  19. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Damon, Lloyd E; Damon, Lauren E

    2009-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells can be mobilized out of the bone marrow into the blood for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis following high-dose therapy. Methods to improve mobilization efficiency and yields are rapidly emerging. Traditional methods include chemotherapy with or without myeloid growth factors. Plerixafor, a novel agent that disrupts the CXCR4-CXCL12 bond, the primary hematopoietic stem cell anchor in the bone marrow, has recently been US FDA-approved for mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Plerixafor and myeloid growth factors as single agents appear safe to use in family or volunteer hematopoietic stem cells donors. Plerixafor mobilizes leukemic stem cells and is not approved for use in patients with acute leukemia. Patients failing to mobilize adequate hematopoietic stem cells with myeloid growth factors can often be successfully mobilized with chemotherapy plus myeloid growth factors or with plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

  20. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  1. Chemical and physical microenvironments at the Viking landing sites.

    PubMed

    Clark, B C

    1979-12-01

    Physical and chemical considerations permit the division of the near-surface regolith on Mars into at least six zones of distinct microenvironments. The zones are euphotic, duricrust/peds, tempofrost, permafrost, endolithic, and interfacial/transitional. Microenvironments vary significantly in temperature extremes, mean temperature, salt content, relative pressure of water vapor, UV and visible light irradiance, and exposure to ionizing radiation events (100 Mrad) and oxidative molecular species. From what is known of the chemistry of the atmosphere and regolith fines (soil), limits upon the aqueous chemistry of soil pastes may be estimated. Heat of wetting could reach 45 cal/g dry soil; initial pH is indeterminate between 1 and 10; ionic strength and salinity are predicted to be extremely high; freezing point depression is inadequate to provide quantities of liquid water except in special cases. The prospects for biotic survival are grim by terrestrial standards, but the extremes of biological resiliency are inaccessible to evaluation. Second-generation in situ experiments which will better define Martian microenvironments are clearly possible. Antarctic dry valleys are approximations to Martian conditions, but deviate significantly by at least half-a-dozen criteria.

  2. Cellular microenvironment modulates the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Hoffmann, Gwendolyn; Wheeler, Benjamin; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter

    2016-02-22

    Galvanotaxis is a complex process that represents the collective outcome of various contributing mechanisms, including asymmetric ion influxes, preferential activation of voltage-gated channels, and electrophoretic redistribution of membrane components. While a large number of studies have focused on various up- and downstream signaling pathways, little is known about how the surrounding microenvironment may interact and contribute to the directional response. Using a customized galvanotaxis chip capable of carrying out experiments in both two- and three-dimensional microenvironments, we show that cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions modulate the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). Five different BTICs across three different glioblastoma subtypes were examined and shown to all migrate toward the anode in the presence of a direct-current electric field (dcEF) when cultured on a poly-L-ornithine/laminin coated surface, while the fetal-derived neural progenitor cells (fNPCs) migrated toward the cathode. Interestingly, when embedded in a 3D ECM composed of hyaluronic acid and collagen, BTICs exhibited opposite directional response and migrated toward the cathode. Pharmacological inhibition against a panel of key molecules involved in galvanotaxis further revealed the mechanistic differences between 2- and 3D galvanotaxis in BTICs. Both myosin II and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were found to hold strikingly different roles in different microenvironments.

  3. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation. PMID:27484403

  4. Current Multistage Drug Delivery Systems Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Binlong; Dai, Wenbing; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of traditional tumor-targeted drug delivery systems based on EPR effect and receptor-mediated endocytosis is very challenging probably because of the biological complexity of tumors as well as the limitations in the design of the functional nano-sized delivery systems. Recently, multistage drug delivery systems (Ms-DDS) triggered by various specific tumor microenvironment stimuli have emerged for tumor therapy and imaging. In response to the differences in the physiological blood circulation, tumor microenvironment, and intracellular environment, Ms-DDS can change their physicochemical properties (such as size, hydrophobicity, or zeta potential) to achieve deeper tumor penetration, enhanced cellular uptake, timely drug release, as well as effective endosomal escape. Based on these mechanisms, Ms-DDS could deliver maximum quantity of drugs to the therapeutic targets including tumor tissues, cells, and subcellular organelles and eventually exhibit the highest therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we expatiate on various responsive modes triggered by the tumor microenvironment stimuli, introduce recent advances in multistage nanoparticle systems, especially the multi-stimuli responsive delivery systems, and discuss their functions, effects, and prospects. PMID:28255348

  5. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation.

  6. The effects of CA IX catalysis products within tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Corti, Denise; Camici, Guido; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Serni, Sergio; Chiarugi, Paola; Cirri, Paolo

    2013-10-29

    Solid tumors are composed of both cancer cells and various types of accessory cells, mainly fibroblasts, that collectively compose the so called tumor-microenvironment. Cancer-associated fibroblasts have been described to actively participate in cancer progression by establishing a cytokine-mediated as well as metabolic crosstalk with cancer cells. In the present paper we show that activated human fibroblasts are able to boost tumor cells proliferation and that this effect is greatly dependent on stromal carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) activity. In fact fibroblasts show a strong upregulation of CA IX expression upon activation by cancer cells, while CA IX products, protons and bicarbonate, exert differential effects on cancer cells proliferation. While acidification of extracellular pH, a typical condition of rapidly growing solid tumors, is detrimental for tumor cells proliferation, bicarbonate, through its organication, supplies cancer cells with intermediates useful to sustain their high proliferation rate. Here we propose a new kind of fibroblasts/tumor cells crosstalk within tumor microenvironment, mediated by stromal CA IX products, aimed to favor cancer cells growth, opening new perspectives on CA IX role in tumor microenvironment.

  7. Precision Assembly of Complex Cellular Microenvironments using Holographic Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Glen R.; Britchford, Emily; Upton, Thomas; Ware, James; Gibson, Graham M.; Devaud, Yannick; Ehrbar, Martin; Padgett, Miles; Allen, Stephanie; Buttery, Lee D.; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The accurate study of cellular microenvironments is limited by the lack of technologies that can manipulate cells in 3D at a sufficiently small length scale. The ability to build and manipulate multicellular microscopic structures will facilitate a more detailed understanding of cellular function in fields such as developmental and stem cell biology. We present a holographic optical tweezers based technology to accurately generate bespoke cellular micro-architectures. Using embryonic stem cells, 3D structures of varying geometries were created and stabilized using hydrogels and cell-cell adhesion methods. Control of chemical microenvironments was achieved by the temporal release of specific factors from polymer microparticles positioned within these constructs. Complex co-culture micro-environmental analogues were also generated to reproduce structures found within adult stem cell niches. The application of holographic optical tweezers-based micromanipulation will enable novel insights into biological microenvironments by allowing researchers to form complex architectures with sub-micron precision of cells, matrices and molecules. PMID:25716032

  8. Chemical and physical microenvironments at the Viking landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Physical and chemical considerations permit the division of the near-surface regolith on Mars into at least six zones of distinct microenvironments. The zones are euphotic, duricrust/peds, tempofrost, permafrost, endolithic, and interfacial/transitional. Microenvironments vary significantly in temperature extremes, mean temperature, salt content, relative pressure of water vapor, UV and visible light irradiance, and exposure to ionizing radiation events (100 Mrad) and oxidative molecular species. From what is known of the chemistry of the atmosphere and regolith fines (soil), limits upon the aqueous chemistry of soil pastes may be estimated. Heat of wetting could reach 45 cal/g dry soil; initial pH is indeterminate between 1 and 10; ionic strength and salinity are predicted to be extremely high; freezing point depression is inadequate to provide quantities of liquid water except in special cases. The prospects for biotic survival are grim by terrestrial standards, but the extremes of biological resiliency are inaccessible to evaluation. Second-generation in situ experiments which will better define Martian microenvironments are clearly possible. Antarctic dry valleys are approximations to Martian conditions, but deviate significantly by at least half-a-dozen criteria.

  9. Neurodegeneration in the Brain Tumor Microenvironment: Glutamate in the Limelight

    PubMed Central

    Savaskan, Nicolai E.; Fan, Zheng; Broggini, Thomas; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are characterized by destructive growth and neuronal cell death making them one of the most devastating diseases. Neurodegenerative actions of malignant gliomas resemble mechanisms also found in many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recent data demonstrate that gliomas seize neuronal glutamate signaling for their own growth advantage. Excessive glutamate release via the glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT (system xc-, SLC7a11) renders cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutics and create the tumor microenvironment toxic for neurons. In particular the glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT takes center stage in neurodegenerative processes and sets this transporter a potential prime target for cancer therapy. Noteworthy is the finding, that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and thereby TRP channels can potentiate glutamate release. Yet another important biological feature of the xCT/glutamate system is its modulatory effect on the tumor microenvironment with impact on host cells and the cancer stem cell niche. The EMA and FDA-approved drug sulfasalazine (SAS) presents a lead compound for xCT inhibition, although so far clinical trials on glioblastomas with SAS were ambiguous. Here, we critically analyze the mechanisms of action of xCT antiporter on malignant gliomas and in the tumor microenvironment. Deciphering the impact of xCT and glutamate and its relation to TRP channels in brain tumors pave the way for developing important cancer microenvironmental modulators and drugable lead targets. PMID:26411769

  10. The Two Faces of IL-6 in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Appenheimer, Michelle M.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2014-01-01

    Within the tumor microenvironment, IL-6 signaling is generally considered a malevolent player, assuming a dark visage that promotes tumor progression. Chronic IL-6 signaling is linked to tumorigenesis in numerous mouse models as well as in human disease. IL-6 acts intrinsically on tumor cells through numerous downstream mediators to support cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic dissemination. Moreover, IL-6 can act extrinsically on other cells within the complex tumor microenvironment to sustain a pro-tumor milieu by supporting angiogenesis and tumor evasion of immune surveillance. A lesser known role for IL-6 signaling has recently emerged in which it plays a beneficial role, presenting a fairer face that opposes tumor growth by mobilizing anti-tumor T cell immune responses to attain tumor control. Accumulating evidence establishes IL-6 as a key player in the activation, proliferation and survival of lymphocytes during active immune responses. IL-6 signaling can also resculpt the T cell immune response, shifting it from a suppressive to a responsive state that can effectively act against tumors. Finally, IL-6 plays an indispensable role in boosting T cell trafficking to lymph nodes and to tumor sites, where they have the opportunity to become activated and execute their cytotoxic effector functions, respectively. Here, we discuss the dual faces of IL-6 signaling in the tumor microenvironment; the dark face that drives malignancy, and the fairer aspect that promotes anti-tumor adaptive immunity. PMID:24602448

  11. Embelin suppresses pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Justine L; Jackman, Chris P; Tang, Su-Ni; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2014-01-01

    Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, development of novel agents is required for the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer. The objective of this paper was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer growth in mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment. Embelin inhibited PANC-1 tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis which were associated with suppression of Akt and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways. Embelin inhibited the expression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK6, IL-6 and IL-8, and induced the expression of Bax in tumor tissues. Embelin also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug and Zeb1. Embelin inhibited pancreatic cancer growth in Kras(G12D) mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment where CTL, NKT, γδT, NK, and IFNγ (Th1 type) cells were up-regulated, and Th17, PMN-MDSC, IL-6 and IL-8 (Th2 type) immune cells were inhibited. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment and Akt and Shh pathways, and inhibiting inflammation. Embelin may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment and/or prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  12. The role of nerve microenvironment for neurofibroma development

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chung-Ping; Pradhan, Sanjay; Chen, Zhiguo; Patel, Amish J.; Booker, Reid C.; Le, Lu Q.

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of RAS signaling in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) results in the development of multiple neurofibromas, complex tumor of the peripheral nerves with no effective medical treatment. There is increasing evidences that neurofibroma initiates through loss of NF1 function in the Schwann cell lineage, followed by a cascade of interactions with other cell types in the surrounding tumor microenvironment. In NF1 patients, neurofibromas always develop along peripheral nerves and do not migrate to distant organs, including the central nervous system. In this study, we sought to identify the contributions of these peripheral nerves in neurofibroma formation. Using in vivo and in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culturing system, we show that peripheral nerves are absolutely required for neurofibroma tumorigenesis and report a novel 3D skin raft culture system for neurofibroma formation in vitro to decipher tumor pathogenesis. This interaction between neoplastic Schwann cells and their surrounding neural microenvironment has important implications for understanding early cellular events that dictate tumorigenesis. It also provides fertile ground for the elucidation of intrinsic and extrinsic factors within the nerve microenvironment that likely play essential roles in neurofibroma development and, therefore, viable therapeutic targets in neurofibroma therapy. PMID:27517146

  13. Impact of tumor microenvironment on oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wojton, Jeffrey; Kaur, Balveen

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment have been shown to play a very significant role in the initiation, progression, and invasiveness of cancer. These tumor-stromal interactions are capable of altering the delivery and effectiveness of therapeutics into the tumor and are also known to influence future resistance and re-growth after treatment. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and its response to oncolytic viral therapy. The multifaceted environmental response to viral therapy can influence viral infection, replication, and propagation within the tumor. Recent studies have unveiled the complicated temporal changes in the tumor vasculature post OV treatment, and their impact on tumor biology. Similarly, the secreted extracellular matrix in solid tumors can affect both infection and spread of the therapeutic virus. Together, these complex changes in the tumor microenvironment also modulate the activation of the innate antiviral host immune response, leading to quick and efficient viral clearance. In order to combat these detrimental responses, viruses have been combined with pharmacological adjuvants and “armed” with therapeutic genes in order to suppress the pernicious environmental conditions following therapy. In this review we will discuss the impact of the tumor environment on viral therapy and examine some of the recent literature investigating methods of modulating this environment to enhance oncolysis. PMID:20399700

  14. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Korashon Lynn; Adair, Jennifer; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy remains a highly attractive treatment option for many disorders including hematologic conditions, immunodeficiencies including HIV/AIDS, and other genetic disorders like lysosomal storage diseases, among others. In this review, we discuss the successes, side effects, and limitations of current gene therapy protocols. In addition, we describe the opportunities presented by implementing ex vivo expansion of gene-modified HSCs, as well as summarize the most promising ex vivo expansion techniques currently available. We conclude by discussing how some of the current limitations of HSC gene therapy could be overcome by combining novel HSC expansion strategies with gene therapy. PMID:21999373

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Steward, Colin G

    2010-02-01

    Osteopetrosis is the generic name for a group of diseases caused by deficient formation or function of osteoclasts, inherited in either autosomal recessive or dominant fashion. Osteopetrosis varies in severity from a disease that may kill infants to an incidental radiological finding in adults. It is increasingly clear that prognosis is governed by which gene is affected, making detailed elucidation of the cause of the disease a critical component of optimal care, including the decision on whether hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is appropriate. This article reviews the characteristics and management of osteopetrosis.

  16. Acellular Bone Marrow Extracts Significantly Enhance Engraftment Levels of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Mouse Xeno-Transplantation Models

    PubMed Central

    Zibara, Kazem; Hamdan, Rima; Dib, Leila; Sindet-Pedersen, Steen; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed; Bazarbachi, Ali; El-Sabban, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) derived from cord blood (CB), bone marrow (BM), or mobilized peripheral blood (PBSC) can differentiate into multiple lineages such as lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid cells and platelets. The local microenvironment is critical to the differentiation of HSCs and to the preservation of their phenotype in vivo. This microenvironment comprises a physical support supplied by the organ matrix as well as tissue specific cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. We investigated the effects of acellular bovine bone marrow extracts (BME) on HSC in vitro and in vivo. We observed a significant increase in the number of myeloid and erythroid colonies in CB mononuclear cells (MNC) or CB CD34+ cells cultured in methylcellulose media supplemented with BME. Similarly, in xeno-transplantation experiments, pretreatment with BME during ex-vivo culture of HSCs induced a significant increase in HSC engraftment in vivo. Indeed, we observed both an increase in the number of differentiated myeloid, lymphoid and erythroid cells and an acceleration of engraftment. These results were obtained using CB MNCs, BM MNCs or CD34+ cells, transplanted in immuno-compromised mice (NOD/SCID or NSG). These findings establish the basis for exploring the use of BME in the expansion of CB HSC prior to HSC Transplantation. This study stresses the importance of the mechanical structure and soluble mediators present in the surrounding niche for the proper activity and differentiation of stem cells. PMID:22768336

  17. Transcriptome comparison of distinct osteolineage subsets in the hematopoietic stem cell niche using a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Scadden, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow niche is recognized as a central player in maintaining and regulating the behavior of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Specific gain-of and loss-of function experiments perturbing a range of osteolineage cells or their secreted proteins had been shown to affect stem cell maintenance (Calvi et al, 2003 [1]; Stier et al., 2005 [2]; Zhang et al., 2003 [3]; Nilsson et al., 2005 [4]; Greenbaum et al., 2013 [5]) and engraftment (Adam et al., 2006, 2009 [6], [7]). We used specific in vivo cell deletion approaches to dissect the niche cell-parenchymal cell dependency in a complex bone marrow microenvironment. Endogenous deletion of osteocalcin-expressing (Ocn+) cells led to a loss of T immune cells (Yu et al., 2015 [8]. Ocn+ cells express the Notch ligand DLL4 to communicate with T-competent progenitors, and thereby ensuring T precursor production and expression of chemotactic molecules on their cell surface for subsequent thymic seeding. In contrast, depletion of osterix-expressing (Osx+) osteoprogenitors led to reduced B immune cells. These distinct hematopoietic phenotypes suggest specific pairing of mesenchymal niche cells and parenchymal hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow to create unique functional units to support hematopoiesis. Here, we present the global gene expression profiles of these osteolineage subtypes utilizing a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model (OsxCre+;Rosa-mCh+;Ocn:Topaz+) that labels Osx+ cells red, Ocn+ cells green, and Osx+ Ocn+ cells yellow. This system allows isolation of distinct osteolineage subsets within the same animal by flow cytometry. Array data that have been described in our study [8] are also publically available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) with the accession number GSE66042. Differences in gene expression may correlate with functional difference in supporting hematopoiesis. PMID:26484277

  18. Thymic and peripheral microenvironments differentially mediate development and maturation of iNKT cells by IL-15 transpresentation.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Eliseo F; Acero, Luis F; Stonier, Spencer W; Zhou, Dapeng; Schluns, Kimberly S

    2010-10-07

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are an innate type of T cells, which respond rapidly on activation. iNKT cells acquire these innate-like abilities during development; however, the signals driving development and functional maturation remain only partially understood. Because interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for iNKT development and is delivered by transpresentation, we set out to identify the cell types providing IL-15 to developing iNKT cells and determine their role at the various states of development and maturation. We report here that transpresentation of IL-15 by parenchymal cells was crucial for generating normal number of iNKTs in the thymus, whereas both hematopoietic and parenchymal cells regulated iNKT cell numbers in the periphery, particularly in the liver. Specifically, dendritic cells contributed to peripheral iNKT cell numbers by up-regulating Bcl-2 expression and promoting extrathymic iNKT cell ex-pansion and their homeostatic proliferation. Whether IL-15 affects functional maturation of iNKT cells was also examined. In IL-15Rα(-/-) mice, CD44(High)NK1.1(+) iNKT cells displayed decreased T-bet expression and in response to α-galactosylceramide, had deficient interferon-γ expression. Such defects could be reversed by exogenous IL-15 signals. Overall, these studies identify stage-specific functions of IL-15, which are determined by the tissue microenvironment and elucidate the importance of IL-15 in functional maturation.

  19. Thymic and peripheral microenvironments differentially mediate development and maturation of iNKT cells by IL-15 transpresentation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Eliseo F.; Acero, Luis F.; Stonier, Spencer W.; Zhou, Dapeng

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are an innate type of T cells, which respond rapidly on activation. iNKT cells acquire these innate-like abilities during development; however, the signals driving development and functional maturation remain only partially understood. Because interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for iNKT development and is delivered by transpresentation, we set out to identify the cell types providing IL-15 to developing iNKT cells and determine their role at the various states of development and maturation. We report here that transpresentation of IL-15 by parenchymal cells was crucial for generating normal number of iNKTs in the thymus, whereas both hematopoietic and parenchymal cells regulated iNKT cell numbers in the periphery, particularly in the liver. Specifically, dendritic cells contributed to peripheral iNKT cell numbers by up-regulating Bcl-2 expression and promoting extrathymic iNKT cell ex-pansion and their homeostatic proliferation. Whether IL-15 affects functional maturation of iNKT cells was also examined. In IL-15Rα−/− mice, CD44HighNK1.1+ iNKT cells displayed decreased T-bet expression and in response to α-galactosylceramide, had deficient interferon-γ expression. Such defects could be reversed by exogenous IL-15 signals. Overall, these studies identify stage-specific functions of IL-15, which are determined by the tissue microenvironment and elucidate the importance of IL-15 in functional maturation. PMID:20581314

  20. Human fetal hepatic progenitor cells are distinct from, but closely related to, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingfeng; Khoury, Maroun; Limmon, Gino; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y; Chen, Jianzhu

    2013-06-01

    Much controversy surrounds the identity and origin of human hepatic stem and progenitor cells in part because of a lack of small animal models in which the developmental potential of isolated candidate cell populations can be functionally evaluated. We show here that adoptive transfer of CD34(+) cells from human fetal liver into sublethally irradiated NOD-SCID Il2rg(-/-) (NSG) mice leads to an efficient development of not only human hematopoietic cells but also human hepatocyte-like cells in the liver of the recipient mice. Using this simple in vivo assay in combination with cell fractionation, we show that CD34(+) fetal liver cells can be separated into three distinct subpopulations: CD34(hi) CD133(hi), CD34(lo) CD133(lo), and CD34(hi) CD133(neg). The CD34(hi) CD133(hi) population contains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) as they give rise to T cells, B cells, NK cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes/macrophages in NSG mice and colony-forming unit (CFU)-GEMM cells in vitro. The CD34(lo) CD133(lo) population does not give rise to hematopoietic cells, but reproducibly generates hepatocyte-like cells in NSG mice and in vitro. The CD34(hi) CD133(neg) population only gives rise to CFU-GM and burst-forming unit-erythroid in vitro. Furthermore, we show that the CD34(lo) CD133(lo) cells express hematopoietic, hepatic, and mesenchymal markers, including CD34, CD133, CD117, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, CD73, albumin, α-fetal protein, and vimentin and transcriptionally are more closely related to HSPCs than to mature hepatocytes. These results show that CD34(lo) CD133(lo) fetal liver cells possess the hepatic progenitor cell properties and that human hepatic and hematopoietic progenitor cells are distinct, although they may originate from the same precursors in the fetal liver.

  1. [Pegfilgrastim in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fernández Alvarez, R

    2010-12-01

    Pegylation implies progress in filgrastim therapy. The addition of one molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the drug's half-life by reducing renal excretion. A single dose of pegfilgrastim is equivalent to a daily administration of G-CSF for recovering from neutropenia after cancer chemotherapy. Pegfilgrastim is also useful to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have researched its efficacy in this context, in patients with myeloma or lymphoma. Outcomes suggest that it has an efficacy similar to daily G-CSF. In allogeneic donors, a single 12-mg dose of pegfilgrastim produces sufficient increase of CD34+ in peripheral blood, with acceptable toxicity. There is interest on the data about the various functional and biologic properties of hematopoietic stem cells mobilized with pegfilgrastim compared to G-CSF, and on the effect that these differences may have on the graft composition. The administration of a single dose of pegfilgrastim after autologous transplantation has been shown to shorten the time for leukocyte recovery in a manner similar to G-CSF

  2. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Isabel

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  3. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J; Slamon, Dennis J; Chute, John P

    2014-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation-mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner.

  4. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS

    PubMed Central

    Himburg, Heather A.; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L.; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation–mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation–induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner. PMID:25250571

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for auto immune rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Jain, Sandeep; Ravindran, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have their origins in the embryo and during the process of organogenesis, these differentiate into specialized cells which mature to form tissues. In addition, stem cell are characterized by an ability to indefinitely self renew. Stem cells are broadly classified into embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Adult stem cells can be genetically reprogrammed to form pluripotent stem cells and exist in an embroyonic like state. In the early phase of embryogenesis, human embryonic stem cells only exist transiently. Adult stem cells are omnipresent in the body and function to regenerate during the process of apoptosis or tissue repair. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells. Autoimmune responses are sustained due to the perennial persistence of tissue self autoantigens and/or auto reactive lymphocytes. Immune reset is a process leading to generation of fresh self-tolerant lymphocytes after chemotherapy induced elimination of self or autoreactive lymphocytes. This forms the basis for autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT). In the beginning HSCT had been limited to refractory autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) due to concern about transplant related mortality and morbidity. However HSCT for AIRD has come a long way with better understanding of patient selection, conditioning regime and supportive care. In this narrative review we have examined the available literature regarding the HSCT use in AIRD. PMID:27011918

  6. Drug hypersensitivity reactions during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Scherer Hofmeier, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Drugs may elicit a considerable variety of clinical signs, often affecting the skin and the mucous membranes. The most common are maculopapular exanthema, urticaria and angioedema. More rarely pustular, vesiculobullous, vasculitic and lichenoid lesions may be observed. Apart from the morphology, also the chronology of the occurrence and the evolution of the single skin lesions and the exanthema are paramount in the clinical diagnosis. Often, the skin is the only affected organ; however, it may herald a systemic involvement of internal organs, such as in severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndromes or anaphylaxis. Cutaneous manifestations, particularly maculopapular exanthemas have a high incidence among patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In many cases, a virus- or drug-induced origin or a combination of both is responsible. However, the transplantation itself may also induce similar skin changes. These exanthemas include most often graft-versus-host disease, and rarely engraftment syndrome or eruption of lymphocyte recovery. The elucidation of the underlying cause of the exanthemas occurring in immune compromised patients and the determination of the correct diagnosis remain challenging. An extensive differential diagnosis has to be put forward. This includes several groups of disorders with sometimes very similar cutaneous manifestations. Manifestations form the underlying disease, complications from therapy, infections and drug reactions are the most common differential diagnoses.

  7. The impact of regulatory T cells on T-cell immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Shashidhar, Sumana; Chang, Daisy S.; Ho, Lena; Kambham, Neeraja; Bachmann, Michael; Brown, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) by inhibiting the proliferation and function of conventional T cells (Tcons). However, the impact of Tregs on T-cell development and immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. Using a murine GvHD model induced by Tcons, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of Tregs leads to (1) abrogration of GvHD, (2) preservation of thymic and peripheral lymph node architecture, and (3) an accelerated donor lymphoid reconstitution of a diverse TCR-Vβ repertoire. The resultant enhanced lymphoid reconstitution in Treg recipients protects them from lethal cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. By contrast, mice that receive Tcons alone have disrupted lymphoid organs from GvHD and remain lymphopenic with a restricted TCR-Vβ repertoire and rapid death on MCMV challenge. Lymphocytes from previously infected Treg recipients generate secondary response specific to MCMV, indicating long-term protective immunity with transferred Tregs. Thymectomy significantly reduces survival after MCMV challenge in Treg recipients compared with euthymic controls. Our results indicate that Tregs enhance immune reconstitution by preventing GvHD-induced damage of the thymic and secondary lymphoid microenvironment. These findings provide new insights into the role of Tregs in affording protection to lymphoid stromal elements important for T-cell immunity. PMID:17916743

  8. Non-hematopoietic expression of IDO is integrally required for inflammatory tumor promotion

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Alexander J.; DuHadaway, James B.; Chang, Mee Young; Ramalingam, Arivudinambi; Sutanto-Ward, Erika; Boulden, Janette; Soler, Alejandro P.; Mandik-Nayak, Laura; Gilmour, Susan K.

    2010-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is generally considered to be immunosuppressive but recent findings suggest this characterization oversimplifies its role in disease pathogenesis. Recently, we showed that IDO is essential for tumor outgrowth in the classical two-stage model of inflammatory skin carcinogenesis. Here, we report that IDO loss did not exacerbate classical inflammatory responses. Rather, IDO induction could be elicited by environmental signals and tumor promoters as an integral component of the inflammatory tissue microenvironment even in the absence of cancer. IDO loss had limited impact on tumor outgrowth in carcinogenesis models that lacked an explicit inflammatory tumor promoter. In the context of inflammatory carcinogenesis where IDO was critical to tumor development, the most important source of IDO was radiation-resistant non-hematopoietic cells, consistent with evidence that loss of the IDO regulatory tumor suppressor gene Bin1 in transformed skin cells facilitates IDO-mediated immune escape by a cell autonomous mechanism. Taken together, our results identify IDO as an integral component of ‘cancer-associated’ inflammation that tilts the immune system toward tumor support. More generally, they promote the concept that mediators of immune escape and cancer-associated inflammation may be genetically synonymous. PMID:20640572

  9. Hematopoietic Transcriptional Mechanisms: From Locus-Specific to Genome-Wide Vantage Points

    PubMed Central

    DeVilbiss, Andrew W.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Johnson, Kirby D.; Keles, Sunduz; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is an exquisitely regulated process in which stem cells in the developing embryo and the adult generate progenitor cells that give rise to all blood lineages. Master regulatory transcription factors control hematopoiesis by integrating signals from the microenvironment and dynamically establishing and maintaining genetic networks. One of the most rudimentary aspects of cell type-specific transcription factor function, how they occupy a highly restricted cohort of cis-elements in chromatin remains poorly understood. Transformative technological advances involving the coupling of next-generation DNA sequencing technology with the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP-seq) have enabled genome-wide mapping of factor occupancy patterns. However, formidable problems remain, notably ChIP-seq analysis yields hundreds to thousands of chromatin sites occupied by a given transcription factor, and only a fraction of the sites appear to be endowed with critical, non-redundant function. It has become en vogue to map transcription factor occupancy patterns genome-wide, while utilizing powerful statistical tools to establish correlations to inform biology and mechanisms. With the advent of revolutionary genome editing technologies, one can now reach beyond correlations to conduct definitive hypothesis testing. This review will focus on key discoveries that have emerged during the path from single loci to genome-wide analyses, specifically in the context of hematopoietic transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:24816274

  10. Hypercholesterolemia Tunes Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells for Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Feng, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    As the pathological basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), atherosclerosis is featured as a chronic inflammation. Hypercholesterolemia is an independent risk factor for CVD. Accumulated studies have shown that hypercholesterolemia is associated with myeloid cell expansion, which stimulates innate and adaptive immune responses, strengthens inflammation, and accelerates atherosclerosis progression. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in bone marrow (BM) expresses a panel of lipoprotein receptors to control cholesterol homeostasis. Deficiency of these receptors abrogates cellular cholesterol efflux, resulting in HSPC proliferation and differentiation in hypercholesterolemic mice. Reduction of the cholesterol level in the lipid rafts by infusion of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or its major apolipoprotein, apoA-I, reverses hypercholesterolemia-induced HSPC expansion. Apart from impaired cholesterol metabolism, inhibition of reactive oxygen species production suppresses HSPC activation and leukocytosis. These data indicate that the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypercholesterolemia on HSPC proliferation and differentiation could be multifaceted. Furthermore, dyslipidemia also regulates HSPC-neighboring cells, resulting in HSPC mobilization. In the article, we review how hypercholesterolemia evokes HSPC activation and mobilization directly or via its modification of BM microenvironment. We hope this review will bring light to finding key molecules to control HSPC expansion, inflammation, and atherosclerosis for the treatment of CVD. PMID:27447612

  11. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic

  12. Epo and non-hematopoietic cells: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Ogunshola, Omolara O; Bogdanova, Anna Yu

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) circulates in plasma and controls the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood (Fisher. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 228:1-14, 2003). Epo is produced primarily in the adult kidney and fetal liver and was originally believed to play a role restricted to stimulation of early erythroid precursor proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and differentiation of the erythroid lineage. Early studies showed that mice with targeted deletion of Epo or the Epo receptor (EpoR) show impaired erythropoiesis, lack mature erythrocytes, and die in utero around embryonic day 13.5 (Wu et al. Cell 83:59-67, 1995; Lin et al. Genes Dev. 10:154-164, 1996). These animals also exhibited heart defects, abnormal vascular development as well as increased apoptosis in the brain suggesting additional functions for Epo signaling in normal development of the central nervous system and heart. Now, in addition to its well-known role in erythropoiesis, a diverse array of cells have been identified that produce Epo and/or express the Epo-R including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and cells of the central nervous system (Masuda et al. J Biol Chem. 269:19488-19493, 1994; Marti et al. Eur J Neurosci. 8:666-676, 1996; Bernaudin et al. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 19:643-651, 1999; Li et al. Neurochem Res. 32:2132-2141, 2007). Endogenously produced Epo and/or expression of the EpoR gives rise to autocrine and paracrine signaling in different organs particularly during hypoxia, toxicity, and injury conditions. Epo has been shown to regulate a variety of cell functions such as calcium flux (Korbel et al. J Comp Physiol B. 174:121-128, 2004) neurotransmitter synthesis and cell survival (Velly et al. Pharmacol Ther. 128:445-459, 2010; Vogel et al. Blood. 102:2278-2284, 2003). Furthermore Epo has neurotrophic effects (Grimm et al. Nat Med. 8:718-724, 2002; Junk et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 99:10659-10664, 2002), can induce an angiogenic phenotype in cultured

  13. Galectin 3 as a guardian of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ruvolo, Peter P

    2016-03-01

    Galectin 3 is a member of a family of β-galactoside binding proteins and has emerged as an important regulator of diverse functions critical in cancer biology including apoptosis, metastasis, immune surveillance, molecular trafficking, mRNA splicing, gene expression, and inflammation. Galectin 3's ability to support cancer cell survival by intra-cellular and extra-cellular mechanisms suggests this molecule is an important component of the tumor microenvironment that potentially could be targeted for therapy. Data is emerging that Galectin 3 is elevated in many cancers including solid tumors and the cancers of the blood. Galectin 3 also appears to be a key molecule produced by tumor microenvironment support cells including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to suppress immune surveillance by killing T cells and interfering with NK cell function and by supporting metastasis. Levels of Galectin 3 increase in the MSC of aging mice and perhaps this contributes to the development of cancer in the elderly. Galectin 3 modulates surface protein expression of a diverse set of glycoproteins including CD44 by regulating endocytosis of these proteins. In addition, Galectin 3 binding to receptor kinases such as CD45 and the T cell receptor is critical in the regulation of their function. In this review I will examine the various mechanisms how Galectin 3 supports chemoresistance and metastasis in solid tumors and in leukemia and lymphoma. I will also discuss possible therapeutic strategies to target this Galectin for cancer therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  14. Engineered nanomedicine for myeloma and bone microenvironment targeting

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Archana; Reagan, Michaela R.; Basto, Pamela; Mishima, Yuji; Kamaly, Nazila; Glavey, Siobhan; Zhang, Sufeng; Moschetta, Michele; Seevaratnam, Dushanth; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jinhe; Memarzadeh, Masoumeh; Wu, Jun; Manier, Salomon; Shi, Jinjun; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lu, Zhi Ning; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; Sacco, Antonio; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Ghobrial, Irene M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth and a frequent destination for metastatic cancer cells. Targeting cancers within the bone marrow remains a crucial oncologic challenge due to issues of drug availability and microenvironment-induced resistance. Herein, we engineered bone-homing polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for spatiotemporally controlled delivery of therapeutics to bone, which diminish off-target effects and increase local drug concentrations. The NPs consist of poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and bisphosphonate (or alendronate, a targeting ligand). The engineered NPs were formulated by blending varying ratios of the synthesized polymers: PLGA-b-PEG and alendronate-conjugated polymer PLGA-b-PEG-Ald, which ensured long circulation and targeting capabilities, respectively. The bone-binding ability of Ald-PEG-PLGA NPs was investigated by hydroxyapatite binding assays and ex vivo imaging of adherence to bone fragments. In vivo biodistribution of fluorescently labeled NPs showed higher retention, accumulation, and bone homing of targeted Ald-PEG-PLGA NPs, compared with nontargeted PEG-PLGA NPs. A library of bortezomib-loaded NPs (bone-targeted Ald-Bort-NPs and nontargeted Bort-NPs) were developed and screened for optimal physiochemical properties, drug loading, and release profiles. Ald-Bort-NPs were tested for efficacy in mouse models of multiple myeloma (MM). Results demonstrated significantly enhanced survival and decreased tumor burden in mice pretreated with Ald-Bort-NPs versus Ald-Empty-NPs (no drug) or the free drug. We also observed that bortezomib, as a pretreatment regimen, modified the bone microenvironment and enhanced bone strength and volume. Our findings suggest that NP-based anticancer therapies with bone-targeting specificity comprise a clinically relevant method of drug delivery that can inhibit tumor progression in MM. PMID:24982170

  15. Effect of host microenvironment on the microcirculation of human colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, D.; Yuan, F.; Monsky, W. L.; Chen, Y.; Jain, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    distribution of vessel diameters of liver tumor was slightly shifted to smaller size compared with that of subcutaneous tumor. Leukocyte rolling in liver tumor was twofold lower than that in subcutaneous tumor. These physiological findings were consistent with the measurement of VEGF/VPF in that the VEGF/VPF mRNA level was lower in the liver tumor than that in the subcutaneous tumor. However, macromolecular vascular permeability in the liver tumor was significantly higher than in the subcutaneous tumor. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, the origin of liver tumor vessel endothelium, are known to be fenestrated and not to have a basement membrane, suggesting that the difference in endothelial cell origin may explain the difference in tumor vascular permeability in two sites. These findings demonstrate that liver microenvironment has different effects on some aspects of the tumor angiogenesis and microcirculation compared with the subcutaneous tissues. The new model/method described in this paper has significant implications in two research areas: 1) the liver microenvironment and its effect on tumor pathophysiology in conjunction with cytokine/ growth factor regulation and 2) the delivery of drugs, cells, and genes to liver tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9284816

  16. Methods to study the tumor microenvironment under controlled oxygen conditions

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Matthew B.; Leslie, Matthew T.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Kenis, Paul J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex heterogeneous assembly composed of a variety of cell types and physical features. One such feature, hypoxia, is associated with metabolic reprogramming, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and therapeutic resistance. Many questions remain regarding the effects of hypoxia on these outcomes, yet only few experimental methods enable both precise control over oxygen concentration and real-time imaging of cell behavior. Recent efforts with microfluidic platforms offer a promising solution to these limitations. We discuss conventional methods and tools used to control oxygen concentration for cell studies then highlight recent advances in microfluidic-based approaches for controlling oxygen in engineered platforms. PMID:25282035

  17. Targeting stromal microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: controversies and promises

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease. Conventional therapeutics targeting pancreas cancer cell compartment using cytotoxics improved patient survival but at the expense of significant toxicity. Microscopically, the tumor is characterized by thick desmoplastic stroma that surrounds islands of pancreatic cancer cells. The tumor microenvironment has been found to play important roles in carcinogenesis, the development of drug resistance, and mediating immunosuppression. The understanding the tumor-stromal interaction has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we review the strategies that are currently in (or, near to) clinical evaluation and the underlying preclinical rationales. PMID:27284483

  18. Microenvironment drug resistance in multiple myeloma: emerging new players

    PubMed Central

    Solimando, Antonio Giovanni; Ruggieri, Simona; Annese, Tiziana; Nico, Beatrice; Fumarulo, Ruggiero; Vacca, Angelo; Frassanito, Maria Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) drug resistance (DR) is a multistep transformation process based on a powerful interplay between bone marrow stromal cells and MM cells that allows the latter to escape anti-myeloma therapies. Here we present an overview of the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in both soluble factors-mediated drug resistance (SFM-DR) and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), focusing on the role of new players, namely miRNAs, exosomes and cancer-associated fibroblasts. PMID:27474171

  19. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME. PMID:26000022

  20. Combined effects of pericytes in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.

  1. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  2. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function.

  3. Probing the luminal microenvironment of reconstituted epithelial microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Cerchiari, Alec E.; Samy, Karen E.; Todhunter, Michael E.; Schlesinger, Erica; Henise, Jeff; Rieken, Christopher; Gartner, Zev J.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric microparticles can serve as carriers or sensors to instruct or characterize tissue biology. However, incorporating microparticles into tissues for in vitro assays remains a challenge. We exploit three-dimensional cell-patterning technologies and directed epithelial self-organization to deliver microparticles to the lumen of reconstituted human intestinal microtissues. We also develop a novel pH-sensitive microsensor that can measure the luminal pH of reconstituted epithelial microtissues. These studies offer a novel approach for investigating luminal microenvironments and drug-delivery across epithelial barriers. PMID:27619235

  4. Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment: Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eunice Yuen-Ting; Ho, Nicole Pui-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Tumor consists of heterogeneous cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can terminally differentiate into tumor bulk. Normal stem cells in normal organs regulate self-renewal within a stem cell niche. Likewise, accumulating evidence has also suggested that CSCs are maintained extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment, which includes both cellular and physical factors. Here, we review the significance of stromal cells, immune cells, extracellular matrix, tumor stiffness, and hypoxia in regulation of CSC plasticity and therapeutic resistance. With a better understanding of how CSC interacts with its niche, we are able to identify potential therapeutic targets for the development of more effective treatments against cancer. PMID:28337221

  5. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  6. Disparate regulation of human fetal erythropoiesis by the microenvironments of the liver and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Muench, M O; Namikawa, R

    2001-01-01

    The liver and the bone marrow (BM) are the major organs that support hematopoiesis in the human fetus. Although both tissues contain the spectrum of hematopoietic cells, erythropoiesis dominates the liver. Previous studies suggested that a unique responsiveness of fetal burst-forming units erythroid (BFU-E) to erythropoietin (EPO) obviates the need for cytokines with burst-promoting activity (BPA) in fetal erythropoiesis. This potential regulatory mechanism whereby fetal erythropoiesis is enhanced was further investigated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to isolate liver and BM progenitors based on their levels of CD34 and CD38 expression. The most mature population of CD34+ lineage (Lin-) cells was also the most prevalent of the three subpopulations and contained BFU-E responsive to EPO alone under serum-deprived conditions. Kit ligand (KL) also strongly synergized with EPO in stimulating the growth of these BFU-E. An intermediate subset of CD34++CD38+Lin- cells contained erythroid progenitors responsive to EPO alone, but also displayed synergism between EPO and KL, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or interleukin (IL)-3, demonstrating that erythroid progenitors that respond to cytokines with BPA do exist in fetal tissues as in the adult BM. Candidate stem cells (CD34++CD38-Lin- cells) did not respond to EPO. Synergisms among KL, GM-CSF, and IL-3, and to a lesser extent granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and FLK-2/FLT-3 ligand (FL), supported the growth of primitive multipotent progenitors that became responsive to EPO. These data define the limits of EPO activity in fetal erythropoiesis to cells that express CD38 and demonstrate the potential for various cytokine interactions to be involved in regulating fetal erythropoiesis. Furthermore, a comparison of the responses of liver and BM erythroid progenitors revealed similarity in their responses to cytokines but a difference in the frequency of BFU-E among the three

  7. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  8. Partitioning microfluidic channels with hydrogel to construct tunable 3-D cellular microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Amy P; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel; Christopher Love, J; Whitesides, George M

    2008-04-01

    Accurate modeling of the cellular microenvironment is important for improving studies of cell biology in vitro. Here, we demonstrate a flexible method for creating a cellular microenvironment in vitro that allows (i) controlled spatial distribution (patterning) of multiple types of cells within three-dimensional (3-D) matrices of a biologically derived, thermally curable hydrogel (Matrigel) and (ii) application of gradients of soluble factors, such as cytokines, across the hydrogel. The technique uses laminar flow to divide a microchannel into multiple subchannels separated by microslabs of hydrogel. It does not require the use of UV light or photoinitiators and is compatible with cell culture in the hydrogel. This technique makes it possible to design model systems to study cellular communication mediated by the diffusion of soluble factors within 3-D matrices. Such factors can originate either from secretions of neighboring cells patterned within the microchannel, or from an external source -- e.g., a solution of growth factors injected into a subchannel. This method is particularly useful for studying cells such as those of the immune system, which are often weakly adherent and difficult to position precisely with standard systems for cell culture. We demonstrated this application by co-culturing two types of macrophage-like cells (BAC1.2F5 and LADMAC cell lines) within spatially separated regions of a slab of hydrogel. This pair of cell lines represents a simple model system for intercellular communication: the LADMAC cells produce colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), which is required by the BAC cells for survival.

  9. Partitioning Microfluidic Channels with Hydrogel to Construct Tunable 3-D Cellular Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Amy P.; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel; Love, J. Christopher; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the cellular microenvironment is important for improving studies of cell biology in vitro. Here, we demonstrate a flexible method for creating a cellular microenvironment in vitro that allows i) controlled spatial distribution (patterning) of multiple types of cells within three-dimensional (3-D) matrices of a biologically-derived, thermally-curable hydrogel (Matrigel) and ii) application of gradients of soluble factors, such as cytokines, across the hydrogel. The technique uses laminar flow to divide a microchannel into multiple subchannels separated by microslabs of hydrogel. It does not require the use of UV light or photoinitiators, and is compatible with cell culture in the hydrogel. This technique makes it possible to design model systems to study cellular communication mediated by the diffusion of soluble factors within 3-D matrices. Such factors can originate either from secretions of neighboring cells patterned within the microchannel, or from an external source—e.g., a solution of growth factors injected into a subchannel. This method is particularly useful for studying cells such as those of the immune system, which are often weakly adherent and difficult to position precisely with standard systems for cell culture. We demonstrated this application by co-culturing two types of macrophage-like cells (BAC1.2F5 and LADMAC cell lines) within spatially separated regions of a slab of hydrogel. This pair of cell lines represents a simple model system for intercellular communication: the LADMAC cells produce colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), which is required by the BAC cells for survival. PMID:18243301

  10. Tuberculosis in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Batista, Marjorie Vieira; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Literature on tuberculosis (TB) occurring in recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is scanty even in countries where TB is common. Most reports of TB in HSCT patients were from ASIA, in fact the TB incidence ranging from 0.0014 (USA) to 16% (Pakistan). There are few reports of TB diagnosis during the first two weeks after HSCT; most of cases described in the literature occurred after 90 days of HSCT, and the lung was the organ most involved. The mortality ranged from 0 to 50% and is higher in allogeneic HSCT than in autologous. There is no consensus regarding the screening with tuberculin skin test or QuantiFERON-TB gold, primary prophylaxis for latent TB, and whether the epidemiologic query should be emphasized in developing countries with high prevalence of TB. PMID:24363876

  11. Lineage-related cytotoxicity and clonogenic profile of 1,4-benzoquinone-exposed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Paik Wah; Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Chan, Kok Meng; Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan Hussain; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2015-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are sensitive targets for benzene-induced hematotoxicity and leukemogenesis. The impact of benzene exposure on the complex microenvironment of HSCs and HPCs remains elusive. This study aims to investigate the mechanism linking benzene exposure to targeting HSCs and HPCs using phenotypic and clonogenic analyses. Mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were exposed ex vivo to the benzene metabolite, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), for 24 h. Expression of cellular surface antigens for HSC (Sca-1), myeloid (Gr-1, CD11b), and lymphoid (CD45, CD3e) populations were confirmed by flow cytometry. The clonogenicity of cells was studied using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay for multilineage (CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM) and single-lineage (CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M) progenitors. 1,4-BQ demonstrated concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in mouse BM cells. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased (p < 0.05) following 1,4-BQ exposure. Exposure to 1,4-BQ showed no significant effect on CD3e{sup +} cells but reduced the total counts of Sca-1{sup +}, CD11b{sup +}, Gr-1{sup +}, and CD45{sup +} cells at 7 and 12 μM (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CFU assay showed reduced (p < 0.05) clonogenicity in 1,4-BQ-treated cells. 1,4-BQ induced CFU-dependent cytotoxicity by significantly inhibiting colony growth for CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M starting at a low concentration of exposure (5 μM); whereas for the CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM, the inhibition of colony growth was remarkable only at 7 and 12 μM of 1,4-BQ, respectively. Taken together, 1,4-BQ caused lineage-related cytotoxicity in mouse HPCs, demonstrating greater toxicity in single-lineage progenitors than in those of multi-lineage. - Highlights: • We examine 1,4-BQ toxicity targeting mouse hematopoietic cell lineages. • 1,4-BQ induces concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in bone marrow (BM) cells. • 1,4-BQ shows lineage-related toxicity on hematopoietic stem and

  12. Of birds and mice: hematopoietic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2005-01-01

    For many years it has been assumed that the ontogeny of the mammalian hematopoietic system involves sequential transfers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generated in the yolk sac blood islands, to successive hematopoietic organs as these become active in the embryo (fetal liver, thymus, spleen and eventually bone marrow). Very little was known about early events related to hematopoiesis that could take place during the 4.5 day gap separating the appearance of the yolk sac blood islands and the stage of a fully active fetal liver. Experiments performed in birds documented that the yolk sac only produce erythro-myeloid precursors that become extinct after the emergence of a second wave of intra-embryonic HSCs from the region neighbouring the dorsal aorta. The experimental approaches undertaken over the last ten years in the murine model, which are reviewed here, led to the conclusion that the rules governing avian hematopoietic development basically apply to higher vertebrates.

  13. Gs signaling in osteoblasts and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Henry M

    2010-03-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein Gs is a major mediator of the actions of several G protein-coupled receptors that target cells of the osteoblast lineage. For this reason, we generated chimeric mice with normal host cells and cells derived from embryonic stem cells missing the gene encoding the alpha subunit of Gs. While the mutant cells contributed to cortical osteoblasts and to hematopoietic cells in the liver, the marrow space contained few if any osteoblasts or hematopoietic cells missing Gs. Subsequent studies using the Cre-lox approach to delete Gsalpha from early cells of the osteoblast lineage and from hematopoietic stem cells were performed. These studies demonstrated the crucial roles of Gsalpha in osteoblastic cells in regulating the differentiation of osteoblasts and in supporting B-cell development as well as the essential role for Gsalpha in hematopoietic stem cells in allowing the homing of these cells to the marrow.

  14. Impact craters as biospheric microenvironments, Lawn Hill Structure, Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, John; Brasier, Martin

    2006-04-01

    Impact craters on Mars act as traps for eolian sediment and in the past may have provided suitable microenvironments that could have supported and preserved a stressed biosphere. If this is so, terrestrial impact structures such as the 18-km-diameter Lawn Hill Structure, in northern Australia, may prove useful as martian analogs. We sampled outcrop and drill core from the carbonate fill of the Lawn Hill Structure and recorded its gamma-log signature. Facies data along with whole rock geochemistry and stable isotope signatures show that the crater fill is an outlier of the Georgina Basin and was formed by impact at, or shortly before, approximately 509-506 million years ago. Subsequently, it was rapidly engulfed by the Middle Cambrian marine transgression, which filled it with shallow marine carbonates and evaporites. The crater formed a protected but restricted microenvironment in which sediments four times the thickness of the nearby basinal succession accumulated. Similar structures, common on the martian surface, may well have acted as biospheric refuges as the planet's water resources declined. Low-pH aqueous environments on Earth similar to those on Mars, while extreme, support diverse ecologies. The architecture of the eolian crater fill would have been defined by long-term ground water cycles resulting from intermittent precipitation in an extremely arid climate. Nutrient recycling, critical to a closed lacustrine sub-ice biosphere, could be provided by eolian transport onto the frozen water surface.

  15. Tissue microenvironments within functional cortical subdivisions adjacent to focal stroke.

    PubMed

    Katsman, Diana; Zheng, Jian; Spinelli, Kateri; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2003-09-01

    Stroke produces a region of complete cell death and areas of partial damage, injury, and gliosis. The spatial relationship of these regions of damage to the infarct core and within spared neuronal circuits has not been identified. A model of cortical stroke was developed within functional subsets of the somatosensory cortex. Infarct size, regions of apoptosis, oxidative DNA damage, heat shock protein induction, and subtypes of reactive gliosis were precisely mapped with the somatosensory body map, quantified, and interrelated. Three tissue microenvironments were recognized: zones of partial ischemic damage, heat shock protein induction, and distributed gliosis. These three zones involved progressively more distant cortical regions, each larger than the infarct core. The zone of partial ischemic damage represents an overlap region of apoptotic cell death, oxidative DNA damage, loss of synaptic connections, and local reactive gliosis. The zone of distributed gliosis occupies distinct functional areas of the somatosensory cortex. The tissue reorganization induced by stroke is much larger than the stroke site itself. Adjacent tissue microenvironments are sites of distinct reactive cellular signaling and may serve as a link between the processes of acute cell death and delayed neuronal plasticity after focal stroke.

  16. Interleukin-5 facilitates lung metastasis by modulating the immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Gleaves, Linda A; McLoed, Allyson G; Saxon, Jamie A; Habermann, Arun C; Connelly, Linda; Dulek, Daniel; Peebles, R Stokes; Fingleton, Barbara; Yull, Fiona E; Stathopoulos, Georgios T; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2015-04-15

    Although the lung is the most common metastatic site for cancer cells, biologic mechanisms regulating lung metastasis are not fully understood. Using heterotopic and intravenous injection models of lung metastasis in mice, we found that IL5, a cytokine involved in allergic and infectious diseases, facilitates metastatic colonization through recruitment of sentinel eosinophils and regulation of other inflammatory/immune cells in the microenvironment of the distal lung. Genetic IL5 deficiency offered marked protection of the lungs from metastasis of different types of tumor cells, including lung cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer. IL5 neutralization protected subjects from metastasis, whereas IL5 reconstitution or adoptive transfer of eosinophils into IL5-deficient mice exerted prometastatic effects. However, IL5 deficiency did not affect the growth of the primary tumor or the size of metastatic lesions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that eosinophils produce CCL22, which recruits regulatory T cells to the lungs. During early stages of metastasis, Treg created a protumorigenic microenvironment, potentially by suppressing IFNγ-producing natural killer cells and M1-polarized macrophages. Together, our results establish a network of allergic inflammatory circuitry that can be co-opted by metastatic cancer cells to facilitate lung colonization, suggesting interventions to target this pathway may offer therapeutic benefits to prevent or treat lung metastasis.

  17. Rapid 3D extrusion of synthetic tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Grolman, Joshua M.; Zhang, Douglas; Smith, Andrew M.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors house an assortment of complex and dynamically changing microenvironments in which signaling events between multiple cell types are known to play a critical role in tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. To deepen our understanding of this biology, it is desirable to accurately model these structures in vitro for basic studies and for drug screening; however, current systems fall short of mimicking the complex organization of cells and matrix in vivo. Here we demonstrate the generation of spatially-organized 3D hydrogels of cells and matrix produced from a simple concentric flow device in a single step. Multiple cell types are pre-seeded in different spatial domains such as concentric regions of vessel-like tubular structures to reproducibly establish heterotypic cellular environments in 3D. Using macrophages and breast adenocarcinoma cells as an example of a paracrine loop that regulates metastasis, we explored the effects of clinical drug treatments and observed a dose-dependent modulation of cellular migration. This versatile and tunable approach for tissue fabrication will enable a means to study a wide range of microenvironments and may provide a clinically-viable solution for personalized assessment of patient response to therapeutics. PMID:26283579

  18. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Amanda W.; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S.; Broggi, Maria A.; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment. PMID:27525437

  19. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in transportation microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongwoo; Jaimes, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    This study is one of the first case studies to characterize the exposure of urban residents to traffic-related air pollution across locations and transportation microenvironments during everyday activities. Twenty-four adult residents of Boyle Heights, a neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles, carried a portable air pollution monitor and a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tracking device for a total of 96 days. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pPAH) concentrations in transportation microenvironments. Average pPAH concentrations were higher while walking outdoors (190 ng m-3) compared to traveling in private passenger vehicles (138-155 ng m-3) or traveling in public transportation (61-124 ng m-3). Although travel comprised 5% of participant days, it was associated with 27% of overall daily pPAH exposure. Regression models explained 40-55% of the variation in daily average pPAH concentrations, and 40-44% of the variation in 1-min interval concentrations. Important factors included time spent traveling, travel speed, meteorological and nearby land use factors, time of day, and proximity to roadways. Although future research is needed to develop stronger predictive models, our study demonstrates portable tracking devices can provide a more complete, diurnal characterization of air pollution exposures for urban populations.

  20. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans.

  1. Interleukin-5 Facilitates Lung Metastasis by Modulating the Immune Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gleaves, Linda A.; McLoed, Allyson G.; Saxon, Jamie A.; Habermann, Arun C.; Connelly, Linda; Dulek, Daniel; Peebles, R. Stokes; Fingleton, Barbara; Yull, Fiona E.; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Although the lung is the most common metastatic site for cancer cells, biological mechanisms regulating lung metastasis are not fully understood. Using heterotopic and intravenous injection models of lung metastasis in mice, we found that IL-5, a cytokine involved in allergic and infectious diseases, facilitates metastatic colonization through recruitment of sentinel eosinophils and regulation of other inflammatory/immune cells in the microenvironment of the distal lung. Genetic IL-5 deficiency offered marked protection of the lungs from metastasis of different types of tumor cells, including lung cancer, melanoma and colon cancer. IL-5 neutralization protected subjects from metastasis, whereas IL-5 reconstitution or adoptive transfer of eosinophils into IL-5 deficient mice exerted pro-metastatic effects. However, IL-5 deficiency did not affect the growth of the primary tumor or the size of metastatic lesions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that eosinophils produce CCL22, which recruits regulatory T cells (Treg) to the lungs. During early stages of metastasis Treg created a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, potentially by suppressing IFNγ-producing natural killer cells and M1-polarized macrophages. Together, our results establish a network of allergic inflammatory circuitry that can be co-opted by metastatic cancer cells to facilitate lung colonization, suggesting interventions to target this pathway may offer therapeutic benefits to prevent or treat lung metastasis. PMID:25691457

  2. Acute myeloid leukemia creates an arginase-dependent immunosuppressive microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mussai, Francis; De Santo, Carmela; Abu-Dayyeh, Issa; Booth, Sarah; Quek, Lynn; McEwen-Smith, Rosanna M.; Qureshi, Amrana; Dazzi, Francesco; Vyas, Paresh

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and the second most common frequent leukemia of childhood. Patients may present with lymphopenia or pancytopenia at diagnosis. We investigated the mechanisms by which AML causes pancytopenia and suppresses patients’ immune response. This study identified for the first time that AML blasts alter the immune microenvironment through enhanced arginine metabolism. Arginase II is expressed and released from AML blasts and is present at high concentrations in the plasma of patients with AML, resulting in suppression of T-cell proliferation. We extended these results by demonstrating an arginase-dependent ability of AML blasts to polarize surrounding monocytes into a suppressive M2-like phenotype in vitro and in engrafted nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In addition, AML blasts can suppress the proliferation and differentiation of murine granulocyte-monocyte progenitors and human CD34+ progenitors. Finally, the study showed that the immunosuppressive activity of AML blasts can be modulated through small-molecule inhibitors of arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggesting a novel therapeutic target in AML. The results strongly support the hypothesis that AML creates an immunosuppressive microenvironment that contributes to the pancytopenia observed at diagnosis. PMID:23733335

  3. Use of laser scanning cytometry to study tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, S; Wang, E; Panelli, M; Rossi, C R; Marincola, F M

    2003-04-01

    The study of phenomena occurring in the tumor microenvironment is a challenging task because of technical difficulties, particularly when dealing with hypocellular specimens. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a new laboratory technology that has been recently introduced to overcome the limitations of other traditional technologies. By combining the properties and the advantages of flow cytometry (FC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), LSC allows the investigator to obtain objective information on DNA content, protein expression and cellular localization is combination with morphological features. It has been already shown that LSC results are reliable compared to more traditional technologies, and its implementation in the clinical routine is under way. Its use in oncology, which is rapidly expanding, spans from apoptosis analysis to DNA content quantitation and tumor cell phenotyping. Here we describe the technology underlying this novel fluorescence-based device, review its use in oncology by dissecting the phenomena occurring in the tumor microenvironment and propose its application for the immunological follow-up of malignant lesions undergoing immunotherapeutic manipulation.

  4. The Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Choline and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Noriko; Wildes, Flonné; Takagi, Tomoyo; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    An increase of cellular phosphocholine (PC) and total choline (tCho)-containing compounds as well as alterations in lipids have been consistently observed in cancer cells and tissue. These metabolic changes are closely related to malignant transformation, invasion, and metastasis. The study of cancer cells in culture plays an important role in understanding mechanisms leading to altered choline (Cho) and lipid metabolism in cancer, as it provides a carefully controlled environment. However, a solid tumor is a complex system with a unique tumor microenvironment frequently containing hypoxic and acidic regions and areas of nutrient deprivation and necrosis. Cancer cell–stromal cell interactions and the extracellular matrix may also alter Cho and lipid metabolism. Human tumor xenograft models in mice are useful to mimic the growth of human cancers and provide insights into the influence of in vivo conditions on metabolism. Here, we have compared metabolites, obtained with high resolution 1H MRS of extracts from human breast and prostate cancer cells in a 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture and from solid tumor xenografts derived from these cells, as well as the protein expression of enzymes that regulate Cho and lipid metabolism. Our data demonstrate significant differences in Cho and lipid metabolism and protein expression patterns between human breast and prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumors derived from these cells. These data highlight the influence of the tumor microenvironment on Cho and lipid metabolism. PMID:28066718

  5. Multiparametric probing of microenvironment with solvatochromic fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2008-01-01

    We describe new methodology for multiparametric probing of weak non-covalent interactions in the medium based on response of environment-sensitive fluorescent dyes. The commonly used approach is based on correlation of one spectroscopic parameter (e.g. wavelength shift) with environment polarity, which describes a superposition of universal and specific (such as hydrogen bonding) interactions. In our approach, by using several independent spectroscopic parameters of a dye, we monitor simultaneously each individual type of the interactions. For deriving these extra parameters the selected dye should exist in several excited and/or ground states. In the present work, we applied 4'-(diethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone, which undergoes the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and thus exhibits an additional emission band belonging to an ESIPT product (tautomer) form of the dye. The spectroscopic characteristics of the excited normal and the tautomer states as well as of the ESIPT reaction of the dye are differently sensitive to the different types of interactions with microenvironment and therefore can be used for its multiparametric description. The new methodology allowed us to monitor simultaneously three fundamental physicochemical parameters of probe microenvironment: polarity, electronic polarizability and H-bond donor ability. The applications of this approach to binary solvent mixtures, reverse micelles, lipid bilayers and binding sites of proteins are presented and the limitations of this approach are discussed. We believe that the methodology of multiparametric probing will extend the capabilities of fluorescent probes as the tools in biomolecular and cellular research.

  6. Emergence of therapy resistance in multiple myeloma in heterogeneous microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, Hyungsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2014-03-01

    Cancer chemotherapy resistance is always a problem that is not clear considering spatial heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. We culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region in a microfluidic device which mimics the tumor microenvironment with a chemotherapy drug gradient and microhabitats. Resistance of the multiple myeloma cells to doxorubicin emerged within two weeks. For the resistant cells evolved from the devices, the doxorubicin concentration that inhibits 50% of the controlled population increased by 16-fold than the parental cells. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed that 39% of newly acquired mutational hotspots (the genes with more than 3 non-synonymous point mutation) of the resistant cells are involved in apoptosis and DNA repair. On the other hand, 40% of the non-mutated genes that are abnormally regulated in the resistant cells, are involved in metabolism, biosynthesis, and biomolecular transport. Among them, metabolic drug efflux pumps and oxidative stress scavengers are up-regulated to reduce the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and further result in the resistance. The roles of the spatial drug gradients and microhabitats in rapid emergence of cancer resistance will be discussed. The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  7. Carcinoma Cell Hyaluronan as a "Portable" Cancerized Prometastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Eva A; Wood, David K; McCarthy, James B

    2016-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a structurally simple polysaccharide, but its ability to act as a template for organizing pericellular matrices and its regulated synthesis and degradation are key to initiating repair responses. Importantly, these HA functions are usurped by tumor cells to facilitate progression and metastasis. Recent advances have identified the functional complexities associated with the synthesis and degradation of HA-rich matrices. Three enzymes synthesize large HA polymers while multiple hyaluronidases or tissue free radicals degrade these into smaller bioactive fragments. A family of extracellular and cell-associated HA-binding proteins/receptors translates the bioinformation encrypted in this complex polymer mixture to activate signaling networks required for cell survival, proliferation, and migration in an actively remodeling microenvironment. Changes in HA metabolism within both the peritumor stroma and parenchyma are linked to tumor initiation, progression, and poor clinical outcome. We review evidence that metastatic tumor cells must acquire the capability to autonomously synthesize, assemble, and process their own "portable" HA-rich microenvironments to survive in the circulation, metastasize to ectopic sites, and escape therapeutic intervention. Strategies to disrupt the HA machinery of primary tumor and circulating tumor cells may enhance the effectiveness of current conventional and targeted therapies. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2507-12. ©2016 AACR.

  8. A Novel Organotypic Model Mimics the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nurmenniemi, Sini; Sinikumpu, Teemu; Alahuhta, Ilkka; Salo, Sirpa; Sutinen, Meeri; Santala, Markku; Risteli, Juha; Nyberg, Pia; Salo, Tuula

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoma cell invasion is traditionally studied in three-dimensional organotypic models composed of type I collagen and fibroblasts. However, carcinoma cell behavior is affected by the various cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, a novel organotypic model based on human uterine leiomyoma tissue was established and characterized to create a more authentic environment for carcinoma cells. Human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-3) were cultured on top of either collagen or myoma. Organotypic sections were examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The maximal invasion depth of HSC-3 cells was markedly increased in myomas compared with collagen. In myomas, various cell types and ECM components were present, and the HSC-3 cells only expressed ECM molecules in the myoma model. Organotypic media were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, zymography, or Western blotting. During carcinoma cell invasion, matrix metalloprotease-9 production and collagen degradation were enhanced particularly in the myoma model. To evaluate the general applicability of the myoma model, several oral carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and melanoma cell lines were cultured on myomas and found to invade in highly distinct patterns. We conclude that myoma tissue mimics the native tumor microenvironment better than previous organotypic models and possibly enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Thus, the myoma model provides a promising tool for analyzing the behavior of carcinoma cells. PMID:19679876

  9. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  10. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  11. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  12. Hematopoietic progenitors are required for proper development of coronary vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Lluri, Gentian; Huang, Vincent; Touma, Marlin; Liu, Xiaoqian; Harmon, Andrew W.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Rationale During embryogenesis, hematopoietic cells appear in the myocardium prior to the initiation of coronary formation. However, their role is unknown. Objective Here we investigate whether pre-existing hematopoietic cells are required for the formation of coronary vasculature. Methods and Results As a model of for hematopoietic cell deficient animals, we used Runx1 knockout embryos and Vav1-cre; R26-DTA embryos, latter of which genetically ablates 2/3 of CD45+ hematopoietic cells. Both Runx1 knockout embryos and Vav1-cre; R26-DTA embryos revealed disorganized, hypoplastic microvasculature of coronary vessels on section and whole-mount stainings. Furthermore, coronary explant experiments showed that the mouse heart explants from Runx1 and Vav1-cre; R26-DTA embryos exhibited impaired coronary formation ex vivo. Interestingly, in both models it appears that epicardial to mesenchymal transition is adversely affected in the absence of hematopoietic progenitors. Conclusion Hematopoietic cells are not merely passively transported via coronary vessel, but substantially involved in the induction of the coronary growth. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of coronary growth. PMID:26241844

  13. A promoter DNA demethylation landscape of human hematopoietic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Fernández, Agustín F.; Urdinguio, Rocío G.; Suárez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Mangas, Cristina; Pérez-García, Vicente; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Ferrero, Cecilia; Assenov, Yassen; Bock, Christoph; Menendez, Pablo; Carrera, Ana Clara; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Fraga, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    Global mechanisms defining the gene expression programs specific for hematopoiesis are still not fully understood. Here, we show that promoter DNA demethylation is associated with the activation of hematopoietic-specific genes. Using genome-wide promoter methylation arrays, we identified 694 hematopoietic-specific genes repressed by promoter DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and whose loss of methylation in hematopoietic can be associated with gene expression. The association between promoter methylation and gene expression was studied for many hematopoietic-specific genes including CD45, CD34, CD28, CD19, the T cell receptor (TCR), the MHC class II gene HLA-DR, perforin 1 and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and results indicated that DNA demethylation was not always sufficient for gene activation. Promoter demethylation occurred either early during embryonic development or later on during hematopoietic differentiation. Analysis of the genome-wide promoter methylation status of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from somatic CD34+ HSPCs and differentiated derivatives from CD34+ HSPCs confirmed the role of DNA methylation in regulating the expression of genes of the hemato-immune system, and indicated that promoter methylation of these genes may be associated to stemness. Together, these data suggest that promoter DNA demethylation might play a role in the tissue/cell-specific genome-wide gene regulation within the hematopoietic compartment. PMID:21911366

  14. Exosome in tumour microenvironment: overview of the crosstalk between normal and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro Viana

    2014-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process in which exosomes play important roles. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. The major role of exosomes seems to be the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Depending on the cell of origin, exosomes are implicated in the regulation of several cellular events, with phenotypic consequences in recipient cells. Cancer derived exosomes (CCEs) are important players in the formation of the tumour microenvironment by (i) enabling the escape of tumour cells to immunological system and help initiating the inflammatory response; (ii) acting in the differentiation of fibroblasts and mesenchymal cells into myofibroblasts; (iii) triggering the angiogenic process; and (iv) enhancing the metastatic evolution of the tumour by promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transformation of tumour cells and by preparing the tumour niche in the new anatomical location. Since the finding that exosomes content resembles that of the cell of origin, they may be regarded as suitable biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, allowing for diagnosis and prognosis via a minimal invasive procedure. Exosome involvement in cancer may open new avenues regarding therapeutics, such as vectors for targeted drug delivery.

  15. Biosimilar Filgrastim in Autologous Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Post-Transplant Hematologic Recovery.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Francesco; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To date, two kinds of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factors (G-CSF) have been approved for autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSCs) mobilization and posttransplant hematologic recovery after high-dose chemotherapy: filgrastim (originator and biosimilar) and lenograstim. Biosimilar filgrastim has been approved on the basis of comparable efficacy and safety in clinical studies where it has been used as chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia prophylaxis, but no specific pre-registration studies have been published in the transplant setting. Hence, there is still general skepticism about the role of biosimilar G-CSFs in this setting of patients. This review of biochemical, pre-clinical and clinical data suggests significant comparability of biosimilar filgrastim with both originator filgrastim and lenograstim in autologous PBSCs mobilization and post-autograft hematologic recovery.

  16. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The project is designed to test whether genetic and/or tumor environmental heterogeneity is a...TERMS DCIS, intra-tumor heterogeneity, genetic diversity, phenotypic diversity, somatic evolution, microenvironment, mammographic biomarkers 16...DCIS, cancer progression, intra-tumor heterogeneity, genetic diversity, phenotypic diversity, somatic evolution, microenvironment, mammographic

  17. Cancer-stroma evolutionary dynamics in stress-gradient microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Lambert, Guillaume; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto

    2012-02-01

    In order to study the evolution of drug resistance in cancer, it is important to mimic the tumor microenvironment, in which cells are exposed to not uniform concentrations but rather gradients of drugs, nutrients, and other factors Compared to traditional in-vitro methods, microfluidic structure enables better control of the temporal and spatial profile of gradients. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic Doxorubicin gradient environment with heterogeneous landscape, and culture multiple myeloma (8226-S, expressing RFP) and bone marrow stroma (HS-5, expressing GFP) cell lines together. The myeloma cells are not directly motile, but they are able to migrate via the adhesion to motile stroma cells. The indirect motility mechanism of the myeloma cells is crucial for the adaptation to stress environment. Finally, we will report the co-culture dynamics under the stress of doxorubicin gradients, observing for cellular migrations and growth

  18. Switching off malignant mesothelioma: exploiting the hypoxic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Noushin; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Churg, Andrew; Wang, Yuzhuo; Collins, Colin C.; Mutti, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas are aggressive, asbestos-related cancers with poor patient prognosis, typically arising in the mesothelial surfaces of tissues in pleural and peritoneal cavity. The relative unspecific symptoms of mesotheliomas, misdiagnoses, and lack of precise targeted therapies call for a more critical assessment of this disease. In the present review, we categorize commonly identified genomic aberrations of mesotheliomas into their canonical pathways and discuss targeting these pathways in the context of tumor hypoxia, a hallmark of cancer known to render solid tumors more resistant to radiation and most chemo-therapy. We then explore the concept that the intrinsic hypoxic microenvironment of mesotheliomas can be Achilles' heel for targeted, multimodal therapeutic intervention. PMID:28191281

  19. Reprogramming the immunological microenvironment through radiation and targeting Axl

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Todd A.; Rafat, Marjan; Castellini, Laura; Shehade, Hussein; Kariolis, Mihalis S.; Hui, Angela Bik-Yu; Stehr, Henning; von Eyben, Rie; Jiang, Dadi; Ellies, Lesley G.; Koong, Albert C.; Diehn, Maximilian; Rankin, Erinn B.; Graves, Edward E.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that ionizing radiation therapy (RT) in combination with checkpoint immunotherapy is highly effective in treating a subset of cancers. To better understand the limited responses to this combination we analysed the genetic, microenvironmental, and immune factors in tumours derived from a transgenic breast cancer model. We identified two tumours with similar growth characteristics but different RT responses primarily due to an antitumour immune response. The combination of RT and checkpoint immunotherapy resulted in cures in the responsive but not the unresponsive tumours. Profiling the tumours revealed that the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in the unresponsive tumours, and Axl knockout resulted in slower growth and increased radiosensitivity. These changes were associated with a CD8+ T-cell response, which was improved in combination with checkpoint immunotherapy. These results suggest a novel role for Axl in suppressing antigen presentation through MHCI, and enhancing cytokine release, which promotes a suppressive myeloid microenvironment. PMID:28008921

  20. The Interaction Between Human Papillomaviruses and the Stromal Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Woodby, B; Scott, M; Bodily, J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate in stratified squamous epithelia and cause a variety of malignancies. Current efforts in HPV biology are focused on understanding the virus-host interactions that enable HPV to persist for years or decades in the tissue. The importance of interactions between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment has become increasingly apparent in recent years, but how stromal interactions impact the normal, benign life cycle of HPVs, or progression of lesions to cancer is less understood. Furthermore, how productively replicating HPV impacts cells in the stromal environment is also unclear. Here we bring together some of the relevant literature on keratinocyte-stromal interactions and their impacts on HPV biology, focusing on stromal fibroblasts, immune cells, and endothelial cells. We discuss how HPV oncogenes in infected cells manipulate other cells in their environment, and, conversely, how neighboring cells may impact the efficiency or course of HPV infection.

  1. Water permeation drives tumor cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-04-24

    Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach ("Osmotic Engine Model") and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation.

  2. Tumor Microenvironment, a Paradigm in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Maryam; Carloni, Vinicio

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most lethal and prevalent cancers in the human population. Different etiological factors such as hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol and diabetes cause liver injury followed by inflammation, necrosis and hepatocytes proliferation. Continuous cycles of this destructive–regenerative process culminates in liver cirrhosis which is characterized by regenerating nodules that progress to dysplastic nodules and ultimately HCC. Despite its significance, there is only an elemental understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms, and there are only limited therapeutic options. Therefore, the study of the involved molecular mechanisms can open a new insight to define more effective treatment strategies. A variety of alterations have been reported in HCC patients, particularly the cancer-associated microenvironment components including immune cells, fibroblast cells, endothelial cells and extracellular matrix can support the neoplastic cells to proliferate, growth and invade. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge and highlights the principal challenges that are relevant to controlling this milieu. PMID:28216578

  3. Temperature of the Magnetic Nanoparticle Microenvironment: Estimation from Relaxation Times

    PubMed Central

    Perreard, IM; Reeves, DB; Zhang, X; Kuehlert, E; Forauer, ER; Weaver, JB

    2014-01-01

    Accurate temperature measurements are essential to safe and effective thermal therapies for cancer and other diseases. However, conventional thermometry is challenging so using the heating agents themselves as probes allows for ideal local measurements. Here, we present a new noninvasive method for measuring the temperature of the microenvironment surrounding magnetic nanoparticles from the Brownian relaxation time of nanoparticles. Experimentally, the relaxation time can be determined from the nanoparticle magnetization induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies. A previously described method for nanoparticle temperature estimation used a low frequency Langevin function description of magnetic dipoles and varied the excitation field amplitude to estimate the energy state distribution and the corresponding temperature. We show that the new method is more accurate than the previous method at higher applied field frequencies that push the system farther from equilibrium. PMID:24556943

  4. Modeling tumor microenvironments using custom-designed biomaterial scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zen; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The dominant roles of the tumor microenvironment in regulating tumor formation, progression, and metastasis have driven the application of tissue engineering strategies in cancer biology. Highly dynamic and reciprocal communication of tumor cells with their surroundings suggests that studying cancer in custom-designed biomaterial scaffolds may lead to novel therapeutic targets and therapeutic regimens more reliably than traditional monolayer tissue culture models. As tissue engineering becomes progressively more successful in recapitulating the native tumor environment, critical insights into mechanisms of tumor resistance may be elucidated, to impact clinical practice, drug development, and biological research. We review here the recent developments in the use of custom-designed biomaterial scaffolds for modeling human tumors. PMID:27152253

  5. Friend or foe?: The tumour microenvironment dilemma in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Tommaso; Polcaro, Giovanna; Muccillo, Livio; D'Agostino, Giovanna; Rosato, Valeria; Ziccardi, Pamela; Lupo, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sabatino, Lina; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    The network of bidirectional homotypic and heterotypic interactions established among parenchymal tumour cells and surrounding mesenchymal stromal cells generates the tumour microenvironment (TME). These intricate crosstalks elicit both beneficial and adverse effects on tumour initiation and progression unbalancing the signals and responses from the neighbouring cells. Here, we highlight the structure, activities and evolution of TME cells considering a novel colorectal cancer (CRC) classification based on differential stromal composition and gene expression profiles. In this scenario, we scrutinise the molecular pathways that either change or become corrupted during CRC development and their relative prognostic value. Finally, we survey the therapeutic molecules directed against TME components currently available in clinical trials as well as those with stronger potential in preclinical studies. Elucidation of dynamic variations in the CRC TME cell composition and their relative contribution could provide novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and allow more personalised therapeutic strategies.

  6. Colorectal cancer microenvironment: among nutrition, gut microbiota, inflammation and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem causing significant morbidity and mortality. During the last decade, results from different studies indicate that the pathogenetic mechanisms of CRC encompass tumour microenvironment, emphasizing a tight correlation with aging, inflammation, nutrition, gut microbiome composition and epigenetic modifications. Aging is one of the most important risk factors for the development of a wide range of neoplasies, including CRC, as it represents the general framework in which the tumor environment evolves. Together, these elements likely contribute to the carcinogenic process with specific effects, impacts and roles in the different stages of the tumor progression. CRCs evolve through loops of deregulated inflammatory stimuli which are sustained by DNA damage signaling pathways, dysbiosis of gut microbiota (GM) and epigenetic re-modelling (DNA methylation). To date no studies address those elements simultaneously. The synergic analysis of such parameters could provide new biological insights and effective biomarkers that could have applications in prevention, molecular diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of CRC.

  7. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  8. Characterization of the Microenvironment of Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Lydia; Wu, Rui; Rutgers, Bea; Diepstra, Arjan; van den Berg, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is characterized by a low percentage of neoplastic lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells in a background of lymphocytes. The goal of this study is to characterize the microenvironment in NLPHL. Ten NLPHL cases and seven reactive lymph nodes (RLN) were analyzed by flow cytometry for the main immune cells and multiple specific subpopulations. To discriminate between cells in or outside the tumor cell area, we used CD26. We observed significantly lower levels of CD20+ B-cells and CD56+ NK cells and higher levels of CD4+ T-cells in NLPHL in comparison to RLN. In the subpopulations, we observed increased numbers of PD-1+CD4+ T follicular helper cells (TFH), CD69+CD4+ and CD69+CD8+ T-cells and CCR7-CD45RA-CD4+ effector memory T-cells, while FoxP3+CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) and CCR7-CD45RA+ terminally differentiated CD4+ T-cells were decreased in NLPHL compared to RLN. CD69+ cells were increased in the tumor cell area in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while FoxP3+CD25+CD4+ Tregs and CD25+CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased outside the tumor area. Thus, we show a markedly altered microenvironment in NLPHL, with lower numbers of NK cells and Tregs. PD-1+CD4+ and CD69+ T-cells were located inside, and Tregs and CD25+CD8+ cells outside the tumor cell area. PMID:27999289

  9. Targeting tumor microenvironment: crossing tumor interstitial fluid by multifunctional nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The genesis of cancer appears to be a complex matter, which is not simply based upon few genetic abnormalities/alteration. In fact, irregular microvasculature and aberrant interstitium of solid tumors impose significant pathophysiologic barrier functions against cancer treatment modalities, hence novel strategies should holistically target bioelements of tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we provide some overview and insights on TME and important strategies used to control the impacts of such pathophysiologic barriers. Methods: We reviewed all relevant literature for the impacts of tumor interstitium and microvasculature within the TME as well as the significance of the implemented strategies. Results: While tumorigenesis initiation seems to be in close relation with an emergence of hypoxia and alterations in epigenetic/genetic materials, large panoplies of molecular events emerge as intricate networks during oncogenesis to form unique lenient TME in favor of tumor progression. Within such irregular interstitium, immune system displays defective surveillance functionalities against malignant cells. Solid tumors show multifacial traits with coadaptation and self-regulation potentials, which bestow profound resistance against the currently used conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents that target solely one face of the disease. Conclusion: The cancerous cells attain unique abilities to form its permissive microenvironment, wherein (a) extracellular pH is dysregulated towards acidification, (b) extracellular matrix (ECM) is deformed, (c) stromal cells are cooperative with cancer cells, (d) immune system mechanisms are defective, (e) non-integrated irregular microvasculature with pores (120-1200 nm) are formed, and (h) interstitial fluid pressure is high. All these phenomena are against cancer treatment modalities. As a result, to control such abnormal pathophysiologic traits, novel cancer therapy strategies need to be devised using

  10. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuo; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Traditional Chinese medicine displays a broad range of biological effects, and increasing evidence has shown that it may relate with synergistic effect on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Based on literature review and our previous studies, we summarize the synergistic effect and the molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. PMID:27042656

  11. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  12. Major complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Afessa, Bekele; Peters, Steve G

    2006-06-01

    Tens of thousands of patients undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually, 15 to 40% of whom are admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary complications are the most life threatening conditions that develop in HSCT recipients. Both infectious and noninfectious complications occur more frequently in allogeneic HSCT. The management of HSCT recipients requires knowledge of their immune status, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, and early treatment. During the pre-engraftment phase (0 to 30 days after transplant), the most prevalent pathogens causing infection are bacteria and Candida species and, if the neutropenia persists, Aspergillus species. The early post-engraftment phase (30 to 100 days) is characterized by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jiroveci, and Aspergillus infections. During the late posttransplant phase (> 100 days), allogeneic HSCT recipients are at risk for CMV, community-acquired respiratory virus, and encapsulated bacterial infections. Antigen and polymerase chain reaction assays are important for the diagnosis of CMV and Aspergillus infections. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and peri-engraftment respiratory distress syndrome occur in both allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients, usually during the first 30 days. Bronchiolitis obliterans occurs exclusively in allogeneic HSCT recipients with graft versus host disease. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome occurs at any time following transplant. Bronchoscopy is usually helpful for the diagnosis of the infectious pulmonary complications and DAH.

  13. The regulation of hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mayani, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Evidence presented over the last few years indicates that the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment comprises not just one but a number of different cell populations. Based on HSCs’ proliferation and engraftment potential, it has been suggested that there are two classes of HSC, with long- and short-term engraftment potential. HSC heterogeneity seems to involve differentiation capacities as well, since it has been shown that some HSC clones are able to give rise to both myeloid and lymphoid progeny, whereas others are lymphoid deficient. It has been recognized that HSC function depends on intrinsic cell regulators, which are modulated by external signals. Among the former, we can include transcription factors and non-coding RNAs as well as epigenetic modifiers. Among the latter, cytokines and extracellular matrix molecules have been implicated. Understanding the elements and mechanisms that regulate HSC populations is of significant relevance both in biological and in clinical terms, and research in this area still has to face several complex and exciting challenges. PMID:27408695

  14. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, JingJing; Zhang, ChengCheng

    2015-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would benefit clinical applications in several aspects, to improve patient survival, utilize cord blood stem cells for adult applications, and selectively propagate stem cell populations after genetic manipulation. In this review we summarize and discuss recent advances in the culture systems of mouse and human HSCs, which include stroma/HSC co-culture, continuous perfusion and fed-batch cultures, and those supplemented with extrinsic ligands, membrane transportable transcription factors, complement components, protein modification enzymes, metabolites, or small molecule chemicals. Some of the expansion systems have been tested in clinical trials. The optimal condition for ex vivo expansion of the primitive and functional human HSCs is still under development. An improved understanding of the mechanisms for HSC cell fate determination and the HSC culture characteristics will guide development of new strategies to overcome difficulties. In the future, development of a combination treatment regimen with agents that enhance self-renewal, block differentiation, and improve homing will be critical. Methods to enhance yields and lower cost during collection and processing should be employed. The employment of an efficient system for ex vivo expansion of HSCs will facilitate the further development of novel strategies for cell and gene therapies including genome editing.

  15. Human proT-cells generated in vitro facilitate hematopoietic stem cell-derived T-lymphopoiesis in vivo and restore thymic architecture.

    PubMed

    Awong, Génève; Singh, Jastaranpreet; Mohtashami, Mahmood; Malm, Maria; La Motte-Mohs, Ross N; Benveniste, Patricia M; Serra, Pablo; Herer, Elaine; van den Brink, Marcel R; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2013-12-19

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is followed by a period of immune deficiency due to a paucity in T-cell reconstitution. Underlying causes are a severely dysfunctional thymus and an impaired production of thymus-seeding progenitors in the host. Here, we addressed whether in vitro-derived human progenitor T (proT)-cells could not only represent a source of thymus-seeding progenitors, but also able to influence the recovery of the thymic microenvironment. We examined whether co-transplantation of in vitro-derived human proT-cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was able to facilitate HSC-derived T-lymphopoiesis posttransplant. A competitive transfer approach was used to define the optimal proT subset capable of reconstituting immunodeficient mice. Although the 2 subsets tested (proT1, CD34(+)CD7(+)CD5(-); proT2, CD34(+)CD7(+)CD5(+)) showed thymus engrafting function, proT2-cells exhibited superior engrafting capacity. Based on this, when proT2-cells were coinjected with HSCs, a significantly improved and accelerated HSC-derived T-lymphopoiesis was observed. Furthermore, we uncovered a potential mechanism by which receptor activator of nuclear factor κb (RANK) ligand-expressing proT2-cells induce changes in both the function and architecture of the thymus microenvironment, which favors the recruitment of bone marrow-derived lymphoid progenitors. Our findings provide further support for the use of Notch-expanded progenitors in cell-based therapies to aid in the recovery of T-cells in patients undergoing HSCT.

  16. Unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry and the role of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank

    PubMed Central

    Beom, Su-Hee; Kim, Eung Jo; Kim, Miok

    2016-01-01

    Background The hematopoietic stem cell bank has been actively recruiting registrants since 1994. This study systematically reviews its operations and outcomes over the last 20 years. Methods Retrospective data on a total of 47,711 registrants were reviewed. Relevant data were processed using PASW Statistics for Windows, version 18.0. Results As of 2013, the Korean Network for Organ Sharing database contained 265,307 registrants. Of these, 49,037 (18%) registrants committed to hematopoietic cell donation from 1994 to 2013. Fifty-seven percent of the registrants were men, and 43% were women. The reasons for opting out of the registry included refusal to donate (70%), family refusal (28%), and others (2%). The donation willingness of registrants was significantly higher than those who refused to receive a mail to confirm their continued enrollment (χ2=6.103, P=0.013). The bank successfully coordinated a total of 512 donors among newly matched donors from 1995 to 2013, of which the bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell accounted for 40.8% and 59.2% of the total donations, respectively. Conclusion Our recruitment activities focus on promoting voluntary registration and the importance of updating personal contact information. We expect that these data may be useful for diverse studies and demonstrate the positive impacts on the donation program. PMID:27382555

  17. NLRP1 inflammasome activation induces pyroptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Seth L.; Gerlic, Motti; Metcalf, Donald; Preston, Simon; Pellegrini, Marc; O’Donnell, Joanne A.; McArthur, Kate; Baldwin, Tracey M.; Chevrier, Stephane; Nowell, Cameron J.; Cengia, Louise H.; Henley, Katya J.; Collinge, Janelle E.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Hilton, Douglas J.; Alexander, Warren S.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Croker, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    Cytopenias are key prognostic indicators of life-threatening infection, contributing to immunosuppression and mortality. Here we define a role for Caspase-1-dependent death, known as pyroptosis, in infection-induced cytopenias by studying inflammasome activation in hematopoietic progenitor cells. The NLRP1a inflammasome is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells and its activation triggers their pyroptotic death. Active NLRP1a induced a lethal systemic inflammatory disease that was driven by Caspase-1 and IL-1β but was independent of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and ameliorated by IL-18. Surprisingly, in the absence of IL-1β-driven inflammation, active NLRP1a triggered pyroptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting in leukopenia in the steady state. During periods of hematopoietic stress induced by chemotherapy or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, active NLRP1a caused prolonged cytopenia, bone marrow hypoplasia and immunosuppression. Conversely, NLRP1-deficient mice showed enhanced recovery from chemotherapy and LCMV infection, demonstrating that NLRP1 acts as a cellular sentinel to alert Caspase-1 to hematopoietic and infectious stress. PMID:23219391

  18. Characterization of hematopoietic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, Eva; Cramer, Christopher; Xia, Xiujin; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Slakey, Douglas P; Chiu, Ernest; Newsome, Edward R; Alt, Eckhard U; Izadpanah, Reza

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal and hematopoietic tissues are important reservoirs of adult stem cells. The potential of tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into cells of mesodermal and ectodermal lineages has been reported previously. We examined the hypothesis that adherent adipose tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are capable of generating cells with hematopoietic characteristics. When cultured in differentiation media, clonally isolated ASCs develop into cells with hematopoietic attributes. The hematopoietic differentiated cells (HD) express early hematopoietic (c-kit, PROM1, CD4) as well as monocyte/macrophage markers (CCR5, CD68, MRC1, CD11b, CSF1R). Additionally, HD cells display functional characteristics of monocyte/macrophages such as phagocytosis and enzymatic activity of α-Naphthyl Acetate Esterase. HD cells are also responsive to stimulation by IL-4 and LPS as shown by increased CD14 and HLA-DRB1 expressions and release of IL-2, IL10, and TNF. Taken together, this study characterizes the potential of ASCs to generate functional macrophages in vitro, and therefore paves way for their possible use in cell therapy applications.

  19. Hematopoietic organs of Manduca sexta and hemocyte lineages.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Pilas, Barbara; Ujhelyi, Elizabeth; Garsha, Karl; Kanost, Michael R

    2003-10-01

    Cells of the moth immune system are derived from organs that loosely envelop the four wing imaginal discs. The immune response in these insects is believed to depend on the activities of two main classes of hemocytes: plasmatocytes and granular cells. The fates of cells that arise from these hematopoietic organs have been followed by immunolabeling with plasmatocyte-specific and granular-cell-specific antibodies. Cells within each hematopoietic organ differ in their coherence and in their expression of two plasmatocyte-specific surface proteins, integrin and neuroglian. Within an organ there is no overlap in the expression of these two surface proteins; neuroglian is found on the surfaces of the coherent cells while integrin is expressed on cells that are losing coherence, rounding up, and dispersing. A granular-cell-specific marker for the protein lacunin labels the basal lamina that delimits each organ but only a small number of granular cells that lie on or near the periphery of the hematopoietic organ. When organs are cultured in the absence of hemolymph, all cells derived from hematopoietic organs turn out to immunolabel with the plasmatocyte-specific antibody MS13. The circulating plasmatocytes derived from hematopoietic organs have higher ploidy levels than the granular cells and represent a separate lineage of hemocytes.

  20. All hematopoietic stem cells engraft in submyeloablatively irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Forgacova, Katarina; Savvulidi, Filipp; Sefc, Ludek; Linhartova, Jana; Necas, Emanuel

    2013-05-01

    Significant controversy exists regarding the impact of hematopoietic stroma damage by irradiation on the efficiency of engraftment of intravenously transplanted stem cells. It was previously demonstrated that in normal syngenic mice, all intravenously transplanted donor stem cells, present in the bone marrow, compete equally with those of the host. In this study, we comprehensively compared the blood cell production derived from transplanted donor stem cells with that from the host stem cells surviving various doses of submyeloablative irradiation. We compared the partial chimerism resulting from transplantation with theoretical estimates that assumed transplantation efficiencies ranging from 100% to 20%. The highest level of consensus between the experimental and the theoretical results was 100% for homing and engraftment (ie, the utilization of all transplanted stem cells). These results point to a very potent mechanism through which intravenously administered hematopoietic stem cells are captured from circulation, engraft in the hematopoietic tissue, and contribute to blood cell production in irradiated recipients. The damage done to hematopoietic stroma and to the trabecular bone by submyeloablative doses of ionizing radiation does not negatively affect the homing and engraftment mechanisms of intravenously transplanted hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells.

  1. Jagged-1 Signaling in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment Promotes Endothelial Progenitor Cell Expansion and Commitment of CD133+ Human Cord Blood Cells for Postnatal Vasculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ishige-Wada, Mika; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Eguchi, Masamichi; Hozumi, Katsuto; Iwaguro, Hideki; Matsumoto, Taro; Fukuda, Noboru; Mugishima, Hideo; Masuda, Haruchika; Asahara, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling is involved in cell fate decisions during murine vascular development and hematopoiesis in the microenvironment of bone marrow. To investigate the close relationship between hematopoietic stem cells and human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the bone marrow niche, we examined the effects of Notch signals [Jagged-1 and Delta-like ligand (Dll)-1] on the proliferation and differentiation of human CD133+ cell-derived EPCs. We established stromal systems using HESS-5 murine bone marrow cells transfected with human Jagged-1 (hJagged-1) or human Dll-1 (hDll-1). CD133+ cord blood cells were co-cultured with the stromal cells for 7 days, and then their proliferation, differentiation, and EPC colony formation was evaluated. We found that hJagged-1 induced the proliferation and differentiation of CD133+ cord blood EPCs. In contrast, hDll-1 had little effect. CD133+ cells stimulated by hJagged-1 differentiated into CD31+/KDR+ cells, expressed vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and showed enhanced EPC colony formation compared with CD133+ cells stimulated by hDll-1. To evaluate the angiogenic properties of hJagged-1- and hDll-1-stimulated EPCs in vivo, we transplanted these cells into the ischemic hindlimbs of nude mice. Transplantation of EPCs stimulated by hJagged-1, but not hDll-1, increased regional blood flow and capillary density in ischemic hindlimb muscles. This is the first study to show that human Notch signaling influences EPC proliferation and differentiation in the bone marrow microenvironment. Human Jagged-1 induced the proliferation and differentiation of CD133+ cord blood progenitors compared with hDll-1. Thus, hJagged-1 signaling in the bone marrow niche may be used to expand EPCs for therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:27846321

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julianne N. P.; Kanwar, Vikramjit S.; MacNamara, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta) are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein, we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients. PMID:27621733

  3. Aberrant PGE2 metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE2. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE2, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue. PMID:21315786

  4. Original Misunderstanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Humorist Josh Billings quipped, "About the most originality that any writer can hope to achieve honestly is to steal with good judgment." Billings was harsh in his view of originality, but his critique reveals a tension faced by students every time they write a history paper. Research is the essence of any history paper. Especially in high school,…

  5. Chemokine-mobilized adult stem cells; defining a better hematopoietic graft.

    PubMed

    Pelus, L M; Fukuda, S

    2008-03-01

    Stem cell research is currently focused on totipotent stem cells and their therapeutic potential, however adult stem cells, while restricted to differentiation within their tissue or origin, also have therapeutic utility. Transplantation with bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been used for curative therapy for decades. More recently, alternative sources of HSC, particularly those induced to exit marrow or mobilize to peripheral blood by G-CSF, have become the most widely used hematopoietic graft and show significant superiority to marrow HSC. The chemokine/chemokine receptor axis also mobilizes HSC that occurs more rapidly than with G-CSF. In mice, the HSC and progenitor cells (HPC) mobilized by the CXCR2 receptor agonist GRObeta can be harvested within minutes of administration and show significantly lower levels of apoptosis, enhanced homing to marrow, expression of more activated integrin receptors and superior repopulation kinetics and more competitive engraftment than the equivalent cells mobilized by G-CSF. These characteristics suggest that chemokine axis-mobilized HSC represent a population of adult stem cells distinct from those mobilized by G-CSF, with superior therapeutic potential. It remains to be determined if the chemokine mobilization axis can be harnessed to mobilize other populations of unique adult stem cells with clinical utility.

  6. Activation of a Drosophila Janus kinase (JAK) causes hematopoietic neoplasia and developmental defects.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, D A; Binari, R; Nahreini, T S; Gilman, M; Perrimon, N

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, many cytokines and growth factors stimulate members of the Janus kinase (JAK) family to transduce signals for the proliferation and differentiation of various cell types, particularly in hematopoietic lineages. Mutations in the Drosophila hopscotch (hop) gene, which encodes a JAK, also cause proliferative defects. Loss-of-function alleles result in lethality and underproliferation of diploid tissues of the larva. A dominant gain-of-function allele, Tumorous-lethal (hopTum-l), leads to formation of melanotic tumors and hypertrophy of the larval lymph glands, the hematopoietic organs. We show that a single amino acid change in Hop is associated with the hopTum-l mutation. Overexpression of either wild-type hop or hopTum-l in the larval lymph glands causes melanotic tumors and lymph gland hypertrophy indistinguishable from the original hopTum-l mutation. In addition, overexpression of Hop in other tissues of the larva leads to pattern defects in the adult or to lethality. Finally, overexpression of either hop or hopTum-l in Drosophila cell culture results in tyrosine phosphorylation of Hop protein. However, overexpression of hopTum-l results in greater phosphorylation than overexpression of the wild-type. We conclude that hopTum-l encodes a hyperactive Hop kinase and that overactivity of Hop in lymph glands causes malignant neoplasia of Drosophila blood cells. Images PMID:7796812

  7. A systems biology approach for defining the molecular framework of the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Charbord, Pierre; Pouget, Claire; Binder, Hans; Dumont, Florent; Stik, Grégoire; Levy, Pacifique; Allain, Fabrice; Marchal, Céline; Richter, Jenna; Uzan, Benjamin; Pflumio, Françoise; Letourneur, Franck; Wirth, Henry; Dzierzak, Elaine; Traver, David; Jaffredo, Thierry; Durand, Charles

    2014-09-04

    Despite progress in identifying the cellular composition of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) niches, little is known about the molecular requirements of HSPC support. To address this issue, we used a panel of six recognized HSPC-supportive stromal lines and less-supportive counterparts originating from embryonic and adult hematopoietic sites. Through comprehensive transcriptomic meta-analyses, we identified 481 mRNAs and 17 microRNAs organized in a modular network implicated in paracrine signaling. Further inclusion of 18 additional cell strains demonstrated that this mRNA subset was predictive of HSPC support. Our gene set contains most known HSPC regulators as well as a number of unexpected ones, such as Pax9 and Ccdc80, as validated by functional studies in zebrafish embryos. In sum, our approach has identified the core molecular network required for HSPC support. These cues, along with a searchable web resource, will inform ongoing efforts to instruct HSPC ex vivo amplification and formation from pluripotent precursors.

  8. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  9. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 regulates RANK gene expression in myeloid progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Oh Hyung; Lee, Chong-Kil; Lee, Young Ik; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Hyun-Jun . E-mail: hjlee7@kribb.re.kr

    2005-09-23

    Osteoclasts are bone resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 is critical for osteoclastogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of PU.1-regulated osteoclastogenesis have not been explored. Here, we present evidence that the receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B (RANK) gene that has been shown to be crucial for osteoclastogenesis is a transcriptional target of PU.1. The PU.1 {sup -/-} progenitor cells failed to express the RANK gene and reconstitution of PU.1 in these cells induced RANK expression. Treatment of the PU.1 reconstituted cells with M-CSF and RANKL further augmented the RANK gene expression. To explore the regulatory mechanism of the RANK gene expression by PU.1, we have cloned the human RANK promoter. Transient transfection assays have revealed that the 2.2-kb RANK promoter was functional in a monocyte line RAW264.7, whereas co-transfection of PU.1 transactivated the RANK promoter in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PU.1 regulates the RANK gene transcription and this may represent one of the key roles of PU.1 in osteoclast differentiation.

  10. Regulation of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells by EPCR/PAR1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Kollet, Orit; Graf, Claudine; Esmon, Charles T.; Ruf, Wolfram; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2016-01-01

    The common developmental origin of endothelial and hematopoietic cells is manifested by coexpression of several cell surface receptors. Adult murine bone marrow (BM) long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs), endowed with the highest repopulation and self-renewal potential, express endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), which is used as a marker to isolate them. EPCR/PAR1 signaling in endothelial cells has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory roles, while thrombin/PAR1 signaling induces coagulation and inflammation. Recent studies define two new PAR1-mediated signaling cascades that regulate EPCR+ LT-HSC BM retention and egress. EPCR/PAR1 signaling facilitates LT-HSC BM repopulation, retention, survival, and chemotherapy resistance by restricting nitric oxide (NO) production, maintaining NOlow LT-HSC BM retention with increased VLA4 expression, affinity, and adhesion. Conversely, acute stress and clinical mobilization upregulate thrombin generation and activate different PAR1 signaling which overcomes BM EPCR+ LT-HSC retention, inducing their recruitment to the bloodstream. Thrombin/PAR1 signaling induces NO generation, TACE-mediated EPCR shedding, and upregulation of CXCR4 and PAR1, leading to CXCL12-mediated stem and progenitor cell mobilization. This review discusses new roles for factors traditionally viewed as coagulation related, which independently act in the BM to regulate PAR1 signaling in bone- and blood-forming progenitor cells, navigating their fate by controlling NO production. PMID:26928241

  11. First evidence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haenen, O L M; Schuetze, H; Cieslak, M; Oldenburg, S; Spierenburg, M A H; Roozenburg-Hengst, I; Voorbergen-Laarman, M; Engelsma, M Y; Olesen, N J

    2016-08-01

    In spring 2008, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected for the first time in the Netherlands. The virus was isolated from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from a put-and-take fishery with angling ponds. IHNV is the causative agent of a serious fish disease, infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN). From 2008 to 2011, we diagnosed eight IHNV infections in rainbow trout originating from six put-and-take fisheries (symptomatic and asymptomatic fish), and four IHNV infections from three rainbow trout farms (of which two were co-infected by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, IPNV), at water temperatures between 5 and 15 °C. At least one farm delivered trout to four of these eight IHNV-positive farms. Mortalities related to IHNV were mostly <40%, but increased to nearly 100% in case of IHNV and IPNV co-infection. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that these 12 isolates clustered into two different monophyletic groups within the European IHNV genogroup E. One of these two groups indicates a virus-introduction event by a German trout import, whereas the second group indicates that IHNV was already (several years) in the Netherlands before its discovery in 2008.

  12. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  13. Enhanced Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors on Native and Spin Coated Acellular Matrices Prepared from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wasnik, Samiksha; Kantipudi, Suma; Kirkland, Mark A.; Pande, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular microenvironment in bone marrow (BM) is known to regulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have developed cell-free matrices from a BM stromal cell line (HS-5), which can be used as substrates either in native form or as tissue engineered coatings, for the enhanced ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (UCB) derived HSPC. The physicochemical properties (surface roughness, thickness, and uniformity) of native and spin coated acellular matrices (ACM) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM). Lineage-specific expansion of HSPC, grown on these substrates, was evaluated by immunophenotypic (flow cytometry) and functional (colony forming) assays. Our results show that the most efficient expansion of lineage-specific HSPC occurred on spin coated ACM. Our method provides an improved protocol for ex vivo HSPC expansion and it offers a system to study the in vivo roles of specific molecules in the hematopoietic niche that influence HSPC expansion. PMID:26981135

  14. The role of children's bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in the ex vivo expansion of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pelagiadis, Iordanis; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Choulaki, Christianna; Kalmanti, Maria; Dimitriou, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The recognition of the role of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) in hematopoiesis, as part of the bone marrow microenvironment, renewed the interest for cord blood (CB) ex vivo expansion as a source of HSC for transplantation. MSC from children are recognized to have different biological properties compared to the ones from adults. The current study focuses on the evaluation of the effects of children's bone marrow MSC on the ex vivo expansion capacity of both allogeneic cord blood and autologous bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) when used as a cell feeder layer with or without recombinant cytokines. Our results showed that children's bone marrow-derived MSC expand more primitive populations in co culture with CD34 and that the expansion is further enhanced when the culture is supplemented with growth factors. No additive effect was seen either with the early- or late-acting growth factors' cocktails used. Biological features of CB hematopoietic progenitors seem to make them more suitable than their BM counterparts for ex vivo expansion. Clinical implementation will be facilitated by methodological standardization and guidelines' establishment.

  15. Synchronized chaotic targeting and acceleration of surface chemistry in prebiotic hydrothermal microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Priye, Aashish; Yu, Yuncheng; Hassan, Yassin A.; Ugaz, Victor M.

    2017-01-01

    Porous mineral formations near subsea alkaline hydrothermal vents embed microenvironments that make them potential hot spots for prebiotic biochemistry. But, synthesis of long-chain macromolecules needed to support higher-order functions in living systems (e.g., polypeptides, proteins, and nucleic acids) cannot occur without enrichment of chemical precursors before initiating polymerization, and identifying a suitable mechanism has become a key unanswered question in the origin of life. Here, we apply simulations and in situ experiments to show how 3D chaotic thermal convection—flows that naturally permeate hydrothermal pore networks—supplies a robust mechanism for focused accumulation at discrete targeted surface sites. This interfacial enrichment is synchronized with bulk homogenization of chemical species, yielding two distinct processes that are seemingly opposed yet synergistically combine to accelerate surface reaction kinetics by several orders of magnitude. Our results suggest that chaotic thermal convection may play a previously unappreciated role in mediating surface-catalyzed synthesis in the prebiotic milieu. PMID:28119504

  16. Diet-induced obesity promotes myelopoiesis in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Kanakadurga; DelProposto, Jennifer; Lee Morris, David; Zamarron, Brian; Mergian, Taleen; Maley, Nidhi; Cho, Kae Won; Geletka, Lynn; Subbaiah, Perla; Muir, Lindsey; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Nien-Kai Lumeng, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an activated macrophage phenotype in multiple tissues that contributes to tissue inflammation and metabolic disease. To evaluate the mechanisms by which obesity potentiates myeloid activation, we evaluated the hypothesis that obesity activates myeloid cell production from bone marrow progenitors to potentiate inflammatory responses in metabolic tissues. High fat diet-induced obesity generated both quantitative increases in myeloid progenitors as well as a potentiation of inflammation in macrophages derived from these progenitors. In vivo, hematopoietic stem cells from obese mice demonstrated the sustained capacity to preferentially generate inflammatory CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages after serial bone marrow transplantation. We identified that hematopoietic MyD88 was important for the accumulation of CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophage accumulation by regulating the generation of myeloid progenitors from HSCs. These findings demonstrate that obesity and metabolic signals potentiate leukocyte production and that dietary priming of hematopoietic progenitors contributes to adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:25161889

  17. Children's lived experiences of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Manookian, Arpi; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Asadi, Monireh

    2014-09-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a valuable treatment in many life-threatening pediatric disorders, a large number of children who receive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are faced with a variety of physical and psychological problems throughout this process. In this study, we explored the lived experiences of these children during their treatment to provide a better understanding of their main concerns, emotions, and expectations. The participants were six children, aged between 6 and 17 years, who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Data were collected through individual, in-depth, and semistructured interviews. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, the findings revealed that the children experienced "transplantation rejoicing" in this "difficult passage", which was associated with "deepening of family ties". Awareness of these experiences, feelings, and concerns can help in the development of more professional interventions to provide children with holistic care during their hospitalization.

  18. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles.

  19. Mechanisms of Tolerance Induction by Hematopoietic Chimerism: The Immune Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Esma S; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2017-03-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism is one of the effective approaches to induce tolerance to donor-derived tissue and organ grafts without administration of life-long immunosuppressive therapy. Although experimental efforts to develop such regimens have been ongoing for decades, substantial cumulative toxicity of combined hematopoietic and tissue transplants precludes wide clinical implementation. Tolerance is an active immunological process that includes both peripheral and central mechanisms of mutual education of coresident donor and host immune systems. The major stages include sequential suppression of early alloreactivity, establishment of hematopoietic chimerism and suppressor cells that sustain the state of tolerance, with significant mechanistic and temporal overlap along the tolerization process. Efforts to devise less toxic transplant strategies by reduction of preparatory conditioning focus on modulation rather than deletion of residual host immunity and early reinstitution of regulatory subsets at the central and peripheral levels. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:700-712.

  20. Salvage Second Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Laura C.; Saad, Ayman; Zhong, Xiaobo; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Freytes, Cesar O.; Marks, David I.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bird, Jennifer M.; Holmberg, Leona; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kumar, Shaji; Lill, Michael; Meehan, Kenneth R.; Saber, Wael; Schriber, Jeffrey; Tay, Jason; Vogl, Dan T.; Wirk, Baldeep; Savani, Bipin N.; Gale, Robert P.; Vesole, David H.; Schiller, Gary J.; Abidi, Muneer; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Nishihori, Taiga; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Vose, Julie M.; Moreb, Jan S.; Drobyski, William; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Ghobadi, Armin; Holland, H. Kent; Nath, Rajneesh; To, L. Bik; Maiolino, Angelo; Kassim, Adetola A.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Landau, Heather; Schouten, Harry C.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mikhael, Joseph; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Stiff, Patrick J.; Gibson, John; Lonial, Sagar; Krishnan, Amrita; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hari, Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) as initial therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) improves survival. However, data to support this approach for relapsed/progressive disease after initial AHCT (AHCT1) are limited. Using Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data, we report the outcomes of 187 patients who underwent a second AHCT (AHCT2) for the treatment of relapsed/progressive MM. Planned tandem AHCT was excluded. Median age at AHCT2 was 59 years (range, 28 to 72), and median patient follow-up was 47 months (range, 3 to 97). Nonrelapse mortality after AHCT2 was 2% at 1 year and 4% at 3 years. Median interval from AHCT1 to relapse/progression was 18 months, and median interval between transplantations was 32 months. After AHCT2, the incidence of relapse/progression at 1 and 3 years was 51% and 82%, respectively. At 3 years after AHCT2, progression-free survival was 13%, and overall survival was 46%. In multivariate analyses, those relapsing ≥36 months after AHCT1 had superior progression-free (P = .045) and overall survival (P = .019). Patients who underwent AHCT2 after 2004 had superior survival (P = .026). AHCT2 is safe and feasible for disease progression after AHCT1. In this retrospective study, individuals relapsing ≥36 months from AHCT1 derived greater benefit from AHCT2 compared with those with a shorter disease-free interval. Storage of an adequate graft before AHCT1 will ensure that the option of a second autologous transplantation is retained for patients with relapsed/progressive MM. PMID:23298856

  1. Plaquing procedure for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.A.; Mulcahy, D.

    1980-01-01

    A single overlay plaque assay was designed and evaluated for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus. Epithelioma papillosum carpio cells were grown in normal atmosphere with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane- or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered media. Plaques were larger and formed more quickly on 1- to 3-day-old cell monolayers than on older monolayers. Cell culture medium with a 10% addition of fetal calf serum (MEM 10) or without serum (MEM 0) were the most efficient virus diluents. Dilution with phosphate-buffered saline, saline, normal broth, or deionized water reduced plaque numbers. Variations in the pH (7.0 to 8.0) of a MEM 0 diluent did not affect plaque numbers. Increasing the volume of viral inoculum above 0.15 ml (15- by 60-mm plate) decreased plaquing efficiency. Significantly more plaques occurred under gum tragacanth and methylcellulose than under agar or agarose overlays. Varying the pH (6.8 to 7.4) of methylcellulose overlays did not significantly change plaque numbers. More plaques formed under the thicker overlays of both methylcellulose and gum tragacanth. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HEPES performed equally well, buffering either medium or overlay. Plaque numbers were reduced when cells were rinsed after virus adsorption or less than 1 h was allowed for adsorption. Variation in adsorption time between 60 and 180 min did not change plaque numbers. The mean plaque formation time was 7 days at 16 degrees C. The viral dose response was linear when the standardized assay was used.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  3. Screening for Stromal and Matrix Effects in 3D Microenvironments of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.

    Breast cancer progression ensures through the acquisition of genetic mutations, the uncontrollable growth of cells, and their progression to invasion. Studies have shown that the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment can also influence breast cancer cell progression by controlling the morphology, differentiation, proliferation, and migration of cells. However, most of the currently available in vitro screening platforms are based on the two-dimensional (2D) culture of cells, and do not provide cells with the complex 3D microenvironment that exists in vivo. Therefore, there is a need for more biologically relevant in vitro platforms to help decipher the complexity of the microenvironment and its influence in breast cancer. In this dissertation we present an automated microfluidic platform that allows to efficiently screen for the effect of multiple matrix and stromal microenvironment in 3D cultures of breast cancer cells. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and stromal cells are included in the 3D microenvironments to examine their influence on breast cancer cell behavior. The screening results suggest that collagen gels with fibronectin might be influencing paracrine signals between breast cancer cells and stromal cells. The ability of the platform to culture and treat cells in 3D microenvironments offers a powerful screening tool for the identification of compounds and interactions using more in vivo-like 3D microenvironments. The identification of these mechanisms will increase our current understanding of breast cancer, and will aid in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  4. Clinical impact of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Shintaro; Nakamura, Toru; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative multimodal strategy including combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy, in addition to surgical resection, has been acknowledged to improve patient prognosis. However chemotherapy has not been actively applied as an immunomodulating modality because of concerns about various immunosuppressive effects. It has recently been shown that certain chemotherapeutic agents could modify tumor microenvironment and host immune responses through several underlying mechanisms such as immunogenic cell death, local T-cell infiltration and also the eradication of immune-suppressing regulatory cells such as regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. With the better understanding of the cell components in the tumor microenvironment and the effect of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment, it has been gradually clear that the chemotherapeutic agents is two-edged sword to have both immune promoting and suppressing effects. The cellular components of the tumor microenvironment include infiltrating T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells, tumor associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts. Based on the better understanding of tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy, the treatment protocol could be modified as personalized medicine and the prognosis of pancreas cancer would be more improved utilizing multimodal chemotherapy. Here we review the recent advances of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, introducing the unique feature of tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, interaction between anti-cancer reagents and these constituting cells and future prospects. PMID:27895816

  5. Identification of Senescent Cells in the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Joshua N; Fraser, Daniel G; Wang, Haitao; Jaehn, Katharina; Ogrodnik, Mikolaj B; Weivoda, Megan M; Drake, Matthew T; Tchkonia, Tamara; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Kirkland, James L; Bonewald, Lynda F; Pignolo, Robert J; Monroe, David G; Khosla, Sundeep

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a fundamental mechanism by which cells remain metabolically active yet cease dividing and undergo distinct phenotypic alterations, including upregulation of p16Ink4a, profound secretome changes, telomere shortening, and decondensation of pericentromeric satellite DNA. Because senescent cells accumulate in multiple tissues with aging, these cells and the dysfunctional factors they secrete, termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), are increasingly recognized as promising therapeutic targets to prevent age-related degenerative pathologies, including osteoporosis. However, the cell type(s) within the bone microenvironment that undergoes senescence with aging in vivo has remained poorly understood, largely because previous studies have focused on senescence in cultured cells. Thus in young (age 6 months) and old (age 24 months) mice, we measured senescence and SASP markers in vivo in highly enriched cell populations, all rapidly isolated from bone/marrow without in vitro culture. In both females and males, p16Ink4a expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (rt-qPCR) was significantly higher with aging in B cells, T cells, myeloid cells, osteoblast progenitors, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Further, in vivo quantification of senescence-associated distension of satellites (SADS), ie, large-scale unraveling of pericentromeric satellite DNA, revealed significantly more senescent osteocytes in old compared with young bone cortices (11% versus 2%, p < 0.001). In addition, primary osteocytes from old mice had sixfold more (p < 0.001) telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs) than osteocytes from young mice. Corresponding with the age-associated accumulation of senescent osteocytes was significantly higher expression of multiple SASP markers in osteocytes from old versus young mice, several of which also showed dramatic age-associated upregulation in myeloid cells. These data show that with aging, a subset of cells

  6. NANIVID: A New Research Tool for Tissue Microenvironment Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem K.

    Metastatic tumors are heterogeneous in nature and composed of subpopulations of cells having various metastatic potentials. The time progression of a tumor creates a unique microenvironment to improve the invasion capabilities and survivability of cancer cells in different microenvironments. In the early stages of intravasation, cancer cells establish communication with other cell types through a paracrine loop and covers long distances by sensing growth factor gradients through extracellular matrices. Cellular migration both in vitro and in vivo is a complex process and to understand their motility in depth, sophisticated techniques are required to document and record events in real time. This study presents the design and optimization of a new versatile chemotaxis device called the NANIVID (NANo IntraVital Imaging Device), developed using advanced Nano/Micro fabrication techniques. The current version of this device has been demonstrated to form a stable (epidermal growth factor) EGF gradient in vitro (2D and 3D) while a miniaturized size of NANIVID is used as an implantable device for intravital studies of chemotaxis and to collect cells in vivo. The device is fabricated using microfabrication techniques in which two substrates are bonded together using a thin polymer layer creating a bonded device with one point source (approximately 150 im x 50 im) outlet. The main structures of the device consist of two transparent substrates: one having etched chambers and channel while the second consists of a microelectrode system to measure real time cell arrival inside the device. The chamber of the device is loaded with a growth factor reservoir consisting of hydrogel to sustain a steady release of growth factor into the surrounding environment for long periods of time and establishing a concentration gradient from the device. The focus of this study was to design and optimize the new device for cell chemotaxis studies in breast cancer cells in cell culture. Our results

  7. Concentrations of mobile source air pollutants in urban microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Eric M; Campbell, David E; Arnott, W Patrick; Johnson, Ted; Ollison, Will

    2014-07-01

    Human exposures to criteria and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in urban areas vary greatly due to temporal-spatial variations in emissions, changing meteorology, varying proximity to sources, as well as due to building, vehicle, and other environmental characteristics that influence the amounts of ambient pollutants that penetrate or infiltrate into these microenvironments. Consequently, the exposure estimates derived from central-site ambient measurements are uncertain and tend to underestimate actual exposures. The Exposure Classification Project (ECP) was conducted to measure pollutant concentrations for common urban microenvironments (MEs) for use in evaluating the results of regulatory human exposure models. Nearly 500 sets of measurements were made in three Los Angeles County communities during fall 2008, winter 2009, and summer 2009. MEs included in-vehicle, near-road, outdoor and indoor locations accessible to the general public. Contemporaneous 1- to 15-min average personal breathing zone concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), particulate matter (< 2.5 microm diameter; PM2.5) mass, ultrafine particle (UFP; < 100 nm diameter) number black carbon (BC), speciated HAPs (e.g, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes [BTEX], 1,3-butadiene), and ozone (O3) were measured continuously. In-vehicle and inside/outside measurements were made in various passenger vehicle types and in public buildings to estimate penetration or infiltration factors. A large fraction of the observed pollutant concentrations for on-road MEs, especially near diesel trucks, was unrelated to ambient measurements at nearby monitors. Comparisons of ME concentrations estimated using the median ME/ambient ratio versus regression slopes and intercepts indicate that the regression approach may be more accurate for on-road MEs. Ranges in the ME/ambient ratios among ME categories were generally

  8. Filgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farese, A M; MacVittie, T J

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Neupogen(®) (filgrastim) for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced myelosuppression following a radiological/nuclear incident. It is the first medical countermeasure currently approved by the FDA for this indication under the criteria of the FDA "animal rule". This article summarizes the consequences of high-dose radiation exposure, a description of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS), the use of hematopoietic growth factors in radiation accident victims and current available treatments for H-ARS with an emphasis on the use of Neupogen in this scenario.

  9. MicroRNA deregulation in cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Calin, George A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a key component of the noncoding RNA family. The underlying mechanisms involved in the interplay between the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells involve highly dynamic factors such as hypoxia and cell types such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and macrophages. Although miRNA levels are known to be altered in cancer cells, recent evidence suggests a critical role for the tumor microenvironment in regulating miRNA biogenesis, methylation, and transcriptional changes. Here, we discuss the complex pro-tumorigenic symbiotic role between tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment, and miRNA deregulation. PMID:26865249

  10. The Relationship Between Dormant Cancer Cells and Their Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Linde, N.; Fluegen, G.; Aguirre-Ghiso, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of cancer deaths are due to metastases that can occur years or decades after primary tumor diagnosis and treatment. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) surviving in a dormant state in target organs appear to explain the timing of this phenomenon. Knowledge on this process is important as it might provide a window of opportunity to prevent recurrences by eradicating dormant DTCs and/or by maintaining DTCs in a dormant state. Importantly, this research might offer markers of dormancy for early monitoring of metastatic relapse. However, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the regulation of entry into and exit from dormancy is still limited and crippling any therapeutic opportunity. While cancer cell-intrinsic signaling pathways have been linked to dormancy regulation, it is likely that these pathways and the switch controlling reactivation from dormancy are regulated by microenvironmental cues. Here we review and discuss recent findings on how the microenvironment regulates cancer dormancy and raise new questions that may help advance the field. PMID:27613129

  11. Influential parameters on particle exposure of pedestrians in urban microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Fuoco, F. C.; Stabile, L.

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to particle concentrations in urban areas was evaluated in several studies since airborne particles are considered to bring about adverse health effects. Transportation modes and urban microenvironments account for the highest contributions to the overall daily particle exposure concentration. In the present study an evaluation of the influential parameters affecting particle exposure of pedestrian in urban areas is reported. Street geometry, traffic mode, wind speed and direction effects were analyzed through an experimental campaign performed in different streets of an Italian town. To this purpose a high-resolution time measurement apparatus was used in order to capture the dynamic of the freshly emitted particles. Number, surface area and mass concentrations and distributions were measured continuously along both the sides of street canyons and avenue canyons during 10-minutes walking routes. The combined effect of street geometry and wind direction may contribute strongly to dilute the fresh particles emitted by vehicles. In particular, street canyons are characterized by lower ventilation phenomena which lead to similar concentration values on both the side of the street. Higher wind speed was found to decrease concentrations in the canyon. Traffic mode also seems to influence exposure concentrations. In particular, submicrometer particle mass concentration was higher as the traffic is more congested; otherwise, coarse fraction dominates mass exposure concentration along street characterized by a more fluent traffic, showing a typical resuspension modality.

  12. Extracellular matrix: A dynamic microenvironment for stem cell niche☆

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Francesca; Urciuolo, Anna; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and complex environment characterized by biophysical, mechanical and biochemical properties specific for each tissue and able to regulate cell behavior. Stem cells have a key role in the maintenance and regeneration of tissues and they are located in a specific microenvironment, defined as niche. Scope of review We overview the progresses that have been made in elucidating stem cell niches and discuss the mechanisms by which ECM affects stem cell behavior. We also summarize the current tools and experimental models for studying ECM–stem cell interactions. Major conclusions ECM represents an essential player in stem cell niche, since it can directly or indirectly modulate the maintenance, proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Several ECM molecules play regulatory functions for different types of stem cells, and based on its molecular composition the ECM can be deposited and finely tuned for providing the most appropriate niche for stem cells in the various tissues. Engineered biomaterials able to mimic the in vivo characteristics of stem cell niche provide suitable in vitro tools for dissecting the different roles exerted by the ECM and its molecular components on stem cell behavior. General significance ECM is a key component of stem cell niches and is involved in various aspects of stem cell behavior, thus having a major impact on tissue homeostasis and regeneration under physiological and pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. PMID:24418517

  13. Chromatin signaling in muscle stem cells: interpreting the regenerative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Arianna; Palacios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult occurs in response to damage at expenses of a population of adult stem cells, the satellite cells. Upon injury, either physical or genetic, signals released within the satellite cell niche lead to the commitment, expansion and differentiation of the pool of muscle progenitors to repair damaged muscle. To achieve this goal satellite cells undergo a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming to coordinately activate and repress specific subset of genes. Although the epigenetics of muscle regeneration has been extensively discussed, less emphasis has been put on how extra-cellular cues are translated into the specific chromatin reorganization necessary for progression through the myogenic program. In this review we will focus on how satellite cells sense the regenerative microenvironment in physiological and pathological circumstances, paying particular attention to the mechanism through which the external stimuli are transduced to the nucleus to modulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We will discuss the pathways involved and how alterations in this chromatin signaling may contribute to satellite cells dysfunction during aging and disease. PMID:25904863

  14. Peritoneal inflammation – A microenvironment for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Ralph S; Deavers, Michael; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Ena

    2004-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a significant cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women. Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients. Advances in biotechnology, such as cDNA microarray, are a product of the Human Genome Project and are beginning to provide fresh opportunities to understand the biology of EOC. In particular, it is now possible to examine in depth, at the molecular level, the complex relationship between the tumor itself and its surrounding microenvironment. This review focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and current immunobiologic research of peritoneal structures, and addresses certain potentially useful animal models. Changes in both the inflammatory and non-inflammatory cell compartments, as well as alterations to the extracellular matrix, appear to be signal events that contribute to the remodeling effects of the peritoneal stroma and surface epithelial cells on tumor growth and spread. These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins. Interactions between these molecules and molecular structures within the extracellular matrix, such as collagens and the proteoglycans, may contribute to a peritoneal mesothelial surface and stromal environment that is conducive to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets. PMID:15219235

  15. Macrophages in Tumor Microenvironments and the Progression of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning-Bo; Lü, Mu-Han; Fan, Ya-Han; Cao, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed innate immune cells that play indispensable roles in the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogens and in-tissue homeostasis. Macrophages can be activated by a variety of stimuli and polarized to functionally different phenotypes. Two distinct subsets of macrophages have been proposed, including classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages express a series of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules, such as IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, iNOS and MHCI/II. In contrast, M2 macrophages express a wide array of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, TGF-β, and arginase1. In most tumors, the infiltrated macrophages are considered to be of the M2 phenotype, which provides an immunosuppressive microenvironment for tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-associated macrophages secrete many cytokines, chemokines, and proteases, which promote tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Recently, it was also found that tumor-associated macrophages interact with cancer stem cells. This interaction leads to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. So mediating macrophage to resist tumors is considered to be potential therapy. PMID:22778768

  16. CAF cellular glycolysis: linking cancer cells with the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amrita; Bera, Soumen

    2016-07-01

    Cancers have long being hallmarked as cells relying heavily on their glycolysis for energy generation in spite of having functional mitochondria. The metabolic status of the cancer cells have been revisited time and again to get better insight into the overall carcinogenesis process which revealed the apparent crosstalks between the cancer cells with the fibroblasts present in the tumour microenvironment. This review focuses on the mechanisms of transformations of normal fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF), the participation of the CAF in tumour progression with special interest to the role of CAF cellular glycolysis in the overall tumorigenesis. The fibroblasts, when undergoes the transformation process, distinctly switches to a more glycolytic phenotype in order to provide the metabolic intermediates necessary for carrying out the mitochondrial pathways of ATP generation in cancer cells. This review will also discuss the molecular mechanisms responsible for this metabolic make over promoting glycolysis in CAF cells. A thorough investigation of the pathways and molecules involved will not only help in understanding the process of activation and metabolic reprogramming in CAF cells but also might open up new targets for cancer therapy.

  17. Targeting CD73 in the tumor microenvironment with MEDI9447

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Carl M.; Sult, Erin; Huang, Qihui; Mulgrew, Kathy; Fuhrmann, Stacy R.; McGlinchey, Kelly A.; Hammond, Scott A.; Rothstein, Raymond; Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Poon, Edmund; Holoweckyj, Nick; Durham, Nicholas M.; Leow, Ching Ching; Diedrich, Gundo; Damschroder, Melissa; Herbst, Ronald; Hollingsworth, Robert E.; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MEDI9447 is a human monoclonal antibody that is specific for the ectoenzyme CD73 and currently undergoing Phase I clinical trials. Here we show that MEDI9447 is a potent inhibitor of CD73 ectonucleotidase activity, with wide ranging immune regulatory consequences. MEDI9447 results in relief from adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-mediated lymphocyte suppression in vitro and inhibition of mouse syngeneic tumor growth in vivo. In contrast with other cancer immunotherapy agents such as checkpoint inhibitors or T-cell agonists, MEDI9447 drives changes in both myeloid and lymphoid infiltrating leukocyte populations within the tumor microenvironment of mouse models. Changes include significant alterations in a number of tumor micro-environmental subpopulations including increases in CD8+ effector cells and activated macrophages. Furthermore, these changes correlate directly with responder and non-responder subpopulations within animal studies using syngeneic tumors. Combination data showing additive activity between MEDI9447 and anti-PD-1 antibodies using human cells in vitro and mouse tumor models further demonstrate the potential value of relieving adenosine-mediated immunosuppression. Based on these data, a Phase I study to test the safety, tolerability, and clinical activity of MEDI9447 in cancer patients was initiated (NCT02503774). PMID:27622077

  18. Prostatic microenvironment in senescence: fibroblastic growth factors × hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Hetzl, A C; Montico, F; Lorencini, R M; Kido, L A; Cândido, E M; Cagnon, V H A

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to characterize and correlate steroid hormone receptors with the FGF2, FGF7 and FGF8 reactivities in the prostatic epithelium and stroma in senile rats. Fifty male senile rats and 10 young male rats were divided into the young (YNG), the senile groups (SE), the castrated group (CAS), the estrogen-deficient group (ED), the castrated + estrogen group (CASE), and the estrogen-deficient + androgen group (EDTEST). The ventral prostate was submitted to immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses. The results showed decreased AR and ERβ levels and increased ERα in the senile animals in relation to YNG group. Increased ERα and ERβ reactivities presenting differential localization were characterized in the CASE group compared to the CAS group. Increased FGF2 level was observed in the stroma of the CAS and ED groups in relation to the SE group and in the epithelium of the ED group in relation to the other groups. Increased and differential immunolocalization of FGF7 levels were observed in the CAS, ED and CASE groups. The FGF8 levels showed differential localization in the CAS and ED groups compared to the senile group. The intense hormone ablation was favorable to the autocrine signaling of FGF2 and FGF8. FGF7 could be activated in the androgen-independent via considering the increased FGF7 in the castrated rats. We concluded that hormone ablation in senescence was favorable to activation or/and to fibroblast signaling in the prostatic microenvironment.

  19. Designing degradable hydrogels for orthogonal control of cell microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Degradable and cell-compatible hydrogels can be designed to mimic the physical and biochemical characteristics of native extracellular matrices and provide tunability of degradation rates and related properties under physiological conditions. Hence, such hydrogels are finding widespread application in many bioengineering fields, including controlled bioactive molecule delivery, cell encapsulation for controlled three-dimensional culture, and tissue engineering. Cellular processes, such as adhesion, proliferation, spreading, migration, and differentiation, can be controlled within degradable, cell-compatible hydrogels with temporal tuning of biochemical or biophysical cues, such as growth factor presentation or hydrogel stiffness. However, thoughtful selection of hydrogel base materials, formation chemistries, and degradable moieties is necessary to achieve the appropriate level of property control and desired cellular response. In this review, hydrogel design considerations and materials for hydrogel preparation, ranging from natural polymers to synthetic polymers, are overviewed. Recent advances in chemical and physical methods to crosslink hydrogels are highlighted, as well as recent developments in controlling hydrogel degradation rates and modes of degradation. Special attention is given to spatial or temporal presentation of various biochemical and biophysical cues to modulate cell response in static (i.e., non-degradable) or dynamic (i.e., degradable) microenvironments. This review provides insight into the design of new cell-compatible, degradable hydrogels to understand and modulate cellular processes for various biomedical applications. PMID:23609001

  20. Mitochondrial Regulation of the Muscle Microenvironment in Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Terence E.; Schmidt, Cameron A.; Green, Tom D.; Brown, David A.; Neufer, P. Darrell; McClung, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is the most severe clinical presentation of peripheral arterial disease and manifests as chronic limb pain at rest and/or tissue necrosis. Current clinical interventions are largely ineffective and therapeutic angiogenesis based trials have shown little efficacy, highlighting the dire need for new ideas and novel therapeutic approaches. Despite a decade of research related to skeletal muscle as a determinant of morbidity and mortality outcomes in CLI, very little progress has been made toward an effective therapy aimed directly at the muscle myopathies of this disease. Within the muscle cell, mitochondria are well positioned to modulate the ischemic cellular response, as they are the principal sites of cellular energy production and the major regulators of cellular redox charge and cell death. In this mini review, we update the crucial importance of skeletal muscle to CLI pathology and examine the evolving influence of muscle and endothelial cell mitochondria in the complex ischemic microenvironment. Finally, we discuss the novelty of muscle mitochondria as a therapeutic target for ischemic pathology in the context of the complex co-morbidities often associated with CLI. PMID:26635622

  1. Model of spacecraft atomic oxygen and solar exposure microenvironments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Pippin, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Computer models of environmental conditions in Earth orbit are needed for the following reasons: (1) derivation of material performance parameters from orbital test data, (2) evaluation of spacecraft hardware designs, (3) prediction of material service life, and (4) scheduling spacecraft maintenance. To meet these needs, Boeing has developed programs for modeling atomic oxygen (AO) and solar radiation exposures. The model allows determination of AO and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposures for spacecraft surfaces (1) in arbitrary orientations with respect to the direction of spacecraft motion, (2) overall ranges of solar conditions, and (3) for any mission duration. The models have been successfully applied to prediction of experiment environments on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and for analysis of selected hardware designs for deployment on other spacecraft. The work on these models has been reported at previous LDEF conferences. Since publication of these reports, a revision has been made to the AO calculation for LDEF, and further work has been done on the microenvironments model for solar exposure.

  2. Treg functional stability and its responsiveness to the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent autoimmunity and tissue damage resulting from excessive or unnecessary immune activation through their suppressive function. While their importance for proper immune control is undeniable, the stability of the Treg lineage has recently become a controversial topic. Many reports have shown dramatic loss of the signature Treg transcription factor Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) and Treg function under various inflammatory conditions. Other recent studies demonstrate that most Tregs are extremely resilient in their expression of Foxp3 and the retention of suppressive function. While this debate is unlikely to be settled in the immediate future, improved understanding of the considerable heterogeneity within the Foxp3+ Treg population and how Treg subsets respond to ranging environmental cues may be keys to reconciliation. In this review, we discuss the diverse mechanisms responsible for the observed stability or instability of Foxp3+ Treg identity and function. These include transcriptional and epigenetic programs, transcript targeting and posttranslational modifications that appear responsive to numerous elements of the microenvironment. These mechanisms for Treg functional modulation add to the discussion of Treg stability. PMID:24712463

  3. Apoptosis of human seminoma cells upon disruption of their microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Olie, R. A.; Boersma, A. W.; Dekker, M. C.; Nooter, K.; Looijenga, L. H.; Oosterhuis, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    One of the main obstacles encountered when trying to culture human seminoma (SE) cells in vitro is massive degeneration of the tumour cells. We investigated whether dissociation of tumour tissue, to obtain single-cell suspensions for in vitro culture, results in the onset of apoptosis. Using morphological analysis and in situ end labelling, less than 4% of apoptotic tumour cells were detected in intact tissue from 11 out of 14 SEs. In these 11 tumours, apoptosis-specific DNA ladders, indicative of internucleosomal double-strand DNA cleavage, were not detected on electrophoresis gels. In contrast, three SEs with over 12% of apoptotic tumour cells in the intact tissue and all analysed (pure) SE cell suspensions, obtained after mechanical dissociation of intact tumour tissue, showed DNA ladders. Flow cytometric analysis of end labelled SE suspensions showed DNA breaks in up to 85% of the tumour cells. As indicated by cell morphology and DNA degradation, SE cells appear to rapidly enter the apoptotic pathway upon mechanical disruption of their microenvironment. No expression of p53 and of the apoptosis-inhibitor bcl-2 was detectable in intact SE tissue or cell suspensions. Our data suggest that abrogation of apoptosis might be crucial to succeed in culturing human SE cells in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8624259

  4. Heterogeneity in tuberculosis pathology, microenvironments and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, Anne; Barry, Clifton E; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) lesions are extremely complex and dynamic. Here, we review the multiple types and fates of pulmonary lesions that form following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the impact of this spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the bacteria they harbor. The diverse immunopathology of granulomas and cavities generates a plethora of microenvironments to which M. tuberculosis bacilli must adapt. This in turn affects the replication, metabolism, and relative density of bacterial subpopulations, and consequently their respective susceptibility to chemotherapy. We outline recent developments that support a paradigm shift in our understanding of lesion progression. The simple model according to which lesions within a single individual react similarly to the systemic immune response no longer prevails. Host-pathogen interactions within lesions are a dynamic process, driven by subtle and local differences in signaling pathways, resulting in diverging trajectories of lesions within a single host. The spectrum of TB lesions is a continuum with a large overlap in the lesion types found in latently infected and active TB patients. We hope this overview will guide TB researchers in the design, choice of read-outs, and interpretation of future studies in the search for predictive biomarkers and novel therapies.

  5. POEMS Syndrome (Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal Gammopathy and Skin Changes) Treated with Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Carlos; Pérez de León, José Antonio; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Pérez-Cano, Ramón; Hernández, Tomás Martín

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: POEMS syndrome Symptoms: General malaise • pretibial edemas • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: POEMS syndrome is a rare systemic pathology of paraneoplastic origin that is associated with plasma cell dyscrasia. It is characterized by the presence of sensorimotor polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, skin changes, and other systemic manifestations. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is unknown but over-production of vascular endothelial growth factor is probably responsible for most of the more characteristic symptoms. There is no standard treatment for POEMS syndrome and no randomized controlled clinical trials of treatment exist in the available literature. High-dose melphalan with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be considered for younger patients with widespread osteosclerotic lesions, and for patients with rapidly progressive neuropathy. Case Report: This is the case of a 62-year-old Caucasian man who was admitted to our center presenting pretibial edema accompanied by significant weight loss and difficulty walking. POEMS criteria were present and an immunofixation test confirmed the presence of a monoclonal plasmaproliferative disorder. After autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the monoclonal component disappeared and the patient’s clinical status improved markedly. Conclusions: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following high-dose melphalan is an effective therapy for younger patients with widespread osteosclerotic lesions in POEMS syndrome. PMID:25726020

  6. Preparation and Evaluation of 99mTc-labeled anti-CD11b Antibody Targeting Inflammatory Microenvironment for Colon Cancer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Zou, Weihong; Li, Xiao; Xiu, Yan; Tan, Hui; Shi, Hongcheng; Yang, Xiangdong

    2015-06-01

    CD11b, an active constituent of innate immune response highly expressed in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), can be used as a marker of inflammatory microenvironment, particularly in tumor tissues. In this research, we aimed to fabricate a (99m)Tc-labeled anti-CD11b antibody as a probe for CD11b(+) myeloid cells in colon cancer imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In situ murine colon tumor model was established in histidine decarboxylase knockout (Hdc(-/-)) mice by chemicals induction. (99m)Tc-labeled anti-CD11b was obtained with labeling yields of over 30% and radiochemical purity of over 95%. Micro-SPECT/CT scans were performed at 6 h post injection to investigate biodistributions and targeting of the probe. In situ colonic neoplasma as small as 3 mm diameters was clearly identified by imaging; after dissection of the animal, anti-CD11b immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify infiltration of CD11b+ MDSCs in microenvironment of colonic neoplasms. In addition, the images displayed intense signal from bone marrow and spleen, which indicated the origin and migration of CD11b(+) MDSCs in vivo, and these results were further proved by flow cytometry analysis. Therefore, (99m)Tc-labeled anti-CD11b SPECT displayed the potential to facilitate the diagnosis of colon tumor in very early stage via detection of inflammatory microenvironment.

  7. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  8. ADA-deficient SCID is associated with a specific microenvironment and bone phenotype characterized by RANKL/OPG imbalance and osteoblast insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Mrak, Emanuela; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Zacchi, Elena; Cavani, Francesco; Casiraghi, Miriam; Grunebaum, Eyal; Roifman, Chaim M; Cervi, Maria C; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Carlucci, Filippo; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Villa, Anna; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2009-10-08

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a disorder of the purine metabolism leading to combined immunodeficiency and systemic alterations, including skeletal abnormalities. We report that ADA deficiency in mice causes a specific bone phenotype characterized by alterations of structural properties and impaired mechanical competence. These alterations are the combined result of an imbalanced receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin axis, causing decreased osteoclastogenesis and an intrinsic defect of osteoblast function with subsequent low bone formation. In vitro, osteoblasts lacking ADA displayed an altered transcriptional profile and growth reduction. Furthermore, the bone marrow microenvironment of ADA-deficient mice showed a reduced capacity to support in vitro and in vivo hematopoiesis. Treatment of ADA-deficient neonatal mice with enzyme replacement therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or gene therapy resulted in full recovery of the altered bone parameters. Remarkably, untreated ADA-severe combined immunodeficiency patients showed a similar imbalance in RANKL/osteoprotegerin levels alongside severe growth retardation. Gene therapy with ADA-transduced hematopoietic stem cells increased serum RANKL levels and children's growth. Our results indicate that the ADA metabolism represents a crucial modulatory factor of bone cell activities and remodeling.

  9. Effect of the local microenvironment on survival and thermal inactivation of Salmonella in low- and intermediate-moisture multi-ingredient foods.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiping; Fu, Xiaowen; Bima, Yige; Koontz, John; Megalis, Christina; Yang, Fei; Fleischman, Gregory; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Multi-ingredient foods having low- or intermediate-moisture characteristics may pose a special challenge to process design and validation. Ingredients of these foods can create local microenvironments that may have a distinct impact on pathogen survival and processing requirements. In this study, two model systems, each consisting of 80% commercial peanut butter (P) and 20% nonfat dry milk powder (M), were formulated to be identical in composition, but different in the source of the Salmonella contamination as originating in either the ingredient P or M. Immediately after inoculation, Salmonella showed a 2.0-log reduction when M was the contaminated ingredient compared with a 0.6-log reduction when P was the contaminated ingredient. This pattern of survival was consistent with the single-ingredient control containing only M (2.5-log reduction) or only P (0.7-log reduction), suggesting that the immediate proximity of cells is determined by the contaminated ingredient in the model system. After 5 weeks of storage, the survival rates of Salmonella in the two systems remained different, i.e.a 4- and 2-log reduction resulted in the system with M or P as the contaminated ingredient, respectively. Furthermore, thermal inactivation efficacies also differed significantly between the two systems. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the nonhomogeneous distribution of water, lipid, and protein, indicating that varied local microenvironments were present and likely affected the behavior of the pathogen. The impact of the microenvironment on inactivation and survival of Salmonella was further confirmed in a butter cookie formulation in which Salmonella was inoculated via four different ingredients. This study shows that the local microenvironment in low- and intermediate-moisture foods affects Salmonella survival and thermal inactivation. The ingredient source of the contamination should be taken into account for process design and validation to ensure the

  10. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  11. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus detected by separation and incubation of cells from salmonid cavity fluid.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Batts, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus is usually detected by inoculating susceptible cell cultures with cavity ("ovarian") fluid (CF) from spawning females. We identified additional adult carriers of virus in spawning populations of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) by collecting nonerythrocytic cells from CF samples by low-speed centrifugation, culturing the cells for at least 7 d at 15 °C, and then testing the culture medium for virus. Virus appeared in the cultured cells from some samples of CF that remained negative during incubation. In additional samples of CF from these species, the virus titer increased in cultured cells compared with the titer in the original CF sample. With chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha), no negative samples converted to positive during incubation, but the virus titer was retained in incubated CF cells, but not in cell-free CF.

  12. [The tumoral microenvironment: feeding resources, battle field and therapeutic target in cancer].

    PubMed

    Fridman, Wolf H; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Tumors grow surrounded by a complex cellular and tissular microenvironment. Its components influence disease outcome, some accelarating growth and invasion and others blocking it. From the very first steps leading a normal tissue to dysplasia, followed by a benign tumor which may become locally invasive and metastatic, interactions between the transformed cells and their microenvironment direct the evolution of this process. Chronic inflammation in a tissue favors tumor first appearance which then accentuate the nutritional and energetic properties of their microenvironment by producing neoangiogenic, immunosuppressive and inflammatory molecules. In contrast a strong memory Th1/cytotoxic reaction can prevent the transition from benign to malignant tumors and control cancer invasivness and metastasis. Knowledge of these multiple phenomena, discussed in the different articles of the present issue has a major clinical impact, since new prognostic tests and efficient novel therapeutic approaches which target the tumor microenvironment are actively developed.

  13. Cutaneous mast cell maturation does not depend on an intact bone marrow microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Charley, M.R.; Mikhael, A.; Sontheimer, R.D.; Gilliam, J.N.; Bennett, M.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether the maturation of murine cutaneous mast cells from stem cells depends on an intact bone marrow microenvironment. Normal bone marrow cells (+/+) were infused into 2 groups of mast cell-deficient mice: WBB6F1-W/Wv mice and /sup 89/Sr-pretreated W/Wv mice. /sup 89/Sr is a long-lived bone-seeking radioisotope which provides continuous irradiation of the marrow and thereby ablates the marrow microenvironment. Skin biopsies revealed that the /sup 89/Sr-pretreated mice and the controls had repopulated their skin with mast cells equally well. Natural killer cell function was significantly depressed in the /sup 89/Sr-treated mice, confirming that the marrow microenvironment had been functionally altered. It appears that, although the precursors for cutaneous mast cells are marrow derived, they do not need an intact marrow microenvironment for maturation.

  14. Dendritic Cells The Tumor Microenvironment and the Challenges for an Effective Antitumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Sprague, Leslee; McGinty, John; Pate, Michelle; Muccioli, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Many clinical trials have been carried out or are in progress to assess the therapeutic potential of dendritic-cell- (DC-) based vaccines on cancer patients, and recently the first DC-based vaccine for human cancer was approved by the FDA. Herewith, we describe the general characteristics of DCs and different strategies to generate effective antitumor DC vaccines. In recent years, the relevance of the tumor microenvironment in the progression of cancer has been highlighted. It has been shown that the tumor microenvironment is capable of inactivating various components of the immune system responsible for tumor clearance. In particular, the effect of the tumor microenvironment on antigen-presenting cells, such as DCs, does not only render these immune cells unable to induce specific immune responses, but also turns them into promoters of tumor growth. We also describe strategies likely to increase the efficacy of DC vaccines by reprogramming the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22505809

  15. Jawbone microenvironment promotes periodontium regeneration by regulating the function of periodontal ligament stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Yihan; Zhao, Xicong; Zhang, Hao; Luo, Zhuojing; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    During tooth development, the jawbone interacts with dental germ and provides the development microenvironment. Jawbone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (JBMSCs) maintain this microenvironment for root and periodontium development. However, the effect of the jawbone microenvironment on periodontium tissue regeneration is largely elusive. Our previous study showed that cell aggregates (CAs) of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promoted periodontium regeneration on the treated dentin scaffold. Here, we found that JBMSCs enhanced not only the osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) but also their adhesion to titanium (Ti) material surface. Importantly, the compound CAs of PDLSCs and JBMSCs regenerated periodontal ligament-like fibers and mineralized matrix on the Ti scaffold surface, both in nude mice ectopic and minipig orthotopic transplantations. Our data revealed that an effective regenerative microenvironment, reconstructed by JBMSCs, promoted periodontium regeneration by regulating PDLSCs function on the Ti material. PMID:28053317

  16. How-to-Do-It: Leaf Morphology & Light Microenvironments: A Field Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, David

    1989-01-01

    A field-based exercise which illustrates one aspect of how leaves in multilayered trees take advantage of light microenvironments is presented. Procedures, tree selection and data analysis are discussed. (CW)

  17. Hematopoietic stem cells burn fat to prevent exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valerie; de Thé, Hugues

    2012-10-05

    Ito et al. (2012) recently report in Nature Medicine that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) regulated by PPARδ controls asymmetric division in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This metabolic mechanism prevents HSC exhaustion and is downstream of the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML, suggesting therapeutic implications for HSC function and disease.

  18. Broadening the indications for hematopoietic stem cell genetic therapies.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2013-09-05

    The use of recombinant retroviral vectors to effect corrective genetic therapies in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has long been predicted to revolutionize medicine. Two recent papers in Science now show that this technology could be considered as effective as, and perhaps superior to, allogeneic HSC transplants in some rare diseases.

  19. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  20. Height indicates hematopoietic capacity in elderly Japanese men

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yuji; Sato, Shimpei; Koyamatsu, Jun; Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Nagayoshi, Mako; Kadota, Koichiro; Maeda, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported that height is an indicator of the capacity of vascular repair in elderly men, especially hypertensive men. On the other hand, hemoglobin could act as a possible biochemical index of hypertension-induced vascular damage. However, no studies have clarified the correlation between height and hematopoietic activity. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 249 men aged 65-69 undergoing a general health check-up. Reticulocyte was used to evaluate hematopoietic activity. Because hemoglobin concentration should influence hematopoietic activity, analyses stratified by hemoglobin level were performed. Independent of known cardiovascular risk factors and other hematological parameters (white blood cell count), a significant positive correlation was seen between height and reticulocytes for total subjects and subjects with a high hemoglobin concentration (≥14.5 g/dL), but not in subjects with a low hemoglobin concentration (<14.5 g/dL). The standardized parameter estimates (β) were β=0.18, p=0.003 for total subjects, β=0.28, p=0.001 for subjects with a high hemoglobin concentration, and β=0.03, p=0.717 for subjects with low hemoglobin. Independently, height is significantly positively correlated with reticulocyte in elderly Japanese men, particularly in men with a high hemoglobin concentration. These results indicate that subjects with a short stature might have lower hematopoietic capacity than those with a high stature. PMID:27705902

  1. Dynamic equilibrium of heterogeneous and interconvertible multipotent hematopoietic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Wendy; Zayas, Jennifer; Perez, Ruben; George, John; Jurecic, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Populations of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are quite heterogeneous and consist of multiple cell subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. Some of these subsets also appear to be interconvertible and oscillate between functionally distinct states. The multipotent hematopoietic cell line EML has emerged as a unique model to study the heterogeneity and interconvertibility of multipotent hematopoietic cells. Here we describe extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of EML cells which stems from the coexistence of multiple cell subsets. Each of these subsets is phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and displays distinct multilineage differentiation potential, cell cycle profile, proliferation kinetics, and expression pattern of HSC markers and some of the key lineage-associated transcription factors. Analysis of their maintenance revealed that on a population level all EML cell subsets exhibit cell-autonomous interconvertible properties, with the capacity to generate all other subsets and re-establish complete parental EML cell population. Moreover, all EML cell subsets generated during multiple cell generations maintain their distinct phenotypic and functional signatures and interconvertible properties. The model of EML cell line suggests that interconvertible multipotent hematopoietic cell subsets coexist in a homeostatically maintained dynamic equilibrium which is regulated by currently unknown cell-intrinsic mechanisms. PMID:24903657

  2. Hematopoietic potential of the pre-fusion allantois.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Catherine; Salaün, Josselyne; Belo-Diabangouaya, Patricia; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise

    2007-01-15

    We previously showed that the fetal component of the placenta has a vigorous hematopoietic activity. Whether this organ is an environmental niche where hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) proliferate and become committed to various lineages, or whether it is also a site for HSC emergence, was left open. This issue can be addressed only if the components that will give rise to the placenta are tested prior to vascularization. The fetal part of the placenta forms through the fusion of the allantois and the chorionic plate around the stage of 7 somite pairs. The allantois, a mesodermal rudiment that provides fetal blood vessels to the placenta, was retrieved before fusion. We found in this rudiment expression of CD41, a known marker of early embryonic hematopoietic progenitors. c-Kit encoding a progenitor specific receptor was also expressed. Significantly, as early as the 1-2 somite stage, the allantois yielded erythroid, myeloid and multipotent clonogenic progenitors, when pre-cultured in toto prior to seeding in a semisolid medium. These results provide evidence that the allantois has hematopoietic potential per se. Whether this potential also involves the ability to produce HSC is still to be determined.

  3. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease.

  4. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  5. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  6. Instruction of hematopoietic lineage choice by cytokine signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Endele, Max; Etzrodt, Martin; Schroeder, Timm

    2014-12-10

    Hematopoiesis is the cumulative consequence of finely tuned signaling pathways activated through extrinsic factors, such as local niche signals and systemic hematopoietic cytokines. Whether extrinsic factors actively instruct the lineage choice of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or are only selectively allowing survival and proliferation of already intrinsically lineage-committed cells has been debated over decades. Recent results demonstrated that cytokines can instruct lineage choice. However, the precise function of individual cytokine-triggered signaling molecules in inducing cellular events like proliferation, lineage choice, and differentiation remains largely elusive. Signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokine receptors are highly overlapping, but support the production of distinct hematopoietic lineages. Cellular context, signaling dynamics, and the crosstalk of different signaling pathways determine the cellular response of a given extrinsic signal. New tools to manipulate and continuously quantify signaling events at the single cell level are therefore required to thoroughly interrogate how dynamic signaling networks yield a specific cellular response. - Highlights: • Recent studies provided definite proof for lineage-instructive action of cytokines. • Signaling pathways involved in hematopoietic lineage instruction remain elusive. • New tools are emerging to quantitatively study dynamic signaling networks over time.

  7. Amino acid function relates to its embedded protein microenvironment: A study on disulfide-bridged cystine.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Apostol, Marcin I; Bandyopadhyay, Debashree

    2016-11-01

    In our previous study, we have shown that the microenvironments around conserved amino acids are also conserved in protein families (Bandyopadhyay and Mehler, Proteins 2008; 72:646-659). In this study, we have hypothesized that amino acids perform similar functions when embedded in a certain type of protein microenvironment. We have tested this hypothesis on the microenvironments around disulfide-bridged cysteines from high-resolution protein crystal structures. Although such cystines mainly play structural role in proteins, in certain enzymes they participate in catalysis and redox reactions. We have performed and report a functional annotation of enzymatically active cystines to their respective microenvironments. Three protein microenvironment clusters were identified: (i) buried-hydrophobic, (ii) exposed-hydrophilic, and (iii) buried-hydrophilic. The buried-hydrophobic cluster encompasses a small group of 22 redox-active cystines, mostly in alpha-helical conformations in a -C-x-x-C- motif from the Oxido-reductase enzyme class. All these cystines have high strain energy and near identical microenvironments. Most of the active cystines in hydrolase enzyme class belong to buried hydrophilic microenvironment cluster. In total there are 34 half-cystines detected in buried hydrophilic cluster from hydrolases, as a part of enzyme active site. Even within the buried hydrophilic cluster, there is clear separation of active half-cystines between surface exposed part of the protein and protein interior. Half-cystines toward the surface exposed region are higher in number compared to those in protein interior. Apart from cystines at the active sites of the enzymes, many more half-cystines were detected in buried hydrophilic cluster those are part of the microenvironment of enzyme active sites. However, no active half-cystines were detected in extremely hydrophilic microenvironment cluster, that is, exposed hydrophilic cluster, indicating that total exposure of cystine

  8. PAR1 signaling regulates the retention and recruitment of EPCR-expressing bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Itkin, Tomer; Chakrabarty, Sagarika; Graf, Claudine; Kollet, Orit; Ludin, Aya; Golan, Karin; Kalinkovich, Alexander; Ledergor, Guy; Wong, Eitan; Niemeyer, Elisabeth; Porat, Ziv; Erez, Ayelet; Sagi, Irit; Esmon, Charles T; Ruf, Wolfram; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2016-01-01

    Retention of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) in the bone marrow is essential for hematopoiesis and for protection from myelotoxic injury. We report that signaling cascades that are traditionally viewed as coagulation-related also control retention of EPCR+ LT-HSCs in the bone marrow and their recruitment to the blood via two different protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated pathways. Thrombin-PAR1 signaling induces nitric oxide (NO) production, leading to TACE-mediated EPCR shedding, enhanced CXCL12-CXCR4-induced motility, and rapid stem and progenitor cell mobilization. Conversely, bone marrow blood vessels provide a microenvironment enriched with protein C that retain EPCR+ LT-HSCs by limiting NO generation, reducing Cdc42 activity and enhancing VLA4 affinity and adhesion. Inhibition of NO production by activated protein C (aPC)-EPCR-PAR1 signaling reduces progenitor cell egress, increases NOlow bone marrow EPCR+ LT-HSCs retention and protects mice from chemotherapy-induced hematological failure and death. Our study reveals new roles for PAR1 and EPCR that control NO production to balance maintenance and recruitment of bone marrow EPCR+ LT-HSCs with clinical relevance. PMID:26457757

  9. Increased IL-6 secretion by aged human mesenchymal stromal cells disrupts hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells' homeostasis.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan-Wong, Kelsey; Nadeau, Stéphanie; Carrier-Leclerc, Audrey; Apablaza, Felipe; Hamdy, Reggie; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Rodier, Francis; Colmegna, Inés

    2016-03-22

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) homeostasis declines with age, leading to impaired hematopoiesis. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are critical components of the bone marrow niche and key regulators of the balance between HSPC proliferation and quiescence. Accrual of DNA damage, a hallmark of cellular aging, occurs in aged MSC. Whether MSC aging alters the bone marrow niche triggering HSPC dysfunction is unknown. Using a human MSC-HSPC co-culture system, we demonstrated that DNA damaged MSC have impaired capacity to maintain CD34+CD38- HSPC quiescence. Furthermore, human MSC from adult donors display some hallmarks of cellular senescence and have a decreased capacity to maintain HSPC quiescence and the most primitive CD34+CD38- subset compared to MSC from pediatric donors. IL-6 neutralization restores the MSC-HPSC crosstalk in senescent and adult MSC-HSPC co-cultures highlighting the relevance of the local microenvironment in maintaining HSPC homeostasis. These results provide new evidence implicating components of the MSC secretome in HSPC aging.

  10. Increased IL-6 secretion by aged human mesenchymal stromal cells disrupts hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells' homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    O'Hagan-Wong, Kelsey; Nadeau, Stéphanie; Carrier-Leclerc, Audrey; Apablaza, Felipe; Hamdy, Reggie; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Rodier, Francis; Colmegna, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) homeostasis declines with age, leading to impaired hematopoiesis. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are critical components of the bone marrow niche and key regulators of the balance between HSPC proliferation and quiescence. Accrual of DNA damage, a hallmark of cellular aging, occurs in aged MSC. Whether MSC aging alters the bone marrow niche triggering HSPC dysfunction is unknown. Using a human MSC-HSPC co-culture system, we demonstrated that DNA damaged MSC have impaired capacity to maintain CD34+CD38− HSPC quiescence. Furthermore, human MSC from adult donors display some hallmarks of cellular senescence and have a decreased capacity to maintain HSPC quiescence and the most primitive CD34+CD38− subset compared to MSC from pediatric donors. IL-6 neutralization restores the MSC-HPSC crosstalk in senescent and adult MSC-HSPC co-cultures highlighting the relevance of the local microenvironment in maintaining HSPC homeostasis. These results provide new evidence implicating components of the MSC secretome in HSPC aging. PMID:26934440

  11. Caveolin-1 and Accelerated Host Aging in the Breast Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M.; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G.; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1+/+ versus Cav-1−/− age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1–deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues). PMID:22698676

  12. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer ...Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Feng Yang, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0163 Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

  13. Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0059 TITLE: Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...2008 - 6 Jan 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...Symposium on Stem Cells , Cancer, and Aging in Singapore RESEARCH EXPERIENCE 2001 Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary and Critical

  14. Quantitative histology analysis of the ovarian tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chunyan; Heindl, Andreas; Huang, Xin; Xi, Shaoyan; Banerjee, Susana; Liu, Jihong; Yuan, Yinyin

    2015-01-01

    Concerted efforts in genomic studies examining RNA transcription and DNA methylation patterns have revealed profound insights in prognostic ovarian cancer subtypes. On the other hand, abundant histology slides have been generated to date, yet their uses remain very limited and largely qualitative. Our goal is to develop automated histology analysis as an alternative subtyping technology for ovarian cancer that is cost-efficient and does not rely on DNA quality. We developed an automated system for scoring primary tumour sections of 91 late-stage ovarian cancer to identify single cells. We demonstrated high accuracy of our system based on expert pathologists’ scores (cancer = 97.1%, stromal = 89.1%) as well as compared to immunohistochemistry scoring (correlation = 0.87). The percentage of stromal cells in all cells is significantly associated with poor overall survival after controlling for clinical parameters including debulking status and age (multivariate analysis p = 0.0021, HR = 2.54, CI = 1.40–4.60) and progression-free survival (multivariate analysis p = 0.022, HR = 1.75, CI = 1.09–2.82). We demonstrate how automated image analysis enables objective quantification of microenvironmental composition of ovarian tumours. Our analysis reveals a strong effect of the tumour microenvironment on ovarian cancer progression and highlights the potential of therapeutic interventions that target the stromal compartment or cancer-stroma signalling in the stroma-high, late-stage ovarian cancer subset. PMID:26573438

  15. Class (I) Phosphoinositide 3-Kinases in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gyori, David; Chessa, Tamara; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Stephens, Len R.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a diverse family of enzymes which regulate various critical biological processes, such as cell proliferation and survival. Class (I) PI3Ks (PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ) mediate the phosphorylation of the inositol ring at position D3 leading to the generation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 can be dephosphorylated by several phosphatases, of which the best known is the 3-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog). The Class (I) PI3K pathway is frequently disrupted in human cancers where mutations are associated with increased PI3K-activity or loss of PTEN functionality within the tumor cells. However, the role of PI3Ks in the tumor stroma is less well understood. Recent evidence suggests that the white blood cell-selective PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ isoforms have an important role in regulating the immune-suppressive, tumor-associated myeloid cell and regulatory T cell subsets, respectively, and as a consequence are also critical for solid tumor growth. Moreover, PI3Kα is implicated in the direct regulation of tumor angiogenesis, and dysregulation of the PI3K pathway in stromal fibroblasts can also contribute to cancer progression. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of the Class (I) PI3K family in the tumor microenvironment can be a highly attractive anti-cancer strategy and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors may act as potent cancer immunotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:28273837

  16. Can cancer be reversed by engineering the tumor microenvironment?

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    To advance cancer research in a transformative way, we must redefine the problem. Although epithelial cancers, such as breast cancer, may be caused by random somatic gene mutations, the reality is that this is only one of many ways to induce tumor formation. Cancers also can be produced in experimental systems in vitro and in vivo, for example, by inducing sustained alterations of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure. Moreover, certain epithelial cancers can be induced to ‘reboot’ and regenerate normal tissue morphology when combined with embryonic mesenchyme or exogenous ECM scaffolds that are produced through epithelial-stromal interactions. At the same time, work in the field of Mechanical Biology has revealed that many cell behaviors critical for cancer formation (e.g., growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis) can be controlled by physical interactions between cells and their ECM adhesions that alter the mechanical force balance in the ECM, cell and cytoskeleton. Epithelial tumor progression also can be induced in vitro by changing ECM mechanics or altering cytoskeletal tension generation through manipulation of the Rho GTPase signaling pathway. Mechanical interactions between capillary cells and ECM that are mediated by Rho signaling similarly mediate control of capillary cell growth and angiogenesis, which are equally critical for cancer progression and metastasis. These findings question basic assumptions in the cancer field, and raise the intriguing possibility that cancer may be a reversible disease that results from progressive deregulation of tissue architecture, which leads to physical changes in cells and altered mechanical signaling. This perspective raises the possibility of developing a tissue engineering approach to cancer therapy in which biologically-inspired materials that mimic the embryonic microenvironment are used to induce cancers to revert into normal tissues. PMID:18472275

  17. Engineered microenvironments for synergistic VEGF - Integrin signalling during vascularization.

    PubMed

    Moulisová, Vladimíra; Gonzalez-García, Cristina; Cantini, Marco; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Weaver, Jessica; Costell, Mercedes; Sabater I Serra, Roser; Dalby, Matthew J; García, Andrés J; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    We have engineered polymer-based microenvironments that promote vasculogenesis both in vitro and in vivo through synergistic integrin-growth factor receptor signalling. Poly(ethyl acrylate) (PEA) triggers spontaneous organization of fibronectin (FN) into nanonetworks which provide availability of critical binding domains. Importantly, the growth factor binding (FNIII12-14) and integrin binding (FNIII9-10) regions are simultaneously available on FN fibrils assembled on PEA. This material platform promotes synergistic integrin/VEGF signalling which is highly effective for vascularization events in vitro with low concentrations of VEGF. VEGF specifically binds to FN fibrils on PEA compared to control polymers (poly(methyl acrylate), PMA) where FN remains in a globular conformation and integrin/GF binding domains are not simultaneously available. The vasculogenic response of human endothelial cells seeded on these synergistic interfaces (VEGF bound to FN assembled on PEA) was significantly improved compared to soluble administration of VEGF at higher doses. Early onset of VEGF signalling (PLCγ1 phosphorylation) and both integrin and VEGF signalling (ERK1/2 phosphorylation) were increased only when VEGF was bound to FN nanonetworks on PEA, while soluble VEGF did not influence early signalling. Experiments with mutant FN molecules with impaired integrin binding site (FN-RGE) confirmed the role of the integrin binding site of FN on the vasculogenic response via combined integrin/VEGF signalling. In vivo experiments using 3D scaffolds coated with FN and VEGF implanted in the murine fat pad demonstrated pro-vascularization signalling by enhanced formation of new tissue inside scaffold pores. PEA-driven organization of FN promotes efficient presentation of VEGF to promote vascularization in regenerative medicine applications.

  18. Liver metastases: Microenvironments and ex-vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Amanda M; Ma, Bo; Taylor, D Lansing; Griffith, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a highly metastasis-permissive organ, tumor seeding of which usually portends mortality. Its unique and diverse architectural and cellular composition enable the liver to undertake numerous specialized functions, however, this distinctive biology, notably its hemodynamic features and unique microenvironment, renders the liver intrinsically hospitable to disseminated tumor cells. The particular focus for this perspective is the bidirectional interactions between the disseminated tumor cells and the unique resident cell populations of the liver; notably, parenchymal hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver sinusoidal endothelial, Kupffer, and hepatic stellate cells. Understanding the early steps in the metastatic seeding, including the decision to undergo dormancy versus outgrowth, has been difficult to study in 2D culture systems and animals due to numerous limitations. In response, tissue-engineered biomimetic systems have emerged. At the cutting-edge of these developments are ex vivo ‘microphysiological systems’ (MPS) which are cellular constructs designed to faithfully recapitulate the structure and function of a human organ or organ regions on a milli- to micro-scale level and can be made all human to maintain species-specific interactions. Hepatic MPSs are particularly attractive for studying metastases as in addition to the liver being a main site of metastatic seeding, it is also the principal site of drug metabolism and therapy-limiting toxicities. Thus, using these hepatic MPSs will enable not only an enhanced understanding of the fundamental aspects of metastasis but also allow for therapeutic agents to be fully studied for efficacy while also monitoring pharmacologic aspects and predicting toxicities. The review discusses some of the hepatic MPS models currently available and although only one MPS has been validated to relevantly modeling metastasis, it is anticipated that the adaptation of the other hepatic models to include tumors will not

  19. WE-E-BRE-12: Tumor Microenvironment Dynamics Following Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, D; Niles, D; Adamson, E; Torres, A; Kissick, M; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work aims to understand the radiation-induced interplay between tumor oxygenation and metabolic activity. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Using patient-derived xenografts of head and neck cancer we assessed tumor oxygenation via fiber-optic probe monitored hemoglobin saturation and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. Measurements were taken before and after a 10 Gy dose of radiation. Changes in metabolic activity were measured via Fluorescence Lifetime IMaging (FLIM) with the appropriate controls following a 10 Gy dose of radiation. FLIM can non-invasively monitor changes in fluorescence in response to the microenvironment including being able to detect free and bound states of the intrinsically fluorescent metabolite NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide). With this information FLIM can accurately quantify the metabolic state of cells that have been radiated. To model the observed changes, a two-compartment, source-sink simulation relating hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity was performed using MATLAB. Results: Hemoglobin saturation as measured by interstitial probe and BOLD-MRI decreased by 30% within 15 minutes following radiation. FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways. Simulation of radiation-induced alterations in tumor oxygenation demonstrated that these changes can be the result of changes in either vasculature or metabolic activity. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity. These alterations occur on time scales approximately the duration of common radiation treatments. Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  20. The Unique Molecular and Cellular Microenvironment of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Worzfeld, Thomas; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Huber, Magdalena; Adhikary, Till; Wagner, Uwe; Reinartz, Silke; Müller, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The reciprocal interplay of cancer cells and host cells is an indispensable prerequisite for tumor growth and progression. Cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system, in particular tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and T cells, as well as cancer-associated fibroblasts enter into a malicious liaison with tumor cells to create a tumor-promoting and immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME). Ovarian cancer, the most lethal of all gynecological malignancies, is characterized by a unique TME that enables specific and efficient metastatic routes, impairs immune surveillance, and mediates therapy resistance. A characteristic feature of the ovarian cancer TME is the role of resident host cells, in particular activated mesothelial cells, which line the peritoneal cavity in huge numbers, as well as adipocytes of the omentum, the preferred site of metastatic lesions. Another crucial factor is the peritoneal fluid, which enables the transcoelomic spread of tumor cells to other pelvic and peritoneal organs, and occurs at more advanced stages as a malignancy-associated effusion. This ascites is rich in tumor-promoting soluble factors, extracellular vesicles and detached cancer cells as well as large numbers of T cells, TAMs, and other host cells, which cooperate with resident host cells to support tumor progression and immune evasion. In this review, we summarize and discuss our current knowledge of the cellular and molecular interactions that govern this interplay with a focus on signaling networks formed by cytokines, lipids, and extracellular vesicles; the pathophysiologial roles of TAMs and T cells; the mechanism of transcoelomic metastasis; and the cell type selective processing of signals from the TME. PMID:28275576

  1. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-01-01

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment. PMID:27566585

  2. A High-Throughput Screening Model of the Tumor Microenvironment for Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Guha, Rajarshi; Lengyel, Ernst; Kenny, Hilary A; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the processes of tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. We have used a multilayered 3D primary cell culture model that reproduces the human ovarian cancer metastatic microenvironment to study the effect of the microenvironment on the pharmacological responses of different classes of drugs on cancer cell proliferation. A collection of oncology drugs was screened to identify compounds that inhibited the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells growing as monolayers or forming spheroids, on plastic and on a 3D microenvironment culture model of the omentum metastatic site, and also cells already in preformed spheroids. Target-based analysis of the pharmacological responses revealed that several classes of targets were more efficacious in cancer cells growing in the absence of the metastatic microenvironment, and other target classes were less efficacious in cancer cells in preformed spheres compared to forming spheroid cultures. These findings show that both the cellular context of the tumor microenvironment and cell adhesion mode have an essential role in cancer cell drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to perform screens for new drugs using model systems that more faithfully recapitulate the tissue composition at the site of tumor growth and metastasis.

  3. Role of the tumor microenvironment in mature B-cell lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Nathan H.; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Gribben, John; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ghia, Paolo; Bollard, Catherine; Ansell, Stephen; Curran, Michael; Wilson, Wyndham H.; O’Brien, Susan; Grant, Cliona; Little, Richard; Zenz, Thorsten; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Dunleavy, Kieron

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is the cellular and molecular environment in which the tumor exists and with which it continuously interacts. In B-cell lymphomas, this microenvironment is intriguing in that it plays critical roles in the regulation of tumor cell survival and proliferation, fostering immune escape as well as the development of treatment resistance. The purpose of this review is to summarize the proceedings of the Second Annual Summit on the Immune Microenvironment in Hematologic Malignancies that took place on September 11–12, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. We provide a timely overview of the composition and biological relevance of the cellular and molecular microenvironment interface and discuss the role of interactions between the microenvironment and neoplastic cells in a variety of B-cell lymphomas. In addition, we focus on various novel therapeutic strategies that target the tumor microenvironment, including agents that modulate B-cell receptor pathways and immune-checkpoints, chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:27132279

  4. Development and characterization of a microfluidic model of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Virumbrales-Muñoz, María; Lacueva, Alodia; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Botella, Pablo; Fernández, Eduardo; Doblare, Manuel; Allison, Simon J.; Phillips, Roger M.; Pardo, Julián; Fernandez, Luis J.; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The physical microenvironment of tumours is characterized by heterotypic cell interactions and physiological gradients of nutrients, waste products and oxygen. This tumour microenvironment has a major impact on the biology of cancer cells and their response to chemotherapeutic agents. Despite this, most in vitro cancer research still relies primarily on cells grown in 2D and in isolation in nutrient- and oxygen-rich conditions. Here, a microfluidic device is presented that is easy to use and enables modelling and study of the tumour microenvironment in real-time. The versatility of this microfluidic platform allows for different aspects of the microenvironment to be monitored and dissected. This is exemplified here by real-time profiling of oxygen and glucose concentrations inside the device as well as effects on cell proliferation and growth, ROS generation and apoptosis. Heterotypic cell interactions were also studied. The device provides a live ‘window’ into the microenvironment and could be used to study cancer cells for which it is difficult to generate tumour spheroids. Another major application of the device is the study of effects of the microenvironment on cellular drug responses. Some data is presented for this indicating the device’s potential to enable more physiological in vitro drug screening. PMID:27796335

  5. Development and characterization of a microfluidic model of the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Jose M; Virumbrales-Muñoz, María; Lacueva, Alodia; Lanuza, Pilar M; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Botella, Pablo; Fernández, Eduardo; Doblare, Manuel; Allison, Simon J; Phillips, Roger M; Pardo, Julián; Fernandez, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2016-10-31

    The physical microenvironment of tumours is characterized by heterotypic cell interactions and physiological gradients of nutrients, waste products and oxygen. This tumour microenvironment has a major impact on the biology of cancer cells and their response to chemotherapeutic agents. Despite this, most in vitro cancer research still relies primarily on cells grown in 2D and in isolation in nutrient- and oxygen-rich conditions. Here, a microfluidic device is presented that is easy to use and enables modelling and study of the tumour microenvironment in real-time. The versatility of this microfluidic platform allows for different aspects of the microenvironment to be monitored and dissected. This is exemplified here by real-time profiling of oxygen and glucose concentrations inside the device as well as effects on cell proliferation and growth, ROS generation and apoptosis. Heterotypic cell interactions were also studied. The device provides a live 'window' into the microenvironment and could be used to study cancer cells for which it is difficult to generate tumour spheroids. Another major application of the device is the study of effects of the microenvironment on cellular drug responses. Some data is presented for this indicating the device's potential to enable more physiological in vitro drug screening.

  6. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future. PMID:25143954

  7. Long-term hematopoietic stem cell damage in a murine model of the hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chua, Hui Lin; Plett, P Artur; Sampson, Carol H; Joshi, Mandar; Tabbey, Rebeka; Katz, Barry P; MacVittie, Thomas J; Orschell, Christie M

    2012-10-01

    Residual bone marrow damage (RBMD) persists for years following exposure to radiation and is believed to be due to decreased self-renewal potential of radiation-damaged hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Current literature has examined primarily sublethal doses of radiation and time points within a few months of exposure. In this study, the authors examined RBMD in mice surviving lethal doses of total body ionizing irradiation (TBI) in a murine model of the Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (H-ARS). Survivors were analyzed at various time points up to 19 mo post-TBI for hematopoietic function. The competitive bone marrow (BM) repopulating potential of 150 purified c-Kit+ Sca-1+ lineage- CD150+ cells (KSLCD150+) remained severely deficient throughout the study compared to KSLCD150+ cells from non-TBI age-matched controls. The minimal engraftment from these TBI HSCs is predominantly myeloid, with minimal production of lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo. All classes of blood cells as well as BM cellularity were significantly decreased in TBI mice, especially at later time points as mice aged. Primitive BM hematopoietic cells (KSLCD150+) displayed significantly increased cell cycling in TBI mice at all time points, which may be a physiological attempt to maintain HSC numbers in the post-irradiation state. Taken together, these data suggest that the increased cycling among primitive hematopoietic cells in survivors of lethal radiation may contribute to long-term HSC exhaustion and subsequent RBMD, exacerbated by the added insult of aging at later time points.

  8. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-05

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  9. Originator dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Manapat, Michael; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Bürger, Reinhard; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the origin of evolution. Evolution is based on replication, mutation, and selection. But how does evolution begin? When do chemical kinetics turn into evolutionary dynamics? We propose “prelife” and “prevolution” as the logical precursors of life and evolution. Prelife generates sequences of variable length. Prelife is a generative chemistry that proliferates information and produces diversity without replication. The resulting “prevolutionary dynamics” have mutation and selection. We propose an equation that allows us to investigate the origin of evolution. In one limit, this “originator equation” gives the classical selection equation. In the other limit, we obtain “prelife.” There is competition between life and prelife and there can be selection for or against replication. Simple prelife equations with uniform rate constants have the property that longer sequences are exponentially less frequent than shorter ones. But replication can reverse such an ordering. As the replication rate increases, some longer sequences can become more frequent than shorter ones. Thus, replication can lead to “reversals” in the equilibrium portraits. We study these reversals, which mark the transition from prelife to life in our model. If the replication potential exceeds a critical value, then life replicates into existence. PMID:18996397

  10. Observations on the contributions of environmental restraints and innate stem cell ability to hematopoietic regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Duke-Cohan, J.S.

    1988-03-01

    A competitive repopulation assay utilizing chromosome markers was used to assay the reconstituting potential of hematopoietic populations. The test populations consisted of tibial murine marrow locally irradiated with doses ranging from 1.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy and of marrow generated from either murine splenic or marrow stem cells. The purpose of this assay was to assess the innate proliferative potential and microenvironmental influences on the ability to repopulate. Regardless of origin, spleen repopulating ability consistently agreed with spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-s) content. Doses of radiation from 5 Gy to 8.5 Gy diminished, by a factor of 2, the ability to repopulate marrow despite maintenance of CFU-s levels. Marrow generated from splenic stem cells had one-fifth the repopulating ability of marrow derived from marrow stem cells, even though CFU-s levels were equivalent. The results imply that the splenic environment can only maintain stem cells at the level of the CFU-s, even if the stem cells were originally of higher quality, and that their original potential cannot be regained in a marrow environment. Nevertheless, the marrow can maintain more primitive stem cells, but this reserve is drained to support CFU-s levels.

  11. Assessing the Influence of Different Comorbidities Indexes on the Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Bittencourt, Henrique; Rezende, Suely Meireles

    2015-01-01

    Although the application of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) has enabled better prediction of transplant-related mortality (TRM) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (AHSCT), data from developing countries are scarce. This study prospectively evaluated the HCT-CI and the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation (ACE-27), in its original and in a modified version, as predictors of post-transplant complications in adults undergoing a first related or unrelated AHSCT in Brazil. Both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) as graft sources were included. We analyzed the cumulative incidence of granulocyte and platelet recovery, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse and transplant-related mortality, and rates of event-free survival and overall survival. Ninety-nine patients were assessed. Median age was 38 years (18–65 years); HCT-CI ≥ 3 accounted for only 8% of cases; hematologic malignancies comprised 75.8% of the indications for AHSCT. There was no association between the HCT-CI or the original or modified ACE-27 with TRM or any other studied outcomes after AHSCT. These results show that, in the population studied, none of the comorbidity indexes seem to be associated with AHSCT outcomes. A significantly low frequency of high-risk (HCT-CI ≥ 3) in this Brazilian population might justify these results. PMID:26394228

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative sources in adults with high-risk acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco; Reisner, Yair; Martelli, Massimo F

    2004-01-01

    Since 75% of patients with high-risk acute leukemia do not have a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling, alternative sources for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are matched unrelated donors (MUD), unrelated umbilical cord blood (UD-UCB) and one HLA haplotype mismatched family members (haploidentical). The chance of finding a suitable donor in the international voluntary donor registries is limited by frequency of the HLA phenotype and the time required to identify the right donor from a potential panel, to establish eligibility and to harvest the cells. In adult MUD recipients, event-free survival ranges up to 50% and refers only to patients who undergo transplant, without taking into account those who do not find a donor. Umbilical cord blood offers the advantages of easy procurement, the absence of risks to donors, the reduced risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability of cryopreserved samples and acceptance of mismatches at two of the six antigens. Although UD-UCB transplantation is a viable option for children, it is seldom considered for adults. The great divergency between body weight and the number of hematopoietic cells in a standard cord blood unit, particularly if associated with a two-antigen mismatch, increases the risk of graft failure and delays hematopoietic reconstitution. Work on full-haplotype mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years. Originally, outcome in leukemia patients was disappointing because of high incidence of severe graft-vs.-host disease in T-replete transplants and high rejection rates in T-cell-depleted transplants. The breakthrough came with the use of a megadose of T-cell-depleted progenitor cells after a high-intensity conditioning regimen. Treating end-stage patients inevitably confounded clinical outcome in the early pilot studies. Today, high-risk acute leukemia patients are treated at less advanced stages of disease, receive a reasonably well tolerated conditioning

  13. Origin, Development, and Homeostasis of Tissue-resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are versatile cells of the hematopoietic system that display remarkable functional diversity encompassing innate immune responses, tissue development, and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages are present in almost all tissues of the body and display distinct location-specific phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Recent studies also demonstrate distinct origins of tissue-resident macrophages. This emerging picture of ontological, functional, and phenotypic heterogeneity within tissue macrophages has altered our understanding of these cells, which play important roles in many human diseases. In this review, we discuss the different origins of tissue macrophages, the transcription factors regulating their development, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis at steady state. PMID:25319325

  14. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra; Montini, Eugenio; Lorioli, Laura; Cesani, Martina; Fumagalli, Francesca; Plati, Tiziana; Baldoli, Cristina; Martino, Sabata; Calabria, Andrea; Canale, Sabrina; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Vallanti, Giuliana; Biasco, Luca; Leo, Simone; Kabbara, Nabil; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Rizzo, William B; Mehta, Nalini A L; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Boelens, Jaap J; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Dow, David J; Schmidt, Manfred; Assanelli, Andrea; Neduva, Victor; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gardner, Jason; von Kalle, Christof; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Rovelli, Attilio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Sessa, Maria; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-08-23

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) deficiency. Patients with MLD exhibit progressive motor and cognitive impairment and die within a few years of symptom onset. We used a lentiviral vector to transfer a functional ARSA gene into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from three presymptomatic patients who showed genetic, biochemical, and neurophysiological evidence of late infantile MLD. After reinfusion of the gene-corrected HSCs, the patients showed extensive and stable ARSA gene replacement, which led to high enzyme expression throughout hematopoietic lineages and in cerebrospinal fluid. Analyses of vector integrations revealed no evidence of aberrant clonal behavior. The disease did not manifest or progress in the three patients 7 to 21 months beyond the predicted age of symptom onset. These findings indicate that extensive genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis can be achieved with lentiviral vectors and that this approach may offer therapeutic benefit for MLD patients.

  15. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

  16. NRF2 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic death

    PubMed Central

    Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Fractionated, high-dose total body irradiation (TBI) is used therapeutically to myeloablate and immune suppress patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Acute exposure to ionizing radiation can have fatal effects on the hematopoietic and immune systems. Currently, therapies aimed at ameliorating ionizing radiation–associated toxicities are limited. In the February 2014 issue of the JCI, Kim and colleagues demonstrated that induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (NRF2) enhances HSC regeneration and increases survival following ionizing radiation exposure in mice. The results of this study suggest that NRF2 is a novel potential target for the development of therapeutics aimed at mitigating the toxicities of ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:24569364

  17. Expression of ets family genes in hematopoietic-cells.

    PubMed

    Romanospica, V; Suzuki, H; Georgiou, P; Chen, S; Ascione, R; Papas, T; Bhat, N

    1994-03-01

    We have examined the expression of the ets family of transcription factors in different types of hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrate that several members of the ets gene family are expressed differentially in hematopoietic cells. During phorbol ester induced differentiation of HL60 cells, ETS2, PEA3, as well as GABPalpha and GABPbeta mRNAs are coordinately induced. During the activation of T-cells, ETS2 proteins are induced; however, the expression of the ETS1 and ERGB gene products are reduced. These results demonstrate that the regulation of ets family of genes is complex and depends on cell type. This observation leads to the conclusion that the regulation of ets target genes, will be dependent, in part, upon the type of ets genes expressed in each particular cell type.

  18. [Autotransplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Correale, J; Campestri, R; Koziner, B

    1999-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease exhibiting great clinical variability. For control of its primary and secondary progressive variants, treatment has met with limited success. In recent years, increasing experience has been gained with the administration of high dose chemotherapy supported by the autologous infusion of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), in some instances depleted of T cells. The European and International Registry of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Autoimmune Diseases include 43 MS patients. BEAM was the most frequently used conditioning therapy. Treatment related mortality was 7%. The actuarial disease free survival and the overall projected survival at 38 months were 85% and 90% respectively. The inclusion of an increasing number of MS patients into these treatment programs and the growing submission of cases to the Registries will provide useful information to determine if the initial enthusiasm generated by this approach for the control of primary and secondary progressive forms of MS is justified.

  19. Transcription factor-mediated reprogramming toward hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Wataru; Rossi, Derrick J

    2015-01-01

    De novo generation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from renewable cell types has been a long sought-after but elusive goal in regenerative medicine. Paralleling efforts to guide pluripotent stem cell differentiation by manipulating developmental cues, substantial progress has been made recently toward HSC generation via combinatorial transcription factor (TF)-mediated fate conversion, a paradigm established by Yamanaka's induction of pluripotency in somatic cells by mere four TFs. This review will integrate the recently reported strategies to directly convert a variety of starting cell types toward HSCs in the context of hematopoietic transcriptional regulation and discuss how these findings could be further developed toward the ultimate generation of therapeutic human HSCs. PMID:25712209

  20. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  1. Expanding Applications of the Nano Intravital Device as a Platform for Exploring Tumor Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgen, Michael R.

    The tumor microenvironment has been demonstrated to be a key determinant in the progression of cancer. Unfortunately, the mechanisms behind the different microenvironments (cytokine gradients, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, etc) have not been fully elucidated. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to targeted, individualized therapy to prevent metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) is a microfabricated, implantable device designed to initiate specific microenvironments in vivo so that the time course of the effects can be observed. With both spatial and temporal control over the induced environments, the affected regions of the tumor can be compared to the rest of the tumor. The NANIVID was first used to establish cytokine gradients to monitor the migration of invasive cancer cells. The three projects that comprise this work expand the applications of the NANIVID to establish the device as a robust platform for investigating tumor microenvironment interactions. The first project released chemical mimics from the device to induce the cellular hypoxic response in tumors to determine how hypoxia affects the fate of disseminated tumor cells. The second project used the NANIVID in combination with an atomic force microscope to investigate the altered mechanics of migrating invasive cancer cells. The final project was to develop a cell counter to monitor the isolation of the invasive subpopulation of cells that were drawn into the device using a chemoattractant. These three projects demonstrate the potential of the NANIVID as a platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Orchestrating the Tumor Microenvironment to Improve Survival for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Normalization, Not Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Whatcott, Clifford J.; Hanl, Haiyong; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The microenvironment of pancreatic cancer could be one of the “perfect storms” that support the growth of a cancer. Indeed, pancreatic cancer may be the poster child of a problem with the microenvironment. In this article, we review the rationale and attempts to date on modifying or targeting structural proteins in the microenvironment including hyaluronan (HA) (in primary and metastases), collagen, and SPARC (secreted protein, acidic, and rich in cysteine). Indeed, working in this area has produced a regimen that improves survival for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (nab-paclitaxel + gemcitabine). In addition, in initial clinical trials, PEGylated hyaluronidase appears promising. We also review a new approach that is different than targeting/destroying the microenvironment and that is orchestrating, reengineering, reprogramming, or normalizing the microenvironment (including normalizing structural proteins, normalizing an immunologically tumor-friendly environment to a less friendly environment, reversing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and so on). We believe this will be most effectively done by agents that have global effects on transcription. There is initial evidence that this can be done by agents such as vitamin D derivatives and other new agents. There is no doubt these opportunities can now be tried in the clinic with hopefully beneficial effects. PMID:26222082

  3. Natural product derivative BIO promotes recovery after myocardial infarction via unique modulation of the cardiac microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sook; Jeong, Hye-Yun; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Woong-Hee; Cho, Haaglim; Um, JungIn; Seo, Youngha; Kang, Wan Seok; Jin, Suk-Won; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2016-08-11

    The cardiac microenvironment includes cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and macrophages, which regulate remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting this microenvironment is a novel therapeutic approach for MI. We found that the natural compound derivative, BIO ((2'Z,3'E)-6-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime) modulated the cardiac microenvironment to exert a therapeutic effect on MI. Using a series of co-culture studies, BIO induced proliferation in cardiomyocytes and inhibited proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. BIO produced multiple anti-fibrotic effects in cardiac fibroblasts. In macrophages, BIO inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Significantly, BIO modulated the molecular crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and differentiating macrophages to induce polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. In the optically transparent zebrafish-based heart failure model, BIO induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and completely recovered survival rate. BIO is a known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor, but these effects could not be recapitulated using the classical inhibitor, lithium chloride; indicating novel therapeutic effects of BIO. We identified the mechanism of BIO as differential modulation of p27 protein expression and potent induction of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. In a rat MI model, BIO reduced fibrosis and improved cardiac performance. Histological analysis revealed modulation of the cardiac microenvironment by BIO, with increased presence of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that BIO produces unique effects in the cardiac microenvironment to promote recovery post-MI.

  4. Interactions of ion transporters and channels with cancer cell metabolism and the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anne Poder; Moreira, José M. A.; Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2014-01-01

    Major changes in intra- and extracellular pH homoeostasis are shared features of most solid tumours. These changes stem in large part from the metabolic shift of most cancer cells towards glycolytic metabolism and other processes associated with net acid production. In combination with oncogenic signalling and impact from factors in the tumour microenvironment, this upregulates acid-extruding plasma membrane transport proteins which maintain intracellular pH normal or even more alkaline compared with that of normal cells, while in turn acidifying the external microenvironment. Mounting evidence strongly indicates that this contributes significantly to cancer development by favouring e.g. cancer cell migration, invasion and chemotherapy resistance. Finally, while still under-explored, it seems likely that non-cancer cells in the tumour microenvironment also exhibit altered pH regulation and that this may contribute to their malignant properties. Thus, the physical tumour microenvironment and the cancer and stromal cells within it undergo important reciprocal interactions which modulate the tumour pH profile, in turn severely impacting on the course of cancer progression. Here, we summarize recent knowledge of tumour metabolism and the tumour microenvironment, placing it in the context of tumour pH regulation, and discuss how interfering with these properties may be exploited clinically. PMID:24493746

  5. CHAPTER 23 Demystifying the Effects of a Three-Dimensional Microenvironment in Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kandice R.; Leight, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis are dependent on a complex dialogue between multiple cell types and chemical and physical cues in the surrounding microenvironment. The emergence of engineered three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs and the development of tractable methods to recapitulate the native tissue microenvironment ex vivo has led to a deeper understanding of tissue-specific behavior. However, much remains unclear about how the microenvironment and aberrations therein directly affect tissue morphogenesis and behavior. Elucidating the role of the microenvironment in directing tissue-specific behavior will aid in the development of surrogate tissues and tractable approaches to diagnose and treat chronic-debilitating diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Toward this goal, 3D organotypic models have been developed to clarify the mechanisms of epithelial morphogenesis and the subsequent maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we describe the application of these 3D culture models to illustrate how the microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating mammary tissue function and signaling, and discuss the rationale for applying precisely defined organotypic culture assays to study epithelial cell behavior. Experimental methods are provided to generate and manipulate 3D organotypic cultures to study the effect of matrix stiffness and matrix dimensionality on epithelial tissue morphology and signaling. We end by discussing technical limitations of currently available systems and by presenting opportunities for improvement. PMID:17613324

  6. The bone marrow microenvironment as a sanctuary for minimal residual disease in CML

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Tolentino, Joel; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Bcr-abl kinase inhibitors have provided proof of principal that targeted therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer. However, despite the success of these agents in treating chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the majority of patients continue to present with minimal residual disease contained within the bone marrow microenvironment. These clinical observations suggest that the bone marrow microenvironment may provide survival signals that contribute to the failure to eliminate minimal residual disease. The bone marrow microenvironment is comprised of multiple sub-domains which vary in cellular composition and gradients of soluble factors and matrix composition. Experimental evidence indicates that exposure of tumor cells to either bone marrow derived soluble factors or matrixes can confer a multi-drug resistance phenotype. Together, these data indicate that targeting such pathways may be a viable approach for increasing the efficacy of chemotherapy. Moreover, we propose that personalized medicine must go beyond understanding predictive models inherent to tumors but rather build predictive models that consider diversity in response due to interactions with the tumor microenvironment. This review will focus on CML, however, understanding the contribution of the bone marrow microenvironment could contribute to rationale combination therapy in other types of leukemia, multiple myeloma and solid tumors which metastasize to the bone. PMID:20382130

  7. Nanofiber Expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, F; Allahverdi, A; Nasiri, H; Azad, M; Kalantari, N; Soleimani, M; Zare-Zardini, H

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was the ex vivo expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood hematopoietic stem cells on biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds. Materials and Methods CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were separated from umbilical cord blood using MidiMacs (positive selection) system by means of monocolonal antibody CD133 (microbeads); subsequently, flowcytometry method was done to assess the purity of separated cells. Isolated cells were cultured on plate (2 Dimensional) and fibronectin conjugated polyethersulfon nanofiber scaffold, simultaneously (3 Dimensional). Colony assay test was performed to show colonization ability of expanded cells. Results Cell count analysis revealed that expansion of hematopoietic stem cells in 2dimensional (2D) environment was greater than 3dimensional (3D) condition (p= 0.01). Assessment