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Sample records for heme oxygenase-1 protein

  1. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group.

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    JOZKOWICZ, ALICJA; WAS, HALINA; DULAK, JOZEF

    2007-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and ferrous iron. It participates in maintaining cellular homeostasis and plays an important protective role in the tissues by reducing oxidative injury, attenuating the inflammatory response, inhibiting cell apoptosis, and regulating cell proliferation. HO-1 is also an important proangiogenic mediator. Most studies have focused on the role of HO-1 in cardiovascular diseases, in which its significant, beneficial activity is well recognized. A growing body of evidence indicates, however, that HO-1 activation may play a role in carcinogenesis and can potently influence the growth and metastasis of tumors. HO-1 is very often upregulated in tumor tissues, and its expression is further increased in response to therapies. Although the exact effect can be tissue specific, HO-1 can be regarded as an enzyme facilitating tumor progression. Accordingly, inhibition of HO-1 can be suggested as a potential therapeutic approach sensitizing tumors to radiation, chemotherapy, or photodynamic therapy. PMID:17822372

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  4. Glutathione depletion induces heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) mRNA and protein in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J F; Maines, M D

    1993-04-01

    In mammalian systems, the heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes HO-1 (HSP32) and HO-2 oxidatively cleave the heme molecule to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. Although HO-1 is inducible by various chemicals in systemic organs and cell culture systems, this communication reports for the first time the induction of this stress protein and its transcript by a chemical in the brain. In addition, this study demonstrates expression of HO-1 in select populations of cells in the brain in response to GSH depletion. Specifically, treatment of adult rats with diethyl maleate (DEM; 4.7 mmol/kg) caused a pronounced decrease in brain GSH content within 1 h. GSH levels remained significantly depressed for at least 24 h postinjection. Northern blot analysis of brain poly(A)+ mRNA following DEM treatment revealed on the average a sixfold increase in the 1.8-kb HO-1 mRNA level compared with that of controls; concomitant with this change was a decrease in GSH levels. Total brain HO activity was not significantly altered along with the increase in HO-1 mRNA level. The increase in transcription of HO-1 was a direct response to GSH depletion, as judged by the observation that treatment of neonatal rats with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) (3 mmol/kg, twice daily, for 2 days), a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, caused a marked depression in total brain GSH level and a concomitant increase in brain 1.8-kb HO-1 mRNA content. The magnitude of the increase was up to approximately 11.5-fold that of the control level, as evidenced by northern blot analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Differential heme release from various hemoglobin redox states and the upregulation of cellular heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Tigist; Jana, Sirsendu; Meng, Fantao; Alayash, Abdu I

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of the oxidative pathways mediated by free hemoglobin (Hb), the precise contribution of its highly reactive redox forms to tissue and organ toxicities remains ambiguous. Heme, a key degradation byproduct of Hb oxidation, has recently been recognized as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule, able to trigger inflammatory responses. Equally damaging is the interaction of the highly redox active forms of Hb with other biological molecules. We determined the kinetics of heme loss from individual Hb redox states-ferrous (Fe(2+)), ferric (Fe(3+)), and ferryl (Fe(4+))-using two different heme receptor proteins: hemopexin (Hxp), a naturally occurring heme scavenger in plasma, and a double mutant (H64Y/V86F), apomyoglobin (ApoMb), which avidly binds heme released from Hb. We show for the first time that ferric Hb (Fe(3+)) loses heme at rates substantially higher than that of ferryl Hb (Fe(4+)). This was also supported by a higher expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when ferric Hb was added to cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells (E10). The reported cytotoxicity of Hb may therefore be attributed to a combination of accelerated heme loss from the ferric form and protein radical formation associated with ferryl Hb. Targeted therapeutic interventions can therefore be designed to curb specific oxidative pathways of Hb in hemolytic anemias and when Hb is used as an oxygen-carrying therapeutic. PMID:27642551

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  8. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)—a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin—has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  9. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  10. Association of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Polymorphisms with Diabetes and Obesity in Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica Saraí; González-Reyes, Susana; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha Eunice; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Barquera, Rodrigo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear factor-erythroid 2- (NF-E2-) related factor 2 (Nrf2) is abated and its ability to reduce oxidative stress is impaired in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore if polymorphisms in Nrf2 and target genes are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican mestizo subjects. The rs1800566 of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene, rs7211 of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) gene, rs2071749 of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene, and the rs6721961 and the rs2364723 from Nrf2 gene were genotyped in 627 diabetic subjects and 1020 controls. The results showed that the rs7211 polymorphism is a protective factor against obesity in nondiabetic subjects (CC + CT versus TT, OR = 0.40, P = 0.005) and in women (CC versus CT + TT, OR = 0.7, P = 0.016). TT carriers had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower body mass index. The rs2071749 was positively associated with obesity (AA versus AG + GG, OR = 1.25, P = 0.026). Finally, the rs6721961 was negatively associated with diabetes in men (CC versus CA + AA, OR = 0.62, P = 0.003). AA carriers showed lower glucose concentrations. No association was found for rs1800566 and rs2364723 polymorphisms. In conclusion, the presence of Nrf2 and related genes polymorphisms are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican patients. PMID:27274779

  11. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Park, Ga-Young; Bang, Soo Young; Park, Sun Young; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, YoungHee

    2014-01-01

    Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4). CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation. PMID:24839356

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Myeloid Cell Trafficking in AKI.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Kamal, Ahmed I; Boddu, Ravindra; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C; Rangarajan, Sunil; Chen, Bo; Curtis, Lisa M; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is mediated by a complex cascade of events, including the immune response, that occur secondary to injury to renal epithelial cells. We tested the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which is protective in ischemia-reperfusion injury, regulates trafficking of myeloid-derived immune cells in the kidney. Age-matched male wild-type (HO-1(+/+)), HO-1-knockout (HO-1(-/-)), and humanized HO-1-overexpressing (HBAC) mice underwent bilateral renal ischemia for 10 minutes. Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulted in significantly worse renal structure and function and increased mortality in HO-1(-/-) mice. In addition, there were more macrophages (CD45(+) CD11b(hi)F4/80(lo)) and neutrophils (CD45(+) CD11b(hi) MHCII(-) Gr-1(hi)) in HO-1(-/-) kidneys than in sham and HO-1(+/+) control kidneys subjected to ischemia-reperfusion. However, ischemic injury resulted in a significant decrease in the intrarenal resident dendritic cell (DC; CD45(+)MHCII(+)CD11b(lo)F4/80(hi)) population in HO-1(-/-) kidneys compared with controls. Syngeneic transplant experiments utilizing green fluorescent protein-positive HO-1(+/+) or HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys and green fluorescent protein-negative HO-1(+/+) recipients confirmed increased migration of the resident DC population from HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys, compared to HO-1(+/+) donor kidneys, to the peripheral lymphoid organs. This effect on renal DC migration was corroborated in myeloid-specific HO-1(-/-) mice subjected to bilateral ischemia. These mice also displayed impaired renal recovery and increased fibrosis at day 7 after injury. These results highlight an important role for HO-1 in orchestrating the trafficking of myeloid cells in AKI, which may represent a key pathway for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1: the "emerging molecule" has arrived.

    PubMed

    Morse, Danielle; Choi, Augustine M K

    2002-07-01

    Organisms on our planet have evolved in an oxidizing environment that is intrinsically inimical to life, and cells have been forced to devise means of protecting themselves. One of the defenses used most widely in nature is the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This enzyme performs the seemingly lackluster function of catabolizing heme to generate bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and free iron. Remarkably, however, the activity of this enzyme results in profound changes in cells' abilities to protect themselves against oxidative injury. HO-1 has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and antiproliferative effects, and it is now known to have salutary effects in diseases as diverse as atherosclerosis and sepsis. The mechanism by which HO-1 confers its protective effect is as yet poorly understood, but this area of invetsigation is active and rapidly evolving. This review highlights current information on the function of HO-1 and its relevance to specific pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  15. Generation and Characterization of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Transgenic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J.; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D.; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Expressing Heme Oxygenase-1 Reverse Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Olin D.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Chang, Mun Seog; Vergadi, Eleni; Lee, Changjin; Aslam, Muhammad; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Liu, Xianlan; Baveja, Rajiv; Kourembanas, Stella

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a serious disease, and, while current treatments may prolong and improve quality of life, search for novel and effective therapies is warranted. Using genetically-modified mouse lines, we tested the ability of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs), to treat chronic hypoxia-induced PAH. Recipient mice were exposed for five weeks to normobaric hypoxia (8%–10% O2), MSC preparations were delivered through jugular vein injection and their effect on PAH was assessed after two additional weeks in hypoxia. Donor MSCs derived from wild-type (WT) mice or Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) null mice (Hmox1KO) conferred partial protection from PAH when transplanted into WT or Hmox1KO recipients, whereas treatment with MSCs isolated from transgenic mice harboring a human HO-1 transgene under the control of surfactant protein C promoter (SHO1 line) reversed established disease in WT recipients. SH01-MSC treatment of Hmox1KO animals, which develop right ventricular (RV) infarction under prolonged hypoxia, resulted in normal RV systolic pressure, significant reduction of RV hypertrophy and prevention of RV infarction. Donor MSCs isolated from a bitransgenic mouse line with doxycycline-inducible, lung-specific expression of HO-1 exhibited similar therapeutic efficacy only upon doxycycline treatment of the recipients. In vitro experiments indicate that potential mechanisms of MSC action include modulation of hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation. Cumulative, our results demonstrate that MSCs ameliorate chronic hypoxia – induced PAH and their efficacy is highly augmented by lung-specific HO-1 expression in the transplanted cells, suggesting an interplay between HO-1 dependent and HO-1 independent protective pathways. PMID:20957739

  17. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in atrial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Lung-An; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Chen, Wei-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium constitutes the main feature of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is characterized by increased oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potent anti-oxidant system that may provide protection against various oxidative stress-related diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HO-1 has a protective effect on AF-related remodeling. Cultured atrium-derived myocytes (HL-1 cell line) were used to evaluate tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, structural, and electrical remodeling. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was utilized to assess collagen (a main fibrosis-related protein) expression in atrial fibroblasts. Tachypacing in HL-1 myocytes and treatment of atrial fibroblasts with TGF-β enhanced the expression of HO-1, both of which were mediated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2. Over-expression of HO-1 in HL-1 cells attenuated tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, down-regulation of L-type calcium channel, and shortening of action potential duration. Furthermore, HO-1 over-expression in atrial fibroblasts blocked the up-regulation of collagen by TGF-β, implicating a protective role of HO-1 in structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium. In vivo, HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited a higher degree of oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, and collagen deposit in their atria than wild-type mice. Moreover, burst atrial pacing induced a greater susceptibility to AF in HO-1(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. In conclusion, a negative-feedback regulation of HO-1 in activated atrial myocytes and fibroblasts may provide protection against AF-related remodeling and AF development. PMID:27562817

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  1. Interaction of nitric oxide with human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; Lu, Shen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2003-01-24

    NO and CO may complement each other as signaling molecules in some physiological situations. We have examined the binding of NO to human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an enzyme that oxidizes heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron, to determine whether inhibition of hHO-1 by NO can contribute to the signaling interplay of NO and CO. An Fe(3+)-NO hHO-1-heme complex is formed with NO or the NO donors NOC9 or 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide.sodium salt. Resonance Raman spectroscopy shows that ferric hHO-1-heme forms a 6-coordinated, low spin complex with NO. The nu(N-O) vibration of this complex detected by Fourier transform IR is only 4 cm(-1) lower than that of the corresponding metmyoglobin (met-Mb) complex but is broader, suggesting a greater degree of ligand conformational freedom. The Fe(3+)-NO complex of hHO-1 is much more stable than that of met-Mb. Stopped-flow studies indicate that k(on) for formation of the hHO-1-heme Fe(3+)-NO complex is approximately 50-times faster, and k(off) 10 times slower, than for met-Mb, resulting in K(d) = 1.4 microm for NO. NO thus binds 500-fold more tightly to ferric hHO-1-heme than to met-Mb. The hHO-1 mutations E29A, G139A, D140A, S142A, G143A, G143F, and K179A/R183A do not significantly diminish the tight binding of NO, indicating that NO binding is not highly sensitive to mutations of residues that normally stabilize the distal water ligand. As expected from the K(d) value, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited upon exposure to pathologically, and possibly physiologically, relevant concentrations of NO. Inhibition of hHO-1 by NO may contribute to the pleiotropic responses to NO and CO.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages controls prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Li, Mailin; Csizmadia, Eva; Döme, Balazs; Johansson, Martin; Persson, Jenny Liao; Seth, Pankaj; Otterbein, Leo; Wegiel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune cells strongly influence cancer growth and progression via multiple mechanisms including regulation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated whether expression of the metabolic gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in tumor microenvironment imparts significant effects on prostate cancer progression. We showed that HO-1 is expressed in MARCO-positive macrophages in prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts and human prostate cancers. We demonstrated that macrophage specific (LyzM-Cre) conditional deletion of HO-1 suppressed growth of PC3 xenografts in vivo and delayed progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in TRAMP mice. However, initiation and progression of cancer xenografts in the presence of macrophages lacking HO-1 resulted in loss of E-cadherin, a known marker of poor prognosis as well as EMT. Application of CO, a product of HO-1 catalysis, increased levels of E-cadherin in the adherens junctions between cancer cells. We further showed that HO-1-driven expression of E-cadherin in cancer cells cultured in the presence of macrophages is dependent on mitochondrial activity of cancer cells. In summary, these data suggest that HO-1-derived CO from tumor-associated macrophages influences, in part, E-cadherin expression and thus tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26418896

  3. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  4. Hydroxylamine and hydrazine bind directly to the heme iron of the heme-heme oxygenase-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sugishima, Masakazu; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Palmer, Graham; Noguchi, Masato

    2004-07-01

    We investigated whether or not hydroxylamine (HA) and hydrazine (HZ) interact with heme bound to heme oxygenase-1. Anaerobic addition of either HA or HZ to the ferric heme-enzyme complex produced a low-spin heme species. Titration studies at different pHs revealed that the neutral form of each of HA and HZ selectively binds to the heme with dissociation constants of 9.8 and 1.8 mM, respectively. Electron spin resonance analysis suggested that the nitrogen atom of each amine is coordinated to the ferric heme iron. With a concentrated solution of the heme-enzyme complex, however, another species of HA binding appeared, in which the oxygen atom of HA is coordinated to the iron. This species showed an unusual low-spin signal which is similar to that of the ferric hydroperoxide species in the heme oxygenase reaction.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 is a modulator of inflammation and vaso-occlusion in transgenic sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, John D.; Mahaseth, Hemachandra; Welch, Thomas E.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hebbel, Robert P.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic sickle mice expressing βS hemoglobin have activated vascular endothelium that exhibits enhanced expression of NF-κB and adhesion molecules that promote vascular stasis in sickle, but not in normal, mice in response to hypoxia/reoxygenation. Sickle mice hemolyze rbcs in vivo as demonstrated by increased reticulocyte counts, plasma hemoglobin and bilirubin, and reduced plasma haptoglobin. The heme content is elevated in sickle organs, which promotes vascular inflammation and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Treatment of sickle mice with hemin further increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and inhibits hypoxia/reoxygenation–induced stasis, leukocyte-endothelium interactions, and NF-κB, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression. Heme oxygenase inhibition by tin protoporphyrin exacerbates stasis in sickle mice. Furthermore, treatment of sickle mice with the heme oxygenase enzymatic product carbon monoxide or biliverdin inhibits stasis and NF-κB, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression. Local administration of heme oxygenase-1 adenovirus to subcutaneous skin increases heme oxygenase-1 and inhibits hypoxia/reoxygenation–induced stasis in the skin of sickle mice. Heme oxygenase-1 plays a vital role in the inhibition of vaso-occlusion in transgenic sickle mice. PMID:16485041

  6. Natural heme oxygenase-1 inducers in hepatobiliary function

    PubMed Central

    Volti, Giovanni Li; Sacerdoti, David; Giacomo, Claudia Di; Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Scacco, Antonio; Murabito, Paolo; Biondi, Antonio; Basile, Francesco; Gazzolo, Diego; Abella, Raul; Frigiola, Alessandro; Galvano, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological effects of natural antioxidants, their extracts or their major active components, have been reported in recent decades. Most of these compounds are characterized by a phenolic structure, similar to that of α-tocopherol, and present antioxidant properties that have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenols may increase the capacity of endogenous antioxidant defences and modulate the cellular redox state. Changes in the cellular redox state may have wide-ranging consequences for cellular growth and differentiation. The majority of in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far have attributed the protective effect of bioactive polyphenols to their chemical reactivity toward free radicals and their capacity to prevent the oxidation of important intracellular components. However, in recent years a possible novel aspect in the mode of action of these compounds has been suggested; that is, the ultimate stimulation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is likely to account for the established and powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties of these polyphenols. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression by means of natural compounds contributes to protection against liver damage in various experimental models. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against various stressors in several pathological conditions. PMID:18985801

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes the persistence of Leishmania chagasi infection

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Nívea F.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Quintela, Graziele C.; Andrade, Daniela; Abánades, Daniel R.; Melo, Enaldo V.; Silva, Angela M.; Brodyskn, Cláudia I.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina; Soares, Rodrigo P.; Almeida, Roque P.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Borges, Valéria M.

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains a major public health problem worldwide. This disease is highly associated with chronic inflammation and a lack of the cellular immune responses against Leishmania. It is important to identify major factors driving the successful establishment of the Leishmania infection in order to develop better tools for the disease control. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme triggered by cellular stress, and its role in VL has not been investigated. Herein, we evaluated the role of HO-1 in the infection by Leishmania infantum chagasi, the causative agent of VL cases in Brazil. We found that L. chagasi infection or lipophosphoglycan (LPG) isolated from promastigotes triggered HO-1 production by murine macrophages. Interestingly, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), a HO-1 inductor, increased the parasite burden in both mouse and human derived macrophages. Upon L. chagasi infection, macrophages from Hmox1 knockout mice presented significantly lower parasite loads when compared to those from wild type mice. Furthermore, upregulation of HO-1 by CoPP diminished the production of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species by infected murine macrophages and increased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression in human monocytes. Finally, patients with VL presented higher systemic concentrations of HO-1 than healthy individuals and this increase of HO-1 was reduced after antileishmanial treatment, suggesting that HO-1 is associated with disease susceptibility. Our data argue that HO-1 has a critical role in the L. chagasi infection and is strongly associated with the inflammatory imbalance during VL. Manipulation of HO-1 pathways during VL could serve as an adjunctive therapeutic approach. PMID:22461696

  8. A heme oxygenase-1 transducer model of degenerative and developmental brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Hyman M; Song, Wei

    2015-03-09

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In "stressed" astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1: transducer of pathological brain iron sequestration under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Hyman M

    2004-03-01

    Mechanisms responsible for the pathological deposition of redox-active brain iron in human neurological disorders remain incompletely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32-kDa stress protein that degrades heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. In this chapter, we review evidence that (1) HO-1 is overexpressed in CNS tissues affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and other degenerative and nondegenerative CNS diseases; (2) the pro-oxidant effects of dopamine, hydrogen peroxide, beta-amyloid, and proinflammatory cytokines stimulate HO-1 expression in some of these conditions; and (3) upregulation of HO-1 in astrocytes exacerbates intracellular oxidative stress and promotes sequestration of nontransferrin-derived iron by the mitochondrial compartment. A model is presented implicating glial HO-1 induction as a "final common pathway" leading to pathological iron sequestration and mitochondrial insufficiency in a host of human CNS disorders.

  10. Mitochondria-targeted heme oxygenase-1 decreases oxidative stress in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Traylor, Amie; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Johnson, Michelle S; Benavides, Gloria A; Ricart, Karina; Boddu, Ravindra; Moore, Ray D; Landar, Aimee; Barnes, Stephen; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Agarwal, Anupam

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria are both a source and target of the actions of reactive oxygen species and possess a complex system of inter-related antioxidants that control redox signaling and protect against oxidative stress. Interestingly, the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is not present in the mitochondria despite the fact that the organelle is the site of heme synthesis and contains multiple heme proteins. Detoxification of heme is an important protective mechanism since the reaction of heme with hydrogen peroxide generates pro-oxidant ferryl species capable of propagating oxidative stress and ultimately cell death. We therefore hypothesized that a mitochondrially localized HO-1 would be cytoprotective. To test this, we generated a mitochondria-targeted HO-1 cell line by transfecting HEK293 cells with a plasmid construct containing the manganese superoxide dismutase mitochondria leader sequence fused to HO-1 cDNA (Mito-HO-1). Nontargeted HO-1-overexpressing cells were generated by transfecting HO-1 cDNA (HO-1) or empty vector (Vector). Mitochondrial localization of HO-1 with increased HO activity in the mitochondrial fraction of Mito-HO-1 cells was observed, but a significant decrease in the expression of heme-containing proteins occurred in these cells. Both cytosolic HO-1- and Mito-HO-1-expressing cells were protected against hypoxia-dependent cell death and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, but these effects were more pronounced with Mito-HO-1. Furthermore, decrement in production of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates following hypoxia was significantly mitigated in Mito-HO-1 cells. These data suggest that specific mitochondrially targeted HO-1 under acute pathological conditions may have beneficial effects, but the selective advantage of long-term expression is constrained by a negative impact on the synthesis of heme-containing mitochondrial proteins.

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 and Carbon Monoxide in the Heart: The Balancing Act Between Danger Signaling and Pro-Survival.

    PubMed

    Otterbein, Leo E; Foresti, Roberta; Motterlini, Roberto

    2016-06-10

    Understanding the processes governing the ability of the heart to repair and regenerate after injury is crucial for developing translational medical solutions. New avenues of exploration include cardiac cell therapy and cellular reprogramming targeting cell death and regeneration. An attractive possibility is the exploitation of cytoprotective genes that exist solely for self-preservation processes and serve to promote and support cell survival. Although the antioxidant and heat-shock proteins are included in this category, one enzyme that has received a great deal of attention as a master protective sentinel is heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting step in the catabolism of heme into the bioactive signaling molecules carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. The remarkable cardioprotective effects ascribed to heme oxygenase-1 are best evidenced by its ability to regulate inflammatory processes, cellular signaling, and mitochondrial function ultimately mitigating myocardial tissue injury and the progression of vascular-proliferative disease. We discuss here new insights into the role of heme oxygenase-1 and heme on cardiovascular health, and importantly, how they might be leveraged to promote heart repair after injury. PMID:27283533

  12. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 by whisky congeners in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiko; Nemoto, Asuka; Tanaka, Izumi; Koshimizu, Seiichi; Suwa, Yoshihide; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    It is expected that the production of the cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein in endothelial cells would reduce severity of vascular injuries, while phenolic compounds are known to induce HO-1 mRNA and protein in various cells. We investigated the activation of HO-1 by whisky, which contains various phenolic substances. The congeners of whisky stored from 4 to 18 y in oak barrels were shown to induce an increase of HO-1 protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while those of freshly distilled whisky spirit exhibited no activity. To determine the compounds with potent HO-1-inducing activity among the whisky congeners, several chemicals that had been reported to exist in whisky or oak barrels were screened, and coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde showed the activity. Thus, compounds that emerged in whisky during barrel storage induced cytoprotective protein, HO-1, in human endothelial cells.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 as a potential therapeutic target for hepatoprotection.

    PubMed

    Farombi, Ebenezer Olatunde; Surh, Young Joon

    2006-09-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate limiting enzyme in the breakdown of heme into carbon monoxide (CO), iron and bilirubin, has recently received overwhelming research attention. To date three mammalian HO isozymes have been identified, and the only inducible form is HO-1 while HO-2 and HO-3 are constitutively expressed. Advances in unveiling signal transduction network indicate that a battery of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and their upstream kinases including mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important regulatory role in HO-1 gene induction. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to protection against liver damage induced by several chemical compounds such as acetaminophen, carbon tetrachloride and heavy metals, suggesting HO-1 induction as an important cellular endeavor for hepatoprotection. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect against chemically-induced liver injury as well as hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:17002867

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  15. Heme oxygenase-1, a critical arbitrator of cell death pathways in lung injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Morse, Danielle; Lin, Ling; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2009-07-01

    Increases in cell death by programmed (i.e., apoptosis, autophagy) or nonprogrammed mechanisms (i.e., necrosis) occur during tissue injury and may contribute to the etiology of several pulmonary or vascular disease states. The low-molecular-weight stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in various models of lung and vascular injury by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, and cell proliferation. HO-1 serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. The transcriptional induction of HO-1 occurs in response to multiple forms of chemical and physical cellular stress. The cytoprotective functions of HO-1 may be attributed to heme turnover, as well as to beneficial properties of its enzymatic reaction products: biliverdin-IXalpha, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 or CO inhibits stress-induced extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. A variety of signaling molecules have been implicated in the cytoprotection conferred by HO-1/CO, including autophagic proteins, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and others. Enhanced HO-1 expression or the pharmacological application of HO end-products affords protection in preclinical models of tissue injury, including experimental and transplant-associated ischemia/reperfusion injury, promising potential future therapeutic applications.

  16. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a heme oxygenase-1 gene from Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qi-Jiang; Yuan, Xing-Xing; Cui, Wei-Ti; Han, Bin; Feng, Jian-Fei; Xu, Sheng; Shen, Wen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) is a heme-catabolizing enzyme induced by a variety of stress conditions. This article described the cloning and characterization of BrHO1 gene which codes for a putative HO1 from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis). BrHO1 consists of three exons and encodes a protein precursor of 32.3 kD with a putative N-terminal plastid transit peptide. The amino acid sequence of BrHO1 was 84% similar to Arabidopsis counterpart HY1. The three-dimensional structure of BrHO1 showed a high degree of structural conservation compared with the known HO1 crystal structures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BrHO1 clearly grouped with the HO1-like sequences. The recombinant BrHO1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli was active in the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXα (BV). Furthermore, the results of subcellular localization of BrHO1 demonstrated that BrHO1 gene product was most likely localized in the chloroplasts. BrHO1 was differently expressed in all tested tissues and could be induced upon osmotic and salinity stresses, cadmium (Cd) exposure, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and hemin treatments. Together, the results suggested that BrHO1 plays an important role in abiotic stress responses.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a heme oxygenase-1 gene from Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qi-Jiang; Yuan, Xing-Xing; Cui, Wei-Ti; Han, Bin; Feng, Jian-Fei; Xu, Sheng; Shen, Wen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) is a heme-catabolizing enzyme induced by a variety of stress conditions. This article described the cloning and characterization of BrHO1 gene which codes for a putative HO1 from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis). BrHO1 consists of three exons and encodes a protein precursor of 32.3 kD with a putative N-terminal plastid transit peptide. The amino acid sequence of BrHO1 was 84% similar to Arabidopsis counterpart HY1. The three-dimensional structure of BrHO1 showed a high degree of structural conservation compared with the known HO1 crystal structures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BrHO1 clearly grouped with the HO1-like sequences. The recombinant BrHO1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli was active in the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXα (BV). Furthermore, the results of subcellular localization of BrHO1 demonstrated that BrHO1 gene product was most likely localized in the chloroplasts. BrHO1 was differently expressed in all tested tissues and could be induced upon osmotic and salinity stresses, cadmium (Cd) exposure, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and hemin treatments. Together, the results suggested that BrHO1 plays an important role in abiotic stress responses. PMID:21505948

  19. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 suppresses heat shock protein 90 and the proliferation of human breast cancer cells through its byproduct carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wen-Ying; Chen, Yen-Chou; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lin, Chun-Mao; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Chen, Ku-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is an oxidative stress-response enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme into bilirubin, ferric ion, and carbon monoxide (CO). Induction of HO-1 was reported to have antitumor activity; the inhibitory mechanism, however, is still unclear. In the present study, we found that treatment with [Ru(CO){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2} (RuCO), a CO-releasing compound, reduced the growth of human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Analysis of growth-related proteins showed that treatment with RuCO down-regulated cyclinD1, CDK4, and hTERT protein expressions. Interestingly, RuCO treatment resulted in opposite effects on wild-type and mutant p53 proteins. These results were similar to those of cells treated with geldanamycin (a heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitor), suggesting that RuCO might affect HSP90 activity. Moreover, RuCO induced mutant p53 protein destabilization accompanied by promotion of ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. The induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) showed consistent results, while the addition of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, diminished the RuCO-mediated effect. RuCO induction of HO-1 expression was reduced by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor (SB203580). Additionally, treatment with a chemopreventive compound, curcumin, induced HO-1 expression accompanied with reduction of HSP90 client protein expression. The induction of HO-1 by curcumin inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA)-elicited matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and tumor invasion. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence underlying HO-1's antitumor mechanism. CO, a byproduct of HO-1, suppresses HSP90 protein activity, and the induction of HO-1 may possess potential as a cancer therapeutic. - Highlights: • CO and HO-1 inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells. • CO and HO-1 attenuated HSP90 and its client proteins expression. • CO induced mutant p53 protein ubiquitination and

  20. Recombinant truncated and microsomal heme oxygenase-1 and -2: differential sensitivity to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vukomanovic, Dragic; McLaughlin, Brian; Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Dercho, Ryan A; Kinobe, Robert T; Hum, Maaike; Brien, James F; Jia, Zongchao; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2010-04-01

    Recombinant truncated forms of heme oxygenase-1 and -2 (HO-1 and HO-2) were compared with their crude microsomal counterparts from brain and spleen tissue of adult male rats with respect to their inhibition by azole-based, nonporphyrin HO inhibitors. The drugs tested were an imidazole-alcohol, an imidazole-dioxolane, and a triazole-ketone. Both the recombinant and crude forms of HO-2 were similarly inhibited by the 3 drugs. The crude microsomal spleen form of HO-1 was more susceptible to inhibition than was the truncated recombinant form. This difference is attributed to the extra amino acids in the full-length enzyme. These observations may be relevant in the design of drugs as inhibitors of HO and other membrane proteins. PMID:20555417

  1. New Insights into Intracellular Locations and Functions of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Louise L.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Ni, Jun; Hamid, Hafizah A.; Parish, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) plays a critical role in the protection of cells, and the inducible enzyme is implicated in a spectrum of human diseases. The increasing prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic morbidities, for which current treatment approaches are not optimal, emphasizes the necessity to better understand key players such as HMOX1 that may be therapeutic targets. Recent Advances: HMOX1 is a dynamic protein that can undergo post-translational and structural modifications which modulate HMOX1 function. Moreover, trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to other cellular compartments, including the nucleus, highlights that HMOX1 may play roles other than the catabolism of heme. Critical Issues: The ability of HMOX1 to be induced by a variety of stressors, in an equally wide variety of tissues and cell types, represents an obstacle for the therapeutic exploitation of the enzyme. Any capacity to modulate HMOX1 in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases should be tempered with an appreciation that HMOX1 may have an impact on cancer. Moreover, the potential for heme catabolism end products, such as carbon monoxide, to amplify the HMOX1 stress response should be considered. Future Directions: A more complete understanding of HMOX1 modifications and the properties that they impart is necessary. Delineating these parameters will provide a clearer picture of the opportunities to modulate HMOX1 in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20: 1723–1742. PMID:24180287

  2. Novel Insights into the Vasoprotective Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Marcantoni, Emanuela; Di Francesco, Luigia; Dovizio, Melania; Bruno, Annalisa; Patrignani, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors contribute to enhanced oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. These events trigger platelet activation and their interaction with leukocytes and endothelial cells, thus contributing to the induction of chronic inflammatory processes at the vascular wall and to the development of atherosclerotic lesions and atherothrombosis. In this scenario, endogenous antioxidant pathways are induced to restrain the development of vascular disease. In the present paper, we will discuss the role of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 which is an enzyme of the heme catabolism and cleaves heme to form biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO). Biliverdin is reduced enzymatically to the potent antioxidant bilirubin. Recent evidence supports the involvement of HO-1 in the antioxidant and antiinflammatory effect of cyclooxygenase(COX)-2-dependent prostacyclin in the vasculature. Moreover, the role of HO-1 in estrogen vasoprotection is emerging. Finally, possible strategies to develop novel therapeutics against cardiovascular disease by targeting the induction of HO-1 will be discussed. PMID:22518279

  3. Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Efficiently Catabolizes Heme in the Absence of Biliverdin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) uses molecular oxygen and electrons from NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase to convert heme to CO, ferrous iron, and biliverdin (BV). Enzymatic studies with the purified 30-kDa form of HO-1 routinely use a coupled assay containing biliverdin reductase (BVR), which converts BV to bilirubin (BR). BVR is believed to be required for optimal HO-1 activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether HO-1 activity could be monitored directly by following BV generation or iron release (using the ferrous iron chelator, ferrozine) in the absence of BVR. Using assays for each of the three end products, we found that HO-1 activity was stimulated in the presence of catalase and comparable rates were measured with each assay. Absorbance scans revealed characteristic spectra for BR, BV, and/or the ferrozine-iron complex. The optimal conditions were slightly different for the direct and coupled assays. BSA activated the coupled but inhibited the direct assays, and the assays had different pH optima. By measuring the activity of BVR directly using BV as a substrate, these differences were attributed to different enzymatic properties of BVR and HO-1. Thus, BVR is not needed to measure the activity of HO-1 when catalase is present. In fact, the factors affecting catalysis by HO-1 are better understood using the direct assays because the coupled assay can be influenced by properties of BVR. PMID:20679134

  4. Fraxetin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression by Activation of Akt/Nrf2 or AMP-activated Protein Kinase α/Nrf2 Pathway in HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Juthika; Chae, In Gyeong; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Fraxetin (7,8-dihydroxy-6-methoxy coumarin), a coumarin derivative, has been reported to possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. A number of recent observations suggest that the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits inflammation and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we determined the effect of fraxetin on HO-1 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes and investigated its underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blot analysis were performed to detect HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell viability was measured by the MTS test. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fraxetin was evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. Results Fraxetin upregulated mRNA and protein expression of HO-1. Incubation with fraxetin induced the localization of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the nucleus and increased the antioxidant response element-reporter gene activity. Fraxetin also induced the phosphorylation of Akt and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α and diminished the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog, a negative regulator of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt and AMPKα abrogated fraxetin-induced expression of HO-1 and nuclear localization of Nrf2. Furthermore, fraxetin generated ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions Fraxetin induces HO-1 expression through activation of Akt/Nrf2 or AMPKα/Nrf2 pathway in HaCaT cells. PMID:27722139

  5. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  6. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Stuart T.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S.; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Chong, Beng H.; Parish, Christopher R.; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119+-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119+-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes. PMID:25682599

  8. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  9. In vivo regulation of the heme oxygenase-1 gene in humanized transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Traylor, Amie M.; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Hull, Travis D.; George, James F.; Mikhail, Fady M.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in heme degradation producing equimolar amounts of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. Induction of HO-1 is a beneficial response to tissue injury in diverse animal models of diseases including acute kidney injury. In vitro analysis has shown that the human HO-1 gene is transcriptionally regulated by changes in chromatin conformation but whether such control occurs in vivo is not known. To enable such analysis, we generated transgenic mice, harboring an 87-kb bacterial artificial chromosome expressing human HO-1 mRNA and protein and bred these mice with HO-1 knockout mice to generate humanized BAC transgenic mice. This successfully rescued the phenotype of the knockout mice including reduced birth rates, tissue iron overload, splenomegaly, anemia, leukocytosis, dendritic cell abnormalities and survival after acute kidney injury induced by rhabdomyolysis or cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Transcription factors such as USF1/2, JunB, Sp1, and CTCF were found to associate with regulatory regions of the human HO-1 gene in the kidney following rhabdomyolysis. Chromosome Conformation Capture and ChIP-loop assays confirmed this in the formation of chromatin looping in vivo. Thus, these bacterial artificial chromosome humanized HO-1 mice are a valuable model to study the human HO-1 gene providing insight to the in vivo architecture of the gene in acute kidney injury and other diseases. PMID:22495295

  10. Cytoprotective effect of Podophyllum hexandrum against gamma radiation is mediated via hemopoietic system stimulation and up-regulation of heme-oxygenase-1 and the prosurvival multidomain protein Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Arora; Sagar, R; Singh, S; Kumar, R; Sharma, A K; Prasad, J; Singh, S; Gupta, M; Sharma, R K; Puri, S C; Krishna, B; Siddiqui, M S; Lahiri, S S; Tripathi, R P; Qazi, G N

    2007-03-01

    The radioprotective effect of a hydroalcoholic extracted material (REC-2000) from the rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum was studied in mice exposed to lethal gamma radiation (10 Gy). The extract (REC-2000) was found to restore the hemoglobin content (14.73 +/- 0.33) and total leukocyte count (TLC) (4166.66 +/- 0.02) in lethally (10 Gy) gamma-irradiated mice on the 15th day in comparison to the radiation control mice. The hemoglobin content of the drug + radiation group was observed to be significantly (21.25%) higher than the radiation control group on the 10th day. Similarly, the TLC was significantly increased (83.33 times) in the drug + radiation group as compared to a radiation (10 Gy) only group on the 10th day. Enhanced expression of heme-oxygenase-1 and Bcl-2 protein observed by Western blotting further supports the observation of hemopoietic recovery in irradiated mice. These findings indicate that the bioactive constituents present in REC-2000 exert the radioprotective effect by modulating the hemopoietic system.

  11. Non-heme induction of heme oxygenase-1 does not alter cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2007-04-01

    The catabolism of heme is carried out by members of the heme oxygenase (HO) family. The products of heme catabolism by HO-1 are ferrous iron, biliverdin (subsequently converted to bilirubin), and carbon monoxide. In addition to its function in the recycling of hemoglobin iron, this microsomal enzyme has been shown to protect cells in various stress models. Implicit in the reports of HO-1 cytoprotection to date are its effects on the cellular handling of heme/iron. However, the limited amount of uncommitted heme in non-erythroid cells brings to question the source of substrate for this enzyme in non-hemolytic circumstances. In the present study, HO-1 was induced by either sodium arsenite (reactive oxygen species producer) or hemin or overexpressed in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW 264.7. Both of the inducers elicited an increase in active HO-1; however, only hemin exposure caused an increase in the synthesis rate of the iron storage protein, ferritin. This effect of hemin was the direct result of the liberation of iron from heme by HO. Cells stably overexpressing HO-1, although protected from oxidative stress, did not display elevated basal ferritin synthesis. However, these cells did exhibit an increase in ferritin synthesis, compared with untransfected controls, in response to hemin treatment, suggesting that heme levels, and not HO-1, limit cellular heme catabolism. Our results suggest that the protection of cells from oxidative insult afforded by HO-1 is not due to the catabolism of significant amounts of cellular heme as thought previously.

  12. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Additionally the transactivation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and paraoxonase-1 were determined by reporter gene assays. Results Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 in cultured hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by resveratrol was accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 transactivation. Resveratrol mediated Nrf2 transactivation as well as heme oxygenase-1 induction were partly antagonized by 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Conclusions Unlike heme oxygenase-1 (which is highly regulated by Nrf2) paraoxonase-1 (which exhibits fewer ARE/Nrf2 binding sites in its promoter) induction by resveratrol was not counteracted by ascorbic acid. Addition of resveratrol to the cell culture medium produced relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide which may be a positive hormetic redox-signal for Nrf2 dependent gene expression thereby driving heme oxygenase-1 induction. However, high concentrations of ascorbic acid manifold increased hydrogen peroxide production in the cell culture medium which may be a stress signal thereby disrupting the Nrf2 signalling pathway. PMID:21199573

  13. Length Polymorphism in Heme Oxygenase-1 and Risk of CKD among Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The length polymorphism of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in high-risk populations. Experimental data suggest that heme oxygenase-1 protects against kidney disease. However, the association between this polymorphism and long-term risk of CKD in high-risk patients is unknown. We analyzed the allelic frequencies of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter in 386 patients with coronary artery disease recruited from January 1999 to July 2001 and followed until August 31, 2012. The S allele represents short repeats (<27), and the L allele represents long repeats (≥27). The primary renal end points consisted of sustained serum creatinine doubling and/or ESRD requiring long-term RRT. The secondary end points were major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality. At the end of study, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each L allele in the additive model were 1.99 (1.27 to 3.14; P=0.003) for the renal end points, 1.70 (1.27 to 2.27; P<0.001) for major adverse cardiovascular events, and 1.36 (1.04 to 1.79; P=0.03) for mortality. With cardiac events as time-dependent covariates, the adjusted hazard ratio for each L allele in the additive model was 1.91 (1.20 to 3.06; P=0.01) for the renal end points. In conclusion, a greater number of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with higher risk for CKD, cardiovascular events, and mortality among patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:24762402

  14. Heme oxygenase 1 protects ethanol-administered liver tissue in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David; Chen, Ying; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Ichiba, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    A genetic polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (​ALDH2) gene, ALDH2*2, encodes an enzymatically defective ALDH2 protein. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that possessing ALDH2*2 is a protective factor for liver tissue in healthy individuals, although these studies lack a mechanistic explanation. Our animal studies have shown the same trend: levels of serum alanine transaminase (ALT), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), and hepatic tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were lower in Aldh2 knockout (Aldh2(-/-)) mice than in wild-type (Aldh2(+/+)) mice after ethanol administration. To propose a mechanistic hypothesis, residual liver specimens from the previous experiment were analyzed. An anti-oxidative protein, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and an oxidative stress-producing protein, cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), were detected at higher levels in Aldh2(-/-) mice than in Aldh2(+/+) mice, regardless of ethanol treatment. Other oxidative stress-related proteins and inflammatory cytokines did not show such a significant difference. To conclude, we propose a protective role of HO-1 in individuals with A​LDH2*2. Our continued studies support the epidemiological finding that possession of ALDH2*2 is a protective factor in the liver of the healthy individual. PMID:27139237

  15. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Dan; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Hitron, Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Xu Mei; Chen Gang; Luo Jia; Jiang Binghua; Fang Jing; Shi Xianglin

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 muM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.

  16. A knockdown with smoke model reveals FHIT as a repressor of Heme oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Boylston, Jennifer A; Brenner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene deletions are among the earliest and most frequent events in carcinogenesis, particularly in carcinogen-exposed tissues. Though FHIT has been established as an authentic tumor suppressor, the mechanism underlying tumor suppression remains opaque. Most experiments designed to clarify FHIT function have analyzed the consequence of re-expressing FHIT in FHIT-negative cells. However, carcinogenesis occurs in cells that transition from FHIT-positive to FHIT-negative. To better understand cancer development, we induced FHIT loss in human bronchial epithelial cells with RNA interference. Because FHIT is a demonstrated target of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, we combined FHIT silencing with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and measured gene expression consequences by RNA microarray. The data indicate that FHIT loss enhances the expression of a set of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to CSE, including the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) at the RNA and protein levels. Data are consistent with a mechanism in which Fhit protein is required for accumulation of the transcriptional repressor of HMOX1, Bach1 protein. We posit that by allowing superinduction of oxidative stress response genes, loss of FHIT creates a survival advantage that promotes carcinogenesis. PMID:25486479

  17. Characterization of a Wheat Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene and Its Responses to Different Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dao-kun; Jin, Qi-jiang; Xie, Yan-jie; Liu, Ya-hui; Lin, Yu-ting; Shen, Wen-biao; Zhou, Yi-jun

    2011-01-01

    In animals and recently in plants, heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) has been found to confer protection against a variety of oxidant-induced cell and tissue injuries. In this study, a wheat (Triticum aestivum) HO1 gene TaHO1 was cloned and sequenced. It encodes a polypeptide of 31.7 kD with a putative N-terminal plastid transit peptide. The amino acid sequence of TaHO1 was found to be 78% similar to that of maize HO1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TaHO1 clusters together with the HO1-like sequences in plants. The purified recombinant TaHO1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli was active in the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXa (BV), and showed that the Vmax was 8.8 U·mg−1 protein with an apparent Km value for hemin of 3.04 μM. The optimum Tm and pH were 35 °C and 7.4, respectively. The result of subcellular localization of TaHO1 showed that the putative transit peptide was sufficient for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to localize in chloroplast and implied that TaHO1 gene product is at least localized in the chloroplast. Moreover, we found that TaHO1 mRNA could be differentially induced by the well-known nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), gibberellin acid (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and NaCl treatments. Therefore, the results suggested that TaHO1 might play an important role in abiotic stress responses. PMID:22174625

  18. Oxidative stress suppression by luteolin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Min; Ye, Jing-xue; Si, Jian-yong; Xu, Hui-bo; Meng, Xiang-bao; Qin, Meng; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hong-wei; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2012-12-01

    Luteolin enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity. ► Luteolin increases the expression of heme oxygenase-1 protein levels. ► Luteolin activates Akt and ERK signal pathways.

  19. Deletion of Herpud1 Enhances Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuong Manh; Hashida, Koji; Ta, Hieu Minh; Takarada-Iemata, Mika; Kokame, Koichi; Kitao, Yasuko; Hori, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Herp is an endoplasmic reticulum- (ER-) resident membrane protein that plays a role in ER-associated degradation. We studied the expression of Herp and its effect on neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD), in which both the oxidative stress and the ER stress are evoked. Eight hours after administering a PD-related neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), to mice, the expression of Herp increased at both the mRNA and the protein levels. Experiments using Herpud1 (+/+) and Herpud1 (-/-) mice revealed that the status of acute degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons and reactive astrogliosis was comparable between two genotypes after MPTP injection. However, the expression of a potent antioxidant, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was detected to a higher degree in the astrocytes of Herpud1 (-/-) mice than in the astrocytes of Herpud1 (+/+) mice 24 h after MPTP administration. Further experiments using cultured astrocytes revealed that the stress response against MPP(+), an active form of MPTP, and hydrogen peroxide, both of which cause oxidative stress, was comparable between the two genotypes. These results suggest that deletion of Herpud1 may cause a slightly higher level of initial damage in the nigrastrial neurons after MPTP administration but is compensated for by higher induction of antioxidants such as HO-1 in astrocytes.

  20. Hepatic steatosis prevents heme oxygenase-1 induction by isoflurane in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Patrick; Schwer, Christian I; Goebel, Ulrich; Buerkle, Hartmut; Hoetzel, Alexander; Schmidt, Rene

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the inductive effects of isoflurane (ISO) on hepatic heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in an animal model of hepatic steatosis. METHODS: Lean (LEAN) and obese (FAT) Zucker rats were randomized into 4 groups: 1: LEAN + pentobarbital sodium (PEN); 2: LEAN + ISO; 3: FAT + PEN; 4: FAT + ISO. The animals were mechanically ventilated for 6 h. In vitro analyses of liver tissue included determination of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression as well as measurement of HO enzyme activity and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: Compared to PEN treatment, ISO administration profoundly induced hepatic HO-1 mRNA and protein expression and significantly increased HO enzyme activity in lean Zucker rats. In contrast, no difference in HO-1 gene expression was observed after ISO or PEN anesthesia in obese Zucker rats. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that ISO is an inducer of hepatic HO-1 gene expression in non-steatotic organs but failed to upregulate HO-1 in steatotic livers. PMID:22072849

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Chenglong; Zheng, Haining; Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng; Ding, Dafa; Lu, Yibing

    2015-10-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK.

  2. Heme-oxygenase-1 implications in cell morphology and the adhesive behavior of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Geraldine; Giudice, Jimena; Valacco, Pia; Paez, Alejandra; Elguero, Belen; Toscani, Martin; Jaworski, Felipe; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Cotignola, Javier; Marti, Marcelo; Binaghi, Maria; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Although previous studies in PCa have focused on cell adherens junctions (AJs), key players in metastasis, they have left the molecular mechanisms unexplored. Inflammation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical in the regulation of cell adhesion and the integrity of the epithelium. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative and inflammatory damage. Here, we investigated whether HO-1 is implicated in the adhesive and morphological properties of tumor cells. Genes differentially regulated by HO-1 were enriched for cell motility and adhesion biological processes. HO-1 induction, increased E-cadherin and β-catenin levels. Immunofluorescence analyses showed a striking remodeling of E-cadherin/β-catenin based AJs under HO-1 modulation. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin coincided with a markedly change in cell morphology. To further our analysis we sought to identify HO-1 binding proteins that might participate in the regulation of cell morphology. A proteomics approach identified Muskelin, as a novel HO-1 partner, strongly implicated in cell morphology regulation. These results define a novel role for HO-1 in modulating the architecture of cell-cell interactions, favoring a less aggressive phenotype and further supporting its anti-tumoral function in PCa. PMID:24961479

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Geom Seog; Jiang, Wen-Yi; Chi, Jin Hua; Jin, Hao; Park, Won-Chul; Sohn, Dong Hwan; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is upregulated in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. However, the role of HO-1 in the metastatic potential of CRC remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential of HO-1 to control the antitumor immunity of CRC. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in the immune surveillance system. Hemin-induced HO-1 expression suppressed the expression of ICAM-1 in human CRC cells. HO-1 regulated ICAM-1 expression via tristetraprolin, an mRNA-binding protein, at the posttranscriptional level in CRC cells. The upregulated HO-1 expression in CRC cells markedly decreased the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBMLs) to CRC cells and PBML-mediated cytotoxicity against CRC cells. Production of CXCL10, an effector T cell-recruiting chemokine, was significantly reduced by the increased HO-1 expression. The expression of the CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, decreased significantly in PBMLs that adhered to CRC cells. HO-1 expression correlated negatively, although nonsignificantly, with ICAM-1 and CXCL10 expression in xenograft tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that HO-1 expression is functionally linked to the mediation of tumor progression and metastasis of CRC cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity. PMID:26087182

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Corexit 9500A-Induced Respiratory Epithelial Injury across Species

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Octavio M.; Karki, Suman; Surolia, Ranu; Wang, Zheng; Watson, R. Douglas; Thannickal, Victor J.; Powell, Mickie; Watts, Stephen; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Batra, Hitesh; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Corexit 9500A (CE) on respiratory epithelial surfaces of terrestrial mammals and marine animals are largely unknown. This study investigated the role of CE-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-apoptotic and antioxidant activity, in human bronchial airway epithelium and the gills of exposed aquatic animals. We evaluated CE-mediated alterations in human airway epithelial cells, mice lungs and gills from zebrafish and blue crabs. Our results demonstrated that CE induced an increase in gill epithelial edema and human epithelial monolayer permeability, suggesting an acute injury caused by CE exposure. CE induced the expression of HO-1 as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), which are associated with ROS production. Importantly, CE induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent apoptosis of epithelial cells. The expression of the intercellular junctional proteins, such as tight junction proteins occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), ZO-2 and adherens junctional proteins E-cadherin and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), were remarkably inhibited by CE, suggesting that these proteins are involved in CE-induced increased permeability and subsequent apoptosis. The cytoskeletal protein F-actin was also disrupted by CE. Treatment with carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) significantly inhibited CE-induced ROS production, while the addition of HO-1 inhibitor, significantly increased CE-induced ROS production and apoptosis, suggesting a protective role of HO-1 or its reaction product, CO, in CE-induced apoptosis. Using HO-1 knockout mice, we further demonstrated that HO-1 protected against CE-induced inflammation and cellular apoptosis and corrected CE-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin and FAK. These observations suggest that CE activates CRP and NOX4-mediated ROS production, alters permeability by inhibition of junctional proteins, and leads to caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells, while HO-1 and its

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 protects corexit 9500A-induced respiratory epithelial injury across species.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu Jun; Duggal, Ryan N; Oliva, Octavio M; Karki, Suman; Surolia, Ranu; Wang, Zheng; Watson, R Douglas; Thannickal, Victor J; Powell, Mickie; Watts, Stephen; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Batra, Hitesh; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Corexit 9500A (CE) on respiratory epithelial surfaces of terrestrial mammals and marine animals are largely unknown. This study investigated the role of CE-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-apoptotic and antioxidant activity, in human bronchial airway epithelium and the gills of exposed aquatic animals. We evaluated CE-mediated alterations in human airway epithelial cells, mice lungs and gills from zebrafish and blue crabs. Our results demonstrated that CE induced an increase in gill epithelial edema and human epithelial monolayer permeability, suggesting an acute injury caused by CE exposure. CE induced the expression of HO-1 as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), which are associated with ROS production. Importantly, CE induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent apoptosis of epithelial cells. The expression of the intercellular junctional proteins, such as tight junction proteins occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), ZO-2 and adherens junctional proteins E-cadherin and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), were remarkably inhibited by CE, suggesting that these proteins are involved in CE-induced increased permeability and subsequent apoptosis. The cytoskeletal protein F-actin was also disrupted by CE. Treatment with carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) significantly inhibited CE-induced ROS production, while the addition of HO-1 inhibitor, significantly increased CE-induced ROS production and apoptosis, suggesting a protective role of HO-1 or its reaction product, CO, in CE-induced apoptosis. Using HO-1 knockout mice, we further demonstrated that HO-1 protected against CE-induced inflammation and cellular apoptosis and corrected CE-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin and FAK. These observations suggest that CE activates CRP and NOX4-mediated ROS production, alters permeability by inhibition of junctional proteins, and leads to caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells, while HO-1 and its

  6. Epalrestat increases glutathione, thioredoxin, and heme oxygenase-1 by stimulating Nrf2 pathway in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yama, Kaori; Sato, Keisuke; Abe, Natsuki; Murao, Yu; Tatsunami, Ryosuke; Tampo, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Epalrestat (EPS) is the only aldose reductase inhibitor that is currently available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recently, we found that EPS at near-plasma concentration increases the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH) in rat Schwann cells. GSH plays a crucial role in protecting endothelial cells from oxidative stress, thereby preventing vascular diseases. Here we show that EPS increases GSH levels in not only Schwann cells but also endothelial cells. Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), an in vitro model of the vascular endothelium, with EPS caused a dramatic increase in intracellular GSH levels. This was concomitant with the up-regulation of glutamate cysteine ligase, an enzyme catalyzing the first and rate-limiting step in de novo GSH synthesis. Moreover, EPS stimulated the expression of thioredoxin and heme oxygenase-1, which have important redox regulatory functions in endothelial cells. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor that regulates the expression of antioxidant genes. EPS increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in BAECs. Nrf2 knockdown by siRNA suppressed the EPS-induced glutamate cysteine ligase, thioredoxin-1, and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Interestingly, LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, abolished the EPS-stimulated GSH synthesis, suggesting that the kinase is associated with Nrf2 activation induced by EPS. Furthermore, EPS reduced the cytotoxicity induced by H2O2 and tert-butylhydroperoxide, indicating that EPS plays a role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Taken together, the results provide evidence that EPS exerts new beneficial effects on endothelial cells by increasing GSH, thioredoxin, and heme oxygenase-1 levels through the activation of Nrf2. We suggest that EPS has the potential to prevent several vascular diseases caused by oxidative stress. PMID:25529839

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide System and Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Zobi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into energetically efficient cardiomyocytes contributes to functional cardiac repair and is envisioned to ameliorate progressive degenerative cardiac diseases. Advanced cell maturation strategies are therefore needed to create abundant mature cardiomyocytes. In this study, we tested whether the redox-sensitive heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system, operating through mitochondrial biogenesis, acts as a mechanism for ES cell differentiation and cardiomyocyte maturation. Results: Manipulation of HO-1/CO to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis demonstrates a direct pathway to ES cell differentiation and maturation into beating cardiomyocytes that express adult structural markers. Targeted HO-1/CO interventions up- and downregulate specific cardiogenic transcription factors, transcription factor Gata4, homeobox protein Nkx-2.5, heart- and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 1, and MEF2C. HO-1/CO overexpression increases cardiac gene expression for myosin regulatory light chain 2, atrial isoform, MLC2v, ANP, MHC-β, and sarcomere α-actinin and the major mitochondrial fusion regulators, mitofusin 2 and MICOS complex subunit Mic60. This promotes structural mitochondrial network expansion and maturation, thereby supporting energy provision for beating embryoid bodies. These effects are prevented by silencing HO-1 and by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species scavenging, while disruption of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA depletion by loss of mitochondrial transcription factor A compromise infrastructure. This leads to failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and maturation and contractile dysfunction. Innovation: The capacity to augment cardiomyogenesis via a defined mitochondrial pathway has unique therapeutic potential for targeting ES cell maturation in cardiac disease. Conclusion: Our findings establish the HO-1/CO system and redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis as

  8. Methamphetamine induces heme oxygenase-1 expression in cortical neurons and glia to prevent its toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-N.; Wu, C.-H.; Lin, T.-C.; Wang, J.-Y.

    2009-11-01

    The impairment of cognitive and motor functions in humans and animals caused by methamphetamine (METH) administration underscores the importance of METH toxicity in cortical neurons. The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts a cytoprotective effect against various neuronal injures; however, it remains unclear whether HO-1 is involved in METH-induced toxicity. We used primary cortical neuron/glia cocultures to explore the role of HO-1 in METH-induced toxicity. Exposure of cultured cells to various concentrations of METH (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM) led to cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. A METH concentration of 5 mM, which caused 50% of neuronal death and glial activation, was chosen for subsequent experiments. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that METH significantly induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, both preceded cell death. Double and triple immunofluorescence staining further identified HO-1-positive cells as activated astrocytes, microglia, and viable neurons, but not dying neurons. Inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly blocked HO-1 induction by METH and aggravated METH neurotoxicity. Inhibition of HO activity using tin protoporphyrine IX significantly reduced HO activity and exacerbated METH neurotoxicity. However, prior induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrine IX partially protected neurons from METH toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of HO-1 by METH via the p38 signaling pathway may be protective, albeit insufficient to completely protect cortical neurons from METH toxicity.

  9. Impairment of neutrophil oxidative burst in children with sickle cell disease is associated with heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ceri; Orf, Katharine; Horvath, Erzsebet; Levin, Michael; De La Fuente, Josu; Chakravorty, Subarna; Cunnington, Aubrey J

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for invasive bacterial infections, and splenic dysfunction is believed to be the main underlying cause. We have previously shown that the liberation of heme in acute hemolysis can induce heme oxygenase-1 during granulopoiesis, impairing the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a bactericidal oxidative burst, and increasing susceptibility to bacterial infection. We hypothesized that this may also occur with the chronic hemolysis of sickle cell disease, potentially contributing to susceptibility to infections. We found that neutrophil oxidative burst activity was significantly lower in treatment-naïve children with sickle cell disease compared to age-, gender- and ethnicity-matched controls, whilst degranulation was similar. The defect in neutrophil oxidative burst was quantitatively related to both systemic heme oxygenase-1 activity (assessed by carboxyhemoglobin concentration) and neutrophil mobilization. A distinct population of heme oxygenase-1-expressing cells was present in the bone marrow of children with sickle cell disease, but not in healthy children, with a surface marker profile consistent with neutrophil progenitors (CD49d(Hi) CD24(Lo) CD15(Int) CD16(Int) CD11b(+/-)). Incubation of promyelocytic HL-60 cells with the heme oxygenase-1 substrate and inducer, hemin, demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 induction during neutrophilic differentiation could reduce oxidative burst capacity. These findings indicate that impairment of neutrophil oxidative burst activity in sickle cell disease is associated with hemolysis and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Neutrophil dysfunction might contribute to risk of infection in sickle cell disease, and measurement of neutrophil oxidative burst might be used to identify patients at greatest risk of infection, who might benefit from enhanced prophylaxis.

  10. Identification of heme oxygenase-1 stimulators by a convenient ELISA-based bilirubin quantification assay.

    PubMed

    Rücker, Hannelore; Amslinger, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has proven to be a useful tool for fighting inflammation. In order to identify new HO-1 inducers, an efficient screening method was developed which can provide new lead structures for drug research. We designed a simple ELISA-based HO-1 enzyme activity assay, which allows for the screening of 12 compounds in parallel in the setting of a 96-well plate. The well-established murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 is used and only about 26µg of protein from whole cell lysates is needed for the analysis of HO-1 activity. The quantification of HO-1 activity is based on an indirect ELISA using the specific anti-bilirubin antibody 24G7 to quantify directly bilirubin in the whole cell lysate, applying a horseradish peroxidase-tagged antibody together with ortho-phenylenediamine and H2O2 for detection. The bilirubin is produced on the action of HO enzymes by converting their substrate heme to biliverdin and additional recombinant biliverdin reductase together with NADPH at pH 7.4 in buffer. This sensitive assay allows for the detection of 0.57-82pmol bilirubin per sample in whole cell lysates. Twenty-three small molecules, mainly natural products with an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl unit such as polyphenols, including flavonoids and chalcones, terpenes, an isothiocyanate, and the drug oltipraz were tested at typically 6 or 24h incubation with RAW264.7 cells. The activity of known HO-1 inducers was confirmed, while the chalcones cardamonin, flavokawain A, calythropsin, 2',3,4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxychalcone (THMC), and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxychalcone (DHDMC) were identified as new potent HO-1 inducers. The highest inductive power after 6h incubation was found at 10µM for DHDMC (6.1-fold), carnosol (3.9-fold), butein (3.1-fold), THMC (2.9-fold), and zerumbone (2.5-fold). Moreover, the time dependence of HO-1 protein production for DHDMC was compared to its enzyme activity, which was further evaluated in the presence of

  11. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David; Struckhoff, Amanda P.; Doyle, Lisa; Bonstaff, Karlie; Del Valle, Luis; Parsons, Chris; Toole, Bryan P.; Renne, Rolf; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of several malignancies, including Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), which preferentially arise in immunocompromised patients such as HIV+ subpopulation and lack effective therapeutic options. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported as an important regulator of endothelial cell cycle control, proliferation and angiogenesis. HO-1 has also been found to be highly expressed in KSHV-infected endothelial cells and oral AIDS-KS lesions. We previously demonstrate that the multifunctional glycoprotein CD147 is required for KSHV/LANA-induced endothelial cell invasiveness. During the identification of CD147 controlled downstream genes by microarray analysis, we found that the expression of HO-1 is significantly elevated in both CD147-overexpressing and KSHV-infected HUVEC cells when compared to control cells. In the current study, we further identify the regulation of HO-1 expression and mediated cellular functions by both CD147 and KSHV-encoded LANA proteins. Targeting HO-1 by either RNAi or the chemical inhibitor, SnPP, effectively induces cell death of KSHV-infected endothelial cells (the major cellular components of KS) through DNA damage and necrosis process. By using a KS-like nude mouse model, we found that SnPP treatment significantly suppressed KSHV-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the important role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenesis of KSHV-infected endothelial cells, the underlying regulatory mechanisms for HO-1 expression and targeting HO-1 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy against KSHV-related malignancies. PMID:26859574

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 induction and mitochondrial iron sequestration in astroglia exposed to amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Ham, D; Schipper, H M

    2000-05-01

    The mechanisms responsible for pathological iron deposition and mitochondrial insufficiency that have been documented in the brains of Alzheimer (AD) patients remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that low-micromolar concentrations of amyloid1-40 (A40) and amyloid 1-42 (A42), peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of AD, increase levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA and protein in cultured rat astroglia. Furthermore, 6 days of exposure to amyloid augments the sequestration of 55FeCl3-derived iron by astroglial mitochondria without affecting the disposition of this metal in whole-cell and lysosomal compartments. Mitochondrial iron deposition was not observed in the amyloid-treated glia when diferric-transferrin served as the metal donor. We had previously shown that inhibitors of HO-1 and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MTP) block the uptake of mitochondrial iron in astrocytes exposed to the pro-oxidant effects of dopamine and several pro-inflammatory cytokines. Similarly, in the current study, amyloid-induced mitochondrial iron trapping was significantly attenuated by co-administration of the HO-1 transcriptional suppressor, dexamethasone (DEX) or the MTP blocker, cyclosporin A (CSA). Thus, the marked enhancement of HO-1 expression previously demonstrated in AD-affected neurons and astroglia may transduce amyloid (oxidative) stress into the abnormal patterns of iron deposition and mitochondrial insufficiency characteristic of this disease. Finally, in experiments employing cytotoxic concentrations of A40, we provide evidence that inhibition of HO-1 transcription and related mitochondrial iron deposition may be an important mechanism by which DEX protects tissues subjected to amyloid stress.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 protects endothelial cells from the toxicity of air pollutant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Akeem O; Zhang, Min; Dittmar, Michael; Lulla, Aaron; Araujo, Jesus A

    2015-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEPs on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) were treated with an organic extract of DEPs from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4h. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and unfolded protein respone (UPR) gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but to a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMECs from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Reduction of bilirubin by targeting human heme oxygenase-1 through siRNA.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen-Wei; Li, Chun-E; Jin, You-Xin; Shi, Yi; Xu, Li-Qing; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Li, Yun-Zhu; Yu, Shan-Chang; Zhang, Zi-Li

    2007-04-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical condition caused mainly by the increased production and decreased excretion of bilirubin. Current treatment is aimed at reducing the serum levels of bilirubin. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme that generates bilirubin. In this study we intended to suppress HO-1 using the RNA interference technique. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-A, -B, and -C were designed based on human HO-1 (hHO-1) mRNA sequences. siRNA was transfected into a human hepatic cell line (HL-7702). hHO-1 transcription and protein levels were then determined. In addition, the inhibitory effect of siRNA on hHO-1 was assessed in cells treated with hemin or transfected with an hHO-1 plasmid. siRNA-C showed the most potent suppressive effect on hHO-1. This inhibition is dose and time dependent. Compared with control, both hemin and hHO-1 plasmids up-regulated hHO-1 expression in HL-7702 cells. However, the up-regulation was significantly attenuated by siRNA-C. Furthermore, the decrease in hHO-1 activity was coincident with the suppression of its transcription. Finally, siRNA-C was shown to reduce hHO-1 enzymatic activity and bilirubin levels. Thus, this study provides a novel therapeutic rationale by blocking bilirubin formation via siRNA for preventing and treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin encephalopathy at an early clinical stage.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Bolisetty, Subashini; DeAlmeida, Angela; Litovsky, Silvio H.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2013-01-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (MHC-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice) with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed stop signal (CBA-flox mice). MHC-HO-1 overexpress the HO-1 gene and enzymatically protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on two consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  17. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  18. Deficiency of heme oxygenase-1 impairs renal hemodynamics and exaggerates systemic inflammatory responses to renal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Tracz, MJ; Juncos, JP; Croatt, AJ; Ackerman, AW; Grande, JP; Knutson, KL; Kane, GC; Terzic, A; Griffin, MD; Nath, KA

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 may exert cytoprotective effects. In this study we examined the sensitivity of heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1−/−) mice to renal ischemia by assessing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and cytokine expression in the kidney, and inflammatory responses in the systemic circulation and in vital extrarenal organs. Four hours after renal ischemia, the GFR of HO-1−/− mice was much lower than that of wild-type mice in the absence of changes in renal blood flow or cardiac output. Eight hours after renal ischemia, there was a marked induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and its downstream signaling effector, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3), in the kidney, lung, and heart in HO-1−/− mice. Systemic levels of IL-6 were markedly and uniquely increased in HO-1−/− mice after ischemia as compared to wild-type mice. The administration of an antibody to IL-6 protected against the renal dysfunction and mortality observed in HO-1−/− mice following ischemia. We suggest that the exaggerated production of IL-6, occurring regionally and systemically following localized renal ischemia, in an HO-1-deficient state may underlie the heightened sensitivity observed in this setting. PMID:17728706

  19. Prolonged neutrophil dysfunction after Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to hemolysis and heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Cunnington, Aubrey J; Njie, Madi; Correa, Simon; Takem, Ebako N; Riley, Eleanor M; Walther, Michael

    2012-12-01

    It is not known why people are more susceptible to bacterial infections such as nontyphoid Salmonella during and after a malaria infection, but in mice, malarial hemolysis impairs resistance to nontyphoid Salmonella by impairing the neutrophil oxidative burst. This acquired neutrophil dysfunction is a consequence of induction of the cytoprotective, heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in neutrophil progenitors in bone marrow. In this study, we assessed whether neutrophil dysfunction occurs in humans with malaria and how this relates to hemolysis. We evaluated neutrophil function in 58 Gambian children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria [55 (95%) with uncomplicated disease] and examined associations with erythrocyte count, haptoglobin, hemopexin, plasma heme, expression of receptors for heme uptake, and HO-1 induction. Malaria caused the appearance of a dominant population of neutrophils with reduced oxidative burst activity, which gradually normalized over 8 wk of follow-up. The degree of neutrophil impairment correlated significantly with markers of hemolysis and HO-1 induction. HO-1 expression was increased in blood during acute malaria, but at a cellular level HO-1 expression was modulated by changes in surface expression of the haptoglobin receptor (CD163). These findings demonstrate that neutrophil dysfunction occurs in P. falciparum malaria and support the relevance of the mechanistic studies in mice. Furthermore, they suggest the presence of a regulatory pathway to limit HO-1 induction by hemolysis in the context of infection and indicate new targets for therapeutic intervention to abrogate the susceptibility to bacterial infection in the context of hemolysis in humans.

  20. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in demethylating effects on SKM-1 cells induced by decitabine.

    PubMed

    Gao, R; Ma, D; Wang, P; Sun, J; Wang, J S; Fang, Q

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the influence of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene inhibition in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell line SKM-1 on enhancement of the demethylating effects of decitabine on p15, and explored the possible mechanism. DNMT1 gene expression in SKM-1 cells was silenced by being transfected by a constructed siRNA with liposomes. The proliferation inhibition rates after drug treatment were detected by cell counting kit-8 assay. The apoptotic rates were detected by Annexin V/PI assay with flow cytometry. The expressions of p16, p15, TP73, CDH1, ESR1, and PDLIM4 mRNAs were detected by real-time PCR, and those of HO-1, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HDAC, and p15 proteins were measured by western blot. The degree of methylation of the p15 gene was analyzed by using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). CCK-8 assay showed that after HO-1 gene expression was inhibited; the proliferation rate of SKM-1 cells treated by decitabine (70.91 ± 0.05%) was significantly higher than that of the control group (53.67 ± 0.05%). Flow cytometry showed that the apoptotic rate of SKM- 1 cells treated by decitabine in combination with HO-1 expression inhibition (44.25 ± 0.05%) exceeded that of the cells treated by this drug alone (37.70 ± 0.05%). MSP showed that inhibiting HO-1 expression significantly increased the degree of methylation of the p15 gene. As suggested by western blot, the degree of methylation of the p15 protein was changed after decitabine treatment when the expression of the HO-1 protein was changed, being associated with the affected DNMT1 expression. Inhibited HO-1 expression attenuated the hypermethylation of CDKN2B by suppressing DNMT1, which was conducive to treatment by cooperating with decitabine. In conclusion, the findings of this study provide valuable experimental evidence for targeted MDS therapy, and a theoretical basis for further studies.

  1. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Can Halt and Even Reverse Renal Tubule-Interstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Costa, Matheus; Semedo, Patricia; Monteiro, Ana Paula F. S.; Silva, Reinaldo C.; Pereira, Rafael L.; Gonçalves, Giselle M.; Marques, Georgia Daniela Marcusso; Cenedeze, Marcos A.; Faleiros, Ana C. G.; Keller, Alexandre C.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Seguro, Antônio C.; Reis, Marlene A.; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels O. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The tubule-interstitial fibrosis is the hallmark of progressive renal disease and is strongly associated with inflammation of this compartment. Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective molecule that has been shown to be beneficial in various models of renal injury. However, the role of HO-1 in reversing an established renal scar has not yet been addressed. Aim We explored the ability of HO-1 to halt and reverse the establishment of fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic renal disease. Methods Sprague-Dawley male rats were subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) and divided into two groups: non-treated and Hemin-treated. To study the prevention of fibrosis, animals were pre-treated with Hemin at days -2 and -1 prior to UUO. To investigate whether HO-1 could reverse established fibrosis, Hemin therapy was given at days 6 and 7 post-surgery. After 7 and/or 14 days, animals were sacrificed and blood, urine and kidney tissue samples were collected for analyses. Renal function was determined by assessing the serum creatinine, inulin clearance, proteinuria/creatininuria ratio and extent of albuminuria. Arterial blood pressure was measured and fibrosis was quantified by Picrosirius staining. Gene and protein expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules, as well as HO-1 were performed. Results Pre-treatment with Hemin upregulated HO-1 expression and significantly reduced proteinuria, albuminuria, inflammation and pro-fibrotic protein and gene expressions in animals subjected to UUO. Interestingly, the delayed treatment with Hemin was also able to reduce renal dysfunction and to decrease the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, all in association with significantly reduced levels of fibrosis-related molecules and collagen deposition. Finally, TGF-β protein production was significantly lower in Hemin-treated animals. Conclusion Treatment with Hemin was able both to prevent the progression of fibrosis and to reverse an

  2. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Hwang, Jinha; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP)-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located -374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1 expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the -374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI patients and control

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Improves Cardiac Function following Myocardial Ischemia by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Issan, Yossi; Kornowski, Ran; Aravot, Dan; Shainberg, Asher; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Sodhi, Komal; Abraham, Nader G.; Hochhauser, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI) and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation. Methods In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured. Results HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phospho kinase (CK), decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS) was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05). CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01), reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively). CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05). The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05). CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05) in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects. Conclusions HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart as proved by

  4. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Meseda, Clement A; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection. PMID:25450361

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 gene variants and hyperbilirubinemia risk in North Indian newborns.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Pankaj Kumar; Sethi, Amanpreet; Basu, Sriparna; Raman, Rajiva; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in bilirubin metabolism, and its genetic variant may modulate hyperbilirubinemia risk in neonates. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between heme oxygenase-1 gene variants and hyperbilirubinemia risk in Indian newborns. In a prospective case-control study, we analyzed (GT)n repeats and g.-413A>T variant of HO-1 gene and UGT1A1 gene variants in 100 case newborns with total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels exceeding 95th percentile and 100 control newborns with TSB levels below 75th percentile on the hour-specific bilirubin nomogram of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Study population consisted of term (37-41 weeks) and late preterm (34-36 weeks) newborns during the first 2 weeks of age. In our analysis, the (GT)n allele was highly polymorphic, ranging in number from 15 to 40. The incidence of short (GT)n allele (≤ 20) was significantly higher in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia than in controls. Although g.-413A>T variant was widely prevalent in the study population, no difference was noted in its prevalence between cases and controls. Short (GT)n repeats of HO-1 gene, c.211G>A variant of UGT1A1 gene, and excessive weight loss were independent risk factors for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In the presence of two or more risk factors, the odds of developing neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were high. Shorter (GT)n genotype in the promoter region of HO-1 gene is significantly associated with hyperbilirubinemia risk in Indian newborns. This genotype may interact with other genetic and clinical risk factors to further potentiate hyperbilirubinemia risk in newborns.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 protects endothelial cells from the toxicity of air pollutant chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lawal, Akeem O.; Zhang, Min; Dittmar, Michael; Lulla, Aaron; Araujo, Jesus A.

    2015-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEPs on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) were treated with an organic extract of DEPs from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4 h. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and unfolded protein respone (UPR) gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25 μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but to a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMECs from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM. - Highlights: • We examined the role of HO-1 expression on diesel exhaust particle (DEP) in endothelial cells. • DEPs exert cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). • DEPs induce HO-1 expression in HMECs. • HO-1 protects against the oxidative stress induced by DEps. • HO-1 attenuates the proinflammatory effects

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates vascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome: Effect on endothelial dependent relaxation and NO production.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Hassan, Nadia; Zakaria, Mohamed N M

    2014-11-01

    Protective effect of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction from hypertension was previously reported in a diabetic animal model. Here, the effect of HO-1 induction on vascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) was investigated. MetS was induced in rats by fructose drinking for 12weeks while HO-1 was induced by hemin or curcumin administration in the last 6weeks. Then, aortic HO-1 protein expression was assessed, blood pressure (BP) was recorded and serum levels of glucose and insulin were measured. Concentration response curves for phenylephrine (PE), KCl, and acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained in thoracic aortic cross sections. Aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation were also studied. Both hemin and curcumin significantly inhibited the elevated systolic and diastolic BP seen in MetS animals. While not affected by MetS, HO-1 expression was significantly increased by hemin and curcumin treatment. HO-1 induction did not affect the exaggerated vasoconstriction response to KCl and PE. However, HO-1 induction prevented the impaired relaxation and NO generation in aorta isolated from MetS animals. In addition, the HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin, abolished the hemin protective effect on relaxation and NO generation. HO-1 induction prevented the elevated hyperinsulinemia associated with MetS. Furthermore, HO-1 induction inhibited ROS production in aorta isolated from MetS animals. In conclusion, Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates vascular complications associated in MetS through maintaining endothelial-dependent relaxation and NO generation in addition to improving insulin sensitivity.

  8. Heme oxygenase 1-mediated neurogenesis is enhanced by Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761®) after permanent ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Nada, Shadia E; Tulsulkar, Jatin; Shah, Zahoor A

    2014-04-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and a major cause of disability in stroke survivors. Studies have underlined the importance of repair mechanisms in the recovery phase of stroke. Neurogenesis in response to brain injury is one of the regeneration processes that, if enhanced, may offer better stroke treatment alternatives. Previously, we have demonstrated antioxidant, neuritogenic, and angiogenic properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in different mouse models of stroke. In the present study, we were interested to study whether EGb 761 could protect mice from permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and enhance neurogenesis. EGb 761 pre- and posttreated mice had lower infarct volume and improved motor skills with enhanced proliferation of neuronal stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) at 24 h and 7 days posttreatment. Netrin-1 and its receptors (DCC and UNC5B) that mediate axonal attraction and repulsion were observed to be overexpressed in NSPCs only, implying that netrin-1 and its receptors might have partly played a role in enhanced neurogenesis. Interestingly, in heme oxygenase 1 knockout mice (HO1(-/-)), neurogenesis was significantly lower than in vehicle-treated mice at day 8. Furthermore, EGb 761 posttreated mice also demonstrated heme oxygenase 1 (HO1)-activated pathway of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 α/β (p-GSK-3 α/β), collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2), semaphorin3A (SEMA3A), and Wnt, suggesting probable signaling pathways involved in proliferation, differentiation, and migration of NSPCs. Together, these results propose that EGb 761 not only has antioxidant, neuritogenic, and angiogenic properties, but can also augment the repair and regeneration mechanisms following stroke.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 gene delivery by Sleeping Beauty inhibits vascular stasis in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Belcher, John D; Vineyard, Julie V; Bruzzone, Carol M; Chen, Chunsheng; Beckman, Joan D; Nguyen, Julia; Steer, Clifford J; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    Increases in heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and administration of heme degradation products CO and biliverdin inhibit vascular inflammation and vasoocclusion in mouse models of sickle cell disease (SCD). In this study, an albumin (alb) promoter-driven Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase plasmid with a wild-type rat hmox-1 (wt-HO-1) transposable element was delivered by hydrodynamic tail vein injections to SCD mice. Eight weeks after injection, SCD mice had three- to five-fold increases in HO-1 activity and protein expression in liver, similar to hemin-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased perinuclear HO-1 staining in hepatocytes. Messenger RNA transcription of the hmox-1 transgene in liver was confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (qRT-PCR RFLP) with no detectible transgene expression in other organs. The livers of all HO-1 overexpressing mice had activation of nuclear phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phospho-Akt, decreased nuclear expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65, and decreased soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in serum. Hypoxia-induced stasis, a characteristic of SCD, but not normal mice, was inhibited in dorsal skin fold chambers in wt-HO-1 SCD mice despite the absence of hmox-1 transgene expression in the skin suggesting distal effects of HO activity on the vasculature. No protective effects were seen in SCD mice injected with nonsense (ns-) rat hmox-1 that encodes carboxy-truncated HO-1 with little or no enzyme activity. We speculate that HO-1 gene delivery to the liver is beneficial in SCD mice by degrading pro-oxidative heme, releasing anti-inflammatory heme degradation products CO and biliverdin/bilirubin into circulation, activating cytoprotective pathways and inhibiting vascular stasis at sites distal to transgene expression. PMID:20306336

  10. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice’s brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  11. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice's brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Angke; Xu, Lele; Li, Na; Yan, Yunhuan; Gao, Jiming; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Gaiping; Goodfellow, Ian G; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2015-10-29

    Viral cycle progression depends upon host-cell processes in infected cells, and this is true for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), the causative agent of BVD that is a worldwide threat to the bovine industry. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a ubiquitously expressed inducible isoform of the first and rate-limiting enzyme for heme degradation. Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 has significant antiviral properties, inhibiting the replication of viruses such as ebola virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. However, the function of HO-1 in BVDV infection is unclear. In the present study, the relationship between HO-1 and BVDV was investigated. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in BVDV-infected MDBK cells demonstrated that a decrease in HO-1 as BVDV replication increased. Increasing HO-1 expression through adenoviral-mediated overexpression or induction with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP, a potent HO-1 inducer), pre- and postinfection, effectively inhibited BVDV replication. In contrast, HO-1 siRNA knockdown in BVDV-infected cells increased BVDV replication. Therefore, the data were consistent with HO-1 acting as an anti-viral factor and these findings suggested that induction of HO-1 may be a useful prevention and treatment strategy against BVDV infection.

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Replication in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Angke; Xu, Lele; Li, Na; Yan, Yunhuan; Gao, Jiming; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Gaiping; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2015-01-01

    Viral cycle progression depends upon host-cell processes in infected cells, and this is true for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), the causative agent of BVD that is a worldwide threat to the bovine industry. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a ubiquitously expressed inducible isoform of the first and rate-limiting enzyme for heme degradation. Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 has significant antiviral properties, inhibiting the replication of viruses such as ebola virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. However, the function of HO-1 in BVDV infection is unclear. In the present study, the relationship between HO-1 and BVDV was investigated. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in BVDV-infected MDBK cells demonstrated that a decrease in HO-1 as BVDV replication increased. Increasing HO-1 expression through adenoviral-mediated overexpression or induction with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP, a potent HO-1 inducer), pre- and postinfection, effectively inhibited BVDV replication. In contrast, HO-1 siRNA knockdown in BVDV-infected cells increased BVDV replication. Therefore, the data were consistent with HO-1 acting as an anti-viral factor and these findings suggested that induction of HO-1 may be a useful prevention and treatment strategy against BVDV infection. PMID:26510767

  14. Role of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Postnatal Differentiation of Stem Cells: A Possible Cross-Talk with MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kozakowska, Magdalena; Szade, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) converts heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and ferrous ions, but its cellular functions are far beyond heme metabolism. HO-1 via heme removal and degradation products acts as a cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and proangiogenic protein, regulating also a cell cycle. Additionally, HO-1 can translocate to nucleus and regulate transcription factors, so it can also act independently of enzymatic function. Recent Advances: Recently, a body of evidence has emerged indicating a role for HO-1 in postnatal differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. Maturation of satellite cells, skeletal myoblasts, adipocytes, and osteoclasts is inhibited by HO-1, whereas neurogenic differentiation and formation of cardiomyocytes perhaps can be enhanced. Moreover, HO-1 influences a lineage commitment in pluripotent stem cells and maturation of hematopoietic cells. It may play a role in development of osteoblasts, but descriptions of its exact effects are inconsistent. Critical Issues: In this review we discuss a role of HO-1 in cell differentiation, and possible HO-1-dependent signal transduction pathways. Among the potential mediators, we focused on microRNA (miRNA). These small, noncoding RNAs are critical for cell differentiation. Recently we have found that HO-1 not only influences expression of specific miRNAs but also regulates miRNA processing enzymes. Future Directions: It seems that interplay between HO-1 and miRNAs may be important in regulating fates of stem and progenitor cells and needs further intensive studies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1827–1850. PMID:24053682

  15. Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: a possible implication for atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor; Nachtigal, Petr

    2013-11-01

    Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease. PMID:24056745

  16. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit V.; Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  17. Heme oxygenase-1, a novel target for the treatment of diabetic complications: focus on diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Negi, Geeta; Nakkina, Vanaja; Kamble, Pallavi; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a complex disorder induced by long standing diabetes. Many signaling pathways and transcription factors have been proposed to be involved in the development and progression of related processes. Years of research points to critical role of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of neuropathy in diabetes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is heat-shock protein induced under conditions of different kinds of stress and has been implicated in cellular defense against oxidative stress. HO-1 degrades heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO) and free iron. Biliverdin and CO are gaining particular interest because these two have been found to mediate most of anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of HO-1. Although extensively studied in different kinds of cancers and cardiovascular conditions, role of HO-1 in diabetic neuropathy is still under investigation. In this paper, we review the unique therapeutic potential of HO-1 and its role in mitigating various pathological processes that lead to diabetic neuropathy. This review also highlights the therapeutic approaches such as pharmacological and natural inducers of HO-1, gene delivery of HO-1 or its reaction products that in future, could lead to progression of HO-1 activators through the preclinical stages of drug development to clinical trials.

  18. Downregulation of Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Activity in Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Their Engraftment After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Grubczak, Kamil; Rzeszotek, Sylwia; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-response enzyme that not only catalyzes the degradation of heme (e.g., released from erythrocytes) but also has an important function in various physiological and pathophysiological states associated with cellular stress, such as ischemic/reperfusion injury. HO-1 has a well-documented anti-inflammatory potential, and HO-1 has been reported to have a negative effect on adhesion and migration of neutrophils in acute inflammation in a model of peritonitis. This finding is supported by our recent observation that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) from HO-1 KO mice are easy mobilizers, since they respond better to peripheral blood chemotactic gradients than wild-type littermates. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that transient inhibition of HO-1 by nontoxic small-molecule inhibitors would enhance migration of HSPCs in response to bone marrow chemoattractants and thereby facilitate their homing. To directly address this issue, we generated several human hematopoietic cell lines in which HO-1 was upregulated or downregulated. We also exposed murine and human BM-derived cells to small-molecule activators and inhibitors of HO-1. Our results indicate that HO-1 is an inhibitor of hematopoietic cell migration in response to crucial BM homing chemoattractants such as stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Most importantly, our in vitro and in vivo animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transiently inhibiting HO-1 activity in HSPCs by small-molecule inhibitors improves HSPC engraftment. We propose that this simple and inexpensive strategy could be employed in the clinical setting to improve engraftment of HSPCs, particularly in those situations in which the number of HSPCs available for transplant is limited (e.g., when transplanting umbilical cord blood). PMID:27412411

  19. The Mononuclear Phagocyte System in Homeostasis and Disease: A Role for Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potential therapeutic target in many diseases, especially those mediated by oxidative stress and inflammation. HO-1 expression appears to regulate the homeostatic activity and distribution of mononuclear phagocytes (MP) in lymphoid tissue under physiological conditions. It also regulates the ability of MP to modulate the inflammatory response to tissue injury. Recent Advances: The induction of HO-1 within MP—particularly macrophages and dendritic cells—modulates the effector functions that they acquire after activation. These effector functions include cytokine production, surface receptor expression, maturation state, and polarization toward a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype. The importance of HO-1 in MP is emphasized by their expression of specific receptors that primarily function to ingest heme-containing substrate and deliver it to HO-1. Critical Issues: MP are the first immunological responders to tissue damage. They critically affect the outcome of injury to many organ systems, yet few therapies are currently available to specifically target MP during disease pathogenesis. Elucidation of the role of HO-1 expression in MP may help to direct broadly applicable therapies to clinical use that are based on the immunomodulatory capabilities of HO-1. Future Directions: Unraveling the complexities of HO-1 expression specifically within MP will more completely define how HO-1 provides cytoprotection in vivo. The use of models in which HO-1 expression is specifically modulated in bone marrow-derived cells will allow for a more complete characterization of its immunoregulatory properties. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1770–1788. PMID:24147608

  20. Orthodontic Forces Induce the Cytoprotective Enzyme Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Suttorp, Christiaan M; Xie, Rui; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Uijttenboogaart, Jasper Tom; Van Rheden, René; Maltha, Jaap C; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic forces disturb the microenvironment of the periodontal ligament (PDL), and induce craniofacial bone remodeling which is necessary for tooth movement. Unfortunately, orthodontic tooth movement is often hampered by ischemic injury and cell death within the PDL (hyalinization) and root resorption. Large inter-individual differences in hyalinization and root resorption have been observed, and may be explained by differential protection against hyalinization. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) forms an important protective mechanism by breaking down heme into the strong anti-oxidants biliverdin/bilirubin and the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. These versatile HO-1 products protect against ischemic and inflammatory injury. We postulate that orthodontic forces induce HO-1 expression in the PDL during experimental tooth movement. Twenty-five 6-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. The upper three molars at one side were moved mesially using a Nickel-Titanium coil spring, providing a continuous orthodontic force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as control. After 6, 12, 72, 96, and 120 h groups of rats were killed. On parasagittal sections immunohistochemical staining was performed for analysis of HO-1 expression and quantification of osteoclasts. Orthodontic force induced a significant time-dependent HO-1 expression in mononuclear cells within the PDL at both the apposition- and resorption side. Shortly after placement of the orthodontic appliance HO-1 expression was highly induced in PDL cells but dropped to control levels within 72 h. Some osteoclasts were also HO-1 positive but this induction was shown to be independent of time- and mechanical stress. It is tempting to speculate that differential induction of tissue protecting- and osteoclast activating genes in the PDL determine the level of bone resorption and hyalinization and, subsequently, "fast" and "slow" tooth movers during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27486402

  1. Orthodontic Forces Induce the Cytoprotective Enzyme Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Suttorp, Christiaan M; Xie, Rui; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Uijttenboogaart, Jasper Tom; Van Rheden, René; Maltha, Jaap C; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic forces disturb the microenvironment of the periodontal ligament (PDL), and induce craniofacial bone remodeling which is necessary for tooth movement. Unfortunately, orthodontic tooth movement is often hampered by ischemic injury and cell death within the PDL (hyalinization) and root resorption. Large inter-individual differences in hyalinization and root resorption have been observed, and may be explained by differential protection against hyalinization. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) forms an important protective mechanism by breaking down heme into the strong anti-oxidants biliverdin/bilirubin and the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. These versatile HO-1 products protect against ischemic and inflammatory injury. We postulate that orthodontic forces induce HO-1 expression in the PDL during experimental tooth movement. Twenty-five 6-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. The upper three molars at one side were moved mesially using a Nickel-Titanium coil spring, providing a continuous orthodontic force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as control. After 6, 12, 72, 96, and 120 h groups of rats were killed. On parasagittal sections immunohistochemical staining was performed for analysis of HO-1 expression and quantification of osteoclasts. Orthodontic force induced a significant time-dependent HO-1 expression in mononuclear cells within the PDL at both the apposition- and resorption side. Shortly after placement of the orthodontic appliance HO-1 expression was highly induced in PDL cells but dropped to control levels within 72 h. Some osteoclasts were also HO-1 positive but this induction was shown to be independent of time- and mechanical stress. It is tempting to speculate that differential induction of tissue protecting- and osteoclast activating genes in the PDL determine the level of bone resorption and hyalinization and, subsequently, "fast" and "slow" tooth movers during orthodontic treatment.

  2. Orthodontic Forces Induce the Cytoprotective Enzyme Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, Christiaan M.; Xie, Rui; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Uijttenboogaart, Jasper Tom; Van Rheden, René; Maltha, Jaap C.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic forces disturb the microenvironment of the periodontal ligament (PDL), and induce craniofacial bone remodeling which is necessary for tooth movement. Unfortunately, orthodontic tooth movement is often hampered by ischemic injury and cell death within the PDL (hyalinization) and root resorption. Large inter-individual differences in hyalinization and root resorption have been observed, and may be explained by differential protection against hyalinization. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) forms an important protective mechanism by breaking down heme into the strong anti-oxidants biliverdin/bilirubin and the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. These versatile HO-1 products protect against ischemic and inflammatory injury. We postulate that orthodontic forces induce HO-1 expression in the PDL during experimental tooth movement. Twenty-five 6-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. The upper three molars at one side were moved mesially using a Nickel-Titanium coil spring, providing a continuous orthodontic force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as control. After 6, 12, 72, 96, and 120 h groups of rats were killed. On parasagittal sections immunohistochemical staining was performed for analysis of HO-1 expression and quantification of osteoclasts. Orthodontic force induced a significant time-dependent HO-1 expression in mononuclear cells within the PDL at both the apposition- and resorption side. Shortly after placement of the orthodontic appliance HO-1 expression was highly induced in PDL cells but dropped to control levels within 72 h. Some osteoclasts were also HO-1 positive but this induction was shown to be independent of time- and mechanical stress. It is tempting to speculate that differential induction of tissue protecting- and osteoclast activating genes in the PDL determine the level of bone resorption and hyalinization and, subsequently, “fast” and “slow” tooth movers during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27486402

  3. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 by ginsenoside Ro attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophage cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sokho; Oh, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Bum-Seok; Kim, Won-Il; Cho, Ho-Seong; Park, Byoung-Yong; Park, Chul; Shin, Gee-Wook; Kwon, Jungkee

    2015-01-01

    Background The beneficial effects of ginsenoside species have been well demonstrated in a number of studies. However, the function of ginsenoside Ro (GRo), an oleanane-type saponin, has not been sufficiently investigated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of GRo in vitro using the Raw 264.7 mouse macrophage cell line treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and to clarify the possible mechanism of GRo involving heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which itself plays a critical role in self-defense in the presence of inflammatory stress. Methods Raw 264.7 cells were pretreated with GRo (up to 200μM) for 1 h before treatment with 1 μg/mL LPS, and both cell viability and inflammatory markers involving HO-1 were evaluated. Results GRo significantly increased cell viability in a dose dependent manner following treatment with LPS, and decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. GRo decreased inflammatory cytokines such as nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 induced by LPS. Moreover, GRo increased the expression of HO-1 in a dose dependent manner. Cotreatment of GRo with tin protoporphyrin IX, a selective inhibitor of HO-1, not only inhibited upregulation of HO-1 induced by GRo, but also reversed the anti-inflammatory effect of GRo in LPS treated Raw 264.7 cells. Conclusion GRo induces anti-inflammatory effects following treatment with LPS via upregulation of HO-1. PMID:26869829

  4. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP+- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP+ or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD. PMID:27097841

  5. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP(+)- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP(+) or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD. PMID:27097841

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency accompanies neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Alexander J.; Kovacsics, Colleen E.; Cross, Stephanie A.; Vance, Patricia J.; Kolson, Lorraine L.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Kolson, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible, detoxifying enzyme that is critical for limiting oxidative stress, inflammation, and cellular injury within the CNS and other tissues. Here, we demonstrate a deficiency of HO-1 expression in the brains of HIV-infected individuals. This HO-1 deficiency correlated with cognitive dysfunction, HIV replication in the CNS, and neuroimmune activation. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in HIV-infected macrophages, a primary CNS HIV reservoir along with microglia, demonstrated a decrease in HO-1 as HIV replication increased. HO-1 deficiency correlated with increased culture supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity, suggesting a link among HIV infection, macrophage HO-1 deficiency, and neurodegeneration. HO-1 siRNA knockdown and HO enzymatic inhibition in HIV-infected macrophages increased supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity. In contrast, increasing HO-1 expression through siRNA derepression or with nonselective pharmacologic inducers, including the CNS-penetrating drug dimethyl fumarate (DMF), decreased supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity. Furthermore, IFN-γ, which is increased in CNS HIV infection, reduced HO-1 expression in cultured human astrocytes and macrophages. These findings indicate that HO-1 is a protective host factor against HIV-mediated neurodegeneration and suggest that HO-1 deficiency contributes to this degeneration. Furthermore, these results suggest that HO-1 induction in the CNS of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy could potentially protect against neurodegeneration and associated cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25202977

  7. Heme oxygenase-1-derived bilirubin protects endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damage.

    PubMed

    He, Meihua; Nitti, Mariapaola; Piras, Sabrina; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Traverso, Nicola; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Mann, Giovanni E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia and diabetes are associated with endothelial cell dysfunction arising from enhanced oxidative injury, leading to the progression of diabetic vascular pathologies. The redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of antioxidant genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), involved in cellular defenses against oxidative stress. We have investigated the pathways involved in high glucose-induced activation of HO-1 in endothelial cells and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying cytoprotection. Elevated d-glucose increased intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and HO-1 expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells, with no changes in cell viability. Superoxide scavenging and inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) abrogated upregulation of HO-1 expression by elevated glucose. Inhibition of HO-1 increased the sensitivity of endothelial cells to high glucose-mediated damage, while addition of bilirubin restored cell viability. Our findings establish that exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose leads to activation of endogenous antioxidant defense genes via the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Upregulation of HO-1 provides cytoprotection against high glucose-induced oxidative stress through the antioxidant properties of bilirubin. Modulation of the Nrf2 pathway in the early stages of diabetes may thus protect against sustained damage by hyperglycemia during progression of the disease.

  8. Modulation of Melanogenesis by Heme Oxygenase-1 via p53 in Normal Human Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Sun; Jin, Suna; Yun, Sook Jung

    2016-01-01

    As a key regulator of melanogenesis, p53 controls microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expression. The anti-oxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced by various forms of cellular stress and diverse oxidative stimuli. However, few studies have examined the role of HO-1 in melanogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of HO-1 in melanogenesis and the mechanism underlying this relationship. Cultures of normal human melanocytes were treated with the HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). We then measured the melanin content of the cells. Additional analyses consisted of Western blotting and RT-PCR. The results showed that the cellular melanin content was increased by CoPP and decreased by ZnPP. The Western blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that CoPP increased p53, MITF and tyrosinase levels, and ZnPP reduced all of them. The knockdown of p53 by siRNA transfection was followed by large decreases in the expression levels of p53, MITF and tyrosinase at 3 h of transfection. The presence of CoPP or ZnPP had no significant increased or decreased effects on MITF and tyrosinase levels from 15 h in the siRNA transfectants. Our results suggest that HO-1 modulates melanogenesis in human melanocytes via a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:26865999

  9. Targeted expression of heme oxygenase-1 prevents the pulmonary inflammatory and vascular responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Tohru; Christou, Helen; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Liu, Yuxiang; Dhawan, Vijender; Abraham, Nader G.; Perrella, Mark A.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2001-07-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension with smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix deposition in the wall of the pulmonary arterioles. We demonstrate here that hypoxia also induces a pronounced inflammation in the lung before the structural changes of the vessel wall. The proinflammatory action of hypoxia is mediated by the induction of distinct cytokines and chemokines and is independent of tumor necrosis factor- signaling. We have previously proposed a crucial role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxic stress, and potent anti-inflammatory properties of HO-1 have been reported in models of tissue injury. We thus established transgenic mice that constitutively express HO-1 in the lung and exposed them to chronic hypoxia. HO-1 transgenic mice were protected from the development of both pulmonary inflammation as well as hypertension and vessel wall hypertrophy induced by hypoxia. Significantly, the hypoxic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed in HO-1 transgenic mice. Our findings suggest an important protective function of enzymatic products of HO-1 activity as inhibitors of hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory pathways.

  10. Overexpressed human heme Oxygenase-1 decreases adipogenesis in pigs and porcine adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-11-27

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) are multipotent, which means they are able to differentiate into several lineages in vivo and in vitro under proper conditions. This indicates it is possible to determine the direction of differentiation of ADSC by controlling the microenvironment. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a type of antioxidant enzyme, attenuates adipogenicity and obesity. We produced transgenic pigs overexpressing human HO-1 (hHO-1-Tg), and found that these animals have little fatty tissue when autopsied. To determine whether overexpressed human HO-1 suppresses adipogenesis in pigs, we analyzed body weight increases of hHO-1-Tg pigs and wild type (WT) pigs of the same strain, and induced adipogenic differentiation of ADSC derived from WT and hHO-1-Tg pigs. The hHO-1-Tg pigs had lower body weights than WT pigs from 16 weeks of age until they died. In addition, hHO-1-Tg ADSC showed reduced adipogenic differentiation and expression of adipogenic molecular markers such as PPARγ and C/EBPα compared to WT ADSC. These results suggest that HO-1 overexpression reduces adipogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, which could support identification of therapeutic targets of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  11. ATF4-dependent induction of heme oxygenase 1 prevents anoikis and promotes metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Souvik; Sayers, Carly M.; Verginadis, Ioannis I.; Lehman, Stacey L.; Cheng, Yi; Cerniglia, George J.; Tuttle, Stephen W.; Feldman, Michael D.; Zhang, Paul J.L.; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) is a critical mediator of cancer cell survival, and targeting the ISR inhibits tumor progression. Here, we have shown that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a master transcriptional effector of the ISR, protects transformed cells against anoikis — a specialized form of apoptosis — following matrix detachment and also contributes to tumor metastatic properties. Upon loss of attachment, ATF4 activated a coordinated program of cytoprotective autophagy and antioxidant responses, including induced expression of the major antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). HO-1 upregulation was the result of simultaneous activation of ATF4 and the transcription factor NRF2, which converged on the HO1 promoter. Increased levels of HO-1 ameliorated oxidative stress and cell death. ATF4-deficient human fibrosarcoma cells were unable to colonize the lungs in a murine model, and reconstitution of ATF4 or HO-1 expression in ATF4-deficient cells blocked anoikis and rescued tumor lung colonization. HO-1 expression was higher in human primary and metastatic tumors compared with noncancerous tissue. Moreover, HO-1 expression correlated with reduced overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma. These results establish HO-1 as a mediator of ATF4-dependent anoikis resistance and tumor metastasis and suggest ATF4 and HO-1 as potential targets for therapeutic intervention in solid tumors. PMID:26011642

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulation in the Brain: Implications for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Kolson, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a highly inducible and ubiquitous cellular enzyme that subserves cytoprotective responses to toxic insults, including inflammation and oxidative stress. In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, HO-1 expression is increased, presumably reflecting an endogenous neuroprotective response against ongoing cellular injury. In contrast, we have found that in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the brain, which is also associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, HO-1 expression is decreased, likely reflecting a unique role for HO-1 deficiency in neurodegeneration pathways activated by HIV infection. We have also shown that HO-1 expression is significantly suppressed by HIV replication in cultured macrophages which represent the primary cellular reservoir for HIV in the brain. HO-1 deficiency is associated with release of neurotoxic levels of glutamate from both HIV-infected and immune-activated macrophages; this glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity is suppressed by pharmacological induction of HO-1 expression in the macrophages. Thus, HO-1 induction could be a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection against HIV infection and other neuroinflammatory brain diseases. Here, we review various stimuli and signaling pathways regulating HO-1 expression in macrophages, which could promote neuronal survival through HO-1-modulation of endogenous antioxidant and immune modulatory pathways, thus limiting the oxidative stress that can promote HIV disease progression in the CNS. The use of pharmacological inducers of endogenous HO-1 expression as potential adjunctive neuroprotective therapeutics in HIV infection is also discussed. PMID:24862327

  13. Neuroprotective effects of Argon are mediated via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heme-oxygenase-1 in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai B; Coburn, Mark; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Roesslein, Martin; Biermann, Julia; Buerkle, Hartmut; Loop, Torsten; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (R-IRI) damage neuronal tissue permanently. Recently, we demonstrated that Argon exerts anti-apoptotic and protective properties. The molecular mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation exert neuroprotective effects in rats retinal ganglion cells (RGC) via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heat-shock proteins. Inhalation of Argon (75 Vol%) was performed after R-IRI on the rats' left eyes for 1 h immediately or with delay. Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 h to analyze mRNA and protein expression of heat-shock proteins -70, -90 and heme-oxygenase-1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38, JNK, ERK-1/2) and histological changes. To analyze ERK dependent effects, the ERK inhibitor PD98059 was applicated prior to Argon inhalation. RGC count was analyzed 7 days after injury. Statistics were performed using anova. Argon significantly reduced the R-IRI-affected heat-shock protein expression (p < 0.05). While Argon significantly induced ERK-1/2 expression (p < 0.001), inhibition of ERK-1/2 before Argon inhalation resulted in significantly lower vital RGCs (p < 0.01) and increase in heme-oxygenase-1 (p < 0.05). R-IRI-induced RGC loss was reduced by Argon inhalation (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry suggested ERK-1/2 activation in Müller cells. We conclude, that Argon treatment protects R-IRI-induced apoptotic loss of RGC via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heme-oxygenase-1. We proposed the following possible mechanism for Argon-mediated neuroprotection: Argon exerts its protective effects via an induction of an ERK with subsequent suppression of the heat shock response. In conclusion, ischemia and reperfusion injuries and subsequent neuronal apoptosis are attenuated. These novel findings may open up new opportunities for Argon as a therapeutic option, especially since Argon is not toxic.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of Saururus chinensis aerial parts in murine macrophages via induction of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue; Kim, Inhye; Jeong, Yong Joon; Cho, Young Mi

    2016-01-01

    Saururus chinensis (Lour.) Baill. is a perennial plant distributed throughout Northeast Asia and its roots have been widely used as a traditional medicine for hepatitis, asthma, pneumonia, and gonorrhea. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of an extract of S. chinensis of the aerial parts (rather than the root), and the signaling pathway responsible for this effect in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. The subfraction 4 (SCF4) from the n-hexane layer of the ethanol extract of the aerial parts of S. chinensis exhibited the highest nitrite-inhibitory activity. SCF4 significantly inhibited the production of nitrite and the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators via heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. SCF4 caused significant phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt, which subsequently induced the nuclear translocation of p-p65 nuclear factor-κB and Nrf2. SCF4 also suppressed the phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (p-STAT1). The heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin attenuated the inhibitory effect of SCF4 on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitrite production and expression of inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and p-STAT1. We identified sauchinone as the active compound in S. chinensis extract and SCF4. Sauchinone was shown to significantly inhibit nitrite production and inflammatory mediators expression via heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. These results suggest that S. chinensis extract, SCF4, and its active compound, sauchinone, could be used as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:26553125

  15. Effects of Silymarin on Hepatitis C Virus and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Vania; Shan, Ying; Lambrecht, Richard W.; Donohue, Susan E.; Moschenross, Darcy; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global medical problem. The current standard treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC), pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, is prolonged, expensive, has serious side effects and, at best, is only 50% effective. Silymarin is a natural antioxidant often used by patients with CHC, although its efficacy for decreasing HCV levels or ameliorating CHC remains uncertain. HCV infection is associated with increased hepatic oxidative stress, and one of the antioxidant enzymes which protect cells against this stress is heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Methods We investigated effects of silymarin on HCV and HO-1 gene expression in Huh-7 cells, CNS3, and 9-13 cells (the latter two stably expressing HCV-proteins). Results Silymarin significantly down-regulated HCV core mRNA (by 20% - 36%) and protein (by 30%-60%) in CNS3 cells. In contrast, silymarin did not decrease HCV NS5A mRNA or protein expression in 9-13 cells. HO-1 mRNA was up-regulated (60%-400%) by silymarin in Huh-7, CNS3 and 9-13 cells, whereas Bach1 and Nrf2 mRNA levels were not affected. The effect of silymarin to down-regulate HCV core was not related to changes in the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. Conclusions Silymarin may be of benefit in CHC, although prospective, randomized, controlled trials are needed to be certain. PMID:18694403

  16. Bach1 repression of ferritin and thioredoxin reductase1 is heme-sensitive in cells and in vitro and coordinates expression with heme oxygenase1, beta-globin, and NADP(H) quinone (oxido) reductase1.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Korry J; Katoh, Yasutake; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2007-11-23

    Ferritin gene transcription is regulated by heme as is ferritin mRNA translation, which is mediated by the well studied mRNA.IRE/IRP protein complex. The heme-sensitive DNA sequence in ferritin genes is the maf recognition/antioxidant response element present in several other genes that are induced by heme and repressed by Bach1. We now report that chromatin immunoprecipitated with Bach1 antiserum contains ferritin DNA sequences. In addition, overexpression of Bach1 protein in the transfected cells decreased ferritin expression, indicating insufficient endogenous Bach1 for full repression; decreasing Bach1 with antisense RNA increased ferritin expression. Thioredoxin reductase1, a gene that also contains a maf recognition/antioxidant response element but is less studied, responded similarly to ferritin, as did the positive controls heme oxygenase1 and NADP(H) quinone (oxido) reductase1. Bach1-DNA promoter interactions in cells were confirmed in vitro with soluble, recombinant Bach1 protein and revealed a quantitative range of Bach1/DNA stabilities: ferritin L approximately ferritin H approximately beta-globin, beta-globin approximately 2-fold >heme oxygenase1 = quinone reductase beta-globin approximately 4-fold >thioredoxin reductase1. Such results indicate the possibility that modulation of cellular Bach1 concentrations will have variable effects among the genes coordinately regulated by maf recognition/antioxidant response elements in iron/oxygen/antioxidant metabolism.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress stimulates heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle. Role in cell survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Peyton, Kelly J; Ensenat, Diana; Wang, Hong; Schafer, Andrew I; Alam, Jawed; Durante, William

    2005-01-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective protein that catalyzes the degradation of heme to biliverdin, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). In the present study, we found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by a variety of experimental agents stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent increase in HO-1 mRNA and protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). The induction of HO-1 by ER stress was blocked by actinomycin D or cycloheximide and was independent of any changes in HO-1 mRNA stability. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that ER stress stimulated HO-1 promoter activity via the antioxidant response element. Moreover, ER stress induced the nuclear import of Nrf2 and the binding of Nrf2 to the HO-1 antioxidant response element. Interestingly, ER stress stimulated SMC apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding, caspase-3 activation, and DNA laddering. The induction of apoptosis by ER stress was potentiated by HO inhibition, whereas it was prevented by addition of HO substrate. In addition, exposure of SMC to exogenously administered CO inhibited ER stress-mediated apoptosis, and this was associated with a decrease in the expression of the proapoptotic protein, GADD153. In contrast, the other HO-1 products failed to block apoptosis or GADD153 expression during ER stress. These results demonstrated that ER stress is an inducer of HO-1 gene expression in vascular SMC and that HO-1-derived CO acts in an autocrine fashion to inhibit SMC apoptosis. The capacity of ER stress to stimulate the HO-1/CO system provides a novel mechanism by which this organelle regulates cell survival.

  18. Combined inhibition of Hsp90 and heme oxygenase-1 induces apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Parenti, Rosalba; Zappalà, Agata; Vanella, Luca; Tibullo, Daniele; Pepe, Francesco; Onni, Toniangelo; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones involved in post-translational folding, stability, activation and maturation of many proteins that are essential mediators of signal transduction and cell cycle progression. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has recently emerged as an attractive therapeutic target in cancer treatment since it may act as a key regulator of various oncogene products and cell-signaling molecules. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; also known as Hsp32) is an inducible enzyme participating in heme degradation and involved in oxidative stress resistance. Recent studies indicate that HO-1 activation may play a role in tumor development and progression. In the present study we investigated the chemotherapic effects of combining an Hsp90 inhibitor (NMS E973) and an HO-1 inhibitor (SnMP) on A375 melanoma cells. NMS E973 treatment was able to reduce cell viability and induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (i.e. Ire1α, ERO1, PDI, BIP and CHOP). Interestingly, no significant effect was observed in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Finally, NMS E973 treatment resulted in a significant HO-1 overexpression, which in turn serves as a possible chemoresistance molecular mechanism. Interestingly, the combination of NMS E973 and SnMP produced an increase of ROS and reduced cell viability compared to NMS E973 treatment alone. The inhibitors combination exhibited higher ER stress, apoptosis as evidenced by bifunctional apoptosis regulator (BFAR) mRNA expression and lower phosphorylation of Akt when compared to NMS E973 alone. In conclusion, these data suggest that HO-1 inhibition potentiates NMS E973 toxicity and may be exploited as a strategy for melanoma treatment.

  19. Construction of a lentiviral vector encoding heme oxygenase 1 and its introduction into mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C H; Lei, W; Chen, Z R

    2015-09-09

    Many studies exist concerning the use of stem cells as delivery vehicles in gene therapy, expressing genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor 165 and hepatocyte growth factor. However, few reports regarding adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) gene have been published. Therefore, we established a lentiviral vector encoding HO-1 and used this to infect ADSCs with the aim of producing therapeutic seed cells. In this study, ADSCs were isolated from mouse adipose tissue (AT), cultured, and identified according to the expression of antigens on their cell surface and their capacity for multilineage differentiation. A lentiviral vector encoding HO-1 was constructed, ADSCs were infected with this, and HO-1 protein expression was examined by western blotting. Our results show that ADSCs can be isolated from mouse AT, while DNA sequencing demonstrated that HO-1 was successfully transferred to the vector fused with GFP. Following 293T cell transfection, lentivirus titers were approximately 3 x 10(8) TU/mL. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the expression of the HO-1 construct in lentivirus-infected ADSCs and the overexpression of HO-1 protein in these cells was verified by western blot. The production of ADSCs overexpressing HO-1 described in this study may aid in the development of a novel method for the treatment of asthma.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against Alzheimer's amyloid-β(1-42)-induced toxicity via carbon monoxide production.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, N; Dallas, M; Al-Owais, M; Griffiths, H; Hooper, N; Scragg, J; Boyle, J; Peers, C

    2014-12-11

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible enzyme up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease, catabolises heme to biliverdin, Fe2+ and carbon monoxide (CO). CO can protect neurones from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting Kv2.1 channels, which mediates cellular K+ efflux as an early step in the apoptotic cascade. Since apoptosis contributes to the neuronal loss associated with amyloid β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in AD, we investigated the protective effects of HO-1 and CO against Aβ(1-42) toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells, employing cells stably transfected with empty vector or expressing the cellular prion protein, PrP(c), and rat primary hippocampal neurons. Aβ(1-42) (containing protofibrils) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability, attributable at least in part to induction of apoptosis, with the PrP(c)-expressing cells showing greater susceptibility to Aβ(1-42) toxicity. Pharmacological induction or genetic over-expression of HO-1 significantly ameliorated the effects of Aβ(1-42). The CO-donor CORM-2 protected cells against Aβ(1-42) toxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Electrophysiological studies revealed no differences in the outward current pre- and post-Aβ(1-42) treatment suggesting that K+ channel activity is unaffected in these cells. Instead, Aβ toxicity was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and by the CaMKKII inhibitor, STO-609. Aβ also activated the downstream kinase, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). CO prevented this activation of AMPK. Our findings indicate that HO-1 protects against Aβ toxicity via production of CO. Protection does not arise from inhibition of apoptosis-associated K+ efflux, but rather by inhibition of AMPK activation, which has been recently implicated in the toxic effects of Aβ. These data provide a novel, beneficial effect of CO which adds to its growing potential as a therapeutic agent.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against Alzheimer's amyloid-β1-42-induced toxicity via carbon monoxide production

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, N; Dallas, M; Al-Owais, M; Griffiths, H; Hooper, N; Scragg, J; Boyle, J; Peers, C

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible enzyme up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease, catabolises heme to biliverdin, Fe2+ and carbon monoxide (CO). CO can protect neurones from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting Kv2.1 channels, which mediates cellular K+ efflux as an early step in the apoptotic cascade. Since apoptosis contributes to the neuronal loss associated with amyloid β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in AD, we investigated the protective effects of HO-1 and CO against Aβ1-42 toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells, employing cells stably transfected with empty vector or expressing the cellular prion protein, PrPc, and rat primary hippocampal neurons. Aβ1-42 (containing protofibrils) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability, attributable at least in part to induction of apoptosis, with the PrPc-expressing cells showing greater susceptibility to Aβ1-42 toxicity. Pharmacological induction or genetic over-expression of HO-1 significantly ameliorated the effects of Aβ1-42. The CO-donor CORM-2 protected cells against Aβ1-42 toxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Electrophysiological studies revealed no differences in the outward current pre- and post-Aβ1-42 treatment suggesting that K+ channel activity is unaffected in these cells. Instead, Aβ toxicity was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and by the CaMKKII inhibitor, STO-609. Aβ also activated the downstream kinase, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). CO prevented this activation of AMPK. Our findings indicate that HO-1 protects against Aβ toxicity via production of CO. Protection does not arise from inhibition of apoptosis-associated K+ efflux, but rather by inhibition of AMPK activation, which has been recently implicated in the toxic effects of Aβ. These data provide a novel, beneficial effect of CO which adds to its growing potential as a therapeutic agent. PMID:25501830

  2. Proinflammatory cytokines promote glial heme oxygenase-1 expression and mitochondrial iron deposition: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mehindate, K; Sahlas, D J; Frankel, D; Mawal, Y; Liberman, A; Corcos, J; Dion, S; Schipper, H M

    2001-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, pathological iron deposition, and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). HO-1 mRNA levels and mitochondrial uptake of [(55)Fe]Cl(3)-derived iron were measured in rat astroglial cultures exposed to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alone or in combination with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitors, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) or dexamthasone (DEX), or interferon beta1b (INF-beta). HO-1 expression in astrocytes was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of spinal cord tissue derived from MS and control subjects. IL-1beta or TNF-alpha promoted sequestration of non-transferrin-derived (55)Fe by astroglial mitochondria. HO-1 inhibitors, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MTP) blockers and antioxidants significantly attenuated cytokine-related mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. IFN-beta decreased HO-1 expression and mitochondrial iron sequestration in IL-1beta- and TNF-alpha-challenged astroglia. The percentage of astrocytes coexpressing HO-1 in affected spinal cord from MS patients (57.3% +/- 12.8%) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in normal spinal cord derived from controls subjects (15.4% +/- 8.4%). HO-1 is over-expressed in MS spinal cord astroglia and may promote mitochondrial iron deposition in MS plaques. In MS, IFN-beta may attenuate glial HO-1 gene induction and aberrant mitochondrial iron deposition accruing from exposure to proinflammatory cytokines.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 is involved in sodium hydrosulfide-induced lateral root formation in tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Li, Jiale; Cao, Zeyu; Chen, Meng; Shen, Wei; Huang, Liqin

    2014-06-01

    By using pharmacological and molecular approaches, we discovered the involvement of HO-1 in NaHS-induced lateral root formation in tomato seedlings. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) regulate various responses to abiotic stress and root development, but their involvement in the simultaneous regulation of plant lateral root (LR) formation is poorly understood. In this report, we observed that the exogenously applied H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and the HO-1 inducer hemin induce LR formation in tomato seedlings by triggering intracellular signaling events involving the induction of tomato HO-1 (SlHO-1), and the modulation of cell cycle regulatory genes, including the up-regulation of SlCDKA;1 and SlCYCA2;1, and simultaneous down-regulation of SlKRP2. The response of NaHS in the induction of LR formation was impaired by the potent inhibition of HO-1, which was further blocked when 50 % saturation of carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution, one of the catalytic by-products of HO-1, was added. Further molecular evidence revealed that the NaHS-modulated gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes was sensitive to the inhibition of HO-1 and reversed by cotreatment with CO. The impairment of LR density and length as well as lateral root primordia number, the decreased tomato HO-1 gene expression and HO activity caused by an H2S scavenger hypotaurine were partially rescued by the addition of NaHS, hemin and CO (in particular). Together, these results revealed that at least in our experimental conditions, HO-1 might be involved in NaHS-induced tomato LR formation. Additionally, the use of NaHS and hemin compounds in crop root organogenesis should be explored.

  4. Galantamine and carbon monoxide protect brain microvascular endothelial cells by heme oxygenase-1 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Atsunori; Kaczorowski, David J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Lei Jing; Faleo, Gaetano; Deguchi, Kentaro; McCurry, Kenneth R.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kanno, Shinichi

    2008-03-14

    Galantamine, a reversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), is a novel drug treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Interestingly, it has been suggested that galantamine treatment is associated with more clinical benefit in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease compared to other AChE inhibitors. We hypothesized that the protective effects of galantamine would involve induction of the protective gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in addition to enhancement of the cholinergic system. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (mvECs) were isolated from spontaneous hypertensive rats. Galantamine significantly reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death of mvECs in association with HO-1 induction. These protective effects were completely reversed by nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) inhibition or HO inhibition. Furthermore, galantamine failed to induce HO-1 in mvECs which lack inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), supplementation of a nitric oxide (NO) donor or iNOS gene transfection on iNOS-deficient mvECs resulted in HO-1 induction with galantamine. These data suggest that the protective effects of galantamine require NF-{kappa}B activation and iNOS expression, in addition to HO-1. Likewise, carbon monoxide (CO), one of the byproducts of HO, up-regulated HO-1 and protected mvECs from oxidative stress in a similar manner. Our data demonstrate that galantamine mediates cytoprotective effects on mvECs through induction HO-1. This pharmacological action of galantamine may, at least in part, account for the superior clinical efficacy of galantamine in vascular dementia and Alzheimer disease.

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  6. Protection from ischemic heart injury by a vigilant heme oxygenase-1 plasmid system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao Liang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Y Clare; Qian, Keping; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2004-04-01

    Although human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) could provide a useful approach for cellular protection in the ischemic heart, constitutive overexpression of hHO-1 may lead to unwanted side effects. To avoid this, we designed a hypoxia-regulated hHO-1 gene therapy system that can be switched on and off. This vigilant plasmid system is composed of myosin light chain-2v promoter and a gene switch that is based on an oxygen-dependent degradation domain from the hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha. The vector can sense ischemia and switch on the hHO-1 gene system, specifically in the heart. In an in vivo experiment, the vigilant hHO-1 plasmid or saline was injected intramyocardially into myocardial infarction mice or sham operation mice. After gene transfer, expression of hHO-1 was only detected in the ischemic heart treated with vigilant hHO-1 plasmids. Masson trichrome staining showed significantly fewer fibrotic areas in vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice compared with saline control (43.0%+/-4.8% versus 62.5%+/-3.3%, P<0.01). The reduction of interstitial fibrosis is accompanied by an increase in myocardial hHO-1 expression in peri-infarct border areas, concomitant with higher Bcl-2 levels and lower Bax, Bak, and caspase 3 levels in the ischemic myocardium compared with saline control. By use of a cardiac catheter, heart from vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice showed improved recovery of contractile and diastolic performance after myocardial infarction compared with saline control. This study documents the beneficial regulation and therapeutic potential of vigilant plasmid-mediated hHO-1 gene transfer. This novel gene transfer strategy can provide cardiac-specific protection from future repeated bouts of ischemic injury.

  7. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 protects against nutritional fibrosing steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant defense enzyme, has been shown to protect against oxidant-induced liver injury. However, its role on liver fibrosis remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the effect and the mechanism of HO-1 in nutritional fibrosing steatohepatitis in mice. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed with a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet for eight weeks to induce hepatic fibrosis. HO-1 chemical inducer (hemin), HO-1 chemical inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX) and/or adenovirus carrying HO-1 gene (Ad-HO-1) were administered to mice, respectively. Liver injury was assessed by serum ALT, AST levels and histological examination; hepatic lipid peroxides levels were determined; the expression levels of several fibrogenic related genes were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. Results MCD feeding mice showed progressive hepatic injury including hepatic steatosis, inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis. Induction of HO-1 by hemin or Ad-HO-1 significantly attenuated the severity of liver injury. This effect was associated with the up-regulation of HO-1, reduction of hepatic lipid peroxides levels, down-regulation of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 as well as the pro-fibrotic genes alpha-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-β1, matrix metallopeptidase-2 and matrix metallopeptidase-9. A contrary effect was observed in mice treated with ZnPP-IX. Conclusions The present study provided the evidence for the protective role of HO-1 in ameliorating MCD diet-induced fibrosing steatohepatitis. Modulation of HO-1 expression might serve as a therapeutic approach for fibrotic steatohepatitis. PMID:21314960

  8. Length polymorphism in heme oxygenase-1 is associated with arteriovenous fistula patency in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C; Yang, W-C; Lin, S-J; Chen, T-W; Lee, W-S; Chang, C-F; Lee, P-C; Lee, S-D; Su, T-S; Fann, C S-J; Chung, M-Y

    2006-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, producing carbon monoxide (CO), which carries potent antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects in the vascular walls. Transcription of the HO-1 gene is regulated by the length polymorphism of dinucleotide guanosine thymine repeat (GT)(n) in the promoter region, which was measured in this study to determine its association with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failure in Chinese hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan. L allele means (GT)(n)>or=30 and S allele means (GT)n<30. Therefore, there are two L alleles for L/L genotype, one L and one S allele for L/S genotype, and two S alleles for S/S genotype. Among the 603 HD patients who were enrolled in this study, 178 patients had history of AVF failure, while 425 patients did not. Significant associations were found between AVF failure and the following factors (hazard ratio): longer HD duration (1.004 month), lower pump flow (0.993 ml/min), higher dynamic venous pressure (1.010 mmHg), location of AVF on the right side (1.587 vs left side) and upper arm (2.242 vs forearm), and L/L and L/S genotypes of HO-1 (2.040 vs S/S genotype). The proportion of AVF failure increased from 20.3% in S/S genotype and 31.0% in L/S genotype to 35.4% in L/L genotype (P=0.011). Relative incidences were 1/87.6 (1 episode per 87.6 patient-months), 1/129, and 1/224.9 for HD patients with L/L, L/S, and S/S genotypes, respectively (P<0.002). The unassisted patency of AVF at 5 years decreased significantly from 83.8% (124/148) to 75.1% (223/297) and 69% (109/158) in S/S, L/S, and L/L genotypes, respectively (P<0.0001). In comparison with HD patients with S/S genotype, those with L/L genotype had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (29.1 vs 14.2%; P=0.005). A longer length polymorphism with (GT)(n) >or=30 in the HO-1 gene was associated with a higher frequency of access failure and a poorer patency of AVF in HD patients. The longer GT repeat in the HO-1 promoter

  9. Aripiprazole increases NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase-1 and heme oxygenase-1 in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yoko S; Takayanagi, Takeshi; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Kodani, Yu; Nakashima, Akira; Mori, Keiji; Suzuki, Atsushi; Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Kondo, Kazunao; Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Ota, Miyuki; Ota, Akira

    2015-06-01

    We previously showed that aripiprazole increases intracellular NADPH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA in PC12 cells. Aripiprazole presumably activates a system that concurrently detoxifies reactive oxygen species and replenishes NADPH. Nrf2, a master transcriptional regulator of redox homeostasis genes, also activates the pentose phosphate pathway, including NADPH production. Therefore, our aim was to determine whether aripiprazole activates Nrf2 in PC12 cells. Aripiprazole increased mRNA expression of Nrf2-dependent genes (NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase-1, Nqo1; heme oxygenase-1, HO1; and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit) and protein expression of Nqo1 and HO1 in these cells (p < 0.05). To maintain increased Nrf2 activity, it is necessary to inhibit Nrf2 degradation; this is done by causing Nrf2 to dissociate from Keap1 or β-TrCP. However, in aripiprazole-treated cells, the relative amount of Nrf2 anchored to Keap1 or β-TrCP was unaffected and Nrf2 in the nuclear fraction decreased (p < 0.05). Aripiprazole did not affect phosphorylation of Nrf2 at Ser40 and decreased the relative amount of acetylated Nrf2 (p < 0.05). The increase in Nqo1 and HO1 in aripiprazole-treated cells cannot be explained by the canonical Nrf2-degrading pathways. Further experiments are needed to determine the biochemical mechanisms underlying the aripiprazole-induced increase in these enzymes.

  10. Curcumin attenuates dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver injury in rats through Nrf2-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Farombi, E Olatunde; Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Na, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Surh, Young-Joon

    2008-04-01

    Curcumin (diferuloymethane), a yellow colouring agent present in the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn (Zingiberaceae), has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. Curcumin exerts its chemoprotective and chemopreventive effects via multiple mechanisms. It has been reported to induce expression of the antioxidant enzymes in various cell lines. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an important antioxidant enzyme that plays a pivotal role in cytoprotection against noxious stimuli of both endogenous and exogenous origin. In the present study, we found that oral administration of curcumin at 200mg/kg dose for four consecutive days not only protected against dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic injury, but also resulted in more than three-fold induction of HO-1 protein expression as well as activity in rat liver. Inhibition of HO-1 activity by zinc protoporphyrin-IX abrogated the hepatoprotective effect of curcumin against DMN toxicity. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a role in the cellular protection against oxidative stress through antioxidant response element (ARE)-directed induction of several phase-2 detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes including HO-1. Curcumin administration resulted in enhanced nuclear translocation and ARE-binding of Nrf2. Taken together, these findings suggest that curcumin protects against DMN-induced hepatotoxicity, at least in part, through ARE-driven induction of HO-1 expression. PMID:18006204

  11. Mitochondrial iron sequestration in dopamine-challenged astroglia: role of heme oxygenase-1 and the permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Schipper, H M; Bernier, L; Mehindate, K; Frankel, D

    1999-05-01

    Little is currently known concerning the mechanisms responsible for the excessive deposition of redox-active iron in the substantia nigra of subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we demonstrate that dopamine promotes the selective sequestration of non-transferrin-derived iron by the mitochondrial compartment of cultured rat astroglia and that the mechanism underlying this novel dopamine effect is oxidative in nature. We also provide evidence that up-regulation of the stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is both necessary and sufficient for mitochondrial iron trapping in dopamine-challenged astroglia. Finally, we show that opening of the mitochondrial transition pore (MTP) mediates the influx of non-transferrin-derived iron into mitochondria of dopamine-stimulated and HO-1-transfected astroglia. Our findings provide an explanation for the pathological iron sequestration, mitochondrial insufficiency, and amplification of oxidative injury reported in the brains of PD subjects. Pharmacological blockade of transition metal trapping by "stressed" astroglial mitochondria (e.g., using HO-1 inhibitors or modulators of the MTP) may afford effective neuroprotection in patients with PD and other neurological afflictions.

  12. MicroRNA-218 promotes high glucose-induced apoptosis in podocytes by targeting heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haibo; Wang, Qingjun; Li, Sutong

    2016-03-18

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a mediatory role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we found that miR-218 was upregulated in high glucose (HG) treated podocytes, which are essential components of the glomerular filtration barrier and a major prognostic determinant in diabetic nephropathy. Additionally, up-regulation of miR-218 was accompanied by an increased rate of podocyte death and down-regulation in the level of nephrin, a key marker of podocytes. However, inhibition of miR-218 exerted the opposite effect. In addition, the dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-218 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and further study confirmed an increase of HO-1 in HG-treated podocytes transfected with anti-miR-218. Knockdown of HO-1 blocked the anti-apoptotic effect of anti-miR-218. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-218 was associated with decreased expression of the known pro-apoptotic molecule p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) activation. Following preconditioning with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38-MAPK, the stimulatory effect of HG on podocyte apoptosis was strikingly ameliorated. These findings suggested that miR-218 accelerated HG-induced podocyte apoptosis through directly down-regulating HO-1 and facilitating p38-MAPK activation. PMID:26876575

  13. Ammonia-induced oxidative damage in neurons is prevented by resveratrol and lipoic acid with participation of heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Flores, Marianne Pires; Leite, Marina Concli; Quincozes-Santos, André; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia is a metabolite that, at high concentrations, is implicated in neurological disorders, such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE), which is associated with acute or chronic liver failure. Astrocytes are considered the primary target of ammonia toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) because glutamine synthetase (GS), responsible for ammonia metabolism in CNS, is an astrocytic enzyme. Thus, neuronal dysfunction has been associated as secondary to astrocytic impairment. However, we demonstrated that ammonia can induce direct effects on neuronal cells. The cell viability was decreased by ammonia in SH-SY5Y cells and cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, ammonia induced increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased GSH intracellular content, the main antioxidant in CNS. As ammonia neurotoxicity is strongly associated with oxidative stress, we also investigated the potential neuroprotective roles of the antioxidants, resveratrol (RSV) and lipoic acid (LA), against ammonia toxicity in cerebellar granule neurons. RSV and LA were able to prevent the oxidative damage induced by ammonia, maintaining the levels of ROS production and GSH close to basal values. Both antioxidants also decreased ROS production and increased GSH content under basal conditions (in the absence of ammonia). Moreover, we showed that heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), a protein associated with protection against stress conditions, is involved in the beneficial effects of RSV and LA in cerebellar granule neurons. Thus, this study reinforces the neuroprotective effects of RSV and LA. Although more studies in vivo are required, RSV and LA could represent interesting therapeutic strategies for the management of HE.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 inhibits phosphorylation of the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA in gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; de Sablet, Thibaut; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) plays a pivotal role in the etiology of Helicobacter (H.) pylori-associated gastric diseases. CagA is injected into the cytoplasm of host cells by a type IV secretion system, and is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the host enzyme c-Src. We previously reported that the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits IL-8 secretion by H. pylori-infected cells. However, the cellular mechanism by which HO-1 regulates the innate immune function of infected cells remains unknown. We now show that nitric oxide and hemin, two inducers of HO-1, decrease the level of phosphorylated CagA (p-CagA) in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells and this is blocked by either pharmacologic inhibition of HO-1 or siRNA knockdown of hmox-1. Moreover, forced expression of HO-1 by transfection of a plasmid expressing hmox-1 also results in a strong attenuation of CagA phosphorylation. This occurs through the inhibition of H. pylori-induced c-Src phosphorylation/activation by HO-1. Consequently, H. pylori-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and activation of the pro-inflammatory response mediated by p-CagA are inhibited in HO-1-expressing cells. These data highlight a mechanism by which the innate immune response of the host can restrict the pathogenicity of H. pylori by attenuating CagA phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:23051580

  15. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by arsenite inhibits cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xi; Pi Jingbo; Liu Wenlan; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian; Feng Changjian

    2009-04-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. Arsenite, as an oxidative stressor, is a potent inducer of HO-1 in human and rodent cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of arsenite-induced HO-1 in modulating tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Arsenite pretreatment, which upregulated HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 protein expression by 50% and 40%, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the arsenite-induced inhibitory effects. These results indicate that induction of HO-1 by arsenite inhibits the cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by suppressing adhesion molecule expression. These findings established an important mechanistic link between the functional monocyte adhesion properties of HUVEC and the induction of HO-1 by arsenite.

  16. Effective suppression of nitric oxide production by HX106N through transcriptional control of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Suk Lee, Doo; Kim, Binna N.; Lim, Seonung; Lee, Junsub; Kim, Jiyoung; Jeong, Jae-Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been suggested to be a key neuroprotective enzyme because of its widespread distribution in the brain as well as its strong antioxidative effects. HX106N, a water-soluble botanical formulation, has previously been demonstrated to prevent amyloid β-induced memory impairment and oxidative stress in mice by upregulating HO-1 levels. In this study, the underlying molecular mechanisms of HX106N-induced HO-1 expression were investigated using BV-2 cells, a murine microglial cell line, and primary microglia. Treatment with HX106N induced the expression of HO-1 at the transcriptional level through the stress-responsive element-containing enhancer present in the ho-1 promoter. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was activated in cells treated with HX106N. The results from knockdown assay showed that small interfering RNA of Nrf2 attenuated HX106N-mediated HO-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibitors of p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases suppressed the HX106N-mediated induction of HO-1. The NF-κB signaling pathway was activated by HX106N and played a role in HX106N-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, HO-1 and one of its by-products during the enzymatic degradation of heme, CO, were found to be involved in HX106N-mediated suppression of NO production. Taken together, these data indicate that HX106N exerts potent antioxidative effects by increasing the expression of HO-1 through multiple signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of NO production. PMID:25605059

  17. Gold nanoparticles induce heme oxygenase-1 expression through Nrf2 activation and Bach1 export in human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tsung-Hsuan; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Tsou, Chih-Jen; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that increased levels and activity of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein ameliorate tissue injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on HO-1 protein expression in human vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The AuNPs induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction was reduced by the thiol-containing antioxidants, including N-acetylcysteine and glutathione, but not by the non-thiol-containing antioxidants and inhibitors that block the enzymes for intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. The AuNPs enhanced Nrf2 protein levels but did not affect Nrf2 mRNA expression. In response to the AuNP treatment, the cytosolic Nrf2 translocated to the nucleus, and, concomitantly, Bach1 exited the nucleus and its tyrosine phosphorylation increased. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the translocated Nrf2 bound to the antioxidant-response element located in the E2 enhancer region of the HO-1 gene promoter and acted as a transcription factor. Although N-acetylcysteine inhibited the AuNP-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, the AuNPs did not promote intracellular reactive oxygen species production or endoplasmic reticulum stress in the ECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 expression by RNA interference significantly inhibited AuNP-induced HO-1 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. In summary, AuNPs enhance the levels and nuclear translocation of the Nrf2 protein and Bach1 export/tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 E2 enhancer promoter region to drive HO-1 expression in ECs. This study, together with our parallel findings, demonstrates that AuNPs can act as an HO-1 inducer, which may partially contribute to their anti-inflammatory bioactivity in human vascular ECs. PMID:26445536

  18. Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Response to Wild Thyme Treatment Protects against Hypertension and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Miloradović, Zoran; Bugarski, Branko; Jovović, Đurđica; Vajić, Una-Jovana; Grujić-Milanović, Jelica

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is the most powerful contributor to the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and inverse correlation between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods or beverages and incidence of cardiovascular diseases gains more importance. Reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the development of hypertension. We found that wild thyme (a spice plant, rich in polyphenolic compounds) induced a significant decrease of blood pressure and vascular resistance in hypertensive rats. The inverse correlation between vascular resistance and plasma heme oxygenase-1 suggests that endogenous vasodilator carbon monoxide generated by heme oxidation could account for this normalization of blood pressure. Next product of heme oxidation, bilirubin (a chain-breaking antioxidant that acts as a lipid peroxyl radical scavenger), becomes significantly increased after wild thyme treatment and induces the reduction of plasma lipid peroxidation in hypertensive, but not in normotensive rats. The obtained results promote wild thyme as useful supplement for cardiovascular interventions. PMID:27774115

  19. Postischemic cardiac recovery in heme oxygenase-1 transgenic ischemic/reperfused mouse myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, Bela; Varga, Balazs; Czompa, Attila; Bak, Istvan; Lekli, Istvan; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Zsuga, Judit; Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Antal, Miklos; Szendrei, Levente; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic mice (Tg) were created using a rat HO-1 genomic transgene. Transgene expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blots in the left ventricle (LV), right ventricle (RV) and septum (S) in mouse hearts, and its function was demonstrated by the elevated HO enzyme activity. Tg and non-transgenic (NTg) mouse hearts were isolated and subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Significant post-ischemic recovery in coronary flow (CF), aortic flow (AF), aortic pressure (AOP) and first derivative of AOP (AOPdp/dt) were detected in the HO-1 Tg group compared to the NTg values. In HO-1 Tg hearts treated with 50 μmol/kg of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), an HO enzyme inhibitor, abolished the post-ischemic cardiac recovery. HO-1 related carbon monoxide (CO) production was detected in NTg, HO-1 Tg and HO-1 Tg + SnPPIX treated groups, and a substantial increase in CO production was observed in the HO-1 Tg hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Moreover, in ischemia/reperfusion-induced tissue Na+ and Ca2+ gains were reduced in HO-1 Tg group in comparison with the NTg and HO-1 Tg + SnPPIX treated groups; furthermore K+ loss was reduced in the HO-1 Tg group. The infarct size was markedly reduced from its NTg control value of 37 ± 4% to 20 ± 6% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 Tg group, and was increased to 47 ± 5% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 knockout (KO) hearts. Parallel to the infarct size reduction, the incidence of total and sustained ventricular fibrillation were also reduced from their NTg control values of 92% and 83% to 25% (P < 0.05) and 8% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 Tg group, and were increased to 100% and 100% in HO-1 KO−/− hearts. Immunohistochemical staining of HO-1 was intensified in HO-1 Tg compared to the NTg myocardium. Thus, the HO-1 Tg mouse model suggests a valuable therapeutic approach in the treatment of ischemic myocardium. PMID:20716121

  20. Role of the Nrf2-heme oxygenase-1 pathway in silver nanoparticle-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Su Jin; Ryoo, In-geun; Lee, Young Joon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) have been widely used in various commercial products including textiles, electronic appliances and biomedical products. However, there remains insufficient information on the potential risk of nano-Ag to human health and environment. In the current study, we have investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor in nano-Ag-induced cytotoxicity. When Nrf2 expression was blocked using interring RNA expression in ovarian carcinoma cell line, nano-Ag treatment showed a substantial decrease in cell viability with concomitant increases in apoptosis and DNA damage compared to the control cells. Target gene analysis revealed that the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was highly elevated by nano-Ag in nonspecific shRNA expressing cells, while Nrf2 knockdown cells (NRF2i) did not increase HO-1 expression. The role of HO-1 in cytoprotection against nano-Ag was reinforced by results using pharmacological inducer of HO-1: cobalt protoporphyrin-mediated HO-1 activation in the NRF2i cells prevented nano-Ag-mediated cell death. Similarly, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of HO-1 in nonspecific control cells exacerbated nano-Ag toxicity. As the upstream signaling mechanism, nano-Ag required the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and p38MAPK signaling cascades for HO-1 induction. The treatment with either PI3K inhibitor or p38MAPK inhibitor suppressed HO-1 induction and intensified nano-Ag-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that Nrf2-dependent HO-1 up-regulation plays a protective role in nano-Ag-induced DNA damage and consequent cell death. In addition, nano-Ag-mediated HO-1 induction is associated with the PI3K and p38MAPK signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Role of Nrf2 signaling in silver nanoparticle toxicity. ► Silver nanoparticle toxicity is increased by Nrf2 blockade. ► Nrf2-dependent HO-1 induction protects cells from silver nanoparticle toxicity. ► PI3K and p38MAPK cascades are

  1. Membrane lipid modification by polyunsaturated fatty acids sensitizes oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells against oxidative stress and promotes up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32).

    PubMed

    Brand, Annette; Bauer, Nina G; Hallott, Amanda; Goldbaum, Olaf; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Reifen, Ram; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2010-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are highly abundant in brain tissue, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) might protect cells from oxidative stress (OS) during inflammation and demyelinating disorders, but also might exert pro-oxidant effects. Here we investigated if PUFA supplements lead to heat shock protein induction, altered cell survival properties and stress responses to OS exerted by hydrogen peroxide in oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells. The data show that supplements of various fatty acids (FA) with 18-22 carbons chain length and 2-6 double bonds led to PUFA enrichment in cellular membranes. Depending on the degree of desaturation, FA-supplements caused the up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32), a stress protein inducible by OS, and an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-treatment. DHA, with the highest number of double bonds, was most effective. Co-treatment with DHA and the lipophilic vitamin E analogue alpha-tocopherol, suppressed heme oxygenase-1 up-regulation and cell survival was restored. Analysis of the lipid profile demonstrates that alpha-tocopherol not only has antioxidant capacities, but also directly modified the PUFA profile in cell membranes. Enrichment with higher omega-3, -6 and -9 PUFA and an increase in the biosynthesis rate of very long chain fatty acids, mainly changed the FA profile of ethanolamine and serine phosphoglycerides.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect of transduced PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 in Raw 264.7 cells and a mouse edema model

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Soon Won; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Jeong, Hoon Jae; Kim, Mi Jin; Ahn, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Nam; Dutta, Suman; Kim, Duk-Soo; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant PEP-1 heme oxygenase-1 expression vector was constructed and overexpressed. {yields} We investigated transduction efficiency of PEP-1-HO-1 protein in Raw 264.7 cells. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 was efficiently transduced into Raw 264.7 cells in a dose and time dependent manner. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 exerted anti-inflammatory activity in Raw 264.7 cells and in a mice edema model. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 could be used as a therapeutic drug against inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of free heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron (Fe{sup 2+}), is up-regulated by several cellular stress and cell injuries, including inflammation, ischemia and hypoxia. In this study, we examined whether fusion of HO-1 with PEP-1, a protein transduction domain that is able to deliver exogenous molecules to living cells or tissues, would facilitate HO-1 delivery to target cells and tissues, and thereby effectively exert a therapeutically useful response against inflammation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins were transduced into Raw 264.7 cells in time- and dose-dependent manners, and were stably maintained in the cells for about 60 h. In addition, fluorescence analysis revealed that only PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins were significantly transduced into the cytoplasm of cells, while HO-1 proteins failed to be transduced. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse edema model, transduced PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins effectively inhibited the overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Also, histological analysis demonstrated that PEP-1-HO-1 remarkably suppressed ear edema. The results suggest that the PEP-1-HO-1 fusion protein can be used as a therapeutic molecule against reactive oxygen species-related inflammatory diseases.

  3. Increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Kutty, R K; Nagineni, C N; Kutty, G; Hooks, J J; Chader, G J; Wiggert, B

    1994-05-01

    Antibodies specific for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were produced in rabbits, using the multiple antigen peptide (MAP) technique, and were employed to investigate the ability of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) to induce the HO-1 protein in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Western blot analyses showed that the cytokine induced HO-1 in these cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. TGF-beta 1 also increased the mRNA for HO-1 in treated cells prior to the increase in HO-1 protein. The induction was effectively blocked by a neutralizing antibody preparation against TGF-beta 1. When tested under similar conditions, other growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor-I, platelet-derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-alpha, and epidermal growth factor did not show appreciable induction of HO-1. Lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma were also not inducers, although TGF-beta 2 effectively induced HO-1. Heavy metal ions and thiol reagents were also highly potent inducers of HO-1 in human RPE cells. The induction of HO-1 by TGF-beta 1 was also observed in bovine choroid fibroblasts, but not in HELA, HEL or bovine corneal fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate for the first time that HO-1 can be induced by an important cytokine, TGF-beta 1, causing an increase in the expression of both HO-1 message and protein in specific neuroepithelial and fibroblast cells.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  5. Multiple elements within the 5' distal enhancer of the mouse heme oxygenase-1 gene mediate induction by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Alam, J

    1994-10-01

    A 268-base pair 5' distal fragment, SX2, which mediates basal level and inducer-dependent activation of the mouse heme oxygenase-1 gene, contains two activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding sites (Alam, J., and Zhining, D. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 21894-21900). Mutation of both AP-1 binding elements diminishes (by 50-70%), but does not abolish, the enhancer activity of SX2 in transient expression assays, suggesting that other sequences contribute to enhancer function. Directly upstream of the AP-1 binding sites are two copies of a sequence motif, TGAGGAAAT, which resemble elements found in cellular and viral genes that are known to interact with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors. These SX2 sequences bind specifically to liver-enriched, heat-stable nuclear proteins and confer C/EBP alpha-dependent transactivation of the heterologous chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Site-directed mutagenesis of these 9-base pair elements abolishes protein binding and transactivation, establishing these sequences as functional C/EBP binding sites. Stably transfected SX2/CAT fusion genes are induced between 37- and 44-fold in mouse hepatoma, Hepa, cells and between 52- and 111-fold in mouse fibroblast L929 cells in response to CdCl2 treatment. Subfragments of SX2 lacking the AP-1 binding elements do not mediate cadmium-dependent activation of the CAT gene, whereas subfragments containing the AP-1 binding elements, but lacking the C/EBP binding sites, exhibit only partial transcriptional activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of one or more of the C/EBP and AP-1 binding sites indicates that each of these elements is required for optimal activity of the SX2 enhancer fragment. The AP-1 binding elements, however, appear to be more important for induction as constructs containing multiple copies of either of the AP-1 binding elements, but not the C/EBP binding sequences, are readily activated by CdCl2. Treatment of Hepa cells with cadmium or

  6. Structural insights into human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition by potent and selective azole-based compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2013-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors, especially those that are isozyme-selective, promises powerful pharmacological tools to elucidate the regulatory characteristics of the HO system. It is already known that HO has cytoprotective properties and may play a role in several disease states, making it an enticing therapeutic target. Traditionally, the metalloporphyrins have been used as competitive HO inhibitors owing to their structural similarity with the substrate, heme. However, given heme's important role in several other proteins (e.g. cytochromes P450, nitric oxide synthase), non-selectivity is an unfortunate side-effect. Reports that azalanstat and other non-porphyrin molecules inhibited HO led to a multi-faceted effort to develop novel compounds as potent, selective inhibitors of HO. This resulted in the creation of non-competitive inhibitors with selectivity for HO, including a subset with isozyme selectivity for HO-1. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures of several complexes of HO-1 with novel inhibitors have been elucidated, which provided insightful information regarding the salient features required for inhibitor binding. This included the structural basis for non-competitive inhibition, flexibility and adaptability of the inhibitor binding pocket, and multiple, potential interaction subsites, all of which can be exploited in future drug-design strategies. PMID:23097500

  7. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated autophagy protects against pulmonary endothelial cell death and development of emphysema in cadmium-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Kim, Hyunki; Yu, Zhihong; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Mirov, Sergey B; Carter, A Brent; Rowe, Steven M; Matalon, Sadis; Thannickal, Victor J; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary exposure to cadmium, a major component of cigarette smoke, has a dramatic impact on lung function and the development of emphysema. Cigarette smoke exposure induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we employed a truncated mouse model of emphysema by intratracheal instillation of cadmium (CdCl2) solution (0.025% per 1 mg/kg body wt) in HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and overexpressing humanized HO-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (hHO-1BAC) mice. We evaluated the role of HO-1 in cadmium-induced emphysema in mice by analyzing histopathology, micro-computed tomography scans, and lung function tests. CdCl2-exposed HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited more severe emphysema compared with HO-1(+/+) or hHO-1BAC mice. Loss of pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) from the alveolar capillary membrane is recognized to be a target in emphysema. PECs from HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and hHO-1BAC were employed to define the underlying molecular mechanism for the protection from emphysema by HO-1. Electron microscopy, expression of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1B-light chain 3 II, autophagy protein 5, and Beclin1) and apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase 3) suggested induction of autophagy and apoptosis in PECs after CdCl2 treatment. CdCl2-treated HO-1(-/-) PECs exhibited downregulation of autophagic markers and significantly increased cleaved caspase 3 expression and activity (∼4-fold higher). Moreover, hHO-1BAC PECs demonstrated upregulated autophagy and absence of cleaved caspase 3 expression or activity. Pretreatment of HO-1(+/+) PECs with rapamycin induced autophagy and resulted in reduced cell death upon cadmium treatment. Induction of autophagy following CdCl2 treatment was found to be protective from apoptotic cell death. HO-1 induced protective autophagy in PECs and mitigated cadmium-induced emphysema.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated autophagy protects against pulmonary endothelial cell death and development of emphysema in cadmium-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Kim, Hyunki; Yu, Zhihong; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Mirov, Sergey B.; Carter, A. Brent; Rowe, Steven M.; Matalon, Sadis; Thannickal, Victor J.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to cadmium, a major component of cigarette smoke, has a dramatic impact on lung function and the development of emphysema. Cigarette smoke exposure induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we employed a truncated mouse model of emphysema by intratracheal instillation of cadmium (CdCl2) solution (0.025% per 1 mg/kg body wt) in HO-1+/+, HO-1−/−, and overexpressing humanized HO-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (hHO-1BAC) mice. We evaluated the role of HO-1 in cadmium-induced emphysema in mice by analyzing histopathology, micro-computed tomography scans, and lung function tests. CdCl2-exposed HO-1−/− mice exhibited more severe emphysema compared with HO-1+/+ or hHO-1BAC mice. Loss of pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) from the alveolar capillary membrane is recognized to be a target in emphysema. PECs from HO-1+/+, HO-1−/−, and hHO-1BAC were employed to define the underlying molecular mechanism for the protection from emphysema by HO-1. Electron microscopy, expression of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1B-light chain 3 II, autophagy protein 5, and Beclin1) and apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase 3) suggested induction of autophagy and apoptosis in PECs after CdCl2 treatment. CdCl2-treated HO-1−/− PECs exhibited downregulation of autophagic markers and significantly increased cleaved caspase 3 expression and activity (∼4-fold higher). Moreover, hHO-1BAC PECs demonstrated upregulated autophagy and absence of cleaved caspase 3 expression or activity. Pretreatment of HO-1+/+ PECs with rapamycin induced autophagy and resulted in reduced cell death upon cadmium treatment. Induction of autophagy following CdCl2 treatment was found to be protective from apoptotic cell death. HO-1 induced protective autophagy in PECs and mitigated cadmium-induced emphysema. PMID:26071551

  9. Chromosomal localization of the human heme oxygenase genes: Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) maps to chromosome 22q12 and heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2) maps to chromosome 16p13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R.K.; Kutty, G.; Rodriguez, I.R.; Chader, G.J.; Wiggert, B. )

    1994-04-01

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, the precursor of the bile pigment bilirubin, and carbon monoxide, a putative neurotransmitter. The authors have employed polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine the chromosome localization of the genes coding for the two known heme oxygenase isozymes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), the inducible form, was localized to human chromosome 22q12, while heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2), the constitutive form, was localized to chromosome 16p13.3. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Cross-talk between two antioxidants, thioredoxin reductase and heme oxygenase-1, and therapeutic implications for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Raninga, Prahlad V.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by an accumulation of abnormal clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancements in anti-myeloma therapies, MM remains an incurable disease. Antioxidant molecules are upregulated in many cancers, correlating with tumor proliferation, survival, and chemoresistance and therefore, have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets. This study investigated the cross-talk between two antioxidant molecules, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and their therapeutic implications in MM. We found that although auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor, significantly inhibited TrxR activity by more than 50% at lower concentrations, myeloma cell proliferation was only inhibited at higher concentrations of auranofin. Inhibition of TrxR using lower auranofin concentrations induced HO-1 protein expression in myeloma cells. Using a sub-lethal concentration of auranofin to inhibit TrxR activity in conjunction with HO-1 inhibition significantly decreased myeloma cell growth and induced apoptosis. TrxR was shown to regulate HO-1 via the Nrf2 signaling pathway in a ROS-dependent manner. Increased HO-1 mRNA levels were observed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared to parent cells and HO-1 inhibition restored the sensitivity to bortezomib in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells. These findings indicate that concurrent inhibition of HO-1 with either a TrxR inhibitor or with bortezomib would improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. Hence, our findings further support the need to target multiple antioxidant systems alone or in combination with other therapeutics to improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. PMID:26795735

  11. Desipramine Protects Neuronal Cell Death and Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mes23.5 Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Huang, Bor-Ren; Lin, Chingju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Ho; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2012-01-01

    Background Desipramine is known principally as a tricyclic antidepressant drug used to promote recovery of depressed patients. It has also been used in a number of other psychiatric and medical conditions. The present study is the first to investigate the neuroprotective effect of desipramine. Methodology/Principal Findings Mes23.5 dopaminergic cells were used to examine neuroprotective effect of desipramine. Western blot, reverse transcription-PCR, MTT assay, siRNA transfection and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) were carried out to assess the effects of desipramine. Desipramine induces endogenous anti-oxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein and mRNA expression in concentration- and time-dependent manners. A different type of antidepressant SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), fluoxetine also shows similar effects of desipramine on HO-1 expression. Moreover, desipramine induces HO-1 expression through activation of ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Desipramine also increases NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) accumulation in the nucleus and enhances Nrf2-DNA binding activity. Moreover, desipramine-mediated increase of HO-1 expression is reduced by transfection with siRNA against Nrf2. On the other hand, pretreatment of desipramine protects neuronal cells against rotenone- and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neuronal death. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 activity by a HO-1 pharmacological inhibitor, ZnPP IX, attenuates the neuroprotective effect of desipramine. Otherwise, activation of HO-1 activity by HO-1 activator and inducer protect 6-OHDA-induced neuronal death. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that desipramine-increased HO-1 expression is mediated by Nrf2 activation through the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Our results also suggest that desipramine provides a novel effect of neuroprotection, and neurodegenerative process might play an important role in depression disorder. PMID:23209658

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 nuclear translocation regulates bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and mediates genomic instability in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Vanella, Luca; Conticello, Concetta; Romano, Alessandra; Saccone, Salvatore; Godos, Justyna; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow leading to bone destruction and bone marrow failure. Several molecular mechanisms underlie chemoresistance among which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could play a major role. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the impact of HO-1 in MM following bortezomib (BTZ) treatment and how HO-1 is implicated in the mechanisms of chemoresistance. MM cells were treated for 24h with BTZ (15 nM), a boronic acid dipeptide inhibitor of the 26S proteasome used in the treatment of patients with MM as first-line therapy. We evaluated cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, HO-1 expression and compartmentalization and cellular genetic instability. Results showed that BTZ significantly reduced cell viability in different MM cell lines and induced ER-stress and ROS formation. Concomitantly, we observed a significant overexpression of both HO-1 gene and protein levels. This effect was abolished by concomitant treatment with 4-phenybutirric acid, a molecular chaperone, which is known to reduce ER-stress. Surprisingly, inhibition of HO activity with SnMP (10μM) failed to increase BTZ sensitivity in MM cells whereas inhibition of HO-1 nuclear translocation by E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor, increased sensitivity to BTZ and decreased genetic instability as measured by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. In conclusion, our data suggest that BTZ sensitivity depends on HO-1 nuclear compartmentalization and not on its enzymatic activity and this finding may represent an important tool to overcome BTZ chemoresistance in MM patients. PMID:26930712

  13. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase activates Nrf2 signalling and induces heme oxygenase 1 transcription in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Wood, J T; Whitten, K M; Vadivel, S K; Seng, S; Makriyannis, A; Avraham, H K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endocannabinoids such as anandamide (AEA) are important lipid ligands regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Their levels are regulated by hydrolase enzymes, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). Here, we investigated whether FAAH or AEA are involved in NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of AEA or FAAH inhibition by the URB597 inhibitor or FAAH/siRNA on the activation of Nrf2-ARE signalling pathway and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction and transcription. KEY RESULTS Endogenous AEA was detected in the immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells (0.034 ng per 106 cells) but not in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Because breast tumour cells express FAAH abundantly, we examined the effects of FAAH on Nrf2/antioxidant pathway. We found that inhibition of FAAH by the URB597 inhibitor induced antioxidant HO-1 in breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of FAAH or treatment with AEA-activated ARE-containing reporter induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, independent of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1, CB2 or TRPV1. Furthermore, URB597, AEA and siRNA-FAAH treatments induced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, while siRNA-Nrf2 treatment and Keap1 expression blocked AEA, URB597 and si-FAAH from activation of ARE reporter and HO-1 induction. siRNA-HO-1 treatment decreased the viability of breast cancer cells and MCF-10A cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data uncovered a novel mechanism by which inhibition of FAAH or exposure to AEA induced HO-1 transcripts and implicating AEA and FAAH as direct modifiers in signalling mediated activation of Nrf2-HO-1 pathway, independent of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:23347118

  14. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver. PMID:25036135

  15. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver.

  16. Isolation and characterization of the mouse heme oxygenase-1 gene. Distal 5' sequences are required for induction by heme or heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Alam, J; Cai, J; Smith, A

    1994-01-14

    Mouse genomic fragments encoding heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were isolated from a recombinant lambda library by in situ plaque hybridization. The mouse HO-1 gene, approximately 7 kilobase pairs (kbp) in length, is organized into 5 exons and 4 introns. The primary structure of the exons and 1287 base pairs (bp) of the 5'-flanking region was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse HO-1 gene is identical to that of p32, initially identified as a stress-induced protein in mouse BALBc/3T3 cells. A single, major transcription initiation site is utilized for constitutive and heme- or metal-induced expression of the HO-1 gene in mouse hepatoma (Hepa) cells. The transcriptional activity of the 5'-flanking region was examined by transient expression assays using the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene as the reporter gene. Basal promoter activity in several cell lines was localized to within 149 bp of the upstream sequence by deletion analysis. This proximal promoter region of the mouse HO-1 gene contains several sequence elements that are not only conserved in both the rat and human HO-1 genes but also resemble consensus binding sites of various transcription factors including AP-1, AP-4, C/EBP and c-Myc:Max/USF. Heavy metals activate HO-1 gene transcription and the rat gene contains a putative metal regulatory element (Müller, R. M., Taguchi, H., and Shibahara, S. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 6795-6802) that is completely conserved in the mouse gene. Transient expression analyses, however, indicate that this sequence, which contains a core heptanucleotide, TGCACTC, identical to that of the strongest metal regulatory element of the mouse metallothionein-1 gene, is not responsive to Cd2+ or Zn2+. Stable transfection of constructs containing the entire mouse HO-1 gene and various portions of the 5'-flanking region into rat C6 glioma cells and simultaneous, quantitative analysis of the mouse and rat HO-1 mRNAs indicate that distal 5' sequences, between positions

  17. Hydrogen Gas Alleviates the Intestinal Injury Caused by Severe Sepsis in Mice by Increasing the Expression of Heme Oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Li, Qi; Chen, Hongguang; Wang, Tao; Liu, Lingling; Wang, Guolin; Xie, Keliang; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects and may have beneficial effects in severe sepsis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying these protective effects. Male Institute for Cancer Research mice were randomized into 6 groups: sham; sham + H2; severe sepsis; severe sepsis + H2; severe sepsis + zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor; and severe sepsis + H2 + ZnPPIX. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used to induce sepsis. Mice in the H2 groups received inhaled 2% H2 for 1 h at 1 h and 6 h after CLP or sham operation. Mice in the ZnPPIX groups received 40-mg/kg ZnPPIX by intraperitoneal injection 1 h before CLP. Tin protoporphyrin IX (TinPPIX), another HO-1 inhibitor, was also used in part for this study. Mice in the TinPPIX groups received 50-mg/kg TinPPIX through subcutaneous injection 6 h before CLP. The levels of biochemical markers, oxidative products, inflammatory mediator, the number of intestinal apoptotic cells, and the colony-forming unit numbers in the peritoneal lavage fluid were much higher in the severe sepsis group compared with the sham group. Intestinal injury in animals with severe sepsis was worse than that in animals in the sham group. H2 therapy in the animals with severe sepsis was associated with reduced intestinal injury, decreased numbers of colony-forming unit and apoptotic cells, reduced levels of biochemical markers, oxidative products, and high-mobility group box 1 protein. The protective effects of H2 were reversed by ZnPPIX and TinPPIX. Protein and messenger RNA expressions of HO-1 and nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the intestine were increased in the severe sepsis group compared to the sham group, and H2 further increased their expressions in the severe septic mice. Zinc protoporphyrin IX and TinPPIX inhibited the expression of HO-1 protein. Hydrogen has the capacity to protect mice from organ injury in

  18. Heme oxygenase 1 plays role of neuron-protection by regulating Nrf2-ARE signaling post intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Bao, Bing; Xie, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) could be activated in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and trigger the expression of ARE regulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) subsequently. This study aims to explore neuroprotection of HO-1 protein in regulating the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway in ICH. In this study, the femoral artery injection method was used to establish the ICH model. The zinc porphyrin-9 (ZPP-IX) was used to inhibit the HO-1 expression in ICH rats. The ICH rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, ICH group, ZPP-IX (10 mg/kg) + ICH group and DMSO (10 mg/kg) + ICH group. Neurological scores were evaluated for the 3 groups. Double immunofluorescence staining method was employed to observe the co-expression of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-κB and TNF-α and CD11b in glia cells. Western blot and RT-PCR assay were used to detect the total Nrf2, binding Nrf2, HO-1, NF-κB and TNF-α expression. The results indicated that ZPP-IX could aggravate the neurological dyafunstions of ICH rats. The HO-1 level in ZPP-IX group was significantly decreased compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). The binding-Nrf2 protein was significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The NF-κB and TNF-α level were significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The ZPP-IX significantly inhibited the HO-1 and Nrf2, and enhanced NF-κB and TNF-α co-expressing with the CD11b compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HO-1 protein regulates the Nrf2-ARE pathway in ICH model by inhibiting the Nrf2 entering nucleus and activating the NF-κB and TNF-α expression. PMID:26617723

  19. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 and p21 confers resistance to apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Min; Chen, George G; Ng, Enders K W; Leung, Wai-Keung; Sung, Joseph J Y; Chung, S C Sydney

    2004-01-15

    Both heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and p21(WAF1/Cip1) (p21) are involved in the pathogenesis of human cancer and their functions are closely associated with apoptosis. However, how these two molecules regulate apoptosis in human gastric cancer is unknown. In this study, we studied how HO-1 and p21 were regulated in two gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 with wild p53 and MKN-28 with mutant p53. The cells were treated with hemin and cadmium to induce HO-1. The result showed that HO-1 protein was significantly induced by hemin and cadmium in both cells tested. Following the HO-1 expression, p21 level was also markedly induced. The cells with increased HO-1 and p21 showed obviously resistantance to apoptotic stimuli. The levels of HO-1 and p21 induced were significantly inhibited by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) inhibitor (SB203580) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor (PD098059). Parallel to decreased HO-1 and p21 expression, the kinase inhibitors also significantly attenuated the resistance of the cells to apoptosis. The elevated HO-1 and p21 was further found to be associated with increase activity of the nuclear NF-kappaB and the inhibition of NF-kappaB led to the block of their induction. The elevated HO-1 and p21 were also demonstrated to be related to increased cellular inhibitor of caspase inbitory protein-2 (c-IAP2) and decreased caspapse-3 activity. It was noted that the above changes observed were not different between MKN-45 and MKN-28 cells, suggesting the functions of HO-1 and p21 were irrespective of the status of p53. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the resistance to apoptosis in gastric cancer cells with elevated HO-1 and p21 is independent of p53 status in a p38 MAPK- and ERK-mediated pathway with elevated c-IAP2 and decreased caspase-3 activity and that this pathway is sensitive to the inhibition of NF-kappaB.

  20. Serum iron increases with acute induction of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Volker; Nakayama, Akihiro; Austin, Lori M; Levander, Ximena A; Ferris, Christopher D; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2007-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is induced by oxidative stress and protects against oxidant injury. We examined the effect of rapid induction of hepatic HO-1 on serum iron level. Serum iron was approximately doubled within 6 h when HO-1 was induced by phenobarbital treatment of selenium-deficient mice. Blocking heme synthesis with diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (DDC) prevented the induction of HO-1 and the rise in serum iron. DDC did not block HO-1 induction by hemin. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin prevented a rise in serum iron that occurred following phorone treatment. These results indicate that heme synthesis or an exogenous source of heme is needed to allow induction of HO-1. Further, they link HO-1 induction with a rise in serum iron, suggesting that the iron resulting from catabolism of heme by HO-1 is released by the liver.

  1. Pharmacological Inhibition of Host Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection In Vivo by a Mechanism Dependent on T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Diego L.; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Arora, Kriti; Chao, Alex; Mittereder, Lara R.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Goulding, Celia W.; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress response antioxidant enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme released during inflammation. HO-1 expression is upregulated in both experimental and human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and in patients it is a biomarker of active disease. Whether the enzyme plays a protective versus pathogenic role in tuberculosis has been the subject of debate. To address this controversy, we administered tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), a well-characterized HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, to mice during acute M. tuberculosis infection. These SnPPIX-treated animals displayed a substantial reduction in pulmonary bacterial loads comparable to that achieved following conventional antibiotic therapy. Moreover, when administered adjunctively with antimycobacterial drugs, the HO-1 inhibitor markedly enhanced and accelerated pathogen clearance. Interestingly, both the pulmonary induction of HO-1 expression and the efficacy of SnPPIX treatment in reducing bacterial burden were dependent on the presence of host T lymphocytes. Although M. tuberculosis expresses its own heme-degrading enzyme, SnPPIX failed to inhibit its enzymatic activity or significantly restrict bacterial growth in liquid culture. Together, the above findings reveal mammalian HO-1 as a potential target for host-directed monotherapy and adjunctive therapy of tuberculosis and identify the immune response as a critical regulator of this function. PMID:27795400

  2. Comparison of the crystal structure and function to wild-type and His25Ala mutant human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Li; Xia, Zhen-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme metabolism. It regulates serum bilirubin level. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that the proximal residue histidine 25 (His25) plays a key role in hHO-1 activity. A highly purified hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was generated and crystallized with a new expression system. The crystal structure of the mutant was determined by X-ray diffraction technology and molecular replacement at the resolution of 2.8 A, and the model of hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was refined. The final crystallographic and free R factors were 0.245 and 0.283, respectively. The standard bond length deviation was 0.007 A, and the standard bond angle deviation was 1.3 degrees . The mutation of His25 to Ala led to an empty pocket underneath the ferric ion in the heme, leading to loss of binding iron ligand. Although this did not cause an overall structural change, the enzymatic activity of the mutant hHO-1 was reduced by 90%. By supplementing imidazole, the HO-1 activity was restored approximately 90% to its normal level. These data suggest that Ala25 remains unchanged in the structure compared to His25, but the important catalytic function of hHO-1 is lost. Thus, it appears that His25 is a crucial residue for proper hHO-1 catalysis.

  3. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Hwang, Jinha; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP)-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located −374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at −374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at −374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the −374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI patients and

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates cigarette smoke-induced restenosis after vascular angioplasty by attenuating inflammation in rat model.

    PubMed

    Ni, Leng; Wang, Zhanqi; Yang, Genhuan; Li, Tianjia; Liu, Xinnong; Liu, Changwei

    2016-03-14

    Cigarette smoke is not only a profound independent risk factor of atherosclerosis, but also aggravates restenosis after vascular angioplasty. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an endogenous antioxidant and cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we investigated whether HO-1 upregulating by hemin, a potent HO-1 inducer, can protect against cigarette smoke-induced restenosis in rat's carotid arteries after balloon injury. Results showed that cigarette smoke exposure aggravated stenosis of the lumen, promoted infiltration of inflammatory cells, and induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules after balloon-induced carotid artery injury. HO-1 upregulating by hemin treatment reduced these effects of cigarette smoke, whereas the beneficial effects were abolished in the presence of Zincprotoporphyrin IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. To conclude, hemin has potential therapeutic applications in the restenosis prevention after the smokers' vascular angioplasty.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  6. The Induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 Decreases Painful Diabetic Neuropathy and Enhances the Antinociceptive Effects of Morphine in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castany, Sílvia; Carcolé, Mireia; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus which is poorly controlled by conventional analgesics. This study investigates if treatment with an heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), could modulate the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by diabetes and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In a diabetic mice model induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ), we evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of CoPP at several days after its administration. The antinociceptive actions produced by the systemic administration of morphine alone or combined with CoPP were also evaluated. In addition, the effects of CoPP treatment on the expression of HO-1, the microglial activation marker (CD11b/c), the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and μ-opioid receptors (MOR), were also assessed. Our results showed that the administration of 10 mg/kg of CoPP during 5 consecutive days completely blocked the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. These effects are accompanied by the increased spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve protein levels of HO-1. In addition, the STZ-induced activation of microglia and overexpression of NOS2 in the spinal cord were inhibited by CoPP treatment. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effects of morphine were enhanced by CoPP treatment and reversed by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP). The spinal cord expression of MOR was also increased by CoPP treatment in diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the induction of HO-1 attenuated STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine via inhibition of microglia activation and NOS2 overexpression as well as by increasing the spinal cord levels of MOR. This study proposes the administration of CoPP alone or

  7. Upregulation of endothelial heme oxygenase-1 expression through the activation of the JNK pathway by sublethal concentrations of acrolein

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.C.; Hsieh, C.W.; Lai, P.H.; Lin, J.B.; Liu, Y.C.; Wung, B.S. . E-mail: bswung@mail.ncyu.edu.tw

    2006-08-01

    Acrolein is a highly electrophilic {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde that is present in cigarette smoke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme activated by various such electrophilic compounds. In this study, the regulatory effects of acrolein upon the expression of HO-1 were investigated in endothelial cells (ECs). We demonstrate that acrolein induces the elevation of HO-1 protein levels, and subsequent enzyme activity, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An additional {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, was also found to increase HO-1 expression and have less cytotoxicity than acrolein. Moreover, acrolein-mediated HO-1 induction is abrogated in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Nrf2 is a transcription factor involved in the induction of HO-1 through an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter region of the HO-1 gene. We show that acrolein induces Nrf2 translocation and ARE-luciferase reporter activity. Acrolein was also found to induce the production of both superoxide and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at levels greater than 100 {mu}M. However, with the exception of NAC, no antioxidant generated any effect upon acrolein-dependent HO-1 expression in ECs. Our present findings suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may not be a major modulator for HO-1 induction. Using buthionine sulfoximine to deplete the intracellular GSH levels further enhanced the effects of acrolein. We also found that cellular GSH level was rapidly reduced after both 10 and 100 {mu}M acrolein treatment. However, after 6 h of exposure to ECs, only 10 {mu}M acrolein treatment increases GSH level. In addition, only the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein had any significant inhibitory impact upon the upregulation of HO-1 by acrolein. Pretreatment with a range of other PI3 kinase inhibitors, including wortmannin and LY294002, showed no effects. Hence, we show in our current experiments that a sublethal concentration of

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 in pregnancy and cancer: similarities in cellular invasion, cytoprotection, angiogenesis, and immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Ozen, Maide; Wong, Ronald J.; Stevenson, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy can be defined as a “permissible” process, where a semi-allogeneic fetus and placenta are allowed to grow and survive within the mother. Similarly, in tumor growth, antigen-specific malignant cells proliferate and evade into normal tissues of the host. The microenvironments of the placenta and tumors are amazingly comparable, sharing similar mechanisms exploited by fetal or cancer cells with regard to surviving in a hypoxic microenvironment, invading tissues via degradation and vasculogenesis, and escaping host attack through immune privilege. Heme oxygease-1 (HO-1) is a stress-response protein that has antioxidative, anti-apoptotic, pro-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Although a large volume of research has been published in recent years investigating the possible role(s) of HO-1 in pregnancy and in cancer development, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these “yin-yang” processes have still not been fully elucidated. Here, we summarize and compare pregnancy and cancer development, focusing primarily on the function of HO-1 in cellular invasion, cytoprotection, angiogenesis, and immunomodulation. Due to the similarities of both processes, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of each process may reveal and guide the development of new approaches to prevent not only pregnancy disorders; but also, to study cancer. PMID:25642189

  9. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer disease: Is heme oxygenase-1 an Achille's heel?

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance, clinically defined as the inability of insulin to increase glucose uptake and utilization, has been found to be associated with the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Indeed, postmortem AD brain shows all the signs of insulin resistance including: (i) reduced brain insulin receptor (IR) sensitivity, (ii) hypophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and downstream second messengers such as IRS-1, and (iii) attenuated insulin and insulin growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression. However, the exact mechanisms driving insulin resistance have not been completely elucidated. Quite recently, the levels of the peripheral inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO-1), a well-known protein up-regulated during cell stress response, were proposed to be among the strongest positive predictors of metabolic disease, including insulin resistance. Because our group previously reported on levels, activation state and oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications of HO-1 in AD brain and our ongoing studies to better elucidate the role of HO-1 in insulin resistance-associated AD pathology, the aim of this review is to provide reader with a critical analysis on new aspects of the interplay between HO-1 and insulin resistance and on how the available lines of evidence could be useful for further comprehension of processes in AD brain.

  10. Suppression of inflammatory cell trafficking and alveolar simplification by the heme oxygenase-1 product carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Anyanwu, Anuli C.; Bentley, J. Kelley; Popova, Antonia P.; Malas, Omar; Alghanem, Husam; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a lung disease of prematurely born infants, is characterized in part by arrested development of pulmonary alveolae. We hypothesized that heme oxygenase (HO-1) and its byproduct carbon monoxide (CO), which are thought to be cytoprotective against redox stress, mitigate lung injury and alveolar simplification in hyperoxia-exposed neonatal mice, a model of BPD. Three-day-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to air or hyperoxia (FiO2, 75%) in the presence or absence of inhaled CO (250 ppm for 1 h twice daily) for 21 days. Hyperoxic exposure increased mean linear intercept, a measure of alveolar simplification, whereas CO treatment attenuated hypoalveolarization, yielding a normal-appearing lung. Conversely, HO-1-null mice showed exaggerated hyperoxia-induced hypoalveolarization. CO also inhibited hyperoxia-induced pulmonary accumulation of F4/80+, CD11c+, and CD11b+ monocytes and Gr-1+ neutrophils. Furthermore, CO attenuated lung mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including the monocyte chemoattractant CCL2 in vivo, and decreased hyperoxia-induced type I alveolar epithelial cell CCL2 production in vitro. Hyperoxia-exposed CCL2-null mice, like CO-treated mice, showed attenuated alveolar simplification and lung infiltration of CD11b+ monocytes, consistent with the notion that CO blocks lung epithelial cell cytokine production. We conclude that, in hyperoxia-exposed neonatal mice, inhalation of CO suppresses inflammation and alveolar simplification. PMID:24532288

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 upregulation modulates tone and fibroelastic properties of internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Rattan, Satish

    2014-09-15

    A compromise in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone and fibroelastic properties (FEP) plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence. Herein, we examined the effects of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 upregulation on these IAS characteristics in young rats. We determined the effect of HO-1 upregulator hemin on HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions and on basal IAS tone and its FEP before and after HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX. For FEP, we determined the kinetics of the IAS smooth muscle responses, by the velocities of relaxation, and recovery of the IAS tone following 0 Ca(2+) and electrical field stimulation. To characterize the underlying signal transduction for these changes, we determined the effects of hemin on RhoA-associated kinase (RhoA)/Rho kinase (ROCK) II, myosin-binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase 1, fibronectin, and elastin expression levels. Hemin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein similar to the increases in the basal tone, and in the FEP of the IAS. Underlying mechanisms in the IAS characteristics are associated with increases in the genetic and translational expressions of RhoA/ROCKII, and elastin. Fibronectin expression levels on the other hand were found to be decreased following HO-1 upregulation. The results of our study show that the hemin/HO-1 system regulates the tone and FEP of IAS. The hemin/HO-1 system thus provides a potential target for the development of new interventions aimed at treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, specifically the age-related IAS dysfunction.

  12. Crystal structure of rat heme oxygenase-1 in complex with biliverdin-iron chelate. Conformational change of the distal helix during the heme cleavage reaction.

    PubMed

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Noguchi, Masato; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2003-08-22

    The crystal structure of rat heme oxygenase-1 in complex with biliverdin-iron chelate (biliverdin(Fe)-HO-1), the immediate precursor of the final product, biliverdin, has been determined at a 2.4-A resolution. The electron density in the heme pocket clearly showed that the tetrapyrrole ring of heme is cleaved at the alpha-meso edge. Like the heme bound to HO-1, biliverdin-iron chelate is located between the distal and proximal helices, but its accommodation state seems to be less stable in light of the disordering of the solvent-exposed propionate and vinyl groups. The middle of the distal helix is shifted away from the center of the active site in biliverdin(Fe)-HO-1, increasing the size of the heme pocket. The hydrogen-bonding interaction between Glu-29 and Gln-38, considered to restrain the orientation of the proximal helix in the heme-HO-1 complex, was lost in biliverdin(Fe)-HO-1, leading to relaxation of the helix. Biliverdin has a distorted helical conformation; the lactam oxygen atom of its pyrrole ring-A interacted with Asp-140 through a hydrogen-bonding solvent network. Because of the absence of a distal water ligand, the iron atom is five-coordinated with His-25 and four pyrrole nitrogen atoms. The coordination geometry deviates considerably from a square pyramid, suggesting that the iron may be readily dissociated. We speculate that the opened conformation of the heme pocket facilitates sequential product release, first iron then biliverdin, and that because of biliverdin's increased flexibility, iron release triggers its slow dissociation. PMID:12794075

  13. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Lee, Ching-Tien; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  14. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Vijith; Hiller, Oliver; Figueiredo, Constanca; Aljabri, Abid; Blasczyk, Rainer; Theilmeier, Gregor; Becker, Jan Ulrich; Larmann, Jan; Immenschuh, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (HLA I) antibodies (Abs) play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]). Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation. PMID:26690352

  15. Myeloid Heme Oxygenase-1 Haploinsufficiency Reduces High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance by Affecting Adipose Macrophage Infiltration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun-Yuan; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Chau, Lee-Young

    2012-01-01

    Increased adipose tissue macrophages contribute to obesity-induced metabolic syndrome. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible enzyme with potent anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic activities in macrophages. However, the role of macrophage HO-1 on obesity-induced adipose inflammation and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Here we show that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding in C57BL/6J mice induced HO-1 expression in the visceral adipose tissue, particularly the stromal vascular fraction. When the irradiated C57BL/6J mice reconstituted with wild-type or HO-1+/− bone marrow were fed with HFD for over 24 weeks, the HO-1+/− chimeras were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance and this was associated with reduced adipose macrophage infiltration and angiogenesis, suggesting that HO-1 affects myeloid cell migration toward adipose tissue during obesity. In vivo and in vitro migration assays revealed that HO-1+/− macrophages exhibited an impaired migration response. Chemoattractant-induced phosphorylation of p38 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) declined faster in HO-1+/− macrophages. Further experiments demonstrated that carbon monoxide and bilirubin, the byproducts derived from heme degradation by HO-1, enhanced macrophage migration by increasing phosphorylation of p38 and FAK, respectively. These data disclose a novel role of hematopoietic cell HO-1 in promoting adipose macrophage infiltration and the development of insulin resistance during obesity. PMID:22761690

  16. Regulation of tolerance of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to heavy metal toxicity by heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan Yuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Zhao Pu; Yang, Zhi Min

    2011-09-01

    Investigation of heavy metal tolerance genes in green algae is of great importance because heavy metals have become one of the major contaminants in the aquatic ecosystem. In plants, accumulation of heavy metals modifies many aspects of cellular functions. However, the mechanism by which heavy metals exert detrimental effects is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a role for HO-1 (encoding heme oxygenase-1) in regulating the response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, to mercury (Hg). Transgenic algae overexpressing HO-1 showed high tolerance to Hg exposure, with a 48.2% increase in cell number over the wild type, but accumulated less Hg. Physiological analysis revealed that expression of HO-1 suppressed the Hg-induced generation of reactive oxygen species. We further identified the effect of carbon monoxide (CO), a product of HO-1-mediated heme degradation, on growth and physiological parameters. Interestingly, administration of exogenous CO at non-toxic levels also conferred the tolerance of algae to Hg exposure. The CO-mediated alleviation of Hg toxicity was closely related to the lower accumulation of Hg and free radical species. These results indicate that functional identification of HO-1 is useful for molecular breeding designed to improve plant tolerance to heavy metals and reduce heavy metal accumulation in plant cells. PMID:21813461

  17. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  18. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E; Hanafy, Khalid A

    2015-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

  19. Human heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer lowers blood pressure and promotes growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabaawy, H E; Zhang, F; Nguyen, X; ElHosseiny, A; Nasjletti, A; Schwartzman, M; Dennery, P; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    2001-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, with release of free iron and carbon monoxide. Both heme and carbon monoxide have been implicated in the regulation of vascular tone. A retroviral vector containing human HO-1 cDNA (LSN-HHO-1) was constructed and subjected to purification and concentration of the viral particles to achieve 5x10(9) to 1x10(10) colony-forming units per milliliter. The ability of concentrated infectious viral particles to express human HO-1 (HHO-1) in vivo was tested. A single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles (expressing HHO-1) to 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats resulted in functional expression of the HHO-1 gene and attenuation of the development of hypertension. Rats expressing HHO-1 showed a significant decrease in urinary excretion of a vasoconstrictor arachidonic acid metabolite and a reduction in myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure in isolated arterioles. Unexpectedly, HHO-1 chimeric rats showed a simultaneous significant proportionate increase in somatic growth. Thus, delivery of HHO-1 gene by retroviral vector attenuates the development of hypertension and promotes body growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase-1 inducing activities of lanostane triterpenes isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum in RAW264.7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Solip; Nguyen, Van Thu; Tae, Nara; Lee, Suhyun; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2014-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom used in traditional medicine for preventing or treating a variety of diseases. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducing effects of 12 lanostane triterpenes from G. lucidum in RAW264.7 cells. Of these, seven triterpenes, butyl lucidenateE{sub 2}, butyl lucidenateD{sub 2} (GT-2), butyl lucidenate P, butyl lucidenateQ, Ganoderiol F, methyl ganodenate J and butyl lucidenate N induced HO-1 expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abrogated the inhibitory effects of these triterpenes on the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of these triterpenes. We further studied the anti-inflammatory and HO-1 inducing effects of GT-2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, did not suppress GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction; however, LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, blocked GT-2-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. GT-2 increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering RNA blocked GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction, suggesting that GT-2 induced HO-1 expression via the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, GT-2 inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These findings suggest that HO-1 inducing activities of these lanostane triterpenes may be important in the understanding of a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of G. lucidum. - Highlights: • The anti-inflammatory effects of selected triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum are demonstrated. • Heme oxygenase-1 induction is attributable to the anti-inflammatory properties of these

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism is associated with reduced incidence of acute chest syndrome among children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Christopher J.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Ellingsen, Dorothy; Pyle, Meredith E.; Barron-Casella, Emily A.; Casella, James F.; Payne, Amanda B.; Driggers, Jennifer; Trau, Heidi A.; Yang, Genyan; Jones, Kimberly; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Hooper, W. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a common hemolytic disorder with a broad range of complications, including vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome (ACS), pain, and stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (gene HMOX1; protein HO-1) is the inducible, rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of heme and might attenuate the severity of outcomes from vaso-occlusive and hemolytic crises. A (GT)n dinucleotide repeat located in the promoter region of the HMOX1 gene is highly polymorphic, with long repeat lengths linked to decreased activity and inducibility. We examined this polymorphism to test the hypothesis that short alleles are associated with a decreased risk of adverse outcomes (hospitalization for pain or ACS) among a cohort of 942 children with sickle cell disease. Allele lengths varied from 13 to 45 repeats and showed a trimodal distribution. Compared with children with longer allele lengths, children with 2 shorter alleles (4%; ≤ 25 repeats) had lower rates of hospitalization for ACS (incidence rate ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.81), after adjusting for sex, age, asthma, percentage of fetal hemoglobin, and α-globin gene deletion. No relationship was identified between allele lengths and pain rate. We provide evidence that genetic variation in HMOX1 is associated with decreased rates of hospitalization for ACS, but not pain. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00072761. PMID:22966170

  2. Heme-mediated inhibition of Bach1 regulates the liver specificity and transience of the Nrf2-dependent induction of zebrafish heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Yuji; Nakajima, Hitomi; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Nakajima, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The induction of the gene encoding heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1, HO-1) by Nrf2 is unique compared with other Nrf2 targets. We previously showed that the Nrf2a-mediated induction of zebrafish hmox1a was liver specific and transient. We screened transcription factors that could repress the induction of hmox1a but not other Nrf2a targets and concluded that Bach1b was a prime candidate. In bach1b-knocked-down larvae, the induction of hmox1a was observed ectopically in nonliver tissues and persisted longer than normal fish, suggesting that Bach1 is the only regulator for both the liver-specific and transient induction of hmox1a. Co-knockdown of bach1b with its co-ortholog bach1a enhanced these effects. To determine why Bach1 could not repress the hmox1a induction in the liver, we analyzed the effects of a heme biosynthesis inhibitor, succinylacetone, and a heme precursor, hemin. Succinylacetone decreased the Nrf2a-mediated hmox1a induction, whereas pre-treatment with hemin caused ectopic induction of hmox1a in nonliver tissues, implying that the high heme levels in the liver may release the repressive activity of Bach1. Our results suggested that Bach1 regulates the liver specificity and transience of the Nrf2a-dependent induction of hmox1a and that heme mediates this regulation through Bach1 inhibition based on its level in each tissue.

  3. An association study between Heme oxygenase-1 genetic variants and Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Pedro; Martínez, Carmen; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Luengo, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) supplies brain tissues with nutrients, filters harmful compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream, and plays a key role in iron homeostasis in the human brain. Disruptions of the BBB are associated with several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress, iron deposition and mitochondrial impaired function are considered as risk factors for degeneration of the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase (HMOX) degrades heme ring to biliverdin, free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide being the rate-limiting activity in heme catabolism. The isoform HMOX1 is highly inducible in response to reactive oxygen species, which induce an increase in BBB permeability and impair its pathophysiology. Consequently, an over- expression of this enzyme may contribute to the marked iron deposition found in PD. We analyzed the HMOX1 SNPs rs2071746, rs2071747, and rs9282702, a microsatellite (GT)n polymorphism and copy number variations in 691 patients suffering from PD and 766 healthy control individuals. Copy number variations in the HMOX1 gene exist, but these do not seem to be associated with PD risk. In contrast two polymorphisms that modify the transcriptional activity of the gene, namely a VNTR (GT)n and the SNP rs2071746, are strongly associated with PD risk, particularly with the classic PD phenotype and with early onset of the disease. This study indicates that HMOX1 gene variants are associated to the risk of developing some forms of PD, thus adding new information that supports association of HMOX gene variations with PD risk. PMID:25309329

  4. An association study between Heme oxygenase-1 genetic variants and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Pedro; Martínez, Carmen; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Luengo, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Agúndez, José A G; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) supplies brain tissues with nutrients, filters harmful compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream, and plays a key role in iron homeostasis in the human brain. Disruptions of the BBB are associated with several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress, iron deposition and mitochondrial impaired function are considered as risk factors for degeneration of the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase (HMOX) degrades heme ring to biliverdin, free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide being the rate-limiting activity in heme catabolism. The isoform HMOX1 is highly inducible in response to reactive oxygen species, which induce an increase in BBB permeability and impair its pathophysiology. Consequently, an over- expression of this enzyme may contribute to the marked iron deposition found in PD. We analyzed the HMOX1 SNPs rs2071746, rs2071747, and rs9282702, a microsatellite (GT) n polymorphism and copy number variations in 691 patients suffering from PD and 766 healthy control individuals. Copy number variations in the HMOX1 gene exist, but these do not seem to be associated with PD risk. In contrast two polymorphisms that modify the transcriptional activity of the gene, namely a VNTR (GT) n and the SNP rs2071746, are strongly associated with PD risk, particularly with the classic PD phenotype and with early onset of the disease. This study indicates that HMOX1 gene variants are associated to the risk of developing some forms of PD, thus adding new information that supports association of HMOX gene variations with PD risk.

  5. An association study between Heme oxygenase-1 genetic variants and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Pedro; Martínez, Carmen; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Luengo, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Agúndez, José A G; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) supplies brain tissues with nutrients, filters harmful compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream, and plays a key role in iron homeostasis in the human brain. Disruptions of the BBB are associated with several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress, iron deposition and mitochondrial impaired function are considered as risk factors for degeneration of the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase (HMOX) degrades heme ring to biliverdin, free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide being the rate-limiting activity in heme catabolism. The isoform HMOX1 is highly inducible in response to reactive oxygen species, which induce an increase in BBB permeability and impair its pathophysiology. Consequently, an over- expression of this enzyme may contribute to the marked iron deposition found in PD. We analyzed the HMOX1 SNPs rs2071746, rs2071747, and rs9282702, a microsatellite (GT) n polymorphism and copy number variations in 691 patients suffering from PD and 766 healthy control individuals. Copy number variations in the HMOX1 gene exist, but these do not seem to be associated with PD risk. In contrast two polymorphisms that modify the transcriptional activity of the gene, namely a VNTR (GT) n and the SNP rs2071746, are strongly associated with PD risk, particularly with the classic PD phenotype and with early onset of the disease. This study indicates that HMOX1 gene variants are associated to the risk of developing some forms of PD, thus adding new information that supports association of HMOX gene variations with PD risk. PMID:25309329

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 and the ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Masini, Emanuela; Vannacci, A; Marzocca, C; Pierpaoli, S; Giannini, L; Fantappié, O; Mazzanti, R; Mannaioni, P F

    2003-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a signaling gas produced intracellularly by heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes using heme as a substrate. During heme breakdown, HO-1 and HO-2 release CO, biliverdin, and Fe(2+). In this study, we investigated the effects of manipulation of the HO-1 system in an in vivo model of focal ischemia-reperfusion (FIR) in the rat heart. Male Wistar albino rats, under general anesthesia and artificial ventilation, underwent thoracotomy, the pericardium was opened, and a silk suture was placed around the left descending coronary artery; ischemia was induced by tightening the suture and was monitored for 30 min. Subsequently, the ligature was released to allow reperfusion lasting for 60 min. The first group of rats was sham operated and injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with saline. The second group underwent FIR. The third group was treated ip 18 hr before FIR with hemin (4 mg/kg). The fourth group was pretreated ip 24 hr before FIR and 6 hr before hemin with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX, 50 microg/kg). Specimens of the left ventricle were taken for determination of HO expression and activity, infarct size, malonyldialdehyde (MDA) production, and tissue calcium content. FIR led to a significant increase in the generation of MDA and notably raised tissue calcium levels. Induction of HO-1 by hemin significantly decreased infarct size, incidence of reperfusion arrhythmias, MDA generation, and calcium overload induced by FIR. These effects were prevented by the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP-IX. The present experiments show that the concerted actions of CO, iron, and biliverdin/bilirubin modulate the FIR-induced myocardial injury. PMID:12709584

  7. Human heme oxygenase-1 deficiency: a lesson on serendipity in the discovery of the novel disease.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Shoichi

    2007-04-01

    The first case of human heme oxygenase (HO)-1 deficiency was reported by Yachie et al. at our laboratory in the Department of Pediatrics, Angiogenesis and Vascular Development, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, in 1999. In the present paper I would like to review this novel disease. Our studies into HO-1 deficiency were called by us 'Kanazawa version Project X'. From the story of our successful discovery we have learned that serendipity is a very important spiritual factor. Serendipity is the making of fortunate and unexpected discoveries by chance (from its possession by the heroes in the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip).

  8. Targeting of heme oxygenase-1 as a novel immune regulator of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fest, Stefan; Soldati, Rocio; Christiansen, Nina M; Zenclussen, Maria L; Kilz, Jana; Berger, Elisa; Starke, Sven; Lode, Holger N; Engel, Christoph; Zenclussen, Ana C; Christiansen, Holger

    2016-04-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 catalyzes the degradation of cytotoxic heme into biliverdin and blocks antitumor immune responses, thus protecting cancer against host defense. Whether this scenario also applies to neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid childhood tumor, is not known. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a prognostic relevance of HO-1 expression in samples from NB patients and show that targeting of HO-1 prevents both cancer resistance against cellular stress and immune escape in the syngeneic NXS2 A/J mouse model of NB. High HO-1 RNA expression in NB tissues emerged as unfavorable prognostic marker, in particular for patients older than 18 months as indicated by univariate as well as multivariate survival probability analyses including disease stage and MYCN status. On the basis of this observation we aimed to target HO-1 by systemic as well as tumor-specific zinc protoporphyrin-mediated HO-1 suppression in a syngeneic immunocompetent NB mouse model. This resulted in 50% reduction of primary tumor growth and a suppression of spontaneous liver metastases. Importantly, HO-1 inhibition abrogated immune cell paralysis affecting CD4 and CD8 T-effector cells. This in turn reverted HO-1-dependent immune escape mechanisms in NB by increasing NB apoptosis and improved DC maturation. In summary, HO-1 emerges as a novel immune regulator in NB and emerges as a promising target for the development of therapeutic approaches.

  9. Electrochemical reduction of ferrous α-verdoheme in complex with heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hideaki; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Takahashi, Kenichi; Palmer, Graham; Noguchi, Masato

    2010-01-01

    The heme oxygenase (HO) reaction consists of three successive oxygenation reactions, i.e. heme to α-hydroxyheme, α-hydroxyheme to verdoheme, and verdoheme to biliverdin-iron chelate. Of these, the least understood step is the conversion of verdoheme to biliverdin-iron chelate. For the cleavage of the oxaporphyrin ring of ferrous verdoheme, involvement of a verdoheme π-neutral radical has been proposed. To probe this hypothetical mechanism in the HO reaction, we performed electrochemical reduction of ferrous verdoheme complexed with rat HO-1 under anaerobic conditions. On the basis of the electrochemical spectral changes, the midpoint potential for the one-electron reduction of the oxaporphyrin ring of ferrous verdoheme was found to be −0.47 ± 0.01 V vs the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE). Because this potential is far lower than those of both flavins of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and of NADPH, it is concluded that the one-electron reduction of the oxaporphyrin ring of ferrous verdoheme is unlikely to occur and that the formation of the π-neutral radical cannot be the initial step in the degradation of verdoheme by HO. Rather, it appears more reasonable to consider an alternative mechanism in which binding of O2 to the ferrous iron of verdoheme is the first step in the degradation of verdoheme. PMID:17644182

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls. The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population. PMID:26313808

  11. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  12. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  13. Lipid peroxidation end product 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal triggers unfolded protein response and heme oxygenase-1 expression in PC12 cells: Roles of ROS and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Han; Yen, Jui-Hung; Weng, Ching-Yi; Wang, Lisu; Ha, Choi-Lan; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the roles of ROS overproduction and MAPK signaling pathways in the induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) and the expression of Phase II enzymes in response to 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4-HNE) in a neuronal-like catecholaminergic PC12 cells. Our results showed that 4-HNE triggered three canonical pathways of UPR, namely IRE1-XBP1, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 and ATF6, and induced the expression of UPR-targeted genes, GRP78, CHOP, TRB3, PUMA, and GADD34, as well as Phase II enzymes, HO-1 and GCLC. 4-HNE also induced apoptosis, intracellular calcium accumulation, caspase-3 activation, and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, which was correlated with the increased expression of GADD45α. The addition of tiron, a cellular permeable superoxide scavenger, scavenged 4-HNE-mediated ROS formation, but did not alleviate cytotoxicity, or the expression of UPR-targeted genes or Phase II enzymes, indicating that ROS overproduction per se did not play a major role in 4-HNE-caused deleterious effects. HO-1 expression was attenuated by Nrf2 siRNA and chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), suggesting HO-1 expression was regulated by Nrf2-ARE, which may work downstream of ER stress. 4-HNE treatment promptly induced ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK activation. Addition of p38 MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580 attenuated HO-1 upregulation, but enhanced expression of CHOP, PUMA and TRB3, and cytotoxicity. These results indicate that 4-HNE-induced transient p38 MAPK activation may serve as an upstream negative regulator of ER stress and confer adaptive cytoprotection against 4-HNE-mediated cell injury.

  14. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 contributes to survival of Mycobacterium abscessus in human macrophages-like THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Maher Y.; Ahmad, Iman M.; Switzer, Barbara; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (M.abs) is a rapidly growing mycobacterial species that infects macrophages, and is an important pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied the early stages of M.abs infection of macrophages, with emphasis on the role of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in this infection. THP-1 cells were activated using TPA into macrophage-like cells and infected with M.abs for different time points. M.abs infection robustly induced HO-1 expression in the THP-1 cells. Production of HO-1 was p38 MAPK-dependent, as p38 inhibitors suppressed HO-1 induction. Pretreatment with HO-1 inhibitors tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP) significantly inhibited M.abs growth inside macrophages. Furthermore, inhibiting HO-1 using HO-1 siRNA or the HO-1 upstream signaling molecule; Nrf2 using Nrf2 siRNA resulted in similar inhibition of M.abs. In contrast, inducing HO-1 did not increase M.abs intracellular growth above control. Products of HO-1 metabolism of heme are bilirubin, biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron. The addition of either bilirubin or biliverdin, but not CO, completely restored the SnPP inhibitory effect and partially that with HO-1 siRNA. To understand the mechanisms, we used Syto-62 labeled M.abs to infect macrophages. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibition promoted M.abs-containing phagosome fusion with lysosomes, which should enhance M.abs killing. M.abs infection enhanced THP-1 ROS production as demonstrated by increased DHE, DCF fluorescence, and EPR signal. HO-1 inhibition further increased ROS production in infected macrophages. Our results indicate that HO-1 induction is important for M.abs growth during the early stages of infection, and that the HO-1 products bilirubin and biliverdin, perhaps through modulation of intracellular ROS levels, may be involved. PMID:25638774

  15. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in Listeria monocytogenes-induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masato; Hashino, Masanori; Nishida, Takashi; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known fact that various pathogens, including bacteria, virus, and protozoa, induce abortion in humans and animals. However the mechanisms of infectious abortion are little known. In this study, we demonstrated that Listeria monocytogenes infection in trophoblast giant cells decreased heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-XL) expression, and that their overexpression inhibited cell death induced by the infection. Furthermore, HO-1 and Bcl-XL expression levels were also decreased by L. monocytogenes in pregnant mice. Treatment with cobalt protoporphyrin, which is known to induce HO-1, inhibited infectious abortion. Taken together, our study indicates that L. monocytogenes infection decreases HO-1 and Bcl-XL expression and induces cell death in placenta, leading to infectious abortion.

  16. Effect of curcumin on hepatic heme oxygenase 1 expression in high fat diet fed rats: is there a triangular relationship?

    PubMed

    Öner-İyidoğan, Yildiz; Tanrıkulu-Küçük, Sevda; Seyithanoğlu, Muhammed; Koçak, Hikmet; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Aydin, A Fatih; Beyhan-Özdaş, Şule; Yapişlar, Hande; Koçak-Toker, Necla

    2014-10-01

    High fat diet (HFD) is associated with oxidative stress induced fatty liver. Curcumin, an extract of Curcuma longa, has been shown to possess potent antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of curcumin treatment on hepatic heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression along with pro-oxidant-antioxidant status and lipid accumulation in rats fed an HFD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed among 4 groups: Group 1, which was fed the control diet (10% of total calories from fat); Group 2, which was fed the HFD (60% of total calories from fat); and groups 3 and 4, which received the HFD supplemented with curcumin and the control diet supplemented with curcumin (1 g/kg diet; w/w), respectively, for 16 weeks. HFD caused increases in hepatic lipid levels, production of reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation. Further, HO-1 expression was significantly decreased. Histopathological examination showed hepatic fat accumulation and slight fibrotic changes. Curcumin treatment reduced hepatic lipids and oxidative stress parameters, and HO-1 expression was significantly increased. These findings suggest that increased HO-1 expression, along with suppressed oxidative stress as well as reduced hepatic fat accumulation and fibrotic changes, contribute to the beneficial effects of curcumin in attenuating the pathogenesis of fatty liver induced metabolic diseases.

  17. NF-kappaB-inhibited acute myeloid leukemia cells are rescued from apoptosis by heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, Stuart A; Bowles, Kristian M; Raninga, Prahlad; MacEwan, David J

    2010-04-01

    Despite high basal NF-kappaB activity in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, inhibiting NF-kappaB in these cells has little or no effect on inducing apoptosis. We previously showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) underlies this resistance of AML to tumor necrosis factor-induced apoptosis. Here, we describe a mechanism by which HO-1 is a silent antiapoptotic factor only revealed when NF-kappaB is inhibited, thus providing a secondary antiapoptotic mechanism to ensure AML cell survival and chemoresistance. We show that inhibition of NF-kappaB increased HO-1 expression in primary AML cells compared with that of nonmalignant cells. In addition, we observed this suppressed HO-1 level in AML cells compared with CD34(+) nonmalignant control cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and small interfering RNA knockdown, we showed that the NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65 control this suppression of HO-1 in AML cells. Finally, we showed that inhibition of HO-1 and NF-kappaB in combination significantly induced apoptosis in AML cells but not in noncancerous control cells. Thus, NF-kappaB inhibition combined with HO-1 inhibition potentially provides a novel therapeutic approach to treat chemotherapy-resistant forms of AML.

  18. Depression-like behaviors and heme oxygenase-1 are regulated by Lycopene in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Fu, Yanyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wei; Shi, Yue; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xunbao; Qi, Dashi; Li, Lei; Ma, Kai; Tang, Renxian; Zheng, Kuiyang; Song, Yuanjian

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lycopene possesses anti-inflammatory properties in the central nervous system. However, the potential role and the molecular mechanisms of lycopene in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenge inflammation and depression-like behaviors has not been clearly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the effects and the potential mechanisms of lycopene on LPS-induced depression-like behaviors. Lycopene was orally administered (60mg/kg) every day for seven days followed by intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg). The Forced swim test and tail suspension test were used to detect changes in the depression-like behaviors. ELISA was used to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) in the plasma. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that pretreatment with lycopene could ameliorate depression-like behaviors. Moreover, lycopene relieved neuronal cell injury in hippocampal CA1 regions. Furthermore, lycopene decreased LPS-induced expression of IL-1β and HO-1 in the hippocampus together with decreasing level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma. Taken together, these results suggest that lycopene can attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and depression-like behaviors, which may be involved in regulating HO-1 in the hippocampus. PMID:27609268

  19. Knockdown of heme oxygenase-1 promotes apoptosis and autophagy and enhances the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, XIAO-FENG; LI, WEN; MA, JIE-YI; SHAO, NAN; ZHANG, YUN-JIAN; LIU, RUI-MING; WU, WEI-BIN; LIN, YING; WANG, SHEN-MING

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1) is a microsomal enzyme that exerts anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects. In the present study, HMOX-1 was demonstrated to be overexpressed and able to be induced by doxorubicin in breast cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HMOX-1 using short interfering (si)RNA enhanced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Knockdown of HMOX-1 downregulated B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and Bcl-extra large expression, and significantly enhanced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Additionally, knockdown of HMOX-1 upregulated light chain 3B expression and markedly increased the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells treated with doxorubicin. These results indicated that HMOX-1 may be involved in conferring the chemoresistance of breast cancer cells, by preventing apoptosis and autophagy. Therefore, HMOX-1 may represent a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the cytotoxicity and efficacy of doxorubicin during the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26722274

  20. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 with hemin reduces obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation via adipose macrophage phenotype switching.

    PubMed

    Tu, Thai Hien; Joe, Yeonsoo; Choi, Hye-Seon; Chung, Hun Taeg; Yu, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Adipose macrophages with the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype protect against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which elicits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, modulates macrophage phenotypes and thus is implicated in various inflammatory diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the HO-1 inducer, hemin, protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation by inducing macrophages to switch to the M2 phenotype. HO-1 induction by hemin reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) from cocultured adipocytes and macrophages by inhibiting the activation of inflammatory signaling molecules (JNK and NF-κB) in both cell types. Hemin enhanced transcript levels of M2 macrophage marker genes (IL-4, Mrc1, and Clec10a) in the cocultures, while reducing transcripts of M1 macrophage markers (CD274 and TNF-α). The protective effects of hemin on adipose inflammation and macrophage phenotype switching were confirmed in mice fed a high-fat diet, and these were associated with PPARγ upregulation and STAT6 activation. These findings suggest that induction of HO-1 with hemin protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation through M2 macrophage phenotype switching, which is induced by the PPARγ and STAT6 pathway. HO-1 inducers such as hemin may be useful for preventing obesity-induced adipose inflammation.

  1. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  2. Pinocembrin attenuates MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity by the induction of heme oxygenase-1 through ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongquan; Wang, Yumin; Zhao, Linan; Cui, Qifu; Wang, Yuehua; Du, Guanhua

    2016-01-26

    Our recent study demonstrated that pinocembrin (PB), the most abundant flavonoid in propolis, has neuroprotective effect against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced SH-SY5Y neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism as how PB can induce neuroprotection is not known. In the present study, we demonstrate here that PB increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which conferred protection against MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity, because the inhibitor of HO-1 zinc protoporphyrin-IX attenuated the neuroprotection of PB. PB induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and its cytoprotective effect was abolished by ERK1/2 inhibitors. Meanwhile, we have shown that MPP(+) induce the expression in a concentration-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y cells, which was further enhanced by PB. Taken together, the results suggest that PB enhances HO-1 expression to suppress MPP(+)-induced oxidative damage via ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These results revealed the mechanisms of PB enhances HO-1 expression, and contribute to shed some light on the mechanisms whereby PB inhibits the MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity. These data indicated that PB might provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD. PMID:26655464

  3. Disruption of Nitric Oxide Signaling by Helicobacter pylori Results in Enhanced Inflammation by Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Verriere, Thomas; Scull, Brooks P.; de Sablet, Thibaut; Glumac, Ashley; Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    A strong cellular crosstalk exists between the pathogen Helicobacter pylori and high-output NO production. However, how NO and H. pylori interact to signal in gastric epithelial cells and modulate the innate immune response is unknown. We show that chemical or cellular sources of NO induce the anti-inflammatory effector heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in gastric epithelial cells through a pathway that requires NF-κB. However, H. pylori decreases NO-induced NF-κB activation, thereby inhibiting HO-1 expression. This inhibitory effect of H. pylori results from activation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 by the H. pylori virulence factor CagA and by the host signaling molecules ERK1/2 and JNK. Consistent with these findings, HO-1 is downregulated in gastric epithelial cells of patients infected with cagA+, but not cagA− H. pylori. Enhancement of HO-1 activity in infected cells or in H. pylori-infected mice inhibits chemokine generation and reduces inflammation. These data define a mechanism by which H. pylori favors its own pathogenesis by inhibiting HO-1 induction through the action of CagA. PMID:21987660

  4. An improved method for purification of recombinant truncated heme oxygenase-1 by expanded bed adsorption and gel filtration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Wei; Han, Ling; Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) expressed in Escherichia coli was efficiently separated and purified from feedstock by DEAE-ion exchange expanded bed adsorption. Protocol optimization of hHO-1 on DEAE adsorbent resulted in adsorption in 0 M NaCl and elution in 150 mM NaCl at a pH of 8.5. The active enzyme fractions separated from the expanded bed column were further purified by a Superdex 75 gel filtration step. The specific hHO-1 activity increased from 0.82 +/- 0.05 to 24.8 +/- 1.8 U/mg during the whole purification steps. The recovery and purification factor of truncated hHO-1 of the whole purification were 72.7 +/- 4.7 and 30.2 +/- 2.3%, respectively. This purification process can decrease the demand on the preparation of feedstock and simplify the purification process.

  5. Expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Thick Ascending Loop of Henle Attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Heather A.; Gousette, Monette U.; Storm, Megan V.; Abraham, Nader G.; Csongradi, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Kidney-specific induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) attenuates the development of angiotensin II (Ang II) -dependent hypertension, but the relative contribution of vascular versus tubular induction of HO-1 is unknown. To determine the specific contribution of thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) -derived HO-1, we generated a transgenic mouse in which the uromodulin promoter controlled expression of human HO-1. Quantitative RT-PCR and confocal microscopy confirmed successful localization of the HO-1 transgene to TALH tubule segments. Medullary HO activity, but not cortical HO activity, was significantly higher in transgenic mice than control mice. Enhanced TALH HO-1 attenuated the hypertension induced by Ang II delivered by an osmotic minipump for 10 days (139±3 versus 153±2 mmHg in the transgenic and control mice, respectively; P<0.05). The lower blood pressure in transgenic mice associated with a 60% decrease in medullary NKCC2 transporter expression determined by Western blot. Transgenic mice also exhibited a 36% decrease in ouabain-sensitive sodium reabsorption and a significantly attenuated response to furosemide in isolated TALH segments,. In summary, these results show that increased levels of HO-1 in the TALH can lower blood pressure by a mechanism that may include alterations in NKCC2-dependent sodium reabsorption. PMID:22323644

  6. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 on induction and development of chemically induced squamous cell carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Was, Halina; Sokolowska, Malgorzata; Sierpniowska, Aleksandra; Dominik, Paweł; Skrzypek, Klaudia; Lackowska, Bozena; Pratnicki, Antoni; Grochot-Przeczek, Anna; Taha, Hevidar; Kotlinowski, Jerzy; Kozakowska, Magdalena; Mazan, Andrzej; Nowak, Witold; Muchova, Lucie; Vitek, Libor; Ratajska, Anna; Dulak, Jozef; Jozkowicz, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme, which may protect neoplastic cells against anticancer therapies, thereby promoting the progression of growing tumors. Our aim was to investigate the role of HO-1 in cancer induction. Experiments were performed in HO-1+/+, HO-1+/−, and HO-1−/− mice subjected to chemical induction of squamous cell carcinoma with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Measurements of cytoprotective genes in the livers evidenced systemic oxidative stress in the mice of all the HO-1 genotypes. Carcinogen-induced lesions appeared earlier in HO-1−/− and HO-1+/− than in wild-type animals. They also contained much higher concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor and keratinocyte chemoattractant, but lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12. Furthermore, tumors grew much larger in HO-1 knockouts than in the other groups, which was accompanied by an increased rate of animal mortality. However, pathomorphological analysis indicated that HO-1−/− lesions were mainly large but benign papillomas. In contrast, in mice expressing HO-1, most lesions displayed dysplastic features and developed to invasive carcinoma. Thus, HO-1 may protect healthy tissues against carcinogen-induced injury, but in already growing tumors it seems to favor their progression toward more malignant forms. PMID:21867749

  7. Curcumin ameliorates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier during hypoxia by upregulating heme oxygenase-1 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-feng; Gu, Yan-ting; Qin, Guang-hua; Zhong, Lei; Meng, Ying-nan

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a major active component of the food flavor turmeric isolated from the powdered dry rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn., which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to ameliorate intracerebral ischemic damage and reduce brain edema. However, the effects of Cur on the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) induced by brain ischemia are still unclear. The effects of Cur on the disruption of BBB and changes of tight junction (TJ) proteins induced by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) were studied in BBB in vitro. The transendothelial electrical resistance and the flux of horseradish peroxidase in BBB in vitro were measured. The expression and localization of the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) were evaluated by Western blots and immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also analyzed via Western blots. Cur attenuated OGD-induced disruption of paracellular permeability and increased the expression of HO-1 protein in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs). After administration of OGD, the expression of occludin and ZO-1 proteins was restored by Cur, and this effect was blocked by a HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). Cur protects RBMECs against OGD-induced disruption of TJ and barrier dysfunction via the HO-1 pathway. We propose that Cur is capable of improving the barrier function of BBB under ischemic conditions and this beneficial effect might be reversed by a HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP. PMID:23494637

  8. Resveratrol Partially Prevents Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity in Dopaminergic SH-SY5Y Cells through Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chen, Shang-Der; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Lin, Hung-Yu; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Liou, Chia-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress or protein misfolding and aggregation may underlie this process. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism responsible for protein degradation and recycling of damaged proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. Autophagic dysfunction may hasten the progression of neuronal degeneration. In this study, resveratrol promoted autophagic flux and protected dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced apoptosis. In an in vivo PD model, rotenone induced loss of dopaminergic neurons, increased oxidation of mitochondrial proteins and promoted autophagic vesicle development in brain tissue. The natural phytoalexin resveratrol prevented rotenone-induced neuronal apoptosis in vitro, and this pro-survival effect was abolished by an autophagic inhibitor. Although both rotenone and resveratrol promoted LC3-II accumulation, autophagic flux was inhibited by rotenone and augmented by resveratrol. Further, rotenone reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, whereas resveratrol increased HO-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HO-1 abolished resveratrol-mediated autophagy and neuroprotection. Notably, the effects of a pharmacological inducer of HO-1 were similar to those of resveratrol, and protected against rotenone-induced cell death in an autophagy-dependent manner, validating the hypothesis of HO-1 dependent autophagy in preventing neuronal death in the in vitro PD model. Collectively, our findings suggest that resveratrol induces HO-1 expression and prevents dopaminergic cell death by regulating autophagic flux; thus protecting against rotenone-induced neuronal apoptosis. PMID:24451142

  9. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Calleja, Patricia; Pisa, Diana; Turpín-Fenoll , Laura; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Ayuso-Peralta, Lucía; Torrecillas, Dolores; García-Albea, Esteban; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier

    2016-01-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, and experimental data suggest a possible role of oxidative stress in the ethiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis(MS). Heme-oxygenases(HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, and HMOX1 is overexpressed in the brain and spinal cord of MS patients and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis(EAE). We analyzed whether common polymorphisms affecting the HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop MS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations(CNVs) of these genes in 292 subjects MS and 533 healthy controls, using TaqMan assays. The frequencies of HMOX2 rs1051308AA genotype and HMOX2 rs1051308A and HMOX1 rs2071746A alleles were higher in MS patients than in controls, although only that of the SNP HMOX2 rs1051308 in men remained as significant after correction for multiple comparisons. None of the studied polymorphisms was related to the age at disease onset or with the MS phenotype. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphism and the risk to develop MS in Spanish Caucasian men and a trend towards association between the HMOX1 rs2071746A and MS risk. PMID:26868429

  10. Heme Oxygenase 1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Pedro; Agúndez, José A.G.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Pastor, Pau; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several reports suggested a role of heme oxygenase genes 1 and 2 (HMOX1 and HMOX2) in modifying the risk to develop Parkinson disease (PD). Because essential tremor (ET) and PD share phenotypical and, probably, etiologic factors of the similarities, we analyzed whether such genes are related with the risk to develop ET. We analyzed the distribution of allelic and genotype frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 single nucleotide polymorphisms, as well as the presence of copy number variations of these genes in 202 subjects with familial ET and 747 healthy controls. Allelic frequencies of rs2071746T and rs1051308G were significantly lower in ET patients than in controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 and HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphisms and the risk to develop ET in the Spanish population. PMID:26091465

  11. Alteration of the regiospecificity of human heme oxygenase-1 by unseating of the heme but not disruption of the distal hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; Evans, John P; Ogura, Hiroshi; La Mar, Gerd N; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-01-10

    Heme oxygenase regiospecifically oxidizes heme at the alpha-meso position to give biliverdin IXalpha, CO, and iron. The heme orientation within the active site, which is thought to determine the oxidation regiospecificity, is shown here for the human enzyme (hHO1) to be largely determined by interactions between the heme carboxylic acid groups and residues Arg183 and Lys18 but not Tyr134. Mutation of either Arg183 or Lys18 individually does not significantly alter the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent reaction regiochemistry but partially shifts the oxidation to the beta/delta-meso positions in the reaction supported by ascorbic acid. Mutation of Glu29 to a lysine, which places a positive charge where it can interact with a heme carboxyl if the heme rotates by approximately 90 degrees, causes a slight loss of regiospecificity but combined with the R183E and K18E mutations results primarily in beta/delta-meso oxidation of the heme under all conditions. NMR analysis of heme binding to the triple K18E/E29K/R183E mutant confirms rotation of the heme in the active site. Kinetic studies demonstrate that mutations of Arg183 greatly impair the rate of the P450 reductase-dependent reaction, in accord with the earlier finding that Arg183 is involved in binding of the reductase to hHO1, but have little effect on the ascorbate reaction. Mutations of Asp140 and Tyr58 that disrupt the active site hydrogen bonding network impair catalytic rates but do not influence the oxidation regiochemistry. The results indicate both that the oxidation regiochemistry is largely controlled by ionic interactions of the heme propionic acid groups with the protein and that shifts in regiospecificity involve rotation of the heme about an axis perpendicular to the heme plane. PMID:16388581

  12. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in normal and malignant B lymphocytes by 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 requires Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Bancos, Simona; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Rahman, Irfan; Phipps, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in response to oxidative stress and is believed to be a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. It is unknown whether normal or malignant human B lineage cells express HO-1. 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is an interesting electrophilic lipid mediator able to increase oxidative stress in B cells. Here, we tested normal and malignant human B lineage cells for their ability to express HO-1 in response to 15d-PGJ2, as well as the signaling pathways required for HO-1 expression. 15d-PGJ2 potently induced HO-1 protein expression in normal and malignant B cells. Malignant B cells exhibited a greater induction of HO-1 protein compared to normal B lymphocytes. Using siRNA directed against the transcription factor Nrf2 and B cells isolated from Nrf2-deficient mice, we show that HO-1 induction by 15d-PGJ2 is dependent on Nrf2. These results show that, compared to normal B lymphocytes, malignant B cells have a greater capacity to increase their HO-1 protein levels in response to 15d-PGJ2. We speculate that the ability to highly express HO-1 by malignant B cells could confer a survival advantage. PMID:20064636

  13. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in normal and malignant B lymphocytes by 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) requires Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Bancos, Simona; Baglole, Carolyn J; Rahman, Irfan; Phipps, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in response to oxidative stress and is believed to be a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. It is unknown whether normal or malignant human B-lineage cells express HO-1. 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) is an interesting electrophilic lipid mediator able to increase oxidative stress in B cells. Here, we tested normal and malignant human B-lineage cells for their ability to express HO-1 in response to 15d-PGJ(2), as well as the signaling pathways required for HO-1 expression. 15d-PGJ(2) potently induced HO-1 protein expression in normal and malignant B cells. Malignant B cells exhibited a greater induction of HO-1 protein compared to normal B lymphocytes. Using siRNA directed against the transcription factor Nrf2 and B cells isolated from Nrf2-deficient mice, we show that HO-1 induction by 15d-PGJ(2) is dependent on Nrf2. These results show that, compared to normal B lymphocytes, malignant B cells have a greater capacity to increase their HO-1 protein levels in response to 15d-PGJ(2). We speculate that the ability to highly express HO-1 by malignant B cells could confer a survival advantage.

  14. Antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects of asiaticoside in lipopolysaccharide-treated rat through up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Wan, JingYuan; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Li

    2013-08-01

    Asiaticoside (AS), a triterpenoid isolated from Centella asiatica, has been found to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in several experimental animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we provide experimental evidences that AS dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever and inflammatory response, including serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production, liver myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, brain cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) production. Interestingly, AS increased serum IL-10 level, liver heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression and activity. Furthermore, we found that the suppressive effects of AS on LPS-induced fever and inflammation were reversed by pretreatment with ZnPPIX, a HO-1 activity inhibitor. In summary, our results suggest that AS has the antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-treated rat. These effects could be associated with the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α and IL-6 levels, COX-2 expression and PGE2 production, as well as MPO activity, which might be mediated by the up-regulation of HO-1.

  15. A novel semisynthetic flavonoid 7-O-galloyltaxifolin upregulates heme oxygenase-1 in RAW264.7 cells via MAPK/Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Vrba, Jiří; Gažák, Radek; Kuzma, Marek; Papoušková, Barbora; Vacek, Jan; Weiszenstein, Martin; Křen, Vladimír; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2013-02-14

    Quercetin and gallic acid are natural activators of the transcription factor Nrf2, which regulates the expression of many cytoprotective enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We developed procedures for the synthesis of monogalloyl esters of quercetin and taxifolin (dihydroquercetin), namely, 3-O-galloylquercetin and 7-O-galloyltaxifolin, and examined their effect on the Nrf2 pathway in RAW264.7 cells. Unlike quercetin and free gallic acid, 3-O-galloylquercetin and natural quercetin derivatives isoquercitrin (quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucoside) and taxifolin had no effect on the expression of HO-1. In contrast, 7-O-galloyltaxifolin increased both mRNA and protein levels of HO-1 at concentrations of 25 μM and above. The induction of HO-1 by 7-O-galloyltaxifolin was primarily associated with the production of reactive oxygen species and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including p38 MAPKs and ERKs, followed by nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and downregulation of Keap1, a negative regulator of Nrf2. We conclude that 7-O-galloyltaxifolin upregulates HO-1 via activation of the MAPK/Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  16. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases. PMID:26945724

  17. Treatment of Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Glatiramer Acetate Alters Expression of Heme-Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Antonia; Fiebiger, Sebastian; Bros, Helena; Hertwig, Laura; Romero-Suarez, Silvina; Hamann, Isabell; Chanvillard, Coralie; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Millward, Jason M.; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) synergizes with the immunomodulatory agent glatiramer acetate (GA) in eliciting anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the relapsing-remitting EAE model. Thus, we hypothesized that mice with chronic EAE may also benefit from this combination therapy. We first assessed how a treatment with a single dose of GA together with daily application of EGCG may modulate EAE. Although single therapies with a suboptimal dose of GA or EGCG led to disease amelioration and reduced CNS inflammation, the combination therapy had no effects. While EGCG appeared to preserve axons and myelin, the single GA dose did not improve axonal damage or demyelination. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of EGCG was abolished when GA was applied in combination. To elucidate how a single dose of GA may interfere with EGCG, we focused on the anti-inflammatory, iron chelating and anti-oxidant properties of EGCG. Surprisingly, we observed that while EGCG induced a downregulation of the gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in affected CNS areas, the combined therapy of GA+EGCG seems to promote an increased HO-1 expression. These data suggest that upregulation of HO-1 may contribute to diminish the neuroprotective benefits of EGCG alone in this EAE model. Altogether, our data indicate that neuroprotection by EGCG in chronic EAE may involve regulation of oxidative processes, including downmodulation of HO-1. Further investigation of the re-dox balance in chronic neuroinflammation and in particular functional studies on HO-1 are warranted to understand its role in disease progression. PMID:26114502

  18. Resveratrol Mitigates Rat Retinal Ischemic Injury: The Roles of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Inducible Nitric Oxide, and Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Qian; Wu, Bing-Jhih; Pan, Wynn H.T.; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chen, Mi-Mi; Chao, Fang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Retinal ischemia-associated ocular disorders, such as retinal occlusive disorders, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma are vision-threatening. In this study, we examined whether and by what mechanisms resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is able to protect against retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Methods In vivo rat retinal ischemia was induced by high intraocular pressure (HIOP), namely, 120 mmHg for 60 min. The mechanism and management was evaluated by electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave amplitudes measurement, immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The HIOP-induced retinal ischemic changes were characterized by a decrease in ERG b-wave amplitudes, a loss of choline acetyltransferase immunolabeling of amacrine cell bodies/neuronal processes, and increased vimentin immunoreactivity, which is a marker of Müller cells, together with upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), and downregulation of Thy-1, both at the mRNA level. The detrimental effects due to the ischemia were concentration-dependent (weaker effect at 0.05 nmole) and/or significantly (at 0.5 nmole) altered when resveratrol was applied 15 min before or after retina ischemia. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that resveratrol may be able to protect the retina against ischemia by downregulation of MMP-9 and iNOS, and upregulation of HO-1. PMID:23075401

  19. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases.

  20. Sequential Upregulation of Superoxide Dismutase 2 and Heme Oxygenase 1 by tert-Butylhydroquinone Protects Mitochondria during Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiahong; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and neurodegenerative conditions. The transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) regulates intracellular antioxidative capacity to combat oxidative stress. We examined the effect of tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway inducer, on mitochondrial function during oxidative challenge in neurons. tBHQ prevented glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in an HT-22 neuronal cell line even with an 8-hour exposure delay. tBHQ blocked glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial superoxide accumulation. It also protected mitochondrial function under glutamate toxicity, including maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial Ca(2+) hemostasis, and mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate-activated, mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was inhibited by tBHQ as well. In rat primary cortical neurons, tBHQ protected cells from both glutamate and buthionine sulfoximine toxicity. We found that tBHQ scavenged ROS and induced a rapid upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expression and a delayed upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression. In HT-22 cells with a knockdown of SOD2 expression, delayed treatment with tBHQ failed to prevent glutamate-induced cell death. Briefly, tBHQ rescues mitochondrial function by sequentially increasing SOD2 and HO-1 expression during glutamate-mediated oxidative stress. This study is the first to demonstrate the role of tBHQ in preserving mitochondrial function during oxidative challenge and provides a clinically relevant argument for using tBHQ against acute neuron-compromising conditions.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates inflammation and oxidative damage in a rat model of smoke-induced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Fan, Guoquan; Zhao, Hui; Li, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a serious disease of the respiratory system and is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis, exerts potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti‑proliferative effects in various diseases. In the present study, we examined the effects of HO-1 on smoke‑induced emphysema, as well as the underlying mechanisms in a rat model of smoke-induced emphysema. Rats were either exposed to cigarette smoke or sham‑exposed for 20 weeks to establish the model of smoke-induced emphysema. The rats were subcutaneously injected with protoporphyrin IX [tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP) or ferriprotoporphyrin IX chloride (hemin)] during this period to examine the protective effects of HO-1. Subsequently, the development of emphysema, inflammatory cells, the levels of inflammatory mediators, particularly interleukin (IL)-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, monocyte chemotactic protein‑1 [MCP‑1, also known as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)], IL-8 [also known as chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)], macrophage inflammatory protein‑2α [MIP-2α, also known as chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2)] and IL-10, as well as the malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) content were determined. Exposure to smoke increased the total cell, neutrophil and macrophage counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It also increased the levels of the inflammatory mediators, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 and MIP-2α, as well as the MDA content and induced emphysema. Treatment with hemin upregulated HO-1 expression and attenuated the development of smoke-induced emphysema by reducing inflammatory cell infiltration, decreasing the levels of inflammatory mediators and attenuating oxidative damage, to a certain extent. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HO-1 exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, thus attenuating the

  2. Coordinated expression and mechanism of induction of HSP32 (heme oxygenase-1) mRNA by hyperthermia in rat organs.

    PubMed

    Raju, V S; Maines, M D

    1994-04-01

    Heme oxygenase isozymes, HO-1 and HO-2, catalyze the cleavage of heme b (Fe-protoporphyrin-IX) at the alpha-meso carbon bridge to form the antioxidant, biliverdin IX alpha, and the putative cellular messenger, carbon monoxide. HO-1 is a heat shock (HSP32) or stress protein, while HO-2 is a noninducible enzyme. Presently, we have examined the time course of expression of HSP32 in liver, kidney, and heart of rats exposed to hyperthermia and investigated the mechanism of induction of HO-1 by hyperthermia. We report a coordinated induction response of all organs to elevated ambient temperature (42 degrees C, 20 min). Specifically, the maximum induction of the 1.8 kb HO-1 mRNA was observed 1 h after hyperthermia and reached a value 20-40-fold that of the control; the transcript level approximated the control value by 6 h after heat stress. In contrast, the levels and the ratio of the 1.3 and 1.9 kb HO-2 transcripts were not affected by hyperthermia. As judged by in vitro nuclear transcription run-on assays, thermal stress caused the stimulation of HO-1 gene transcription. The increase in HO-1 mRNA transcription was accompanied by an increase in binding of nuclear factor(s) to the heat shock element in the promoter region of the gene. The increase of the HO-1 mRNA was reflected in increases in both heme oxygenase activity and in immunoreactive HO-1 protein. We suggest that the induction of heme oxygenase by heat stress is a physiologically relevant defense mechanism whereby both the degradation of heme of denatured hemoproteins and the generation of biologically active products of heme catabolism are enhanced.

  3. Ethyl linoleate from garlic attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Seetharaman, Rajasekar; Ko, Min Jung; Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoon, Moo Kyoung; Kwak, Jung Ho; Lee, Sang Joon; Bae, Yoe Sik; Choi, Young Whan

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, an essential fatty acid, ethyl linoleate (ELA), was isolated from the cloves of Allium sativum, and its structure was elucidated by NMR and GC-MS analyses. In vitro systems were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ELA. Our results indicate that ELA down-regulates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and thereby reduces nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescent microscopy and western blot analyses revealed that these effects were mediated by impaired translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and inhibition of phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases. Furthermore, ELA exerted its anti-inflammatory activity by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, as determined by HO-1 small interfering (Si) RNA system. Si RNA-mediated knock-down of HO-1 abrogated the inhibitory effects of ELA on the production of NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in LPS-induced macrophages. These findings indicate the potential therapeutic use of ELA as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  4. Effect of heat stress-induced production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species on NADPH oxidase and heme oxygenase-1 mRNA levels in avian muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kikusato, Motoi; Yoshida, Hayami; Furukawa, Kyohei; Toyomizu, Masaaki

    2015-08-01

    Heat stress is a major factor inducing oxidative disturbance in cells. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured avian muscle cells in response to heat stress, and also focused attention on the interaction of mitochondrial superoxide anions with altered NADPH oxidase (NOX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA levels in heat-stressed cells. Exposure of cells to heat stress conditions (41°C, 6h) resulted in increased mitochondrial superoxide and intracellular ROS levels, and increased carbonyl protein content as compared with that of normal cells (37°C). The mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol lowered intracellular ROS levels in heat-stressed cells. Heat stress increased NOX4 mRNA and decreased HO-1 mRNA levels, while SOD1 and SOD2 mRNA levels remained relatively stable in heat-stressed cells. Addition of the superoxide scavenger 4-hydroxy TEMPO to the culture medium of heat-stressed cells restored mitochondrial superoxide and intracellular ROS levels as well as NOX4 and HO-1 mRNA levels to near-normal values. We suggest that mitochondrial superoxide production could play an influential role in augmenting oxidative damage to avian muscle cells, possibly via the up-regulation of NOX4 and down-regulation of HO-1 in heat-stressed avian muscle cells.

  5. Cordyceps sinensis Increases Hypoxia Tolerance by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1 and Metallothionein via Nrf2 Activation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Manimaran; Misra, Kshipra

    2013-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, an edible mushroom growing in Himalayan regions, is widely recognized in traditional system of medicine. In the present study, we report the efficacy of Cordyceps sinensis in facilitating tolerance to hypoxia using A549 cell line as a model system. Treatment with aqueous extract of Cordyceps sinensis appreciably attenuated hypoxia induced ROS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained antioxidant status similar to that of controls via induction of antioxidant gene HO1 (heme oxygenase-1), MT (metallothionein) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2). In contrast, lower level of NFκB (nuclear factor kappaB) and tumor necrosis factor-α observed which might be due to higher levels of HO1, MT and transforming growth factor-β. Further, increase in HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1) and its regulated genes; erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and glucose transporter-1 was observed. Interestingly, Cordyceps sinensis treatment under normoxia did not regulate the expression HIF1, NFκB and their regulated genes evidencing that Cordyceps sinensis per se did not have an effect on these transcription factors. Overall, Cordyceps sinensis treatment inhibited hypoxia induced oxidative stress by maintaining higher cellular Nrf2, HIF1 and lowering NFκB levels. These findings provide a basis for possible use of Cordyceps sinensis in tolerating hypoxia. PMID:24063008

  6. Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) seed extract increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and decreases proinflammatory signaling in peripheral blood human leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Fadia; Haines, David; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Dashti, Ali A; Al-Awadhi, Adel; Ibrahim, Basel; Al-Zayer, Bashayer; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2014-05-01

    Sour cherry seed extract (SCE) was evaluated for its capacity to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-treated human peripheral blood T cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and the chemokine interleukin-8. Both proteins are diagnostic biomarkers for inflammatory pathologies. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 11 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and 8 healthy control subjects were co-cultured for 24h in lipopolysaccharide and the extract, then evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell activation and by enzyme-linked immunoassay for lymphocyte-associated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. There was a dose-dependent decrease in expression of the immunophenotypes: CD3+TNF-α+, and CD3+IL8+ in cultures from RA patients to a greater extent than in cells from healthy participants. These results suggest that the extract may have a modulatory roll in RA and other inflammatory disorders via the induction of HO-1, thus abating oxidative stress and strengthening regulation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. PMID:24631368

  7. Isorhamnetin-3-O-Glucuronide Suppresses JNK and p38 Activation and Increases Heme-Oxygenase-1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Challenged RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Song-In; Lee, Hee Jae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Chun, Wanjoo

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research Isorhanmetin (ISH) exhibits a wide range of biological properties including anticancer, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the pharmacological properties of isorhamnetin-3-O-glucuronide (IG), a glycoside derivative of ISH, have not been extensively examined. The objective of this study was to examine the anti-inflammatory properties of IG and its underlying mechanism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged RAW264.7 macrophage cells in comparison with its aglycone, ISH. IG suppressed LPS-induced extracellular secretion of the proinflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2 , and proinflammatory protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2. IG also increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). IG attenuated LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 in a concentration-dependent manner with negligible suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that IG exerts anti-inflammatory activity by increasing HO-1 expression and by suppressing JNK and p38 signaling pathways in LPS-challenged RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Drug Dev Res 77 : 143-151, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113811

  8. Identification of cyclins A1, E1 and vimentin as downstream targets of heme oxygenase-1 in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrea; Mylroie, Hayley; Thornton, C. Clare; Calay, Damien; Birdsey, Graeme M.; Kiprianos, Allan P.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Soares, Miguel P.; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Randi, Anna M.; Mason, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological process and an important factor in disease pathogenesis. However, its exploitation as a clinical target has achieved limited success and novel molecular targets are required. Although heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) acts downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to modulate angiogenesis, knowledge of the mechanisms involved remains limited. We set out identify novel HO-1 targets involved in angiogenesis. HO-1 depletion attenuated VEGF-induced human endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and tube formation. The latter response suggested a role for HO-1 in EC migration, and indeed HO-1 siRNA negatively affected directional migration of EC towards VEGF; a phenotype reversed by HO-1 over-expression. EC from Hmox1−/− mice behaved similarly. Microarray analysis of HO-1-depleted and control EC exposed to VEGF identified cyclins A1 and E1 as HO-1 targets. Migrating HO-1-deficient EC showed increased p27, reduced cyclin A1 and attenuated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. In vivo, cyclin A1 siRNA inhibited VEGF-driven angiogenesis, a response reversed by Ad-HO-1. Proteomics identified structural protein vimentin as an additional VEGF-HO-1 target. HO-1 depletion inhibited VEGF-induced calpain activity and vimentin cleavage, while vimentin silencing attenuated HO-1-driven proliferation. Thus, vimentin and cyclins A1 and E1 represent VEGF-activated HO-1-dependent targets important for VEGF-driven angiogenesis. PMID:27388959

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 secretion and chondrocyte cell death via Nox4 NADPH oxidase activity in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Francis; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Grange, Laurent; Morel, Françoise; Lardy, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of MMPs as well as chondrocyte apoptosis. Those events lead to matrix breakdown and are key features of osteoarthritis (OA). We confirmed that in human C-20/A4 chondrocytes the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is the main source of ROS upon IL-1β stimulation. Since heme molecules are essential for the NADPH oxidase maturation and activity, we therefore investigated the consequences of the modulation of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, on the IL-1β signaling pathway and more specifically on Nox4 activity. Induction of HO-1 expression decreased dramatically Nox4 activity in C-20/A4 and HEK293 T-REx™ Nox4 cell lines. Unexpectedly, this decrease was not accompanied by any change in the expression, the subcellular localization or the maturation of Nox4. In fact, the inhibition of the heme synthesis by succinylacetone rather than heme catabolism by HO-1, led to a confinement of the Nox4/p22(phox) heterodimer in the endoplasmic reticulum with an absence of redox differential spectrum highlighting an incomplete maturation. Therefore, the downregulation of Nox4 activity by HO-1 induction appeared to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO) generated from the heme degradation process. Interestingly, either HO-1 or CO caused a significant decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes stimulated by IL-1β. These results all together suggest that a modulation of Nox4 activity via heme oxygenase-1 may represent a promising therapeutic tool in osteoarthritis. PMID:23840483

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Matrix Metalloproteinase MMP-1 Secretion and Chondrocyte Cell Death via Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Activity in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rousset, Francis; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Grange, Laurent; Morel, Françoise; Lardy, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of MMPs as well as chondrocyte apoptosis. Those events lead to matrix breakdown and are key features of osteoarthritis (OA). We confirmed that in human C-20/A4 chondrocytes the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is the main source of ROS upon IL-1β stimulation. Since heme molecules are essential for the NADPH oxidase maturation and activity, we therefore investigated the consequences of the modulation of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, on the IL-1β signaling pathway and more specifically on Nox4 activity. Induction of HO-1 expression decreased dramatically Nox4 activity in C-20/A4 and HEK293 T-REx™ Nox4 cell lines. Unexpectedly, this decrease was not accompanied by any change in the expression, the subcellular localization or the maturation of Nox4. In fact, the inhibition of the heme synthesis by succinylacetone rather than heme catabolism by HO-1, led to a confinement of the Nox4/p22phox heterodimer in the endoplasmic reticulum with an absence of redox differential spectrum highlighting an incomplete maturation. Therefore, the downregulation of Nox4 activity by HO-1 induction appeared to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO) generated from the heme degradation process. Interestingly, either HO-1 or CO caused a significant decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes stimulated by IL-1β. These results all together suggest that a modulation of Nox4 activity via heme oxygenase-1 may represent a promising therapeutic tool in osteoarthritis. PMID:23840483

  11. Effects of tanshinone IIA on fibrosis in a rat model of cirrhosis through heme oxygenase-1, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    SHU, MING; HU, XIAO-RONG; HUNG, ZUO-AN; HUANG, DAM-DAN; ZHANG, SHUN

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza and used in traditional Chinese medicine for its anti-inflammatory activity and antioxidant effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential protective effects of tanshinone IIA against fibrosis in a rat model of cirrhosis and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague Dawley rats were used as the model of cirrhosis in the present study. In the cirrhotic rats, the extent of fibrosis, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, serum levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), and the protein expression levels of phosphorylated-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased. However, the serum malondialdehyde (MDA) activity and protein kinase B (Akt) protein expression were suppressed in cirrhotic rats compared with the sham (control) group. Compared with the cirrhotic group, administration of tanshinone IIA reduced the extent of fibrosis, levels of ALT and AST, HO-1 protein expression, serum NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels, and the activity of SOD, CAT and GSH-PX. Furthermore, administration of tanshinone IIA significantly increased the inhibition of the serum MDA activity and the Akt protein expression in cirrhotic rats compared with those in the cirrhotic group. The protective effect of tanshinone IIA suppresses fibrosis in a rat model of cirrhosis, and reduces inflammation and oxidative stress, via the HO-1, Akt and p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:26936326

  12. Hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1 and antioxidant response element-mediated genes following administration of ethinyl estradiol to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morio, Lisa A.; Leone, Angelique; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Nie, Alex Y.; Brandon Parker, J.; Taggart, Peter; Barron, Alfred M.; McMillian, Michael K. . E-mail: mmcmilli@prdus.jnj.com; Lord, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of several enzymes induced by hepatotoxicants, and is thought to have an important protective role against cellular stress during liver inflammation and injury. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of HO-1 in estradiol-induced liver injury. A single dose of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg, po) resulted in mild liver injury. Repeated administration of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg/day for 4 days, po) resulted in no detectable liver injury or dysfunction. Using RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that HO-1 gene expression in whole liver tissue is elevated (> 20-fold) after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. The number and intensity of HO-1 immunoreactive macrophages were increased after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. HO-1 expression was undetectable in hepatic parenchymal cells from rats receiving Methocel control or a single dose of ethinyl estradiol, however cytosolic HO-1 immunoreactivity in these cells after repeated dosing of ethinyl estradiol was pronounced. The increases in HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 immunoreactivity following administration of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol suggested that this enzyme might be responsible for the observed protection of the liver during repeated dosing. To investigate the effect of HO-1 expression on ethinyl estradiol-induced hepatotoxicity, rats were pretreated with hemin (50 {mu}mol/kg, ip, a substrate and inducer of HO-1), with tin protoporphyrin IX (60 {mu}mol/kg, ip, an HO-1 inhibitor), or with gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, iv, an inhibitor/toxin of Kupffer cells) 24 h before ethinyl estradiol treatment. Pretreatment with modulators of HO-1 expression and activity had generally minimal effects on ethinyl estradiol-induced liver injury. These data suggest that HO-1 plays a limited role in antioxidant defense against ethinyl estradiol-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and suggests that other coordinately induced enzymes are responsible for protection observed

  13. Sodium arsenite induced reactive oxygen species generation, nuclear factor (erythroid-2 related) factor 2 activation, heme oxygenase-1 expression, and glutathione elevation in Chang human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Li, Xin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huihui; Hou, Yongyong; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan

    2013-07-01

    Liver is one of the major target organs of arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. Nuclear factor (erythroid-2 related) factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor, regulating critically cellular defense responses against the toxic metallic arsenic in many cell types and tissues. This study was conducted to evaluate the hepato-cellular Nrf2 and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant reactions of sodium arsenite exposure in Chang human hepatocytes. Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein levels were detected by Western blot, and Nrf2-regulated HO-1 mRNA expressions were determined using semiquantitative RT-PCR by 0∼50 μmol/L of sodium arsenite exposure for 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. We also observed the changes of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total cellular glutathione (GSH) by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Our results showed that intracellular ROS were both dose- and time-dependent induced by inorganic arsenic; Cellular Nrf2 protein levels increased rapidly after 2 h of exposure, elevated significantly at 6 h, and reached the maximum at 12 h. The endogenous Nrf2-regulated downstream HO-1 mRNA and protein were also induced dramatically and lasted for as long as 24 h. In addition, intracellular GSH levels elevated in consistent with Nrf2 activation. Our findings here suggest that inorganic arsenic alters cellular redox balance in hepatocytes to trigger Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses promptly, which may represent an adaptive cell defense mechanism against inorganic arsenic induced liver injuries and hepatoxicity.

  14. Diverse Nrf2 Activators Coordinated to Cobalt Carbonyls Induce Heme Oxygenase-1 and Release Carbon Monoxide in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nikam, Aniket; Ollivier, Anthony; Rivard, Michael; Wilson, Jayne Louise; Mebarki, Kevin; Martens, Thierry; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2016-01-28

    The Nrf2/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) axis affords significant protection against oxidative stress and cellular damage. We synthesized a series of cobalt-based hybrid molecules (HYCOs) that combine an Nrf2 inducer with a releaser of carbon monoxide (CO), an anti-inflammatory product of HO-1. Two HYCOs markedly increased Nrf2/HO-1 expression, liberated CO and exerted anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. HYCOs also up-regulated tissue HO-1 and delivered CO in blood after administration in vivo, supporting their potential use against inflammatory conditions.

  15. Different Susceptibility to the Parkinson's Toxin MPTP in Mice Lacking the Redox Master Regulator Nrf2 or Its Target Gene Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Innamorato, Nadia G.; Jazwa, Agnieszka; Rojo, Ana I.; García, Concepción; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Grochot–Przeczek, Anna; Stachurska, Anna; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) and its target gene products, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), elicit an antioxidant response that may have therapeutic value for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, HO-1 protein levels are increased in dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, suggesting its participation in free-iron deposition, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Before targeting Nrf2 for PD therapy it is imperative to determine if HO-1 is neurotoxic or neuroprotective in the basal ganglia. Methodology We addressed this question by comparing neuronal damage and gliosis in Nrf2- or HO-1-knockout mice submitted to intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for five consecutive days. Nrf2-knockout mice showed exacerbated gliosis and dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration, as determined by immunohistochemical staining of tyrosine hydroxylase in striatum (STR) and substantia nigra (SN) and by HPLC determination of striatal dopamine and 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). On the other hand, the severity of gliosis and dopaminergic degeneration in HO-1-null mice was neither increased nor reduced. Regarding free-iron deposition, both Nrf2- and HO-1-deficient mice exhibited similar number of deposits as determined by Perl's staining, therefore indicating that these proteins do not contribute significantly to iron accumulation or clearance in MPTP-induced Parkinsonism. Conclusions These results suggest that HO-1 does not protect or enhance the sensitivity to neuronal death in Parkinson's disease and that pharmacological or genetic intervention on Nrf2 may provide a neuroprotective benefit as add on therapy with current symptomatic protocols. PMID:20676377

  16. Quercetin Attenuates Inflammatory Responses in BV-2 Microglial Cells: Role of MAPKs on the Nrf2 Pathway and Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Grace Y.; Chen, Zihong; Jasmer, Kimberly J.; Chuang, Dennis Y.; Gu, Zezong; Hannink, Mark; Simonyi, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    A large group of flavonoids found in fruits and vegetables have been suggested to elicit health benefits due mainly to their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies with immune cells have demonstrated inhibition of these inflammatory responses through down-regulation of the pro-inflammatory pathway involving NF-κB and up-regulation of the anti-oxidative pathway involving Nrf2. In the present study, the murine BV-2 microglial cells were used to compare anti-inflammatory activity of quercetin and cyanidin, two flavonoids differing by their alpha, beta keto carbonyl group. Quercetin was 10 folds more potent than cyanidin in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO production as well as stimulation of Nrf2-induced heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression. In addition, quercetin demonstrated enhanced ability to stimulate HO-1 protein expression when cells were treated with LPS. In an attempt to unveil mechanism(s) for quercetin to enhance Nrf2/HO-1 activity under endotoxic stress, results pointed to an increase in phospho-p38MAPK expression upon addition of quercetin to LPS. In addition, pharmacological inhibitors for phospho-p38MAPK and MEK1/2 for ERK1/2 further showed that these MAPKs target different sites of the Nrf2 pathway that regulates HO-1 expression. However, inhibition of LPS-induced NO by quercetin was not fully reversed by TinPPIX, a specific inhibitor for HO-1 activity. Taken together, results suggest an important role of quercetin to regulate inflammatory responses in microglial cells and its ability to upregulate HO-1 against endotoxic stress through involvement of MAPKs. PMID:26505893

  17. Amomum tsao-ko fruit extract suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages and in septic mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Ryu, Suran; Jang, Dae Sik; Cho, Young-Wuk; Chung, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Amomum tsao-ko Crevost et Lemarié (Zingiberaceae) has traditionally been used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as throat infections, malaria, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. This study was designed to assess the anti-inflammatory effects and the molecular mechanisms of the methanol extract of A. tsao-ko (AOM) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in a murine model of sepsis. In LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, AOM reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO) by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Pretreatment with SnPP (a selective inhibitor of HO-1) and silencing HO-1 using siRNA prevented the AOM-mediated inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression. Furthermore, AOM increased the expression and nuclear accumulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which enhanced Nrf2 binding to antioxidant response element (ARE). In addition, AOM induced the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC; a ROS scavenger) diminished the AOM-induced phosphorylation of ERK and JNK and AOM-induced HO-1 expression, suggesting that ERK and JNK are downstream mediators of ROS during the AOM-induced signalling of HO-1 expression. In LPS-induced endotoxaemic mice, pretreatment with AOM reduced NO serum levels and liver iNOS expression and increased HO-1 expression and survival rates. These results indicate that AOM strongly inhibits LPS-induced NO production by activating the ROS/MAPKs/Nrf2-mediated HO-1 signalling pathway, and supports its pharmacological effects on inflammatory diseases.

  18. Impact of immunosuppressive agents on the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, heme oxygenase-1 and interleukin-7 in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo-Biao; Luo, Guang-Heng; Bao, Ding-Su; Chen, An-Jian; Zhuang, Yong-Xiang; Guo, Ya-Nan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Zong-Ping; Lu, Yi-Ping; Li, You-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a major cause of graft loss following kidney transplantation and may result from the interactions of various immune and non-immune factors. The aim of the present study was to establish an in vitro model of glomerular mesangial cell injury in order to examine the gene expression levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and interleukin-7 (IL-7) in mesangial cells during the healing process as well as to investigate the effects of various immunosuppressants on the expression of these genes. The HBZY-1 glomerular mesangial cell line was pre-treated in vitro with cytochalasin B for 2 h to induce reversible damage. Following the pre-treatment, the HBZY-1 cells were divided into five groups: Blank control group, cyclosporine A (CsA) group, tacrolimus (Tac) group, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) group and rapamycin (RAPA) group. After treating the mesangial cells with each immunosuppressive drug for 6, 12 or 24 h, the mRNA and protein expression levels of IDO, HO-1 and IL-7 were examined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results showed that expression levels of HO-1 were significantly upregulated in response to treatment with CsA, FK506, RAPA and MMF, whereas the expression levels of IL-7 were markedly downregulated by treatment with the above immunosuppressants. CsA, FK506 and MMF significantly enhanced the expression levels of IDO, whereas RAPA exhibited no apparent effect on IDO. The present study may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of CAN and provide novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of CAN.

  19. Impact of immunosuppressive agents on the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, heme oxygenase-1 and interleukin-7 in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo-Biao; Luo, Guang-Heng; Bao, Ding-Su; Chen, An-Jian; Zhuang, Yong-Xiang; Guo, Ya-Nan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Zong-Ping; Lu, Yi-Ping; Li, You-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a major cause of graft loss following kidney transplantation and may result from the interactions of various immune and non-immune factors. The aim of the present study was to establish an in vitro model of glomerular mesangial cell injury in order to examine the gene expression levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and interleukin-7 (IL-7) in mesangial cells during the healing process as well as to investigate the effects of various immunosuppressants on the expression of these genes. The HBZY-1 glomerular mesangial cell line was pre-treated in vitro with cytochalasin B for 2 h to induce reversible damage. Following the pre-treatment, the HBZY-1 cells were divided into five groups: Blank control group, cyclosporine A (CsA) group, tacrolimus (Tac) group, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) group and rapamycin (RAPA) group. After treating the mesangial cells with each immunosuppressive drug for 6, 12 or 24 h, the mRNA and protein expression levels of IDO, HO-1 and IL-7 were examined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results showed that expression levels of HO-1 were significantly upregulated in response to treatment with CsA, FK506, RAPA and MMF, whereas the expression levels of IL-7 were markedly downregulated by treatment with the above immunosuppressants. CsA, FK506 and MMF significantly enhanced the expression levels of IDO, whereas RAPA exhibited no apparent effect on IDO. The present study may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of CAN and provide novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of CAN. PMID:25936769

  20. Puerarin suppresses AGEs-induced inflammation in mouse mesangial cells: A possible pathway through the induction of heme oxygenase-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Mo; Jung, Dong Ho; Jang, Dae Sik; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Ha-Na; Surh, Young-Joon; Kim, Jin Sook

    2010-04-15

    Puerarin is a natural product isolated from Puerarin lobata and has various pharmacological effects, including anti-hyperglycemic and anti-allergic properties. In the present study, we investigated the effect of puerarin against advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced inflammation in mouse mesangial cells. Puerarin acts by inducing the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Puerarin was able to enhance phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) delta, but not PKC alpha/beta II, in a time-dependent manner. Induction of HO-1 expression by puerarin was suppressed by GF109203X, a general inhibitor of PKC, and by rottlerin, a specific inhibitor of PKC delta. However, induction was not suppressed by Goe6976, a selective inhibitor for PKC alpha/beta II. Additionally, the knockdown of endogenous PKC delta by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in the inhibition of HO-1 expression and Akt phosphorylation. Puerarin increased antioxidant response element (ARE)-Luciferase activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner in transfected mouse mesangial cells. Mutation of the ARE sequence abolished puerarin-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, puerarin treatments resulted in a marked increase in NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf-2) translocation, leading to up-regulation of HO-1 expression. However, transfection of Nrf-2 specific siRNA abolished HO-1 expression. Pretreatment with puerarin inhibited the expressions of COX-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9. But, these effects were reversed by ZnPP, an inhibitor of HO-1. Taken together, our results demonstrate that puerarin-induced expression of HO-1 is mediated by the PKC delta-Nrf-2-HO-1 pathway and inhibits N-carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced inflammation in mouse mesangial cells.

  1. Sofalcone, a gastric mucosa protective agent, increases vascular endothelial growth factor via the Nrf2-heme-oxygenase-1 dependent pathway in gastric epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Akiko; Onda, Kenji; Kawahara, Hirofumi; Uchiyama, Yuka; Nakayama, Hiroko; Omi, Takamasa; Nagaoka, Masayoshi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Sofalcone increases HO-1 in gastric epithelial cells. {yields} The induction of HO-1 by sofalcone treatment follows the activation of Nrf2. {yields} The production of VEGF by sofalcone treatment is mediated by HO-1 induction. -- Abstract: Sofalcone, 2'-carboxymethoxy-4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)chalcone, is an anti-ulcer agent that is classified as a gastric mucosa protective agent. Recent studies indicate heat shock proteins such as HSP32, also known as heme-oxygenase-1(HO-1), play important roles in protecting gastrointestinal tissues from several stresses. We have previously reported that sofalcone increases the expression of HO-1 in adipocytes and pre-adipocytes, although the effect of sofalcone on HO-1 induction in gastrointestinal tissues is not clear. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sofalcone on the expression of HO-1 and its functional role in rat gastric epithelial (RGM-1) cells. We found that sofalcone increased HO-1 expression in RGM-1 cells in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. The HO-1 induction was associated with the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) in RGM-1 cells. We also observed that sofalcone increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in the culture medium. Treatment of RGM-1 cells with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin-protoporphyrin), or HO-1 siRNA inhibited sofalcone-induced VEGF production, suggesting that the effect of sofalcone on VEGF expression is mediated by the HO-1 pathway. These results suggest that the gastroprotective effects of sofalcone are partly exerted via Nrf2-HO-1 activation followed by VEGF production.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  3. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Deficiency and Associated Glutamate-Mediated Neurotoxicity Is a Highly Conserved HIV Phenotype of Chronic Macrophage Infection That Is Resistant to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsics, Colleen E.; Vance, Patricia J.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is significantly reduced in the brain prefrontal cortex of HIV-positive individuals with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Furthermore, this HO-1 deficiency correlates with brain viral load, markers of macrophage activation, and type I interferon responses. In vitro, HIV replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) selectively reduces HO-1 protein and RNA expression and induces production of neurotoxic levels of glutamate; correction of this HO-1 deficiency reduces neurotoxic glutamate production without an effect on HIV replication. We now demonstrate that macrophage HO-1 deficiency, and the associated neurotoxin production, is a conserved feature of infection with macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains that correlates closely with the extent of replication, and this feature extends to HIV-2 infection. We further demonstrate that this HO-1 deficiency does not depend specifically upon the HIV-1 accessory genes nef, vpr, or vpu but rather on HIV replication, even when markedly limited. Finally, antiretroviral therapy (ART) applied to MDM after HIV infection is established does not prevent HO-1 loss or the associated neurotoxin production. This work defines a predictable relationship between HIV replication, HO-1 loss, and neurotoxin production in MDM that likely reflects processes in place in the HIV-infected brains of individuals receiving ART. It further suggests that correcting this HO-1 deficiency in HIV-infected MDM could provide neuroprotection above that provided by current ART or proposed antiviral therapies directed at limiting Nef, Vpr, or Vpu functions. The ability of HIV-2 to reduce HO-1 expression suggests that this is a conserved phenotype among macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency viruses that could contribute to neuropathogenesis. IMPORTANCE The continued prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) underscores the need for adjunctive therapy that

  4. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A2-mediated metabolism and production of reactive oxygen species by heme oxygenase-1 in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Reed, James R; Cawley, George F; Backes, Wayne L

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in most cell types by many forms of environmental stress and is believed to play a protective role in cells exposed to oxidative stress. Metabolism by cytochromes P450 (P450) is highly inefficient as the oxidation of substrate is associated with the production of varying proportions of hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide. This study tests the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role against oxidative stress by competing with P450 for binding to the common redox partner, the NADPH P450 reductase (CPR) and in the process, diminishing P450 metabolism and the associated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Liver microsomes were isolated from uninduced rats and rats that were treated with cadmium and/or β-napthoflavone (BNF) to induce HO-1 and/or CYP1A2. HO-1 induction was associated with slower rates of metabolism of the CYP1A2-specific substrate, 7-ethoxyresorufin. Furthermore, HO-1 induction also was associated with slower rates of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical production by microsomes from rats induced for CYP1A2. The inhibition associated with HO-1 induction was not dependent on the addition of heme to the microsomal incubations. The effects of HO-1 induction were less dramatic in the absence of substrate for CYP1A2, suggesting that the enzyme was more effective in inhibiting the CYP1A2-related activity than the CPR-related production of superoxide (that dismutates to form hydrogen peroxide).

  5. Metformin inhibits heme oxygenase-1 expression in cancer cells through inactivation of Raf-ERK-Nrf2 signaling and AMPK-independent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Hee; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-09-01

    Resistance to therapy is the major obstacle to more effective cancer treatment. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is often highly up-regulated in tumor tissues, and its expression is further increased in response to therapies. It has been suggested that inhibition of HO-1 expression is a potential therapeutic approach to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-tumor effects of metformin are mediated by suppression of HO-1 expression in cancer cells. Our results indicate that metformin strongly suppresses HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human hepatic carcinoma HepG2, cervical cancer HeLa, and non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells. Metformin also markedly reduced Nrf2 mRNA and protein levels in whole cell lysates and suppressed tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ)-induced Nrf2 protein stability and antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase activity in HepG2 cells. We also found that metformin regulation of Nrf2 expression is mediated by a Keap1-independent mechanism and that metformin significantly attenuated Raf-ERK signaling to suppress Nrf2 expression in cancer cells. Inhibition of Raf-ERK signaling by PD98059 decreased Nrf2 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells, confirming that the inhibition of Nrf2 expression is mediated by an attenuation of Raf-ERK signaling in cancer cells. The inactivation of AMPK by siRNA, DN-AMPK or the pharmacological AMPK inhibitor compound C, revealed that metformin reduced HO-1 expression in an AMPK-independent manner. These results highlight the Raf-ERK-Nrf2 axis as a new molecular target in anticancer therapy in response to metformin treatment. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits HO-1 expression in cancer cells. • Metformin attenuates Raf-ERK-Nrf2 signaling. • Suppression of HO-1 by metformin is independent of AMPK. • HO-1 inhibition contributes to anti-proliferative effects of metformin.

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Is Not Decreased in Preeclamptic Placenta and Does Not Negatively Regulate Placental Soluble fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 or Soluble Endoglin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Stephen; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Onda, Kenji; Beard, Sally; Hastie, Roxanne; Binder, Natalie K; Cluver, Cathy; Tuohey, Laura; Whitehead, Clare; Brownfoot, Fiona; De Silva, Manarangi; Hannan, Natalie J

    2015-11-01

    Elevated placental release of the antiangiogenic factors, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin (sENG), is central to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. It is widely accepted that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is decreased in preeclamptic placenta and negatively regulates sFlt-1 and sENG production. We set out to verify these contentions. There was no difference in HO-1 mRNA or protein levels in preterm preeclamptic placentas (n=17) compared with gestationally matched controls (n=27). In silico analysis of microarray studies did not identify decreased placental HO-1 expression in preeclamptic placenta. Silencing HO-1 in primary trophoblasts did not affect sFlt-1 protein secretion after 24 or 48 hours. Silencing nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (transcription factor that upregulates HO-1) in trophoblasts also did not affect sFlt-1 secretion. Administering tin protoporphyrin IX dichloride (HO-1 inhibitor) or cobalt protoporphyrin (HO-1 inducer) into placental explants did not affect sFlt-1 or sENG secretion. Silencing HO-1 in 2 types of primary endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial and uterine microvascular endothelial cells) significantly increased sFlt-1 secretion but not sENG secretion. However, HO-1 silencing selectively increased mRNA expression of sFlt-1 i13 (generically expressed sFlt-1 variant) but not of sFlt-1 e15a (sFlt-1 variant mainly expressed in placenta). Furthermore, adding tin protoporphyrin IX dichloride decreased sFlt-1, whereas adding HO-1 inducers (cobalt protoporphyrin, dimethyl fumarate, and rosiglitazone) either had no effect or increased sFlt-1 or sENG secretion (these trends are opposite to what is expected). We conclude that HO-1 expression is not decreased in preeclamptic placenta and HO-1 does not negatively regulate placental sFlt-1 and sENG secretion in placental or endothelial cells. PMID:26324507

  7. Low concentration of 4-hydroxy hexenal increases heme oxygenase-1 expression through activation of Nrf2 and antioxidative activity in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikado, Atsushi; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Morino, Katsutaro; Ugi, Satoshi; Kondo, Hajime; Makino, Taketoshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Low doses of 4-HHE and 4-HNE induce HO-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells. {yields} 4-HHE and 4-HNE increase the intranuclear expression and DNA binding of Nrf2. {yields} 4-HHE and 4-HNE-induced HO-1 expression depends on the activation of Nrf2. {yields} Pretreatment with 4-HHE and 4-HNE prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Large-scale clinical studies have shown that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids reduce cardiovascular events without improving classical risk factors for atherosclerosis. Recent studies have proposed that direct actions of n-3 PUFAs themselves, or of their enzymatic metabolites, have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects on vascular cells. Although a recent study showed that plasma 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE), a peroxidation product of n-3 PUFA, increased after supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid, the antiatherogenic effects of 4-HHE in vascular cells remain unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that 4-HHE induces the antioxidative enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a master regulatory transcriptional factor, and prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in vascular endothelial cells. This mechanism could partly explain the cardioprotective effects of n-3 PUFAs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with 1-10 {mu}M 4-HHE or 4-hydroxy nonenal (4-HNE), a peroxidation product of n-6 PUFAs. Both 4-HHE and 4-HNE dose-dependently increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and intranuclear expression and DNA binding of Nrf2 at 5 {mu}M. Small interfering RNA for Nrf2 significantly reduced 4-HHE- or 4-HNE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, pretreatment with 4-HHE or 4-HNE prevented tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, 4-HHE, a peroxidation product of n-3 PUFAs, stimulated

  8. Effect of ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway in Electro-Acupuncture – Mediated Up-Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Lungs of Rabbits with Endotoxic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Jian-bo; Luo, Xiao-qing; Gong, Li-rong; Wang, Man; Cao, Xin-shun; Dong, Shu-an; Yan, Yu-miao; Kwon, Yihyun; He, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Background The anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of electro-acupuncture (EA), a traditional clinical method, are widely accepted, but its mechanisms are not yet well defined. In this study, we investigated the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways on electro-acupuncture – mediated up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rabbit lungs injured by LPS-induced endotoxic shock. Material/Methods Seventy rabbits were randomly divided into 7 groups: group C, group M, group D, group SEAM, group EAM, group EAMPD, and group PD98059. Male New England white rabbits were given EA treatment on both sides once a day on days 1–5, and then received LPS to replicate the experimental model of injured lung induced by endotoxic shock. Then, they were killed by exsanguination at 6 h after LPS administration. The blood samples were collected for serum examination, and the lungs were removed for pathology examination, determination of wet-to-dry weight ratio, MDA content, SOD activity, serum tumor necrosis factor-α, determination of HO-1 protein and mRNA expression, and determination of ERK1/2 protein. Results The results revealed that after EA treatment, expression of HO-1and ERK1/2 was slightly increased compared to those in other groups, accompanied with less severe lung injury as indicated by lower index of lung injury score, lower wet-to-dry weight ratio, MDA content, and serum tumor necrosis factor-α levels, and greater SOD activity (p<0.05 for all). After pretreatment with ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, the effect of EA treatment and expression of HO-1 were suppressed (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions After electro-acupuncture stimulation at ST36 and BL13, severe lung injury during endotoxic shock was attenuated. The mechanism may be through up-regulation of HO-1, mediated by the signal transductions of ERK1/2 pathways. Thus, the regulation of ERK1/2 pathways via electro-acupuncture may be a therapeutic strategy for endotoxic shock. PMID

  9. Heme Oxygenase-1 Is Not Decreased in Preeclamptic Placenta and Does Not Negatively Regulate Placental Soluble fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 or Soluble Endoglin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Stephen; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Onda, Kenji; Beard, Sally; Hastie, Roxanne; Binder, Natalie K; Cluver, Cathy; Tuohey, Laura; Whitehead, Clare; Brownfoot, Fiona; De Silva, Manarangi; Hannan, Natalie J

    2015-11-01

    Elevated placental release of the antiangiogenic factors, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin (sENG), is central to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. It is widely accepted that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is decreased in preeclamptic placenta and negatively regulates sFlt-1 and sENG production. We set out to verify these contentions. There was no difference in HO-1 mRNA or protein levels in preterm preeclamptic placentas (n=17) compared with gestationally matched controls (n=27). In silico analysis of microarray studies did not identify decreased placental HO-1 expression in preeclamptic placenta. Silencing HO-1 in primary trophoblasts did not affect sFlt-1 protein secretion after 24 or 48 hours. Silencing nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (transcription factor that upregulates HO-1) in trophoblasts also did not affect sFlt-1 secretion. Administering tin protoporphyrin IX dichloride (HO-1 inhibitor) or cobalt protoporphyrin (HO-1 inducer) into placental explants did not affect sFlt-1 or sENG secretion. Silencing HO-1 in 2 types of primary endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial and uterine microvascular endothelial cells) significantly increased sFlt-1 secretion but not sENG secretion. However, HO-1 silencing selectively increased mRNA expression of sFlt-1 i13 (generically expressed sFlt-1 variant) but not of sFlt-1 e15a (sFlt-1 variant mainly expressed in placenta). Furthermore, adding tin protoporphyrin IX dichloride decreased sFlt-1, whereas adding HO-1 inducers (cobalt protoporphyrin, dimethyl fumarate, and rosiglitazone) either had no effect or increased sFlt-1 or sENG secretion (these trends are opposite to what is expected). We conclude that HO-1 expression is not decreased in preeclamptic placenta and HO-1 does not negatively regulate placental sFlt-1 and sENG secretion in placental or endothelial cells.

  10. Gene therapy for nucleus pulposus regeneration by heme oxygenase-1 plasmid DNA carried by mixed polyplex micelles with thermo-responsive heterogeneous coronas.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ganjun; Chen, Hongying; Li, Junjie; Huang, Qiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Liu, Hao; Song, Yueming; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-06-01

    Safe and high-efficiency gene therapy for nucleus pulposus (NP) regeneration was urgently desired to treat disc degeneration-associated diseases. In this work, an efficient nonviral cationic block copolymer gene delivery system was used to deliver therapeutic plasmid DNA (pDNA), which was prepared via complexation between the mixed cationic block copolymers, poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoehtyl]aspartamide} [PEG-b-PAsp(DET)] and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-PAsp(DET) [PNIPAM-b-PAsp(DET)], and pDNA at 25 °C. The mixed polyplex micelles (MPMs) containing heterogeneous coronas with hydrophobic and hydrophilic microdomains coexisting could be obtained upon heating from 25 to 37 °C, which showed high tolerability against nuclease and strong resistance towards protein adsorption. The gene transfection efficiency of MPMs in NP cells was significantly higher than that of regular polyplex micelles prepared from sole block copolymer of PEG-b-PAsp(DET) (SPMs) in in vitro and in vivo evaluation due to the synergistic effect of improved colloidal stability and low cytotoxicity. High expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in NP cells transfected by MPMs loading HO-1 pDNA significantly decreased the expression activity of matrix metalloproteinases 3 (MMP-3) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and simultaneously increased the NP phenotype-associated genes such as aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX-9. Moreover, the therapeutic effects of MPMs loading pDNA were tested to treat disc degeneration induced by stab injury. The results demonstrated that administration of HO-1 pDNA carried by MPMs in rat tail discs apparently reduced inflammatory responses induced by need stab and increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, finally achieving better therapeutic efficacy as compared with SPMs. Consequently, MPMs loading HO-1 pDNA were demonstrated to be potential as a safe and high-efficiency nonviral gene delivery system

  11. Transduction of PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 into insulin-producing INS-1 cells protects them against cytokine-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Hyung Kyung; Song, Dong Keun; Eum, Won Sik; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Hyeok Yil

    2015-06-05

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, thereby triggering the development of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. We recently developed a cell-permeable fusion protein, PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 (PEP-1-HO-1) and investigated the anti-inflammatory effects in macrophage cells. In this study, we transduced PEP-1-HO-1 into INS-1 insulinoma cells and examined its protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. PEP-1-HO-1 was successfully delivered into INS-1 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner and was maintained within the cells for at least 48 h. Pre-treatment with PEP-1-HO-1 increased the survival of INS-1 cells exposed to cytokine mixture (IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. PEP-1-HO-1 markedly decreased cytokine-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA). These protective effects of PEP-1-HO-1 against cytokines were correlated with the changes in the levels of signaling mediators of inflammation (iNOS and COX-2) and cell apoptosis/survival (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, PARP, JNK, and Akt). These results showed that the transduced PEP-1-HO-1 efficiently prevented cytokine-induced cell death of INS-1 cells by alleviating oxidative/nitrosative stresses and inflammation. Further, these results suggested that PEP-1-mediated HO-1 transduction may be a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent β-cell destruction in patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • We showed that PEP-1-HO-1 was efficiently delivered into INS-1 cells. • Transduced PEP-1-HO-1 exerted a protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. • Transduced PEP-1-HO-1 inhibited cytokine-induced ROS and NO accumulation. • PEP-1-HO-1 suppressed cytokine-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, and Bax. • PEP-1-HO-1 transduction may be an efficient tool to prevent β-cell destruction.

  12. Expression of heme oxygenase-1 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its correlation with clinical data.

    PubMed

    Degese, María S; Mendizabal, Javier E; Gandini, Norberto A; Gutkind, J Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo; Hewitt, Stephen M; Curino, Alejandro C; Coso, Omar A; Facchinetti, María M

    2012-07-01

    While changes in heme oxygenase (HO-1) in lung cancer have already been reported, conflicting results were obtained for enzyme expression in human lung cancer specimens. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study HO-1 expression in a large collection of human lung cancer samples. For this purpose, we analyzed the expression of HO-1 in an organized tissue microarray (TMA) and investigated its correlation with clinicopathological data. Ninety-six percent of tumor samples were positive for HO-1, and the expression of HO-1 was significantly higher in cancerous than in non-cancerous tissues. Importantly, HO-1 expression correlated with advanced stages and lymph node involvement. Additionally, quantitative RT-PCR in 18 pairs of human lung carcinomas and their adjacent non-malignant tissues was performed. Our results demonstrate that HO-1 protein is upregulated in epithelial malignant cells in NSCLC and its expression is associated with higher stages of the disease. Additionally, different subcellular localization is observed between tumor and adjacent non-malignant tissues.

  13. Adiponectin-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Protects Against Iron-Induced Liver Injury via a PPARα-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Heng; Yu, Chun-Hsien; Jen, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chou, Ying; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Protective effects of adiponectin (APN; an adipocytokine) were shown against various oxidative challenges; however, its therapeutic implications and the mechanisms underlying hepatic iron overload remain unclear. Herein, we show that the deleterious effects of iron dextran on liver function and iron deposition were significantly reversed by adiponectin gene therapy, which was accompanied by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction. Furthermore, AMPK-mediated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activation by APN was ascribable to HO-1 induction. Additionally, we revealed direct transcriptional regulation of HO-1 by the binding of PPARα to a PPAR-responsive element (PPRE) by various experimental assessments. Interestingly, overexpression of HO-1 in hepatocytes mimicked the protective effect of APN in attenuating iron-mediated injury, whereas it was abolished by SnPP and small interfering HO-1. Furthermore, bilirubin, the end-product of the HO-1 reaction, but not CO, protected hepatocytes from iron dextran-mediated caspase activation. Herein, we demonstrate a novel functional PPRE in the promoter regions of HO-1, and APN-mediated HO-1 induction elicited an antiapoptotic effect and a decrease in iron deposition in hepatocytes subjected to iron challenge. PMID:20709802

  14. Differential Effect of γ-radiation-induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Activity in Female and Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Youngsoo; Platonov, Alexander; Akhalaia, Medea; Yun, Yeon-Sook

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species, which exert diverse biological effects on cells and animals. We investigated alterations of heme oxygenase (HO) and non-protein thiols (NPSH), which are known as two major anti-oxidant enzymes, in female and male C57BL/6 mice in the lung, liver, and brain after whole-body γ-irradiation with 10 Gy (1-7 days) as well as in the lung after whole-thorax γ-irradiation (WTI) with 12.5 Gy (1-26 weeks). Most significant alteration of HO activity was observed in the liver, which elevated 250% in males. NPSH level in female liver was increased on the 5th-7th days but decreased in males on the 3rd day. In the lung, the elevation of HO activity in both sexes and the pattern of NPSH change were similar to that of the liver. On the other hand, the increase of HO activity on the 16th week and the decrease of NPSH level on the 2nd week were observed only in male lung after WTI. This study shows that the liver is the most sensitive tissue to γ-irradiation-induced alterations of HO activity in both female and male mice. In addition, there exists significant differential effect of γ-irradiation on anti-oxidant system in female and male mice. PMID:16100440

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 and inflammation in experimental right ventricular failure on prolonged overcirculation-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Asmae; Dewachter, Laurence; Kerbaul, François; Brimioulle, Serge; Dewachter, Céline; Naeije, Robert; Rondelet, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a stress response enzyme which presents with cardiovascular protective and anti-inflammatory properties. Six-month chronic overcirculation-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in piglets has been previously reported as a model of right ventricular (RV) failure related to the RV activation of apoptotic and inflammatory processes. We hypothesized that altered HO-1 signalling could be involved in both pulmonary vascular and RV changes. Fifteen growing piglets were assigned to a sham operation (n = 8) or to an anastomosis of the left innominate artery to the pulmonary arterial trunk (n = 7). Six months later, hemodynamics was evaluated after closure of the shunt. After euthanasia of the animals, pulmonary and myocardial tissue was sampled for pathobiological evaluation. Prolonged shunting was associated with a tendency to decreased pulmonary gene and protein expressions of HO-1, while pulmonary gene expressions of interleukin (IL)-33, IL-19, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and -2 were increased. Pulmonary expressions of constitutive HO-2 and pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α remained unchanged. Pulmonary vascular resistance (evaluated by pressure/flow plots) was inversely correlated to pulmonary HO-1 protein and IL-19 gene expressions, and correlated to pulmonary ICAM-1 gene expression. Pulmonary arteriolar medial thickness and PVR were inversely correlated to pulmonary IL-19 expression. RV expression of HO-1 was decreased, while RV gene expressions TNF-α and ICAM-2 were increased. There was a correlation between RV ratio of end-systolic to pulmonary arterial elastances and RV HO-1 expression. These results suggest that downregulation of HO-1 is associated to PAH and RV failure.

  16. Homocysteine Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression via Transcription Factor Nrf2 Activation in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Monireh; Golmohammadi, Taghi; Khaghani, Shahnaz; Zamani, Zahra; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Meshkani, Reza; Pasalar, Parvin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elevated level of plasma homocysteine has been related to various diseases. Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia can develop hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. We hypothesized that oxidative stress induced by homocysteine might play an important role in pathogenesis of liver injury. Also, the cellular response designed to combat oxidative stress is primarily controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2, a principal inducer of anti-oxidant and phase II-related genes. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with homocysteine in different time periods. Glutathione content was measured by flowcytometry. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Western-blotting, anti-oxidant response element (ARE)-binding activity of Nrf2 for heme ocygenase-1 (HO-1) was demonstrated. Real time RT-PCR and Western-blotting were performed to evaluate whether homocysteine was able to induce mRNA and protein expression of HO-1. Results: The role of Nrf2 in cellular response to homocysteine is substantiated by the following observations in HepG2 cells exposed to homocysteine (i) Western-blotting revealed that Nrf2 is strongly stabilized and became detectable in nuclear extracts. (ii) EMSA demonstrated increased binding of Nrf2 to oligomers containing HO-1 promoter-specific ARE-binding site. (iii) Real time RT-PCR and Western-blotting revealed increased mRNA and protein expression of inducible gene HO-1 after treatment with homocysteine. Conclusion: Data presented in the current study provide direct evidence that the immediate cellular response to oxidative stress provoked by homocysteine is orchestrated mainly by the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Therefore, induction of Nrf2-ARE-dependent expression of HO-1 could be a therapeutic option for hepatic cells damage induced by homocysteine. PMID:23567851

  17. The herbal extract KCHO-1 exerts a neuroprotective effect by ameliorating oxidative stress via heme oxygenase-1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Song, Bong-Keun; Son, Ilhong; Kim, Dong-Woung; Kang, Dae-Gil; Lee, Ho-Sub; Oh, Hyuncheol; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Kim, Sungchul

    2016-06-01

    KCHO-1 is a novel product comprised of 30% ethanol extracts obtained from nine medical herbs, which are commonly used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine. The nine herbs include Curcuma longa, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Gastrodia elata, Chaenomeles sinensis, Polygala tenuifolia, Paeonia japonica, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Atractylodes japonica and processed Aconitum carmichaeli. Recent studies have reported the beneficial effects of these herbs. The present study aimed to investigate the direct neuroprotective effects of KCHO‑1 on HT22 mouse hippocampal cells, and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. KCHO‑1 significantly suppressed glutamate‑ and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced cell damage, and reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, KCHO‑1 increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of heme oxygenase (HO)‑1. Tin protoporphyrin, which is an inhibitor of HO activity, partially suppressed the effects of KCHO‑1. Furthermore, KCHO‑1 significantly upregulated nuclear factor erythroid‑derived 2‑related factor‑2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. Extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) activation also appeared to be associated with KCHO‑1‑induced HO‑1 expression, since the ERK inhibitor PD98059 suppressed HO‑1 expression and prevented KCHO‑1‑induced cytoprotection. The results of the present study suggested that KCHO‑1 may effectively prevent glutamate‑ or H2O2‑induced oxidative damage via Nrf2/ERK mitogen‑activated protein kinase‑dependent HO‑1 expression. These data suggest that KCHO‑1 may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27082826

  18. Regulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression and MAPK pathways in response to kaempferol and rhamnocitrin in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.-T.; Yen, J.-H.; Wang Lisu; Lo, Y.-H.; Chen, Z.-T.; Wu, M.-J.

    2009-05-15

    Oxidative stress has been considered as a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of clinical abnormalities, especially neural diseases. Our aim of research is to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of kaempferol and rhamnocitrin (kaempferol-7-methyl ether) on oxidative damage in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells induced by a limited supply of serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The current result demonstrated that kaempferol protected PC12 cells from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cells with kaempferol also diminished intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and strongly elevated cell viability. RT-Q-PCR and Western blotting revealed that kaempferol and rhamnocitrin significantly induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 gene expression. Addition of zinc protoporphyrin (Znpp), a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, significantly attenuated their protective effects in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, indicating the vital role of HO-1 in cell resistance to oxidative injury. While investigating the signaling pathways responsible for HO-1 induction, we observed that kaempferol induced sustained extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in PC12 cells grown in low serum medium; while rhamnocitrin only stimulated transient ERK cascade. Addition of U0126, a highly selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, which is upstream of ERK1/2, had no effect on kaempferol- or rhamnocitrin-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, indicating no direct cross-talk between these two pathways. Furthermore, both kaempferol and rhamnocitrin were able to persistently attenuate p38 phosphorylation. Taking together, the above findings suggest that kaempferol and rhamnocitrin can augment cellular antioxidant defense capacity, at least in part, through regulation of HO-1 expression and MAPK signal transduction.

  19. Induction of placental heme oxygenase-1 is protective against TNFalpha-induced cytotoxicity and promotes vessel relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Rahman, M.; Zhang, X.; Acevedo, C. H.; Nijjar, S.; Rushton, I.; Bussolati, B.; St John, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is characterized by an inflammatory-like process and this may be exacerbated in preeclampsia. The heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes generate carbon monoxide (CO) that induces blood vessel relaxation and biliverdin that acts as an endogenous antioxidant. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the expression and localization of HO-1 and HO-2 in normal and preeclamptic placenta using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), RNase protection assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, the effect of HO activation on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) induced placental damage and on feto-placental circulation was studied. RESULTS: We provide the first evidence for the role of HO as an endogenous placental factor involved with cytoprotection and placental blood vessel relaxation. HO-1 was significantly higher at term, compared with first trimester placentae indicating its role in placental vascular development and regulation. HO-1 predominantly localized in the extravascular connective tissue that forms the perivascular contractile sheath around the developing blood vessels. HO-2 was localized in the capillaries, as well as the villous stroma, with weak staining of trophoblast. Induction of HO-1 caused a significant attenuation of TNFalpha-mediated cellular damage in placental villous explants, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage (p < 0.01). HO-1 protein was significantly reduced in placentae from pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia, compared with gestationally matched normal pregnancies. This suggests that the impairment of HO-1 activation may compromise the compensatory mechanism and predispose the placenta to cellular injury and subsequent maternal endothelial cell activation. Isometric contractility studies showed that hemin reduced vascular tension by 61% in U46619-preconstricted placental arteries. Hemin-induced vessel relaxation and CO production was inhibited by HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX

  20. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression by dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA) through the AMPK–Nrf2 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junghun; Kim, Sunyoung

    2014-11-15

    Oxidative stress is induced by the accumulation of free radicals, resulting in an imbalanced cellular redox state, which has been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA), a lignan compound isolated from Cucurbita moschata, has previously been reported to contain anti-adipogenic and anti-lipogenic effects on 3T3-L1 cells and primary MEFs (Abraham and Kappas, 2008). In this study, it was tested whether DHCA could affect the expression of HO-1, using Raw264.7 mouse macrophage cell line. DHCA increased the protein and RNA levels of HO-1 and upregulated its promoter activity. Data from transient transfection assays indicated that ARE located in the E1 region of the HO-1 promoter are important in this DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1 expression. DHCA was also shown to enhance the nuclear translocation and binding of Nrf2 to the respective DNA sequences. The upregulation of HO-1 expression by DHCA was also observed in primary macrophages derived from wild type animals, but not in those from Nrf2 KO mice. Effects of DHCA on HO-1 and Nrf2 were reduced when cells were treated with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C, but not by PI3K/Akt or MAPK inhibitors. Data from an experiment using a specific siRNA or chemical inhibitor for HO-1 suggested that the DHCA-mediated induction of the HO-1 protein could suppress the LPS-stimulated production of NO. Taken together, our data suggest that DHCA induces the expression of HO-1 by controlling its promoter activity through the AMPK–Nrf2 pathway, eventually leading to the reduction of NO production, and may thus have potential as an effective antioxidant. - Highlights: • Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA) induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. • The AMPK–Nrf2 pathway is critically involved in the DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1. • DHCA increased the expression of HO-1, Gclc and Gclm in primary macrophages. • DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1 contributed to the suppression of NO production.

  1. Epigallocatechin activates haem oxygenase-1 expression via protein kinase Cδ and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Ogborne, Richard M.; Rushworth, Stuart A.; O’Connell, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    The Nrf2/anti-oxidant response element (ARE) pathway plays an important role in regulating cellular anti-oxidants, including haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Various kinases have been implicated in the pathways leading to Nrf2 activation. Here, we investigated the effect of epigallocatechin (EGC) on ARE-mediated gene expression in human monocytic cells. EGC time and dose dependently increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression but had minimal effect on expression of other ARE-regulated genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutathione cysteine ligase and ferritin. siRNA knock down of Nrf2 significantly inhibited EGC-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of PKC by Ro-31-8220 dose dependently decreased EGC-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, whereas MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway inhibitors had no significant effect. EGC stimulated phosphorylation of PKCαβ and δ in THP-1 cells. PKCδ inhibition significantly decreased EGC-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, whereas PKCα- and β-specific inhibitors had no significant effect. These results demonstrate for the first time that EGC-induced HO-1 expression occurs via PKCδ and Nrf2. PMID:18586007

  2. Application of Heme Oxygenase-1, Carbon Monoxide and Biliverdin for the Prevention of Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Atsunori; Kaczorowski, David J; Sugimoto, Ryujiro; Billiar, Timothy R.; McCurry, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury occurs frequently in a variety of clinical settings, including mesenteric artery occlusion, abdominal aneurism surgery, trauma, shock, and small intestinal transplantation, and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the exact mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal I/R injury have not been fully elucidated, it is generally believed that polymorphonuclear neutrophils, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and mediators generated in the setting of oxidative stress, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), play important roles. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of heme into equimolar quantities of biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), while the central iron is released. An inducible form of HO (HO-1), biliverdin, and CO, have been shown to possess generalized endogenous anti-inflammatory activities and provide protection against intestinal I/R injury. Further, recent observations have demonstrated that exogenous HO-1 expression, as well as exogenously administered CO and biliverdin, have potent cytoprotective effects on intestinal I/R injury as well. Here, we summarize the currently available data regarding the role of the HO system in the prevention intestinal I/R injury. PMID:18385824

  3. [Cardioprotective effect of heme oxygenase-1 induction by hemin on the isolated rat heart during ischemia--reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Kukoba, T V; Moĭbenko, O O; Kotsioruba, A V

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of both an inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO-1) and products of heme catabolism (carbon monoxide (CO), cardiac bilirubin and Fe2+) in protecting myocardium against post-ischemic myocardial dysfunction. Rat hearts were isolated and perfused according to the Langendorff technique to evaluate the recovery of myocardial function after total ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion (40 min) and production of reactive oxygen forms at a reperfusion phase. Ischemia/reperfusion caused impairment in myocardial function: left ventricular developing pressure (LVDP) was shown to be decreased, while end-diastolic pressure (EDP) and both coronary perfusion pressure and coronary resistance increased. Free oxygen radicals were generated at the reperfusion phase which led to injuries to cardiomyocytes and creatine kinase efflux into perfusate. We have found that upregulation of HO-1 by preliminary (24 h before ischemia) injections of 25 mg/kg hemin (i.p.) resulted in improving the myocardial function due to increasing the enzyme activity and forming the cardial bilirubine, while generation of reactive oxygen forms was inhibited, as well as the contents of creatine kinase reduced. As a result, impairment in cardiomyocytes diminished, and coronary vessels dilated to improve the functional parametres of the heart work.

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Delays Gibberellin-Induced Programmed Cell Death of Rice Aleurone Layers Subjected to Drought Stress by Interacting with Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huangming; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Heting; Chen, Huiping

    2016-01-01

    Cereal aleurone layers undergo a gibberellin (GA)-regulated process of programmed cell death (PCD) following germination. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known as a rate-liming enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin IXα, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron ions (Fe2+). It is a critical component in plant development and adaptation to environment stresses. Our previous studies confirmed that HO-1 inducer hematin (Ht) promotes the germination of rice seeds in drought (20% polyethylene glycol-6000, PEG) conditions, but the corresponding effects of HO-1 on the alleviation of germination-triggered PCD in GA-treated rice aleurone layers remain unknown. The present study has determined that GA co-treated with PEG results in lower HO-1 transcript levels and HO activity, which in turn results in the development of vacuoles in aleurone cells, followed by PCD. The pharmacology approach illustrated that up- or down-regulated HO-1 gene expression and HO activity delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, the application of the HO-1 inducer Ht and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) not only activated HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and endogenous NO content, but also blocked GA-induced rapid vacuolation and accelerated aleurone layers PCD under drought stress. However, both HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl0-4, 4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO) reserved the effects of Ht and SNP on rice aleurone layer PCD under drought stress by down-regulating endogenous HO-1 and NO, respectively. The inducible effects of Ht and SNP on HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and NO content were blocked by cPTIO. Together, these results clearly suggest that HO-1 is involved in the alleviation of GA-induced PCD of drought-triggered rice aleurone layers by associating with NO. PMID:26834769

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Delays Gibberellin-Induced Programmed Cell Death of Rice Aleurone Layers Subjected to Drought Stress by Interacting with Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huangming; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Heting; Chen, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    Cereal aleurone layers undergo a gibberellin (GA)-regulated process of programmed cell death (PCD) following germination. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known as a rate-liming enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin IXα, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron ions (Fe(2+)). It is a critical component in plant development and adaptation to environment stresses. Our previous studies confirmed that HO-1 inducer hematin (Ht) promotes the germination of rice seeds in drought (20% polyethylene glycol-6000, PEG) conditions, but the corresponding effects of HO-1 on the alleviation of germination-triggered PCD in GA-treated rice aleurone layers remain unknown. The present study has determined that GA co-treated with PEG results in lower HO-1 transcript levels and HO activity, which in turn results in the development of vacuoles in aleurone cells, followed by PCD. The pharmacology approach illustrated that up- or down-regulated HO-1 gene expression and HO activity delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, the application of the HO-1 inducer Ht and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) not only activated HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and endogenous NO content, but also blocked GA-induced rapid vacuolation and accelerated aleurone layers PCD under drought stress. However, both HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl0-4, 4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO) reserved the effects of Ht and SNP on rice aleurone layer PCD under drought stress by down-regulating endogenous HO-1 and NO, respectively. The inducible effects of Ht and SNP on HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and NO content were blocked by cPTIO. Together, these results clearly suggest that HO-1 is involved in the alleviation of GA-induced PCD of drought-triggered rice aleurone layers by associating with NO.

  6. Signal peptide peptidase-mediated nuclear localization of heme oxygenase-1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and invasion independent of its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F-F; Yeh, C-T; Sun, Y-J; Chiang, M-T; Lan, W-M; Li, F-A; Lee, W-H; Chau, L-Y

    2015-04-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme-degrading enzyme anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum by a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane segment (TMS). HO-1 is highly expressed in various cancers and its nuclear localization is associated with the progression of some cancers. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying HO-1 nuclear translocation and its pathological significance remain elusive. Here we show that the signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes the intramembrane cleavage of HO-1. Coexpression of HO-1 with wild-type SPP, but not a dominant-negative SPP, promoted the nuclear localization of HO-1 in cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of cytosolic HO-1 isolated from HeLa cells overexpressing HO-1 and SPP revealed two adjacent intramembrane cleavage sites located after S275 and F276 within the TMS. Mutations of S275F276 to A275L276 significantly hindered SPP-mediated HO-1 cleavage and nuclear localization. Nuclear HO-1 was detected in A549 and DU145 cancer cell lines expressing high levels of endogenous HO-1 and SPP. SPP knockdown or inhibition significantly reduced nuclear HO-1 localization in A549 and DU145 cells. The positive nuclear HO-1 stain was also evident in lung cancer tissues expressing high levels of HO-1 and SPP. Overexpression of a truncated HO-1 (t-HO-1) lacking the TMS in HeLa and H1299 cells promoted cell proliferation and migration/invasion. The effect of t-HO-1 was not affected by a mutation in the catalytic site. However, blockade of t-HO-1 nuclear localization abolished t-HO-1-mediated effect. The tumorigenic effect of t-HO-1 was also demonstrated in the mouse model. These findings disclose that SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage of HO-1 promotes HO-1 nuclear localization and cancer progression independent of HO-1 enzymatic activity.

  7. Umbelliferone and daphnetin ameliorate carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed R; Emam, Manal A; Hassan, Nahla S; Mogadem, Abeer I

    2014-09-01

    Among various phytochemicals, coumarins comprise a very large class of plant phenolic compounds that have good nutritive value, in addition to their antioxidant effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of two coumarin derivatives, umbelliferone and daphnetin, against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats and elucidate the underlying mechanism. Treatment of rats with either umbelliferone or daphnetin significantly improved the CCl4-induced biochemical alterations. In addition, both compounds alleviated the induced-lipid peroxidation and boosted the antioxidant defense system. Moreover, the investigated compounds attenuated CCl4-induced histopathological alterations of the liver. Finally, umbelliferone and daphnetin induced the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), thereby inducing the expression and activity of the cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These results suggest that umbelliferone and daphnetin ameliorate oxidative stress-related hepatotoxicity via their ability to augment cellular antioxidant defenses by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression.

  8. Inflammation and Edema in the Lung and Kidney of Hemorrhagic Shock Rats Are Alleviated by Biliary Tract External Drainage via the Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhao, Bing; Chen, Ying; Ma, Li; Chen, Er-Zhen; Mao, En-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The lung and kidney are two organs that are easily affected by hemorrhagic shock (HS). We investigated roles of biliary tract external drainage (BTED) in inflammation and edema of the lung and kidney in HS and its relationship with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Rat models of HS were induced by drawing blood from the femoral artery until a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 40 ± 5 mmHg was achieved. A MAP of 40 ± 5 mmHg was maintained for 60 min. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the following groups: sham group; HS group; HS + zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, group; HS + BTED group; HS + BTED + ZnPP group; and HS + BTED + bile infusion (BI) group. HO-1 levels, aquaporin-1 levels, and ratios of dry/wet in the lung and kidney increased markedly after BTED, but tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase levels in the lung and kidney decreased significantly after BTED under HS conditions. Under the condition that HO-1 was inhibited by ZnPP, all these effects induced by BTED disappeared in the lung and kidney. These results demonstrated that inflammation and edema of the lung and kidney of HS rats are alleviated by BTED via the HO-1 pathway.

  9. Induction of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) does not enhance adiponectin production in human adipocytes: Evidence against a direct HO-1 - Adiponectin axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengliu; Kimura, Masaki; Ng, Choaping; He, Jingjing; Keshvari, Sahar; Rose, Felicity J; Barclay, Johanna L; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2015-09-15

    Adiponectin is a salutary adipokine and hypoadiponectinemia is implicated in the aetiology of obesity-related inflammation and cardiometabolic disease making therapeutic strategies to increase adiponectin attractive. Emerging evidence, predominantly from preclinical studies, suggests induction of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases adiponectin production and reduces inflammatory tone. Here, we aimed to test whether induction of HO-1 enhanced adiponectin production from mature adipocytes. Treatment of human adipocytes with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or hemin for 24-48 h increased HO-1 expression and activity without affecting adiponectin expression and secretion. Treatment of adipocytes with TNFα reduced adiponectin secretion and increased expression and secretion of additional pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, as well as expression of sXBP-1, a marker of ER stress. HO-1 induction failed to reverse these effects. These results demonstrate that induction of HO-1 does not directly enhance adiponectin production or ameliorate the pro-inflammatory effects of TNFα and argue against a direct HO-1 - adiponectin axis.

  10. Whiskey congeners suppress LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production in murine macrophage RAW 264 cells by inducing heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Nukaya, Haruo

    2012-12-26

    Whiskey includes many nonvolatile substances (whiskey congeners; Whc) that seep from the oak cask during the maturation process. To date, many functions of Whc have reported, such as antiallergy and antimelanogenesis. This study examined the effect of Whc on LPS/IFNγ-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in murine macrophage RAW 264 cells. Whc suppressed LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production in a concentration-dependent manner. To determine the active compounds in Whc, the effect of 10 major compounds isolated from Whc on LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production was examined. Coniferylaldehyde (CA) and sinapylaldehyde (SiA) strongly suppressed LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production. Pretreatment with Whc, CA, and SiA induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. The expression of HO-1 by Whc, CA, and SiA pretreatment was due to activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling via the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. To investigate the in vivo effects of Whc, Whc was administered to mice with antitype II collagen antibody-induced arthritis, and we the arthritis score and hind paw volume were measured. Administration of Whc remarkably suppressed the arthritis score and hind paw volume. Taken together, these findings suggest that Whc is beneficial for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  11. Cobalt alleviates GA-induced programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers via the regulation of H2O2 production and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-11-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  12. Eriodictyol Protects Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death through Modulating ERK/Nrf2/ARE-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases is complex and may involve oxidative stress-related pathways. Eriodictyol is a flavonoid present in citrus fruits that demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects in a range of pathophysiological conditions including vascular diseases. Because oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the present study was designed to verify whether eriodictyol has therapeutic potential. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a phase II detoxifying enzyme, in endothelial cells is considered to be helpful in cardiovascular disease. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with eriodictyol showed the upregulation of HO-1 through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathways. Further, eriodictyol treatment provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-provoked cell death. This protective effect was eliminated by treatment with a specific inhibitor of HO-1 and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HO-1 expression. These data demonstrate that eriodictyol induces ERK/Nrf2/ARE-mediated HO-1 upregulation in human endothelial cells, which is directly associated with its vascular protection against oxidative stress-related endothelial injury, and propose that targeting the upregulation of HO-1 is a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26132561

  13. Protective effects of protostemonine on LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure: Roles of increased hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Yue, Ling; Zhao, Wenhao; Yang, Xinzhou; Shu, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    Here, we explored protective effects of protostemonine (PSN), on mouse acute liver failure induced by lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). PSN dose-dependently declined LPS/GalN-induced lethality of mice as well as increase of ALT/AST activities in their serum. Hepatoprotective effects of PSN were also supported by liver histopathological examinations. After LPS/GalN treatment, severe oxidative stresses in the liver could be detected by boosted MDA and ROS as well as decreased GSH. Moreover, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, were sharply elevated. These symptoms were dose-dependently ameliorated by PSN. Mechanistically, PSN promoted the transcription and translation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in hepatocytes and liver Kupffer cells. Nrf2 is a master transcription factor contributing to the expression of HO-1. PSN elevated Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and enhanced Nrf2/HO-1 promoter interaction. Suppressing enzyme activity of HO-1 by co-treating mice with HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP abolished protective effects of PSN. ZnPP also abrogated alleviative impacts of PSN on LPS/GalN-mediated hepatic oxidative stresses and inflammatory responses. Finally, we showed that PSN exhibited undetectable toxic effects on vital organs of mice. Our findings suggested that PSN is able to attenuate LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure and upregulating HO-1 expression is implicated in its hepatoprotective activity.

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 Toward Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide in Macrophages Exposed to Gomisins A, G, and J

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Eun Yeon; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Young Hun; Seetharaman, Rajaseker

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory periodontal disease that develops from gingivitis, is caused by periodontal pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Recent studies have focused on the antioxidant, anti–human immunodeficiency virus, anticarcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties of gomisins. However, the anti-inflammatory activities of gomisin plants through heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) signals remain poorly defined. We found that gomisins' anti-inflammatory activity occurs via the induction of HO-1 expression. Gomisins G and J inhibit the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 and also block nuclear factor-κB activation in Raw264.7 cells stimulated with P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine production is inhibited through the induction of HO-1 expression. HO-1 expression is induced by all gomisins, but their anti-inflammatory activity via HO-1 signaling is observed with gomisins G and J, and not A. We found that gomisins G and J extracted from Schisandria chinensis can inhibit the P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide induced-inflammatory responses in Raw264.7 cells. PMID:22145771

  15. Myeloperoxidase Oxidized LDL Interferes with Endothelial Cell Motility through miR-22 and Heme Oxygenase 1 Induction: Possible Involvement in Reendothelialization of Vascular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Jalil; Martin, Maud; Rousseau, Alexandre; Nuyens, Vincent; Fayyad-Kazan, Hussein; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Courbebaisse, Guy; Martiat, Philippe; Badran, Bassam; Dequiedt, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease linked to atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerosis is mainly linked to dysfunction in vascular endothelial cells and subendothelial accumulation of oxidized forms of LDL. In the present study, we investigated the role of myeloperoxidase oxidized LDL (Mox-LDL) in endothelial cell dysfunction. We studied the effect of proinflammatory Mox-LDL treatment on endothelial cell motility, a parameter essential for normal vascular processes such as angiogenesis and blood vessel repair. This is particularly important in the context of an atheroma plaque, where vascular wall integrity is affected and interference with its repair could contribute to progression of the disease. We investigated in vitro the effect of Mox-LDL on endothelial cells angiogenic properties and we also studied the signalling pathways that could be affected by analysing Mox-LDL effect on the expression of angiogenesis-related genes. We report that Mox-LDL inhibits endothelial cell motility and tubulogenesis through an increase in miR-22 and heme oxygenase 1 expression. Our in vitro data indicate that Mox-LDL interferes with parameters associated with angiogenesis. They suggest that high LDL levels in patients would impair their endothelial cell capacity to cope with a damaged endothelium contributing negatively to the progression of the atheroma plaque. PMID:25530680

  16. Cobalt Alleviates GA-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Wheat Aleurone Layers via the Regulation of H2O2 Production and Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25405743

  17. Whiskey congeners suppress LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production in murine macrophage RAW 264 cells by inducing heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Nukaya, Haruo

    2012-12-26

    Whiskey includes many nonvolatile substances (whiskey congeners; Whc) that seep from the oak cask during the maturation process. To date, many functions of Whc have reported, such as antiallergy and antimelanogenesis. This study examined the effect of Whc on LPS/IFNγ-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in murine macrophage RAW 264 cells. Whc suppressed LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production in a concentration-dependent manner. To determine the active compounds in Whc, the effect of 10 major compounds isolated from Whc on LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production was examined. Coniferylaldehyde (CA) and sinapylaldehyde (SiA) strongly suppressed LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production. Pretreatment with Whc, CA, and SiA induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. The expression of HO-1 by Whc, CA, and SiA pretreatment was due to activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling via the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. To investigate the in vivo effects of Whc, Whc was administered to mice with antitype II collagen antibody-induced arthritis, and we the arthritis score and hind paw volume were measured. Administration of Whc remarkably suppressed the arthritis score and hind paw volume. Taken together, these findings suggest that Whc is beneficial for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:23199195

  18. Eriodictyol Protects Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death through Modulating ERK/Nrf2/ARE-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases is complex and may involve oxidative stress-related pathways. Eriodictyol is a flavonoid present in citrus fruits that demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects in a range of pathophysiological conditions including vascular diseases. Because oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the present study was designed to verify whether eriodictyol has therapeutic potential. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a phase II detoxifying enzyme, in endothelial cells is considered to be helpful in cardiovascular disease. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with eriodictyol showed the upregulation of HO-1 through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathways. Further, eriodictyol treatment provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-provoked cell death. This protective effect was eliminated by treatment with a specific inhibitor of HO-1 and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HO-1 expression. These data demonstrate that eriodictyol induces ERK/Nrf2/ARE-mediated HO-1 upregulation in human endothelial cells, which is directly associated with its vascular protection against oxidative stress-related endothelial injury, and propose that targeting the upregulation of HO-1 is a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26132561

  19. The in vitro protection of human decay accelerating factor and hDAF/heme oxygenase-1 transgenes in porcine aortic endothelial cells against sera of Formosan macaques.

    PubMed

    Tu, C-F; Tai, H-C; Wu, C-P; Ho, L-L; Lin, Y-J; Hwang, C-S; Yang, T-S; Lee, J-M; Tseng, Y-L; Huang, C-C; Weng, C-N; Lee, P-H

    2010-01-01

    To mitigate hyperacute rejection, pigs have been generated with alpha-Gal transferase gene knockout and transgenic expression of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF), MCP, and CD59. Additionally, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been suggested to defend endothelial cells. Sera (MS) (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%) from Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis, MC), an Old World monkey wildly populated in Taiwan, was used to test the protective in vitro, effects of hDAF or hDAF/hHO-1 on porcine aortic endothelial cells (pAEC) derived from hDAF(+), hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+), and hDAF(+)/hHO-1(-) and 1 nontransgenic pAEC. Ten percent human serum (HS) served as a positive control. When MS addition increased to 10% or 15%, all transgenic pAEC exhibited a greater survival than nontransgenic pAEC. Noticeably, 15% MS reduced survived to <10% versus >40% in nontransgenic and transgenic pAEC, respectively. These results revealed that hDAF exerted protective effects against MC complement activation. However, comparing with 10% MS and HS in pAEC of nontransgenic pigs, the survivability was higher in HS, suggesting that complement activation by MS was more toxic than that by HS. Furthermore, hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+) showed no further protection against effects of MS on transgenic pAEC.

  20. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  1. Expression and characterization of full-length human heme oxygenase-1: the presence of intact membrane-binding region leads to increased binding affinity for NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Huber, Warren J; Backes, Wayne L

    2007-10-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the chief regulatory enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin. In the process of heme degradation, HO-1 receives the electrons necessary for catalysis from the flavoprotein NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR), releasing free iron and carbon monoxide. Much of the recent research involving heme oxygenase has been done using a 30 kDa soluble form of the enzyme, which lacks the membrane binding region (C-terminal 23 amino acids). The goal of this study was to express and purify a full-length human HO-1 (hHO-1) protein; however, due to the lability of the full-length form, a rapid purification procedure was required. This was accomplished by use of a glutathione-s-transferase (GST)-tagged hHO-1 construct. Although the procedure permitted the generation of a full-length HO-1, this form was contaminated with a 30 kDa degradation product that could not be eliminated. Therefore, attempts were made to remove a putative secondary thrombin cleavage site by a conservative mutation of amino acid 254, which replaces arginine with lysine. This mutation allowed the expression and purification of a full-length hHO-1 protein. Unlike wild type (WT) HO-1, the R254K mutant could be purified to a single 32 kDa protein capable of degrading heme at the same rate as the WT enzyme. The R254K full-length form had a specific activity of approximately 200-225 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 HO-1 as compared to approximately 140-150 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 for the WT form, which contains the 30 kDa contaminant. This is a 2-3-fold increase from the previously reported soluble 30 kDa HO-1, suggesting that the C-terminal 23 amino acids are essential for maximal catalytic activity. Because the membrane-spanning domain is present, the full-length hHO-1 has the potential to incorporate into phospholipid membranes, which can be reconstituted at known concentrations, in combination with other endoplasmic reticulum resident enzymes.

  2. Phorbaketal A, Isolated from the Marine Sponge Phorbas sp., Exerts Its Anti-Inflammatory Effects via NF-κB Inhibition and Heme Oxygenase-1 Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yun-Ji; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Rho, Jung-Rae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges harbor a range of biologically active compounds. Phorbaketal A is a tricyclic sesterterpenoid isolated from the marine sponge Phorbas sp.; however, little is known about its biological activities and associated molecular mechanisms. In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects and underlying molecular mechanism of phorbaketal A in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that phorbaketal A significantly inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), but not prostaglandin E2, in RAW 264.7 cells. Further, phorbaketal A suppressed the expression of inducible NO synthase at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, phorbaketal A reduced the LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Treatment with phorbaketal A inhibited the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a crucial signaling molecule in inflammation. Moreover, phorbaketal A up-regulated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These data suggest that phorbaketal A, isolated from the marine sponge Phorbas sp., inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators via down-regulation of the NF-κB pathway and up-regulation of the HO-1 pathway. PMID:26610528

  3. Phorbaketal A, Isolated from the Marine Sponge Phorbas sp., Exerts Its Anti-Inflammatory Effects via NF-κB Inhibition and Heme Oxygenase-1 Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yun-Ji; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Rho, Jung-Rae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-11-01

    Marine sponges harbor a range of biologically active compounds. Phorbaketal A is a tricyclic sesterterpenoid isolated from the marine sponge Phorbas sp.; however, little is known about its biological activities and associated molecular mechanisms. In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects and underlying molecular mechanism of phorbaketal A in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that phorbaketal A significantly inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), but not prostaglandin E₂, in RAW 264.7 cells. Further, phorbaketal A suppressed the expression of inducible NO synthase at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, phorbaketal A reduced the LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Treatment with phorbaketal A inhibited the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a crucial signaling molecule in inflammation. Moreover, phorbaketal A up-regulated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These data suggest that phorbaketal A, isolated from the marine sponge Phorbas sp., inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators via down-regulation of the NF-κB pathway and up-regulation of the HO-1 pathway. PMID:26610528

  4. Metallothionein-III protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing expression of heme oxygenase-1 in a PI3K and ERK/Nrf2-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-09-15

    The zinc-binding protein metallothionein-III (MT-III) is associated with resistance to neuronal injury. However, the underlying mechanism for its effects is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that MT-III prevents the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells challenged with the Parkinson's disease-related neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) by a mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK kinase/NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) dependent induction of the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with MT-III significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced generation of ROS, caspase-3 activation, and subsequent cell death. Also, MT-III up-regulates HO-1 expression and this expression confers neuroprotection against oxidative injury induced by 6-OHDA. Moreover, MT-III induces Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of MT-III-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K and ERK1/2 activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and neuroprotection. Taken together, these results suggest that the PI3K and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathway controls the intracellular levels of ROS by regulating the expression of the antioxidant enzyme HO-1.

  5. Comparison of viability and antioxidant capacity between canine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and heme oxygenase-1-overexpressed cells after freeze-thawing

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Mijung; KIM, Yongsun; LEE, Seunghoon; KUK, Minyoung; KIM, Ah Young; KIM, Wanhee; KWEON, Oh-Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Allogenic adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Ad-MSCs) are an alternative source for cytotherapy owing to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Frozen-thawed allogenic Ad-MSCs can be used instantly for this purpose. However, the viability and function of frozen-thawed Ad-MSCs have not been clearly evaluated. The purpose of this study was to compare the viability and function of Ad-MSCs and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-overexpressed Ad-MSCs in vitro after freeze-thawing. The viability, proliferation, antioxidant capacity and mRNA gene expression of growth factors were evaluated. Frozen-thawed cells showed significantly lower viability than fresh cells (77% for Ad-MSCs and 71% for HO-1 Ad-MSCs, P<0.01). However, the proliferation rate of frozen-thawed Ad-MSCs increased and did not differ from that of fresh Ad-MSCs after 3 days of culture. In contrast, the proliferation rate of HO-1-overexpressed Ad-MSCs was lower than that of Ad-MSCs. The mRNA expression levels of TGF-β, HGF and VEGF did not differ between fresh and frozen-thawed Ad-MSCs, but COX-2 and IL-6 had significantly higher mRNA expression in frozen cells than fresh cells (P<0.05). Fresh Ad-MSCs exhibited higher HO-1 mRNA expression than frozen-thawed Ad-MSCs, and fresh HO-1-overexpressed Ad-MSCs exhibited higher than fresh Ad-MSCs (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference between fresh and frozen HO-1-overexpressed Ad-MSCs. The antioxidant capacity of HO-1-overexpressed Ad-MSCs was significantly higher than that of Ad-MSCs. Cryopreservation of Ad-MSCs negatively affects viability and antioxidant capacity, and HO-1-overexpressed Ad-MSCs might be useful to maximize the effect of Ad-MSCs for cytotherapy. PMID:26725542

  6. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular mortality risk in an arsenic-exposed population in northeastern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chi-Ling; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease and mortality in humans. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter is inversely correlated with the development of coronary artery disease and restenosis after clinical angioplasty. The relationship of HO-1 genotype with arsenic-associated cardiovascular disease has not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the HO-1 GT-repeat polymorphism and cardiovascular mortality in an arsenic-exposed population. A total of 504 study participants were followed up for a median of 10.7 years for occurrence of cardiovascular deaths (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Cardiovascular risk factors and DNA samples for determination of HO-1 GT repeats were obtained at recruitment. GT repeats variants were grouped into the S (< 27 repeats) or L allele ({>=} 27 repeats). Relative mortality risk was estimated using Cox regression analysis, adjusted for competing risk of cancer and other causes. For the L/L, L/S, and S/S genotype groups, the crude mortalities for cardiovascular disease were 8.42, 3.10, and 2.85 cases/1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors and competing risk of cancer and other causes, carriers with class S allele (L/S or S/S genotypes) had a significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to non-carriers (L/L genotype) [OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.90]. In contrast, no significant association was observed between HO-1 genotype and cancer mortality or mortality from other causes. Shorter (GT)n repeats in the HO-1 gene promoter may confer protective effects against cardiovascular mortality related to arsenic exposure.

  7. Transforming Growth Factor-β Induces Transcription Factors MafK and Bach1 to Suppress Expression of the Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Okita, Yukari; Kamoshida, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Ken; Motohashi, Hozumi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ogami, Tomohiro; Koinuma, Daizo; Kato, Mitsuyasu

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has multiple functions in embryogenesis, adult homeostasis, tissue repair, and development of cancer. Here, we report that TGF-β suppresses the transcriptional activation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene, which is implicated in protection against oxidative injury and lung carcinogenesis. HO-1 is a target of the oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor Nrf2. TGF-β did not affect the stabilization or nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 after stimulation with electrophiles. Instead, TGF-β induced expression of transcription factors MafK and Bach1. Enhanced expression of either MafK or Bach1 was enough to suppress the electrophile-inducible expression of HO-1 even in the presence of accumulated Nrf2 in the nucleus. Knockdown of MafK and Bach1 by siRNA abolished TGF-β-dependent suppression of HO-1. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Nrf2 substitutes for Bach1 at the antioxidant response elements (E1 and E2), which are responsible for the induction of HO-1 in response to oxidative stress. On the other hand, pretreatment with TGF-β suppressed binding of Nrf2 to both E1 and E2 but marginally increased the binding of MafK to E2 together with Smads. As TGF-β is activated after tissue injury and in the process of cancer development, these findings suggest a novel mechanism by which damaged tissue becomes vulnerable to oxidative stress and xenobiotics. PMID:23737527

  8. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated apoptosis under cadmium-induced oxidative stress is regulated by autophagy, which is sensitized by tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    So, Keum-Young; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2016-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible cytoprotective enzyme. It is often overexpressed in different types of cancers and promotes cell survival. However, the role of HO-1 and the underlying molecular mechanism of cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells remain undefined. Here we show that the role of HO-1 under Cd-induced oxidative stress is dependent upon autophagy, which is sensitized by the tumor suppressor p53. The sensitivity to Cd was 3.5- and 14-fold higher in p53-expressing YD8 and H460 cells than in p53-null YD10B and H1299 cells, respectively. The levels of p53 in YD8 and H460 cells decreased in a Cd concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine. In both cell lines, Cd exposure resulted in caspase-3-mediated PARP-1 cleavage and the induction of CHOP, LC3-II, and HO-1, which were limited in YD10B and H1299 cells exposed to high concentrations of Cd. Cd exposure to p53-overexpressing YD10B cells enhanced Cd-induced HO-1 and LC3-II levels, whereas genetic knockdown of p53 in YD8 cells resulted in the suppression of Cd-induced levels of HO-1 and LC3-II, indicating that p53 is required in the sensing of HO-1 and induction of autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy using small interfering RNA (siRNA) for the autophagy-related gene atg5 enhanced HO-1, CHOP, and PARP-1 cleavage induced by Cd. However, transfection with HO-1 siRNA increased Cd-induced LC3-II, and suppressed the expression of CHOP and cleavage of PARP-1. Collectively, the role of HO-1 in apoptosis could be modulated by autophagy, which is sensitized by p53 expression in human cancer cell lines.

  9. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 improves functions and remodeling of infarcted myocardium in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-jie; Yang, Xia; Liu, Zhi-qiang; Hu, Shun-yin; Du, Zhi-yan; Feng, Lan-lan; Liu, Jian-feng; Chen, Yun-dai

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a promising source of autologous stem cells that are used for regeneration and repair of infracted heart. However, the efficiency of their transplantation is under debate. One of the possible reasons for marginal improvement in ADSCs transplantation is the significant cell death rate of implanted cells after being grafted into injured heart. Therefore, overcoming the poor survival rate of implanted cells may improve stem cell therapy. Due to limited improvement concerning direct stem cell therapy, gene-transfer methods are used to enhance cellular cardiomyoplasty efficacy. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can provide various types of cells with protection against oxidative injury and apoptosis. However, exact effects of autologous ADSCs combined with HO-1 on cardiac performance remains unknown. In this study, rabbits were treated with ADSCs transduced with HO-1 (HO-1-ADSCs), treated with non-transduced ADSCs, or injected with phosphate buffered saline 14 days after experimental myocardial infarction was induced, when autologous ADSCs were obtained simultaneously. Four weeks after injection, echocardiography showed significant improvements for cardiac functions and left ventricular dimensions in HO-1-ADSCs-treated animals. Structural consequences of transplantation were determined by detailed histological analysis, which showed differentiation of HO-1-ADSCs to cardiomyocyte-like tissues and lumen-like structure organizations. Apart from improvement in angiogenesis and scar areas, more connexin 43-positive gap junction and greater tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cardiac sympathetic nerves sprouting were observed in the HO-1-ADSCs-treated group compared with ADSCs group. These data suggest that the transplantation of autologous ADSCs combined with HO-1 transduction is a feasible and efficacious method for improving infarcted myocardium.

  10. Role of nuclear factor-κB and heme oxygenase-1 in the mechanism of action of an anti-inflammatory chalcone derivative in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, María José; Vicente, Ana María; Araico, Amparo; Dominguez, José N; Terencio, María Carmen; Ferrándiz, María Luisa

    2004-01-01

    The synthetic chalcone 3′,4′,5′,3,4,5-hexamethoxy-chalcone (CH) is an anti-inflammatory compound able to reduce nitric oxide (NO) production by inhibition of inducible NO synthase protein synthesis. In this work, we have studied the mechanisms of action of this compound. CH (10–30 μM) prevents the overproduction of NO in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (1 μg ml−1) due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. We have shown that treatment of cells with CH results in diminished degradation of the NF-κB–IκB complex leading to inhibition of NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, DNA binding and transcriptional activity. We also demonstrate the ability of this compound to activate NfE2-related factor (Nrf2) and induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Our results indicate that CH determines a rapid but nontoxic increase of intracellular oxidative species, which could be responsible for Nrf2 activation and HO-1 induction by this chalcone derivative.  This novel anti-inflammatory agent simultaneously induces a cytoprotective response (HO-1) and downregulates an inflammatory pathway (NF-κB) with a mechanism of action different from antioxidant chalcones. PMID:15249426

  11. Anti-inflammatory activities of cardamonin from Alpinia katsumadai through heme oxygenase-1 induction and inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway in the carrageenan-induced paw edema.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lee, Min-Min; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2015-04-01

    Cardamonin is a chalcone isolated from Alpinia katsumadai. This study is aimed to evaluate treatment of cardamonin decreased the paw edema at the 5th hour after λ-carrageenan (Carr) administration and increased the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the anti-inflammatory test. We also demonstrated that cardamonin significantly attenuated the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the edema paw at the 5th hour after Carr injection. Cardamonin decreased the nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 levels on the serum level at the 5th hour after Carr injection. Western blotting revealed that cardamonin decreased Carr-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cycloxyclase (COX-2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), p38] expressions and increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expressions at the 5th hour in the edema paw. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of cardamonin might be related to the decrease in the level of MDA, iNOS, COX-2, NF-κB, and MAPK and induction of the HO-1 expression in the edema paw via increasing the activities of CAT and SOD in the edema paw through the suppression of NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6.

  12. Protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 on Wistar rats with heart failure through the inhibition of inflammation and amelioration of intestinal microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Gan, Zhuo-Kun; Han, Li-Na; Wang, Hao; Bai, Jie; Tan, Guo-Juan; Li, Xiao-Xia; Xu, Ya-Ping; Zhou, Yu; Gong, Mei-Liang; Lin, Mo-Si; Han, Xiao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) has likely contributed to the increased prevalence of heart failure (HF). As a result of reduced cardiac function, splanchnic blood flow decreases, causing ischemia in villi and damage to the intestinal barrier. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could prevent, or lessen the effects of stress and inflammation. Thus, the effect and mechanism thereof of HO-1 on the intestines of rats with HF was investigated. Methods Male Wistar rats with heart failure through ligation of the left coronary artery were identified with an left ventricular ejection fraction of < 45% through echocardiography and then divided into various experimental groups based on the type of peritoneal injection they received [MI: saline; MI + Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP): CoPP solution; and MI + Tin mesoporphyrin IX dichloride (SnMP): SnMP solution]. The control group was comprised of rats without coronary ligation. Echocardiography was performed before ligation for a baseline and eight weeks after ligation in order to evaluate the cardiac function of the rats. The bacterial translocation (BT) incidence, mesenteric microcirculation, amount of endotoxins in the vein serum, ileum levels of HO-1, carbon oxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the ileum morphology were determined eight weeks after the operation. Results The rats receiving MI + CoPP injections exhibited a recovery in cardiac function, an amelioration of mesenteric microcirculation and change in morphology, a lower BT incidence, a reduction in serum and ileac NO and TNF-α levels, and an elevation in ileac HO-1, CO, and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels compared to the MI group (P < 0.05). The rats that received the MI + SnMP injections exhibited results inverse to the MI (P < 0.05) group. Conclusions HO-1 exerted a protective effect on the intestines of rats with HF by inhibiting the inflammation and amelioration of microcirculation through the CO

  13. Ferulic Acid Regulates the Nrf2/Heme Oxygenase-1 System and Counteracts Trimethyltin-Induced Neuronal Damage in the Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line SH-SY5Y.

    PubMed

    Catino, Stefania; Paciello, Fabiola; Miceli, Fiorella; Rolesi, Rolando; Troiani, Diana; Calabrese, Vittorio; Santangelo, Rosaria; Mancuso, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years, several lines of evidence have pointed out the efficacy of ferulic acid (FA) in counteracting oxidative stress elicited by β-amyloid or free radical initiators, based on the ability of this natural antioxidant to up-regulate the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and biliverdin reductase (BVR) system. However, scarce results can be found in literature regarding the cytoprotective effects of FA in case of damage caused by neurotoxicants. The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanisms through which FA exerts neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to the neurotoxin trimethyltin (TMT). FA (1-10 μM for 6 h) dose-dependently increased both basal and TMT (10 μM for 24 h)-induced HO-1 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by fostering the nuclear translocation of the transcriptional activator Nrf2. In particular, the co-treatment of FA (10 μM) with TMT was also responsible for the nuclear translocation of HO-1 in an attempt to further increase cell stress response in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to HO-1, FA (1-10 μM for 6 h) dose-dependently increased the basal expression of BVR. The antioxidant and neuroprotective features of FA, through the increase of HO activity, were supported by the evidence that FA inhibited TMT (10 μM)-induced lipid peroxidation (evaluated by detecting 4-hydroxy-nonenal) and DNA fragmentation in SH-SY5Y cells and that this antioxidant effect was reversed by the HO inhibitor Zinc-protoporphyrin-IX (5 μM). Among the by-products of the HO/BVR system, carbon monoxide (CORM-2, 50 nM) and bilirubin (BR, 50 nM) significantly inhibited TMT-induced superoxide anion formation in SH-SY5Y cells. All together, these results corroborate the neuroprotective effect of FA through the up-regulation of the HO-1/BVR system, via carbon monoxide and BR formation, and provide the first evidence on the role of HO-1/Nrf2 axis in FA-related enhancement of cell stress response in human neurons.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide delays GA-triggered programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by the modulation of glutathione homeostasis and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Zhang, Chen; Lai, Diwen; Sun, Ya; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is considered as a cellular signaling intermediate in higher plants, but corresponding molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways in plant biology are still limited. In the present study, a combination of pharmacological and biochemical approaches was used to study the effect of H2S on the alleviation of GA-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone cells. The results showed that in contrast with the responses of ABA, GA brought about a gradual decrease of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) activity and H2S production, and thereafter PCD occurred. Exogenous H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) not only effectively blocked the decrease of endogenous H2S release, but also alleviated GA-triggered PCD in wheat aleurone cells. These responses were sensitive to hypotaurine (HT), a H2S scavenger, suggesting that this effect of NaHS was in an H2S-dependent fashion. Further experiment confirmed that H2S, rather than other sodium- or sulphur-containing compounds derived from the decomposing of NaHS, was attributed to the rescuing response. Importantly, the reversing effect was associated with glutathione (GSH) because the NaHS triggered increases of endogenous GSH content and the ratio of GSH/oxidized GSH (GSSG) in GA-treated layers, and the NaHS-mediated alleviation of PCD was markedly eliminated by l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO, a selective inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis). The inducible effect of NaHS was also ascribed to the modulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), because the specific inhibitor of HO-1 zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) significantly suppressed the NaHS-related responses. By contrast, the above inhibitory effects were reversed partially when carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution or bilirubin (BR), two of the by-products of HO-1, was added, respectively. NaHS-triggered HO-1 gene expression in GA-treated layers was also confirmed. Together, the above results clearly suggested that the H2S-delayed PCD in GA-treated wheat

  15. Hydrogen sulfide delays GA-triggered programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by the modulation of glutathione homeostasis and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Zhang, Chen; Lai, Diwen; Sun, Ya; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is considered as a cellular signaling intermediate in higher plants, but corresponding molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways in plant biology are still limited. In the present study, a combination of pharmacological and biochemical approaches was used to study the effect of H2S on the alleviation of GA-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone cells. The results showed that in contrast with the responses of ABA, GA brought about a gradual decrease of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) activity and H2S production, and thereafter PCD occurred. Exogenous H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) not only effectively blocked the decrease of endogenous H2S release, but also alleviated GA-triggered PCD in wheat aleurone cells. These responses were sensitive to hypotaurine (HT), a H2S scavenger, suggesting that this effect of NaHS was in an H2S-dependent fashion. Further experiment confirmed that H2S, rather than other sodium- or sulphur-containing compounds derived from the decomposing of NaHS, was attributed to the rescuing response. Importantly, the reversing effect was associated with glutathione (GSH) because the NaHS triggered increases of endogenous GSH content and the ratio of GSH/oxidized GSH (GSSG) in GA-treated layers, and the NaHS-mediated alleviation of PCD was markedly eliminated by l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO, a selective inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis). The inducible effect of NaHS was also ascribed to the modulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), because the specific inhibitor of HO-1 zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) significantly suppressed the NaHS-related responses. By contrast, the above inhibitory effects were reversed partially when carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution or bilirubin (BR), two of the by-products of HO-1, was added, respectively. NaHS-triggered HO-1 gene expression in GA-treated layers was also confirmed. Together, the above results clearly suggested that the H2S-delayed PCD in GA-treated wheat

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 is involved in nitric oxide- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingzhu; Wang, Fangquan; Zhang, Chen; Xie, Yanjie; Han, Bin; Huang, Jingjing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-01-01

    Here, α-Amy2/54 gene expression was used as a molecular probe to investigate the interrelationship among nitric oxide (NO), cyclic GMP (cGMP), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers. The inducible expressions of α-Amy2/54 and α-amylase activity were respectively amplified by two NO-releasing compounds, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine NONOate, in a GA-dependent fashion. Similar responses were observed when an inducer of HO-1, hemin-or one of its catalytic products, carbon monoxide (CO) in aqueous solution-was respectively added. The SNP-induced responses, mimicked by 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a cGMP derivative, were NO-dependent. This conclusion was supported by the fact that endogenous NO overproduction was rapidly induced by SNP, and thereafter induction of α-Amy2/54 gene expression and increased α-amylase activity were sensitive to the NO scavenger. We further observed that the above induction triggered by SNP and 8-Br-cGMP was partially prevented by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1. These blocking effects were clearly reversed by CO, confirming that the above response was HO-1-specific. Further analyses showed that both SNP and 8-Br-cGMP rapidly up-regulated HO-1 gene expression and increased HO activity, and SNP responses were sensitive to cPTIO and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY83583). Molecular evidence confirmed that GA-induced GAMYB and ABA-triggered PKABA1 transcripts were up-regulated or down-regulated by SNP, 8-Br-cGMP or CO cotreated with GA. Contrasting changes were observed when cPTIO, LY83583, or ZnPPIX was added. Together, our results suggested that HO-1 is involved in NO- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated aleurone layers.

  17. Ferulic Acid Regulates the Nrf2/Heme Oxygenase-1 System and Counteracts Trimethyltin-Induced Neuronal Damage in the Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line SH-SY5Y

    PubMed Central

    Catino, Stefania; Paciello, Fabiola; Miceli, Fiorella; Rolesi, Rolando; Troiani, Diana; Calabrese, Vittorio; Santangelo, Rosaria; Mancuso, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, several lines of evidence have pointed out the efficacy of ferulic acid (FA) in counteracting oxidative stress elicited by β-amyloid or free radical initiators, based on the ability of this natural antioxidant to up-regulate the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and biliverdin reductase (BVR) system. However, scarce results can be found in literature regarding the cytoprotective effects of FA in case of damage caused by neurotoxicants. The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanisms through which FA exerts neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to the neurotoxin trimethyltin (TMT). FA (1–10 μM for 6 h) dose-dependently increased both basal and TMT (10 μM for 24 h)-induced HO-1 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by fostering the nuclear translocation of the transcriptional activator Nrf2. In particular, the co-treatment of FA (10 μM) with TMT was also responsible for the nuclear translocation of HO-1 in an attempt to further increase cell stress response in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to HO-1, FA (1–10 μM for 6 h) dose-dependently increased the basal expression of BVR. The antioxidant and neuroprotective features of FA, through the increase of HO activity, were supported by the evidence that FA inhibited TMT (10 μM)-induced lipid peroxidation (evaluated by detecting 4-hydroxy-nonenal) and DNA fragmentation in SH-SY5Y cells and that this antioxidant effect was reversed by the HO inhibitor Zinc-protoporphyrin-IX (5 μM). Among the by-products of the HO/BVR system, carbon monoxide (CORM-2, 50 nM) and bilirubin (BR, 50 nM) significantly inhibited TMT-induced superoxide anion formation in SH-SY5Y cells. All together, these results corroborate the neuroprotective effect of FA through the up-regulation of the HO-1/BVR system, via carbon monoxide and BR formation, and provide the first evidence on the role of HO-1/Nrf2 axis in FA-related enhancement of cell stress response in human neurons. PMID:26779023

  18. Gastrodin protects against MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress by up regulates heme oxygenase-1 expression through p38 MAPK/Nrf2 pathway in human dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Genling; Hu, Yuqin; Liu, Lanlan; Cai, Jiali; Peng, Cheng; Li, Qinglin

    2014-09-01

    Although the etiology of PD remains unclear, increasing evidence has shown that oxidative stress plays an important role in its pathogenesis and that of other neurodegenerative disorders. The phenolic glucoside gastrodin, a main constituent of a Chinese herbal medicine Gastrodia elata (GE) Blume, has been known to display antioxidant activity. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of gastrodin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced oxidative cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells and the underlying mechanism for this neuroprotection. Results indicate that pre-treatment with gastrodin for 1h significantly reduced the MPP(+)-induced viability loss, apoptotic rate and attenuated MPP(+)-mediated ROS production. In addition, gastrodin inhibited MPP(+)-induced lowered membrane potential, decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Moreover, we have revealed the gastrodin increased Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and for the first time revealed gastrodin could increased antioxidant enzyme HO-1 expression in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. HO-1 siRNA transfection was employed, and confirmed gastrodin could active the expression of HO-1. And the increase in HO-1 expression was correlated with the protective effect of gastrodin against MPP(+)-induced injury. Because the inhibitor of HO-1 activity, ZnPP reversed the protective effect of gastrodin against MPP(+)-induced cell death. We also demonstrated that the specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, concentration-dependently blocked on gastrodin-induced HO-1 expression, and meanwhile SB203580 reversed the protective effect of gastrodin against MPP(+)-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that gastrodin can induce HO-1 expression through activation of p38 MAPK/Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting the SH-SY5Y cells from MPP(+)-induced oxidative cell death. Thus our study indicates that gastrodin has a

  19. KMUP-1 Attenuates Endothelin-1-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy through Activation of Heme Oxygenase-1 and Suppression of the Akt/GSK-3β, Calcineurin/NFATc4 and RhoA/ROCK Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liou, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Chen, You-Ting; Chen, Ing-Jun; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2015-01-01

    The signaling cascades of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, calcineurin/NFATc4, and PI3K/Akt/GSK3, are believed to participate in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether KMUP-1, a synthetic xanthine-based derivative, prevents cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by ET-1 and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We found that in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, stimulation with ET-1 (100 nM) for 4 days induced cell hypertrophy and enhanced expressions of hypertrophic markers, including atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide, which were all inhibited by KMUP-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, KMUP-1 prevented ET-1-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation determined by the DCFH-DA assay in cardiomyocytes. KMUP-1 also attenuated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK-3β, and activation of calcineurin/NFATc4 and RhoA/ROCK pathways induced by ET-1. Furthermore, we found that the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress-response enzyme implicated in cardio-protection, was up-regulated by KMUP-1. Finally, KMUP-1 attenuated ET-1-stimulated activator protein-1 DNA binding activity. In conclusion, KMUP-1 attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by ET-1 through inhibiting ERK1/2, calcineurin/NFATc4 and RhoA/ROCK pathways, with associated cardioprotective effects via HO-1 activation. Therefore, KMUP-1 may have a role in pharmacological therapy of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26056815

  20. Induction of heart heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) by hyperthermia: possible role in stress-mediated elevation of cyclic 3':5'-guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J F; Raju, V S; Maines, M D

    1994-10-01

    Presently we have investigated the carbon monoxide generating capacity of the cardiovascular system under normal and stress conditions by examining the microsomal heme oxygenase system at the transcript, protein and activity levels; and have assessed response of heart nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity and cyclic GMP levels to stress. Heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes, HO-1 (HSP32) and HO-2, catalyze the rate limiting step in the only known pathway in eukaryotes for the generation of the potential cellular message, carbon monoxide, and the antioxidant, bilirubin. We show expression of HO-1 and HO-2 at both the transcription and protein levels under normal conditions in the heart and descending aorta, and demonstrate the sensitivity of only the HO-1 isozyme to heat stress in these tissues. The ratio of the two HO-2 homologous transcripts (approximately 1.9 and 1.3 Kb) present in the atrium, ventricles and descending aorta and their levels were not altered by hyperthermia (42 degrees C, 20 min) when measured 1 or 6 hr after treatment. In contrast, hyperthermia caused a rapid, robust and coordinate increase of approximately 10- to 32-fold in the approximately 1.8-Kb HO-1 mRNA in these tissues when measured 1-hr post-treatment. Hyperthermia also caused a significant increase in both HO-1 protein and heme degradation capacity in the heart. Furthermore, the induction of HO-1 protein in the heart was accompanied by a significant elevation in tissue cyclic GMP level first detected 1-hr post-treatment and was sustained 6 hr after heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. The Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer THI-56 Negatively Regulates iNOS Expression and HMGB1 Release in LPS-Activated RAW 264.7 Cells and CLP-Induced Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1. PMID:24098466

  2. Inhibitory effects of benzaldehyde derivatives from the marine fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 on inflammatory mediators via the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Su; Cui, Xiang; Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Sohn, Jae Hak; Yim, Joung Han; An, Ren-Bo; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2014-12-19

    Two benzaldehyde derivatives, flavoglaucin (1) and isotetrahydro-auroglaucin (2), were isolated from the marine fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 through bioassay- and 1H NMR-guided investigation. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of these compounds in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 markedly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression without affecting cell viability. We also demonstrated that the compounds reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation by suppressing phosphorylation of IkappaB (IκB). These results indicated that the anti-inflammatory effects of these benzaldehyde derivatives in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were due to the inactivation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression through the nuclear transcription factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) translocation. The inhibitory effects of compounds 1 and 2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and on NF-κB binding activity were reversed by HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP). Thus, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1 and 2 also correlated with their ability of inducing HO-1 expression.

  3. Kidneys From α1,3-Galactosyltransferase Knockout/Human Heme Oxygenase-1/Human A20 Transgenic Pigs Are Protected From Rejection During Ex Vivo Perfusion With Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Hellen E.; Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Petkov, Stoyan; Herrmann, Doris; Hauschild-Quintern, Janet; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Hassel, Petra; Ziegler, Maren; Baars, Wiebke; Bergmann, Sabine; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple modifications of the porcine genome are required to prevent rejection after pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Here, we produced pigs with a knockout of the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene (GGTA1-KO) combined with transgenic expression of the human anti-apoptotic/anti-inflammatory molecules heme oxygenase-1 and A20, and investigated their xenoprotective properties. Methods The GGTA1-KO/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1)/human A20 (hA20) transgenic pigs were produced in a stepwise approach using zinc finger nuclease vectors targeting the GGTA1 gene and a Sleeping Beauty vector coding for hA20. Two piglets were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and sequencing. The biological function of the genetic modifications was tested in a 51Chromium release assay and by ex vivo kidney perfusions with human blood. Results Disruption of the GGTA1 gene by deletion of few basepairs was demonstrated in GGTA1-KO/hHO-1/hA20 transgenic pigs. The hHO-1 and hA20 mRNA expression was confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ex vivo perfusion of 2 transgenic kidneys was feasible for the maximum experimental time of 240 minutes without symptoms of rejection. Conclusions Results indicate that GGTA1-KO/hHO-1/hA20 transgenic pigs are a promising model to alleviate rejection and ischemia-reperfusion damage in porcine xenografts and could serve as a background for further genetic modifications toward the production of a donor pig that is clinically relevant for xenotransplantation. PMID:27500225

  4. Protective effect of pyrroloquinoline quinine on ultraviolet A irradiation-induced human dermal fibroblast senescence in vitro proceeds via the anti-apoptotic sirtuin 1/nuclear factor-derived erythroid 2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunli; Wen, Chuanjun; Lin, Jinde; Shen, Gan

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ) exerts a protective effect on ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation‑induced senescence in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and to elucidate its mechanism of action in vitro. A senescence model was constructed as follows: HDFs (1x10(4)‑1x10(6)) were cultured in a six‑well plate in vitro and then exposed to UVA irradiation at a dosage of 9 J/cm2. Various concentrations of PQQ (50, 100 and 200 ng/ml) were added to the culture medium 24 h prior to UVA exposure. Following 72 h of irradiation, senescence‑associated β‑galactosidase staining was performed in order to evaluate the senescence state. Furthermore, mRNA expression of the senescence marker genes matrix‑metalloprotease (MMP)1 and MMP3 was determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression of sirtuin (SIRT)1, SIRT6, nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO‑1) were detected using western blot analysis. The results showed that the percentage of cells stained by X‑gal following 9 J/cm2 UVA irradiation was markedly increased compared with that of the control group (53 and 8%, respectively), while 50 ng/ml PQQ attenuated the ratio of positive staining compared with that of the UVA‑only cells (29 vs. 53%, respectively). Expression of fibroblast senescence marker genes MMP1 and MMP3 was decreased in cells treated with UVA and 50 ng/ml PQQ compared with that of cells in the UVA‑only group. Western blot analysis revealed significant effects of PQQ on SIRT1 and SIRT6. Nrf2 and HO‑1 exbibited mild changes with the same trend when treated with or without UVA and PQQ. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that pyrroloquinoline quinine may have a protective effect on UVA irradiation‑induced HDF aging, which may be associated with the anti‑apoptotic SIRT1/Nrf2/HO‑1 pathway as well as SIRT6 signaling.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase-1 inducing activities of lanostane triterpenes isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Solip; Nguyen, Van Thu; Tae, Nara; Lee, Suhyun; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2014-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom used in traditional medicine for preventing or treating a variety of diseases. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducing effects of 12 lanostane triterpenes from G. lucidum in RAW264.7 cells. Of these, seven triterpenes, butyl lucidenateE2, butyl lucidenateD2 (GT-2), butyl lucidenate P, butyl lucidenateQ, Ganoderiol F, methyl ganodenate J and butyl lucidenate N induced HO-1 expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abrogated the inhibitory effects of these triterpenes on the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of these triterpenes. We further studied the anti-inflammatory and HO-1 inducing effects of GT-2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, did not suppress GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction; however, LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, blocked GT-2-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. GT-2 increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering RNA blocked GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction, suggesting that GT-2 induced HO-1 expression via the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, GT-2 inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These findings suggest that HO-1 inducing activities of these lanostane triterpenes may be important in the understanding of a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of G. lucidum.

  6. Adiponectin Inhibits LPS-Induced HMGB1 Release through an AMP Kinase and Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Pathway in RAW 264 Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaede, Ryuji; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) is a late inflammatory mediator that exaggerates septic symptoms. Adiponectin, an adipokine, has potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible effects of adiponectin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced HMGB1 release are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of full length adiponectin on HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated RAW 264 macrophage cells. Treatment of the cells with LPS alone significantly induced HMGB1 release associated with HMGB1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol. However, prior treatment with adiponectin suppressed LPS-induced HMGB1 release and translocation. The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin- (IL-) 10 similarly suppressed LPS-induced HMGB1 release. Adiponectin treatment decreased toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA expression and increased heme oxygenase- (HO-) 1 mRNA expression without inducing IL-10 mRNA, while IL-10 treatment decreased TLR2 and HMGB1 mRNA expression and increased the expression of IL-10 and HO-1 mRNA. Treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP completely prevented the suppression of HMGB1 release by adiponectin but only partially inhibited that induced by IL-10. Treatment with compound C, an AMP kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, abolished the increase in HO-1 expression and the suppression of HMGB1 release mediated by adiponectin. In conclusion, our results indicate that adiponectin suppresses HMGB1 release by LPS through an AMPK-mediated and HO-1-dependent IL-10-independent pathway. PMID:27313399

  7. Gabapentin enhances the morphine anti-nociceptive effect in neuropathic pain via the interleukin-10-heme oxygenase-1 signalling pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yu-Hua; Zhou, Quan-Hong; Chen, Rui; Xu, Hao; Zeng, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Wei; Du, Dong-Ping

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanisms by which gabapentin enhances morphine anti-nociceptive effect in neuropathic pain in rats and the interaction between the anti-nociceptive effects of gabapentin on morphine and the interleukin (IL)-10-heme-oxygenase (HO)-1 signal pathway in a rat model of neuropathic pain. The neuropathic pain model was induced via a left L5/6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. The anti-nociceptive effect of gabapentin and IL-10 on morphine was examined over a 7-day period, and the effects of the anti-IL-10 and HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) on gabapentin/morphine co-injection were assessed. Drug administration was given over 7 days, and on day 8, both anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, a stress-induced protein HO-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured. Gabapentin attenuated morphine tolerance over 7 days of co-administration, and reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines but increased IL-10 and HO-1 expression. The effect of gabapentin on morphine was partially blocked using the anti-IL-10 antibody or the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin. Our findings indicated that the anti-nociceptive effects of gabapentin on morphine might be caused by activation of the IL-10-HO-1 signalling pathway, which resulted in the inhibition of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain in the rat spinal cord.

  8. Stimulation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by nicotine attenuates inflammatory response in macrophages and improves survival in experimental model of sepsis through heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Tsoyi, Konstantin; Jang, Hwa Jin; Kim, Jong Woo; Chang, Hong Kyung; Lee, Young Soo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Kim, Hye Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Lee, Jae Heun; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Chang, Ki Churl

    2011-06-01

    Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit (α7nAChR) by nicotine leads to the improved survival rate in experimental model of sepsis. Previously, we demonstrated that heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducers or carbon monoxide significantly increased survival of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced and cecal ligation and puncture-induced septic mice by reduction of high mobility group box 1 release, a late mediator of sepsis. However, that activation of α7nAChR by nicotine provides anti-inflammatory action through HO-1 upregulation has not been elucidated. Here we show that HO-1-inducible effect by nicotine was mediated through sequential event-Ca(2+) influx, classical protein kinase C activation, and reactive oxygen species production-which activates phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt/Nrf-2 pathway. In addition, HO-1 is required for nicotine-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and high mobility group box 1 expression induced by LPS in macrophages, as evidenced by the fact that nicotine failed to inhibit production of these mediators when HO-1 was suppressed. Importantly, nicotine-induced survival rate was reduced by inhibition of HO-1 in LPS- and cecal ligation and puncture-treated septic mice. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of α7nAChR by nicotine is critical in the regulation of anti-inflammatory process, which could be mediated through HO-1 expression. Thus, we conclude that activation of α7nAChR by nicotine provides anti-inflammatory action through HO-1 upregulation.

  9. Acute toxicity of a commercial glyphosate formulation on European sea bass juveniles (Dicentrarchus labrax L.): gene expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and aromatases (cyp19a and cyp19b).

    PubMed

    Prevot-D'Alvise, N; Richard, S; Coupé, S; Bunet, R; Grillasca, J P

    2013-12-31

    Acute toxicity of Roundup, a commercial glyphosate--based herbicide, was evaluated in a teleost marine fish, the European sea bass, after 96 h of exposure. The LC50 96-h value of Roundup was 529 mg/L. Juveniles (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) were exposed to a sublethal concentration (35% of the LC50, i.e. 193 mg/L) of Roundup for 96-h. The study of heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1) gene expression was performed in four tissues (liver, gills, brain and gonads) and highlighted the disruption of antioxidant defence system. Results showed that ho-1 mRNA levels in liver and gills significantly decreased (p<0.001 and p<0.01 respectively) in fish exposed to 193 mg/L of Roundup, whereas in brain and gonads, ho-1 mRNA level was not altered. The analysis of acetylcholinesterase expression was used to evaluate the overall neurotoxicity of the herbicide and aromatase genes to assess the alteration of the endocrine system. Results showed that AChE and cyp19b gene transcriptions significantly increased (p<0.01) in brain of sea bass, whereas aromatase gene expression (cyp19a) in gonads was not significantly altered. Our results showed complex tissue-specific transcriptional responses after 96 h of exposure to a sublethal concentration. All these disruptions confirmed the deleterious effects of this glyphosate-based herbicide in a marine species.

  10. The Cytoprotective Effect of Petalonia binghamiae Methanol Extract against Oxidative Stress in C2C12 Myoblasts: Mediation by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2 Related Factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Han, Min Ho; Lee, Dae-Sung; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Cheol Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the protective effects of the marine brown algae Petalonia binghamiae against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. P. binghamiae methanol extract (PBME) prevented hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by H2O2 in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. PBME also significantly attenuated H2O2-induced comet tail formation in a comet assay, histone γH2A.X phosphorylation, and annexin V-positive cells, suggesting that PBME prevented H2O2-induced cellular DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, PBME increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent antioxidant enzyme, associated with the induction of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, significantly abolished the protective effects of PBME on H2O2-induced ROS generation, growth inhibition, and apoptosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PBME augments the antioxidant defense capacity through activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:25939035

  11. Aged garlic extract enhances heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit expression via the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-antioxidant response element signaling pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kei; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Morihara, Naoaki

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway defends cells against oxidative stress and regulates the cellular redox balance. Activation of this pathway induces a variety of antioxidant enzymes, resulting in the protection of our bodies against oxidative damage. It has been reported that aged garlic extract (AGE), a garlic preparation that is rich in water-soluble cysteinyl moieties, reduces oxidative stress and helps to ameliorate of cardiovascular, renal and hepatic diseases. We hypothesized that AGE enhances the expression of antioxidant enzymes via the Nrf2-ARE pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture. Gene expression of antioxidant enzymes was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes expression were evaluated using western blotting analyses. We found that AGE promoted the accumulation of Nrf2 into the nucleus in a time- and dose-dependent manner and increased the gene expression and polypeptide level of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Moreover, the effect of AGE in elevating the gene expression of HO-1 and GCLM was found to be mediated via Nrf2 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that AGE induces the expression of HO-1 and GCLM, which are antioxidant enzymes, via activation of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. PMID:26507778

  12. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  13. Mevastatin accelerates loss of synaptic proteins and neurite degeneration in aging cortical neurons in a heme-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Madhuvanthi; Steinert, Joern R; Forsythe, Ian D; Smith, Andrew G; Chernova, Tatyana

    2010-09-01

    The therapeutic use of statins in reducing cholesterol requires careful assessment of potential neuroprotective and/or neurotoxic mechanisms. Chronic treatment with mevastatin (MV) exerts effects on cortical neuron morphology, protein expression and synaptic function in primary culture. MV impaired expression of synaptic proteins, reduced N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents and accelerated neurodegeneration associated with aging. The down-regulating effect of MV on neuronal protein expression was additive with aging-associated decline in culture. Induction of Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) by MV was superimposed on age-related up-regulation. Comparison of MV-treated and heme-deficient neurons showed that inhibition of heme synthesis (by succinyl acetone) had similar damaging effect on neurite integrity and MNDAR expression and function but not on expression of the receptor for neuropeptide Y1 (NPY1R). Replacement of heme in heme-deficient cultures restored protein expression but had no effect in those cultures co-treated with MV. Despite the dramatic induction of HMOX1, intracellular heme remained sufficient in MV-treated cultures, consistent with a heme-independent mechanism of MV-induced neurotoxicity and this was confirmed by analysing neurons with lentiviral over-expression of HMOX1. We conclude that MV exerts a neurotoxic effect in cultured neurons in a heme-independent manner.

  14. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism on cancer risk by histological subtype: A prospective study in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Lee, Te-Chang; Wang, Yuang-Hung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-04-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is upregulated by many stressful stimuli, including arsenic. A GT-repeat ((GT)n) polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter inversely modulates the levels of HO-1 induction. Previous HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism studies in relation to cancer risk have shown disparate results. We prospectively investigated the associations between HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism and cancer risk related to arsenic from drinking water. Totally, 1,013 participants from community-based cohorts of arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan were followed for 13 years. Allelic polymorphisms were classified into long (L, ≥ 27 (GT)n) and short (S, <27 (GT)n). Newly developed cases were identified through linkage with National Cancer Registry of Taiwan. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard methods were used to evaluate effects of the HO-1 polymorphism alone or combined with arsenic exposure. Results showed that participants with the S/S genotype had an increased risk of Bowen's disease (HR = 10.49; 95% CI: 2.77-39.7), invasive skin cancer (HR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13-7.87), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (HR = 3.39; 95% CI: 1.15-9.95) versus those with L/S or L/L genotype. The S/S genotype combined with high arsenic exposure (>300 μg/L) had a greater risk of skin cancer compared to the genotype alone. Consistent with previous findings, participants with the S-allele had a reduced risk of lung adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.03-0.68) versus those with L/L genotype. There were no significant differences in risk of urothelial carcinoma among the three genotypes. Associations of HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism with cancer risk differs by histological subtype and the polymorphism should be considered a modifier in the risk assessment of arsenic exposure.

  15. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism on cancer risk by histological subtype: A prospective study in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Lee, Te-Chang; Wang, Yuang-Hung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-04-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is upregulated by many stressful stimuli, including arsenic. A GT-repeat ((GT)n) polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter inversely modulates the levels of HO-1 induction. Previous HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism studies in relation to cancer risk have shown disparate results. We prospectively investigated the associations between HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism and cancer risk related to arsenic from drinking water. Totally, 1,013 participants from community-based cohorts of arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan were followed for 13 years. Allelic polymorphisms were classified into long (L, ≥ 27 (GT)n) and short (S, <27 (GT)n). Newly developed cases were identified through linkage with National Cancer Registry of Taiwan. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard methods were used to evaluate effects of the HO-1 polymorphism alone or combined with arsenic exposure. Results showed that participants with the S/S genotype had an increased risk of Bowen's disease (HR = 10.49; 95% CI: 2.77-39.7), invasive skin cancer (HR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13-7.87), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (HR = 3.39; 95% CI: 1.15-9.95) versus those with L/S or L/L genotype. The S/S genotype combined with high arsenic exposure (>300 μg/L) had a greater risk of skin cancer compared to the genotype alone. Consistent with previous findings, participants with the S-allele had a reduced risk of lung adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.03-0.68) versus those with L/L genotype. There were no significant differences in risk of urothelial carcinoma among the three genotypes. Associations of HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism with cancer risk differs by histological subtype and the polymorphism should be considered a modifier in the risk assessment of arsenic exposure. PMID:26566708

  16. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a strong stimulus of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in experimental studies in response to oxidative stress caused by a stimulus. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter was inversely correlated to the development of coronary artery disease in diabetics and development of restenosis following angioplasty in patients. The role of this potential vascular protective factor in carotid atherosclerosis remains unclear. We previously reported a graded association of arsenic exposure in drinking water with an increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HO-1 genetic polymorphism and the risk of atherosclerosis related to arsenic. Methods Three-hundred and sixty-seven participants with an indication of carotid atherosclerosis and an additional 420 participants without the indication, which served as the controls, from two arsenic exposure areas in Taiwan, a low arsenic-exposed Lanyang cohort and a high arsenic-exposed LMN cohort, were studied. Carotid atherosclerosis was evaluated using a duplex ultrasonographic assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries. Allelic variants of (GT)n repeats in the 5'-flanking region of the HO-1 gene were identified and grouped into a short (S) allele (< 27 repeats) and long (L) allele (≥ 27 repeats). The association of atherosclerosis and the HO-1 genetic variants was assessed by a logistic regression analysis, adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Results Analysis results showed that arsenic's effect on carotid atherosclerosis differed between carriers of the class S allele (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.86-2.25; p = 0.181) and non-carriers (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.03-6.82; p = 0.044) in the high-exposure LMN cohort. At arsenic exposure levels exceeding 750 μg/L, difference in OR estimates between class S allele carriers and non-carriers was borderline significant (p = 0.051). In contrast, no such results were found in the low-exposure Lanyang

  17. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  18. YS 51, 1-(beta-naphtylmethyl)-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4,-tetrahydroisoquinoline, protects endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury via carbon monoxide derived from heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ja Myung; Kim, Hye Jung; Ha, Yu Mi; Park, Min Kyu; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Young Soo; Seo, Han Geuk; Lee, Jae Heun; Yun-Choi, Hye Sook; Chang, Ki Churl

    2007-11-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, and great attention has been placed on the protective role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) for vasculature against oxidant-induced injury. We tested whether the protective effects of YS 51, 1-(beta-naphtyl-methyl)-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4,-tetrahydroisoquinoline, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell injury is associated with HO-1 activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). YS 51 increased HO-1 expression and activity in concentration-dependent manners (10-100 microM) and time-dependent manners (1, 3, 6, 18 h), which were correlated well with its protective effect against H2O2-induced injury. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP IX), a HO inhibitor, significantly inhibited the effect of YS 51 (50 microM). In contrast, [Ru(CO)3(Cl)2]2 (CORM-2, a CO releasing molecule) but not bilirubin protected against H2O2-induced injury. Oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) used as a CO scavenger significantly inhibited the protective effect of both YS 51 and CORM-2. Furthermore, both YS 51 and CORM-2 significantly reduced H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; however, this was counteracted by ZnPP IX, HbO2 and deferoxamine. We found evidence for the involvement of PI3/Akt kinase and ERK1/2 pathways in HO-1 induction by YS-51. Taken together, we conclude that CO is, at least, responsible for the YS 51-mediated protective action of endothelial cells against oxidant stress via HO-1 gene induction, involving the activation of the PI3/Akt and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. Thus, YS 51 may be useful in oxidative stress-induced vascular disorders.

  19. Sour cherry seed kernel extract increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and decreases representation of CD3+ TNF-α+ and CD3+IL-8+ subpopulations in peripheral blood leukocyte cultures from type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Fadia F; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Haines, David D; Dashti, Ali; Dashti, Hussain; Al-Ozairi, Ebaa; Bak, Istvan; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-05-01

    The present study evaluates a hypothesis that sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) seed extracts (SCE) modulate CD3+ T lymphocyte activity in ways predictive of potential for uses of SCE in management of inflammatory diseases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 12 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients and eight healthy control subjects were cultured 24 h with 100 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to increase inflammatory signaling and co-incubated with 0.5-100 µg/ml SCE. Cultures were evaluated by two-color flow cytometry for percent representation of CD3+ IL8+ and CD3+TNF-α cells which express interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNF-α+) respectively, and by enzyme-linked immunoassay for lymphocyte-associated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, known to be induced by SCE). SCE dosage ranges of 0.5-100 µg/ml in cell cultures significantly suppressed LPS-increased CD3+TNF-α+ and CD3+IL8+ representation from all participants (p < 0.05), with greater pharmacological effect noted in suppression of CD3+TNF-α+ noted in cells from T2DM patients versus healthy control subjects. These effects correlated with increased HO-1 expression in SCE-treated PBMC from all subjects (p < 0.05). Since TNF-α and IL-8 are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for many inflammatory syndromes, the capacity of SCE to down-regulate representation of cells that express them suggests potential for therapeutic use of SCE in T2DM and other diseases. PMID:22848037

  20. 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose protects PC12 Cells from MPP(+)-mediated cell death by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in an ERK- and Akt-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Hongge; Cao, Fei; Zhen, Lan; Bai, Jing; Yuan, Shijin; Mei, Yuanwu

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the ability of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (β-PGG) to induce the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the PC12 cells and its regulation in the PC12 cells. One week before treatment with the drug, nerve growth factor (NGF) was added to the cultures at a final concentration of 50 ng/mL to induce neuronal differentiation. After drug treatment, HO-1 gene transcription was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of HO-1 and NF-E2-related factor2 (Nrf2) and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt were detected by Western blotting. The viability of the PC12 cells treated with different medicines was examined by MTT assay. The oxidative stress in the PC12 cells was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by DCFH-DA. The results showed that β-PGG up-regulated HO-1 expression and this increased expression provided neuroprotection against MPP(+)-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, β-PGG induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which was found to be upstream of β-PGG-induced HO-1 expression, and the activation of ERK and Akt, a pathway that is involved in β-PGG-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and neuroprotection. In conclusion, β-PGG up-regulates HO-1 expression by stimulating Nrf2 nuclear translocation in an ERK- and Akt-dependent manner, and HO-1 expression by β-PGG may provide the PC12 cells with an acquired antioxidant defense capacity to survive the oxidative stress.

  1. Crude Preparations of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Activating Akt-Nrf2 and mTOR–IκB Kinase–NF-κB Pathways in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su Hyuk; Rho, Da Jeong; Jeon, Jong Ik; Kim, Young-Jeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori sheds outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain many surface elements of bacteria. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in directing the nature of adaptive immune responses against H. pylori, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in regulating function of DCs. In addition, HO-1 is important for adaptive immunity and the stress response. Although H. pylori-derived OMVs may contribute to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection, responses of DCs to OMVs have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of H. pylori-derived crude OMVs in modulating the expression of HO-1 in DCs. Exposure of DCs to crude H. pylori OMVs upregulated HO-1 expression. Crude OMVs obtained from a cagA-negative isogenic mutant strain induced less HO-1 expression than OMVs obtained from a wild-type strain. Crude H. pylori OMVs activated signals of transcription factors such as NF-κB, AP-1, and Nrf2. Suppression of NF-κB or Nrf2 resulted in significant attenuation of crude OMV-induced HO-1 expression. Crude OMVs increased the phosphorylation of Akt and downstream target molecules of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), such as S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Suppression of Akt resulted in inhibition of crude OMV-induced Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression. Furthermore, suppression of mTOR was associated with inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK), NF-κB, and HO-1 expression in crude OMV-exposed DCs. These results suggest that H. pylori-derived OMVs regulate HO-1 expression through two different pathways in DCs, Akt-Nrf2 and mTOR–IKK–NF-κB signaling. Following this induction, increased HO-1 expression in DCs may modulate inflammatory responses in H. pylori infection. PMID:27185786

  2. Isoegomaketone Upregulates Heme Oxygenase-1 in RAW264.7 Cells via ROS/p38 MAPK/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chang Hyun; So, Yang Kang; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2016-01-01

    Isoegomaketone (IK) was isolated from Perilla frutescens, which has been widely used as a food in Asian cuisine, and evaluated for its biological activity. We have already confirmed that IK induced the HO-1 expression via Nrf2 activation in RAW264.7 cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of IK on the mechanism of HO-1 expression. IK upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in a dose dependent manner. The level of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 4 h after 15 μM IK treatment. To investigate the mechanisms of HO-1 expression modulation by IK, we used pharmacological inhibitors for the protein kinase C (PKC) family, PI3K, and p38 MAPK. IK-induced HO-1 mRNA expression was only suppressed by SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. ROS scavengers (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC, and glutathione, GSH) also blocked the IK-induced ROS production and HO-1 expression. Furthermore, both NAC and SB203580 suppressed the IK-induced Nrf2 activation. In addition, ROS scavengers suppressed other oxidative enzymes such as catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and NADH quinone oxidoreductase (NQO-1) in IK-treated RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, it can be concluded that IK induced the HO-1 expression through the ROS/p38 MAPK/ Nrf2 pathway in RAW264.7 cells. PMID:27582555

  3. Isoegomaketone Upregulates Heme Oxygenase-1 in RAW264.7 Cells via ROS/p38 MAPK/Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chang Hyun; So, Yang Kang; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2016-09-01

    Isoegomaketone (IK) was isolated from Perilla frutescens, which has been widely used as a food in Asian cuisine, and evaluated for its biological activity. We have already confirmed that IK induced the HO-1 expression via Nrf2 activation in RAW264.7 cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of IK on the mechanism of HO-1 expression. IK upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in a dose dependent manner. The level of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 4 h after 15 μM IK treatment. To investigate the mechanisms of HO-1 expression modulation by IK, we used pharmacological inhibitors for the protein kinase C (PKC) family, PI3K, and p38 MAPK. IK-induced HO-1 mRNA expression was only suppressed by SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. ROS scavengers (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC, and glutathione, GSH) also blocked the IK-induced ROS production and HO-1 expression. Furthermore, both NAC and SB203580 suppressed the IK-induced Nrf2 activation. In addition, ROS scavengers suppressed other oxidative enzymes such as catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and NADH quinone oxidoreductase (NQO-1) in IK-treated RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, it can be concluded that IK induced the HO-1 expression through the ROS/p38 MAPK/ Nrf2 pathway in RAW264.7 cells. PMID:27582555

  4. Sulforaphane Suppresses Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Up-Regulating Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression through PI3K/Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jung-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Chun; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Hsu, Yao-Chin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-induced oxidative stress is a major risk factor for the development of HCV-associated liver disease. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an antioxidant phytocompound that acts against cellular oxidative stress and tumorigenesis. However, there is little known about its anti-viral activity. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN significantly suppressed HCV protein and RNA levels in HCV replicon cells and infectious system, with an IC50 value of 5.7 ± 0.2 μM. Moreover, combination of SFN with anti-viral drugs displayed synergistic effects in the suppression of HCV replication. In addition, we found nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/HO-1 induction in response to SFN and determined the signaling pathways involved in this process, including inhibition of NS3 protease activity and induction of IFN response. In contrast, the anti-viral activities were attenuated by knockdown of HO-1 with specific inhibitor (SnPP) and shRNA, suggesting that anti-HCV activity of SFN is dependent on HO-1 expression. Otherwise, SFN stimulated the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) leading Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression against HCV replication. Overall, our results indicated that HO-1 is essential in SFN-mediated anti-HCV activity and provide new insights in the molecular mechanism of SFN in HCV replication. PMID:27023634

  5. Sulforaphane Suppresses Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Up-Regulating Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression through PI3K/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Hsu, Yao-Chin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-induced oxidative stress is a major risk factor for the development of HCV-associated liver disease. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an antioxidant phytocompound that acts against cellular oxidative stress and tumorigenesis. However, there is little known about its anti-viral activity. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN significantly suppressed HCV protein and RNA levels in HCV replicon cells and infectious system, with an IC50 value of 5.7 ± 0.2 μM. Moreover, combination of SFN with anti-viral drugs displayed synergistic effects in the suppression of HCV replication. In addition, we found nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/HO-1 induction in response to SFN and determined the signaling pathways involved in this process, including inhibition of NS3 protease activity and induction of IFN response. In contrast, the anti-viral activities were attenuated by knockdown of HO-1 with specific inhibitor (SnPP) and shRNA, suggesting that anti-HCV activity of SFN is dependent on HO-1 expression. Otherwise, SFN stimulated the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) leading Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression against HCV replication. Overall, our results indicated that HO-1 is essential in SFN-mediated anti-HCV activity and provide new insights in the molecular mechanism of SFN in HCV replication. PMID:27023634

  6. Synergistic Effects of Cilostazol and Probucol on ER Stress-Induced Hepatic Steatosis via Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Activation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingqing; Pandiri, Indira; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Seul-Ki; Park, Jeongmin; Ryu, Jinhyun; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Jeong Woo; Ryter, Stefan W.; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-01-01

    The selective type-3 phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostazol and the antihyperlipidemic agent probucol have antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties. Moreover, cilostazol and probucol can regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the combinatorial effect of cilostazol and probucol on mitochondrial biogenesis remains unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a well-known causative factor of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which can impair mitochondrial function in hepatocytes. Here, we investigated the synergistic effects of cilostazol and probucol on mitochondrial biogenesis and ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis. A synergistic effect of cilostazol and probucol on HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis gene expression was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and murine primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, in an animal model of ER stress involving tunicamycin, combinatorial treatment with cilostazol and probucol significantly increased the expression of HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes and proteins, whereas it downregulated serum ALT, eIF2 phosphorylation, and CHOP expression, as well as the lipogenesis-related genes SREBP-1c and FAS. Based on these results, we conclude that cilostazol and probucol exhibit a synergistic effect on the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis via upregulation of HO-1, which confers protection against ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:27057275

  7. Distance metrics for heme protein electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christopher C; Chobot, Sarah E; Page, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that distance is the principal parameter that sets the order of magnitude for electron-tunneling rates in proteins. However, there continue to be varying ways to measure electron-tunneling distances in proteins. This distance uncertainty blurs the issue of whether the intervening protein medium has been naturally selected to speed or slow any particular electron-tunneling reaction. For redox cofactors lacking metals, an edge of the cofactor can be defined that approximates the extent in space that includes most of the wavefunction associated with its tunneling electron. Beyond this edge, the wavefunction tails off much more dramatically in space. The conjugated porphyrin ring seems a reasonable edge for the metal-free pheophytins and bacteriopheophytins of photosynthesis. For a metal containing redox cofactor such as heme, an appropriate cofactor edge is more ambiguous. Electron-tunneling distance may be measured from the conjugated heme macrocycle edge or from the metal, which can be up to 4.8 A longer. In a typical protein medium, such a distance difference normally corresponds to a approximately 1000 fold decrease in tunneling rate. To address this ambiguity, we consider both natural heme protein electron transfer and light-activated electron transfer in ruthenated heme proteins. We find that the edge of the conjugated heme macrocycle provides a reliable and useful tunneling distance definition consistent with other biological electron-tunneling reactions. Furthermore, with this distance metric, heme axially- and edge-oriented electron transfers appear similar and equally well described by a simple square barrier tunneling model. This is in contrast to recent reports for metal-to-metal metrics that require exceptionally poor donor/acceptor couplings to explain heme axially-oriented electron transfers.

  8. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  9. An intercellular heme trafficking protein delivers maternal heme to the embryo during development in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Caiyong; Samuel, Tamika K.; Sinclair, Jason; Dailey, Harry A.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Summary Heme is a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole that crosses multiple biological membranes for incorporation into proteins critical for numerous biological processes. Thus, a prima facie argument can be made that heme trafficking within the aqueous cellular milieu must be mediated by specific intra- and intercellular pathways. Embryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans, a heme auxotroph, is inextricably dependent on maternal heme acquisition. Here we show that HRG-3 is required to deliver maternal heme to oocytes for zygotic development. HRG-3 binds heme and is exclusively secreted by the intestine during heme insufficiency into the interstitial fluid for transport of maternal heme to extra-intestinal cells. HRG-3 deficiency results either in death during embryogenesis or in developmental arrest immediately post hatching – phenotypes that are fully suppressed by maternal but not zygotic hrg-3 expression. Our results establish an unprecedented role for HRG-3 as an intercellular heme chaperone in zygotic development and maternal-embryonic nutrition in C. elegans. PMID:21620137

  10. EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FULL-LENGTH HUMAN HEME OXYGENASE-1: PRESENCE OF INTACT MEMBRANE-BINDING REGION LEADS TO INCREASED BINDING AFFINITY FOR NADPH-CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2009-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the chief regulatory enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin. In the process of heme degradation, this NADPH and cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR)-dependent oxidation of heme also releases free iron and carbon monoxide. Much of the recent research involving heme oxygenase is done using a 30-kDa soluble form of the enzyme, which lacks the membrane binding region (C-terminal 23 amino acids). The goal of this study was to express and purify a full-length human HO-1 (hHO-1) protein; however, due to the lability of the full-length form, a rapid purification procedure was required. This was accomplished by use of a GST-tagged hHO-1 construct. Although the procedure permitted the generation of a full-length HO-1, this form was contaminated with a 30-kDa degradation product that could not be eliminated. Therefore, we attempted to remove a putative secondary thrombin cleavage site by a conservative mutation of amino acid 254, which replaces lysine with arginine. This mutation allowed the expression and purification of a full length hHO-1 protein. Unlike wild-type HO-1, the K254R mutant could be purified to a single 32-kDa protein capable of degrading heme at the same rate as the wild-type enzyme. The K254R full-length form had a specific activity of ~200–225 nmol bilirubin hr−1nmol−1 HO-1 as compared to ~140–150 nmol bilirubin hr−1nmol−1 for the WT form, which contains the 30-kDa contaminant. This is a 2–3-fold increase from the previously reported soluble 30-kDa HO-1, suggesting that the C-terminal 23 amino acids are essential for maximal catalytic activity. Because the membrane spanning domain is present, the full-length hHO-1 has the potential to incorporate into phospholipid membranes, which can be reconstituted at known concentrations, in combination with other ER-resident enzymes. PMID:17915953

  11. Molecular Simulations of Porphyrins and Heme Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-01-18

    An overview of the use of classical mechanical molecular simulations of porphyrins, hydroporphyrins, and heme proteins is given. The topics cover molecular mechanics calculations of structures and conformer energies of porphyrins, energies of barriers for interconversion between stable conformers, molecular dynamics of porphyrins and heme proteins, and normal-coordinate structural analysis of experimental and calculated porphyrin structures. Molecular mechanics and dynamics are currently a fertile area of research on porphyrins. In the future, other computational methods such as Monte Carlo simulations, which have yet to be applied to porphyrins, will come into use and open new avenues of research into molecular simulations of porphyrins.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta1 stimulates heme oxygenase-1 expression via the PI3K/Akt and NF-kappaB pathways in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Chun; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chung-Hung; Liao, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2007-04-10

    A previous report showed that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) can induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, attenuate cellular injury, and maintain tissue homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the involvement of phosphoinositide-3-OH-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway in TGF-beta1-induced HO-1 expression in human lung epithelial cells (A549). Treatment of A549 cells with TGF-beta1 caused HO-1 to be expressed in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of A549 cells with LY 294002 (2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one, a PI3K inhibitor), an Akt inhibitor, and the dominant negative mutant of Akt (Akt DN) inhibited TGF-beta1-induced HO-1 expression and HO-1-luciferase activity. Stimulation of cells with TGF-beta1 caused an increase in Akt phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner, which was inhibited by wortmannin and LY 294002 (PI3K inhibitors). In addition, treatment of A549 cells with Bay 117082 ((E)-3-[4-methylphenylsulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile, an IkappaB phosphorylation inhibitor), pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-kappaB inhibitor), and the dominant negative mutant of IkappaBalpha (IkappaBalphaM) inhibited TGF-beta1-induced HO-1 expression and HO-1-luciferase activity. Treatment of A549 cells with TGF-beta1-induced IkappaB kinase alpha/beta (IKKalpha/beta) phosphorylation, IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, IkappaBalpha degradation, p65 Ser536 phosphorylation, and kappaB-luciferase activity. The TGF-beta1-mediated increases in IKKalpha/beta phosphorylation, p65 Ser536 phosphorylation, and kappaB-luciferase activity were inhibited by LY 294002, an Akt inhibitor, and Akt DN. Taken together, these results suggest that the PI3K/Akt dependent IKKalpha/beta/NF-kappaB signaling pathway plays an important role in TGF-beta1-induced HO-1 expression in A549 cells.

  13. An IκBα phosphorylation inhibitor induces heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) expression through the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-Nrf2-ARE signaling and ROS-PI3K/Akt signaling in an NF-κB-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung-jin; Lee, Jung Tae; Joe, Eun-hye; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2011-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in cells. Excessive ROS induce expression of inflammatory mediators, such as iNOS and COX2. Antioxidant enzymes, such as, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), tightly regulate ROS levels within cells. Here, we show that Bay 11-7082 (Bay) increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human colon cancer HT29 cells. Bay induced translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) into nuclei and increased the binding activity of the antioxidant response element (ARE). In addition, PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) blocked Bay-induced HO-1 expression. Pretreatment with anti-oxidants (N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or glutathione) significantly reduced Bay-induced HO-1 mRNA/protein expression, nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and phosphorylation of Akt. However, PI3K/Akt signaling was independent of Bay-induced Nrf2 translocation and ARE binding activity. Furthermore, other NF-κB inhibitors, such as pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and MG132, also increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. However, although overexpression of dominant negative inhibitory κB (IκB) reduced NF-κB-driven transcriptional activity, IκB overexpression did not increase HO-1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that in human colon cancer HT29 cells, Bay induces HO-1 expression by increasing ROS production in an Nrf2-ARE and PI3K dependent manner, but Bay acts independently of NF-κB.

  14. Characterization of heme ligation properties of Rv0203, a secreted heme binding protein involved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis heme uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Cedric P.; Du, Jing; Dawson, John H.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    The secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) heme binding protein Rv0203 has been shown to play a role in Mtb heme uptake. In this work we use spectroscopic (absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic circular dichrosim) methods to further characterize the heme coordination environments of His-tagged and native protein forms, Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag, respectively. Rv0203-His binds the heme molecule through bis-His coordination and is low spin in both ferric and ferrous oxidation states. Rv0203-notag is high spin in both oxidation states and shares spectroscopic similarity with pentacoordinate oxygen ligated heme proteins. Mutagenesis experiments identified that residues Tyr59, His63 and His89 are required for Rv0203-notag to efficiently bind heme, reinforcing the hypothesis based on our previous structural and mutagenesis studies of Rv0203-His. While Tyr59, His63 and His89 are required for heme binding to Rv0203-notag, comparison of the absorption spectra of the Rv0203-notag mutants suggest the heme-ligand may be the hydroxyl group of Tyr59, although an exogenous hydroxide cannot be ruled out. Additionally, we measured the heme affinities of Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag using stopped flow techniques. The rates for heme binding to Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag are similar, 115 (μM s)-1 and 133 (μM s)-1, respectively. However, the heme off-rates differ quite dramatically, whereby Rv0203-His gives biphasic dissociation kinetics with fast and slow rates of 0.0019 s-1 and 0.0002 s-1, respectively, and Rv0203-notag has a single off-rate of 0.082 s-1. The spectral and heme binding affinity differences between Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag suggest that the His-tag interferes with heme binding. Furthermore, these results imply that the His-tag has the ability to stabilize heme binding as well as alter heme ligand coordination of Rv0203 by providing an unnatural histidine ligand. Moreover, the heme affinity of Rv0203-notag is comparable to that of other heme

  15. Curcumin-Induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Prevents H2O2-Induced Cell Death in Wild Type and Heme Oxygenase-2 Knockout Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; van Dalen, Stephanie C. M.; Schelbergen, Rik F.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; Szarek, Walter A.; Regan, Raymond F.; Carels, Carine E.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration is a promising adjuvant therapy to treat tissue injury. However, MSC survival after administration is often hampered by oxidative stress at the site of injury. Heme oxygenase (HO) generates the cytoprotective effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron/ferritin by breaking down heme. Since HO-activity mediates anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects, we hypothesized that modulation of the HO-system affects MSC survival. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) from wild type (WT) and HO-2 knockout (KO) mice were isolated and characterized with respect to ASC marker expression. In order to analyze potential modulatory effects of the HO-system on ASC survival, WT and HO-2 KO ASCs were pre-treated with HO-activity modulators, or downstream effector molecules biliverdin, bilirubin, and CO before co-exposure of ASCs to a toxic dose of H2O2. Surprisingly, sensitivity to H2O2-mediated cell death was similar in WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. However, pre-induction of HO-1 expression using curcumin increased ASC survival after H2O2 exposure in both WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. Simultaneous inhibition of HO-activity resulted in loss of curcumin-mediated protection. Co-treatment with glutathione precursor N-Acetylcysteine promoted ASC survival. However, co-incubation with HO-effector molecules bilirubin and biliverdin did not rescue from H2O2-mediated cell death, whereas co-exposure to CO-releasing molecules-2 (CORM-2) significantly increased cell survival, independently from HO-2 expression. Summarizing, our results show that curcumin protects via an HO-1 dependent mechanism against H2O2-mediated apoptosis, and likely through the generation of CO. HO-1 pre-induction or administration of CORMs may thus form an attractive strategy to improve MSC therapy. PMID:25299695

  16. Inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 partially reverses the arsenite-mediated decrease of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A23, and CYP3A2 catalytic activity in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2012-03-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the physiological breakdown of heme, is ubiquitous, and its expression can be increased by arsenite [As(III)], and similar other stimuli that induce cellular oxidative stress. Interestingly, it has been shown that the As(III)-induced HO-1 is inversely correlated with a decrease in cytochromes P450 (P450s) activity; however, the direct role for HO-1 in the inhibition of P450 enzymes remains unknown. Our results showed that As(III) at a concentration of 5 μM decreased the constitutive and inducible expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A23, and CYP3A2 at the mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. Moreover, As(III) decreased the nuclear accumulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and pregnane X receptor without increasing their degradation. As(III) also increased the binding of cytosolic AhR to heat shock protein 90 and hepatitis B virus X-associated protein 2. In the presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin as an inducer for CYP1A and rifampin as an inducer for CYP3A, As(III) decreased the enzymatic activity of the four P450s more than it decreased their mRNA or protein expression levels. It is noteworthy that treatment with the competitive HO-1 inhibitor, tin-mesoporphyrin, or supplementing external heme partially reversed the As(III)-mediated decrease in activities of the four P450s. In conclusion, the current study provides the first evidence that As(III) decreases CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A23, and CYP3A2 expression in freshly isolated rat primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, inhibiting the As(III)-mediated induction of HO-1 partially restores the enzymatic activity of these P450s that was initially decreased by As(III), confirming the direct role of HO-1 in the inhibition of P450s.

  17. Time-resolved heme protein intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2005-03-01

    To determine the enzymatic mechanisms of heme proteins, it is necessary to identify the intermediates along the catalytic pathway and measure the times of their formation and decay. Resonance Raman scattering spectra are especially powerful for obtaining such information as the electronic structure of the heme group and the nature of the ligand coordinated to the heme iron atom may be monitored. The oxygen intermediates of two physiologically important enzymes will be presented. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uses oxygen to convert arginine to NO and citrulline; and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces oxygen to water to support oxidative phosphorylation. The fate or the oxygen in each of these enzymes has been followed by resonance Raman scattering. In NOS the oxygen is slowly converted to an activated species that then reacts fast, whereas in CcO the oxygen is rapidly converted to a reactive species that subsequently reacts slowly. The properties of the intermediates and the origin of the differences between these enzymes will be discussed.

  18. Mechanisms of Peroxynitrite Interactions with Heme Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jia; Groves, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygenated hemoproteins are known to react rapidly with nitric oxide (NO) to produce peroxynitrite (PN) at the heme site. This process could lead either to attenuation of the effects of NO or to nitrosative protein damage. Peroxynitrite is a powerful nitrating and oxidizing agent that has been implicated in a variety of cell injuries. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the nature and variety of reaction mechanisms of PN reactions with heme proteins. In this Forum we survey the range of reactions of PN with heme proteins, with particular attention to myoglobin and cytochrome c. While these two proteins are textbook paradigms for oxygen binding and electron transfer, respectively, both have recently been shown to have other important functions that involve nitric oxide and peroxynitrite. We have recently described direct evidence that ferrylMb and NO2 are both produced during the reaction of PN and metmyolgobin (metMb). Kinetic evidence indicates that these products evolve from initial formation of a caged radical intermediate [FeIV=O .NO2]. This caged pair reacts mainly via internal return with a rate constant kr to form metMb and nitrate in an oxygen rebound scenario. Detectable amounts of ferrylMb are observed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, appearing at a rate consistent with the rate, kobs of heme-mediated PN decomposition. Freely-diffusing NO2, which is liberated concomitantly from the radical pair (ke), preferentially nitrates myoglobin Tyr103 and added fluorescein. For cytochrome c, Raman spectroscopy has revealed that a substantial fraction of cytochrome c converts to a β-sheet structure, at the expense of turns and helices at low pH. It is proposed that a short β-sheet segment, comprising residues 37-39 and 58-61, extends itself into the large 37-61 loop when the latter is destabilized by protonation of H26, which forms an anchoring H-bond to loop residue P44. This conformation change ruptures the Met80-Fe bond, as revealed by changes in

  19. Nitric oxide blocks cellular heme insertion into a broad range of heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Syed Mohsin; Ghosh, Arnab; Chakravarti, Ritu; Biswas, Ashis; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Panda, Koustubh; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Although heme insertion into proteins enables their function in bioenergetics, metabolism, and signaling, the mechanisms and regulation of this process is not fully understood. We developed a means to study cellular heme insertion into apo-protein targets over a 3 h time period, and then investigated how nitric oxide (NO) released from a chemical donor (NOC-18) might influence heme (protoporphyrin IX) insertion into seven targets that present a range of protein structure, heme ligation, and function (three NO synthases, two cytochrome P450’s, catalase, and hemoglobin). NO blocked cellular heme insertion into all seven apo-protein targets. The inhibition occurred at relatively low (nM/min) fluxes of NO, was reversible, and did not involve changes in intracellular heme level, activation of guanylate cyclase, or inhibition of mitochondrial ATP production. These aspects and the range of protein targets suggest that NO can act as a global inhibitor of heme insertion, possibly by inhibiting a common step in the process. PMID:20211245

  20. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  1. Multi-heme proteins: Nature's electronic multi-purpose tool

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Kathryn D.; Ellis, Katie E.; Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A.; Elliott, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    While iron is often a limiting nutrient to Biology, when the element is found in the form of heme cofactors (iron protoporphyrin IX), living systems have exceled at modifying and tailoring the chemistry of the metal. In the context of proteins and enzymes, heme cofactors are increasingly found in stoichiometries greater than one, where a single protein macromolecule contains more than one heme unit. When paired or coupled together, these protein associated heme groups perform a wide variety of tasks, such as redox communication, long range electron transfer and storage of reducing/oxidizing equivalents. Here, we review recent advances in the field of multi-heme proteins, focusing on emergent properties of these complex redox proteins, and strategies found in Nature where such proteins appear to be modular and essential components of larger biochemical pathways. PMID:23558243

  2. Multi-heme proteins: nature's electronic multi-purpose tool.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Kathryn D; Ellis, Katie E; Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A; Elliott, Sean J

    2013-01-01

    While iron is often a limiting nutrient to Biology, when the element is found in the form of heme cofactors (iron protoporphyrin IX), living systems have excelled at modifying and tailoring the chemistry of the metal. In the context of proteins and enzymes, heme cofactors are increasingly found in stoichiometries greater than one, where a single protein macromolecule contains more than one heme unit. When paired or coupled together, these protein associated heme groups perform a wide variety of tasks, such as redox communication, long range electron transfer and storage of reducing/oxidizing equivalents. Here, we review recent advances in the field of multi-heme proteins, focusing on emergent properties of these complex redox proteins, and strategies found in Nature where such proteins appear to be modular and essential components of larger biochemical pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  3. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy. PMID:26590114

  4. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy.

  5. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries.

  6. Biological significance and applications of heme c proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Kleingardner, Jesse G; Bren, Kara L

    2015-07-21

    Hemes are ubiquitous in biology and carry out a wide range of functions. The heme group is largely invariant across proteins with different functions, although there are a few variations seen in nature. The most common variant is heme c, which is formed by a post-translational modification in which heme is covalently linked to two Cys residues on the polypeptide via thioether bonds. In this Account, the influence of this covalent attachment on heme c properties and function is discussed, and examples of how covalent attachment has been used in selected applications are presented. Proteins that bind heme c are among the most well-characterized proteins in biochemistry. Most of these proteins are cytochromes c (cyts c) that serve as electron carriers in photosynthesis and respiration. Despite the intense study of cyts c, the functional significance of heme covalent attachment has remained elusive. One observation is that heme c reaches a lower reduction potential in nature than its noncovalently linked counterpart, heme b, when comparing proteins with the same axial ligands. Furthermore, covalent attachment is known to enhance protein stability and allow the heme to be relatively solvent exposed. However, an inorganic chemistry perspective on the effects of covalent attachment has been lacking. Spectroscopic measurements and computations on cyts c and model systems reveal a number of effects of covalent attachment on heme electronic structure and reactivity. One is that the predominant nonplanar ruffling distortion seen in heme c lowers heme reduction potential. Another is that covalent attachment influences the interaction of the heme iron with the proximal His ligand. Heme ruffling also has been shown to influence electronic coupling to redox partners and, therefore, electron transfer rates by altering the distribution of the orbital hole on the porphyrin in oxidized cyt c. Another consequence of heme covalent attachment is the strong vibrational coupling seen

  7. Pyridine Hemochromagen Assay for Determining the Concentration of Heme in Purified Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Ian; Guo, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Heme is a common cofactor in proteins, found in hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome P450, DGCR8, and nitric oxide synthase, among others. This protocol describes a method for quantifying heme that works best in purified protein samples. This protocol might be used to, for example, determine whether a given heme-binding protein is fully occupied by heme, thus allowing correlation of heme content with activity. This requires the absolute heme concentration and an accurate protein concentration. Another use is to determine the extinction coefficients of a heme-bound protein. This assay is fast, easy, and reproducible if done correctly. PMID:27390766

  8. EPR of Mononuclear Non-Heme Iron Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    Flexible geometry of three- to six-protein side-chain ligands to non-heme iron in proteins is the basis for widely diverse reactivites ranging from iron transport to redox chemistry. The gap between fixed states determined by x-ray analysis can be filled by spectroscopic study of trapped intermediates. EPR is a versatile and relatively quick approach to defining intermediate states in terms of the geometry and electronic structures of iron. A number of examples in which the iron chemistry of non-heme proteins is understood through x-ray structures at subbond length resolution, refined calculations, and spectroscopy exist now. Some examples in which EPR has provided unique insight are summarized in Table 1. Assignment and quantitative evaluation of the EPR resonances in ferric, non-heme iron sites is the focus of the first section of this review. An earlier chapter in this series provides more background on the theory specific to EPR of S = 5/2 metal ions [1]. Besides EPR spectra of ferric mononuclear sites, EPR of ferrous iron coupled to a spin 1/2 radical, as it pertains to the categories mononuclear and non-heme, will also be covered, in the second half of this chapter. Examples include the quinone-ferrous interactions in photosynthetic reaction centers and nitric oxide complexes with non-heme ferrous iron. Other recent reviews of the biochemistry and spectroscopy of non-heme iron proteins provide additional background [2-6]. PMID:20428459

  9. Metal ion facilitated dissociation of heme from b-type heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Mauk, Marcia R; Rosell, Federico I; Mauk, A Grant

    2009-11-25

    Addition of Ni(2+), Cu(2+), or Zn(2+) (10-40 equiv) to metMb in sodium bicarbonate buffer (25 degrees C) at alkaline pH (7.8-9.5) results in a time-dependent (2-6 h) change in the electronic absorption spectrum of the protein that is consistent with dissociation of the heme from the active site and that can be largely reversed by addition of EDTA. Similar treatment of cytochrome b(5), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and cytochrome P450(cam) (in the presence or absence of camphor) produces a similar spectroscopic response. Elution of metMb treated with Ni(2+) in this manner over an anion exchange column in buffer containing Ni(2+) affords apo-myoglobin without exposure to acidic pH or organic solvents as usually required. Bovine liver catalase, in which the heme groups are remote from the surface of the protein, and horseradish peroxidase, which has four disulfide bonds and just three histidyl residues, exhibit a much smaller spectroscopic response. We propose that formation of carbamino groups by reaction of bicarbonate with protein amino groups promotes both protein solubility and the interaction of the protein with metal ions, thereby avoiding precipitation while destabilizing the interaction of heme with the protein. From these observations, bicarbonate buffers may be of value in the study of nonmembrane proteins of limited solubility. PMID:19874033

  10. Acerogenin A from Acer nikoense Maxim Prevents Oxidative Stress-Induced Neuronal Cell Death through Nrf2-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mouse Hippocampal HT22 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Woo, Je-Tae; Kim, Youn-Chul; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative cell damage contributes to neuronal degeneration in many central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and ischemia. Inducible heme oxygenase (HO)-1 acts against oxidants that are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. The stem bark of Acer nikoense Maxim (Aceraceae) is indigenous to Japan; it has been used in folk medicine as a treatment of hepatic disorders and eye diseases. Acerogenin A, a natural compound isolated from Japanese folk medicine A. nikoense, showed neuroprotective effects and reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity by inducing the expression of HO-1 in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Furthermore, acerogenin A caused the nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrated that acerogenin A effectively prevents glutamate-induced oxidative damage, and HO-1 induction via PI3K/Akt and Nrf2 pathways appears to play a key role in the protection of HT22 cells. Therefore, this study implies that the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway represents a biological target and that acerogenin A might be a candidate for the prevention of neurodegeneration.

  11. Protein oxidation mediated by heme-induced active site conversion specific for heme-regulated transcription factor, iron response regulator

    PubMed Central

    Kitatsuji, Chihiro; Izumi, Kozue; Nambu, Shusuke; Kurogochi, Masaki; Uchida, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro; O’Brian, Mark R.; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum transcriptional regulator Irr (iron response regulator) is a key regulator of the iron homeostasis, which is degraded in response to heme binding via a mechanism that involves oxidative modification of the protein. Here, we show that heme-bound Irr activates O2 to form highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the “active site conversion” from heme iron to non-heme iron to degrade itself. In the presence of heme and reductant, the ROS scavenging experiments show that Irr generates H2O2 from O2 as found for other hemoproteins, but H2O2 is less effective in oxidizing the peptide, and further activation of H2O2 is suggested. Interestingly, we find a time-dependent decrease of the intensity of the Soret band and appearance of the characteristic EPR signal at g = 4.3 during the oxidation, showing the heme degradation and the successive formation of a non-heme iron site. Together with the mutational studies, we here propose a novel “two-step self-oxidative modification” mechanism, during which O2 is activated to form H2O2 at the heme regulatory motif (HRM) site and the generated H2O2 is further converted into more reactive species such as ·OH at the non-heme iron site in the His-cluster region formed by the active site conversion. PMID:26729068

  12. Protein oxidative damage and heme oxygenase in sunlight-exposed human skin: roles of MAPK responses to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Emiko; Takekoshi, Susumu; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Toriumi, Kentarou; Ikoma, Norihiro; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Tamiya, Shiho; Matsuyama, Takashi; Ozawa, Akira

    2010-12-20

    Oxidative stress derived from ultraviolet (UV) light in sunlight induces different hazardous effects in the skin, including sunburn, photo-aging and DNA mutagenesis. In this study, the protein-bound lipid peroxidation products 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and the oxidative DNA damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) were investigated in chronically sun-exposed and sun-protected human skins using immunohistochemistry. The levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as heme oxygenase 1 and 2, Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase, were also examined. Oxidative stress is also implicated in the activation of signal transduction pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Therefore, the expression and distribution of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, phosphorylated Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were observed. Skin specimens were obtained from the surgical margins. Chronically sunlight-exposed skin samples were taken from the ante-auricular (n = 10) and sunlight-protected skin samples were taken from the post-auricular (n = 10). HNE was increased in the chronically sunlight-exposed skin but not in the sunlight-protected skin. The expression of heme oxygenase-2 was markedly increased in the sunlight-exposed skin compared with the sun-protected skin. In contrast, the intensity of immunostaining of Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase was not different between the two areas. Phosphorylated p38 MAPK and phosphorylated JNK accumulated in the ante-auricular dermis and epidermis, respectively. These data show that particular anti-oxidative enzymes function as protective factors in chronically sunlight-exposed human skin. Taken together, our results suggest (1) antioxidative effects of heme oxygenase-2 in chronically sunlight-exposed human skin, and that (2) activation of p38 MAPK may be responsible for oxidative stress.

  13. The Synthetic Analogs of Oxygen-Binding Heme Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suslick, Kenneth S.; Reinert, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses model studies aimed at elucidating various ways in which molecular oxygen interacts with metalloproteins. The focus is on the chemistry of iron(II) porphyrins and their adducts with nitrogenous bases, carbon monoxide, and dioxygen, which are most relevant to the functional proteries of the heme proteins, hemoglobin, and myoglobin. (JN)

  14. Fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase is a heme protein.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Y; Matsui, K; Kajiwara, T; Hatanaka, A

    1995-02-01

    Fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase (HPO lyase) is an enzyme that cleaves hydroperoxides of polyunsaturated fatty acids to form short chain aldehydes and omega-oxoacids. Spectrophotometric analyses of HPO lyase highly purified from green bell pepper fruits indicate that it is a heme protein. The heme species was revealed to be heme b (protoheme IX) from the absorption spectrum of the pyridine hemochromogen. Although the spectrum highly resembles that of a plant cytochrome P450, allene oxide synthase from flaxseed, CO treatment of the enzyme caused no appearance of a peak at 450 nm, which is an essential diagnostic feature of a cytochrome P450. Internal amino acid sequences determined with peptide fragments obtained from the lyase showed no homology with any reported sequences.

  15. A novel tyrosine-heme C−O covalent linkage in F43Y myoglobin: a new post-translational modification of heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dao-Jing; Li, Wei; Xiang, Yu; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2015-01-01

    Heme post-translational modification plays a key role in tuning the structure and function of heme proteins. We herein report a novel tyrosine-heme covalent C−O bond in an artificially produced sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) mutant, F43Y Mb, which formed spontaneously in vivo between the Tyr43 hydroxy group and the heme 4-vinyl group. This highlights the diverse chemistry of heme post-translational modifications, and lays groundwork for further investigation of the structural and functional diversity of covalently-bound heme proteins. PMID:25392956

  16. A novel tyrosine-heme C−O covalent linkage in F43Y myoglobin: a new post-translational modification of heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dao-Jing; Li, Wei; Xiang, Yu; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2015-01-01

    Heme post-translational modification plays a key role in tuning the structure and function of heme proteins. We herein report a novel tyrosine-heme covalent C−O bond in an artificially produced sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) mutant, F43Y Mb, which formed spontaneously in vivo between the Tyr43 hydroxy group and the heme 4-vinyl group. This highlights the diverse chemistry of heme post-translational modifications, and lays groundwork for further investigation of the structural and functional diversity of covalently-bound heme proteins.

  17. The Role of Heme Chirality in the Circular Dichroism of Heme Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, Robert W.; Pescitelli, Gennaro

    2014-07-01

    The rotational strength (R) of the Soret transition in sperm-whale myoglobin (SW Mb), the hemoglobin from Chironomus thummi thummi (CTT Hb), and human hemoglobin (hHb) has been calculated using 20 high-resolution (< 1:5 Å) crystal structures. The intrinsic rotational strength due to heme non-planarity was calculated using π-electron theory and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Calculations on model protoporphyrins with a planar nucleus and with various torsional angles for the 2- and 4-vinyl substituents showed maximum R of ±0.70 Debye-Bohr magneton (1 DBM = 0.9273 · 10-38 cgs units). Viewing the heme so that the 2- and 4-vinyls are in a counterclockwise relationship, if a vinyl points toward the viewer, it contributes positively to R. Calculations of the intrinsic R for explicit heme geometries of SW Mb, CTT Hb, and hHb gave averages of 0.40±0.09, ±0:44±0.04, and +0.32±0.11 DBM, respectively. Coupling of the Soret transition with aromatic side-chain and peptide backbone transitions was also considered. For SW Mb, the magnitudes of the contributions decreased in the order Rint > Raro > Rpep. For CTT Hb and hHB, the orders were, respectively, Rint > Rpep > Raro and Rint > Raro ≈ Rpep. Human Hb ɑ chains showed the same trend as CTT Hb. Only in the hHb β chains did Raro predominate, with the order Raro > Rint > Rpep. The total predicted Rtot for SW Mb, CTT Hb, and hHb averaged +0.77±0.10 (0.56 - 0.80), -0.37±0.12 (-0.5), and +0.31±0.17 DBM (0.23 - 0.50), respectively. (Values in parentheses are experimental values.) Thus, contrary to the currently accepted view, coupling with aromatic side-chain or peptide transitions is not the dominant factor in the Soret circular dichroism (CD) of these proteins. The Soret CD is dominated by intrinsic CD of the heme chromophore, of which vinyl torsion is the major determinant. This result suggests an explanation for the large effect of heme isomerism on the Soret CD of Mb and Hb. Rotation about the

  18. Heme-Oxygenases during Erythropoiesis in K562 and Human Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Liliane R.; Costa, Elaine S.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara L.; Teodosio, Cristina; Bárcena, Paloma; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Orfao, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, heme can be degraded by heme-oxygenases (HO). Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is known to be the heme inducible isoform, whereas heme-oxygenase 2 (HO-2) is the constitutive enzyme. Here we investigated the presence of HO during erythroid differentiation in human bone marrow erythroid precursors and K562 cells. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were below limits of detection in K562 cells. Moreover, heme was unable to induce HO-1, at the protein and mRNA profiles. Surprisingly, HO-2 expression was inhibited upon incubation with heme. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these findings, we analyzed HO expression during normal erythropoiesis in human bone marrow. Erythroid precursors were characterized by lack of significant expression of HO-1 and by progressive reduction of HO-2 during differentiation. FLVCR expression, a recently described heme exporter found in erythroid precursors, was also analyzed. Interestingly, the disruption in the HO detoxification system was accompanied by a transient induction of FLVCR. It will be interesting to verify if the inhibition of HO expression, that we found, is preventing a futile cycle of concomitant heme synthesis and catabolism. We believe that a significant feature of erythropoiesis could be the replacement of heme breakdown by heme exportation, as a mechanism to prevent heme toxicity. PMID:21765894

  19. Heme, iron, and the mitochondrial decay of ageing.

    PubMed

    Atamna, Hani

    2004-07-01

    Heme, the major functional form of iron, is synthesized in the mitochondria. Although disturbed heme metabolism causes mitochondrial decay, oxidative stress, and iron accumulation, all of which are hallmarks of ageing, heme has been little studied in nutritional deficiency, in ageing, or age-related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Biosynthesis of heme requires Vitamin B(6), riboflavin, biotin, pantothenic acid, and lipoic acid and the minerals zinc, iron, and copper, micronutrients are essential for the production of succinyl-CoA, the precursor for porphyrins, by the TCA (Krebs) cycle. Only a small fraction of the porphyrins synthesized from succinyl-CoA are converted to heme, the rest are excreted out of the body together with the degradation products of heme (e.g. bilirubin). Therefore, the heme biosynthetic pathway causes a net loss of succinyl-CoA from the TCA cycle. The mitochondrial pool of succinyl-CoA may limit heme biosynthesis in deficiencies for micronutrients (e.g. iron or biotin deficiency). Ageing and AD are also associated with hypometabolism, increase in heme oxygenase-1, loss of complex IV, and iron accumulation. Heme is a common denominator for all these changes, suggesting that heme metabolism maybe altered in age-related disorders. Heme can also be a prooxidant: it converts less reactive oxidants to highly reactive free radicals. Free heme has high affinity for different cell structures (protein, membranes, and DNA), triggering site-directed oxidative damage. This review discusses heme metabolism as related to metabolic changes seen in ageing and age-related disorders and highlights the possible role in iron deficiency.

  20. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption.

  1. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  2. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  3. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  4. Porphyrin-induced photodynamic cross-linking of hepatic heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S H; Holeman, B; Cully, B C; Muller-Eberhard, U

    1986-01-27

    Three types of hepatic proteins, a heme-binding Z protein, a mixture of the glutathione S-transferases and a cytochrome P450 isozyme, were shown to be susceptible to photodynamic cross-linking and loss in antigenicity by naturally occurring porphyrins. At 50 microM, uroporphyrin caused the most and protoporphyrin the least photodecomposition. Hemopexin, a specific serum heme carrier, was photodecomposed but no cross-linking was detected. Heme and scavengers of singlet oxygen partially prevented protein photodecomposition.

  5. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (p<0.05). Study 2: the bioavailability from heme alone (10.3%) was reduced (p<0.05) when it was blended with fish (7.1%) and chicken (4.9%), however it was unaffected by beef. Study 3: casein, collagen, and albumin did not affect the bioavailability of Fe. Proteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption.

  6. Efficient and selective isotopic labeling of hemes to facilitate the study of multiheme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, Bruno M.; Tien, Ming; Rivera, Mario; Shi, Liang; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2012-04-02

    Specific isotopic labeling of hemes provides a unique opportunity to characterize the structure and function of heme-proteins. Unfortunately, present day methods do not allow efficient labeling in high yields of multiheme cytochromes c, which are of great biotechnological interest. Here, a method for production of recombinant multiheme cytochromes c in Escherichia coli with isotopically labeled hemes is reported. A small tetraheme cytochrome of 12 kDa from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to demonstrate the method, achieving a production of 4 mg of pure protein per liter. This method achieves, in a single step, efficient expression and incorporation of hemes isotopically labeled in specific atom positions adequate for spectroscopic characterization of these complex heme proteins. It is, furthermore, of general application to heme proteins opening new possibilities in the characterization of this important class of proteins.

  7. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Josefina; Barisón, María Julia; Pral, Elizabeth M. F.; Silber, Ariel M.; Cricco, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite’s replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE) with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport), which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi. PMID:26752206

  8. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake.

    PubMed

    Merli, Marcelo L; Pagura, Lucas; Hernández, Josefina; Barisón, María Julia; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Silber, Ariel M; Cricco, Julia A

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite's replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE) with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport), which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi. PMID:26752206

  9. Multicopper manganese oxidase accessory proteins bind Cu and heme.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tao, Lizhi; Chacón, Kelly N; Spiro, Thomas G; Blackburn, Ninian J; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M

    2015-12-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) catalyze the oxidation of a diverse group of metal ions and organic substrates by successive single-electron transfers to O2 via four bound Cu ions. MnxG, which catalyzes MnO2 mineralization by oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III), is unique among multicopper oxidases in that it carries out two energetically distinct electron transfers and is tightly bound to accessory proteins. There are two of these, MnxE and MnxF, both approximately 12kDa. Although their sequences are similar to those found in the genomes of several Mn-oxidizing Bacillus species, they are dissimilar to those of proteins with known function. Here, MnxE and MnxF are co-expressed independent of MnxG and are found to oligomerize into a higher order stoichiometry, likely a hexamer. They bind copper and heme, which have been characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry. Cu is found in two distinct type 2 (T2) copper centers, one of which appears to be novel; heme is bound as a low-spin species, implying coordination by two axial ligands. MnxE and MnxF do not oxidize Mn in the absence of MnxG and are the first accessory proteins to be required by an MCO. This may indicate that Cu and heme play roles in electron transfer and/or Cu trafficking.

  10. Time-Resolved X-Ray Crystallography of Heme Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srajer, Vukica; Royer, Jr., William E.

    2008-04-29

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third-generation synchrotrons provide 100-ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have recently permitted observing for the first time allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin.

  11. Time-resolved x-ray crystallography of heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Royer, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third generation synchrotrons provide 100ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have permitted observing allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin. PMID:18433638

  12. Protein Machineries Involved in the Attachment of Heme to Cytochrome c: Protein Structures and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes c (Cyt c) are ubiquitous heme-containing proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer processes, whose structure and functions have been and still are intensely studied. Surprisingly, our understanding of the molecular mechanism whereby the heme group is covalently attached to the apoprotein (apoCyt) in the cell is still largely unknown. This posttranslational process, known as Cyt c biogenesis or Cyt c maturation, ensures the stereospecific formation of the thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the cysteine thiols of the apoCyt heme binding motif. To accomplish this task, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved distinctive protein machineries composed of different proteins. In this review, the structural and functional properties of the main maturation apparatuses found in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells will be presented, dissecting the Cyt c maturation process into three functional steps: (i) heme translocation and delivery, (ii) apoCyt thioreductive pathway, and (iii) apoCyt chaperoning and heme ligation. Moreover, current hypotheses and open questions about the molecular mechanisms of each of the three steps will be discussed, with special attention to System I, the maturation apparatus found in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24455431

  13. Resilience of the Iron Environment in Heme Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Bogdan M.; Zhang, Yong; Bu, Lintao; Straub, John E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Sage, J. Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Conformational flexibility is essential to the functional behavior of proteins. We use an effective force constant introduced by Zaccai, the resilience, to quantify this flexibility. Site-selective experimental and computational methods allow us to determine the resilience of heme protein active sites. The vibrational density of states of the heme Fe determined using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy provides a direct experimental measure of the resilience of the Fe environment, which we compare quantitatively with values derived from the temperature dependence of atomic mean-squared displacements in molecular dynamics simulations. Vibrational normal modes in the THz frequency range dominate the resilience. Both experimental and computational methods find a higher resilience for cytochrome c than for myoglobin, which we attribute to the increased number of covalent links to the peptide in the former protein. For myoglobin, the resilience of the iron environment is larger than the average resilience previously determined for hydrogen sites using neutron scattering. Experimental results suggest a slightly reduced resilience for cytochrome c upon oxidation, although the change is smaller than reported in previous Mössbauer investigations on a bacterial cytochrome c, and is not reproduced by the simulations. Oxidation state also has no significant influence on the compressibility calculated for cyt c, although a slightly larger compressibility is predicted for myoglobin. PMID:18835904

  14. Protein/Protein Interactions in the Mammalian Heme Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Andrea L. M.; Bagai, Ireena; Becker, Donald F.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the O2-dependent degradation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and iron with electrons delivered from NADPH via cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Biliverdin reductase (BVR) then catalyzes conversion of biliverdin to bilirubin. We describe mutagenesis combined with kinetic, spectroscopic (fluorescence and NMR), surface plasmon resonance, cross-linking, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation studies aimed at evaluating interactions of HO-2 with CPR and BVR. Based on these results, we propose a model in which HO-2 and CPR form a dynamic ensemble of complex(es) that precede formation of the productive electron transfer complex. The 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2 reveals specific residues, including Leu-201, near the heme face of HO-2 that are affected by the addition of CPR, implicating these residues at the HO/CPR interface. Alanine substitutions at HO-2 residues Leu-201 and Lys-169 cause a respective 3- and 22-fold increase in Km values for CPR, consistent with a role for these residues in CPR binding. Sedimentation velocity experiments confirm the transient nature of the HO-2·CPR complex (Kd = 15.1 μm). Our results also indicate that HO-2 and BVR form a very weak complex that is only captured by cross-linking. For example, under conditions where CPR affects the 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2, BVR has no effect. Fluorescence quenching experiments also suggest that BVR binds HO-2 weakly, if at all, and that the previously reported high affinity of BVR for HO is artifactual, resulting from the effects of free heme (dissociated from HO) on BVR fluorescence. PMID:25196843

  15. Kinetics of nitric oxide dissociation from five- and six-coordinate nitrosyl hemes and heme proteins, including soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, V G; Sharma, V S; Magde, D; Koesling, D

    1997-06-01

    Kinetics of NO dissociation were characterized for three five-coordinate systems, heme-NO, HSA-heme-NO (human serum albumin), GC-NO (soluble guanylate cyclase), and for the six-coordinate system, Im-heme-NO. Nitrosyl myoglobin was redetermined for comparison. Previously known, six-coordinate R and T state nitrosyl hemoglobins are also included in the comparison. The data indicate that NO dissociates more than 1000 times faster from five-coordinate model heme than it does from the six-coordinate analog. Such a negative trans-effect between NO and a proximal base is in sharp contrast to carboxy heme derivatives, in which ligand dissociation rates are greatly slowed in when a trans base is present. As a result of opposite trans-effects, six-coordinate carboxy and nitrosyl derivatives have comparable dissociation rates, even though the five-coordinate species are very different. In proteins, five- and six-coordinate forms do not show a large difference in dissociation rates. Part of the reason may be due to different probabilities for geminate recombination in the different proteins, but this cannot explain all the facts. There must also be influences of the protein structure on bond-breaking rate constants themselves. With the exception of hemoglobin in the T state, nitrosyl guanylate cyclase shows the highest NO dissociation rate constant, k(obs) = 6 x 10(-4) s(-1). This would yield a half-life of about 2 min at 37 degrees C for dissociation of NO from GC-NO, a number that has implications for the mechanism of regulation of the activity of this key heme enzyme.

  16. Holo- and apo-bound structures of bacterial periplasmic heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ho, Winny W; Li, Huiying; Eakanunkul, Suntara; Tong, Yong; Wilks, Angela; Guo, Maolin; Poulos, Thomas L

    2007-12-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an "in" position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an "out" orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg(228) in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg(228), and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B(12)-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B(12), compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  17. The lipocalin alpha1-microglobulin protects erythroid K562 cells against oxidative damage induced by heme and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Magnus G; Olofsson, Tor; Tapper, Hans; Akerstrom, Bo

    2008-08-01

    Alpha(1)-microglobulin is a 26 kDa plasma and tissue glycoprotein that belongs to the lipocalin protein superfamily. Recent reports show that it is a reductase and radical scavenger and that it binds heme and has heme-degrading properties. This study has investigated the protective effects of alpha(1)-microglobulin against oxidation by heme and reactive oxygen species in the human erythroid cell line, K562. The results show that alpha(1)-microglobulin prevents intracellular oxidation and up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 induced by heme, hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction-generated hydroxyl radicals in the culture medium. It also reduces the cytosol of non-oxidized cells. Endogeneous expression of alpha(1)-microglobulin was up-regulated by these oxidants and silencing of the alpha(1)-microglobulin expression increased the cytosol oxidation. alpha(1)-microglobulin also inhibited cell death caused by heme and cleared cells from bound heme. Binding of heme to alpha(1)-microglobulin increased the radical reductase activity of the protein as compared to the apo-protein. Finally, alpha(1)-microglobulin was localized mainly at the cell surface both when administered exogeneously and in non-treated cells. The results suggest that alpha(1)-microglobulin is involved in the defence against oxidative cellular injury caused by haemoglobin and heme and that the protein may employ both heme-scavenging and one-electron reduction of radicals to achieve this.

  18. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells. PMID:27547752

  19. Electrochemistry and electrocatalysis with heme proteins in chitosan biopolymer films.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Hu, Naifei; Zeng, Yonghuai; Zhou, Gu

    2002-09-01

    Protein-chitosan (CS) films were made by casting a solution of proteins and CS on pyrolytic graphite electrodes. Myoglobin (Mb), hemoglobin (Hb), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) incorporated in CS films gave a pair of stable, well-defined, and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks at about -0.33V vs saturated calomel electrode in pH 7 buffers, respectively, while catalase (Ct) in CS films showed a peak pair at about -0.46V which was not stable. All these peaks are located at the potentials characteristic of heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couples of the proteins. The electrochemical parameters such as formal potentials (E degrees (')) and apparent heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constants (k(s)) were estimated by square-wave voltammetry with nonlinear regression analysis. Chitosan films contained considerable water and formed hydrogel in aqueous solution. Positions of the Soret absorbance band suggest that Mb and Hb in CS films keep their secondary structure similar to the native states in the medium pH range, while HRP and Ct retain their native conformation at least in the dry CS films. Scanning electron microscopy of the films demonstrated that interaction between the proteins and CS would make the morphology of dry protein-CS films very different from the CS films alone. Oxygen, trichloroacetic acid, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide were catalytically reduced by all four proteins in CS films. PMID:12234475

  20. Co-expression of ferrochelatase allows for complete heme incorporation into recombinant proteins produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Kabir, Mariam; Airola, Michael V.; Patel, Bhumit A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Dennis L.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Over-expression of heme binding proteins in E. coli often results in sub-optimal heme incorporation and the amount of heme-bound protein produced usually varies with the protein of interest. Complete heme incorporation is important for biochemical characterization, spectroscopy, structural studies, and for the production of homogeneous commercial proteins with high activity. We have determined that recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli often contain less than a full complement of heme because they rather are partially incorporated with free-base porphyrin. Porphyrin-incorporated proteins have similar spectral characteristics as the desired heme-loaded targets, and thus are difficult to detect, even in purified samples. We present a straightforward and inexpensive solution to this problem that involves the co-expression of native ferrochelatase with the protein of interest. The method is shown to be effective for proteins that contain either Cys- or His- ligated hemes. PMID:20303407

  1. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  2. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  3. Ferroportin expression in haem oxygenase 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Starzyński, Rafał R; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Willemetz, Alexandra; Styś, Agnieszka; Bierła, Joanna; Pietrzak, Piotr; Dziaman, Tomasz; Lipiński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    HO1 (haem oxygenase 1) and Fpn (ferroportin) are key proteins for iron recycling from senescent red blood cells and therefore play a major role in controlling the bioavailability of iron for erythropoiesis. Although important aspects of iron metabolism in HO1-deficient (Hmox1-/-) mice have already been revealed, little is known about the regulation of Fpn expression and its role in HO1 deficiency. In the present study, we characterize the cellular and systemic factors influencing Fpn expression in Hmox1-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages and in the liver and kidney of Hmox1-/- mice. In Hmox1-/- macrophages, Fpn protein was relatively highly expressed under high levels of hepcidin in culture medium. Similarly, despite high hepatic hepcidin expression, Fpn is still detected in Kupffer cells and is also markedly enhanced at the basolateral membrane of the renal tubules of Hmox1-/- mice. Through the activity of highly expressed Fpn, epithelial cells of the renal tubules probably take over the function of impaired system of tissue macrophages in recycling iron accumulated in the kidney. Moreover, although we have found increased expression of FLVCR (feline leukaemia virus subgroup C receptor), a haem exporter, in the kidneys of Hmox1-/- mice, haem level was increased in these organs. Furthermore, we show that iron/haem-mediated toxicity are responsible for renal injury documented in the kidneys of Hmox1-/- mice.

  4. A Soret marker band for four-coordinate ferric heme proteins from absorption spectra of isolated Fe(III)-Heme+ and Fe(III)-Heme+(His) ions in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Lykkegaard, Morten Køcks; Ehlerding, Anneli; Hvelplund, Preben; Kadhane, Umesh; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Panja, Subhasis; Wyer, Jean Ann; Zettergren, Henning

    2008-09-10

    In this work, we report the absorption spectra in the Soret band region of isolated Fe(III)-heme+ and Fe(III)-heme+(His) ions in vacuo from action spectroscopy. Fe(III)-heme+ refers to iron(III) coordinated by the dianion of protoporphyrin IX. We find that the absorption of the five-coordinate complex is similar to that of pentacoordinate metmyoglobin variants with hydrophobic binding pockets except for an overall blueshift of about 16 nm. In the case of four-coordinate iron(III), the Soret band is similar to that of five-coordinate iron(III) but much narrower. These spectra serve as a benchmark for theoretical modeling and also serve to identify the coordination state of ferric heme proteins. To our knowledge this is the first unequivocal spectroscopic characterization of isolated 4c ferric heme in the gas phase. PMID:18700762

  5. The Fowler syndrome-associated protein FLVCR2 is an importer of heme.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Simon P; Shing, Jennifer; Saraon, Punit; Berger, Lloyd C; Eiden, Maribeth V; Wilde, Andrew; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2010-11-01

    Mutations in FLVCR2, a cell surface protein related by homology and membrane topology to the heme exporter/retroviral receptor FLVCR1, have recently been associated with Fowler syndrome, a vascular disorder of the brain. We previously identified FLVCR2 to function as a receptor for FY981 feline leukemia virus (FeLV). However, the cellular function of FLVCR2 remains unresolved. Here, we report the cellular function of FLVCR2 as an importer of heme, based on the following observations. First, FLVCR2 binds to hemin-conjugated agarose, and binding is competed by free hemin. Second, mammalian cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing FLVCR2 display enhanced heme uptake. Third, heme import is reduced after the expression of FLVCR2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) or after the binding of the FY981 FeLV envelope protein to the FLVCR2 receptor. Finally, cells overexpressing FLVCR2 are more sensitive to heme toxicity, a finding most likely attributable to enhanced heme uptake. Tissue expression analysis indicates that FLVCR2 is expressed in a broad range of human tissues, including liver, placenta, brain, and kidney. The identification of a cellular function for FLVCR2 will have important implications in elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms of Fowler syndrome and of phenotypically associated disorders.

  6. A mononuclear non-heme-iron dioxygen-carrying protein?

    PubMed

    Attia, Amr A A; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-09-01

    The ability of mononuclear non-heme iron complexes to function as molecular oxygen transporters is investigated by density functional theory. The factors governing the efficiency of the reversible binding of dioxygen at the active site of the dinuclear non-heme iron enzyme hemerythrin, including antiferromagnetic coupling and the conversion of dioxygen to hydroperoxo by a proton coupled 2-electron transfer mechanism, are revisited and considered as possible tools in mononuclear non-heme complexes. Several mononuclear non-heme model complexes, including active sites of enzymes already known to interact with dioxgenic ligands, are constructed and the molecular oxygen transportation capabilities of these complexes are examined computationally. The high-spin nature of the ground state of these complexes implies an intrinsic kinetic lability of the oxy structures, as also evident from potential energy surface calculations towards iron-dioxygen cleavage. Proton affinities as calibrated with reference compounds showed that these complexes are highly unlikely to undergo protonation to form hydroperoxo-like adducts. Mixed superoxo descriptions of the dissociated dioxygenic ligands in all complexes add to the overall conclusion that these model structures are significantly disadvantaged in any attempt to be employed for molecular oxygen transportation. PMID:27607306

  7. Effect of the hinge protein on the heme iron site of cytochrome c sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.; Yencha, A.J.; Bunker, G.; Zhang, G.; Chance, B.; King, T.E. )

    1989-02-21

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies on cytochrome c{sub 1} from beef heart mitochondria were conducted to identify the effect of the hinge protein on the structure of the heme site in cytochrome c{sub 1}. A comparison of XAS data of highly purified one-band and two-band cytochrome c{sub 1} demonstrates that the hinge protein exerts a rather pronounced effect on the heme environment of the cytochrome c{sub 1}: a conformational change occurs within a radius of approximately 5 {angstrom} from the heme iron in cytochrome c{sub 1} when the hinge protein is bound to cytochrome c{sub 1}. This result may be correlated with the previous observations that the structure and reactivity of cytochrome c{sub 1} are affected by the hinge protein.

  8. Covalent attachment of heme to the protein moiety in an insect E75 nitric oxide sensor

    PubMed Central

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Valhondo-Falcón, Margarita; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.; Rodriguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    We have recombinantly expressed and purified the ligand binding domains (LBDs) of four insect nuclear receptors of the E75 family. The Drosophila melanogaster and Bombyx mori nuclear receptors were purified as ferric hemoproteins with Soret maxima at 424 nm, whereas their ferrous form had a Soret maximum at 425 nm that responds to ·NO and CO binding. In contrast, the purified LBD of Oncopeltus fasciatus displayed a Soret maximum at 415 nm for the ferric protein that shifted to 425 nm in its ferrous state. Binding of ·NO to the heme moiety of D. melanogaster and B. mori E75 LBD resulted in the appearance of a peak at 385 nm, whereas this peak appeared at 416 nm in the case of the O. fasciatus hemoprotein, resembling the behaviour displayed by its human homolog Rev-erbβ. HPLC analysis revealed that, unlike the D. melanogaster and B. mori counterparts, the heme group of O. fasciatus is covalently attached to the protein through the side-chains of two amino acids. The large sequence homology with O. fasciatus E75 led us to clone and express the LBD of Blattella germanica, which established that its spectral properties closely resemble those of O. fasciatus and that it also has the heme group covalently bound to the protein. Hence, ·NO/CO regulation of the transcriptional activity of these nuclear receptors might be differently controlled among various insect species. In addition, covalent heme binding provides strong evidence that at least some of these nuclear receptors function as diatomic gas sensors rather than heme sensors. Finally, our findings expand the classes of hemoproteins in which the heme group is normally covalently attached to the polypeptide chain. PMID:22946928

  9. Heme protein dynamics studied by phosphorescence of an external phosphorescent probe molecule.

    PubMed

    Beckham, S; Cook, M P; Karki, L; Luchsinger, M M; Whitlock, V R; Wu, Y; Zhang, Q; Schuh, M D

    1994-05-01

    The rate constant for quenching, kq, of the phosphorescence of 6-bromo-2-naphthyl sulfate (BNS) by cytochromes c, cytochrome c peroxidase, catalase, and myoglobin has been measured as a function of temperature and solvent viscosity. In aqueous solution at pH 7.0 for cytochromes c and myoglobin the value of kq is nearly equal to the rate constant for diffusional intermolecular contact, which is estimated from the value of kq for microperoxidase-11. For cytochrome c peroxidase and catalase kq is at least 350 times smaller than the rate of diffusional quenching, which shows that quenching of BNS phosphorescence occurs predominantly over the short distance between donor and acceptor. The mechanism for cytochrome c and myoglobin is found not to involve static quenching, deep penetration of BNS into the globin, or unfolding of the protein to allow contact between heme and BNS. It is concluded that quenching occurs by interaction of BNS with the exposed heme edge and by surface insertion of BNS into the protein to a depth sufficient for quenching by the unexposed heme. The effect of rapid-diffusional enhancement on kq is small. From a comparison of the results for the heme proteins, a model emerges that describes cytochrome c and myoglobin as having dynamic surfaces. Sufficient fluctuations persist to allow penetration of polyatomic probe molecules into the protein matrix, but the dynamics and/or interior microenvironment acts to increase resistance with increasing depth of penetration. PMID:8179330

  10. Isoelectric focusing and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of heme proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, R.G.; Gennis, R.B.

    1982-04-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), agarose electrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) were used to resolve the heme-containing proteins of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane after solubilization by Triton X-100. Two bands in IEF stained for heme with pI values of 4.7 and 5.3. One of the bands, with an isoelectric point of pH 5.3, was present only when the cells were grown to late log or stationary phase and possessed N,N,N,'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) oxidase activity. The pI 4.7 band was present in cells harvested in both mid-log and stationary phases. Agarose electrophoresis, using larger samples, revealed the same two components apparent by IEF, and, in addition, a third component. The heme-containing fractions were extracted after agarose electrophoresis and subjected to further study. The component which was present in cells grown to stationary phase contained hemes b, a/sub 1/, and d. The other two fractions contained only b heme. One of these corresponded to the component with pI 4.7 in IEF and had catalase activity. Antisera were raised against Triton X-100-solubilized cytoplasmic membranes and against the focused TMPD oxidase complex. With these anti-sera, CIE in the presence of Triton X-100 revealed four precipitin complexes containing heme. Three of these corresponded to the components identified by IEF and agarose electrophoresis. We demonstrate that the combined use of IEF and CIE is valuable for analysis of membrane proteins. In particular, this work represents a substantial initial step toward a structural elucidation of the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain.

  11. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Secreted Protein Rv0203 Transfers Heme to Membrane Proteins MmpL3 and MmpL11*

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Cedric P.; Chim, Nicholas; Graves, Amanda B.; Harmston, Christine A.; Iniguez, Angelina; Contreras, Heidi; Liptak, Matthew D.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis, which is becoming an increasingly global public health problem due to the rise of drug-resistant strains. While residing in the human host, M. tuberculosis needs to acquire iron for its survival. M. tuberculosis has two iron uptake mechanisms, one that utilizes non-heme iron and another that taps into the vast host heme-iron pool. To date, proteins known to be involved in mycobacterial heme uptake are Rv0203, MmpL3, and MmpL11. Whereas Rv0203 transports heme across the bacterial periplasm or scavenges heme from host heme proteins, MmpL3 and MmpL11 are thought to transport heme across the membrane. In this work, we characterize the heme-binding properties of the predicted extracellular soluble E1 domains of both MmpL3 and MmpL11 utilizing absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Rv0203 transfers heme to both MmpL3-E1 and MmpL11-E1 domains at a rate faster than passive heme dissociation from Rv0203. This work elucidates a key step in the mycobacterial uptake of heme, and it may be useful in the development of anti-tuberculosis drugs targeting this pathway. PMID:23760277

  12. Highly selective isolation and purification of heme proteins in biological samples using multifunctional magnetic nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Li, Yan; Wei, Yun

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic particles with suitable surface modification are capable of binding proteins selectively, and magnetic separations have advantages of rapidity, convenience, and high selectivity. In this paper, new magnetic nanoparticles modified with imidazolium ionic liquid (Fe3O4 @SiO2 @ILs) were successfully fabricated. N-Methylimidazolium was immobilized onto silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles via γ-chloropropyl modification as a magnetic nanoadsorbent for heme protein separation. The particle size was about 90 nm without significant aggregation during the preparation process. Hemoglobin as one of heme proteins used in this experiment was compared with other nonheme proteins. It has been found that the magnetic nanoparticles can be used for more rapid, efficient, and specific adsorption of hemoglobin with a binding capacity as high as 5.78 mg/mg. In comparison with other adsorption materials of proteins in the previous reports, Fe3 O4 @SiO2 @ILs magnetic nanoparticles exhibit the excellent performance in isolation of heme proteins with higher binding capacity and selectivity. In addition, a short separation time makes the functionalized nanoparticles suitable for purifying unstable proteins, as well as having other potential applications in a variety of biomedical fields.

  13. Axial ligand replacement mechanism in heme transfer from streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp to HtsA of the HtsABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yanchao; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Clubb, Robert T; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-17

    The heme-binding protein Shp of Group A Streptococcus rapidly transfers its heme to HtsA, the lipoprotein component of the HtsABC transporter, in a concerted two-step process with one kinetic phase. Heme axial residue-to-alanine replacement mutant proteins of Shp and HtsA (Shp(M66A), Shp(M153A), HtsA(M79A), and HtsA(H229A)) were used to probe the axial displacement mechanism of this heme transfer reaction. Ferric Shp(M66A) at high pH and Shp(M153A) have a pentacoordinate heme iron complex with a methionine axial ligand. ApoHtsA(M79A) efficiently acquires heme from ferric Shp but alters the reaction mechanism to two kinetic phases from a single phase in the wild-type protein reactions. In contrast, apoHtsA(H229A) cannot assimilate heme from ferric Shp. The conversion of pentacoordinate holoShp(M66A) into pentacoordinate holoHtsA(H229A) involves an intermediate, whereas holoHtsA(H229A) is directly formed from pentacoordinate holoShp(M153A). Conversely, apoHtsA(M79A) reacts with holoShp(M66A) and holoShp(M153A) in mechanisms with one and two kinetic phases, respectively. These results imply that the Met79 and His229 residues of HtsA displace the Met66 and Met153 residues of Shp, respectively. Structural docking analysis supports this mechanism of the specific axial residue displacement. Furthermore, the rates of the cleavage of the axial bond in Shp in the presence of a replacing HtsA axial residue are greater than that in the absence of a replacing HtsA axial residue. These findings reveal a novel heme transfer mechanism of the specific displacement of the Shp axial residues with the HtsA axial residues and the involvement of the HtsA axial residues in the displacement.

  14. Heme-bound SiaA from Streptococcus pyogenes: Effects of Mutations and Oxidation State on Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Akbas, Neval; Draganova, Elizabeth B.; Block, Darci R.; Sook, Brian R.; Chan, Yau Fong; Zhuo, Joy; Eichenbaum, Zehava; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Dixon, Dabney W.

    2016-01-01

    The protein SiaA (HtsA) is part of a heme uptake pathway in Streptococcus pyogenes. In this report, we present the heme binding of the alanine mutants of the axial histidine (H229A) and methionine (M79A) ligands, as well as a lysine (K61A) and cysteine (C58A) located near the heme propionates (based on homology modeling) and a control mutant (C47A). pH titrations gave pKa values ranging from 9.0 to 9.5, close to the value of 9.7 for WT SiaA. Resonance Raman spectra of the mutants suggested that the ferric heme environment may be distinct from the wild-type; spectra of the ferrous states were similar. The midpoint reduction potential of the K61A mutant was determined by spectroelectrochemical titration to be 61 ± 3 mV vs. SHE, similar to the wild-type protein (68 ± 3 mV). The addition of guanidine hydrochloride showed two processes for protein denaturation, consistent with heme loss from protein forms differing by the orientation of the heme in the binding pocket (the half-life for the slower process was one to three days). The ease of protein unfolding was related to the strength of interaction of the residues with the heme. We hypothesize that kinetically facile but only partial unfolding, followed by a very slow approach to the completely unfolded state, may be a fundamental attribute of heme trafficking proteins. Small motions to release/transfer the heme accompanied by resistance to extensive unfolding may preserve the three dimensional form of the protein for further uptake and release. PMID:26746808

  15. Heme-bound SiaA from Streptococcus pyogenes: Effects of mutations and oxidation state on protein stability.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Neval; Draganova, Elizabeth B; Block, Darci R; Sook, Brian R; Chan, Yau Fong; Zhuo, Joy; Eichenbaum, Zehava; Rodgers, Kenton R; Dixon, Dabney W

    2016-05-01

    The protein SiaA (HtsA) is part of a heme uptake pathway in Streptococcus pyogenes. In this report, we present the heme binding of the alanine mutants of the axial histidine (H229A) and methionine (M79A) ligands, as well as a lysine (K61A) and cysteine (C58A) located near the heme propionates (based on homology modeling) and a control mutant (C47A). pH titrations gave pKa values ranging from 9.0 to 9.5, close to the value of 9.7 for WT SiaA. Resonance Raman spectra of the mutants suggested that the ferric heme environment may be distinct from the wild-type; spectra of the ferrous states were similar. The midpoint reduction potential of the K61A mutant was determined by spectroelectrochemical titration to be 61±3mV vs. SHE, similar to the wild-type protein (68±3mV). The addition of guanidine hydrochloride showed two processes for protein denaturation, consistent with heme loss from protein forms differing by the orientation of the heme in the binding pocket (the half-life for the slower process ranged from less than half a day to two days). The ease of protein unfolding was related to the strength of interaction of the residues with the heme. We hypothesize that kinetically facile but only partial unfolding, followed by a very slow approach to the completely unfolded state, may be a fundamental attribute of heme trafficking proteins. Small motions to release/transfer the heme accompanied by resistance to extensive unfolding may preserve the three dimensional form of the protein for further uptake and release. PMID:26746808

  16. Fungal unspecific peroxygenases: heme-thiolate proteins that combine peroxidase and cytochrome p450 properties.

    PubMed

    Hofrichter, Martin; Kellner, Harald; Pecyna, Marek J; Ullrich, René

    2015-01-01

    Eleven years ago, a secreted heme-thiolate peroxidase with promiscuity for oxygen transfer reactions was discovered in the basidiomycetous fungus, Agrocybe aegerita. The enzyme turned out to be a functional mono-peroxygenase that transferred an oxygen atom from hydrogen peroxide to diverse organic substrates (aromatics, heterocycles, linear and cyclic alkanes/alkenes, fatty acids, etc.). Later similar enzymes were found in other mushroom genera such as Coprinellus and Marasmius. Approximately one thousand putative peroxygenase sequences that form two large clusters can be found in genetic databases and fungal genomes, indicating the widespread occurrence of such enzymes in the whole fungal kingdom including all phyla of true fungi (Eumycota) and certain fungus-like heterokonts (Oomycota). This new enzyme type was classified as unspecific peroxygenase (UPO, EC 1.11.2.1) and placed in a separate peroxidase subclass. Furthermore, UPOs and related heme-thiolate peroxidases such as well-studied chloroperoxidase (CPO) represent a separate superfamily of heme proteins on the phylogenetic level. The reactions catalyzed by UPOs include hydroxylation, epoxidation, O- and N-dealkylation, aromatization, sulfoxidation, N-oxygenation, dechlorination and halide oxidation. In many cases, the product patterns of UPOs resemble those of human cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases and, in fact, combine the catalytic cycle of heme peroxidases with the "peroxide shunt" of P450s. Here, an overview on UPOs is provided with focus on their molecular and catalytic properties.

  17. Mitochondrial Translocator Protein (TSPO) Function Is Not Essential for Heme Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Amy H; Tu, Lan N; Mukai, Chinatsu; Sirivelu, Madhu P; Pillai, Viju V; Morohaku, Kanako; Cohen, Roy; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-01-22

    Function of the mammalian translocator protein (TSPO; previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor) remains unclear because its presumed role in steroidogenesis and mitochondrial permeability transition established using pharmacological methods has been refuted in recent genetic studies. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is considered a conserved endogenous ligand for TSPO. In bacteria, TSPO was identified to regulate tetrapyrrole metabolism and chemical catalysis of PPIX in the presence of light, and in vertebrates, TSPO function has been linked to porphyrin transport and heme biosynthesis. Positive correlation between high TSPO expression in cancer cells and susceptibility to photodynamic therapy based on their increased ability to convert the precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to PPIX appeared to reinforce this mechanism. In this study, we used TSPO knock-out (Tspo(-/-)) mice, primary cells, and different tumor cell lines to examine the role of TSPO in erythropoiesis, heme levels, PPIX biosynthesis, phototoxic cell death, and mitochondrial bioenergetic homeostasis. In contrast to expectations, our results demonstrate that TSPO deficiency does not adversely affect erythropoiesis, heme biosynthesis, bioconversion of ALA to PPIX, and porphyrin-mediated phototoxic cell death. TSPO expression levels in cancer cells do not correlate with their ability to convert ALA to PPIX. In fibroblasts, we observed that TSPO deficiency decreased the oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) indicative of a cellular metabolic shift, without a negative impact on porphyrin biosynthetic capability. Based on these findings, we conclude that mammalian TSPO does not have a critical physiological function related to PPIX and heme biosynthesis.

  18. Lincomycin Biosynthesis Involves a Tyrosine Hydroxylating Heme Protein of an Unusual Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Jitka; Olsovska, Jana; Novak, Petr; Mojzes, Peter; Chaloupkova, Radka; Kamenik, Zdenek; Spizek, Jaroslav; Kutejova, Eva; Mareckova, Marketa; Tichy, Pavel; Damborsky, Jiri; Janata, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The gene lmbB2 of the lincomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces lincolnensis ATCC 25466 was shown to code for an unusual tyrosine hydroxylating enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of this clinically important antibiotic. LmbB2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified near to homogeneity and shown to convert tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In contrast to the well-known tyrosine hydroxylases (EC 1.14.16.2) and tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1), LmbB2 was identified as a heme protein. Mass spectrometry and Soret band-excited Raman spectroscopy of LmbB2 showed that LmbB2 contains heme b as prosthetic group. The CO-reduced differential absorption spectra of LmbB2 showed that the coordination of Fe was different from that of cytochrome P450 enzymes. LmbB2 exhibits sequence similarity to Orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which has recently been classified as a heme peroxidase. Tyrosine hydroxylating activity of LmbB2 yielding DOPA in the presence of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) was also observed. Reaction mechanism of this unique heme peroxidases family is discussed. Also, tyrosine hydroxylation was confirmed as the first step of the amino acid branch of the lincomycin biosynthesis. PMID:24324587

  19. Redox and redox-coupled processes of heme proteins and enzymes at electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Murgida, Daniel H; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2005-11-21

    Modern bioelectrochemical methods rely upon the immobilisation of redox proteins and enzymes on electrodes coated with biocompatible materials to prevent denaturation. However, even when protein denaturation is effectively avoided, heterogeneous protein electron transfer is often coupled to non-Faradaic processes like reorientation, conformational transitions or acid-base equilibria. Disentangling these processes requires methods capable of probing simultaneously the structure and reaction dynamics of the adsorbed species. Here we provide an overview of the recent developments in Raman and infrared surface-enhanced spectroelectrochemical techniques applied to the study of soluble and membrane bound redox heme proteins and enzymes. Possible biological implications of the findings are critically discussed.

  20. CO, NO and O2 as Vibrational Probes of Heme Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Thomas G; Soldatova, Alexandra V; Balakrishnan, Gurusamy

    2013-01-15

    The gaseous XO molecules (X = C, N or O) bind to the heme prosthetic group of heme proteins, and thereby activate or inhibit key biological processes. These events depend on interactions of the surrounding protein with the FeXO adduct, interactions that can be monitored via the frequencies of the Fe-X and X-O bond stretching modes, νFeX and νXO. The frequencies can be determined by vibrational spectroscopy, especially resonance Raman spectroscopy. Backbonding, the donation of Fe dπ electrons to the XO π* orbitals, is a major bonding feature in all the FeXO adducts. Variations in backbonding produce negative νFeX/νXO correlations, which can be used to gauge electrostatic and H-bonding effects in the protein binding pocket. Backbonding correlations have been established for all the FeXO adducts, using porphyrins with electron donating and withdrawing substituents. However the adducts differ in their response to variations in the nature of the axial ligand, and to specific distal interactions. These variations provide differing vantages for evaluating the nature of protein-heme interactions. We review experimental studies that explore these variations, and DFT computational studies that illuminate the underlying physical mechanisms. PMID:23471138

  1. CO, NO and O2 as Vibrational Probes of Heme Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Thomas G.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Balakrishnan, Gurusamy

    2012-01-01

    The gaseous XO molecules (X = C, N or O) bind to the heme prosthetic group of heme proteins, and thereby activate or inhibit key biological processes. These events depend on interactions of the surrounding protein with the FeXO adduct, interactions that can be monitored via the frequencies of the Fe-X and X-O bond stretching modes, νFeX and νXO. The frequencies can be determined by vibrational spectroscopy, especially resonance Raman spectroscopy. Backbonding, the donation of Fe dπ electrons to the XO π* orbitals, is a major bonding feature in all the FeXO adducts. Variations in backbonding produce negative νFeX/νXO correlations, which can be used to gauge electrostatic and H-bonding effects in the protein binding pocket. Backbonding correlations have been established for all the FeXO adducts, using porphyrins with electron donating and withdrawing substituents. However the adducts differ in their response to variations in the nature of the axial ligand, and to specific distal interactions. These variations provide differing vantages for evaluating the nature of protein-heme interactions. We review experimental studies that explore these variations, and DFT computational studies that illuminate the underlying physical mechanisms. PMID:23471138

  2. Evolution of the SOUL Heme-Binding Protein Superfamily Across Eukarya.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Sordino, Paolo; Andreakis, Nikos

    2016-06-01

    SOUL homologs constitute a heme-binding protein superfamily putatively involved in heme and tetrapyrrole metabolisms associated with a number of physiological processes. Despite their omnipresence across the tree of life and the biochemical characterization of many SOUL members, their functional role and the evolutionary events leading to such remarkable protein repertoire still remain cryptic. To explore SOUL evolution, we apply a computational phylogenetic approach, including a relevant number of SOUL homologs, to identify paralog forms and reconstruct their genealogy across the tree of life and within species. In animal lineages, multiple gene duplication or loss events and paralog functional specializations underlie SOUL evolution from the dawn of ancestral echinoderm and mollusc SOUL forms. In photosynthetic organisms, SOUL evolution is linked to the endosymbiosis events leading to plastid acquisition in eukaryotes. Derivative features, such as the F2L peptide and BH3 domain, evolved in vertebrates and provided innovative functionality to support immune response and apoptosis. The evolution of elements such as the N-terminal protein domain DUF2358, the His42 residue, or the tetrapyrrole heme-binding site is modern, and their functional implications still unresolved. This study represents the first in-depth analysis of SOUL protein evolution and provides novel insights in the understanding of their obscure physiological role. PMID:27209522

  3. Time-resolved Studies of IsdG Protein Identify Molecular Signposts along the Non-canonical Heme Oxygenase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Streit, Bennett R; Kant, Ravi; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Celis, Arianna I; Machovina, Melodie M; Skaar, Eric P; Bothner, Brian; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    IsdGs are heme monooxygenases that break open the tetrapyrrole, releasing the iron, and thereby allowing bacteria expressing this protein to use heme as a nutritional iron source. Little is currently known about the mechanism by which IsdGs degrade heme, although the products differ from those generated by canonical heme oxygenases. A synthesis of time-resolved techniques, including in proteo mass spectrometry and conventional and stopped-flow UV/visible spectroscopy, was used in conjunction with analytical methods to define the reaction steps mediated by IsdG from Staphylococcus aureus and their time scales. An apparent meso-hydroxyheme (forming with k = 0.6 min(-1), pH 7.4, 10 mm ascorbate, 10 μm IsdG-heme, 22 °C) was identified as a likely common intermediate with the canonical heme oxygenases. Unlike heme oxygenases, this intermediate does not form with added H2O2 nor does it convert to verdoheme and CO. Rather, the next observable intermediates (k = 0.16 min(-1)) were a set of formyloxobilin isomers, similar to the mycobilin products of the IsdG homolog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MhuD). These converted in separate fast and slow phases to β-/δ-staphylobilin isomers and formaldehyde (CH2O). Controlled release of this unusual C1 product may support IsdG's dual role as both an oxygenase and a sensor of heme availability in S. aureus. PMID:26534961

  4. Unique Structure and Stability of HmuY, a Novel Heme-Binding Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Guevara, Tibisay; Tallant, Cynthia; Olczak, Mariusz; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Solà, Maria; Olczak, Teresa; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Infection, survival, and proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in humans depend on their capacity to impair host responses and acquire nutrients in a hostile environment. Among such nutrients is heme, a co-factor for oxygen storage, electron transport, photosynthesis, and redox biochemistry, which is indispensable for life. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe periodontitis. It recruits heme through HmuY, which sequesters heme from host carriers and delivers it to its cognate outer-membrane transporter, the TonB-dependent receptor HmuR. Here we report that heme binding does not significantly affect the secondary structure of HmuY. The crystal structure of heme-bound HmuY reveals a new all-β fold mimicking a right hand. The thumb and fingers pinch heme iron through two apical histidine residues, giving rise to highly symmetric octahedral iron co-ordination. The tetrameric quaternary arrangement of the protein found in the crystal structure is consistent with experiments in solution. It shows that thumbs and fingertips, and, by extension, the bound heme groups, are shielded from competing heme-binding proteins from the host. This may also facilitate heme transport to HmuR for internalization. HmuY, both in its apo- and in its heme-bound forms, is resistant to proteolytic digestion by trypsin and the major secreted proteases of P. gingivalis, gingipains K and R. It is also stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. In conclusion, these studies reveal novel molecular properties of HmuY that are consistent with its role as a putative virulence factor during bacterial infection. PMID:19424422

  5. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Steer, David L; Bulach, Dieter M; Hiscox, Thomas J; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A Ian; Gell, David A; Rood, Julian I; Awad, Milena M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen. PMID:27637108

  6. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Jocelyn M.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Steer, David L.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A. Ian; Gell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen. PMID:27637108

  7. Ambidentate H-bonding of NO and O2 in Heme Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Thomas G.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.

    2012-01-01

    The affinity and reactivity of the gaseous molecules CO, NO and O2 (XO) in heme protein adducts are controlled by secondary interactions, especially by H-bonds donated from distal protein residues. Vibrational spectroscopy, supported by DFT modeling, has revealed that for NO and O2, but not for CO, a critical issue is whether the H-bond is donated to the outer or inner atom of the bound diatomic ligand. DFT modeling shows that bound NO and O2 are ambidentate, both atoms separately acting as H-bond acceptors. This is not the case for CO, whose π* orbital acts as a delocalized H-bond acceptor. Vibrational spectra of heme-XO adducts reveal a general pattern of backbonding variations, marked by families of negative correlations between frequencies associated with Fe-X and X-O bond stretches. For heme-CO adducts, H-bonding increases backbonding, the νFeX/νXO points moving up the backbonding correlation established with model compounds. For NO and O2 adducts, however, increased backbonding is only observed when the outer atom is the H-bond acceptor. H-bonding to the inner (X) atom instead produces a positive νFeX/νXO correlation. This effect can be reproduced by DFT modeling. Its mechanism is polarization of the sp2 orbital on the X atom, on the back side of the bent FeXO unit, drawing electrons from both the Fe-X and X-O bonds and weakening them together. Thus, the positioning of H-bond donors in the protein differentially affects bonding and reactivity in heme adducts of NO and O2. PMID:22824153

  8. Ambidentate H-bonding of NO and O2 in heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Thomas G; Soldatova, Alexandra V

    2012-10-01

    The affinity and reactivity of the gaseous molecules CO, NO and O(2) (XO) in heme protein adducts are controlled by secondary interactions, especially by H-bonds donated from distal protein residues. Vibrational spectroscopy, supported by DFT (Density Functional Theory) modeling, has revealed that for NO and O(2), but not for CO, a critical issue is whether the H-bond is donated to the outer or inner atom of the bound diatomic ligand. DFT modeling shows that bound NO and O(2) are ambidentate, both atoms separately acting as H-bond acceptors. This is not the case for CO, whose π* orbital acts as a delocalized H-bond acceptor. Vibrational spectra of heme-XO adducts reveal a general pattern of backbonding variations, marked by families of negative correlations between frequencies associated with FeX and XO bond stretches. For heme-CO adducts, H-bonding increases backbonding, the νFeX/νXO points moving up the backbonding correlation established with model compounds. For NO and O(2) adducts, however, increased backbonding is only observed when the outer atom is the H-bond acceptor. H-bonding to the inner (X) atom instead produces a positive νFeX/νXO correlation. This effect can be reproduced by DFT modeling. Its mechanism is polarization of the sp(2) orbital on the X atom, on the back side of the bent FeXO unit, drawing electrons from both the FeX and XO bonds and weakening them together. Thus, the positioning of H-bond donors in the protein differentially affects bonding and reactivity in heme adducts of NO and O(2). PMID:22824153

  9. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Steer, David L; Bulach, Dieter M; Hiscox, Thomas J; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A Ian; Gell, David A; Rood, Julian I; Awad, Milena M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen.

  10. Shr of Group A Streptococcus is a new type of composite NEAT protein involved in sequestering heme from methemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Mahamoudou; Cunha, Elizabeth Bentley; Li, Xueru; Huang, Ya-Shu; Dixon, Dabney; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A growing body of evidence suggests that surface or secreted proteins with NEAr Transporter (NEAT) domains play a central role in heme acquisition and trafficking across the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a β-hemolytic human pathogen, expresses a NEAT protein, Shr, which binds several hemoproteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Shr is a complex, membrane-anchored protein, with a unique N-terminal domain (NTD) and two NEAT domains separated by a central leucine-rich repeat region. In this study we have carried out an analysis of the functional domains in Shr. We show that Shr obtains heme in solution and furthermore reduces the heme iron; this is the first report of heme reduction by a NEAT protein. More specifically, we demonstrate that both of the constituent NEAT domains of Shr are responsible for binding heme, although they are missing a critical tyrosine residue found in the ligand-binding pocket of other heme-binding NEAT domains. Further investigations show that a previously undescribed region within the Shr NTD interacts with methemoglobin. Shr NEAT domains, however, do not contribute significantly to the binding of methemoglobin but mediate binding to the ECM components fibronectin and laminin. A protein fragment containing the NTD plus the first NEAT domain was found to be sufficient to sequester heme directly from methemoglobin. Correlating these in vitro findings to in vivo biological function, mutants analysis establishes the role of Shr in GAS growth with methemoglobin as a sole source of iron, and indicates that at least one NEAT domain is necessary for the utilization of methemoglobin. We suggest that Shr is the prototype of a new group of NEAT composite proteins involved in heme uptake found in pyogenic streptococci and Clostridium novyi. PMID:20807204

  11. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  12. Heme-independent Redox Sensing by the Heme-Nitric Oxide/Oxygen-binding Protein (H-NOX) from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadyay, Roma; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Schaub, Tanner; Yukl, Erik T

    2016-08-19

    Heme nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX)-binding proteins act as nitric oxide (NO) sensors among various bacterial species. In several cases, they act to mediate communal behavior such as biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and motility by influencing the activity of downstream signaling proteins such as histidine kinases (HisKa) in a NO-dependent manner. An H-NOX/HisKa regulatory circuit was recently identified in Vibrio cholerae, and the H-NOX protein has been spectroscopically characterized. However, the influence of the H-NOX protein on HisKa autophosphorylation has not been evaluated. This process may be important for persistence and pathogenicity in this organism. Here, we have expressed and purified the V. cholerae HisKa (HnoK) and H-NOX in its heme-bound (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Autophosphorylation assays of HnoK in the presence of H-NOX show that the holoprotein in the Fe(II)-NO and Fe(III) forms is a potent inhibitor of HnoK. Activity of the Fe(III) form and aerobic instability of the Fe(II) form suggested that Vibrio cholerae H-NOX may act as a sensor of the redox state as well as NO. Remarkably, the apoprotein also showed robust HnoK inhibition that was dependent on the oxidation of cysteine residues to form disulfide bonds at a highly conserved zinc site. The importance of cysteine in this process was confirmed by mutagenesis, which also showed that holo Fe(III), but not Fe(II)-NO, H-NOX relied heavily upon cysteine for activation. These results highlight a heme-independent mechanism for activation of V. cholerae H-NOX that implicates this protein as a dual redox/NO sensor.

  13. Decursin Isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai Rescues PC12 Cells from Amyloid β-Protein-Induced Neurotoxicity through Nrf2-Mediated Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1: Potential Roles of MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Du, Ji-kun; Zou, Li-yi; Wu, Tie; Lee, Yong-woo; Kim, Yong-ho

    2013-01-01

    Decursin (D), purified from Angelica gigas Nakai, has been proven to exert neuroprotective property. Previous study revealed that D reduced Aβ25‒35-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells. Our study explored the underlying mechanisms by which D mediates its therapeutic effects in vitro. Pretreatment of cells with D diminished intracellular generation of ROS in response to Aβ25‒35. Western blot revealed that D significantly increased the expression and activity of HO-1, which was correlated with its protection against Aβ25‒35-induced injury. Addition of ZnPP, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor, significantly attenuated its protective effect in Aβ25‒35-treated cells, indicating the vital role of HO-1 resistance to oxidative injury. Moreover, D induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, the upstream of HO-1 expression. While investigating the signaling pathways responsible for HO-1 induction, D activated ERK and dephosphorylated p38 in PC12 cells. Addition of U0126, a selective inhibitor of ERK, blocked D-induced Nrf2 activation and HO-1 induction and meanwhile reversed the protection of D against Aβ25‒35-induced cell death. These findings suggest D augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through both intrinsic free radical scavenging activity and activation of MAPK signal pathways that leads to Nrf2 activation, and subsequently HO-1 induction, thereby protecting the PC12 cells from Aβ25‒35-induced oxidative cytotoxicity. PMID:23762139

  14. Photoperturbation-relaxation approach to the kinetics of cooperative ligand binding by heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schuresko, D.D.

    1983-05-01

    A small perturbation technique for measuring the ligand photodissociation and recombination kinetics of heme proteins has been developed. The Photodissociation Perturbation Relaxation (PPR) method involves perturbing the photodissociation rates of ligand-heme systems maintained at photointensity-dependent, nonequilibrium photostationary states. The theoretical and experimental datails of the PPR method are presented herein. A formalism for computing PPR amplitudes and time constants for complex reaction mechanisms for the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the appropriate linear rate equations is derived; a FORTRAN code embodying this formalism is presented. PPR kinetics measurements obtained for the carbon monoxide derivatives of sperm whale myoglobin and human hemoglobin are presented. CO-hemoglobin combination rate constants and photodissociation quantum efficiencies, determined via fitting model-derived relaxation eigenmodes to PPR transients are presented.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus FepA and FepB Proteins Drive Heme Iron Utilization in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Turlin, Evelyne; Débarbouillé, Michel; Augustyniak, Katarzyna; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Wandersman, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    EfeUOB-like tripartite systems are widespread in bacteria and in many cases they are encoded by genes organized into iron-regulated operons. They consist of: EfeU, a protein similar to the yeast iron permease Ftrp1; EfeO, an extracytoplasmic protein of unknown function and EfeB, also an extracytoplasmic protein with heme peroxidase activity, belonging to the DyP family. Many bacterial EfeUOB systems have been implicated in iron uptake, but a prefential iron source remains undetermined. Nevertheless, in the case of Escherichia coli, the EfeUOB system has been shown to recognize heme and to allow extracytoplasmic heme iron extraction via a deferrochelation reaction. Given the high level of sequence conservations between EfeUOB orthologs, we hypothesized that heme might be the physiological iron substrate for the other orthologous systems. To test this hypothesis, we undertook characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus FepABC system. Results presented here indicate: i) that the S. aureus FepB protein binds both heme and PPIX with high affinity, like EfeB, the E. coli ortholog; ii) that it has low peroxidase activity, comparable to that of EfeB; iii) that both FepA and FepB drive heme iron utilization, and both are required for this activity and iv) that the E. coli FepA ortholog (EfeO) cannot replace FepA in FepB-driven iron release from heme indicating protein specificity in these activities. Our results show that the function in heme iron extraction is conserved in the two orthologous systems. PMID:23437157

  16. Selenolate complexes of CYP101 and the heme-bound hHO-1/H25A proximal cavity mutant.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongying; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2008-05-01

    Thiolate and selenolate complexes of CYP101 (P450cam) and the H25A proximal cavity mutant of heme-bound human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) have been examined by UV-vis spectroscopy. Both thiolate and selenolate ligands bound to the heme distal side in CYP101 and gave rise to characteristic hyperporphyrin spectra. Thiolate ligands also bound to the proximal side of the heme in the cavity created by the H25A mutation in hHO-1, giving a Soret absorption similar to that of the H25C hHO-1 mutant. Selenolate ligands also bound to this cavity mutant under anaerobic conditions but reduced the heme iron to the ferrous state, as shown by the formation of a ferrous CO complex. Under aerobic conditions, the selenolate ligand but not the thiolate ligand was rapidly oxidized. These results indicate that selenocysteine-coordinated heme proteins will not be stable species in the absence of a redox potential stabilizing effect.

  17. Bis-methionyl coordination in the crystal structure of the heme-binding domain of the streptococcal cell surface protein Shp

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Roman; Worley, Chad E.; Liu, Mengyao; Bitto, Eduard; Cates, M. Susan; Olson, John S.; Lei, Benfang; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    Surface proteins Shr, Shp, and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter HtsABC are believed to make up the machinery for heme uptake in Streptococcus pyogenes. Shp transfers its heme to HtsA, the lipoprotein component of HtsABC, providing the only experimentally demonstrated example of direct heme transfer from a surface protein to an ABC transporter in Gram-positive bacteria. To understand the structural basis of heme transfer in this system, the heme-binding domain of Shp (Shp180) was crystallized, and its structure determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å. Shp180 exhibits an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich fold that has been recently found in other pathogenic bacterial cell surface heme-binding proteins, suggesting that the mechanisms of heme acquisition are conserved. Shp shows minimal amino acid sequence identity to these heme-binding proteins and the structure of Shp180 reveals a unique heme-iron coordination with the axial ligands being two methionines from the same Shp molecule. A negative electrostatic surface of protein structure surrounding the heme pocket may serve as a docking interface for heme transfer from the more basic outer cell wall heme receptor protein Shr. The crystal structure of Shp180 reveals two exogenous, weakly bound hemins, which form a large interface between the two Shp180 molecules in the asymmetric unit. These “extra” hemins form a stacked pair with a structure similar to that observed previously for free hemin dimers in aqueous solution. The propionates of the protein-bound heme coordinate to the iron atoms of the exogenous hemin dimer, contributing to the stability of the protein interface. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that both full-length Shp and Shp180 are monomeric in dilute aqueous solution. PMID:17920629

  18. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of heme detoxification protein (HDP) from the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei.

    PubMed

    Soni, Awakash; Goyal, Manish; Prakash, Kirtika; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Siddiqui, Arif Jamal; Puri, Sunil K

    2015-07-15

    Malaria parasite resides within the host red blood cells, where it degrades vast amount of haemoglobin. During haemoglobin degradation, toxic free heme is liberated which subsequently gets converted into hemozoin. This process is facilitated by action of various proteins viz. heme detoxification protein (HDP), and histidine rich proteins II and III (HRP II & III). Out of these, HDP is the most potent in hemozoin formation and plays indispensible role for parasite survival. Despite this, the detailed study of HDP from rodent and simian parasite has not been performed till date. Here, we have cloned and sequenced hdp gene from different malaria parasites Plasmodium vinckei, Plasmodium yoelii, Plasmodium knowlesi, and Plasmodium cynomolgi. Furthermore, HDP from P. vinckei (PvHDP) was over-expressed and purified for detailed characterization. The PvHDP is cytosolic, expressed throughout the intra erythrocytic stages and its expression is higher in late trophozoite and schizont stages of parasite. The PvHDP interacts with free heme (KD=89 nM) and efficiently converts heme into hemozoin in a time and concentration dependent manner. Moreover, PvHDP showed activity in acidic pH and over a broad range of temperature. Histidine modification of PvHDP using DEPC showed reduction in heme binding and hemozoin formation, thus emphasizing the importance of histidine residues in heme binding and subsequent hemozoin production. Furthermore, applicability of PvHDP to screen anti-plasmodial agents (targeting heme to hemozoin conversion) was also determined using chloroquine, and mefloquine as reference antimalarials. Results showed that these drugs inhibit heme polymerization effectively in a concentration dependent manner. In conclusion, our study identified and biochemically characterized HDP from rodent malaria parasite P. vinckei and this will help to develop a high throughput assay to evaluate new antimalarials targeting hemozoin pathway.

  19. Structure of a novel dodecaheme cytochrome c from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals an extended 12 nm protein with interacting hemes.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Pessanha, M.; Yang, X.; Orshonsky, V.; Orshonsky, L.; Erickson, J.; Zagyansky, Y.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.

    2011-04-01

    Multiheme cytochromes c are important in electron transfer pathways in reduction of both soluble and insoluble Fe(III) by Geobacter sulfurreducens. We determined the crystal structure at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution of the first dodecaheme cytochrome c (GSU1996) along with its N-terminal and C-terminal hexaheme fragments at 2.6 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The macroscopic reduction potentials of the full-length protein and its fragments were measured. The sequence of GSU1996 can be divided into four c{sub 7}-type domains (A, B, C and D) with homology to triheme cytochromes c{sub 7}. In cytochromes c{sub 7} all three hemes are bis-His coordinated, whereas in c{sub 7}-type domains the last heme is His-Met coordinated. The full-length GSU1996 has a 12 nm long crescent shaped structure with the 12 hemes arranged along a polypeptide to form a 'nanowire' of hemes; it has a modular structure. Surprisingly, while the C-terminal half of the protein consists of two separate c{sub 7}-type domains (C and D) connected by a small linker, the N-terminal half of the protein has two c{sub 7}-type domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. This is also observed in the AB fragment. There is an unexpected interaction between the hemes at the interface of domains A and B, which form a heme-pair with nearly parallel stacking of their porphyrin rings. The hemes adjacent to each other throughout the protein are within van der Waals distance which enables efficient electron exchange between them. For the first time, the structural details of c{sub 7}-type domains from one multiheme protein were compared.

  20. Protein effects in non-heme iron enzyme catalysis: insights from multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Proos Vedin, Nathalie; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Many non-heme iron enzymes have similar sets of ligands but still catalyze widely different reactions. A key question is, therefore, the role of the protein in controlling reactivity and selectivity. Examples from multiscale simulations, primarily QM/MM, of both mono- and binuclear non-heme iron enzymes are used to analyze the stability of these models and what they reveal about the protein effects. Consistent results from QM/MM modeling are the importance of the hydrogen bond network to control reactivity and electrostatic stabilization of electron transfer from second-sphere residues. The long-range electrostatic effects on reaction barriers are small for many systems. In the systems where large electrostatic effects have been reported, these lead to higher barriers. There is thus no evidence of any significant long-range electrostatic effects contributing to the catalytic efficiency of non-heme iron enzymes. However, the correct evaluation of electrostatic contributions is challenging, and the correlation between calculated residue contributions and the effects of mutation experiments is not very strong. The largest benefits of QM/MM models are thus the improved active-site geometries, rather than the calculation of accurate energies. Reported differences in mechanistic predictions between QM and QM/MM models can be explained by differences in hydrogen bonding patterns in and around the active site. Correctly constructed cluster models can give results with similar accuracy as those from multiscale models, but the latter reduces the risk of drawing the wrong mechanistic conclusions based on incorrect geometries and are preferable for all types of modeling, even when using very large QM parts. PMID:27364958

  1. Protein effects in non-heme iron enzyme catalysis: insights from multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Proos Vedin, Nathalie; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Many non-heme iron enzymes have similar sets of ligands but still catalyze widely different reactions. A key question is, therefore, the role of the protein in controlling reactivity and selectivity. Examples from multiscale simulations, primarily QM/MM, of both mono- and binuclear non-heme iron enzymes are used to analyze the stability of these models and what they reveal about the protein effects. Consistent results from QM/MM modeling are the importance of the hydrogen bond network to control reactivity and electrostatic stabilization of electron transfer from second-sphere residues. The long-range electrostatic effects on reaction barriers are small for many systems. In the systems where large electrostatic effects have been reported, these lead to higher barriers. There is thus no evidence of any significant long-range electrostatic effects contributing to the catalytic efficiency of non-heme iron enzymes. However, the correct evaluation of electrostatic contributions is challenging, and the correlation between calculated residue contributions and the effects of mutation experiments is not very strong. The largest benefits of QM/MM models are thus the improved active-site geometries, rather than the calculation of accurate energies. Reported differences in mechanistic predictions between QM and QM/MM models can be explained by differences in hydrogen bonding patterns in and around the active site. Correctly constructed cluster models can give results with similar accuracy as those from multiscale models, but the latter reduces the risk of drawing the wrong mechanistic conclusions based on incorrect geometries and are preferable for all types of modeling, even when using very large QM parts.

  2. Oat avenanthramides induce heme oxygenase-1 expression via Nrf2-mediated signaling in HK-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous laboratory and human studies have shown that avenanthramides (AVAs), unique compounds found in oats, are strong antioxidants. Their underlying mechanisms, however, remain unclear. We demonstrated for the first time that the three major AVAs in oats—2c, 2f, and 2p—significantly increased hem...

  3. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  4. Molecular Modeling of Heme Proteins Using MOE: Bio-Inorganic and Structure-Function Activity for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gigi B.; Cook, J. Whitney

    2005-01-01

    A biochemical molecular modeling project on heme proteins suitable for an introductory Biochemistry I class has been designed with a 2-fold objective: i) to reinforce the correlation between protein three-dimensional structure and function through a discovery oriented project, and ii) to introduce students to the fields of bioinorganic and…

  5. Cloning of a DNA fragment encoding a heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding outer membrane protein from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Ren, Z; Pozsgay, J M; Elkins, C; Whitby, P W; Morton, D J; Stull, T L

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is able to use hemoglobin as a sole source of heme, and heme-repressible hemoglobin binding to the cell surface has been demonstrated. Using an affinity purification methodology, a hemoglobin-binding protein of approximately 120 kDa was isolated from H. influenzae type b strain HI689 grown in heme-restricted but not in heme-replete conditions. The isolated protein was subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and the derived amino acid sequence was used to design corresponding oligonucleotides. The oligonucleotides were used to probe a Southern blot of EcoRI-digested HI689 genomic DNA. A hybridizing band of approximately 4.2 kb was successfully cloned into pUC19. Using a 1.9-kb internal BglII fragment of the 4.2-kb clone as a probe, hybridization was seen in both typeable and nontypeable H. influenzae but not in other bacterial species tested. Following partial nucleotide sequencing of the 4.2-kb insert, a putative open reading frame was subcloned into an expression vector. The host Escherichia coli strain in which the cloned fragment was expressed bound biotinylated human hemoglobin, whereas binding of hemoglobin was not detected in E. coli with the vector alone. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the DNA fragment encoding an approximately 120-kDa heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding protein mediates one step in the acquisition of hemoglobin by H. influenzae in vivo. PMID:8757844