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Sample records for hemochromatosis

  1. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    Hemochromatosis is a disease in which too much iron builds up in your body. Your body needs iron but too much of it ... types of hemochromatosis. Primary hemochromatosis is an inherited disease. Secondary hemochromatosis is usually the result of something ...

  2. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... unknown. The juvenile form leads to severe iron overload and liver and heart disease in adolescents and ... if patients with these diseases also have iron overload. How is hemochromatosis treated? Treatment for hemochromatosis is ...

  3. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... much iron builds up in your body (iron overload). Iron is a mineral found in many foods. ... of another disease or condition that causes iron overload. Most people who have primary hemochromatosis inherit it ...

  4. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 407–333–1284 Email: mail@ americanhs. org Internet: www. americanhs. org American Liver Foundation 39 Broadway, ... or 212–668–1000 Fax: 212–483–8179 Internet: www. liverfoundation. org 7 Hemochromatosis Iron Disorders Institute ...

  5. [Hemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Oppl, B; Zwerina, J

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a frequent autosomal recessive iron storage disease in northern and western Europe. The classical clinical triad of liver cirrhosis, hyperpigmentation and diabetes is nowadays rare, most probably because of early recognition. The homozygous C282Y mutation in the HFE gene is responsible for most cases of hereditary hemochromatosis, although other much rarer mutations in other genes have been recently identified. Progressive iron overload not only causes liver cirrhosis but also triggers development of a characteristic arthropathy. Bony swelling with intermittent arthritis of the second and third metacarpophalangeal joints is typical as well as occurrence of chondrocalcinosis in wrists and knee joints. The therapy of choice is excess iron removal by phlebotomy. Treatment usually prevents or even reverses liver damage but does not alter the course of hemochromatosis arthropathy.

  6. Hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with HH. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of HH. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  7. Neonatal Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Whitington, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as “self” and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies. PMID:25755519

  8. Non-HFE hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Paulo Caleb Júnior de Lima; Dinardo, Carla Luana; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; Schettert, Isolmar Tadeu; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder classically related to HFE mutations. However, since 1996, it is known that HFE mutations explain about 80% of HH cases, with the remaining around 20% denominated non-HFE hemochromatosis. Nowadays, four main genes are implicated in the pathophysiology of clinical syndromes classified as non-HFE hemochromatosis: hemojuvelin (HJV, type 2Ajuvenile HH), hepcidin (HAMP, type 2B juvenile HH), transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, type 3 HH) and ferroportin (SLC40A1, type 4 HH). The aim of this review is to explore molecular, clinical and management aspects of non-HFE hemochromatosis. PMID:23049448

  9. Hereditary Hemochromatosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... buildup can be prevented. Doctors usually diagnose iron overload with these blood tests: serum ferritin : measures the ... disease. previous continue Treatment Doctors treat the iron overload from hereditary hemochromatosis by regularly drawing blood to ...

  10. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... org] Multimedia educational site including screening and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Iron Overload and Hemochromatosis FAQs [cdc.gov] Questions and answers ...

  11. What Causes Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... each parent), you're at risk for iron overload and signs and symptoms of hemochromatosis. If you ... of another disease or condition that causes iron overload. Examples of such diseases and conditions include: Certain ...

  12. Overview of hemochromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that occurs with high prevalence in populations of European origin. The gene that is abnormal in hemochromatosis is found on the short arm of chromosome 6 in close proximity (approximately 1 centimorgan) to HLA-A, but the product coded for by that gene is unknown. The pathogenetic mechanism in hemochromatosis is that of continued, excessive absorption of dietary iron with loss of normal control mechanisms, leading to a gradual but vast expansion of storage iron as ferritin and especially as hemosiderin. Through mechanisms that probably include peroxidation of lipid membranes, the excess iron injures hepatocytes, islet B cells, gonadotropes in the anterior pituitary, myocardium, synovial cells, and chondrocytes, and probably other cells and tissues as well. Most patients with hemochromatosis remain undiagnosed throughout life. Removal of the excess iron by phlebotomy will prevent all of the complications of hemochromatosis when begun early and will significantly improve survival in virtually all patients. It is important, therefore, that the diagnosis of hemochromatosis be considered much more frequently in clinical medicine in order that this effective therapy be utilized. Images PMID:2219895

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase the excretion of iron, excess iron can overload and eventually damage tissues and organs. For this reason, hereditary hemochromatosis is also called an iron overload disorder. Early symptoms of hereditary hemochromatosis are nonspecific ...

  14. Hereditary hemochromatosis of tongue.

    PubMed

    Al Wayli, Hessa; Rastogi, Sanjay; Verma, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) refers to several inherited disorders of iron metabolism leading to tissue iron overload. Classical HH is associated with mutations in HFE (C282Y homozygotes or C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes) and is almost exclusively found in populations of northern European descent. Non-HFE-associated HH is caused by mutations in other recently identified genes involved in iron metabolism. Hepcidin is an iron regulatory hormone that inhibits ferroportin-mediated iron export from enterocytes and macrophages. Defective hepcidin gene expression or function may underlie most forms of HH. Target organs and tissues affected by HH include the liver, heart, pancreas, joints, and skin, with cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus representing late signs of disease in patients with markedly elevated liver iron concentration. Recently, we have encountered the rare representation of this disease of the oral cavity associated with generalized burning sensation of the tongue. The diagnosis was established accidently, from the lab investigations, otherwise the patient was healthy and free from classical signs and symptoms of the disease. The patient was adequately treated by phlebotomy. To conclude, all patients with a chief complaint of burning sensation of the oral cavity and tongue should be adequately screened for hereditary hemochromatosis to prevent the associated mortality and morbidity with the hemochromatosis.

  15. Molecular pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqi; Pu, Chunwen; Lang, Lang; Qiao, Liang; Abdullahi, Mohanud Abukar Haji; Jiang, Chunmeng

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited iron overload disorder characterized by normal iron-driven erythropoiesis and abnormal iron metabolism, leading to excess iron deposited in parenchymal cells of liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Iron hormone, hepcidin, plays a critical role in iron homeostasis through interaction with ferroportin (FPN), a major cellular iron exporter. Hepcidin is encoded by hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP). Mutations in hepcidin and any genes that regulate the biology of hepcidin, including hemochromatosis genes (HFE), Hemojuvelin (HJV), transferring receptor 2 (TFR2) and FPN, result in hemochromatosis. The identification of hepcidin and its role will provide a better understanding for pathogenesis of HH.

  16. Hereditary hemochromatosis: a rare disease in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, Hossein; Merat, Shahin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common cause of chronic liver disease in western countries. No report of this disease has appeared from Iran and the few studies which have focused on chronic liver disease have failed to identify a single case of hemochromatosis. In this report, we present the first case of hereditary hemochromatosis during our 25 years of gastroenterology practice in Iran.

  17. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis.

  18. Recent advances in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis, a very common genetic defect in the Caucasian population, is characterized by progressive tissue iron overload which leads to irreversible organ damage if it is not treated in a timely manner. Recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically improved the understanding of the physiopathology and diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for identifying subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of this disease and the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of the normal population if phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damage. In this review we discuss the genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical features, and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

  19. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population.

  20. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  1. Night sweats: it may be hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Murday, H K M; Rusli, F D; Blandy, C; Vollenhoven, B

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this case report is to show that hemochromatosis can present, unusually, with night sweats. At presentation, hemochromatosis often tends to have non-specific symptoms, making it easy to misdiagnose, especially if it presents with rare symptoms. Misdiagnosis of hemochromatosis can lead to lethal outcomes, given it can cause multiple organ dysfunctions if left untreated and hence the need to identify it early on. The case we present is a 41-year-old woman with previously undiagnosed hemochromatosis complaining of night sweats. She thought she was menopausal. The diagnosis of hemochromatosis was made solely on investigations given that she did not have any other symptoms other than night sweats. Her serum iron concentrations were within the normal range due to menstruation. It is uncommon for women to present with symptoms of hemochromatosis during their reproductive life since their iron concentration is kept within normal range through monthly menstrual bleeding. PMID:27296845

  2. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment of Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heinz; Henninger, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common cause of chronic liver disease and HFE genotyping allows decisive and non-invasive diagnosis. Molecular and clinical genetic studies have led to the identification of genes other than HFE in patients with inherited diseases associated with increased hepatic iron storage that can cause hemochromatosis, which adds complexity to a diagnostic approach to patients with suspected hemochromatosis. Despite major advances in genetics, hepatic iron quantification by non-invasive methods therefore remains the key to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Although associated with homozygosity for the C282Y polymorphism in the HFE gene in >80% of patients, hemochromatosis is a complex genetic disease with strong environmental disease modifiers. Testing for mutations in the non-HFE hemochromatosis genes transferrin receptor 2, hemojuvelin, HAMP and SLC40A1 is complex, costly and time-consuming. Demonstration of hepatic iron overload by liver biopsy or MRI is therefore required before such complex tests are carried out. The pathogenesis of chronic liver disease in hemochromatosis is mainly attributed to the redox potential of tissue iron, and only the more recent studies have focused on the toxic properties of circulating iron. Considering the fact that an increased saturation of transferrin and high iron in plasma are the hallmark of all hemochromatosis forms, an alternative view would be that toxic iron in the circulation is involved in the pathogenesis of hemochromatosis. Recent studies have shown an increased concentration of redox-active iron in plasma in patients with increased transferrin saturation. This finding supports the hypothesis that tissue iron may be the 'smoking gun' of iron-induced organ damage. Taken together, caring for patients with suspected or established hemochromatosis still remains a challenge, where understanding the genetics, biochemistry and cell biology of hemochromatosis will aid better diagnosis and treatment of affected

  3. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  4. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemochromatosis? Hemochromatosis can affect many parts of the body and cause various signs and symptoms. Many of the signs and symptoms ...

  6. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  7. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... characteristics. Other health problems such as diabetes, arthritis, liver failure, and heart failure will be treated. If you ... Complications include: Liver cirrhosis Liver failure Liver cancer ... Heart problems Increased risk for certain bacterial infections ...

  8. Hemochromatosis: the new blood donor.

    PubMed

    Leitman, Susan F

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene is a common inherited iron overload disorder in whites of northern European descent. Hepcidin deficiency, the hallmark of the disorder, leads to dysregulated intestinal iron absorption and progressive iron deposition in the liver, heart, skin, endocrine glands, and joints. Survival is normal if organ damage is prevented by early institution of phlebotomy therapy. HH arthropathy is the symptom most affecting quality of life and can be debilitating. Genotype screening in large population studies has shown that the clinical penetrance of C282Y homozygosity is highly variable and can be very low, with up to 50% of women and 20% of men showing a silent phenotype. Targeted population screening for the HFE C282Y mutation is not recommended at present, but might be reconsidered as a cost-effective approach to management if counseling and care were better organized and standardized. Referral of patients to the blood center for phlebotomy therapy and use of HH donor blood for transfusion standardizes treatment, minimizes treatment costs, and may benefit society as a whole. Physician practices should be amended such that HH subjects are more frequently referred to the blood center for therapy.

  9. Population screening in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, A G; Beutler, E

    2000-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive condition found in the homozygous state in 1/200-1/400 people of northern-, central-, and western-European origin. It causes increased iron storage, which may lead to liver cirrhosis, liver cancer, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes in many but not all affected adults, with a higher frequency in males. The condition is easily treated by repeated venesections without side effects but is frequently overlooked. Population screening of adults using iron indices alone or combined with DNA testing has therefore been recommended, but a consensus conference in 1997 recommended that such screening be deferred, owing to uncertainty regarding the extent of clinical disease that may develop in individuals detected by such programs. There was also concern that DNA screening results might be used for discrimination in insurance and occupational settings. Screening family members of patients with evidence of definite iron loading, however, is accepted by all observers. Because serious complications may be overlooked, a more aggressive stance toward case detection in the adult population has been advocated by some observers, realizing that unnecessary treatment might occur. Because additional information regarding the spectrum of clinical disease in homozygotes in now accumulating, a consensus conference in the near future is suggested to consider appropriate policies.

  10. Diagnostic evaluation of hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE and non-HFE).

    PubMed

    Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The management and understanding of hereditary hemochromatosis have evolved with recent advances in iron biology and the associated discovery of numerous genes involved in iron metabolism. HFE-related (type 1) hemochromatosis remains the most frequent form, characterized by C282Y mutation homozygosity. Rare forms of hereditary hemochromatosis include type 2 (A and B, juvenile hemochromatosis caused by HJV and HAMP mutation), type 3 (related to TFR2 mutation), and type 4 (A and B, ferroportin disease). The diagnostic evaluation relies on comprehension of the involved pathophysiologic defect, and careful characterization of the phenotype, which gives clues to guide appropriate genetic testing.

  11. Multiple hormone deficiencies in children with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Oerter, K E; Kamp, G A; Munson, P J; Nienhuis, A W; Cassorla, F G; Manasco, P K

    1993-02-01

    Patients with thalassemia major require multiple blood transfusions leading to hemochromatosis. These patients often have pubertal delay and growth failure, the etiology of which has not been fully elucidated. We performed an extensive endocrine evaluation which included measurements of spontaneous and stimulated levels of gonadotropins, GH, thyroid hormone, and adrenal hormones in 17 patients between the ages of 12 and 18 yr with hemochromatosis receiving desferoxamine therapy. All of the 17 patients had at least one endocrine abnormality, and 12 had more than one abnormality. Abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were the most common. Six patients had clinical evidence of delayed puberty with spontaneous and stimulated gonadotropin and sex steroid levels appropriate for their delayed pubertal stage. All 14 children in puberty LH pulsatility index below the mean for pubertal stage compared to normal children. Six of the 14 had LH pulsatility index more than 2 SD below the mean for pubertal stage. This may be an indicator of abnormal pituitary function. Six patients failed either the provocative GH tests (peak GH < 7 micrograms/L) or had a mean spontaneous GH less than 1 microgram/L. The 4 patients who failed provocative tests had growth velocities more than 2 SD below the mean for bone age. Three patients had evidence of primary hypothyroidism. We conclude that all patients with hemochromatosis need periodic careful endocrine evaluations because the incidence of endocrine dysfunction is substantial and they may benefit from hormonal therapy.

  12. Non-HFE hemochromatosis: pathophysiological and diagnostic aspects.

    PubMed

    Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Ben Ali, Zeineb; Beaumont-Epinette, Marie-Pascale; Loreal, Olivier; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Rare genetic iron overload diseases are an evolving field due to major advances in genetics and molecular biology. Genetic iron overload has long been confined to the classical type 1 hemochromatosis related to the HFE C282Y mutation. Breakthroughs in the understanding of iron metabolism biology and molecular mechanisms led to the discovery of new genes and subsequently, new types of hemochromatosis. To date, four types of hemochromatosis have been identified: HFE-related or type1 hemochromatosis, the most frequent form in Caucasians, and four rare types, named type 2 (A and B) hemochromatosis (juvenile hemochromatosis due to hemojuvelin and hepcidin mutation), type 3 hemochromatosis (related to transferrin receptor 2 mutation), and type 4 (A and B) hemochromatosis (ferroportin disease). The diagnosis relies on the comprehension of the involved physiological defect that can now be explored by biological and imaging tools, which allow non-invasive assessment of iron metabolism. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to support the physicians in the diagnosis and management of those rare diseases.

  13. Metal storage disorders: Wilson disease and hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Pushpjeet; Kowdley, Kris V

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis and Wilson disease are autosomal recessive storage disorders of iron and copper overload, respectively. These metals are involved in multiple redox reactions, and their abnormal accumulation can cause significant injury in the liver and other organs. Over the last few decades clinicians have developed a much better understanding of these metals and their mechanism of action. Moreover, sophisticated molecular genetic testing techniques that make diagnostic testing less invasive are now available. This article updates and discusses the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of these metal storage disorders.

  14. Hereditary hemochromatosis: insights from the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Gordon D; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2009-01-01

    Hemochromatosis comprises a group of inherited disorders resulting from mutations of genes involved in regulating iron metabolism. The multicenter, multi-ethnic Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study screened approximately 100,000 participants in the US and Canada, testing for HFE mutations, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. As in other studies, HFE C282Y homozygosity was common in Caucasians but rare in other ethnic groups, and there was a marked heterogeneity of disease expression in C282Y homozygotes. Nevertheless, this genotype was often associated with elevations of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation and with iron stores of more than four grams in men but not in women. If liver biopsy was performed, in some cases because of evidence of hepatic dysfunction, fibrosis or cirrhosis was often found. Combined elevations of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were observed in non-C282Y homozygotes of all ethnic groups, most prominently Asians, but not often with iron stores of more than four grams. Future studies to discover modifier genes that affect phenotypic expression in C282Y hemochromatosis should help identify patients who are at greatest risk of developing iron overload and who may benefit from continued monitoring of iron status to detect progressive iron loading.

  15. Hemochromatosis heterozygotes may constitute a radiation-sensitive subpopulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R G.; Morris, James E. ); Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-12-01

    A primary mechanism of radiation-induced DNA damage is by generation of free radicals. Chronically increased oxidative stress from elevated body iron may increase radiation sensitivity by decreasing cellular oxygen radical scavenging capability. Hemochromatosis heterozygotes have elevated body iron. Low-level radiation sensitization by iron may be particularly pertinent for risk of breast cancer. Since ten percent of the population appears to be heterozygous for the hemochromatosis gene, a radiosensitizing effect would have pervasive implications.

  16. Is exchange transfusion a possible treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis?

    PubMed

    Timpani, Giuseppina; Foti, Francesca; Nicolò, Antonino; Nicotina, Pier Antonio; Nicastro, Emanuele; Iorio, Raffaele

    2007-11-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare congenital disorder of the liver associated to a poor prognosis. Liver transplantation is often required, since no effective medical treatment has been found. Despite mounting evidence of an alloimmune etiology of this condition, exchange transfusion has never been proposed as a specific treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis. Here we describe two siblings affected by neonatal hemochromatosis. The first, a female, died at 18 days of severe coagulopathy and acute renal failure, diagnosed as affected by neonatal hemochromatosis only when the second sibling was suspected as being affected by the same disease. The second child showed a rapidly worsening coagulopathy which was treated with two exchange transfusions, followed by rapid clinical and laboratory improvement, before reaching a definite diagnosis of neonatal hemochromatosis. He is healthy at present after a follow-up of 12 months. Although exchange transfusion has never been considered as treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis, this case suggests that it could be a feasible treatment option for children affected by this disease, as for other alloimmune conditions.

  17. Acquired Hemochromatosis with Pronounced Pigment Deposition of the Upper Eyelids

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian; Hu, Shasa

    2013-01-01

    Hemochromatosis may be classified into two groups: primary (hereditary) or secondary (acquired). The acquired type most commonly occurs after massive intake of iron supplements or blood transfusions and is also known as transfusional iron overload. In the past, hemochromatosis was usually recognized at an advanced stage by the classic triad of hyperpigmentation, diabetes mellitus (“bronze diabetes”), and hepatic cirrhosis. Cutaneous hyperpigmentation is present in 70 percent of patients due to two different mechanisms: (1) hemosiderin deposition resulting in diffuse, slate-gray darkening and (2) increased production of melanin in the epidermis. A 47-year-old woman who receives regular transfusions due to low iron and chronic, unresolving anemia and who subsequently developed pronounced hyperpigmentation of the upper eyelids is described. The presentation, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment options of hyperpigmentation due to secondary hemochromatosis are discussed. PMID:24155994

  18. [The new paradigm of neonatal hemochromatosis: fetal alloimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Costaguta, Alejandro; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The classical model of neonatal hemochromatosis was based on the analogy with hereditary hemochromatosis. Medical treatment consisted on the antioxidant-chelator cocktail. The new hypothesis of an alloimmune origin of the process by which the pregnant woman mounts an IgG-based destructive response against fetal hepatocytes offers a pathogenic explanation, allowing treatment to be focused on the immunological aspects, with excellent results, and opens the possibility of preventive treatment in future pregnancies. This new paradigm produces a deep impact in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease, that should be called "fetal alloimmune hepatitis".

  19. Juvenile Hemochromatosis in Iran: A Case Report with 5-Year Follow-up after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Hossein; Zolfaghari, Sheida; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Malek, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile hemochromatosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that typically occurs in the first to third decades of life. Its symptoms are more acute and severe than classic hemochromatosis. We describe a 27-year-old man who was referred to the gastrointestinal clinic with a probable diagnosis of fatty liver and was finally diagnosed as having juvenile hemochromatosis. A review of the scientific literature reveals that recently only three siblings suffering from the disease have been reported in Iran. PMID:27252822

  20. Juvenile Hemochromatosis in Iran: A Case Report with 5-Year Follow-up after Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, Hossein; Zolfaghari, Sheida; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Malek, Mojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile hemochromatosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that typically occurs in the first to third decades of life. Its symptoms are more acute and severe than classic hemochromatosis. We describe a 27-year-old man who was referred to the gastrointestinal clinic with a probable diagnosis of fatty liver and was finally diagnosed as having juvenile hemochromatosis. A review of the scientific literature reveals that recently only three siblings suffering from the disease have been reported in Iran.

  1. Hereditary hemochromatosis restores the virulence of plague vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Quenee, Lauriane E; Hermanas, Timothy M; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-10-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv(-/-)) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv(-/-) mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv(-/-) mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines.

  2. Bloodletting therapy in hemochromatosis: Does it affect trace element homeostasis?

    PubMed

    Bolann, Bjørn J; Distante, Sonia; Mørkrid, Lars; Ulvik, Rune J

    2015-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is the most common hereditary disorder in the Nordic population, if left untreated it can result in severe parenchymal iron accumulation. Bloodletting is mainstay treatment. Iron and trace elements partially share cellular uptake and transport mechanisms, and the aim of the present study was to see if bloodletting for hemochromatosis affects trace elements homeostasis. We recruited patients referred for diagnosis and treatment of hemochromatosis, four women and 22 men 23-68 years of age. Thirteen were C282Y homozygote, one was C282Y heterozygote, three were H63D homozygote, seven were compound heterozygote and two had none of the mutations above. Iron and liver function tests were performed; serum levels of trace elements were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results before the start of treatment and after normalization of iron parameters were compared. On completion of the bloodlettings the following average serum concentrations increased: Co from 5.6 to 11.5 nmol/L, serum Cu 16.2-17.6 μmol/L, Ni increased from 50.0 to 52.6 nmol/L and Sb from 13.2 to 16.3 nmol/L. Average serum Mn concentration declined from 30.2 to 28.3 nmol/L. All changes were statistically significant (by paired t-test). B, Ba, Cs, Mo, Se, Sr and Zn were not significantly changed. We conclude that bloodlettings in hemochromatosis lead to changes in trace element metabolism, including increased absorption of potentially toxic elements.

  3. Concomitant presentation of collagenous sprue and HFE hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Parisian, Keely R; Plesec, Thomas P; Fairbanks, Kyrsten D; Tavill, Anthony S; Shen, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a progressive malabsorptive disorder characterized by collagen deposition beneath the basement membrane of small bowel epithelium in refractory celiac sprue. CS is a pathologically distinct entity from celiac disease, despite a similar clinical presentation. The etiology of CS is unclear, although there are speculations that CS and celiac disease may share similar pathogenetic pathways. On the other hand, HFE hemochromatosis (HH) is a distinct disease entity. Celiac disease and HH are common HLA-associated genetic disorders in Northern European populations. There are a few case reports linking celiac disease and HH. We present a patient diagnosed with concurrent CS and HH.

  4. Hereditary hemochromatosis should be considered a conformational disorder.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Matthew W; Mankan, Arun K; Norris, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease associated with iron overload, in which individuals homozygous for the mutant C282Y HFE associated allele are at risk of developing liver disease, diabetes and arthritis. Conformational diseases are a class of disorders associated with the expression of misfolded protein and examples include conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Z alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and Huntington's diseases. HFE C282Y is a mutant protein that does not fold correctly forming aggregates and is retained in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). Consequently, we propose that HH associated with the C282Y HFE mutation should be considered a conformational disorder. PMID:17904763

  5. High liver FDG uptake on PET/CT in patient with lymphoma diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Infante, Jose R; Moreno, Manuel; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Garcia, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism resulting in toxic accumulation of iron in vital organs. We present a 64-year-old white man with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant that was subsequently diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis. F-FDG PET/CT was performed as routine follow-up and showed a pathological finding of homogeneous increased liver glucose metabolism. Increased FDG avidity in the liver suggested the presence of damage caused by hemochromatosis.

  6. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy analysis of iron in hemochromatosis liver and intestines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J. Y. Peter; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Adams, Paul C.

    2009-11-01

    Hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes body to store excess iron in organs such as heart or liver. Distribution of iron, as well as copper, zinc and calcium, and chemical identity of iron in hemochromatosis liver and intestine were investigated by X-ray microprobe experiments, which consist of X-ray microscopy and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure. Our results show that iron concentration in hemochromatosis liver tissue is high, while much less Fe is found in intestinal tissue. Moreover, chemical identity of Fe in hemochromatosis liver can be identified. X-ray microprobe experiments allows for examining elemental distribution at an excellent spatial resolution. Moreover, chemical identity of element of interest can be obtained.

  8. Exome sequencing for molecular characterization of non-HFE hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Colin P; Parker, Charles J; Phillips, John D

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis is readily available for clinically relevant HFE variants (i.e., those that generate the C282Y, H63D and S65C HFE polymorphisms); however, genetic testing for other known causes of iron overload, including mutations affecting genes encoding hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor 2, HAMP, and ferroportin is not. As an alternative to conventional genetic testing we propose diagnostic use of whole exome sequencing for characterization of non-HFE hemochromatosis. To illustrate the effectiveness of whole exome sequencing as a diagnostic tool, we present the case of an 18-year-old female with a probable case of juvenile hemochromatosis, who was referred for specialty care after testing negative for commonly occurring HFE variants. Whole exome sequencing offered complete coverage of target genes and is a fast, cost effective diagnostic tool for characterization of non-HFE hemochromatosis.

  9. Exome Sequencing for Molecular Characterization of Non-HFE Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colin P.; Parker, Charles J.; Phillips, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis is readily available for clinically relevant HFE variants (i.e., those that generate the C282Y, H63D and S65C HFE polymorphisms); however, genetic testing for other known causes of iron overload, including mutations affecting genes encoding hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor 2, HAMP, and ferroportin is not. As an alternative to conventional genetic testing we propose diagnostic use of whole exome sequencing for characterization of non-HFE hemochromatosis. To illustrate the effectiveness of whole exome sequencing as a diagnostic tool, we present the case of an 18-year-old female with a probable case of juvenile hemochromatosis, who was referred for specialty care after testing negative for commonly occurring HFE variants. Whole exome sequencing offered complete coverage of target genes and is a fast, cost effective diagnostic tool for characterization of non-HFE hemochromatosis. PMID:26142323

  10. Management of human factors engineering-associated hemochromatosis: A 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Menaka; Powell, Lawrie W

    2016-03-18

    This review focuses on the management of iron metabolism and iron overload experienced in the hereditary condition, human factors engineering (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis. Hemochromatosis refers to a group of genetic diseases that result in iron overload; the major one globally is HFE-associated hemochromatosis. The evolution in understanding of the most common form of hereditary hemochromatosis, being the substation of cysteine to a tyrosine at position 282 in the HFE gene, has been extensively studied Novel mutations in both HFE and non-HFE genes have been indicated in this disease which hold significance in its application for the Asia-Pacific region. In conditions with iron overload, the storage of excess iron in various body tissues leads to complications and toxic damage. The most common presenting complaint for this disease is malaise, lethargy and other non-specific symptoms. In order to diagnose hereditary hemochromatosis, there are biochemical, imaging and genetic testing options. Currently, cascade screening of affected families is preferred over population-level screening. The mainstay of treatment is venesection and the appropriate approach to treatment has been consolidated over the years. Recently, the indications for venesection therapy of hemochromatosis have been challenged and are the subject of ongoing research.

  11. Management of human factors engineering-associated hemochromatosis: A 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Menaka; Powell, Lawrie W

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the management of iron metabolism and iron overload experienced in the hereditary condition, human factors engineering (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis. Hemochromatosis refers to a group of genetic diseases that result in iron overload; the major one globally is HFE-associated hemochromatosis. The evolution in understanding of the most common form of hereditary hemochromatosis, being the substation of cysteine to a tyrosine at position 282 in the HFE gene, has been extensively studied Novel mutations in both HFE and non-HFE genes have been indicated in this disease which hold significance in its application for the Asia-Pacific region. In conditions with iron overload, the storage of excess iron in various body tissues leads to complications and toxic damage. The most common presenting complaint for this disease is malaise, lethargy and other non-specific symptoms. In order to diagnose hereditary hemochromatosis, there are biochemical, imaging and genetic testing options. Currently, cascade screening of affected families is preferred over population-level screening. The mainstay of treatment is venesection and the appropriate approach to treatment has been consolidated over the years. Recently, the indications for venesection therapy of hemochromatosis have been challenged and are the subject of ongoing research. PMID:27004087

  12. Preliminary investigation of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) for hfe gene-related hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brianne E; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Archer, Linda L; Nollens, Hendrik H; Wellehan, James F X

    2014-10-01

    Hemochromatosis (iron storage disease) has been reported in diverse mammals including bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). The primary cause of excessive iron storage in humans is hereditary hemochromatosis. Most human hereditary hemochromatosis cases (up to 90%) are caused by a point mutation in the hfe gene, resulting in a C282Y substitution leading to iron accumulation. To evaluate the possibility of a hereditary hemochromatosis-like genetic predisposition in dolphins, we sequenced the bottlenose dolphin hfe gene, using reverse transcriptase-PCR and hfe primers designed from the dolphin genome, from liver of affected and healthy control dolphins. Sample size included two case animals and five control animals. Although isotype diversity was evident, no coding differences were identified in the hfe gene between any of the animals examined. Because our sample size was small, we cannot exclude the possibility that hemochromatosis in dolphins is due to a coding mutation in the hfe gene. Other potential causes of hemochromatosis, including mutations in different genes, diet, primary liver disease, and insulin resistance, should be evaluated.

  13. Management of human factors engineering-associated hemochromatosis: A 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Menaka; Powell, Lawrie W

    2016-03-18

    This review focuses on the management of iron metabolism and iron overload experienced in the hereditary condition, human factors engineering (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis. Hemochromatosis refers to a group of genetic diseases that result in iron overload; the major one globally is HFE-associated hemochromatosis. The evolution in understanding of the most common form of hereditary hemochromatosis, being the substation of cysteine to a tyrosine at position 282 in the HFE gene, has been extensively studied Novel mutations in both HFE and non-HFE genes have been indicated in this disease which hold significance in its application for the Asia-Pacific region. In conditions with iron overload, the storage of excess iron in various body tissues leads to complications and toxic damage. The most common presenting complaint for this disease is malaise, lethargy and other non-specific symptoms. In order to diagnose hereditary hemochromatosis, there are biochemical, imaging and genetic testing options. Currently, cascade screening of affected families is preferred over population-level screening. The mainstay of treatment is venesection and the appropriate approach to treatment has been consolidated over the years. Recently, the indications for venesection therapy of hemochromatosis have been challenged and are the subject of ongoing research. PMID:27004087

  14. Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma in a patient with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Adams, Denise M; Wang, Jiang; Prakash, Rajan; Karim, Nagla Abdel

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) is a rare hepatic vascular tumor that represents a diagnostic challenge. The rarity of this neoplasm precludes establishment of a standard-of-care treatment. Risk factors for HEHE are not well-known. Liver transplant remains the most common therapeutic modality for nonmetastatic disease. This article describes a patient who presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, poor appetite, and weight loss. Genetic testing showed that the patient was homozygous for C282Y consistent with hereditary hemochromatosis, and liver biopsy was consistent with malignant epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The patient was referred for a liver transplant but was deemed inappropriate for transplant secondary to peritoneal studding, with frozen-section analysis showing metastatic disease at the time of surgery. PMID:25190690

  15. Living Related Liver Transplantation in an Infant with Neonatal Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Shin Jie; Choi, Jong Sub; Chun, Peter; Yoo, Jung Kyung; Moon, Jin Soo; Kim, Woo Sun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Yi, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a severe neonatal liver injury that is confirmed by extra-hepatic iron accumulation. Although a recent study described treating NH with exchange transfusions and intravenous immunoglobulin, liver transplantation should be considered for patients with severe liver failure that does not respond to other medical treatment. Herein, we report the case of a two-month-old female infant who presented with persistent ascites and hyperbilirubinemia. Her laboratory findings demonstrated severe coagulopathy, high indirect and direct bilirubin levels, and high ferritin levels. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging presented low signal intensity in the liver on T2-weighted images, suggesting iron deposition. The infant was diagnosed with NH as a result of the clinical findings and after congenital infection and metabolic diseases were excluded. The infant was successfully treated with a living-donor liver transplantation. Living related liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for NH in infants. PMID:27437193

  16. Epidemiology and diagnostic testing for hemochromatosis and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Adams, P C

    2015-05-01

    Hemochromatosis is the most common genetic disease in northern European populations. Body iron stores progressively increase in most patients, which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver, hepatocellular carcinoma, heart failure, arthritis, and pigmentation. Simple blood tests such as the serum ferritin and transferrin saturation are useful to suggest the diagnosis which can be confirmed in most cases with a simple genetic test for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. However, these blood tests are often misinterpreted and there are rare patients with iron overload without HFE mutations. A diagnostic approach is presented based on a large referral practice and a population-based study (HEIRS) which screened for iron overload in 101,168 participants.

  17. Living Related Liver Transplantation in an Infant with Neonatal Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Shin Jie; Choi, Jong Sub; Chun, Peter; Yoo, Jung Kyung; Moon, Jin Soo; Ko, Jae Sung; Kim, Woo Sun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Yi, Nam-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a severe neonatal liver injury that is confirmed by extra-hepatic iron accumulation. Although a recent study described treating NH with exchange transfusions and intravenous immunoglobulin, liver transplantation should be considered for patients with severe liver failure that does not respond to other medical treatment. Herein, we report the case of a two-month-old female infant who presented with persistent ascites and hyperbilirubinemia. Her laboratory findings demonstrated severe coagulopathy, high indirect and direct bilirubin levels, and high ferritin levels. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging presented low signal intensity in the liver on T2-weighted images, suggesting iron deposition. The infant was diagnosed with NH as a result of the clinical findings and after congenital infection and metabolic diseases were excluded. The infant was successfully treated with a living-donor liver transplantation. Living related liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for NH in infants. PMID:27437193

  18. [Idiopathic hemochromatosis linkage with the HLA system (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lipinski, M; Hors, J; Saleun, J P; Saddi, R; Passa, P; Feingold, J; Lafaurie, S; Dausset, J

    1978-06-01

    Fourteen selected families containing two or more subjects suffering from idiopathic hemochromatosis and 34 unrelated cases have been studied for their HLA markers. A 3 was present in 75% of the unrelated cases vs 26% in the normal population (p less than 10(-8)). The frequencies of B 7 (38% vs 19%) and B 14 (23% vs 9%) were also increased (p lessthan 0,05). Inevitably, in most cases both antigens in the B locus were associated with A 3. Seven of nine affected sib pairs shared both HLA haplotypes, while two shared only one. Significant association between HLA haplotypes and diseases segregation has been demonstrated in family studies. These facts are consistent with the recessive inheritance of a strongly A 3 linked "disease" gene responsible for abnormal iron stores in the heterozygote state. This hypothesis would account for 64% of our present cases. Most of discordances (26%) were females who are physiologically protected, or children under 17 who might later develop the disease. The remaining 10% of disordant cases could be explained by crossing-over between "disease" gene and HLA loci or by an heterogeneity of the disease. This provides a method for screening for high risk subjects and perhaps an opportunity for anticipatory prevention. PMID:680310

  19. Recent advances in hemochromatosis: a 2015 update : a summary of proceedings of the 2014 conference held under the auspices of Hemochromatosis Australia.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, Dilum; Roddick, Clinton; Powell, Lawrie W

    2015-04-01

    This review focuses on iron metabolism, the genetics of hemochromatosis, current treatment protocols and various screening methods. Even though the most common form of hereditary hemochromatosis, C282Y gene mutations in the HFE gene, has been extensively studied, novel mutations in both HFE and non-HFE genes have been implicated in this disease. These have important implications for the Asia-Pacific region. In overload, deposition of iron in various body tissues leads to toxic damage. Patients commonly present with non-specific symptoms of malaise and lethargy. Biochemical, imaging and genetic testing can be carried out to confirm diagnosis. Venesection forms the mainstay of treatment and at present cascade screening of affected families is recommended over population-level screening.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of a 16-year-old Chinese patient with concurrent hereditary hemochromatosis and Gilbert's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianbo; Liu, Yanmin; Chang, Yujuan; Liu, Huimin; Wang, Peng

    2014-09-28

    Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis predominantly affect Caucasians with a low incidence in Asians. Here we report the case of a 16-year-old Chinese boy, who was admitted with hepatalgia, jaundice, hyperpigmentation, and splenomegaly to our hospital. After excluding chronic hepatitis, autoimmune disorders, and alcohol or drug injury, genetic analyses of the patient and his parents revealed simultaneous manifestations of Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis, though his parents did not develop related symptoms. The presented case indicates that diagnoses of Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis should be taken into consideration when chronic hepatitis is suspected without a clear etiology.

  1. Reversible retinal edema in an infant with neonatal hemochromatosis and liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Ramiro S; Freedman, Sharon F; Cotten, C Michael; Ferranti, Jeffrey M; Toth, Cynthia A

    2011-02-01

    We present a case of bilateral severe retinal edema with subretinal fluid in an infant diagnosed with neonatal hemochromatosis and liver failure. A macular cherry-red spot in each eye mimicked the clinical appearance of many metabolic storage diseases. Both the clinical retinal appearance and the anatomic abnormalities observed on spectral domain optical coherence tomography resolved after successful liver transplant.

  2. Genetics, Genetic Testing, and Management of Hemochromatosis: 15 Years Since Hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of hepcidin in 2000 and the subsequent unprecedented explosion of research and discoveries in the iron field have dramatically changed our understanding of human disorders of iron metabolism. Today, hereditary hemochromatosis, the paradigmatic iron-loading disorder, is recognized as an endocrine disease due to the genetic loss of hepcidin, the iron hormone produced by the liver. This syndrome is due to unchecked transfer of iron into the bloodstream in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs and its toxic effects in parenchymatous organs. It is caused by mutations that affect any of the proteins that help hepcidin to monitor serum iron, including HFE and, in rarer instances, transferrin-receptor 2 and hemojuvelin, or make its receptor ferroportin, resistant to the hormone. In Caucasians, C282Y HFE homozygotes are numerous, but they are only predisposed to hemochromatosis; complete organ disease develops in a minority, due to alcohol abuse or concurrent genetic modifiers that are now being identified. HFE gene testing can be used to diagnose hemochromatosis in symptomatic patients, but analyses of liver histology and full gene sequencing are required to identify patients with rare, non-HFE forms of the disease. Due to the central pathogenic role of hepcidin, it is anticipated that nongenetic causes of hepcidin loss (eg, end-stage liver disease) can cause acquired forms of hemochromatosis. The mainstay of hemochromatosis management is still removal of iron by phlebotomy, first introduced in 1950s, but identification of hepcidin has not only shed new light on the pathogenesis of the disease and the approach to diagnosis, but etiologic therapeutic applications from these advances are now foreseen.

  3. Restriction mapping of a YAC contig in the hemochromatosis gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, M.J.; Smit, D.J.; Pyper, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism that can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, cardiomyopathy, diabetes and anthropathy. We have mapped the hemochromatosis gene to within 1 cM of HLA-A and the microsatellite D6S105, and our allele association studies have shown that D6S105 is the marker most closely associated with the hemochromatosis gene. We are currently constructing a YAC contig and restriction map of this region as part of a positional cloning strategy to identify the hemochromatosis gene. YACs containing HLA-A or D6S105 were selected, and fluorescent-in-situ-hybridization (FISH) was performed to confirm chromosomal location and exclude chimerism. YAC DNA was digested with a panel of rare cutters, separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotted and probed with the vector arms to create restriction maps. YAC insert terminal ends were isolated using vectorette methodology. A contig extending 600 kb centromeric and 350 kb telomeric of HLA-A has been established. HLA-A, HLA-F and the microsatellite D6S265 have been positioned on this map. The contig does not yet overlap any D6S105 positive YACs but the telomeric end of the contig has been sequenced and is being used to identify additional YACs to bridge this interval. Restriction mapping of three D6S105 YACs has shown the presence of several CpG islands in this region. As these CpG islands are in close proximity to D6S105, they are being used to isolate coding sequences to determine whether any of these mark the position of the hemochromatosis gene.

  4. Analysis of hemochromatosis gene mutations in 52 consecutive patients with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; de Matteis, Giovanna; Federici, Francesca; Solero, Pietro; Veneri, Dino

    2004-01-01

    A literature review reports increased erythrocyte indices [hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), MCH concentration] in subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). We, therefore, screened 52 consecutive patients with polycythemia vera for 12 HH gene mutations, comparing iron status and red cell parameters between patients positive or negative for HH gene mutations. Our results support the evidence that there is no association between these two conditions.

  5. Comprehensive functional annotation of 18 missense mutations found in suspected hemochromatosis type 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Joubrel, Rozenn; Pissard, Serge; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Gérolami, Victoria; Ged, Cécile; Cadet, Estelle; Cartault, François; Ka, Chandran; Gourlaouen, Isabelle; Gourhant, Lénaick; Oudin, Claire; Goossens, Michel; Grandchamp, Bernard; De Verneuil, Hubert; Rochette, Jacques; Férec, Claude; Le Gac, Gérald

    2014-09-01

    Hemochromatosis type 4 is a rare form of primary iron overload transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait caused by mutations in the gene encoding the iron transport protein ferroportin 1 (SLC40A1). SLC40A1 mutations fall into two functional categories (loss- versus gain-of-function) underlying two distinct clinical entities (hemochromatosis type 4A versus type 4B). However, the vast majority of SLC40A1 mutations are rare missense variations, with only a few showing strong evidence of causality. The present study reports the results of an integrated approach collecting genetic and phenotypic data from 44 suspected hemochromatosis type 4 patients, with comprehensive structural and functional annotations. Causality was demonstrated for 10 missense variants, showing a clear dichotomy between the two hemochromatosis type 4 subtypes. Two subgroups of loss-of-function mutations were distinguished: one impairing cell-surface expression and one altering only iron egress. Additionally, a new gain-of-function mutation was identified, and the degradation of ferroportin on hepcidin binding was shown to probably depend on the integrity of a large extracellular loop outside of the hepcidin-binding domain. Eight further missense variations, on the other hand, were shown to have no discernible effects at either protein or RNA level; these were found in apparently isolated patients and were associated with a less severe phenotype. The present findings illustrate the importance of combining in silico and biochemical approaches to fully distinguish pathogenic SLC40A1 mutations from benign variants. This has profound implications for patient management.

  6. Update on iron metabolism and molecular perspective of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seongseok; Vincelette, Nicole D

    2015-07-01

    Iron is an essential component of erythropoiesis and its metabolism is tightly regulated by a variety of internal and external cues including iron storage, tissue hypoxia, inflammation and degree of erythropoiesis. There has been remarkable improvement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of iron metabolism past decades. The classical model of iron metabolism with iron response element/iron response protein (IRE/IRP) is now extended to include hepcidin model. Endogenous and exogenous signals funnel down to hepcidin via wide range of signaling pathways including Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3), Bone Morphogenetic Protein/Hemojuvelin/Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog (BMP/HJV/SMAD), and Von Hippel Lindau/Hypoxia-inducible factor/Erythropoietin (VHL/HIF/EPO), then relay to ferroportin, which directly regulates intra- and extracellular iron levels. The successful molecular delineation of iron metabolism further enhanced our understanding of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis. The majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are now shown to have mutations in the genes coding either upstream or downstream proteins of hepcidin, resulting in iron overload. The update on hepcidin centered mechanisms of iron metabolism and their clinical perspective in hemochromatosis will be discussed in this review.

  7. Southern blood club symposium: an update on selected aspects of hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C Q; Griffen, L M; Kushner, J P

    1990-10-01

    Genetic epidemiology studies have indicated that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) occurs in caucasians with a frequency of 3 to 13 per thousand. Clinical recognition however occurs far less frequently. The disparity is best resolved by defining HH as homozygosity for the HLA-linked hemochromatosis allele, regardless of the total body iron burden. Variability of clinical expression is explained in part by physiologic iron loss in women but variability in males may be due to environmental factors, gene-gene interactions or polymorphisms in mutated hemochromatosis alleles. Although clinical variability is great, the laboratory phenotype of HH is fairly constant and is marked by elevation of the transferrin saturation. The elevated transferrin saturation occurs early in life, before organ iron loading occurs and can be used as a screening tool to detect HH before organ damage occurs. Cloning and characterizing the HH gene, which is located within 1 centimorgan of the HLA-A locus should resolve some of the issues concerning clinical variability. PMID:2248278

  8. Recurrent pregnancy-induced diabetes insipidus in a woman with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kobielusz-Gembala, Iwona; Okopien, Boguslaw

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder in pregnant women, predating pregnancy or appearing for the first time during gestation. In pregnancy it usually affects women with HELLP syndrome or acute fatty liver of pregnancy and results from the reduced hepatic degradation of placental vasopressinase leading to its increased activity. Although infiltrative diseases have been found to cause diabetes insipidus in non-pregnant population, very few studies showed that these disorders may manifest for the first time during gestation. We describe here the case of transient diabetes insipidus in two subsequent pregnancies of a female with hemochromatosis. The first symptoms of this disease appeared for the first time at the beginning of the third trimester of her second pregnancy, and diagnosis was established on the basis of typical clinical presentation, confirmed by a water deprivation test. Diabetes insipidus resulted from the increased activity of vasopressinase, caused by hemochromatosis-induced liver dysfunction, the presence of which was confirmed between the pregnancies by liver biopsy and identification of the HFE gene mutation. Subsequent desferrioxamine treatment resulted in a less severe clinical course of diabetes insipidus in the last patient's pregnancy. In both pregnancies, the patient was successfully treated with oral desmopressin, which is resistant to degradation by placental vasopressinase. Although unrecognized pituitary disorders may pose a serious health problem to the mother and fetus, hemochromatosis-induced diabetes insipidus, as the case of our patient demonstrates, if effectively diagnosed and treated, cannot be regarded as a contraindication for pregnancy.

  9. Usefulness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Diagnosis of Hemochromatosis with Severe Hepatic Steatosis in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuichi; Sato, Noriko; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Kojima, Yasushi; Umemoto, Kumiko; Mishima, Saori; Mikami, Shintaro; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Igari, Toru; Akiyama, Junichi; Imamura, Masatoshi; Masaki, Naohiko; Yanase, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of the number of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to the total number of patients with liver dysfunction has increased in many countries around the world. Liver dysfunction is also caused by multiple blood transfusions in patients with leukemia and other hematological diseases, with liver dysfunction often accompanied by secondary hemochromatosis. This study describes a 25-year-old man with secondary hemochromatosis combined with NASH. Magnetic resonance imaging was useful for visualizing the distributions of both iron and fat in the liver of this patient in order to make a differential diagnosis and to evaluate the effect of treatment. PMID:27580542

  10. Haplotype Analysis of Hemochromatosis Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerayli, Sina; Pasdar, Alireza; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Sepahi, Samaneh; Hoseini, Seyed Mousalreza; Ahadi, Mitra; Rostami, Sina; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with elevated serum iron markers. Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) genes are responsible for iron accumulation in most cases of hemochromatosis, and may play a role in HCV infection. Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of HFE gene polymorphisms in a group of Iranian HCV-infected patients, and to explore the association of these polymorphisms with HCV infection. Patients and Methods HFE gene polymorphisms were examined in a total of 69 HCV patients and 69 healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. Haplotype and diplotype analyses were performed using PHASE software. Results In a recessive analysis model of the His63Asp (H63D) locus (HH vs. HD + DD), the HH genotype was more common in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.012; OR = 6.42 [95% CI: 1.51 - 27.33]). Also, in a recessive analysis model of the Cys282Tyr (C282Y) locus (CC vs. CY + YY), the CC genotype was more frequent in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.03; OR = 5.06 [95% CI: 1.13 - 22.06]). In addition, there was a significant association between the HC haplotype and the HCDC diplotype and HCV infection. Conclusions Polymorphism in the hemochromatosis gene may confer some degree of risk for HCV infection, and individuals carrying the H and C alleles may be susceptible to this disease; however, a larger sample of HCV patients and healthy individuals may be necessary to further illustrate the role of these polymorphisms in HCV. PMID:27621921

  11. Haplotype Analysis of Hemochromatosis Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerayli, Sina; Pasdar, Alireza; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Sepahi, Samaneh; Hoseini, Seyed Mousalreza; Ahadi, Mitra; Rostami, Sina; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with elevated serum iron markers. Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) genes are responsible for iron accumulation in most cases of hemochromatosis, and may play a role in HCV infection. Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of HFE gene polymorphisms in a group of Iranian HCV-infected patients, and to explore the association of these polymorphisms with HCV infection. Patients and Methods HFE gene polymorphisms were examined in a total of 69 HCV patients and 69 healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. Haplotype and diplotype analyses were performed using PHASE software. Results In a recessive analysis model of the His63Asp (H63D) locus (HH vs. HD + DD), the HH genotype was more common in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.012; OR = 6.42 [95% CI: 1.51 - 27.33]). Also, in a recessive analysis model of the Cys282Tyr (C282Y) locus (CC vs. CY + YY), the CC genotype was more frequent in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.03; OR = 5.06 [95% CI: 1.13 - 22.06]). In addition, there was a significant association between the HC haplotype and the HCDC diplotype and HCV infection. Conclusions Polymorphism in the hemochromatosis gene may confer some degree of risk for HCV infection, and individuals carrying the H and C alleles may be susceptible to this disease; however, a larger sample of HCV patients and healthy individuals may be necessary to further illustrate the role of these polymorphisms in HCV.

  12. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia.

  13. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  14. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia.

  15. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  16. Is the Iron Donor Lipocalin 2 Implicated in the Pathophysiology of Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Akira, Shizuo; Santos, Manuela M.

    2010-01-01

    Under normal conditions, iron is taken up by the cells through the transferrin-mediated pathway. However, in hereditary hemochromatosis, a common iron-overloading disorder associated with mutations in the HFE gene, iron in plasma exceeds transferrin-binding capacity, and non–transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) appears in the circulation of patients with iron overload. NTBI can be taken up by hepatocytes through a transferrin-independent pathway. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), a secreted protein of the lipocalin family, has emerged as the mediator of an alternative, transferrin-independent pathway for cellular iron delivery. To evaluate the importance of Lcn2 in the pathogenesis of hepatic iron loading in Hfe knockout mice, we generated HfeLcn2 double-deficient mice. Our studies revealed that deletion of Lcn2 in Hfe-knockout mice does not influence hepatic iron accumulation in Hfe−/− mice, or their response to iron loading, as the phenotype of HfeLcn2−/− mice remained indistinguishable from that of Hfe−/− mice. Conclusion Lcn2 is not essential for iron delivery to hepatocytes in hemochromatosis. PMID:19152427

  17. Recent advance in the molecular genetics of Wilson disease and hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tingxia; Li, Xiaojin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xinyan; Ou, Xiaojuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic liver diseases such as Wilson disease (WD) and hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) possess complicated pathogenesis and typical hereditary characteristics with the hallmarks of a deficiency in metal metabolism. Mutations in genes encoding ATPase, Cu + transporting, beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and hemochromatosis (HFE) or several non-HFE genes are considered to be causative for WD and HH, respectively. Although the identification of novel mutations in ATP7B for WD and HFE or the non-HFE genes for HH has increased, especially with the application of whole genome sequencing technology in recent years, the biological function of the identified mutations, as well as genotype-phenotype correlations remain to be explored. Further analysis of the causative gene mutation would be critical to clarify the mechanisms underlying specific disease phenotypes. In this review, we therefore summarize the recent advances in the molecular genetics of WD and HH including the updated mutation spectrums and the correlation between genotype and phenotype, with an emphasis on biological functional studies of the individual mutations identified in WD and HH. The weakness of the current functional studies and analysis for the clinical association of the individual mutation was also discussed. These works are essential for the understanding of the association between genotypes and phenotypes of these inherited metabolic liver diseases.

  18. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Pitlick, Emily; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an iron metabolism disorder that leads to excess iron buildup, especially in the heart, liver, and pancreas. Mutations in the HFE gene are the single most common cause of HH, which can be treated effectively if diagnosed early. Patents cover the HFE gene, related proteins, screening methods, and testing kits. Most initial testing for HH is biochemical, but HFE DNA testing or genotyping is used to confirm a diagnosis of inherited hemochromatosis. Concerns over patents covering HFE testing emerged in 2002, when scholars argued that exclusive licensing and the patent-enabled sole provider model then in place led to high prices and limited access. Critics of the sole provider model noted that the test was available at multiple laboratories prior to the enforcement of patents. By 2007, however, Bio-Rad, Limited, acquired the key intellectual property and sub-licensed it widely. In part because of broad, non-exclusive licensing, there are now multiple providers and testing technologies, and research continues. This case study illustrates how both changes in intellectual property ownership and evolving clinical utility of HFE genetic testing in the last decade have effected the licensing of patents and availability of genetic testing. PMID:20393306

  19. Imaging iron in skin and liver: Non-invasive tools for hemochromatosis therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Fleming, R.; Gonçalves, A.; Neres, M.; Alves, L. C.; Silva, J. N.; Filipe, P.; Silva, R.

    2009-06-01

    Hemochromatosis is a hereditary disease that causes an inappropriate intestinal absorption of Fe resulting in its accumulation in multiple organs, such as liver, heart and skin. Fe metabolism indicators in the circulation do not provide reliable indication of organ overload as they can be influenced by other clinical conditions. Assessing metabolism organs such as liver requires invasive procedures which is not adequate to patient's serial observations. Our aim was establishing cross sectional and longitudinal information on the amount of Fe that deposited in skin and liver during a life period, how iron is cleared out by therapy intervention and study the relationship of these changes between the two organs using non-invasive methods. Results on skin Fe deposition were evaluated by nuclear microscopy techniques and liver Fe concentrations determined by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. Skin and liver Fe concentrations were correlated. Though Fe deposits in the two organs were differently associated with blood Fe metabolism conventional markers. Fe serial variations in skin and liver highlighted the value of assessing Fe organ deposits for estimating hemochromatosis evolution and therapy efficacy.

  20. Hemochromatosis: Niche Construction and the Genetic Domino Effect in the European Neolithic.

    PubMed

    McCullough, John M; Heath, Kathleen M; Smith, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is caused by a potentially lethal recessive gene (HFE, C282Y allele) that increases iron absorption and reaches polymorphic levels in northern European populations. Because persons carrying the allele absorb iron more readily than do noncarriers, it has often been suggested that HFE is an adaptation to anemia. We hypothesize positive selection for HFE began during or after the European Neolithic with the adoption of an iron-deficient high-grain and dairying diet and consequent anemia, a finding confirmed in Neolithic and later European skeletons. HFE frequency compared with rate of lactase persistence in Eurasia yields a positive linear correlation coefficient of 0.86. We suggest this is just one of many mutations that became common after the adoption of agriculture. PMID:26416321

  1. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease. PMID:25352340

  2. Hemochromatosis: Niche Construction and the Genetic Domino Effect in the European Neolithic.

    PubMed

    McCullough, John M; Heath, Kathleen M; Smith, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is caused by a potentially lethal recessive gene (HFE, C282Y allele) that increases iron absorption and reaches polymorphic levels in northern European populations. Because persons carrying the allele absorb iron more readily than do noncarriers, it has often been suggested that HFE is an adaptation to anemia. We hypothesize positive selection for HFE began during or after the European Neolithic with the adoption of an iron-deficient high-grain and dairying diet and consequent anemia, a finding confirmed in Neolithic and later European skeletons. HFE frequency compared with rate of lactase persistence in Eurasia yields a positive linear correlation coefficient of 0.86. We suggest this is just one of many mutations that became common after the adoption of agriculture.

  3. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-10-29

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease.

  4. Erythrocytic Pyruvate Kinase Mutations Causing Hemolytic Anemia, Osteosclerosis, and Secondary Hemochromatosis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, G. Inal; Raj, K.; Foureman, P.; Lehman, S.; Manhart, K.; Abdulmalik, O.; Giger, U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythrocytic pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, first documented in Basenjis, is the most common inherited erythroenzymopathy in dogs. Objectives To report 3 new breed-specific PK-LR gene mutations and a retrospective survey of PK mutations in a small and selected group of Beagles and West Highland White Terriers (WHWT). Animals Labrador Retrievers (2 siblings, 5 unrelated), Pugs (2 siblings, 1 unrelated), Beagles (39 anemic, 29 other), WHWTs (22 anemic, 226 nonanemic), Cairn Terrier (n = 1). Methods Exons of the PK-LR gene were sequenced from genomic DNA of young dogs (<2 years) with persistent highly regenerative hemolytic anemia. Results A nonsense mutation (c.799C>T) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in anemic Labrador Retriever siblings that had osteosclerosis, high serum ferritin concentrations, and severe hepatic secondary hemochromatosis. Anemic Pug and Beagle revealed 2 different missense mutations (c.848T>C, c.994G>A, respectively) resulting in intolerable amino acid changes to protein structure and enzyme function. Breed-specific mutation tests were developed. Among the biased group of 248 WHWTs, 9% and 35% were homozygous (affected) and heterozygous, respectively, for the previously described mutation (mutant allele frequency 0.26). A PK-deficient Cairn Terrier had the same insertion mutation as the affected WHWTs. Of the selected group of 68 Beagles, 35% were PK-deficient and 3% were carriers (0.37). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Erythrocytic PK deficiency is caused by different mutations in different dog breeds and causes chronic severe hemolytic anemia, hemosiderosis, and secondary hemochromatosis because of chronic hemolysis and, an as yet unexplained osteosclerosis. The newly developed breed-specific mutation assays simplify the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:22805166

  5. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in asymptomatic hereditary hemochromatosis subjects with C282Y homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Tripodi, Dorothy J; Zalos, Gloria; Bolan, Charles D; Yau, Yu-Ying; Leitman, Susan F; Waclawiw, Myron A; Rosing, Douglas R

    2012-03-15

    It is not well known whether systemic iron overload per se in hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is associated with cardiac arrhythmias before other signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease occur. In the present study, we examined the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in cardiac asymptomatic subjects with HH (New York Heart Association functional class I) and compared it to that in age- and gender-matched normal volunteers. The 42 subjects with HH and the 19 normal control subjects were recruited through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored "Heart Study of Hemochromatosis." They completed 48-hour Holter electrocardiography ambulatory monitoring at the baseline evaluation. The subjects with HH were classified as newly diagnosed (group A) and chronically treated (group B) subjects. All subjects with HH had C282Y homozygosity, and the normal volunteers lacked any HFE gene mutations known to cause HH. Although statistically insignificant, the incidence of ventricular and supraventricular ectopy tended to be greater in the combined HH groups than in the controls. Supraventricular ectopy was more frequently noted in group B compared to in the controls (ectopy rate per hour 11.1 ± 29.9 vs 1.5 ± 3.5, p < 0.05, using the Kruskal-Wallis test). No examples of heart block, other than first-degree atrioventricular node block, were seen in any of the subjects. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was not significantly reduced after 6 months of intensive iron removal therapy in the group A subjects. No life-threatening arrhythmias were observed in our subjects with HH. In conclusion, our data suggest that the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is, at most, marginally increased in asymptomatic subjects with HH. A larger clinical study is warranted to further clarify our observation.

  6. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in asymptomatic hereditary hemochromatosis subjects with C282Y homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Tripodi, Dorothy J; Zalos, Gloria; Bolan, Charles D; Yau, Yu-Ying; Leitman, Susan F; Waclawiw, Myron A; Rosing, Douglas R

    2012-03-15

    It is not well known whether systemic iron overload per se in hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is associated with cardiac arrhythmias before other signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease occur. In the present study, we examined the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in cardiac asymptomatic subjects with HH (New York Heart Association functional class I) and compared it to that in age- and gender-matched normal volunteers. The 42 subjects with HH and the 19 normal control subjects were recruited through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored "Heart Study of Hemochromatosis." They completed 48-hour Holter electrocardiography ambulatory monitoring at the baseline evaluation. The subjects with HH were classified as newly diagnosed (group A) and chronically treated (group B) subjects. All subjects with HH had C282Y homozygosity, and the normal volunteers lacked any HFE gene mutations known to cause HH. Although statistically insignificant, the incidence of ventricular and supraventricular ectopy tended to be greater in the combined HH groups than in the controls. Supraventricular ectopy was more frequently noted in group B compared to in the controls (ectopy rate per hour 11.1 ± 29.9 vs 1.5 ± 3.5, p < 0.05, using the Kruskal-Wallis test). No examples of heart block, other than first-degree atrioventricular node block, were seen in any of the subjects. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was not significantly reduced after 6 months of intensive iron removal therapy in the group A subjects. No life-threatening arrhythmias were observed in our subjects with HH. In conclusion, our data suggest that the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is, at most, marginally increased in asymptomatic subjects with HH. A larger clinical study is warranted to further clarify our observation. PMID:22196777

  7. Therapeutic Depletion of Iron Stores Is Not Associated with a Reduced Hemoglobin Mass in a Hemochromatosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Nina; Pottgiesser, Torben; Birkner, Philipp; Deibert, Peter; Ahlgrim, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hereditary hemochromatosis features a dysregulated iron absorption leading to iron overload and organ damage. The regulation of total hemoglobin mass during depletion of iron deposits by therapeutic phlebotomy has not been studied. Case Presentation The initial ferritin level of the 52-year-old male subject was 1,276 μg/l. Despite successful depletion of iron stores (ferritinmin: 53 μg/l) through phlebotomies, total hemoglobin mass stabilized at the pretherapy level. However, regeneration of total hemoglobin mass was accelerated (up to 10.8 g/day). Conclusion In this hemochromatosis patient, the total hemoglobin mass was not altered in the long term, but regeneration was accelerated, possibly due to elevated body iron content. PMID:27721733

  8. Eighty percent of French sport winners in Olympic, World and Europeans competitions have mutations in the hemochromatosis HFE gene.

    PubMed

    Hermine, Olivier; Dine, Gérard; Genty, Vincent; Marquet, Laurie-Anne; Fumagalli, Gabriela; Tafflet, Muriel; Guillem, Flavia; Van Lierde, Françoise; Rousseaux-Blanchi, Marie-Philippe; Palierne, Christian; Lapostolle, Jean-Claude; Cervetti, Jean-Pierre; Frey, Alain; Jouven, Xavier; Noirez, Philippe; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    The HFE gene encodes a protein involved in iron homeostasis; individuals with mutations in both alleles develop hemochromatosis. 27% of the French population is heterozygous for mutations in this gene. We found that 80% of the French athletes who won international competitions in rowing, Nordic skiing and judo display mutations in one allele of HFE, thus demonstrating the existence of a favourable phenotype linked to this heterozygosity.

  9. Do all hemochromatosis patients have the same origin? A pilot study of mitochondrial DNA and Y-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Symonette, Caitlin J; Adams, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-DNA analysis have been widely used to predict ancestral origin. Genetic anthropologists predict that human civilizations may have originated in central Africa one to two million years previously. Primary iron overload is not a common diagnosis among indigenous people of northern Africa, but hereditary hemochromatosis is present in approximately one in 200 people in northern Europe. MtDNA analysis has the potential to determine whether contemporary hemochromatosis patients have an ancient ancestral linkage. METHODS: DNA was obtained from buccal smears for mtDNA and Y-DNA analysis. Y-DNA analysis included examination of 20 short tandem repeat markers on the Y chromosome. Analysis of mtDNA involved sequencing of the HVR-1 genetic sequence (nucleotides 16001 to 16520) and was compared with the Cambridge Reference Sequence. MtDNA ancestral haplotypes were predicted from the analysis of the HVR-1 sequence. RESULTS: Twenty-six male C282Y homozygotes were studied. There were 28 polymorphisms present in the HVR-1 sequence of these participants. The most common polymorphism was present at position 16519 in 15 participants and at position 16311 in eight participants. There were 12 different ancestral haplotypes predicted by mtDNA analysis, with the K haplotype being present in five participants. Y-DNA analysis revealed eight different haplotypes, with R1b being found in 11 of the 26 participants. CONCLUSION: Analysis of mtDNA and Y-DNA in 26 hemochromatosis patients suggested that they did not all originate from the same ancestral tribe in Africa. These findings were consistent with the theory that the original hemochromatosis mutation occurred after migration of these ancestral people to central Europe, possibly 4000 years previously. PMID:21766093

  10. Eighty percent of French sport winners in Olympic, World and Europeans competitions have mutations in the hemochromatosis HFE gene.

    PubMed

    Hermine, Olivier; Dine, Gérard; Genty, Vincent; Marquet, Laurie-Anne; Fumagalli, Gabriela; Tafflet, Muriel; Guillem, Flavia; Van Lierde, Françoise; Rousseaux-Blanchi, Marie-Philippe; Palierne, Christian; Lapostolle, Jean-Claude; Cervetti, Jean-Pierre; Frey, Alain; Jouven, Xavier; Noirez, Philippe; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    The HFE gene encodes a protein involved in iron homeostasis; individuals with mutations in both alleles develop hemochromatosis. 27% of the French population is heterozygous for mutations in this gene. We found that 80% of the French athletes who won international competitions in rowing, Nordic skiing and judo display mutations in one allele of HFE, thus demonstrating the existence of a favourable phenotype linked to this heterozygosity. PMID:26416567

  11. Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be a sign. People who have a very high iron levels may have skin with a bronze or gray ... goal of the treatment is to lower the level of iron in your blood back to normal. Usually, this is done by removing blood from your body (called phlebotomy [say: flee-bot-oh-me]) on ...

  12. Increased duodenal DMT-1 expression and unchanged HFE mRNA levels in HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis and iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, V; Barrett, S; Ryan, E; Kelleher, T; O'Keane, C; Coughlan, B; Crowe, J

    2002-01-01

    HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis is characterized by imbalances of iron homeostasis and alterations in intestinal iron absorption. The identification of the HFE gene and the apical iron transporter divalent metal transporter-1, DMT-1, provide a direct method to address the mechanisms of iron overload in this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of duodenal HFE and DMT-1 gene expression in HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis. Small bowel biopsies and serum iron indices were obtained from a total of 33 patients. The study population comprised 13 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (C282Y homozygous), 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia, and 10 apparently healthy controls, all of whom were genotyped for the two common mutations in the HFE gene (C282Y and H63D). Total RNA was isolated from tissue and amplified via RT-PCR for HFE, DMT-1, and the internal control GAPDH. DMT-1 protein expression was additionally assessed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of HFE mRNA did not differ significantly between patient groups (P = 0.09), specifically between C282Y homozygotes and iron deficiency anemic patients, when compared to controls (P = 0.09, P = 0.9, respectively). In contrast, DMT-1 mRNA levels were at least twofold greater in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and iron deficiency anemia when compared to controls (P = 0.02, P = 0.01, respectively). Heightened DMT-1 protein expression correlated with mRNA levels in all patients. Loss of HFE function in hereditary hemochromatosis is not derived from inhibition of its gene expression. DMT-1 expression in C282Y homozygote subjects is consistent with the hypothesis of a "paradoxical" duodenal iron deficiency in hereditary hemochromatosis. The observed twofold upregulation of the DMT-1 is consistent with the slow but steady increase in body iron stores observed in those presenting with clinical features of hereditary hemochromatosis.

  13. Anonymous marker loci within 400 kb of HLA-A generate haplotypes in linkage disequilibrium with the hemochromatosis gene (HFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaouanq, J.; Perichon, M.; Treut, A.L.; Kahloun, A.E.; Mauvieux, V.; Blayau, M.; Jouanolle, A.M.; Chauvel, B.; Le Gall, J.Y.; David, V. )

    1994-02-01

    The hemochromatosis gene (HFE) maps to 6p21.3 and is less than 1 cM from the HLA class I gene; however, the precise physical location of the gene has remained elusive and controversial. The unambiguous identification of a crossover event within hemochromatosis families is very difficult; it is particularly hampered by the variability of the phenotypic expression as well as by the sex- and age-related penetrance of the disease. For these considerations, traditional linkage analysis could prove of limited value in further refining the extrapolated physical position of HFE. The authors therefore embarked upon a linkage-disequilibrium analysis of HFE and normal chromosomes for the Brittany population. In this report, 66 hemochromatosis families yielding 151 hemochromatosis chromosomes and 182 normal chromosomes were RFLP-typed with a battery of probes, including two newly derived polymorphic markers from the 6.7 and HLA-F loci located 150 and 250 kb telomeric to HLA-A, respectively. The results suggest a strong peak of existing linkage disequilibrium focused within the i82-to-6.7 interval (approximately 250 kb). The zone of linkage disequilibrium is flanked by the i97 locus, positioned 30 kb proximal to i82, and the HLA-F gene, found 250 kb distal to HLA-A, markers of which display no significant association with HFE. These data support the possibility that HFE resides within the 400-kb expanse of DNA between i97 and HLA-F. Alternatively, the very tight association of HLA-A3 and allele 1 of the 6.7 locus, both of which are comprised by the major ancestral or founder HFE haplotype in Brittany, supports the possibility that the disease gene may reside immediately telomeric to the 6.7 locus within the linkage-disequilibrium zone. Additionally, hemochromatosis haplotypes possessing HLA-A11 and the low-frequency HLA-F polymorphism (allele 2) are supportive of a separate founder chromosome containing a second, independently arising mutant allele. 69 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  14. Effect of C282Y Genotype on Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Complications in Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Márcio; Cancela, Leonor; Ottaviani, Sébastien; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Richette, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arthropathy that mimics osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporosis (OP) is considered a complication of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). We have limited data comparing OA and OP prevalence among HH patients with different hemochromatosis type 1 (HFE) genotypes. We investigated the prevalence of OA and OP in patients with HH by C282Y homozygosity and compound heterozygosity (C282Y/H63D) genotype. Methods A total of 306 patients with HH completed a questionnaire. Clinical and demographic characteristics and presence of OA, OP and related complications were compared by genotype, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), current smoking and menopausal status. Results In total, 266 of the 306 patients (87%) were homozygous for C282Y, and 40 (13%) were compound heterozygous. The 2 groups did not differ by median age [60 (interquartile range [IQR] 53 to 68) vs. 61 (55 to 67) years, P=0.8], sex (female: 48.8% vs. 37.5%, P=0.18) or current smoking habits (12.4% vs. 10%, P=0.3). As compared with compound heterozygous patients, C282Y homozygous patients had higher median serum ferritin concentration at diagnosis [1090 (IQR 610 to 2210) vs. 603 (362 to 950) µg/L, P<0.001], higher median transferrin saturation [80% (IQR 66 to 91%) vs. 63% (55 to 72%), P<0.001]) and lower median BMI [24.8 (22.1 to 26.9) vs. 26.2 (23.5 to 30.3) kg/m2, P<0.003]. The overall prevalence of self-reported OA was significantly higher with C282Y homozygosity than compound heterozygosity (53.4% vs. 32.5%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.4 [95% confidence interval 1.2–5.0]), as was self-reported OP (25.6% vs. 7.5%; aOR 3.5 [1.1–12.1]). Conclusion Patients with C282Y homozygosity may be at increased risk of musculoskeletal complications of HH. PMID:25822977

  15. Changes in Exercise Capacity of Cardiac Asymptomatic Hereditary Hemochromatosis Subjects over 5-Year Follow up

    PubMed Central

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Smith, Kevin P.; Tripodi, Dorothy J.; Arena, Ross; Yau, Yu-Ying; Bolan, Charles D.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; Leitman, Susan F.; Rosing, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A long-term effect of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) on aerobic exercise capacity (AEC) has not been well described. Design Forty-three HH and 21 volunteer control (VC) subjects who were asymptomatic underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using the Bruce protocol. AEC was assessed with minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) at baseline (BL) at a 5-year follow up (5Y) assessment. A paired t-test was used for analyses of normality data; otherwise, a Wilcoxon singed rank sum test was used. Results Thirty-three HH subjects and 18 VC subjects returned for a repeat CPX at 5Y (80% overall return rate). At 5Y, AEC was not different between the two groups. As compared with BL measurements, exercise time, peak VO2, and the VE/VCO2 slope did not differ statistically at 5Y between both groups. Iron depletion by phlebotomy for 5 years did not significantly affect AEC in newly diagnosed HH subjects at baseline (n=14) and cardiac arrhythmias during exercise tended to decrease after 5 years of therapy in this group. Conclusions The AEC of asymptomatic HH subjects treated with conventional therapy is not statistically affected by the disease over a 5-year period. PMID:22311055

  16. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH)

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Graça; Brissot, Pierre; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zoller, Heinz; Kamarainen, Outi; Patton, Simon; Alonso, Isabel; Morris, Michael; Keeney, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is recognized as a reference test to confirm the diagnosis of suspected HH or to predict its risk. The vast majority (typically >90%) of patients with clinically characterized HH are homozygous for the p.C282Y variant in the HFE gene, referred to as HFE-related HH. Since 1996, HFE genotyping was implemented in diagnostic algorithms for suspected HH, allowing its early diagnosis and prevention. However, the penetrance of disease in p.C282Y homozygotes is incomplete. Hence, homozygosity for p.C282Y is not sufficient to diagnose HH. Neither is p.C282Y homozygosity required for diagnosis as other rare forms of HH exist, generally referred to as non-HFE-related HH. These pose significant challenges when defining criteria for referral, testing protocols, interpretation of test results and reporting practices. We present best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic diagnosis of HH where recommendations are classified, as far as possible, according to the level and strength of evidence. For clarification, the guidelines' recommendations are preceded by a detailed description of the methodology and results obtained with a series of actions taken in order to achieve a wide expert consensus, namely: (i) a survey on the current practices followed by laboratories offering molecular diagnosis of HH; (ii) a systematic literature search focused on some identified controversial topics; (iii) an expert Best Practice Workshop convened to achieve consensus on the practical recommendations included in the guidelines. PMID:26153218

  17. In vitro functional analysis of human ferroportin (FPN) and hemochromatosis-associated FPN mutations.

    PubMed

    Schimanski, Lisa M; Drakesmith, Hal; Merryweather-Clarke, Alison T; Viprakasit, Vip; Edwards, Jon P; Sweetland, Emma; Bastin, Judy M; Cowley, Diana; Chinthammitr, Yingyong; Robson, Kathryn J H; Townsend, Alain R M

    2005-05-15

    Type IV hemochromatosis is associated with dominant mutations in the SLC40A1 gene encoding ferroportin (FPN). Known as the "ferroportin disease," this condition is typically characterized by high serum ferritin, reduced transferrin saturation, and macrophage iron loading. Previously FPN expression in vitro has been shown to cause iron deficiency in human cell lines and mediate iron export from Xenopus oocytes. We confirm these findings by showing that expression of human FPN in a human cell line results in an iron deficiency because of a 3-fold increased export of iron. We show that FPN mutations A77D, V162delta, and G490D that are associated with a typical pattern of disease in vivo cause a loss of iron export function in vitro but do not physically or functionally impede wild-type FPN. These mutants may, therefore, lead to disease by haploinsufficiency. By contrast the variants Y64N, N144D, N144H, Q248H, and C326Y, which can be associated with greater transferrin saturation and more prominent iron deposition in liver parenchyma in vivo, retained iron export function in vitro. Because FPN is a target for negative feedback in iron homeostasis, we postulate that the latter group of mutants may resist inhibition, resulting in a permanently "turned on" iron exporter.

  18. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency causing neonatal liver failure and hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Shneider, B L; Setchell, K D; Whitington, P F; Neilson, K A; Suchy, F J

    1994-02-01

    Neonatal liver failure was evaluated in two infants. Neither infant had evidence of congenital infection, galactosemia, alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, tyrosinemia, Zellweger syndrome, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Abnormal levels of iron were detected in the minor salivary glands of the first infant and in the explanted liver of the second. Analyses of urinary bile salts by fast-atom bombardment ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a paucity of primary bile acids and a predominance of 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic acids. These findings are consistent with delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency, a primary genetic defect in bile acid synthesis. Postmortem evaluation of the first infant revealed significant iron deposition in the liver, pancreas, thyroid, adrenal glands, myocardium, stomach, and submucosal glands of the respiratory tract. In both infants examination of the liver revealed extensive loss of hepatic parenchyma. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of bile acid metabolism defects to include neonatal liver failure with associated hemochromatosis. PMID:8301429

  19. Structural basis of urea-induced unfolding: Unraveling the folding pathway of hemochromatosis factor E.

    PubMed

    Khan, Parvez; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis factor E (HFE) is a type 1 transmembrane protein, and acts as a negative regulator of iron-uptake. The equilibrium unfolding and conformational stability of the HFE protein was examined in the presence of urea. The folding and unfolding transitions were monitored with the help of circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of transition curves revealed that the folding of HFE is not a two-state process. However, it involved stable intermediates. Transition curves (plot of fluorescence (F346) and CD signal at 222nm (θ222) versus [Urea], the molar urea concentration) revealed a biphasic transition with midpoint (Cm) values at 2.88M and 4.95M urea. Whereas, absorption analysis shows one two-state transition centered at 2.96M. To estimate the protein stability, denaturation curves were analyzed for Gibbs free energy change in the absence of urea (ΔGD(0)) associated with the equilibrium of denaturation exist between native state↔denatured state. The intermediate state was further characterized by hydrophobic probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS-binding). For seeing the effect of urea on the structure and dynamics of HFE, molecular dynamics simulation for 60ns was also performed. A clear correspondence was established between the in vitro and in silico studies.

  20. [Mutation analysis of the pathogenic gene in a Chinese family with hereditary hemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Li; Hongxing, Zhang; Haitao, Zhang; Xiaobo, Peng; Lili, Bai; Fuchu, He; Zewu, Qiu; Gangqiao, Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. We recruited a consanguineous Chinese family including the proband with HHC and other four members without HHC. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified two homozygous mutations (c.G18C [p.Q6H] and c.GC962_963AA [p.C321X]) in the hemojuvelin gene (HJV) in the proband with HHC. No mutation was found in other four previously identified HHC related genes, HAMP, TFR2, FPN and HFE. The functional impact of p.Q6H mutation is weak whereas p.C321X, a premature termination mutation, results in a truncated HJV protein, which lacks the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor domain. In addition to the mutations in HJV, other 12 homozygous mutations were identified in this patient. However, none of these mutations showed strong damaging impact and the mutated genes are not related to iron metabolism. Our in-house data further demonstrated that p.C321X is absent in the general Chinese population, suggesting that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV is causative in the patient with HHC. Accordingly, all of the four members without HHC from the same family carried wild-type alleles or heterozygous mutations, but not the homozygous mutation in this site. Thus, we found for the first time that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV can result in HHC, which will help genetic diagnosis and prenatal counseling for HHC.

  1. Structural basis of urea-induced unfolding: Unraveling the folding pathway of hemochromatosis factor E.

    PubMed

    Khan, Parvez; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis factor E (HFE) is a type 1 transmembrane protein, and acts as a negative regulator of iron-uptake. The equilibrium unfolding and conformational stability of the HFE protein was examined in the presence of urea. The folding and unfolding transitions were monitored with the help of circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of transition curves revealed that the folding of HFE is not a two-state process. However, it involved stable intermediates. Transition curves (plot of fluorescence (F346) and CD signal at 222nm (θ222) versus [Urea], the molar urea concentration) revealed a biphasic transition with midpoint (Cm) values at 2.88M and 4.95M urea. Whereas, absorption analysis shows one two-state transition centered at 2.96M. To estimate the protein stability, denaturation curves were analyzed for Gibbs free energy change in the absence of urea (ΔGD(0)) associated with the equilibrium of denaturation exist between native state↔denatured state. The intermediate state was further characterized by hydrophobic probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS-binding). For seeing the effect of urea on the structure and dynamics of HFE, molecular dynamics simulation for 60ns was also performed. A clear correspondence was established between the in vitro and in silico studies. PMID:27339324

  2. Hereditary hemochromatosis: perspectives of public health, medical genetics, and primary care.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Giuseppina; Pinsky, Linda E; Motulsky, Arno; Reyes, Michele; Bradley, Linda A; Burke, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is a condition characterized by excess iron in body tissues, resulting in complications such as cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, and arthritis. These complications usually manifest during adulthood. Two methods of screening for the detection of early stage of HHC are available: serum iron measures and molecular testing to detect mutations in the gene. These phenotypic and genotypic screening tests are of particular interest because a simple treatment-periodic phlebotomy-can be used to prevent iron accumulation and clinical complications. HHC might represent the first adult-onset genetic disorder for which universal population-based screening would be appropriate. Therefore, HHC has been proposed as a paradigm for the introduction of adult genetic diseases into clinical and public health practice. However, universal screening for HHC has not been recommended because of the uncertainty about the natural history of the iron overload or HHC and, in particular, uncertainty about the prevalence of asymptomatic iron overload and the likelihood that it will progress to clinical complications. If universal screening is not appropriate based on current data, what other measures might reduce the disease burden of iron overload? New studies provide more systematic information about the penetrance of the C282Y mutation and shed further light on the natural history of the disorder. The authors review these data and consider their implications for public health, medical genetics, and primary care.

  3. A Novel Phenotype of a Hereditary Hemochromatosis Type 4 with Ferroportin-1 Mutation, Presenting with Juvenile Cataracts.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Noriyuki; Oe, Kengo; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Murakami, Kosaku; Nakashima, Ran; Imura, Yoshitaka; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Ohmura, Koichiro; Miura, Yasuo; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited disorder usually seen in Northern Europeans, which results in iron overload syndrome. A few cases have also been reported in Japan. We herein report a Japanese man presenting with fever, arthritis, liver dysfunction, and hyperferritinemia who was diagnosed with type 4 HH. He was heterozygous for the 1520A>G (His507Arg) mutation in the ferroportin-1 gene (SLC40A1). He had a familial cataract as an infant, but hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome was excluded. This is the first report of type 4 HH with juvenile cataracts and suggests that there is an association between hyperferritinemia and early cataract formation. PMID:27629970

  4. Hemochromatosis Enhances Tumor Progression via Upregulation of Intracellular Iron in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lenarduzzi, Michelle; Hui, Angela B. Y.; Yue, Shijun; Ito, Emma; Shi, Wei; Williams, Justin; Bruce, Jeff; Sakemura-Nakatsugawa, Noriko; Xu, Wei; Schimmer, Aaron; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite improvements in treatment strategies for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), outcomes have not significantly improved; highlighting the importance of identifying novel therapeutic approaches to target this disease. To address this challenge, we proceeded to evaluate the role of iron in HNSCC. Experimental Design Expression levels of iron-related genes were evaluated in HNSCC cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR. Cellular phenotypic effects were assessed using viability (MTS), clonogenic survival, BrdU, and tumor formation assays. The prognostic significance of iron-related proteins was determined using immunohistochemistry. Results In a panel of HNSCC cell lines, hemochromatosis (HFE) was one of the most overexpressed genes involved in iron regulation. In vitro knockdown of HFE in HNSCC cell lines significantly decreased hepcidin (HAMP) expression and intracellular iron level. This in turn, resulted in a significant decrease in HNSCC cell viability, clonogenicity, DNA synthesis, and Wnt signalling. These cellular changes were reversed by re-introducing iron back into HNSCC cells after HFE knockdown, indicating that iron was mediating this phenotype. Concordantly, treating HNSCC cells with an iron chelator, ciclopirox olamine (CPX), significantly reduced viability and clonogenic survival. Finally, patients with high HFE expression experienced a reduced survival compared to patients with low HFE expression. Conclusions Our data identify HFE as potentially novel prognostic marker in HNSCC that promotes tumour progression via HAMP and elevated intracellular iron levels, leading to increased cellular proliferation and tumour formation. Hence, these findings suggest that iron chelators might have a therapeutic role in HNSCC management. PMID:23991213

  5. Functional consequences of transferrin receptor-2 mutations causing hereditary hemochromatosis type 3

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ricky; Shvartsman, Maya; Morán, Erica; Lois, Sergi; Aranda, Jessica; Barqué, Anna; de la Cruz, Xavier; Bruguera, Miquel; Vagace, José Manuel; Gervasini, Guillermo; Sanz, Cristina; Sánchez, Mayka

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type 3 is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by excessive iron deposition in the liver and caused by mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) gene. Here, we describe three new HH type 3 Spanish families with four TFR2 mutations (p.Gly792Arg, c.1606-8A>G, Gln306*, and Gln672*). The missense variation p.Gly792Arg was found in homozygosity in two adult patients of the same family, and in compound heterozygosity in an adult proband that also carries a novel intronic change (c.1606-8A>G). Two new nonsense TFR2 mutations (Gln306* and Gln672*) were detected in a pediatric case. We examine the functional consequences of two TFR2 variants (p.Gly792Arg and c.1606-8A>G) using molecular and computational methods. Cellular protein localization studies using immunofluorescence demonstrated that the plasma membrane localization of p.Gly792Arg TFR2 is impaired. Splicing studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the c.1606-8A>G mutation leads to the creation of a new acceptor splice site and an aberrant TFR2 mRNA. The reported mutations caused HH type 3 by protein truncation, altering TFR2 membrane localization or by mRNA splicing defect, producing a nonfunctional TFR2 protein and a defective signaling transduction for hepcidin regulation. TFR2 genotyping should be considered in adult but also in pediatric cases with early-onset of iron overload. PMID:26029709

  6. Iranian hereditary hemochromatosis patients: Baseline characteristics, laboratory data and gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Farhad; Bagheri, Zohreh; Bayat, Maryam; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Basi, Ali; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ajdarkosh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common autosomal recessive disorder in white people, characterized by highly abnormal uptake of iron from the gastrointestinal tracts. Recently, mutation studies have focused to detect the genes responsible for HH. Material/Methods In this cross-sectional study, 12 HH patients were recruited, who were referred to Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran. In addition to the clinical assessments, a complete laboratory evaluation, imaging modalities, histopathologic assessment, atomic absorption spectrophotometry and gene mutation study were performed. The genetic study for HFE gene mutation was examined for all of the patients since 2006, while non-HFE mutation was conducted since December 2010 (only for 1 of them). Results Twelve patients were evaluated consisting of 11 men and 1 woman, with the mean age of 39.58±12.68 yr. The average of atomic iron loads was 13.25±4.83-fold higher than normal standards. Four patients had heterozygotic mutation of H63D (33.3%). There was no significant difference in either the iron load of liver (P=0.927) and heart (P=0.164) or serum concentration of ferritin (P=0.907) and TIBC (P=0.937) between the HFE-mutant and without HFE mutation HH cases. Conclusions In contrast to other studies, C282Y mutation was not detected in any of our Iranian HH patients. Heterozygotic mutations of H63D (HFE) and TFR2 (non-HFE) genes were found to be more common in these patients. Similar to previous reports, these mutations were not found to be significantly associated with severity of presentation in HH patients. PMID:23018356

  7. [Mutation analysis of the pathogenic gene in a Chinese family with hereditary hemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Li; Hongxing, Zhang; Haitao, Zhang; Xiaobo, Peng; Lili, Bai; Fuchu, He; Zewu, Qiu; Gangqiao, Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. We recruited a consanguineous Chinese family including the proband with HHC and other four members without HHC. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified two homozygous mutations (c.G18C [p.Q6H] and c.GC962_963AA [p.C321X]) in the hemojuvelin gene (HJV) in the proband with HHC. No mutation was found in other four previously identified HHC related genes, HAMP, TFR2, FPN and HFE. The functional impact of p.Q6H mutation is weak whereas p.C321X, a premature termination mutation, results in a truncated HJV protein, which lacks the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor domain. In addition to the mutations in HJV, other 12 homozygous mutations were identified in this patient. However, none of these mutations showed strong damaging impact and the mutated genes are not related to iron metabolism. Our in-house data further demonstrated that p.C321X is absent in the general Chinese population, suggesting that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV is causative in the patient with HHC. Accordingly, all of the four members without HHC from the same family carried wild-type alleles or heterozygous mutations, but not the homozygous mutation in this site. Thus, we found for the first time that the homozygous mutation p.C321X in HJV can result in HHC, which will help genetic diagnosis and prenatal counseling for HHC. PMID:25567873

  8. Complete hematopoietic recovery after continuous iron chelation therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia with secondary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jeong; Han, Chi-Wha

    2008-04-01

    A 16-yr-old male patient with hemochromatosis due to multiple packed red blood cell transfusions was referred to our emergency center for the treatment of severe aplastic anemia and dyspnea. He was diagnosed with aplastic anemia at 11-yr of age. He had received continuous transfusions because an HLA-matched marrow donor was unavailable. Following a continuous, approximately 5-yr transfusion, he was noted to develop hemochromatosis. He had a dilated cardiomyopathy and required diuretics and digitalis, multiple endocrine and liver dysfunction, generalized bleeding, and skin pigmentation. A total volume of red blood cell transfusion before deferoxamine therapy was about 96,000 mL. He received a regular iron chelation therapy (continuous intravenous infusion of deferoxamine, 50 mg/kg/day for 5 days q 3-4 weeks) for approximately seven years after the onset of multiple organ failures. His cytopenia and organ dysfunctions began to be gradually recovered since about 2002, following a 4-yr deferoxamine treatment. He showed completely normal ranges of peripheral blood cell counts, heart size, and liver function two years ago. He has not received any transfusions for the last four years. This finding suggests that a continuous deferoxamine infusion may play a role in the immune regulation in addition to iron chelation effect.

  9. Autoimmune Conditions in 235 Hemochromatosis Probands with HFE C282Y Homozygosity and Their First-Degree Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Barton, J. Clayborn

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study of autoimmune conditions (ACs) in 235 hemochromatosis probands at diagnosis by analyzing age, sex, ACs, history of first-degree family members with ACs (FH), diabetes, heavy ethanol consumption, elevated serum ALT/AST, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, iron removed to achieve iron depletion (QFe), and positivity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes A∗01, B∗08; A∗02, B∗44; A∗03, B∗07; A∗03, B∗14; and A∗29, B∗44. There were 138 men (58.7%). Median followup was 19.6 y. One or more of 19 ACs were diagnosed in each of 35 probands (14.9%). Prevalences of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis were 8.1% (95% CI: [5.1, 12.5]), 1.7% [0.6, 4.6], and 0.0085 [0.0015, 0.0337], respectively. Eighteen probands (7.7%) had a FH. Eight probands with ACs had 9 family members with ACs. In a logistic regression, ACs were less likely in men (odds ratio (OR) 0.3 [0.1, 0.6]) and more likely in probands with a FH (OR 4.1 [1.4, 11.8]). Overall ACs risk was not significantly associated with QFe or HLA haplotypes. Estimated survival of probands with and without ACs did not differ significantly. We conclude that ACs are common in hemochromatosis probands, especially women and probands with a FH. PMID:26504855

  10. SLC39A14 Is Required for the Development of Hepatocellular Iron Overload in Murine Models of Hereditary Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Jenkitkasemwong, Supak; Wang, Chia-Yu; Coffey, Richard; Zhang, Wei; Chan, Alan; Biel, Thomas; Kim, Jae-Sung; Hojyo, Shintaro; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Knutson, Mitchell D

    2015-07-01

    Nearly all forms of hereditary hemochromatosis are characterized by pathological iron accumulation in the liver, pancreas, and heart. These tissues preferentially load iron because they take up non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI), which appears in the plasma during iron overload. Yet, how tissues take up NTBI is largely unknown. We report that ablation of Slc39a14, the gene coding for solute carrier SLC39A14 (also called ZIP14), in mice markedly reduced the uptake of plasma NTBI by the liver and pancreas. To test the role of SLC39A14 in tissue iron loading, we crossed Slc39a14(-/-) mice with Hfe(-/-) and Hfe2(-/-) mice, animal models of type 1 and type 2 (juvenile) hemochromatosis, respectively. Slc39a14 deficiency in hemochromatotic mice greatly diminished iron loading of the liver and prevented iron deposition in hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. The data suggest that inhibition of SLC39A14 may mitigate hepatic and pancreatic iron loading and associated pathologies in iron overload disorders.

  11. Deferasirox in patients with iron overload secondary to hereditary hemochromatosis: results of a 1-yr Phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Cançado, Rodolfo; Melo, Murilo R; de Moraes Bastos, Roberto; Santos, Paulo C J L; Guerra-Shinohara, Elivira M; Chiattone, Carlos; Ballas, Samir K

    2015-12-01

    This open-label, prospective, phase 2 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of deferasirox (10 ± 5 mg/kg/d) in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and iron overload refractory to or intolerant of phlebotomy. Ten patients were enrolled and all completed the 12-month treatment period. There were significant decreases from baseline to end of study (i.e., 12 months) in median serum ferritin (P < 0.001), mean transferrin saturation (P < 0.05), median liver iron concentration (P < 0.001), and mean alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.05). The median time to achieve serum ferritin reduction ≥50% compared to baseline was 7.53 months. The most common adverse events were mild, transient diarrhea (n = 5) and nausea (n = 2). No patient experienced an increase in serum creatinine that exceeded the upper limit of normal. These data confirm that deferasirox was well tolerated and effective in reducing iron burden in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and could be a safe alternative to phlebotomy in selected patients.

  12. Localization of the hemochromatosis gene close to D6S105

    SciTech Connect

    Jazwinska, E.C.; Lee, S.C.; Webb, S.I.; Halliday, J.W.; Powell, L.W. )

    1993-08-01

    The hemochromatosis (HC) gene is known to be linked to HLA-A (6p21.3); however, its precise location has been difficult to determine because of a lack of additional highly polymorphic markers for this region. The recent identification of short tandem repeat sequences (microsatellites) has now provided this area with a number of markers with similar polymorphic index to the HLA serological polymorphisms. Using four microsatellites - D6S105, D6S109, D6S89, and F13A - together with the HLA class I loci HLA-A and HLA-B in 13 large pedigrees clearly segregating for HC, the authors have been able to refine the location of the HC gene. They identified no recombination between HC and HLA-A or D6S105, and two-point analyses placed the HC gene within one centimorgan (cM) of HLA-A and D6S105. The markers HLA-B, D6S109, D6S89, and F13A were separated from the HC locus by recombination, defining the centromeric and telomeric limits for the HC gene as HLA-B and D5S109, respectively. A multipoint map constructed using HLA-B, HLA-A, and D6S109 indicates that the HC gene is located in a region less than 1 cM proximal to HLA-A and less than 1 cM telomeric of HLA-A. These pedigree data indicate an association between HC and specific alleles at HLA-A and D6S105 (i.e., HLA-A3 and D6S105 allele 8). To determine the significance of these allelic associations, the authors have analyzed the allele's frequency in 82 unrelated HC patients and 82 unrelated healthy controls. D6S105 allele 8 was present in 93% of patients and only 21% of controls ([chi][sup 2] = 86.46; P < .0001). The approximate relative risk for this allele was 48.4 HLA-A3 was present in 62% of patients and 26% of controls ([chi][sup 2] = 22.28; P<.001). Approximate relative risk for A3 was 4.8. They conclude that the microsatellite marker D6S105 is the closest marker to the HC gene reported to date. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Population-based analysis of the frequency of HFE gene polymorphisms: Correlation with the susceptibility to develop hereditary hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    KATSAROU, MARTHA-SPYRIDOULA; LATSI, ROSANA; PAPASAVVA, MARIA; DEMERTZIS, NIKOLAOS; KALOGRIDIS, THODORIS; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDES M.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; DRAKOULIS, NIKOLAOS

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease, characterized by increased dietary iron absorption. Due to the absence of an effective excretory mechanism, the excess iron in the body may accumulate resulting in toxic effects. The HFE gene also affects the activity of hepcidin, a hormone which acts as a negative regulator of iron metabolism. In this study, we performed a population-based analysis of the distribution of three hemochromatosis-related polymorphisms in the HFE gene (rs1800562, rs1799945 and rs1800730). DNA from 1,446 non-related individuals of Greek ethnicity was collected and analyzed, either from whole blood or buccal swabs. The frequency distribution of these HFE gene polymorphisms was then determined. The results revealed that in our Greek population cohort (gr) the frequencies of each polymorphism were as follows: rs1800562: GG (wild-type)=97.0%, GA=1.5%, AA=1.5%; rs1799945: CC (wild-type)=74.4%, CG=23.4%, GG=2.2%; rs1800730: AA (wild-type)=98.1%, AT=1.5% and TT=0.4%. No association between the HFE polymorphisms rs1800562, rs1799945 and rs1800730 and gender could be established. As regards the rs1800562 polymorphism, the A allele (mutant) was ~1.8-fold more frequent in the European population (eur) than in the Greek population [(gr)=2,3%<(eur)=4%]. As for the rs1799945 polymorphism, the G allele (mutant) was 1.2-fold more frequent in the European population than in the Greek population [(gr)=13,9%<(eur)=17%]. As regards the rs1800730 polymorphism, the T allele (mutant) was ~1.7-fold more frequent in the European population than in the Greek population [(gr)=1.2%<(eur)=2%]. However, these pathogenic mutations were found more frequently in the Greek population compared to the global population (gl) [rs1800562: (gl)=1%<(gr)=2,3%; rs1799945: (gl)=7%<(gr)=13,9%; rs1800730: (gl)=<1%<(gr)=1.2%]. This suggests that the Greek population may differ genetically from the northern European population, due to influences from

  14. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-07-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe(-/-) mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe(-/-) mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe(-/-) mice showed decreased manganese accumulation in the cerebellum. Hfe(-/-) mice also exhibited increased anxiety with decreased exploratory activity and elevated dopamine D1 receptor and norepinephrine transporter in the striatum. Moreover, Hfe deficiency attenuated manganese-associated impulsivity and modified the effect of manganese on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter and serotonin transporter. Together, our data indicate that loss of HFE function alters manganese-associated emotional behavior and further suggest that HFE could be a potential molecular target to alleviate affective disorders induced by manganese inhalation.

  15. Dietary iron intake and serum ferritin concentration in 213 patients homozygous for the HFEC282Y hemochromatosis mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Lovato, Laura; Barton, James C; Vitolins, Mara; McLaren, Gordon; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Christine; Harris, Emily L; Speechley, Mark; Eckfeldt, John H; Diaz, Sharmin; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Adams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary iron content influences iron stores in HFEC282Y homozygotes as assessed by serum ferritin concentration. DESIGN: Serum ferritin concentration was measured and a dietary iron questionnaire was completed as part of the evaluation of 213 HFEC282Y homozygotes who were identified through screening of >100,000 primary care patients at five HEmochromatosis and IRon Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study Field Centers in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: No significant relationships between serum ferritin concentration and dietary heme iron content, dietary nonheme iron content or reports of supplemental iron use were found. CONCLUSION: These results do not support recommending dietary heme or nonheme iron restrictions for HFEC282Y homozygotes diagnosed through screening in North America. PMID:22720276

  16. Autoimmune Conditions in 235 Hemochromatosis Probands with HFE C282Y Homozygosity and Their First-Degree Relatives.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Barton, J Clayborn

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study of autoimmune conditions (ACs) in 235 hemochromatosis probands at diagnosis by analyzing age, sex, ACs, history of first-degree family members with ACs (FH), diabetes, heavy ethanol consumption, elevated serum ALT/AST, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, iron removed to achieve iron depletion (QFe), and positivity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes A (∗) 01, B (∗) 08; A (∗) 02, B (∗) 44; A (∗) 03, B (∗) 07; A (∗) 03, B (∗) 14; and A (∗) 29, B (∗) 44. There were 138 men (58.7%). Median followup was 19.6 y. One or more of 19 ACs were diagnosed in each of 35 probands (14.9%). Prevalences of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis were 8.1% (95% CI: [5.1, 12.5]), 1.7% [0.6, 4.6], and 0.0085 [0.0015, 0.0337], respectively. Eighteen probands (7.7%) had a FH. Eight probands with ACs had 9 family members with ACs. In a logistic regression, ACs were less likely in men (odds ratio (OR) 0.3 [0.1, 0.6]) and more likely in probands with a FH (OR 4.1 [1.4, 11.8]). Overall ACs risk was not significantly associated with QFe or HLA haplotypes. Estimated survival of probands with and without ACs did not differ significantly. We conclude that ACs are common in hemochromatosis probands, especially women and probands with a FH. PMID:26504855

  17. Precipitating factors of porphyria cutanea tarda in Brazil with emphasis on hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations. Study of 60 patients*

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fatima Mendonça Jorge; Nakhle, Maria Cristina; Abrantes-Lemos, Clarice Pires; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, characterized by the decreased activity of the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase enzyme. Several reports associated HFE gene mutations of hereditary hemochromatosis with porphyria cutanea tarda worldwide, although up to date only one study has been conducted in Brazil. OBJECTIVES Investigation of porphyria cutanea tarda association with C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Identification of precipitating factors (hepatitis C, HIV, alcoholism and estrogen) and their link with HFE mutations. METHODS An ambispective study of 60 patients with PCT was conducted during the period from 2003 to 2012. Serological tests for hepatitis C and HIV were performed and histories of alcohol abuse and estrogen intake were investigated. HFE mutations were identified with real-time PCR. RESULTS Porphyria cutanea tarda predominated in males and alcohol abuse was the main precipitating factor. Estrogen intake was the sole precipitating factor present in 25% of female patients. Hepatitis C was present in 41.7%. All HIV-positive patients (15.3%) had a history of alcohol abuse. Allele frequency for HFE mutations, i.e., C282Y (p = 0.0001) and H63D (p = 0.0004), were significantly higher in porphyria cutanea tarda patients, compared to control group. HFE mutations had no association with the other precipitating factors. CONCLUSIONS Alcohol abuse, hepatitis C and estrogen intake are prevalent precipitating factors in our porphyria cutanea tarda population; however, hemochromatosis in itself can also contribute to the outbreak of porphyria cutanea tarda, which makes the research for HFE mutations necessary in these patients PMID:24068123

  18. Hereditary hemochromatosis: Generation of a transcription map within a refined and extended map of the HLA class I region

    SciTech Connect

    Totaro, A.; Grifa, A.; Gasparini, P.

    1996-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis, a common severe inherited disease, maps to the short arm of chromosome 6 close to the HLA-A locus. Recently, linkage data on Italian and French populations confirmed this location, while a similar analysis on Australian and British populations located the gene closer to D6S105, a marker residing telomeric of HLA-A. To increase our knowledge on the region of highest linkage disequilibrium in our population and possibly to identify the disease gene, a 1.2-Mb detailed physical and transcription map was generated, spanning the HLA class I region. Thirty-eight unique cDNA fragments, retrieved following the hybridization of immobilized YACs to primary pools of cDNAs prepared from RNA of fetal brain, adult brain, liver, placenta, and the CaCo{sub 2} cell line, were characterized. All cDNA fragments were positioned in a refined and extended map of the human major histocompatibility complex spanning from HLA-E to approximately 500 kb telomeric of HLA-F. The localization of known genes was refined, and a new gene from the RNA helicase superfamily was identified. Overall, 14 transcription units in addition to the HLA genes have been detected and integrated in the map. Thirteen cDNA fragments show no similarity with known sequences and could be candidates for the disease. Their characterization and assessment for involvement in hemochromatosis are still under investigation. Seven new polymorphisms, some tightly linked to the disease, were also identified and localized. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Autoimmune Conditions in 235 Hemochromatosis Probands with HFE C282Y Homozygosity and Their First-Degree Relatives.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Barton, J Clayborn

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study of autoimmune conditions (ACs) in 235 hemochromatosis probands at diagnosis by analyzing age, sex, ACs, history of first-degree family members with ACs (FH), diabetes, heavy ethanol consumption, elevated serum ALT/AST, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, iron removed to achieve iron depletion (QFe), and positivity for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes A (∗) 01, B (∗) 08; A (∗) 02, B (∗) 44; A (∗) 03, B (∗) 07; A (∗) 03, B (∗) 14; and A (∗) 29, B (∗) 44. There were 138 men (58.7%). Median followup was 19.6 y. One or more of 19 ACs were diagnosed in each of 35 probands (14.9%). Prevalences of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis were 8.1% (95% CI: [5.1, 12.5]), 1.7% [0.6, 4.6], and 0.0085 [0.0015, 0.0337], respectively. Eighteen probands (7.7%) had a FH. Eight probands with ACs had 9 family members with ACs. In a logistic regression, ACs were less likely in men (odds ratio (OR) 0.3 [0.1, 0.6]) and more likely in probands with a FH (OR 4.1 [1.4, 11.8]). Overall ACs risk was not significantly associated with QFe or HLA haplotypes. Estimated survival of probands with and without ACs did not differ significantly. We conclude that ACs are common in hemochromatosis probands, especially women and probands with a FH.

  20. [Neonatal hemochromatosis: Another entity that is no longer orphan. Advances in the diagnosis and management of the main cause of neonatal acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Molera Busoms, C; Quintero Bernabeu, J; Martín de Carpi, J

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the neonatal period. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to iron overload in hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues. New evidence has emerged during the last few years as regards its alloimmune etiology, which have had an important repercussion on the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of these patients. Treatment with immunoglobulins and exchange transfusions has radically changed the prognosis without liver transplant. Another great success has been the preventive use of immunoglobulin in pregnant women with a past history of neonatal hemochromatosis, thus decreasing the rate of disease recurrence up to 70%. This new paradigm has led to an entity with a poor prognosis becoming a curable disease if diagnosed and treated early. Nevertheless, a large widespread ignorance of the disease persists, with medical implications that result in significant health problems, due to the delayed referral of these patients to specialized centers.

  1. Non-mutagenic Suppression of Enterocyte Ferroportin 1 by Chemical Ribosomal Inactivation via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated Regulation: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEMOCHROMATOSIS.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-09-16

    Iron transfer across the basolateral membrane of an enterocyte into the circulation is the rate-limiting step in iron absorption and is regulated by various pathophysiological factors. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron exporter, transports iron from the basolateral surface of enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes into the blood. Patients with genetic mutations in FPN or repeated blood transfusion develop hemochromatosis. In this study, non-mutagenic ribosomal inactivation was assessed as an etiological factor of FPN-associated hemochromatosis in enterocytes. Non-mutagenic chemical ribosomal inactivation disrupted iron homeostasis by regulating expression of the iron exporter FPN-1, leading to intracellular accumulation in enterocytes. Mechanistically, a xenobiotic insult stimulated the intracellular sentinel p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which was positively involved in FPN-1 suppression by ribosomal dysfunction. Moreover, ribosomal inactivation-induced iron accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans as a simplified in vivo model for gut nutrition uptake was dependent on SEK-1, a p38 kinase activator, leading to suppression of FPN-1.1 expression and iron accumulation. In terms of gene regulation, ribosomal stress-activated p38 signaling down-regulated NRF2 and NF-κB, both of which were positive transcriptional regulators of FPN-1 transcription. This study provides molecular evidence for the modulation of iron bioavailability by ribosomal dysfunction as a potent etiological factor of non-mutagenic environmental hemochromatosis in the gut-to-blood axis.

  2. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-01-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe−/− mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe−/− mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe−/− mice showed decreased manganese accumulation in the cerebellum. Hfe−/− mice also exhibited increased anxiety with decreased exploratory activity and elevated dopamine D1 receptor and norepinephrine transporter in the striatum. Moreover, Hfe deficiency attenuated manganese-associated impulsivity and modified the effect of manganese on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter and serotonin transporter. Together, our data indicate that loss of HFE function alters manganese-associated emotional behavior and further suggest that HFE could be a potential molecular target to alleviate affective disorders induced by manganese inhalation. PMID:26189056

  3. Next-generation sequencing of hereditary hemochromatosis-related genes: Novel likely pathogenic variants found in the Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Faria, Ricardo; Silva, Bruno; Silva, Catarina; Loureiro, Pedro; Queiroz, Ana; Fraga, Sofia; Esteves, Jorge; Mendes, Diana; Fleming, Rita; Vieira, Luís; Gonçalves, João; Faustino, Paula

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by excessive iron absorption resulting in pathologically increased body iron stores. It is typically associated with common HFE gene mutation (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp). However, in Southern European populations up to one third of HH patients do not carry the risk genotypes. This study aimed to explore the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyse a panel of iron metabolism-related genes (HFE, TFR2, HJV, HAMP, SLC40A1, and FTL) in 87 non-classic HH Portuguese patients. A total of 1241 genetic alterations were detected corresponding to 53 different variants, 13 of which were not described in the available public databases. Among them, five were predicted to be potentially pathogenic: three novel mutations in TFR2 [two missense (p.Leu750Pro and p.Ala777Val) and one intronic splicing mutation (c.967-1G>C)], one missense mutation in HFE (p.Tyr230Cys), and one mutation in the 5'-UTR of HAMP gene (c.-25G>A). The results reported here illustrate the usefulness of NGS for targeted iron metabolism-related gene panels, as a likely cost-effective approach for molecular genetics diagnosis of non-classic HH patients. Simultaneously, it has contributed to the knowledge of the pathophysiology of those rare iron metabolism-related disorders. PMID:27667161

  4. Identification of novel mutations in hemochromatosis genes by targeted next generation sequencing in Italian patients with unexplained iron overload.

    PubMed

    Badar, Sadaf; Busti, Fabiana; Ferrarini, Alberto; Xumerle, Luciano; Bozzini, Paolo; Capelli, Paola; Pozzi-Mucelli, Roberto; Campostrini, Natascia; De Matteis, Giovanna; Marin Vargas, Sergio; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Delledonne, Massimo; Olivieri, Oliviero; Girelli, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis, one of the commonest genetic disorder in Caucasians, is mainly associated to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene, which is highly prevalent (allele frequency up to near 10% in Northern Europe) and easily detectable through a widely available "first level" molecular test. However, in certain geographical regions like the Mediterranean area, up to 30% of patients with a HH phenotype has a negative or non-diagnostic (i.e. simple heterozygosity) test, because of a known heterogeneity involving at least four other genes (HAMP, HJV, TFR2, and SLC40A1). Mutations in such genes are generally rare/private, making the diagnosis of atypical HH essentially a matter of exclusion in clinical practice (from here the term of "non-HFE" HH), unless cumbersome traditional sequencing is applied. We developed a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-based test targeting the five HH genes, and applied it to patients with clinically relevant iron overload (IO) and a non-diagnostic first level genetic test. We identified several mutations, some of which were novel (i.e. HFE W163X, HAMP R59X, and TFR2 D555N) and allowed molecular reclassification of "non-HFE" HH clinical diagnosis, particularly in some highly selected IO patients without concurring acquired risk factors. This NGS-based "second level" genetic test may represent a useful tool for molecular diagnosis of HH in patients in whom HH phenotype remains unexplained after the search of common HFE mutations.

  5. Isolation of novel non-HLA gene fragments from the hemochromatosis region (6p21.3) by cDNA hybridization selection.

    PubMed Central

    Goei, V. L.; Parimoo, S.; Capossela, A.; Chu, T. W.; Gruen, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    It has previously been shown that cDNA hybridization selection can identify and recover novel genes from large cloned genomic DNA such as cosmids or YACs. In an effort to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, this technique was applied to a 320-kb YAC containing the HLA-A gene. A short fragment cDNA library derived from human duodenum was selected with the YAC DNA. Ten novel gene fragments were isolated, characterized, and localized on the physical map of the YAC. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8304341

  6. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Predisposes Mice to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infection Even in the Absence of the Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Miller, Halie K; Schwiesow, Leah; Au-Yeung, Winnie; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) predisposes humans to serious disseminated infection with pathogenic Yersinia as well as several other pathogens. Recently, we showed that the iron-sulfur cluster coordinating transcription factor IscR is required for type III secretion in Y. pseudotuberculosis by direct control of the T3SS master regulator LcrF. In E. coli and Yersinia, IscR levels are predicted to be regulated by iron bioavailability, oxygen tension, and oxidative stress, such that iron depletion should lead to increased IscR levels. To investigate how host iron overload influences Y. pseudotuberculosis virulence and the requirement for the Ysc type III secretion system (T3SS), we utilized two distinct murine models of HH: hemojuvelin knockout mice that mimic severe, early-onset HH as well as mice with the Hfe (C282Y∕C282Y) mutation carried by 10% of people of Northern European descent, associated with adult-onset HH. Hjv (-∕-) and Hfe (C282Y∕C282Y) transgenic mice displayed enhanced colonization of deep tissues by Y. pseudotuberculosis following oral inoculation, recapitulating enhanced susceptibility of humans with HH to disseminated infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia. Importantly, HH mice orally infected with Y. pseudotuberculosis lacking the T3SS-encoding virulence plasmid, pYV, displayed increased deep tissue colonization relative to wildtype mice. Consistent with previous reports using monocytes from HH vs. healthy donors, macrophages isolated from Hfe (C282Y∕C282Y) mice were defective in Yersinia uptake compared to wildtype macrophages, indicating that the anti-phagocytic property of the Yersinia T3SS plays a less important role in HH animals. These data suggest that Yersinia may rely on distinct virulence factors to cause disease in healthy vs. HH hosts. PMID:27446816

  7. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Predisposes Mice to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infection Even in the Absence of the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Halie K.; Schwiesow, Leah; Au-Yeung, Winnie; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) predisposes humans to serious disseminated infection with pathogenic Yersinia as well as several other pathogens. Recently, we showed that the iron-sulfur cluster coordinating transcription factor IscR is required for type III secretion in Y. pseudotuberculosis by direct control of the T3SS master regulator LcrF. In E. coli and Yersinia, IscR levels are predicted to be regulated by iron bioavailability, oxygen tension, and oxidative stress, such that iron depletion should lead to increased IscR levels. To investigate how host iron overload influences Y. pseudotuberculosis virulence and the requirement for the Ysc type III secretion system (T3SS), we utilized two distinct murine models of HH: hemojuvelin knockout mice that mimic severe, early-onset HH as well as mice with the HfeC282Y∕C282Y mutation carried by 10% of people of Northern European descent, associated with adult-onset HH. Hjv−∕− and HfeC282Y∕C282Y transgenic mice displayed enhanced colonization of deep tissues by Y. pseudotuberculosis following oral inoculation, recapitulating enhanced susceptibility of humans with HH to disseminated infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia. Importantly, HH mice orally infected with Y. pseudotuberculosis lacking the T3SS-encoding virulence plasmid, pYV, displayed increased deep tissue colonization relative to wildtype mice. Consistent with previous reports using monocytes from HH vs. healthy donors, macrophages isolated from HfeC282Y∕C282Y mice were defective in Yersinia uptake compared to wildtype macrophages, indicating that the anti-phagocytic property of the Yersinia T3SS plays a less important role in HH animals. These data suggest that Yersinia may rely on distinct virulence factors to cause disease in healthy vs. HH hosts. PMID:27446816

  8. Expression of hepcidin and other iron-related genes in type 3 hemochromatosis due to a novel mutation in transferrin receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    Pelucchi, Sara; Mariani, Raffaella; Trombini, Paola; Coletti, Sabina; Pozzi, Matteo; Paolini, Valentina; Barisani, Donatella; Piperno, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 (TFR2) regulates hepatic hepcidin secretion and when mutated causes type-3 hemochromatosis. No functional study is available in humans. We studied a 47 year-old woman with hemochromatosis. TFR2 DNA and its hepatic transcript were directly sequenced. Hepatic expression of hepcidin and other iron-related genes were measured by qRT-PCR. Urinary hepcidin was measured at baseline and after an oral iron challenge (ferrous sulfate, 65 mg) by SELDI-TOF-MS. A novel homozygous TFR2 mutation was identified in the splicing donor site of intron 4 (c.614+4 A>G) causing exon 4 skipping. Hepcidin and hemojuvelin expression were markedly reduced. Urinary hepcidin was lower than normal and further decreased after iron challenge. This is the first description of iron-related gene expression profiles in a TFR2 mutated patient. The decreased hepatic and urinary expression of hepcidin and lack of acute response to iron challenge confirms the primary role of TFR2 in iron homeostasis. PMID:19144662

  9. A hemochromatosis-causing mutation C282Y is a risk factor for proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peterlin, Borut; Globocnik Petrovic, Mojca; Makuc, Jana; Hawlina, Marko; Petrovic, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Iron metabolism might be involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. C282Y and H63D mutations in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are associated with increased serum iron levels and consequently with hereditary hemochromatosis. In the present study, we searched for a relationship between C282Y and H63D gene mutations and the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes. For this purpose, 90 subjects with type 2 diabetes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) were compared to 133 diabetic subjects without PDR. There was a significantly higher frequency of the C282Y heterozygotes in patients with PDR compared to subjects without it (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.2-8.0; p=0.02), whereas no association was demonstrated between PDR and H63D genotypes (OR=1.1, 95% CI=0.6-2.2; p=0.7). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the C282Y mutation was a significant independent risk factor for the development of PDR (OR=6.1, 95% CI=1.2-30.5; p=0.027). These data suggest that heterozygosity for C282Y might be a novel risk factor for PDR in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes. PMID:14618419

  10. Expression of SFT (stimulator of Fe transport) is enhanced by iron chelation in HeLa cells and by hemochromatosis in liver.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Yu, Z K; Wessling-Resnick, M

    1998-12-25

    SFT (stimulator of Fe transport) is a novel transport protein that has been found to facilitate uptake of iron presented to cells as either Fe(II) or Fe(III). When HeLa cells are exposed to the iron chelator desferrioxamine, levels of SFT mRNA increase in an actinomycin D-sensitive manner. In contrast, cells exposed to high levels of iron down-regulate SFT expression in a time-dependent and reversible fashion. Thus, homeostatic regulation of SFT expression not only ensures that sufficient levels of iron are maintained but also limits excessive assimilation to prevent potentially harmful effects of this toxic metal. The unexpected observation that SFT transcript levels are up-regulated in hemochromatosis patients therefore suggests that enhanced SFT expression contributes to the etiology of this iron overload disorder.

  11. Iron, copper, zinc and bromine mapping in cirrhotic liver slices from patients with hemochromatosis studied by microscopic synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis in continuous scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterode, W.; Falkenberg, G.; Höftberger, R.; Wrba, F.

    2007-07-01

    Iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are essential metals in physiological cell metabolism. While Fe is easy to determine biochemically in histological slices, Cu and zinc (Zn) distribution is frequently critical in confirming the presence of an overload in disturbed Fe/Cu metabolism. To analyze Fe, Cu and Zn in a near histological resolution, energy dispersive microscopic synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence was applied. In normal liver tissue, after fixation and imbedding in paraffin, mean Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations were 152 ± 54, 20.1 ± 4.3 and 88.919.5 μg/g sample weight, respectively. No substantial, characteristic differences in their distribution were found in the two-dimensional scans. In slices from patients with hemochromatosis mean Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations were 1102 ± 539, 35.9 ± 14.6 and 27.2 ± 6.7 μg/g sample weight, respectively. Additionally, a significant decrease in phosphorus and sulphur concentrations existed. An increased Cu around cirrhotic regenerations nodules is mostly associated with a lymphocytic infiltration in this region. Analyzing concentrations of Fe in different regions of the samples show a clear negative dependency between Fe and Cu, Cu and Zn, but a positive one between Fe and Zn. Conclusion: With a focal beam size of 15 μm in diameter a resolution of the elemental distribution was achieved which is widely comparable with stained histological slices (20× light microscope). The analysis of simultaneous determined elements reveals metabolic differences between Fe, Cu and Zn in liver tissue from patients with hemochromatosis.

  12. [Advances in hereditary hemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Nardi, Graciela; Cadiz, Claudia; Lachman, J; Cornelio, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary hemocromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with a recessive autosomic pattern, in which inadequate iron (Fe) absorption is made by the intestinal cell. As consequence of that process, takes place a progressive accumulation of metal in different organs, predominantly in the liver. This leads to an alteration of liver structure and function: cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma (1). The gene implied in this pathology was identified (HFE) in 1996. This codes a similar molecule to the mayor histocompatibility complex type 1(MHC-T1 like) that can modulate the transport of PE binding the transferrin receptor. This progress allows a deep understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the homeostasis of the Fe and its alterations in the NH. The diagnosis of disease by means of a genetic test let to carry out a familiar screening and to detect asymptomatic carriers. This makes possible to begin the appropriate treatment at early stages of the disease in order to avoid its consequences and offering a better quality of life to these patients.

  13. How Is Hemochromatosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... they started and their severity. Whether you take iron (pills or injections) with or without vitamin C supplements (vitamin C helps your body absorb iron from food). If so, your doctor may ask ...

  14. UbcH5A, a member of human E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, is closely related to SFT, a stimulator of iron transport, and is up-regulated in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Sven G; Riedel, Hans-Dieter; Herrmann, Thomas; Hadaschik, Boris; Bents, Karin; Veltkamp, Claudia; Stremmel, Wolfgang

    2003-04-15

    SFT, a stimulator of iron (Fe) transport, has been described as a transmembrane protein that facilitates the uptake of ferrous and ferric iron in mammalian cells. This study was initiated to investigate the 5' regulatory region of SFT and its role in the etiology of hereditary hemochromatosis. Sequence analyses of the putative 5' regulatory region revealed that the SFT cDNA sequence corresponds to intron 6/exon 7 of UbcH5A, a member of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, which is involved in the iron-dependent ubiquitination of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) by the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (pVHL) E3 ligase complex. Further mRNA expression studies using a sequence-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay showed that UbcH5A is significantly up-regulated in the liver of iron-overloaded patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, as previously published for SFT. However, in vitro studies on HepG2 cells failed to demonstrate any significant UbcH5A regulation in response to iron loading or iron chelation. In conclusion, in vivo mRNA expression data previously obtained for SFT might be attributed to UbcH5A. The role of UbcH5A and the ubiquitination pathway in the etiology of hereditary hemochromatosis remains to be elucidated further.

  15. Phenotypic expression of a novel C282Y/R226G compound heterozygous state in HFE hemochromatosis: molecular dynamics and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Cézard, Christine; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Le Gac, Gérald; Gourlaouen, Isabelle; Ferec, Claude; Rochette, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Most adults affected with hereditary hemochromatosis are homozygous for a single point mutation of HFE (p.Cys282Tyr). Apart from the compound heterozygous state for the p.Cys282Tyr mutant and the widespread p.His63Asp variant allele, other rare HFE mutations can be found in trans and may have clinical impact. In the present report we describe the structural and functional consequences of a new mutation, namely the p.Arg226Gly which was inherited in trans with the p.Cys282Tyr allele in a patient affected with a mild iron overload. Because the R226G substitution is located in the vicinity of the normal Cys225S-S282Cys disulfide bond we initially investigated the structure of the variant by molecular dynamics techniques in order to estimate the effect of the mutation on the global structure of HFE domain α3. We found that the solvation free energy, hydrophobicity and formation of salt bridges are slightly modified with the global secondary structure of the α3 domain being conserved. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that the Q283P substitution leads to the loss of the normal Cys225S-S282Cys disulfide bridge. Similar to the Q283P substitution, the R226G substitution does not substitute a residue directly involved in the formation of the disulfide bridge. However, unlike the p.Gln283Pro variant which destroyed the normal disulfide bridge, the R226G mutation does not affect the normal Cys225S-S282Cys bridge. Furthermore based on cell line studies we clearly show that the mutation does not prevent cell surface localization, β2-microglobulin association and binding to transferrin receptor 1. This new compound heterozygous phenotype is very close to those of the C282Y/H63D compound heterozygous patients who display the biochemical hemochromatosis phenotype but with lower body iron stores than C282Y homozygotes. Our results do not exclude unknown genetic and/or metabolic factors that may act synergistically to increase the ferritin level. PMID:23953397

  16. Phenotypic expression of a novel C282Y/R226G compound heterozygous state in HFE hemochromatosis: molecular dynamics and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Cézard, Christine; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Le Gac, Gérald; Gourlaouen, Isabelle; Ferec, Claude; Rochette, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Most adults affected with hereditary hemochromatosis are homozygous for a single point mutation of HFE (p.Cys282Tyr). Apart from the compound heterozygous state for the p.Cys282Tyr mutant and the widespread p.His63Asp variant allele, other rare HFE mutations can be found in trans and may have clinical impact. In the present report we describe the structural and functional consequences of a new mutation, namely the p.Arg226Gly which was inherited in trans with the p.Cys282Tyr allele in a patient affected with a mild iron overload. Because the R226G substitution is located in the vicinity of the normal Cys225S-S282Cys disulfide bond we initially investigated the structure of the variant by molecular dynamics techniques in order to estimate the effect of the mutation on the global structure of HFE domain α3. We found that the solvation free energy, hydrophobicity and formation of salt bridges are slightly modified with the global secondary structure of the α3 domain being conserved. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that the Q283P substitution leads to the loss of the normal Cys225S-S282Cys disulfide bridge. Similar to the Q283P substitution, the R226G substitution does not substitute a residue directly involved in the formation of the disulfide bridge. However, unlike the p.Gln283Pro variant which destroyed the normal disulfide bridge, the R226G mutation does not affect the normal Cys225S-S282Cys bridge. Furthermore based on cell line studies we clearly show that the mutation does not prevent cell surface localization, β2-microglobulin association and binding to transferrin receptor 1. This new compound heterozygous phenotype is very close to those of the C282Y/H63D compound heterozygous patients who display the biochemical hemochromatosis phenotype but with lower body iron stores than C282Y homozygotes. Our results do not exclude unknown genetic and/or metabolic factors that may act synergistically to increase the ferritin level.

  17. Prevalence of C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations in hereditary HFE-hemochromatosis gene in Lithuanian population.

    PubMed

    Kucinskas, Laimutis; Juzenas, Simonas; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Cedaviciute, Ruta; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Kalibatas, Vytenis; Kondrackiene, Jurate; Kupcinskas, Limas

    2012-04-01

    HFE-hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive disease caused by HFE gene mutations and characterized as iron overload and failure of different organs. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of C282Y (c.845 G>A), H63D (c.187 C>G), and S65C (c.193A>T) alleles of HFE gene in the Lithuanian population. One thousand and eleven healthy blood donors of Lithuanian nationality were examined in four different ethnic Lithuanian regions to determine HFE gene alleles and genotype frequencies. The samples of DNA were analyzed for the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphism and validated by DNA sequencing. Among 1,011 blood donors tested, the frequency of C282Y, H63D, and S65C alleles were 2.6%, 15.9%, and 1.9%, respectively. One third of the tested subjects (n = 336) had at least one of the C282Y or H63D HFE gene mutations. The screening of Lithuanian blood donors has detected 13 (1.3%) subjects with a genotype C282Y/C282Y or C282Y/H63D responsible for the development of HFE-hemochromatosis. The prevalence of C282Y mutation was significantly higher among the inhabitants of Zemaitija (Somogitia) at the Baltic Sea area (5.9%) in comparison to the regions of continental part of Lithuania (2.4% in Dzukija, 2.3% in Aukstaitija, and 2% in Suvalkija, p < 0.05). These data support the hypothesis that the p.C282Y mutation originated from Scandinavia and spread with the Vikings along the Baltic Sea coast. The first epidemiological investigation of HFE gene mutations in ethnic Lithuanians showed that the frequencies of H63D, C282Y, and S65C of HFE gene alleles are similar to the other North-Eastern Europeans, especially in the Baltic region (Estonia, Latvia), Poland, and part of Russia (Moscow region).

  18. Increased Retinal Expression of the Pro-Angiogenic Receptor GPR91 via BMP6 in a Mouse Model of Juvenile Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Arjunan, Pachiappan; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P.; Ananth, Sudha; Romej, Michelle A.; Rajalakshmi, Veeranan-Karmegam; Prasad, Puttur D.; Martin, Pamela M.; Gurusamy, Mariappan; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hemochromatosis, an iron-overload disease, occurs as adult and juvenile types. Mutations in hemojuvelin (HJV), an iron-regulatory protein and a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor, underlie most of the juvenile type. Hjv−/− mice accumulate excess iron in retina and exhibit aberrant vascularization and angiomas. A succinate receptor, GPR91, is pro-angiogenic in retina. We hypothesized that Hjv−/− retinas have increased BMP signaling and increased GPR91 expression as the basis of angiomas. Methods Expression of GPR91 was examined by qPCR, immunofluorescence, and Western blot in wild-type and Hjv−/− mouse retinas and pRPE cells. Influence of excess iron and BMP6 on GPR91 expression was investigated in ARPE-19 cells, and wild-type and Hjv−/− pRPE cells. Succinate was used to activate GPR91 and determine the effects of GPR91 signaling on VEGF expression. Signaling of BMP6 was studied by the expression of Smad1/5/8 and pSmad4, and the BMP-target gene Id1. The interaction of pSmad4 with GPR91 promoter was studied by ChIP. Results Expression of GPR91 was higher in Hjv−/− retinas and RPE than in wild-type counterparts. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling was increased, not decreased, in Hjv−/− retinas and RPE. Bone morphogenetic protein 6 induced GPR91 in RPE, suggesting that increased BMP signaling in Hjv−/− retinas was likely responsible for GPR91 upregulation. Exposure of RPE to excess iron and succinate as well as BMP6 and succinate increased VEGF expression. Bone morphogenetic protein 6 promoted the interaction of pSmad4 with GPR91 promoter in RPE. Conclusions G-protein-coupled receptor 91 is a BMP6 target and Hjv deletion enhances BMP signaling in retina, thus underscoring a role for excess iron and hemochromatosis in abnormal retinal vascularization. PMID:27046124

  19. Hepatic morphology and iron quantitation in perinatal hemochromatosis. Comparison with a large perinatal control population, including cases with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Valberg, L. S.; Cutz, E.; Lines, L. D.; Phillips, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    We compared hepatic morphology, hepatocellular siderosis, extrahepatic parenchymal siderosis, and (by chemical assay of liver and spleen) the amount of elemental iron and copper in 12 cases of perinatal hemochromatosis (PH) with 119 perinatal controls. Controls were subgrouped according to diagnoses based on clinical and autopsy findings; 37 had chronic liver disease, either hepatic fibrosis (17) or cirrhosis (20). Graded semiquantitatively, hepatocellular siderosis varied widely among controls, and some showed more than PH cases. By chemical assay, total hepatic iron in PH cases was not significantly greater than in any control group except the preterm. Therefore, our findings do not support an etiological role for iron in PH. Its distinctive hepatic morphology seems related to onset of liver disease during fetal life, when periportal hepatocytes normally contain hemosiderin (as in 71 of 82 controls without chronic liver disease). Environmental agents (such as hypoxia, virus, drug) that could damage a fetal liver would usually damage other fetal organs as well. They would be unlikely to recur in a subsequent pregnancy and thereby account for PH occurring in siblings. In initiating PH, therefore, putative environmental agents may need to interact with a factor or factors intrinsic to the developing fetal liver. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8238250

  20. Use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) in vivo as an alternative technique for the assessment of iron levels in patients with thalassemia and hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Estevam, Marcelo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2013-02-01

    This work investigated the viability of the portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF) technique as a means of measuring iron levels in patients suffering from thalassemia major (beta-thalassemia) and hereditary hemochromatosis (HH or Haemochromatosis) or other iron-overload conditions. Measurements were conducted at the University Hospital Blood Center and in the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics at the State University of Londrina, Brazil. One thalassemia major patient and four healthy people were grouped. A PXRF system consisting of a Pu x-ray source and a SiPIN diode detector was used for measurements in vivo on the hand of each patient. The measuring system was calibrated with phantoms of aqueous solution doped with 15 to 150 ppm of iron. The duration of each measurement was 50 s. The detection limit (LLD) reached for iron was 13 ppm. The radiation dose on the skin was 10 mSv. The thalassemia patient presented 74 ± 6 ppm of iron, whereas the healthy people presented an average of 53 ± 5 ppm of iron. The results are in accord with the literature, which shows iron levels in the skin to be between 15 - 60 ppm for healthy people and between 70 - 150 ppm for thalassemia major patients. This work concluded that it is viable to apply the XRF methodology to follow thalassemia major and HH patients.

  1. Hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 phenotype modifiers in Italian patients. The controversial role of variants in HAMP, BMP2, FTL and SLC40A1 genes.

    PubMed

    Radio, Francesca Clementina; Majore, Silvia; Aurizi, Caterina; Sorge, Fiammetta; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Bernabini, Sara; Giotti, Irene; Torricelli, Francesca; Giannarelli, Diana; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a heterogeneous disorder of iron metabolism. The most common form of the disease is Classic or type 1 HH, mainly caused by a biallelic missense p.Cys282Tyr (c.845G>A) mutation in the HFE gene. However, the penetrance of p.Cys282Tyr/p.Cys282Tyr genotype is incomplete in terms of both biochemical and clinical expressivity. Lack of penetrance is thought to be caused by several genetic and environmental factors. Recently, a lot of evidences on HH genetic modifiers were produced, often without conclusive results. We investigated 6 polymorphisms (rs10421768 in HAMP gene, rs235756 in BMP2 gene, rs2230267 in FTL gene, rs1439816 in SLC40A1 gene, rs41295942 in TFR2 gene and rs2111833 in TMPRSS6 gene) with uncertain function in order to further evaluate their role in an independent cohort of 109 HH type 1 patients. Our results make it likely the role of rs10421768, rs235756, rs2230267 and rs1439816 polymorphisms, respectively in HAMP, BMP2, FTL and SLC40A1 genes in HH expressivity. In addition, previous and our findings support a hypothetical multifactorial model of HH, characterized by a principal gene (HFE in HH type 1) and minor genetic and environmental factors that still have to be fully elucidated.

  2. Maternal hemochromatosis gene H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism and lead levels of placental tissue, maternal and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Kayaalti, Zeliha; Kaya-Akyüzlü, Dilek; Söylemez, Esma; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-07-01

    Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE), a major histocompatibility complex class I-like integral membrane protein, participates in the down regulation of intestinal iron absorption by binding to transferrin receptor (TR). HFE competes with transferrin-bound iron for the TR and thus reduces uptake of iron into cells. On the other hand, a lack of HFE increases the intestinal absorption of iron similarly to iron deficiency associated with increasing in absorption and deposition of lead. During pregnancy, placenta cannot prevent transfer lead to the fetus; even low-level lead poisoning causes neurodevelopmental toxicity in children. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the maternal HFE H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism and lead levels in placental tissue, maternal blood and umbilical cord bloods. The study population comprised 93 mother-placenta pairs. Venous blood from mother was collected to investigate lead levels and HFE polymorphism that was detected by standard PCR-RFLP technique. Cord bloods and placentas were collected for lead levels which were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system. The HFE H63D genotype frequencies of mothers were found as 75.3% homozygote typical (HH), 23.6% heterozygote (HD) and 1.1% homozygote atypical (DD). Our study results showed that the placental tissue, umbilical cord and maternal blood lead levels of mothers with HD+DD genotypes were significantly higher than those with HH genotype (p<0.05). The present study indicated for the first time that mothers with H63D gene variants have higher lead levels of their newborn's placentas and umbilical cord bloods.

  3. Maternal hemochromatosis gene H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism and lead levels of placental tissue, maternal and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Kayaalti, Zeliha; Kaya-Akyüzlü, Dilek; Söylemez, Esma; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-07-01

    Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE), a major histocompatibility complex class I-like integral membrane protein, participates in the down regulation of intestinal iron absorption by binding to transferrin receptor (TR). HFE competes with transferrin-bound iron for the TR and thus reduces uptake of iron into cells. On the other hand, a lack of HFE increases the intestinal absorption of iron similarly to iron deficiency associated with increasing in absorption and deposition of lead. During pregnancy, placenta cannot prevent transfer lead to the fetus; even low-level lead poisoning causes neurodevelopmental toxicity in children. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the maternal HFE H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism and lead levels in placental tissue, maternal blood and umbilical cord bloods. The study population comprised 93 mother-placenta pairs. Venous blood from mother was collected to investigate lead levels and HFE polymorphism that was detected by standard PCR-RFLP technique. Cord bloods and placentas were collected for lead levels which were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system. The HFE H63D genotype frequencies of mothers were found as 75.3% homozygote typical (HH), 23.6% heterozygote (HD) and 1.1% homozygote atypical (DD). Our study results showed that the placental tissue, umbilical cord and maternal blood lead levels of mothers with HD+DD genotypes were significantly higher than those with HH genotype (p<0.05). The present study indicated for the first time that mothers with H63D gene variants have higher lead levels of their newborn's placentas and umbilical cord bloods. PMID:25981872

  4. Bivariate mixture modeling of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin concentration in Asians, African Americans, Hispanics, and whites in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Mclaren, Christine E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; Speechley, Mark; Castro, Oswaldo; Adams, Paul C.; Snively, Beverly M.; Harris, Emily L.; Reboussin, David M.; Mclachlan, Geoffrey J.; Bean, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Bivariate mixture modeling was used to analyze joint population distributions of transferrin saturation (TS) and serum ferritin concentration (SF) measured in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Four components (C1, C2, C3, and C4) with successively age-adjusted increasing means for TS and SF were identified in data from 26,832 African Americans, 12,620 Asians, 12,264 Hispanics, and 43,254 whites. The largest component, C2, had normal mean TS (21% to 26% for women, 29% to 30% for men) and SF (43–82 μg/L for women, 165–242 μg/L for men), which consisted of component proportions greater than 0.59 for women and greater than 0.68 for men. C3 and C4 had progressively greater mean values for TS and SF with progressively lesser component proportions. C1 had mean TS values less than 16% for women (<20% for men) and SF values less than 28 μg/L for women (<47 μg/L for men). Compared with C2, adjusted odds of iron deficiency were significantly greater in C1 (14.9–47.5 for women, 60.6–3530 for men), adjusted odds of liver disease were significantly greater in C3 and C4 for African-American women and all men, and adjusted odds of any HFE mutation were increased in C3 (1.4–1.8 for women, 1.2–1.9 for men) and in C4 for Hispanic and white women (1.5 and 5.2, respectively) and men (2.8 and 4.7, respectively). Joint mixture modeling identifies a component with lesser SF and TS at risk for iron deficiency and 2 components with greater SF and TS at risk for liver disease or HFE mutations. This approach can identify populations in which hereditary or acquired factors influence metabolism measurement. PMID:18201677

  5. Maternal hemochromatosis gene H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism and lead levels of placental tissue, maternal and umbilical cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaalti, Zeliha; Kaya-Akyüzlü, Dilek; Söylemez, Esma; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-07-15

    Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE), a major histocompatibility complex class I-like integral membrane protein, participates in the down regulation of intestinal iron absorption by binding to transferrin receptor (TR). HFE competes with transferrin-bound iron for the TR and thus reduces uptake of iron into cells. On the other hand, a lack of HFE increases the intestinal absorption of iron similarly to iron deficiency associated with increasing in absorption and deposition of lead. During pregnancy, placenta cannot prevent transfer lead to the fetus; even low-level lead poisoning causes neurodevelopmental toxicity in children. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the maternal HFE H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism and lead levels in placental tissue, maternal blood and umbilical cord bloods. The study population comprised 93 mother–placenta pairs. Venous blood from mother was collected to investigate lead levels and HFE polymorphism that was detected by standard PCR–RFLP technique. Cord bloods and placentas were collected for lead levels which were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system. The HFE H63D genotype frequencies of mothers were found as 75.3% homozygote typical (HH), 23.6% heterozygote (HD) and 1.1% homozygote atypical (DD). Our study results showed that the placental tissue, umbilical cord and maternal blood lead levels of mothers with HD+DD genotypes were significantly higher than those with HH genotype (p<0.05). The present study indicated for the first time that mothers with H63D gene variants have higher lead levels of their newborn's placentas and umbilical cord bloods. - Highlights: • Mothers with H63D gene variants have higher lead levels of their newborn's umbilical cord blood. • Unborn child of women with HD+DD genotypes may be at increased risk of internal exposure to lead. • Maternal HFE status may have an effect on increased placenta, maternal and cord blood lead levels. • Maternal HFE

  6. Effects of Highly Conserved Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Extended Haplotypes on Iron and Low CD8+ T Lymphocyte Phenotypes in HFE C282Y Homozygous Hemochromatosis Patients from Three Geographically Distant Areas

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Thorstensen, Ketil; Morais, Sandra; da Silva, Berta M.; Pinto, Jorge P.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Acton, Ronald T.; Porto, Graça

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH) is a recessively inherited disorder of iron overload occurring commonly in subjects homozygous for the C282Y mutation in HFE gene localized on chromosome 6p21.3 in linkage disequilibrium with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A locus. Although its genetic homogeneity, the phenotypic expression is variable suggesting the presence of modifying factors. One such genetic factor, a SNP microhaplotype named A-A-T, was recently found to be associated with a more severe phenotype and also with low CD8+T-lymphocyte numbers. The present study aimed to test whether the predictive value of the A-A-T microhaplotype remained in other population settings. In this study of 304 HH patients from 3 geographically distant populations (Porto, Portugal 65; Alabama, USA 57; Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 182), the extended haplotypes involving A-A-T were studied in 608 chromosomes and the CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers were determined in all subjects. Patients from Porto had a more severe phenotype than those from other settings. Patients with A-A-T seemed on average to have greater iron stores (p = 0.021), but significant differences were not confirmed in the 3 separate populations. Low CD8+ T-lymphocytes were associated with HLA-A*03-A-A-T in Porto and Alabama patients but not in the greater series from Nord-Trøndelag. Although A-A-T may signal a more severe iron phenotype, this study was unable to prove such an association in all population settings, precluding its use as a universal predictive marker of iron overload in HH. Interestingly, the association between A-A-T and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, which was confirmed in Porto and Alabama patients, was not observed in Nord-Trøndelag patients, showing that common HLA haplotypes like A*01–B*08 or A*03–B*07 segregating with HFE/C282Y in the three populations may carry different messages. These findings further strengthen the relevance of HH as a good disease model to search for novel candidate loci associated with

  7. Penetrance of Hemochromatosis in HFE Genotypes Resulting in p.Cys282Tyr and p.[Cys282Tyr];[His63Asp] in the eMERGE Network

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Carlos J.; Burt, Amber; Sundaresan, Agnes S.; Ye, Zi; Shaw, Christopher; Crosslin, David R.; Crane, Paul K.; Fullerton, S. Malia; Hansen, Kris; Carrell, David; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Derr, Kimberly; de Andrade, Mariza; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Ragon, Brittany K.; Stallings, Sarah C.; Papa, Gabriella; Bochenek, Joseph; Smith, Maureen E.; Aufox, Sharon A.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Patel, Vaibhav; Friesema, Elisha M.; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Gottesman, Omri; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Ritchie, Marylyn; Motulsky, Arno G.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Larson, Eric B.; Tromp, Gerard; Brilliant, Murray H.; Bottinger, Erwin; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Williams, Marc S.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder associated with pathogenic HFE variants, most commonly those resulting in p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp. Recommendations on returning incidental findings of HFE variants in individuals undergoing genome-scale sequencing should be informed by penetrance estimates of HH in unselected samples. We used the eMERGE Network, a multicenter cohort with genotype data linked to electronic medical records, to estimate the diagnostic rate and clinical penetrance of HH in 98 individuals homozygous for the variant coding for HFE p.Cys282Tyr and 397 compound heterozygotes with variants resulting in p.[His63Asp];[Cys282Tyr]. The diagnostic rate of HH in males was 24.4% for p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes and 3.5% for compound heterozygotes (p < 0.001); in females, it was 14.0% for p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes and 2.3% for compound heterozygotes (p < 0.001). Only males showed differences across genotypes in transferrin saturation levels (100% of homozygotes versus 37.5% of compound heterozygotes with transferrin saturation > 50%; p = 0.003), serum ferritin levels (77.8% versus 33.3% with serum ferritin > 300 ng/ml; p = 0.006), and diabetes (44.7% versus 28.0%; p = 0.03). No differences were found in the prevalence of heart disease, arthritis, or liver disease, except for the rate of liver biopsy (10.9% versus 1.8% [p = 0.013] in males; 9.1% versus 2% [p = 0.035] in females). Given the higher rate of HH diagnosis than in prior studies, the high penetrance of iron overload, and the frequency of at-risk genotypes, in addition to other suggested actionable adult-onset genetic conditions, opportunistic screening should be considered for p.[Cys282Tyr];[Cys282Tyr] individuals with existing genomic data. PMID:26365338

  8. Penetrance of Hemochromatosis in HFE Genotypes Resulting in p.Cys282Tyr and p.[Cys282Tyr];[His63Asp] in the eMERGE Network.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Carlos J; Burt, Amber; Sundaresan, Agnes S; Ye, Zi; Shaw, Christopher; Crosslin, David R; Crane, Paul K; Fullerton, S Malia; Hansen, Kris; Carrell, David; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Derr, Kimberly; de Andrade, Mariza; McCarty, Catherine A; Kitchner, Terrie E; Ragon, Brittany K; Stallings, Sarah C; Papa, Gabriella; Bochenek, Joseph; Smith, Maureen E; Aufox, Sharon A; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Patel, Vaibhav; Friesema, Elisha M; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Gottesman, Omri; Gerhard, Glenn S; Ritchie, Marylyn; Motulsky, Arno G; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Larson, Eric B; Tromp, Gerard; Brilliant, Murray H; Bottinger, Erwin; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M; Williams, Marc S; Jarvik, Gail P

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder associated with pathogenic HFE variants, most commonly those resulting in p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp. Recommendations on returning incidental findings of HFE variants in individuals undergoing genome-scale sequencing should be informed by penetrance estimates of HH in unselected samples. We used the eMERGE Network, a multicenter cohort with genotype data linked to electronic medical records, to estimate the diagnostic rate and clinical penetrance of HH in 98 individuals homozygous for the variant coding for HFE p.Cys282Tyr and 397 compound heterozygotes with variants resulting in p.[His63Asp];[Cys282Tyr]. The diagnostic rate of HH in males was 24.4% for p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes and 3.5% for compound heterozygotes (p < 0.001); in females, it was 14.0% for p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes and 2.3% for compound heterozygotes (p < 0.001). Only males showed differences across genotypes in transferrin saturation levels (100% of homozygotes versus 37.5% of compound heterozygotes with transferrin saturation > 50%; p = 0.003), serum ferritin levels (77.8% versus 33.3% with serum ferritin > 300 ng/ml; p = 0.006), and diabetes (44.7% versus 28.0%; p = 0.03). No differences were found in the prevalence of heart disease, arthritis, or liver disease, except for the rate of liver biopsy (10.9% versus 1.8% [p = 0.013] in males; 9.1% versus 2% [p = 0.035] in females). Given the higher rate of HH diagnosis than in prior studies, the high penetrance of iron overload, and the frequency of at-risk genotypes, in addition to other suggested actionable adult-onset genetic conditions, opportunistic screening should be considered for p.[Cys282Tyr];[Cys282Tyr] individuals with existing genomic data. PMID:26365338

  9. Penetrance of Hemochromatosis in HFE Genotypes Resulting in p.Cys282Tyr and p.[Cys282Tyr];[His63Asp] in the eMERGE Network.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Carlos J; Burt, Amber; Sundaresan, Agnes S; Ye, Zi; Shaw, Christopher; Crosslin, David R; Crane, Paul K; Fullerton, S Malia; Hansen, Kris; Carrell, David; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Derr, Kimberly; de Andrade, Mariza; McCarty, Catherine A; Kitchner, Terrie E; Ragon, Brittany K; Stallings, Sarah C; Papa, Gabriella; Bochenek, Joseph; Smith, Maureen E; Aufox, Sharon A; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Patel, Vaibhav; Friesema, Elisha M; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Gottesman, Omri; Gerhard, Glenn S; Ritchie, Marylyn; Motulsky, Arno G; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Larson, Eric B; Tromp, Gerard; Brilliant, Murray H; Bottinger, Erwin; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M; Williams, Marc S; Jarvik, Gail P

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder associated with pathogenic HFE variants, most commonly those resulting in p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp. Recommendations on returning incidental findings of HFE variants in individuals undergoing genome-scale sequencing should be informed by penetrance estimates of HH in unselected samples. We used the eMERGE Network, a multicenter cohort with genotype data linked to electronic medical records, to estimate the diagnostic rate and clinical penetrance of HH in 98 individuals homozygous for the variant coding for HFE p.Cys282Tyr and 397 compound heterozygotes with variants resulting in p.[His63Asp];[Cys282Tyr]. The diagnostic rate of HH in males was 24.4% for p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes and 3.5% for compound heterozygotes (p < 0.001); in females, it was 14.0% for p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes and 2.3% for compound heterozygotes (p < 0.001). Only males showed differences across genotypes in transferrin saturation levels (100% of homozygotes versus 37.5% of compound heterozygotes with transferrin saturation > 50%; p = 0.003), serum ferritin levels (77.8% versus 33.3% with serum ferritin > 300 ng/ml; p = 0.006), and diabetes (44.7% versus 28.0%; p = 0.03). No differences were found in the prevalence of heart disease, arthritis, or liver disease, except for the rate of liver biopsy (10.9% versus 1.8% [p = 0.013] in males; 9.1% versus 2% [p = 0.035] in females). Given the higher rate of HH diagnosis than in prior studies, the high penetrance of iron overload, and the frequency of at-risk genotypes, in addition to other suggested actionable adult-onset genetic conditions, opportunistic screening should be considered for p.[Cys282Tyr];[Cys282Tyr] individuals with existing genomic data.

  10. Liver transplantation for neonatal hemochromatosis: analysis of the UNOS database.

    PubMed

    Sheflin-Findling, Shari; Annunziato, Rachel A; Chu, Jaime; Arvelakis, Antonios; Mahon, Danielle; Arnon, Ronen

    2015-03-01

    NH is the most common identifiable cause of ALF in the neonate. LT is the definitive treatment for neonates with NH who have failed medical therapy. Our aim was to determine the outcomes of LT in infants with NH. Patients (less than one yr of age) with NH who were listed for LT and patients who underwent LT between 1994 and 2013 were identified from the UNOS database for analysis. Risk factors for death and graft loss were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Thirty-eight infants with NH with a total of 43 transplants were identified. One- and five-yr patient and graft survival were 84.2%, 81.6%, 71.1%, and 68.4%, respectively. The outcomes for NH were not significantly different when compared to the same age-matched recipients with other causes of ALF. There were no statistically significant risk factors identified for graft loss or death. Ninety infants with NH were listed for LT. Reasons for removal included transplanted (49%), death (27%), too sick to transplant (7%), and improved status (13%). LT for infants with NH has a high rate of graft loss and death; however, outcomes are comparable to the same age-matched recipients with other causes of ALF.

  11. Towards the isolation of the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chorney, M.J.; Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Despite the existence of many useful reagents which exist to aid in the positional cloning of the idiopathic hermochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the nature and precise location of this common genetic disease has remained elusive. Our group has pursued an MHC-based positional cloning approach which has centered on the precise physical definition of HLA-A variant chromosomes. Using deletion breakpoint locations in combination with genetic data derived from the Brittany founder population, we have used cDNA selection techniques to isolate new members of distinct multigene families which reside in the HFE critical region (distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint/proximal to HLA-F). We have also initiated an independent set of cytogenetic and physical mapping studies to position the marker D6S105 with respect to the telomeric end of the class I subregion. Toward this end, we have performed double labelling FISH experiments which have allowed the localization of D6S105-containing YACs with respect to the HLA-A subregion and to the major G-bands which contain these loci. We have also derived single-copy probes, cosmids and cDNA clones from the region which have been used to create a physical map around D6S105. The combination of the cytogenetic and physical mapping data indicate that D6S105 is at least 2 Mb from HLA-A and that the distal limit of the MHC class I region may extend much further into the the euchromatic region of 6p21.3 than previously expected. A mega-YAC walk is now in progress to link the two loci. Finally, we have identified and characterized a family which is segregating a balanced inversion in phase with HFE. The breakpoint locations of this mutant chromosome may be important in the precise positioning of the HFE gene and attempts to define coding sequences in the proximity of this rearrangement are underway.

  12. Effect of co-inheritance of β-thalassemia and hemochromatosis mutations on iron overload.

    PubMed

    López-Escribano, Herminio; Ferragut, Joana F; Parera, Maria M; Guix, Pilar; Castro, José A; Ramon, M Misericòrdia; Picornell, Antònia

    2012-01-01

    Co-inheritance of mutations in the HFE gene underlying hereditary hemocromatosis (HH) may play a role in the variability of iron status in patients with β-thalassemia (β-thal) minor. Different studies have yielded conflicting results: some suggest iron overload might arise from the interaction of the β-thal trait with homozygosity or even heterozygosity for HFE mutations and others that it was unrelated to the HFE genotype. Because of the high frequency of HFE mutations in the Balearic Islands, where the β-thal trait is also moderately common, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of the co-inheritance of mutations in both genes on the severity of iron loading. A retrospective analysis of 142 individuals heterozygous for β-thal was performed to investigate the effect of HFE mutations on iron status of these patients. No significant differences were detected between β-thal carriers with and without HFE mutations. These results suggest that in the Balearic population the β-thal trait does not tend to be aggravated by the co-inheritance of HFE mutations.

  13. Heterozygous beta-thalassemia and homozygous H63D hemochromatosis in a child: an 18-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Miniero, Roberto; Tardivo, Irene; Roetto, Antonella; De Gobbi, Marco

    2005-03-01

    At age of 3.2 years routine blood analysis showed the presence of a beta-thalassemic trait with unexpected high level of serum iron and high transferrin saturation. Hematological follow-up confirmed the moderate degree of anemia and persisting high levels of iron indices throughout the years with a progressive increase of serum ferritin. At the age of 19 years the patient was diagnosed homozygous for HC63D HFE. The patient referred by us confirm the possibility of precocious alteration of iron indices in patients with heterozygosity for beta-thalassemia inherited together with HFE mutations. This observation suggests that any children with thalassemic trait with increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin might be investigated for the presence of the hemocromatosis genes in order to detect the disease before any clinical manifestation and even before organ iron loading.

  14. Frequency of Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HFE) Gene Mutations in Egyptian Beta Thalassemia Patients and its Relation to Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Enein, Azza Aboul; El Dessouky, Nermine A.; Mohamed, Khalda S.; Botros, Shahira K.A.; Abd El Gawad, Mona F.; Hamdy, Mona; Dyaa, Nehal

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to detect the most common HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S56C) in Egyptian beta thalassemia major patients and its relation to their iron status. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study included 50 beta thalassemia major patients and 30 age and sex matched healthy persons as a control group. Serum ferritin, serum iron and TIBC level were measured. Detection of the three HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) was done by PCR-RFLP analysis. Confirmation of positive cases for the mutations was done by sequencing. RESULTS: Neither homozygote nor carrier status for the C282Y or S65C alleles was found. The H63D heterozygous state was detected in 5/50 (10%) thalassemic patients and in 1/30 (3.3%) controls with no statistically significant difference between patients and control groups (p = 0.22). Significantly higher levels of the serum ferritin and serum iron in patients with this mutation (p = 001). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that there is an association between H63D mutation and the severity of iron overload in thalassemic patients. PMID:27335591

  15. Reversal of hemochromatosis by apotransferrin in non-transfused and transfused Hbbth3/+ (heterozygous B1/B2 globin gene deletion) mice.

    PubMed

    Gelderman, Monique P; Baek, Jin Hyen; Yalamanoglu, Ayla; Puglia, Michele; Vallelian, Florence; Burla, Bo; Vostal, Jaroslav; Schaer, Dominik J; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Intermediate beta-thalassemia has a broad spectrum of sequelae and affected subjects may require occasional blood transfusions over their lifetime to correct anemia. Iron overload in intermediate beta-thalassemia results from a paradoxical intestinal absorption, iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes, and sporadic transfusions. Pathological iron accumulation in parenchyma is caused by chronic exposure to non-transferrin bound iron in plasma. The iron scavenger and transport protein transferrin is a potential treatment being studied for correction of anemia. However, transferrin may also function to prevent or reduce iron loading of tissues when exposure to non-transferrin bound iron increases. Here we evaluate the effects of apotransferrin administration on tissue iron loading and early tissue pathology in non-transfused and transfused Hbb(th3/+) mice. Mice with the Hbb(th3/+) phenotype have mild to moderate anemia and consistent tissue iron accumulation in the spleen, liver, kidneys and myocardium. Chronic apotransferrin administration resulted in normalization of the anemia. Furthermore, it normalized tissue iron content in the liver, kidney and heart and attenuated early tissue changes in non-transfused Hbb(th3/+) mice. Apotransferrin treatment was also found to attenuate transfusion-mediated increases in plasma non-transferrin bound iron and associated excess tissue iron loading. These therapeutic effects were associated with normalization of transferrin saturation and suppressed plasma non-transferrin bound iron. Apotransferrin treatment modulated a fundamental iron regulatory pathway, as evidenced by decreased erythroid Fam132b gene (erythroferrone) expression, increased liver hepcidin gene expression and plasma hepcidin-25 levels and consequently reduced intestinal ferroportin-1 in apotransferrin-treated thalassemic mice.

  16. Non HFE related hereditary haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Mangudkar, Sangram; Rathod, Mehul; Verma, Amrita; Phanikumar, R L V; Garg, Subodh; Dhakne, Ajinkya; Barure, Ramdas

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is manifested as iron overload in different organs due to homozygosity of a single autosomal mutation. Two different mutations C282Y and H63D in the HFE gene have been associated with hereditary hemochromatosis cases. This disease is seen in northern european populations, but in India it is a rare disease. We report a young male with severe abnormalty of liver functions due to Non HFE related Hereditary Hemochromatosis.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... characterized by pigmentation of the skin), and chronic renal disease. (b) Classification. Class I. ... diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis (a disease...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... characterized by pigmentation of the skin), and chronic renal disease. (b) Classification. Class I. ... diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis (a disease...

  19. When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Child for Surgery Hepatitis Hereditary Hemochromatosis Digestive System Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel What Happens in the Operating Room? Hepatitis Your Liver Your Digestive System Anesthesia - ...

  20. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs (such as minocycline and birth control pills) Endocrine diseases such as Addison disease Hemochromatosis (iron overload) Sun exposure Pregnancy Causes of hypopigmentation include: Skin inflammation Certain fungal ...

  1. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... of the heart lining (endocardium), such as endomyocardial fibrosis and Loeffler syndrome (rare) Iron overload (hemochromatosis) Sarcoidosis ...

  2. Iron storage disease in tapirs.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Christopher J; Trupkiewicz, John G; Toddes, Barbara; Lewandowski, Albert H

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies of serum iron and iron binding capacity have indicated that tapirs could be at risk of developing hemochromatosis. However, in recent surveys of pathologic findings in tapirs, hemochromatosis was not reported as a cause of death. This study reviews necropsy reports from three species of tapir (Baird's tapir [Tapirus bairdii], Malayan tapir [Tapirus indicus], and Brazilian tapir [Tapirus terrestris]) at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden between 1902 and 1994. Twelve cases of hemosiderosis, including fatal hemochromatosis in two Baird's tapirs, were found among 19 cases examined histologically. Hemochromatosis has previously been reported in the horse, rhinoceros, and in one Brazilian tapir. Dietary factors were investigated but could not be confirmed to have contributed to the incidence of hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis in the three species of tapir in the Philadelphia Zoological Garden collection.

  3. [Molecular diagnosis of HFE mutations in routine laboratories. Results of a survey from reference laboratories in France].

    PubMed

    Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Gérolami, Victoria; Ged, Cécile; Grandchamp, Bernard; Le Gac, Gérald; Pissard, Serge; Rochette, Jacques; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    HFE-related hemochromatosis (HFE hemochromatosis) or type 1 hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive iron overload usually expressed in adulthood. The HFE gene, located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), encodes a protein that plays a crucial role in iron metabolism by modulating hepcidin synthesis in the liver. Homozygosity for the p.Cys282Tyr mutation accounts for nearly 80% of cases of hemochromatosis in France. Genetic testing is the key investigation to confirm the diagnosis of HFE hemochromatosis. A survey on routine practices was carried out among the eight reference laboratories of the French national network on genetic iron disorders. The main findings from this survey are as follows: 1) the p.Cys282Tyr mutation must be searched for as an initial step to establish the diagnosis of HFE hemochromatosis. This is in agreement with the recommendations of the French Health Authority (HAS) published in 2005. In these recommendations, homozygosity for the p.Cys282Tyr mutation with at least elevated transferrin saturation, is considered the only genotype that confirms of the diagnosis of HFE hemochromatosis; 2) in combination with the p.Cys282Tyr mutation (compound heterozygous genotypes), the p.Ser65Cys and the p.His63Asp variants may contribute to the occurrence of mild iron overload; 3) family screening is mandatory following the detection of homozygous individuals for the p.Cys282Tyr mutation.

  4. [Hereditary hemocromatosis].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  5. What Are the Types of Genetic Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder, such as hereditary hemochromatosis (an iron overload disorder), before any signs or symptoms appear. The results of predictive and presymptomatic testing can provide information about a person’s risk of developing a specific ...

  6. TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin

    MedlinePlus

    ... suspected of having either iron deficiency or iron overload. These two tests are used to calculate the ... thus transferrin saturation becomes very low. In iron overload states, such as hemochromatosis , the iron level will ...

  7. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UROD in the liver. Hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder, also can predispose individuals to PCT. Symptoms ... centers regardless of whether there is confirmed iron overload. A phlebotomy is a simple and safe procedure ...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of diseases affecting iron metabolism, such as hemochromatosis (iron overload) and iron deficiency amemia....

  9. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxins in the blood Storing sugars, fats, iron, copper, and vitamins The most common reason for a ... cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis Metabolic disorders of copper or iron ( Wilson's disease and hemochromatosis ) Liver transplant ...

  10. Imaging of miscellaneous pancreatic pathology (trauma, transplant, infections, and deposition).

    PubMed

    Holalkere, Nagaraj-Setty; Soto, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    In this article's coverage of miscellaneous pancreatic topics, a brief review of pancreatic trauma; pancreatic transplantation; rare infections, such as tuberculosis; deposition disorders, including fatty replacement and hemochromatosis; cystic fibrosis; and others are discussed with pertinent case examples.

  11. HFE gene: Structure, function, mutations, and associated iron abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Edwards, Corwin Q; Acton, Ronald T

    2015-12-15

    The hemochromatosis gene HFE was discovered in 1996, more than a century after clinical and pathologic manifestations of hemochromatosis were reported. Linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p, HFE encodes the MHC class I-like protein HFE that binds beta-2 microglobulin. HFE influences iron absorption by modulating the expression of hepcidin, the main controller of iron metabolism. Common HFE mutations account for ~90% of hemochromatosis phenotypes in whites of western European descent. We review HFE mapping and cloning, structure, promoters and controllers, and coding region mutations, HFE protein structure, cell and tissue expression and function, mouse Hfe knockouts and knockins, and HFE mutations in other mammals with iron overload. We describe the pertinence of HFE and HFE to mechanisms of iron homeostasis, the origin and fixation of HFE polymorphisms in European and other populations, and the genetic and biochemical basis of HFE hemochromatosis and iron overload.

  12. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious bleeding. Common causes of portal hypertension are: Alcohol use Blood clots in a vein that flows from the liver to the heart Too much iron in the liver ( hemochromatosis ) Hepatitis B or hepatitis ...

  13. HFE mutations in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Willis, Gavin; Wimperis, Jennie Z; Smith, Katy; Fellows, Ian W; Jennings, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Most individuals diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis have mutations in both copies of the HFE gene, with such mutations being common in populations of north European origin. The number of individuals currently diagnosed and treated for hemochromatosis is small relative to the number carrying two HFE mutations. Studies searching for undiagnosed hemochromatosis cases among disease cohorts have generally failed to find the number of cases that would be expected if disease were the commonest outcome for individuals with two C282Y HFE mutations. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that individuals with two HFE mutations would be under-represented in an elderly population because many would have died from disease caused by hemochromatosis before they reached old age. This is a cross-sectional study of elderly patients referred for full blood counts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. We screened blood samples from 1,000 elderly men (aged 85 and over) and women (aged 89 and over) for the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations of the HFE gene. We also analyzed any recent laboratory data relevant to signs of hemochromatosis. None of the ten possible genotypes was significantly under- or over-represented compared to the expected frequency calculated from the Hardy-Weinberg equation. Four C282Y homozygotes were found. There were few significant differences in the laboratory findings between the genotypes. Our data suggest that most people with HFE mutations survive to old age and do not suffer from signs of iron overload and hemochromatosis. PMID:12972032

  14. Spleen Uptake on Bone Scan After Frequent Platelet and RBC Transfusions.

    PubMed

    De Marini, Pierre; Laplace, Annegret; Matuszak, Julien; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2016-10-01

    A 21-year-old man, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient, was referred to our nuclear medicine department for a suspicion of knee osteonecrosis. Bone scan with Tc-HMDP did not show abnormal bone uptake but an intense spleen accumulation. F-FDG PET/CT performed on the same day showed no pathological spleen uptake. The patient had secondary hemochromatosis resulting from frequent transfusions in the setting of a chronic graft versus host disease with hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. The last RBC and platelet transfusions were performed 9 and 2 days before the examination, respectively. Secondary hemochromatosis and recent transfusions may explain our findings.

  15. [Unilateral hip arthrosis: expression of joint haemochromatosis].

    PubMed

    Prieto Zancudo, C; Villán Villán, Y F; Tascón Guerra, M F

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis is the most common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, with an estimated prevalence of 1/200-1/400 (homozygous) and 1/8-1/10 in carriers (heterozygous). The transmission is recessive and linked to HLA. The clinical expression of disease appears only in homozygous and will depend on the time of diagnosis and the degree of organ involvement. The clinical case presented below describes the process of differential diagnosis made in a young patient with unilateral coxarthrosis and clinical suspicion of hemochromatosis. Early diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis in primary care can reduce morbidity and mortality of this disease by detecting homozygous at younger ages.

  16. The Power of Natural Selection: A Guided Investigation of Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachly, William

    2010-01-01

    I describe a quantitative approach to three case studies in evolution that can be used to challenge college freshmen to explore the power of natural selection and ask questions that foster a deeper understanding of its operation and relevance. Hemochromatosis, the peppered moth, and hominid cranial capacity are investigated with a common algebraic…

  17. Multiple medical problems following agent orange exposure.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Islam, A; Akhter, S; Dembinski, W; Kulaylat, M; Ambrus, C M

    2004-01-01

    A patient exposed to agent orange and a gunshot wound during the Vietnam War has developed multiple medical problems including nocardiosis, onychomycosis (Trichophyton rubrum), multiple thromboembolic episodes, hemochromatosis, diabetes mellitus type 2, diabetic neuropathy, activated protein C resistance (without Leyden V 1st mutation), degree A-V block, lung cancer (metastatic adenocarcinoma), carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis. PMID:18084883

  18. A human homologue to the yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 maps 100 kb centromeric to HLA-A

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvel, B.; Dorval, I.; Fergelot, P.

    1995-04-01

    Idipathic hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The molecular defect is unknown. However, the gene responsible for the disease (HFE) has been localized on the short arm of chromosome 6. It is closely linked to the HLA class I genes and possibly within a 350 kilobase (kb) region around the HLA-A locus. In order to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, we applied a cDNA selection technique to isolate transcribed sequences encoded on yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). At first, we screened a cDNA library derived from normal human duodenal mucosa with the YAC B30 H3. This YAC contains a 320 kb DNA insert including the HLA-A gene and spanning 150 kb of the 350 kb zone where the hemochromatosis gene is in linkage disequilibrium with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Preparation of the cDNA library of duodenal mucosa in Lambda Zap II phage and library screening with YAC B30 were carried out as previously described. In this way, we isolated seven non-HLA-A cDNAs corresponding to seven new genomic sequences. These potential genes were named hemochromatosis candidate gene (HCG) and numbered I to VII. The survey of all these cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences is in progress. In this work, we are especially interested in one of the seven non-HLA class I cDNA clones, named clone 58. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Feasibility Study of NMR Based Serum Metabolomic Profiling to Animal Health Monitoring: A Case Study on Iron Storage Disease in Captive Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miki; Roth, Terri L; Bauer, Stuart J; Lane, Adam; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E

    2016-01-01

    A variety of wildlife species maintained in captivity are susceptible to iron storage disease (ISD), or hemochromatosis, a disease resulting from the deposition of excess iron into insoluble iron clusters in soft tissue. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is one of the rhinoceros species that has evolutionarily adapted to a low-iron diet and is susceptible to iron overload. Hemosiderosis is reported at necropsy in many African black and Sumatran rhinoceroses but only a small number of animals reportedly die from hemochromatosis. The underlying cause and reasons for differences in susceptibility to hemochromatosis within the taxon remains unclear. Although serum ferritin concentrations have been useful in monitoring the progression of ISD in many species, there is some question regarding their value in diagnosing hemochromatosis in the Sumatran rhino. To investigate the metabolic changes during the development of hemochromatosis and possibly increase our understanding of its progression and individual susceptibility differences, the serum metabolome from a Sumatran rhinoceros was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The study involved samples from female rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo (n = 3), including two animals that died from liver failure caused by ISD, and the Sungai Dusun Rhinoceros Conservation Centre in Peninsular Malaysia (n = 4). Principal component analysis was performed to visually and statistically compare the metabolic profiles of the healthy animals. The results indicated that significant differences were present between the animals at the zoo and the animals in the conservation center. A comparison of the 43 serum metabolomes of three zoo rhinoceros showed two distinct groupings, healthy (n = 30) and unhealthy (n = 13). A total of eighteen altered metabolites were identified in healthy versus unhealthy samples. Results strongly suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is a valuable tool for animal health

  20. Feasibility Study of NMR Based Serum Metabolomic Profiling to Animal Health Monitoring: A Case Study on Iron Storage Disease in Captive Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis)

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miki; Roth, Terri L.; Bauer, Stuart J.; Lane, Adam; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of wildlife species maintained in captivity are susceptible to iron storage disease (ISD), or hemochromatosis, a disease resulting from the deposition of excess iron into insoluble iron clusters in soft tissue. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is one of the rhinoceros species that has evolutionarily adapted to a low-iron diet and is susceptible to iron overload. Hemosiderosis is reported at necropsy in many African black and Sumatran rhinoceroses but only a small number of animals reportedly die from hemochromatosis. The underlying cause and reasons for differences in susceptibility to hemochromatosis within the taxon remains unclear. Although serum ferritin concentrations have been useful in monitoring the progression of ISD in many species, there is some question regarding their value in diagnosing hemochromatosis in the Sumatran rhino. To investigate the metabolic changes during the development of hemochromatosis and possibly increase our understanding of its progression and individual susceptibility differences, the serum metabolome from a Sumatran rhinoceros was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The study involved samples from female rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo (n = 3), including two animals that died from liver failure caused by ISD, and the Sungai Dusun Rhinoceros Conservation Centre in Peninsular Malaysia (n = 4). Principal component analysis was performed to visually and statistically compare the metabolic profiles of the healthy animals. The results indicated that significant differences were present between the animals at the zoo and the animals in the conservation center. A comparison of the 43 serum metabolomes of three zoo rhinoceros showed two distinct groupings, healthy (n = 30) and unhealthy (n = 13). A total of eighteen altered metabolites were identified in healthy versus unhealthy samples. Results strongly suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is a valuable tool for animal health

  1. Cardiac Failure after Liver Transplantation Requiring a Biventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Soe, Eiei; D'Alessandro, David; Shin, Julia; Jakobleff, William; Schwartz, Daniel; Kinkhabwala, Milan; Gaglio, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Increased hepatic iron load in extrahepatic organs of cirrhotic patients with and without hereditary hemochromatosis portends a poorer long term prognosis after liver transplant. Hepatic as well as nonhepatic iron overload is associated with increased infectious and postoperative complications, including cardiac dysfunction. In this case report, we describe a cirrhotic patient with alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency and nonhereditary hemochromatosis (non-HFE) that developed cardiogenic shock requiring mechanical circulatory support for twenty days after liver transplant. Upon further investigation, she was found to have significant iron deposition in both the liver and heart biopsies. Her heart regained complete and sustained recovery following ten days of mechanical biventricular support. This case highlights the importance of preoperatively recognizing extrahepatic iron deposition in patients referred for liver transplantation irrespective of etiology of liver disease as this may prevent postoperative complications. PMID:25431733

  2. Disorders associated with systemic or local iron overload: from pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, Giada; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-10-01

    In healthy subjects, the rate of dietary iron absorption, as well as the amount and distribution of body iron are tightly controlled by hepcidin, the iron regulatory hormone. Disruption of systemic iron homeostasis leads to pathological conditions, ranging from anemias caused by iron deficiency or defective iron traffic, to iron overload (hemochromatosis). Other iron-related disorders are caused by misregulation of cellular iron metabolism, which results in local accumulation of the metal in mitochondria. Brain iron overload is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. Secondary hemochromatosis develops as a complication of another disease. For example, repeated blood transfusions, a standard treatment of various anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, promote transfusional siderosis, while chronic liver diseases are often associated with mild to moderate secondary iron overload. In this critical review, we discuss pathophysiological and clinical aspects of all types of iron metabolism disorders (265 references).

  3. [Clinical evaluation of a hyperferritinemia].

    PubMed

    Sogni, Philippe; Buffet, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    A hyperferritinemia has to be interpreted in relation with age and sex. The clinical evaluation begins with the interpretation of transferrine saturation which has to be controlled with a second fasting blood test. In case of high transferrine saturation associated with hyperferritinemia, HFE testing has first to be realized since the first diagnosis suspected is a HFE hemochromatosis. In case of normal transferrine saturation associated with a hyperferritinemia, the more frequent diagnosis is a metabolic syndrome, an inflammatory syndrome, a syndrome of cellular lysis or an excessive alcohol consumption. In case of HFE hemochromatosis, phlebotomy prevents complications. The goal is to obtain and to maintain a normal-low ferritin level. In case of metabolic syndrome, phlebotomy could be useful in case of high hepatic iron concentration measured with MRI or in case of on-alcoholic steato-hepatitis.

  4. Using skin to assess iron accumulation in human metabolic disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinote, I.; Fleming, R.; Silva, R.; Filipe, P.; Silva, J. N.; Veríssimo, A.; Napoleão, P.; Alves, L. C.; Pinheiro, T.

    2006-08-01

    The distribution of Fe in skin was assessed to monitor body Fe status in human hereditary hemochromatosis. The paper reports on data from nine patients with hemochromatosis that were studied along the therapeutic programme. Systemic evaluation of Fe metabolism was carried out by measuring with PIXE technique the Fe concentration in plasma and blood cells, and by determining with biochemical methods the indicators of Fe transport in serum (ferritin and transferrin). The Fe distribution and concentration in skin was assessed by nuclear microscopy and Fe deposits in liver estimated through nuclear magnetic resonance. Elevated Fe concentrations in skin were related to increased plasma Fe (p < 0.004), serum ferritin content (p < 0.01) and Fe deposits in liver (p < 0.004). The relationship of Fe deposits in organs and metabolism markers may help to better understand Fe pools mobilisation and to establish the quality of skin as a marker for the disease progression and therapy efficacy.

  5. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  6. Pyogenic liver abscess in beta-thalassemia major--report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C F; Lee, C Y; Lee, P I; Chen, J M; Lli, K H; Lin, D T; Chang, M H

    1994-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess, which may lead to devastating consequences, is an uncommon medical problem in pediatrics and has generally been reported in compromised hosts. This article describes two patients with beta-thalassemia major and hemochromatosis complicated by Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess. One of the patients had severe complications, including subphrenic abscess, pleural effusion and meningitis. To present knowledge, the occurrence of K. pneumoniae liver abscess in patients with beta-thalassemia major has never before been reported in the literature.

  7. Iron chelation with deferasirox in a patient with de-novo ferroportin mutation.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Piperno, Alberto; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-04-01

    Ferroportin disease is a rare type of autosomal dominantly inherited hemochromatosis caused with mutations in the ferroportin gene (SLC40A1). The patients characteristically have hyperferritinemia but normal transferin saturations. Herein, we present a 15-year-old female whose chief complaint was persistent nausea for the last one year. Extensive work-up including brain imaging revealed nothing to explain the etiology of nausea. The serum ferritin level of 1474ng/mL was suggestive for hemochromatosis syndromes and the molecular testing revealed de-novo c.485_487delTTG (P.Val162del) ferroportin gene mutation. Mild hepatic iron loading, in addition to the cumbersome nausea were accepted as indications for chelation treatment in this particular patient and deferasirox was initiated (10mg/kg/day) since family did not consent for phlebotomy. Deferasirox was stopped by the 9th month of initiation, since nausea subsided and hepatic iron content was normalized, in order to prevent over chelation. There are no well-established guidelines for the chelation of patients with hereditary hemochromatosis syndromes. However, lifelong monitorization for iron loading and re-initiation of chelation when necessary was planned in our patient.

  8. Hypothalamic-pituitary function (LH, FSH and prolactin) in males with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Geisthövel, W

    1979-07-01

    Because of the central importance of the liver for the metabolism of estrogens and androgens the chronically ill liver per se represents an essential disturbing factor within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis caused by the altered hepatic metabolism of the steroid hormones as well as the abnormal synthesis of steroid-hormone-binding proteins with changed free fractions of sex hormones. The question has been differently answered whether a chronic hepatic disease can also be the reason for disturbance on hypothalamic-pituitary and/or testicular level. Recent plasma determination of LH/FSH before and after LHRH and clomiphene, of sex hormones before and after HCG as well as unbound sex hormones in males with chronic hepatic diseases lead to the following conclusion. 1. Chronic liver disease (without idopathic hemochromatosis). Even sever chronic hepatic diseases are not accompanied by primary hypopituitarism. With regard to the impaired Leydig cells stimulation by HCG and the abnormal seminal fluid and testicular histology one can suppose a primary gonadal hypogonadism. However, an additional hypothalamic disturbance has to be considered. 2. Idiopathic hemochromatosis. Presumably in hemochromatosis a primary insufficiency of pituitary and/or testes can take place related to the general metabolic disturbances of this illness. The classic hypothesis of an exclusively primary lesion with secondary hypogonadism does not appear to be correct.

  9. Characterization and chromosomal mapping of the human gene for SFT, a stimulator of Fe transport.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, J A; Yu, J; Wessling-Resnick, M

    1998-12-30

    Hemochromatosis is the most common genetic disorder known in man and results in progressive tissue deposition of iron leading to cirrhosis of the liver, hepatic carcinoma, congestive heart failure, endocrinopathies, and premature death. SFT (stimulator of Fe transport) is a newly discovered transport protein that facilitates uptake of iron. Recent studies have demonstrated that although SFT expression is reciprocally regulated in response to cellular iron levels, it is aberrantly upregulated in the liver of hemochromatosis patients, indicating that enhanced SFT expression contributes to the etiology of this disease. Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the human gene for SFT. FISH analysis maps the SFT gene to human chromosome 10q21. PCR analysis indicates 1000 nucleotides of intervening intron sequence near the 3' end of the coding region for SFT. Based on DNA sequence analysis of the additional 5' untranslated region obtained from the genomic clone, SFT lacks known metal-regulated transcriptional or translational control elements. These studies provide the basis for future elucidation of the mechanisms that control SFT expression in order to discover how this regulation is lost in hemochromatosis.

  10. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE LESIONS ASSOCIATED WITH IRON STORAGE DISEASE IN CAPTIVE EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique M; Crawshaw, Graham J; Garner, Michael M; Frasca, Salvatore; Stasiak, Iga; Rose, Karrie; Neal, Dan; Farina, Lisa L

    2016-03-01

    Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) are one of many species within zoologic collections that frequently develop iron storage disease. The goals of this retrospective multi-institutional study were to determine the tissue distribution of iron storage in captive adult Egyptian fruit bats and the incidence of intercurrent neoplasia and infection, which may be directly or indirectly related to iron overload. Tissue sections from 83 adult Egyptian fruit bats were histologically evaluated by using tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, and Prussian blue techniques. The liver and spleen consistently had the largest amount of iron, but significant amounts of iron were also detected in the pancreas, kidney, skeletal muscle, and lung. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; 11) was the most common neoplasm, followed by cholangiocarcinoma (4). Extrahepatic neoplasms included bronchioloalveolar adenoma (3), pulmonary carcinosarcoma (1), oral sarcoma (1), renal adenocarcinoma (1), transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (1), mammary gland adenoma (1), and parathyroid adenoma (1). There were also metastatic neoplasms of undetermined primary origin that included three poorly differentiated carcinomas, a poorly differentiated sarcoma, and a neuroendocrine tumor. Bats with hemochromatosis were significantly more likely to have HCC than bats with hemosiderosis (P = 0.032). Cardiomyopathy was identified in 35/77 bats with evaluable heart tissue, but no direct association was found between cardiac damage and the amount of iron observed within the liver or heart. Hepatic abscesses occurred in multiple bats, although a significant association was not observed between hemochromatosis and bacterial infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication providing evidence of a positive correlation between hemochromatosis and HCC in any species other than humans.

  11. Decreased Bone Formation Explains Osteoporosis in a Genetic Mouse Model of Hemochromatosiss

    PubMed Central

    Doyard, Mathilde; Chappard, Daniel; Leroyer, Patricia; Roth, Marie-Paule; Loréal, Olivier; Guggenbuhl, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis may complicate iron overload diseases such as genetic hemochromatosis. However, molecular mechanisms involved in the iron-related osteoporosis remains poorly understood. Recent in vitro studies support a role of osteoblast impairment in iron-related osteoporosis. Our aim was to analyse the impact of excess iron in Hfe-/- mice on osteoblast activity and on bone microarchitecture. We studied the bone formation rate, a dynamic parameter reflecting osteoblast activity, and the bone phenotype of Hfe−/− male mice, a mouse model of human hemochromatosis, by using histomorphometry. Hfe−/− animals were sacrificed at 6 months and compared to controls. We found that bone contains excess iron associated with increased hepatic iron concentration in Hfe−/− mice. We have shown that animals with iron overload have decreased bone formation rate, suggesting a direct impact of iron excess on active osteoblasts number. For bone mass parameters, we showed that iron deposition was associated with bone loss by producing microarchitectural impairment with a decreased tendency in bone trabecular volume and trabecular number. A disorganization of trabecular network was found with marrow spaces increased, which was confirmed by enhanced trabecular separation and star volume of marrow spaces. These microarchitectural changes led to a loss of connectivity and complexity in the trabecular network, which was confirmed by decreased interconnectivity index and increased Minkowski’s fractal dimension. Our results suggest for the first time in a genetic hemochromatosis mouse model, that iron overload decreases bone formation and leads to alterations in bone mass and microarchitecture. These observations support a negative effect of iron on osteoblast recruitment and/or function, which may contribute to iron-related osteoporosis. PMID:26829642

  12. Effect of Hfe Deficiency on Memory Capacity and Motor Coordination after Manganese Exposure by Drinking Water in Mice.

    PubMed

    Alsulimani, Helal Hussain; Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-12-01

    Excess manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic. Increased manganese stores in the brain are associated with a number of behavioral problems, including motor dysfunction, memory loss and psychiatric disorders. We previously showed that the transport and neurotoxicity of manganese after intranasal instillation of the metal are altered in Hfe-deficient mice, a mouse model of the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). However, it is not fully understood whether loss of Hfe function modifies Mn neurotoxicity after ingestion. To investigate the role of Hfe in oral Mn toxicity, we exposed Hfe-knockout (Hfe (-/-)) and their control wild-type (Hfe (+/+)) mice to MnCl2 in drinking water (5 mg/mL) for 5 weeks. Motor coordination and spatial memory capacity were determined by the rotarod test and the Barnes maze test, respectively. Brain and liver metal levels were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Compared with the water-drinking group, mice drinking Mn significantly increased Mn concentrations in the liver and brain of both genotypes. Mn exposure decreased iron levels in the liver, but not in the brain. Neither Mn nor Hfe deficiency altered tissue concentrations of copper or zinc. The rotarod test showed that Mn exposure decreased motor skills in Hfe (+/+) mice, but not in Hfe (-/-) mice (p = 0.023). In the Barns maze test, latency to find the target hole was not altered in Mn-exposed Hfe (+/+) compared with water-drinking Hfe (+/+) mice. However, Mn-exposed Hfe (-/-) mice spent more time to find the target hole than Mn-drinking Hfe (+/+) mice (p = 0.028). These data indicate that loss of Hfe function impairs spatial memory upon Mn exposure in drinking water. Our results suggest that individuals with hemochromatosis could be more vulnerable to memory deficits induced by Mn ingestion from our environment. The pathophysiological role of HFE in manganese neurotoxicity should be carefully examined in patients with HFE-associated hemochromatosis and

  13. Evidence that the Cys282Tyr mutation of the HFE gene originated from a population in Southern Scandinavia and spread with the Vikings.

    PubMed

    Milman, N; Pedersen, P

    2003-07-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis has been recognized as a clinical disorder for more than 100 years. The common form of the disorder is caused by the Cys282Tyr mutation (C282Y) of the HFE gene. Hereditary hemochromatosis affects predominantly people of Northern European origin. The C282Y mutation probably occurred on a single chromosome carrying the ancestral hemochromatosis haplotype, which subsequently was spread by emigration and the founder effect. It has been estimated that the C282Y mutation appeared 60-70 generations ago. It was initially suggested that the ancestral C282Y mutation occurred within the Celtic group of peoples. However, we hypothesize that the distribution of the C282Y mutation in Europe is more consistent with an origin among the Germanic Iron Age population in Southern Scandinavia. From this area, the mutation could later be spread by the migratory activities of the Vikings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity of these two hypotheses. Several arguments are in favor of the 'Viking hypothesis': first, the highest frequencies (5.1-9.7%) of the C282Y mutation are observed in populations in the Northern part of Europe, i.e. Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Faeroe Islands, Iceland, Eastern part of England (Danelaw) and the Dublin area, all Viking homelands and settlements. Second, the highest allele frequencies are reported among populations living along the coastlines. Third, the frequencies of the C282Y mutation decline from Northern to Southern Europe. Intermediate allele frequencies (3.1-4.8%) are seen in the populations in Central Europe, which is the original Celtic homeland. Low allele frequencies (0-3.1%) are recognized in populations in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean.

  14. Effect of Hfe Deficiency on Memory Capacity and Motor Coordination after Manganese Exposure by Drinking Water in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alsulimani, Helal Hussain; Ye, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Excess manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic. Increased manganese stores in the brain are associated with a number of behavioral problems, including motor dysfunction, memory loss and psychiatric disorders. We previously showed that the transport and neurotoxicity of manganese after intranasal instillation of the metal are altered in Hfe-deficient mice, a mouse model of the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). However, it is not fully understood whether loss of Hfe function modifies Mn neurotoxicity after ingestion. To investigate the role of Hfe in oral Mn toxicity, we exposed Hfe-knockout (Hfe-/-) and their control wild-type (Hfe+/+) mice to MnCl2 in drinking water (5 mg/mL) for 5 weeks. Motor coordination and spatial memory capacity were determined by the rotarod test and the Barnes maze test, respectively. Brain and liver metal levels were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Compared with the water-drinking group, mice drinking Mn significantly increased Mn concentrations in the liver and brain of both genotypes. Mn exposure decreased iron levels in the liver, but not in the brain. Neither Mn nor Hfe deficiency altered tissue concentrations of copper or zinc. The rotarod test showed that Mn exposure decreased motor skills in Hfe+/+ mice, but not in Hfe-/- mice (p = 0.023). In the Barns maze test, latency to find the target hole was not altered in Mn-exposed Hfe+/+ compared with water-drinking Hfe+/+ mice. However, Mn-exposed Hfe-/- mice spent more time to find the target hole than Mn-drinking Hfe+/+ mice (p = 0.028). These data indicate that loss of Hfe function impairs spatial memory upon Mn exposure in drinking water. Our results suggest that individuals with hemochromatosis could be more vulnerable to memory deficits induced by Mn ingestion from our environment. The pathophysiological role of HFE in manganese neurotoxicity should be carefully examined in patients with HFE-associated hemochromatosis and other iron overload

  15. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE LESIONS ASSOCIATED WITH IRON STORAGE DISEASE IN CAPTIVE EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique M; Crawshaw, Graham J; Garner, Michael M; Frasca, Salvatore; Stasiak, Iga; Rose, Karrie; Neal, Dan; Farina, Lisa L

    2016-03-01

    Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) are one of many species within zoologic collections that frequently develop iron storage disease. The goals of this retrospective multi-institutional study were to determine the tissue distribution of iron storage in captive adult Egyptian fruit bats and the incidence of intercurrent neoplasia and infection, which may be directly or indirectly related to iron overload. Tissue sections from 83 adult Egyptian fruit bats were histologically evaluated by using tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, and Prussian blue techniques. The liver and spleen consistently had the largest amount of iron, but significant amounts of iron were also detected in the pancreas, kidney, skeletal muscle, and lung. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; 11) was the most common neoplasm, followed by cholangiocarcinoma (4). Extrahepatic neoplasms included bronchioloalveolar adenoma (3), pulmonary carcinosarcoma (1), oral sarcoma (1), renal adenocarcinoma (1), transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (1), mammary gland adenoma (1), and parathyroid adenoma (1). There were also metastatic neoplasms of undetermined primary origin that included three poorly differentiated carcinomas, a poorly differentiated sarcoma, and a neuroendocrine tumor. Bats with hemochromatosis were significantly more likely to have HCC than bats with hemosiderosis (P = 0.032). Cardiomyopathy was identified in 35/77 bats with evaluable heart tissue, but no direct association was found between cardiac damage and the amount of iron observed within the liver or heart. Hepatic abscesses occurred in multiple bats, although a significant association was not observed between hemochromatosis and bacterial infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication providing evidence of a positive correlation between hemochromatosis and HCC in any species other than humans. PMID:27010264

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma and the risk of occupational exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Malaguarnera, Michele; Ardiri, Annalisa; Proiti, Maria; Rigano, Giuseppe; Frazzetto, Evelise; Ruggeri, Maria Irene; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Nicoletta; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Catania, Vito Emanuele; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Toro, Adriana; Bertino, Emanuele; Mangano, Dario; Bertino, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer. The main risk factors for HCC are alcoholism, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cirrhosis, aflatoxin, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease and hemophilia. Occupational exposure to chemicals is another risk factor for HCC. Often the relationship between occupational risk and HCC is unclear and the reports are fragmented and inconsistent. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the association of infective and non-infective occupational risk exposure and HCC in order to encourage further research and draw attention to this global occupational public health problem. PMID:27168870

  17. [Other specific types of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Gessl, Alois W; Riedl, Michaela; Luger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Numerous endocrine diseases are associated with impaired glucose metabolism and can induce diabetes mellitus. With the exception of hyperthyroidism, where this is uncommon, these diseases are rare. Acromegaly and Cushing syndrome are frequently associated with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In contrast, this is a rare finding in pheochromocytoma and Conn syndrome. Among the many drugs that can induce diabetes this can be observed most frequently with hormones, atypic antipsychotic drugs and immunosuppressives. In addition, diseases of the pancreas such as pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, cystic fibrosis and hemochromatosis can cause diabetes as well as Down syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome and Prader Willi syndrome and rare immunmediated or genetic syndromes. PMID:27056389

  18. Iron Overload Leading to Torsades de Pointes in β-Thalassemia and Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Marwan M; El Hage, Lea; Steffensen, Annette Buur; Hotait, Mostafa; Schmitt, Nicole; Scheinman, Melvin; Badhwar, Nitish

    2016-03-01

    The authors present a unique case of torsades de pointes in a β-thalassemia patient with early iron overload in the absence of any structural abnormalities as seen in hemochromatosis. Genetic testing showed a novel KCNQ1 gene mutation 1591C>T [Gln531Ter(X)]. Testing of the gene mutation in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed loss of function of the IKs current. The authors hypothesize that iron overload combined with the KCNQ1 gene mutation leads to prolongation of QTc and torsades de pointes. PMID:26920202

  19. Computed tomography of the spleen and liver in sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-08-01

    The spleen was assessed in 10 patients with sickle cell disease studied with computed tomography (CT) for abdominal pain and/or unexplained fever. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were found to have small, densely calcified spleens with occasional low-density infarcts. Five of six had hepatomegaly, and there was one case each of hepatic abscess, infarcts, and hemochromatosis. All patients with heterozygous sickle cell disease were found to have splenomegaly, with a variety of findings including acute hemorrhage, acute and chronic infarcts, rupture, and possible sequestration. It was concluded that CT is useful for evaluating the status of the spleen and liver in symptomatic patients with sickle cell disease.

  20. Clinical applications of therapeutic phlebotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Oh, Ki Young

    2016-01-01

    Phlebotomy is the removal of blood from the body, and therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for blood disorders in which the removal of red blood cells or serum iron is the most efficient method for managing the symptoms and complications. Therapeutic phlebotomy is currently indicated for the treatment of hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with hyperferritinemia. This review discusses therapeutic phlebotomy and the related disorders and also offers guidelines for establishing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. PMID:27486346

  1. Modulation of hepcidin to treat iron deregulation: potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Nicole L.; Manz, David H.; Torti, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    The secreted peptide hormone hepcidin regulates systemic and local iron homeostasis through degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin. Dysregulation of hepcidin leads to altered iron homeostasis and development of pathological disorders including hemochromatosis, and iron loading and iron restrictive anemias. Therapeutic modulation of hepcidin is a promising method to ameliorate these conditions. Several approaches have been taken to enhance or reduce the effects of hepcidin in vitro and in vivo. Based on these approaches, hepcidin modulating drugs have been developed and are undergoing clinical evaluation. In this article we review the rationale for development of these drugs, the data concerning their safety and efficacy, their therapeutic uses, and potential future prospects. PMID:26669208

  2. Fast, sensitive point of care electrochemical molecular system for point mutation and select agent detection.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, J A; Nemeth, A C; Dicke, W C; Wang, D; Manalili Wheeler, S; Hannis, J C; Collier, G B; Drader, J J

    2016-07-01

    Point of care molecular diagnostics benefits from a portable battery-operated device capable of performing a fast turnaround using reliable inexpensive cartridges. We describe a prototype device for performing a molecular diagnostics test for clinical and biodefense samples in 16 minutes using a prototype capable of an 8 minute PCR reaction, followed by hybridization and detection on an electrochemical microarray based on the i-STAT® system. We used human buccal swabs for hemochromatosis testing including in-device DNA extraction. Additional clinical and biodefense samples included influenza A and bacterial select agents Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis. PMID:27280174

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma and the risk of occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Malaguarnera, Michele; Ardiri, Annalisa; Proiti, Maria; Rigano, Giuseppe; Frazzetto, Evelise; Ruggeri, Maria Irene; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Nicoletta; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Catania, Vito Emanuele; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Toro, Adriana; Bertino, Emanuele; Mangano, Dario; Bertino, Gaetano

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer. The main risk factors for HCC are alcoholism, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cirrhosis, aflatoxin, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease and hemophilia. Occupational exposure to chemicals is another risk factor for HCC. Often the relationship between occupational risk and HCC is unclear and the reports are fragmented and inconsistent. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the association of infective and non-infective occupational risk exposure and HCC in order to encourage further research and draw attention to this global occupational public health problem. PMID:27168870

  4. Structural analysis of the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion: Precise localization of two new multigene families closely associated with the HLA class I sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, L.; Carn, G.; Bouric, P.

    1996-03-01

    Positional cloning strategies for the hemochromatosis gene have previously concentrated on a target area restricted to a maximum genomic expanse of 400 kb around the HLA-A and HLA-F loci. Recently, the candidate region has been extended to 2-3 Mb on the distal side of the MHC. In this study, 10 coding sequences [hemochromatosis candidate genes (HCG) I to X] were isolated by cDNA selection using YACs covering the HLA-A/HLA-F subregion. Two of these (HCG II and HCG IV) belong to multigene families, as well as other sequences already described in this region, i.e., P5, pMC 6.7, and HLA class I. Fingerprinting of the four YACSs overlapping the region was performed and allowed partial localization of the different multigene family sequences on each YAC without defining their exact positions. Fingerprinting on cosmids isolated from the ICRF chromosome 6-specific cosmid library allowed more precise localization of the redundant sequences in all of the multigene families and revealed their apparent organization in clusters. Further examination of these intertwined sequences demonstrated that this structural organization resulted from a succession of complex phenomena, including duplications and contractions. This study presents a precise description of the structural organization of the HLA-A/HLA-F region and a determination of the sequences involved in the megabase size polymorphism observed among the A3, A24, and A31 haplotypes. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Universal iron fortification of foods: the view of a hematologist

    PubMed Central

    Martins, José Murilo

    2012-01-01

    With the objective of reducing the high incidence of iron deficiency anemia, the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) adopted Resolution 344 in December 2002, which made the addition of iron and folic acid to all industrialized wheat and maize flours in Brazil compulsory. After a series of doubts about this universal measure of food fortification, a review of case reports on long-term medicinal iron intake published in the medical literature was undertaken to investigate the clinical behavior of this hematological conduct. Long-term medicinal iron ingestion is an extremely rare and serious situation. The data suggest that there are cases of hemochromatosis in women whose illnesses were accelerated with this therapy. It is very difficult to determine the amount of iron ingested by Brazilian citizens in the current system of fortification, but there is evidence that there has been an appreciable increase. Although iron fortification of food has been recognized by some authors as a good strategy to combat iron deficiency, some nation shave abandoned this measure. The patient with hemochromatosis is the most affected by compulsory iron fortification and as this disease is now considered a public health problem, we believe that Resolution 344 of ANVISA should be reviewed in order to find a solution beneficial to all segments of the Brazilian population; one should not try to correct one condition (iron deficiency) by exacerbating another (acceleration of iron overload cases). PMID:23323072

  6. Iron-Dependent Regulation of MDM2 Influences p53 Activity and Hepatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Cairo, Gaetano; Megazzini, Chiara Paola; Gatti, Stefano; Rametta, Raffaela; Fargion, Silvia; Valenti, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Iron overload is a risk factor for hepatocarcinoma, but the pathways involved are poorly characterized. Gene expression analysis in immortalized mouse hepatocytes exposed to iron or the iron chelator deferoxamine revealed that iron downregulated, whereas deferoxamine upregulated, mRNA levels of mouse double minute gene 2 (MDM2), the ubiquitin ligase involved in the degradation of the oncosuppressor p53. Regulation of MDM2 by iron status was observed at protein levels in mouse hepatocytes and rat liver, and was associated with specular changes in p53 expression. Iron dependent regulation of MDM2/p53 was confirmed ex-vivo in human monocytes, by manipulation of iron pool and in a genetic model of iron deficiency, leading to modulation of p53 target genes involved in the antioxidant response and apoptosis. Iron status influenced p53 ubiquitination and degradation rate, and the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin increased p53 levels in iron-depleted cells. Furthermore, nutlin enhanced the antiproliferative activity of deferoxamine in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells. The MDM2 −309T > G promoter polymorphism, determining increased MDM2 and lower p53 activity, was associated with higher risk of hepatocarcinoma in cirrhotic patients with hemochromatosis, and with HFE mutations in patients with hepatocarcinoma without hemochromatosis, suggesting an interaction between MDM2 and iron in the pathogenesis of hepatocarcinoma. In conclusion, iron status influences p53 activity and antioxidant response by modulating MDM2 expression. MDM2 inhibitors may enhance the antiproliferative activity of iron chelators. PMID:20019189

  7. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  8. Effect of ferroportin polymorphism on iron homeostasis and infection.

    PubMed

    Kasvosve, Ishmael

    2013-02-01

    Ferroportin (FPN) is the sole iron export membrane protein identified in mammals that is abundantly expressed on absorptive enterocytes and macrophages, and is essential for physiological regulation of cellular iron. The expression of FPN is positively induced by cellular iron and is suppressed by liver hepcidin in response to either increased systemic iron or inflammatory stimuli. Hepcidin binds to cell surface FPN inducing FPN internalization followed by lysosomal degradation of the protein and consequently iron efflux from macrophages is blocked and there is suboptimal iron absorption by duodenal enterocytes. Dozens of FPN gene mutations have been identified in different ethnic populations and some of the mutations are associated with autosomal dominant iron overload disorder described as FPN disease or hemochromatosis type 4 that is distinct from hereditary hemochromatosis due to HFE mutations. Clinical manifestations of iron overload FPN disease can be classified into two groups according to whether there is selective macrophage iron loading or parenchymal and reticuloendothelial iron accumulation. There is evidence suggesting that altered hepcidin-FPN interaction can modulate host's response to infection. Resistance to hepcidin promotes iron egress from cells and this inhibits growth of intracellular pathogens. Conversely, iron retention due to loss of iron export activity by mutated FPN results in intracellular iron accumulation and a permissive environment for intracellular pathogens.

  9. Staining of minerals and solubility of iron in tissues.

    PubMed

    Klavins, J V; Pickett, J P; Wessely, Z

    1976-01-01

    Iron deposits in ethionine induced aortic siderosis of rats, in splenic deposits in sickle cell anemia and siderocalcific vessels in cerebral arteriosclerosis were completely removed by exposure to 20 percent hydrochloric acid for 30 min. This contrasted with idiopathic hemochromatosis and idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis in which the iron containing organs had to be exposed to 40 percent hydrochloric acid for two hours. The more soluble iron appeared colorless in unstained tissues, purplish blue with hematoxylin and eosin, turquoise blue with Perls' stain, violet blue with gallocyanin and dark-drown with sodium rhodizonate. The less soluble iron was golden yellow in unstained tissues. It appeared golden yellow with hematoxylin and eosin and sodium rhodizonate, but it stained greenish blue with Perls' method and dark brown with gallocyanin. Lead and copper were capable of deposition in some tissues in vitro in the presence of iron and/or calcium but not when these minerals were removed. This phenomenon may be of importance in certain pathological conditions, e.g. hemochromatosis, where on preexisting tissue-iron-complexes there is a secondary deposition of copper.

  10. Analysis of HFE and TFR2 gene mutations in patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; Krampera, Mauro; de Matteis, Giovanna; Solero, Pietro; Pizzolo, Giovanni

    2005-06-01

    There are increasing evidences regarding the association between iron overload and extra-hepatic malignancies. We studied the prevalence of 12 hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) gene mutations (C282Y, V53M, V59M, H63D, H63H, S56C, Q127H, E168Q, E168X, W169X and Q283P in the HFE gene and Y250X in the TFR2 gene) and its correlation with the iron status in 82 adult patients with acute leukemia (AL); 48 patients (58.5%) were affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 34 patients (41.5%) by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); 27 patients (32.9%) had at least one HH gene mutation (6 heterozygous for C282Y, 6 homozygous for H63D, 13 heterozygous for H63D and 2 heterozygous for S56C). Mean serum ferritin levels at diagnosis were increased (822.5+/-811.4 microg/L). However, there was no difference between patients positive or negative for the HH gene mutations. Similarly, we did not observe any statistically significant difference as far as iron status between AML and ALL patients. Our study does not support the evidence of an association between hemochromatosis gene mutations and iron overload in AL patients.

  11. A Single Center Study Comparing the Stainable Iron Depositions in 1000 Explanted Cirrhotic Livers of Different Causes

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Ghazanfari, Yalda; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Malekhosseini, Seyed-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: There have been very few studies evaluating the close association between excess iron and cirrhosis; however, cirrhosis could be regarded as an iron-loading disorder. Objectives: In this study, the goal was to show the levels of the iron content in the liver tissue in certain types of cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: In this 7 year study (2008 - 2014), in 1000 explanted livers, the amount of iron was scored and compared according to the cause of the cirrhosis. The amount of iron in the liver was determined via the histochemical staining of the liver tissue, using Prussian-blue staining. Additionally, in each patient, the serum iron was determined and compared according to the cause of cirrhosis. Results: The highest content of iron has been found in cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis (i.e. hepatitis B, C, and autoimmune hepatitis), as well as in alcoholic cirrhosis. The least amount of stainable iron has been shown in biliary cirrhosis. Conclusions: The presence of high stainable iron in patients with cirrhosis, secondary to chronic viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, and alcoholic hepatitis, should not be considered indicative of the presence of hereditary hemochromatosis; however, in those patients with biliary cirrhosis, a high iron content is rare, and can be a sign of the presence of the high iron Fe (HFE) gene mutation, or another type of hereditary hemochromatosis. PMID:26977170

  12. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  13. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully.

  14. Pathological relationships involving iron and myelin may constitute a shared mechanism linking various rare and common brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Moones; Gerami, Sam H.; Bassett, Brianna; Graham, Ross M.; Chua, Anita C.G.; Aryal, Ritambhara; House, Michael J.; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Ryten, Mina; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie; Johnstone, Daniel M.; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated elevated brain iron levels in myelinated structures and associated cells in a hemochromatosis Hfe−/−xTfr2mut mouse model. This was accompanied by altered expression of a group of myelin-related genes, including a suite of genes causatively linked to the rare disease family ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation’ (NBIA). Expanded data mining and ontological analyses have now identified additional myelin-related transcriptome changes in response to brain iron loading. Concordance between the mouse transcriptome changes and human myelin-related gene expression networks in normal and NBIA basal ganglia testifies to potential clinical relevance. These analyses implicate, among others, genes linked to various rare central hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and peripheral neuropathies including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as well as genes linked to other rare neurological diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. The findings may help understand interrelationships of iron and myelin in more common conditions such as hemochromatosis, multiple sclerosis and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27500074

  15. The evolutionary adaptation of the C282Y mutation to culture and climate during the European Neolithic

    PubMed Central

    Axton, Jacob H.; McCullough, John M.; Harris, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The C282Y allele is the major cause of hemochromatosis as a result of excessive iron absorption. The mutation arose in continental Europe no earlier than 6,000 years ago, coinciding with the arrival of the Neolithic agricultural revolution. Here we hypothesize that this new Neolithic diet, which originated in the sunny warm and dry climates of the Middle East, was carried by migrating farmers into the chilly and damp environments of Europe where iron is a critical micronutrient for effective thermoregulation. We argue that the C282Y allele was an adaptation to this novel environment. Materials and Methods To address our hypothesis, we compiled C282Y allele frequencies, known Neolithic sites in Europe and climatic data on temperature and rainfall for statistical analysis. Results Our findings indicate that the geographic cline for C282Y frequency in Europe increases as average temperatures decrease below 16°C, a critical threshold for thermoregulation, with rainy days intensifying the trend. Discussion The results indicate that the deleterious C282Y allele, responsible for most cases of hemochromatosis, may have evolved as a selective advantage to culture and climate during the European Neolithic. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:86–101, 2016. © 2016 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26799452

  16. The relationship between the iron isotopic composition of human whole blood and iron status parameters.

    PubMed

    Van Heghe, Lana; Delanghe, Joris; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2013-11-01

    As the iron status of an individual cannot be adequately assessed on the basis of the (total) Fe concentration in whole blood or serum, in medicine a number of parameters, such as the serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor and the transferrin saturation, are routinely determined instead. As previous research has shown that also the isotopic composition of Fe in blood and tissues is dependent on the metabolism, the present study assessed whether Fe isotopic composition in whole blood provides information as to an individual's iron status. Fe isotopic analysis of whole blood samples from a reference population (healthy volunteers) was carried out using multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (after chromatographic target element isolation) and the results obtained were investigated by statistical means as to their potential relation with the iron status parameters conventionally used in medicine. A low δ(56)Fe value was demonstrated to coincide with high iron status and a high δ(56)Fe value with low iron status, thus reflecting the response of the body to this iron status in terms of iron uptake, distribution between blood and stores and mobilization of storage iron. In a second phase, the iron isotopic composition in blood from patients treated for hemochromatosis type I and from patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was determined. The results for hemochromatosis patients plotted with the values of low iron status, while those for ACD patients plotted with the values of high iron status. By taking a closer look at the aberrant iron metabolism that comes with these diseases, it can be seen that the patient samples confirm the conclusions drawn for the reference population. Patients with hemochromatosis type I have a strongly upregulated iron uptake, like healthy individuals with low iron status. The metabolism of patients suffering from ACD tries to remove iron from the circulation by downregulating the iron uptake

  17. Clinical Consequences of New Insights in the Pathophysiology of Disorders of Iron and Heme Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brittenham, Gary M.; Weiss, Günter; Brissot, Pierre; Lainé, Fabrice; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Guyader, Dominique; Moirand, Romain; Deugnier, Yves

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the clinical consequences for the practicing hematologist of remarkable new insights into the pathophysiology of disorders of iron and heme metabolism. The familiar proteins of iron transport and storage-transferrin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin-have recently been joined by a host of newly identified proteins that play critical roles in the molecular management of iron homeostasis. These include the iron-regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and -2), HFE (the product of the HFE gene that is mutated in most patients with hereditary hemochromatosis), the divalent metal transporter (DMT1), transferrin receptor 2, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin, the "Stimulator of Fe Transport" (SFT), frataxin, ferroportin 1 and others. The growing appreciation of the roles of these newly identified proteins has fundamental implications for the clinical understanding and laboratory evaluation of iron metabolism and its alterations with iron deficiency, iron overload, infection, and inflammation. In Section I, Dr. Brittenham summarizes current concepts of body and cellular iron supply and storage and reviews new means of evaluating the full range of body iron stores including genetic testing for mutations in the HFE gene, measurement of serum ferritin iron, transferrin receptor, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and measurement of tissue iron by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic susceptometry using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) instrumentation. In Section II, Dr. Weiss discusses the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations in iron metabolism due to chronic inflammatory disorders. The anemia of chronic disorders remains the most common form of anemia found in hospitalized patients. The network of interactions that link iron metabolism with cellular immune effector functions involving pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase proteins and oxidative stress is described, with an emphasis on

  18. Influence of lead on repetitive behavior and dopamine metabolism in a mouse model of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Chang, JuOae; Kueon, Chojin; Kim, Jonghan

    2014-12-01

    Exposures to lead (Pb) are associated with neurological problems including psychiatric disorders and impaired learning and memory. Pb can be absorbed by iron transporters, which are up-regulated in hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder in which increased iron deposition in various parenchymal organs promote metal-induced oxidative damage. While dysfunction in HFE (High Fe) gene is the major cause of hemochromatosis, the transport and toxicity of Pb in Hfe-related hemochromatosis are largely unknown. To elucidate the relationship between HFE gene dysfunction and Pb absorption, H67D knock-in Hfe-mutant and wild-type mice were given drinking water containing Pb 1.6 mg/ml ad libitum for 6 weeks and examined for behavioral phenotypes using the nestlet-shredding and marble-burying tests. Latency to nestlet-shredding in Pb-treated wild-type mice was prolonged compared with non-exposed wild-types (p < 0.001), whereas Pb exposure did not alter shredding latency in Hfe-mutant mice. In the marble-burying test, Hfe-mutant mice showed an increased number of marbles buried compared with wild-type mice (p = 0.002), indicating more repetitive behavior upon Hfe mutation. Importantly, Pb-exposed wild-type mice buried more marbles than non-exposed wild-types, whereas the number of marbles buried by Hfe-mutant mice did not change whether or not exposed to Pb. These results suggest that Hfe mutation could normalize Pb-induced behavioral alteration. To explore the mechanism of repetitive behavior caused by Pb, western blot analysis was conducted for proteins involved in brain dopamine metabolism. The levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter increased upon Pb exposure in both genotypes, whereas Hfe-mutant mice displayed down-regulation of the dopamine transporter and dopamine D1 receptor with D2 receptor elevated. Taken together, our data support the idea that both Pb exposure and Hfe mutation increase repetitive behavior in mice and further suggest that

  19. Hyaluronic acid as a biomarker of fibrosis in chronic liver diseases of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    ORASAN, OLGA HILDA; CIULEI, GEORGE; COZMA, ANGELA; SAVA, MADALINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a significant public health problem worldwide. The degree of liver fibrosis secondary to these diseases is important, because it is the main predictor of their evolution and prognosis. Hyaluronic acid is studied as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases, in an attempt to avoid the complications of liver puncture biopsy, considered the gold standard in the evaluation of fibrosis. We review the advantages and limitations of hyaluronc acid, a biomarker, used to manage patients with chronic viral hepatitis B or C infection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, HIV-HCV coinfection, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, biliary atresia, hereditary hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27004022

  20. Clinical and roentgenographic aspects of pseudogout: a study of 50 cases and a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fam, A G; Topp, J R; Stein, H B; Little, A H

    1981-01-01

    Pseudogout, defined as recurrent acute arthritis due to intrasynovial deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals, is a relatively common arthritic disorder of the elderly. The clinical and roentgenographic aspects of 50 cases of pseudogout in hospitalized patients are reviewed in this paper. Oligoarticular and polyarticular episodes were observed in half of these patients. Antecedent problems included infection, trauma, surgery and vascular events. Consistent with previous reports, most patients had roentgenographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. A third had asymptomatic capsular or periarticular calcific deposits or both, and a third had pyrophosphate arthropathy, a progressive, destructive, accelerated form of osteoarthritis. An attack of pseudogout may offer a clue to the presence of an unsuspected metabolic disease, such as primary hyperparathyroidism or idiopathic hemochromatosis. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:7008926

  1. Liver Transplantation After Bone Marrow Transplantation for End Stage Liver Disease with Severe Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in Dyskeratosis Congenita: A Literature First.

    PubMed

    Mahansaria, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Senthil; Bharathy, Kishore G S; Kumar, Sachin; Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2015-12-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a multisystem genetic disorder. Although hepatic involvement is reported in about 7% of patients with dyskeratosis congenita, it is not well characterized and often attributed to hemochromatosis from frequent blood transfusions. A few case reports describe cirrhosis and hepatic cell necrosis in affected individuals in autosomal dominant pedigrees. Bone marrow failure and malignancies are the principal causes of death in dyskeratosis congenita. We describe the first case of living donor liver transplantation, in dyskeratosis congenita for decompensated cirrhosis with portal hypertension. The patient also had associated severe hepatopulmonary syndrome, interstitial lung disease, bilateral hip replacement for avascular necrosis of the head of femur, and a past history of bone marrow transplantation for bone marrow failure. PMID:26900277

  2. Resistance of ferroportin to hepcidin binding causes exocrine pancreatic failure and fatal iron overload.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Sandro; Kessler, Regina; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Gretz, Norbert; Hentze, Matthias W; Galy, Bruno; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2014-08-01

    The regulatory axis between the iron hormone hepcidin and its receptor, the iron exporter ferroportin (FPN), is central to iron homeostasis. Mutations preventing hepcidin-mediated degradation of FPN cause systemic iron overload. We have introduced a point mutation (C326S) into the murine Fpn locus, resembling human hereditary hemochromatosis type 4, including elevated plasma iron and ferritin levels, high transferrin saturation, hepatic iron overload, and iron depletion of duodenal enterocytes and reticuloendothelial macrophages. Unlike other mouse models of iron overload, homozygous C326S mice die between 7 and 14 months of age. Pancreatic acinar cells display marked iron accumulation, oxidative damage and degeneration, associated with failure of the exocrine pancreas and severe body weight loss. Rescue experiments reveal iron overload and exocrine pancreatic failure as leading causes of death. This work uncovers the critical importance of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis for life and unveils the sensitivity of the exocrine pancreas to iron overload.

  3. The influence of oxidative stress induced by iron on telomere length.

    PubMed

    Kepinska, Marta; Szyller, Jakub; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress can be induced by increased concentrations of iron in the body and consequently can cause shortening of telomeres. Telomeres, called mitotic clocks, are non-coding fragments at the end of chromosomes. During the replication of genetic material they are shortened, playing the role of ageing biomarkers in eukaryotes. In human endothelial cells, oxidative stress causes a decrease in telomerase activity. Shortening of chromosomes in telomeric parts was found in patients with primary hemochromatosis and in patients taking supplements containing iron. Increased level of transferrin saturation is associated with the presence of shorter telomeres in the chromosomes of leukocytes. The relationship between iron status and telomere length is still not fully understood.

  4. Interpreting results of coulometry and immunoprecipitation in diagnosing iron disorders.

    PubMed

    Rettmer, R L; Labbé, R F; Huebers, H A; Brown, W P; Josephson, B M; Finch, C A

    1987-07-01

    Concentration of iron in plasma, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and transferrin saturation are often determined by standard spectrophotometric methods, but iron concentration may be quantified by immunoprecipitation or, electrochemically, by controlled-potential coulometry. Because these iron assays do not all measure the same form(s) of iron, we studied subjects in various states of iron nutriture: normal adults, iron-deficient patients, thalassemia patients with unsaturated transferrin or oversaturated transferrin, and patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis. The spectrophotometric and coulometric methods detected essentially all non-heme iron in plasma; results correlated well but showed a negative bias toward the coulometric method. Results by an immunoprecipitation procedure, which measures only transferrin-bound iron, correlated well with those obtained coulometrically but were slightly higher than the latter. The characteristics of the various methods for iron must be understood by the clinical laboratory if diagnosis of iron disorders is to be accurate.

  5. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2013-05-01

    Elevated transaminases in asymptomatic patients can be detected in more than 5 % of the investigations. If there are no obvious reasons, the finding should be confirmed within the next 3 months. Frequent causes are non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), alcohol, hepatitis B or C, hemochromatosis and drugs or toxins. Rarer causes are autoimmune hepatitis, M. Wilson and α1-antitrypsine deficiency. There are also non-hepatic causes such as celiac disease or hemolysis and myopathies in the case of an exclusive increase of ASAT. I recommend a two-step investigational procedure; the more frequent causes are examined first before the rare causes are studied. The value of the proposed investigations is discussed.

  6. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  7. Genome-wide association study of serum iron phenotypes in premenopausal women of European descent.

    PubMed

    Koller, Daniel L; Imel, Erik A; Lai, Dongbing; Padgett, Leah R; Acton, Dena; Gray, Amie; Peacock, Munro; Econs, Michael J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2016-03-01

    A genome-wide association study was performed on 1130 premenopausal women to detect common variants associated with three serum iron-related phenotypes. Total iron binding capacity was strongly associated (p=10(-14)) with variants in and near the TF gene (transferrin), the serum iron transporting protein, and with variants in HFE (p=4×10(-7)), which encodes the human hemochromatosis gene. Association was also detected between percent iron saturation (p=10(-8)) and variants in the chromosome 6 region containing both HFE and SLC17A2, which encodes a phosphate transport protein. No significant associations were detected with serum iron, but variants in HFE were suggestive (p=10(-6)). Our results corroborate prior studies in older subjects and demonstrate that the association of these genetic variants with iron phenotypes can be detected in premenopausal women.

  8. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  9. Identification of the first low-molecular-weight inhibitors of matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Stirnberg, Marit; Maurer, Eva; Hammami, Maya; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-08-12

    As recently discovered, matriptase-2, a type II transmembrane serine protease, plays a crucial role in body iron homeostasis by down-regulating hepcidin expression, which results in increased iron levels. Thus, matriptase-2 represents a novel target for the development of enzyme inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of systemic iron overload (hemochromatosis). A comparative three-dimensional model of the catalytic domain of matriptase-2 was generated and utilized for structure-based virtual screening in combination with similarity searching and knowledge-based compound design. Two N-protected dipeptide amides containing a 4-amidinobenzylamide as P1 residue (compounds 1 and 3) were identified as the first small molecule inhibitors of matriptase-2 with K(i) values of 170 and 460 nM, respectively. An inhibitor of the closely related protease matriptase (compound 2, K(i) = 220 nM), with more than 50-fold selectivity over matriptase-2, was also identified. PMID:20684597

  10. Movement disorders in the Hfe knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Germann, Stacey L; Araiza, Renee S; Reader, J Rachel; Griffey, Stephen M; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2005-08-01

    The Hfe(- /-) mouse is a model for human hereditary hemochromatosis (HHH). The accumulation of tissue iron in this condition has led to the suggestion that HHH patients may be at higher risk for neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, adult male Hfe(-/-) mice and wildtype controls (n = 12/group) were evaluated for impairment with motor tests (stride length, landing footsplay, rotarod) as well as a general observational battery (Functional Observational Battery, FOB). Hfe(-/-) mice were characterized by more falls from the rotarod, wider forelimb landing footsplay and hypersensitivity to proximal stimulation. Iron accumulation in brain was not detected by histopathology. These data suggest that a motor syndrome may be associated with HHH that could be further understood through the Hfe(-/-) mouse model. PMID:16491649

  11. [Porphyria cutanea tara].

    PubMed

    Merk, H F

    2016-03-01

    Porphyria cutanea tara (PCT) has a prevelance of about 40 new diagnoses per 1 million people per year and is the most frequently occurring type of porphyria worldwide. Inhibition of the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) is the main cause of the disease, which can be the result of a heterozygous or homozygous mutation of the UROD gene; however, xenobiotics or other diseases may play an important role for the precipitation of the disease. Risk factors include alcohol, estrogen, iron overload, and hemochromatosis, hepatitis C or poisoning, e.g., with polyhalogenated aromatic compounds such as hexachlorobenzene. Signs and symptoms are blisters, skin fragility, erosions hyperpigmentation, sclerodermoid plaques. Therapy includes sun protection, prevention of risk factors, phlebotomy, and chloroquine. PMID:26743054

  12. [Metabolic disorders and corneal changes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    François, J

    1981-06-01

    The following inborn errors of metabolism may show corneal changes: A. Inborn errors of metabolism affecting the corneal epithelium: (1) familial dysautonomia, (2) tyrosinaemia type II, (3) Fabry's glycolipidosis. B. Inborn errors of metabolism affecting the corneal stroma: I. Localized amyloidosis (lattice dystrophy of the cornea), II. Defects in carbohydrate metabolism: (1) localized mucopolysaccharidosis (macular dystrophy of the cornea), (2) systemic mucopolysaccharides, (3) glycogen storage disease. III. Defects in lipid metabolism: (1) localized from (Schnyder's crystalline dystrophy), (2) systemic forms (hyperlipoproteinaemia, hypolipoproteinaemia, Lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase deficiency, Wolman's disease, Gaucher's disease). IV. Combined defects in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism (mucolipidoses). V. Other inherited metabolic disorders: (1) aminoacidopathies (cystinosis, Wilson's disease, ochronosis, Chediak-Higashi syndrome), (2) hemochromatosis.

  13. Variation in an Iron Metabolism Gene Moderates the Association Between Blood Lead Levels and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel T.; Elmore, Alexis L.; Natarajan, Neil; Friderici, Karen H.; Nikolas, Molly A.

    2016-01-01

    Although attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heritable neurodevelopmental condition, there is also considerable scientific and public interest in environmental modulators of its etiology. Exposure to neurotoxins is one potential source of perturbation of neural, and hence psychological, development. Exposure to lead in particular has been widely investigated and is correlated with neurodevelopmental outcomes, including ADHD. To investigate whether this effect is likely to be causal, we used a Mendelian randomization design with a functional gene variant. In a case-control study, we examined the association between ADHD symptoms in children and blood lead level as moderated by variants in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene. The HFE gene regulates iron uptake and secondarily modulates lead metabolism. Statistical moderation was observed: The magnitude of the association of blood lead with symptoms of ADHD was altered by functional HFE genotype, which is consistent with a causal hypothesis. PMID:26710823

  14. Iron Homeostasis in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gozzelino, Raffaella; Arosio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Iron is required for the survival of most organisms, including bacteria, plants, and humans. Its homeostasis in mammals must be fine-tuned to avoid iron deficiency with a reduced oxygen transport and diminished activity of Fe-dependent enzymes, and also iron excess that may catalyze the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, oxidative stress, and programmed cell death. The advance in understanding the main players and mechanisms involved in iron regulation significantly improved since the discovery of genes responsible for hemochromatosis, the IRE/IRPs machinery, and the hepcidin-ferroportin axis. This review provides an update on the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular and systemic Fe homeostasis and their roles in pathophysiologic conditions that involve alterations of iron metabolism, and provides novel therapeutic strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of its deficiency/overload. PMID:26805813

  15. Screening in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Paolo Del; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  16. Clinical application of therapeutic erythrocytapheresis (TEA).

    PubMed

    Valbonesi, M; Bruni, R

    2000-06-01

    Therapeutic erythrocytapheresis (TEA) has been used in different diseases such as polycythemia vera (PV), secondary erythrocytosis or hemochromatosis as a process of the less cumbersome but more expensive phlebotomy. TEA is preferred in emergency conditions such as thrombocytosis or in conditions such as porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) or erythropoietic porphyria when plasma exchange (PEX) is often combined with TEA to reduce extracellular levels of uroporphyrin which contribute to plasma hyperviscosity. TEA is often combined with drug therapy that varies from etoposide in PV to EPO and desferoxamine which are used to mobilize and reduce iron stores in hemochromatosis. Benefits from this combination may be more long lasting than expected. Nonetheless for TEA, there is no standard protocol and, clinical experience with this therapy remains highly anecdotal. Therapeutic red cell-exchange (TREX) has been used with much interest over the years, starting with the management of hemolytic disease of the newborn and later used to correct severe anemia in thalassemia patients thereby preventing iron overload. It has also been used for the management of complications of sickle cell disease such as priapism, chest syndrome, stroke, retinal, bone, splenic and hepatic infarction or in preparation for surgery by reducing HbS to less than 30%. Automated apheresis has also favored the use of TREX in conditions such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and aniline poisoning, arsenic poisoning, Na chlorate intoxications and CO intoxications, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, reactions due to ABO incompatibility, in preparation for ABO incompatible bone marrow transplantation or for preventing anti-D immunization after the transfusion of D(+) cells to D(-) recipients. Another field of application has been in the emergency management of intraerythrocytic parasite infections such as malaria and babesiosis. Application of TREX may be wide but its real use remains limited

  17. Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) Activates Hepcidin mRNA Expression in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Simeng; Feng, Teng; Vujić Spasić, Maja; Altamura, Sandro; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Altenöder, Jutta; Weiss, Thomas S; Dooley, Steven; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-06-17

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Its expression level is adjusted to alterations in iron levels, inflammatory cues, and iron requirements for erythropoiesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) contributes to the iron-dependent control of hepcidin. In addition, TGF-β1 may stimulate hepcidin mRNA expression in murine hepatocytes and human leukocytes. However, receptors and downstream signaling proteins involved in TGF-β1-induced hepcidin expression are still unclear. Here we show that TGF-β1 treatment of mouse and human hepatocytes, as well as ectopic expression of TGF-β1 in mice, increases hepcidin mRNA levels. The hepcidin response to TGF-β1 depends on functional TGF-β1 type I receptor (ALK5) and TGF-β1 type II receptor (TβRII) and is mediated by a noncanonical mechanism that involves Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Interestingly, increasing availability of canonical Smad2/3 decreases TGF-β1-induced hepcidin regulation, whereas the BMP6-hepcidin signal was enhanced, indicating a signaling component stoichiometry-dependent cross-talk between the two pathways. Although ALK2/3-dependent hepcidin activation by BMP6 can be modulated by each of the three hemochromatosis-associated proteins: HJV (hemojuvelin), HFE (hemochromatosis protein), and TfR2 (transferrin receptor 2), these proteins do not control the ALK5-mediated hepcidin response to TGF-β1. TGF-β1 mRNA levels are increased in mouse models of iron overload, indicating that TGF-β1 may contribute to hepcidin synthesis under these conditions. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that a complex regulatory network involving TGF-β1 and BMP6 may control the sensing of systemic and/or hepatic iron levels.

  18. Causes of death in 2877 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Stark, Romina; Strupp, Corinna; Kündgen, Andrea; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Germing, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes face a poor prognosis. The exact causes of death have not been described properly in the past. We performed a retrospective analysis of causes of death using data of 3792 patients in the Düsseldorf registry who have been followed up for a median time of 21 months. Medical files as well as death certificates were screened and primary care physicians were contacted. Death after AML evolution, infection, and bleeding was considered to be clearly disease-related. Further categories of causes of death were heart failure, other possibly disease-related reasons, such as hemochromatosis, disease-independent reasons as well as cases with unclear causes of death. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 71 years. At the time of analysis, 2877 patients (75.9 %) had deceased. In 1212 cases (42.1 %), the exact cause of death could not be ascertained. From 1665 patients with a clearly documented cause of death, 1388 patients (83.4 %) succumbed directly disease-related (AML (46.6 %), infection (27.0 %), bleeding (9.8 %)), whereas 277 patients (16.6 %) died for reasons not directly related with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including 132 patients with cardiac failure, 77 non-disease-related reasons, 23 patients with solid tumors, and 45 patients with possibly disease-related causes like hemochromatosis. Correlation with IPSS, IPSS-R, and WPSS categories showed a proportional increase of disease-related causes of death with increasing IPSS/IPSS-R/WPSS risk category. Likewise, therapy-related MDS were associated with a higher percentage of disease-related causes of death than primary MDS. This reflects the increasing influence of the underlying disease on the cause of death with increasing aggressiveness of the disease.

  19. Hepcidin: A Promising Therapeutic Target for Iron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Bingbing; Yin, Huijun; Liu, Sijin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Iron is required for most forms of organisms, and it is the most essential element for the functions of many iron-containing proteins involved in oxygen transport, cellular respiration, DNA replication, and so on. Disorders of iron metabolism are associated with diverse diseases, including anemias (e.g., iron-deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases) and iron overload diseases, such as hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia. Hepcidin (encoded by Hamp gene) is a peptide hormone synthesized by hepatocytes, and it plays an important role in regulating the systematic iron homeostasis. As the systemic iron regulator, hepcidin, not only controls dietary iron absorption and iron egress out of iron storage cells, but also induces iron redistribution in various organs. Deregulated hepcidin is often seen in a variety of iron-related diseases including anemias and iron overload disorders. In the case of iron overload disorders (e.g., hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia), hepatic hepcidin concentration is significantly reduced. Since hepcidin deregulation is responsible for iron disorder-associated diseases, the purpose of this review is to summarize the recent findings on therapeutics targeting hepcidin. Continuous efforts have been made to search for hepcidin mimics and chemical compounds that could be used to increase hepcidin level. Here, a literature search was conducted in PubMed, and research papers relevant to hepcidin regulation or hepcidin-centered therapeutic work were reviewed. On the basis of literature search, we recapitulated recent findings on therapeutic studies targeting hepcidin, including agonists and antagonists to modulate hepcidin expression or its downstream signaling. We also discussed the molecular mechanisms by which hepcidin level and iron metabolism are modulated. Elevating hepcidin concentration is an optimal strategy to ameliorate iron overload diseases, and also to relieve β-thalassemia phenotypes by improving

  20. Transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and putative stimulator of Fe transport (SFT) expression in iron deficiency and overload: an overview.

    PubMed

    Barisani, Donatella; Conte, Dario

    2002-01-01

    Transferrin Receptor 1 (TfR1) and putative Stimulator of Fe Transport (SFT) represent two different proteins involved in iron metabolism in mammalian cells. The expression of TfR1 in the duodenum of subjects with normal body iron stores has been mainly localized in the basolateral portion of the cytoplasm of crypt cells, supporting the idea that this molecule may be involved in the sensing of body iron stores. In iron deficiency anemia TfR1 expression demonstrated an inverse relationship with body iron stores as assessed by immunohistochemistry with anti-TfR1 antibodies. In iron overload, TfR1 expression in the duodenum differed according to the presence or absence of the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene, being increased in HFE-related hemochromatosis and similar to controls in non-HFE-related iron overload. SFT is characterized by its ability to increase iron transport both through the transferrin dependent and independent uptake, and could thus affect iron absorption in the intestine. Immunohistochemistry using anti-SFT antibodies which recognize a putative stimulator of Fe transport of approximately 80 KDa revealed a localization of this protein in the apical part of the cytoplasm of enterocytes localized at the tip of the villi. The expression of the protein recognized by these antibodies was increased in iron deficiency, as well as in patients carrying the C282Y HFE mutation. Thus, the increased expression of both proteins only in patients with HFE-related hemochromatosis suggests that other factors should be involved in determining non-HFE-related iron overload.

  1. Expression of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) in chronic (necro-)inflammatory liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Breuhahn, Kai; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Peters, Malte; Prang, Nadja; Töx, Ulrich; Köhne-Volland, Rudolph; Dries, Volker; Schirmacher, Peter; Leo, Eugen

    2006-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in a several epithelial tissues and carcinomas, but not on mature hepatocytes. Here, we analysed the expression of Ep-CAM in 230 patients suffering from various liver diseases like chronic hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV infection), chronic autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), hereditary hemochromatosis and dysplastic nodules (DNs) as well as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and cholangiocellular carcinomas (CCCs) by immunohistochemistry. De novo hepatocellular Ep-CAM expression was found in 75.9% of ALD (22/29), 63.6% of HCV (21/33) and 55.6% of each AIH and HBV cases (5/9 and 15/27, respectively). Lower Ep-CAM expression levels were observed for primary sclerosing liver diseases (PBC and PSC) with 25% (3/12) and 7.7% (1/13) of cases. Moreover, only 14.3% of HCCs (9/63) manifested expression, while all CCCs showed strong Ep-CAM expression (5/5). For DNs and hereditary hemochromatosis, Ep-CAM expression was found in 10 and 50% (3/30 and 2/4), respectively. In HBV and HCV, Ep-CAM expression correlated significantly with inflammatory activity as assessed by histological parameters and to the extent of fibrosis. In addition, for HCV also transaminase levels correlated significantly with Ep-CAM expression. Our results indicate that de novo Ep-CAM expression in hepatocytes is frequent in inflammatory liver diseases and is potentially linked to regenerative activity. CCCs and Ep-CAM positive HCCs may represent an attractive target group for Ep-CAM-directed immunotherapies, yet unwanted toxicity may limit the use of such strategies due to Ep-CAM expression in biliary epithelium and several chronic liver diseases such as HBV-and HCV-hepatitis.

  2. Brain iron accumulation affects myelin-related molecular systems implicated in a rare neurogenetic disease family with neuropsychiatric features

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, M; Johnstone, D M; Bassett, B; Graham, R M; Chua, A C G; House, M J; Collingwood, J F; Bettencourt, C; Houlden, H; Ryten, M; Olynyk, J K; Trinder, D; Milward, E A

    2016-01-01

    The ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation' (NBIA) disease family entails movement or cognitive impairment, often with psychiatric features. To understand how iron loading affects the brain, we studied mice with disruption of two iron regulatory genes, hemochromatosis (Hfe) and transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2). Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy demonstrated increased iron in the Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain (P=0.002, n ≥5/group), primarily localized by Perls' staining to myelinated structures. Western immunoblotting showed increases of the iron storage protein ferritin light polypeptide and microarray and real-time reverse transcription-PCR revealed decreased transcript levels (P<0.04, n ≥5/group) for five other NBIA genes, phospholipase A2 group VI, fatty acid 2-hydroxylase, ceruloplasmin, chromosome 19 open reading frame 12 and ATPase type 13A2. Apart from the ferroxidase ceruloplasmin, all are involved in myelin homeostasis; 16 other myelin-related genes also showed reduced expression (P<0.05), although gross myelin structure and integrity appear unaffected (P>0.05). Overlap (P<0.0001) of differentially expressed genes in Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain with human gene co-expression networks suggests iron loading influences expression of NBIA-related and myelin-related genes co-expressed in normal human basal ganglia. There was overlap (P<0.0001) of genes differentially expressed in Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain and post-mortem NBIA basal ganglia. Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut mice were hyperactive (P<0.0112) without apparent cognitive impairment by IntelliCage testing (P>0.05). These results implicate myelin-related systems involved in NBIA neuropathogenesis in early responses to iron loading. This may contribute to behavioral symptoms in NBIA and hemochromatosis and is relevant to patients with abnormal iron status and psychiatric disorders involving myelin abnormalities or resistant to conventional treatments. PMID:26728570

  3. Screening in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  4. Liver pathology of hepatitis C, beyond grading and staging of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Sadhna; Ward, Stephen C; Thung, Swan N

    2016-01-01

    Liver biopsy evaluation plays a critical role in management of patients with viral hepatitis C. In patients with acute viral hepatitis, a liver biopsy, though uncommonly performed, helps to rule out other non-viral causes of deranged liver function. In chronic viral hepatitis C, it is considered the gold standard in assessment of the degree of necroinflammation and the stage of fibrosis, to help guide treatment and determine prognosis. It also helps rule out any concomitant diseases such as steatohepatitis, hemochromatosis or others. In patients with chronic progressive liver disease with cirrhosis and dominant nodules, a targeted liver biopsy is helpful in differentiating a regenerative nodule from dysplastic nodule or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the setting of transplantation, the liver biopsy helps distinguish recurrent hepatitis C from acute rejection and also is invaluable in the diagnosis of fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis, a rare variant of recurrent hepatitis C. This comprehensive review discusses the entire spectrum of pathologic findings in the course of hepatitis C infection. PMID:26819505

  5. [Between evidence and negligence: coverage and invisibilityof health topics in the Portuguese printed media].

    PubMed

    Cavaca, Aline Guio; Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Ferreira, Patrícia; Nunes, João Arriscado

    2015-11-01

    The scope of this study is to conduct an assessment of the media coverage and dissemination of health issues in Portugal in order to problematize the aspects of coverage and invisibility of health topics and establish the themes neglected in media coverage. To achieve this, the coverage on health issues in the Portuguese daily newspaper Público was compared with the epidemiological context regarding health priorities and the perceptions of key players on media dissemination and the themes that are relevant to the Portuguese population. The results showed that the recurrent health-associated themes do not deal with diseases per se, but with the politics and economics of health and medication. The themes neglected in media coverage identified in the Portuguese context include: communicable diseases, such as hepatitis and tuberculosis; issues related to mental health and suicide; and ailments and social consequences associated with the economic crisis that has beset Portugal recently. From the standpoint of the people interviewed, other neglected diseases include hemochromatosis and other rare diseases. In tandem with this, the study highlights the well covered media themes that revolve around the lives and activities of celebrities, which are exhaustively aired in the communication media in the country.

  6. C282Y and H63D Mutation Frequencies in a Population from Central Spain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, S.; Mesa, M. S.; Bandrés, F.; Arroyo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations, C282Y and H63D, from 125 autochthonous blood donors originating from a Central region of Spain, to provide epidemiological data about HFE gene in the Iberian Peninsula. Methods: DNA extracted from blood samples was analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Restriction enzimes were Snab I and Bcl I for C282Y and H63D, respectively. Results were visualized with Ethidium Bromide staining after gel electrophoresis. Results and discussion: C282Y frequency was 0.02 and that of H63D was 0.16. Result for C282Y mutation falls within the range of variation of the Mediterranean populations. H63D frequency agrees with those reported for other European populations. In both cases frequencies obtained are the lowest of compared Spanish data. Conclusions: This study is useful to compare expected versus presented C282Y and H63D frequencies in Spanish populations and to contribute to the knowledge of Spanish variability, rarely analyzed until now for HFE gene mutations. PMID:11673657

  7. Gastric siderosis: An under-recognized and rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Kothadia, Jiten P; Arju, Rezina; Kaminski, Monica; Mahmud, Arif; Chow, Jonathan; Giashuddin, Shah

    2016-01-01

    The increased deposition of iron in gastric mucosa is known as gastric siderosis. It is believed that the only regulated step of the iron metabolism cycle occurs during absorption in the small intestine. Once this system becomes overwhelmed due to either local or widespread iron levels, then iron can be absorbed very quickly by a passive concentration-dependent mechanism. This excess iron is initially stored in the liver but later can be found in the pancreas, heart and joints. Excess iron is not expected to deposit in the gastric mucosa. This gastric deposition has been found in association with hemochromatosis, oral iron medications, alcohol abuse, blood transfusions, hepatic cirrhosis and spontaneous portacaval shunt with esophageal varices. The precise mechanism of this iron deposition in gastric epithelial and stromal cells is still not well understood; thus, identification of iron in gastric mucosa raises many questions. On histology, the pattern of deposition is variable, and recognition of the pattern is often useful to choose the appropriate workup for the patient and to diagnose and possibly treat the cause of iron overload. In this article, we have described a well-referenced review of this rare clinical entity with different histological patterns, diagnostic tests and the clinical significance of the different patterns of iron deposition. PMID:26985391

  8. HFE p.C282Y gene variant is associated with varicose veins in Russian population.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina A; Shadrina, Alexandra S; Sevost'ianova, Kseniya S; Shevela, Andrey I; Soldatsky, Evgenii Yu; Seliverstov, Evgenii I; Demekhova, Marina Yu; Shonov, Oleg A; Ilyukhin, Evgenii A; Smetanina, Mariya A; Voronina, Elena N; Zolotukhin, Igor A; Filipenko, Maxim L

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the association of polymorphism rs1800562 (p.C282Y) in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene with the increased risk of venous ulceration was shown. We hypothesized that HFE gene polymorphism might be involved not only in ulceration process, but also in susceptibility to primary varicose veins. We genotyped HFE p.C282Y (rs1800562) and p.H63D (rs1799945) variants in patients with primary varicose veins (n = 463) and in the control group (n = 754). In our study, p.282Y variant (rs1800562 A allele) was significantly associated with the risk of varicose veins (OR 1.79, 95 % CI = 1.11-2.89, P = 0.02). A borderline significant reverse association of p.63D variant (rs1799945 G allele) with venous leg ulcer development was revealed in Russians (OR 0.25, 95 % CI = 0.06-1.00, P = 0.05), but not in the meta-analysis (P = 0.56). We conclude that the HFE gene polymorphism can affect the risk of developing primary varicose veins.

  9. The role of iron in the skin and cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Josephine A.; Richards, Toby; Srai, Surjit K. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA) 320–400 nm portion of the UVA spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialization. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localized iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron hemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation. PMID:25071575

  10. Treatment of nongout joint deposition diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Pascart, Tristan; Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen.

  11. Abundance and Significance of Iron, Zinc, Copper, and Calcium in the Hearts of Patients With Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Pamela C.; Yang, Karl X.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Becker, Alyssa B.; Feustel, Paul J.; Koeppen, Arnulf H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of death in patients with Friedreich ataxia (FA), and a characteristic pathological feature is the focal accumulation of iron (Fe) in cardiomyocytes. This restricted localization of the metal contrasts with the diffuse cardiac Fe overload in hemochromatosis and transfusion siderosis. Nevertheless, heart Fe in FA contributes to cardiomyocyte necrosis, inflammation, and scarring as the disease progresses. A putative mechanism of cardiomyopathy in FA is Fe-mediated oxidative damage. Two other transition metals zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), are diffusely distributed throughout normal hearts and the hearts of patients with FA. The myocardium in FA is also prone to deposits of calcium in the form of scattered concretions. In this study, heart tissues (left and right ventricular walls and ventricular septum) of 23 patients with genetically confirmed FA and 8 normal controls were obtained at autopsy and analyzed for Fe, Zn, Cu, and calcium. The principal assay methods were inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and plasma mass spectrometry. Total levels of Fe in bulk extracts were not significantly higher than normal, and the concentrations of Zn also remained in the normal range. Cu levels, however, were significantly lower in FA. In conclusion, the decrease of Cu may be important in consideration of the potential benefit of Cu supplements in FA cardiomyopathy. PMID:27189813

  12. Repulsive Guidance Molecule is a structural bridge between Neogenin and Bone Morphogenetic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Eleanor G.; Bishop, Benjamin; Elegheert, Jonathan; Bell, Christian H.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Siebold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) control crucial processes spanning cell motility, adhesion, immune cell regulation and systemic iron metabolism. RGMs signal via two fundamental signaling cascades: the Neogenin (NEO1) and the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathways. Here, we report crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of all human RGM family members in complex with the BMP ligand BMP2, revealing a novel protein fold and a conserved BMP-binding mode. Our structural and functional data suggest a pH-linked mechanism for RGM-activated BMP signaling and offer a rationale for RGM mutations causing juvenile hemochromatosis. We also determined the ternary BMP2–RGM–NEO1 complex crystal structure, which combined with solution scattering and live-cell super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, indicates BMP-induced clustering of the RGM–NEO1 complex. Our results show how RGM acts as the central hub linking BMP and NEO1 and physically connecting these fundamental signaling pathways. PMID:25938661

  13. Utility of the trabecular bone score (TBS) in secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Fabio M; Silva, Barbara C; Sardanelli, Francesco; Hans, Didier; Bilezikian, John P; Caudarella, Renata

    2014-11-01

    Altered bone micro-architecture is an important factor in accounting for fragility fractures. Until recently, it has not been possible to gain information about skeletal microstructure in a way that is clinically feasible. Bone biopsy is essentially a research tool. High-resolution peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography, while non-invasive, is available only sparsely throughout the world. The trabecular bone score (TBS) is an imaging technology adapted directly from the Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) image of the lumbar spine. Thus, it is potentially readily and widely available. In recent years, a large number of studies have demonstrated that TBS is significantly associated with direct measurements of bone micro-architecture, predicts current and future fragility fractures in primary osteoporosis, and may be a useful adjunct to BMD for fracture detection and prediction. In this review, we summarize its potential utility in secondary causes of osteoporosis. In some situations, like glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and in diabetes mellitus, the TBS appears to out-perform DXA. It also has apparent value in numerous other disorders associated with diminished bone health, including primary hyperparathyroidism, androgen-deficiency, hormone-receptor positive breast cancer treatment, chronic kidney disease, hemochromatosis, and autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Further research is both needed and warranted to more clearly establish the role of TBS in these and other disorders that adversely affect bone.

  14. Measurement of liver iron overload: noninvasive calibration of MRI-R2* by magnetic iron detector susceptometer.

    PubMed

    Gianesin, B; Zefiro, D; Musso, M; Rosa, A; Bruzzone, C; Balocco, M; Carrara, P; Bacigalupo, L; Banderali, S; Rollandi, G A; Gambaro, M; Marinelli, M; Forni, G L

    2012-06-01

    An accurate assessment of body iron accumulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of iron overload in diseases such as thalassemia or hemochromatosis. Magnetic iron detector susceptometry and MRI are noninvasive techniques capable of detecting iron overload in the liver. Although the transverse relaxation rate measured by MRI can be correlated with the presence of iron, a calibration step is needed to obtain the liver iron concentration. Magnetic iron detector provides an evaluation of the iron overload in the whole liver. In this article, we describe a retrospective observational study comparing magnetic iron detector and MRI examinations performed on the same group of 97 patients with transfusional or congenital iron overload. A biopsy-free linear calibration to convert the average transverse relaxation rate in iron overload (R(2) = 0.72), or in liver iron concentration evaluated in wet tissue (R(2) = 0.68), is presented. This article also compares liver iron concentrations calculated in dry tissue using MRI and the existing biopsy calibration with liver iron concentrations evaluated in wet tissue by magnetic iron detector to obtain an estimate of the wet-to-dry conversion factor of 6.7 ± 0.8 (95% confidence level).

  15. The last two millennias echo-catastrophes are the driving forces for the potential genetic advantage mechanisms in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Lerner

    2011-11-01

    Many human genes have adapted to the constant threat of exposure to changing environmental conditions. Balancing selection is the result of an initial stage of positive selection that favors the spread in a population of a new allele until selection opposes its fixation and balanced situation is established. It is suggested that the disadvantageous celiac patients survived the last two millennias echo-catastrophes by adapting to the extreme temperature changes and their consequences in Europe. Genetic selective diversity induced by changing environment, enabled the celiac population to survive. Such a genetic positive selection is represented by the HEF C282Y mutation of hemochromatosis, SH2B3 loci and the HLA celiac disease-associated repertoire, enabling the celiac to overcome iron deficiency anemia and micro pathogen richness, respectively. The increased incidence of those evolutionary events in the celiac patients is a recent phenomenon that occurred in the latest era of the modern human history. The present hypothesis can shed light on additional selective genetic adaptations, echo catastrophe-driven that are at the basis of autoimmune disease-affected population survival and current expansion.

  16. A high-fat diet modulates iron metabolism but does not promote liver fibrosis in hemochromatotic Hjv⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Gkouvatsos, Konstantinos; Guido, Maria; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2015-02-15

    Hemojuvelin (Hjv) is a membrane protein that controls body iron metabolism by enhancing signaling to hepcidin. Hjv mutations cause juvenile hemochromatosis, a disease of systemic iron overload. Excessive iron accumulation in the liver progressively leads to inflammation and disease, such as fibrosis, cirrhosis, or hepatocellular cancer. Fatty liver (steatosis) may also progress to inflammation (steatohepatitis) and liver disease, and iron is considered as pathogenic cofactor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological implications of parenchymal iron overload due to Hjv ablation in the fatty liver. Wild-type (WT) and Hjv(-/-) mice on C57BL/6 background were fed a standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with 2% carbonyl iron (HFD+Fe) for 12 wk. The animals were analyzed for iron and lipid metabolism. As expected, all Hjv(-/-) mice manifested higher serum and hepatic iron and diminished hepcidin levels compared with WT controls. The HFD reduced iron indexes and promoted liver steatosis in both WT and Hjv(-/-) mice. Notably, steatosis was attenuated in Hjv(-/-) mice on the HFD+Fe regimen. Hjv(-/-) animals gained less body weight and exhibited reduced serum glucose and cholesterol levels. Histological and ultrastructural analysis revealed absence of iron-induced inflammation or liver fibrosis despite early signs of liver injury (expression of α-smooth muscle actin). We conclude that parenchymal hepatic iron overload does not suffice to trigger progression of liver steatosis to steatohepatitis or fibrosis in C57BL/6 mice.

  17. HFE and transferrin directly compete for transferrin receptor in solution and at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Anthony M; Björkman, Pamela J

    2004-06-11

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a dimeric cell surface protein that binds both the serum iron transport protein transferrin (Fe-Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in patients with the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis. HFE and Fe-Tf can bind simultaneously to TfR to form a ternary complex, but HFE binding to TfR lowers the apparent affinity of the Fe-Tf/TfR interaction. This apparent affinity reduction could result from direct competition between HFE and Fe-Tf for their overlapping binding sites on each TfR polypeptide chain, from negative cooperativity, or from a combination of both. To explore the mechanism of the affinity reduction, we constructed a heterodimeric TfR that contains mutations such that one TfR chain binds only HFE and the other binds only Fe-Tf. Binding studies using a heterodimeric form of soluble TfR demonstrate that TfR does not exhibit cooperativity in heterotropic ligand binding, suggesting that some or all of the effects of HFE on iron homeostasis result from competition with Fe-Tf for TfR binding. Experiments using transfected cell lines demonstrate a physiological role for this competition in altering HFE trafficking patterns. PMID:15056661

  18. Roles of transferrin receptors in erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis, which is mainly provided by macrophages and the intestines in a transferrin (Tf)-bound form. Bone marrow erythroblasts incorporate Tf through endocytosis, which is mediated by transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Recently, human TFR1, aside from its role as a Tf receptor, was also found to be a receptor for the H-subunit of ferritin (FTH). In humans, hematopoietic erythroid precursor cells express high levels of TFR1 and specifically take up the FTH homopolymer (H-ferritin). H-ferritin inhibits the formation of burst forming unit-erythroid colonies in vitro. TFR2, which is also a Tf receptor, is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and erythroid precursor cells. In the liver, TFR2 forms a complex with HFE, a hereditary hemochromatosis-associated protein, and acts as an iron sensor. In mice, hepatocyte-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene has been shown to cause systemic iron-overload with decreased expression of hepcidin, the central regulator of iron homeostasis. In erythroid cells, TFR2 forms a complex with the erythropoietin receptor and facilitates its trafficking to the cell membrane. Moreover, hematopoietic cell-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene causes microcytic erythrocytosis in mice. This review focuses on the molecular evolution and functions of these TFRs and their ligands. PMID:27498743

  19. Minihepcidin peptides as disease modifiers in mice affected by β-thalassemia and polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Casu, Carla; Oikonomidou, Paraskevi Rea; Chen, Huiyong; Nandi, Vijay; Ginzburg, Yelena; Prasad, Princy; Fleming, Robert E; Shah, Yatrik M; Valore, Erika V; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; MacDonald, Brian; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-07-14

    In β-thalassemia and polycythemia vera (PV), disordered erythropoiesis triggers severe pathophysiological manifestations. β-Thalassemia is characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, reduced production of erythrocytes, anemia, and iron overload and PV by erythrocytosis and thrombosis. Minihepcidins are hepcidin agonists that have been previously shown to prevent iron overload in murine models of hemochromatosis and induce iron-restricted erythropoiesis at higher doses. Here, we show that in young Hbb(th3/+) mice, which serve as a model of untransfused β-thalassemia, minihepcidin ameliorates ineffective erythropoiesis, anemia, and iron overload. In older mice with untransfused β-thalassemia, minihepcidin improves erythropoiesis and does not alter the beneficial effect of the iron chelator deferiprone on iron overload. In PV mice that express the orthologous JAK2 mutation causing human PV, administration of minihepcidin significantly reduces splenomegaly and normalizes hematocrit levels. These studies indicate that drug-like minihepcidins have a potential as future therapeutics for untransfused β-thalassemia and PV. PMID:27154187

  20. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization.

  1. Extensive myocardial iron deposition in a patient with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Rusovici, Arthur; Ibrahim, Samia; Sood, Sunita; Maher, James; Gerula, Christine; Kaluski, Edo; Klapholz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    During a cardiac evaluation prior to liver transplantation, a 51-year-old man with hepatitis C and cirrhosis was found to have nonischemic cardiomyopathy-a condition that would have made him ineligible for liver transplantation. Right ventricular biopsy revealed extensive cardiac hemosiderosis. Despite the elevated levels of serum ferritin, the patient had no history of multiple red blood cell transfusions; moreover, genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis was negative for the HFE mutations C282Y and H63D. Chelation therapy was considered for this patient, to reduce the cardiac iron deposits. However, before a course of treatment was established, the patient's clinical condition worsened, and chelation therapy was no longer feasible. He was referred for combined heart and liver transplantation. Cardiac iron deposition can be diagnosed readily using right ventricular biopsy or T2* magnetic resonance imaging. Early detection may allow time for intensive chelation therapy, which might, in turn, reverse the myopathic process. Improved cardiac function should improve cirrhosis patients' chances to be placed on the liver transplant waiting list and ultimately optimize transplantation outcomes.

  2. Deficits of learning and memory in Hemojuvelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinglong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hongju; Ren, Wei; Song, Jinjing; Rao, Elizabeth; Takahashi, Eiki; Zhou, Ying; Li, Weidong; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-10-01

    Iron is involved in various physiological processes of the human body to maintain normal functions. Abnormal iron accumulation in brain has been reported as a pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders and cognitive impairments. Hemojuvelin (HVJ) is a membrane-bound and soluble protein in mammals that is responsible for the iron overload condition known as juvenile hemochromatosis. Although iron accumulation in brain has been related to neurodegenerative diseases, it remains unknown the effect of mutation of HVJ gene on cognitive performance. In our studies, HJV(-/-) mice showed deficits in novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests. Furthermore, the expression ration of apoptotic marker Bax and anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex showed higher levels in HJV(-/-) mice. Our results suggested that deletion of HJV gene could increase apoptosis in brain which might contribute to learning and memory deficits in mutant mice. These results indicated that HJV(-/-) mice would be a useful model to study cognitive impairment induced by iron overload in brain.

  3. Pituitary responsiveness to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone in different reproductive disorders. A review.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, J M; Greenblatt, R B

    1985-08-01

    As a result of the use of synthetic luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) (and its analogs), significant advances in modern clinical practice are being realized. We studied the use of LHRH as a test for pituitary reserve for gonadotropin secretion in different reproductive disorders. Synthetic LHRH was used as a diagnostic test for discriminating pituitary from hypothalamic disorders. After appropriate LHRH priming of the pituitary, LHRH was used to document hypothalamic dysfunction in patients with Kallmann's syndrome who had normal gonadotropin responsiveness to LHRH. The gonadotropin responsiveness to 100 micrograms of LHRH was impaired or absent in patients with panhypopituitarism, craniopharyngiomas, hemochromatosis and acromegaly accompanied by abnormal lactation. In women with gonadal dysgenesis, the absence of gonadal steroid feedback exacerbated the pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Women with hyperprolactinemia are also known to have a blunted gonadotropin response to endogenous and exogenous LHRH. An experimental rat model was developed in our laboratory to study the site of prolactin action on gonadotropin secretion. LHRH challenge tests during perphenazine-induced hyperprolactinemia in rats indicated that prolactin may decrease pituitary sensitivity to LHRH. Additional experiments indicated that the increased progesterone produced in these hyperprolactinemic (pseudopregnant) rats was probably responsible for the decreased pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether prolactin, which can alter ovarian steroidogenesis in vitro, interferes with ovulation directly in addition to affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  4. Transcriptome variations in human CaCo-2 cells: a model for enterocyte differentiation and its link to iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Bédrine-Ferran, Hélène; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Gicquel, Isabelle; Le Cunff, Martine; Soriano, Nicolas; Guisle, Isabelle; Mottier, Stéphanie; Monnier, Annabelle; Teusan, Raluca; Fergelot, Patricia; Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Léger, Jean; Mosser, Jean

    2004-05-01

    Complete clinical expression of the HFE1 hemochromatosis is very likely modulated by genes linked to duodenal iron absorption, whose level is conditioned by unknown processes taking place during enterocyte differentiation. We carried out a transcriptomic study on CaCo-2 cells used as a model of enterocyte differentiation in vitro. Of the 720 genes on the microarrays, 80, 50, and 56 were significantly down-regulated up-regulated, and invariant during differentiation. With regard to iron metabolism, we showed that HEPH, SLC11A2, SLC11A3, and TF are significantly up-regulated, while ATP7B and SLC39A1 (and SFT) are down-regulated and ACO1, dCYTb, FECH, and FTH1 show constant expression. Ontological annotations highlight the decrease in the expression of cell cycle and DNA metabolism associated genes as well as transcription, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and nucleocytoplasmic transport associated genes, whereas there are increases in the expression of genes linked to cell adhesion, lipid and xenobiotic metabolism, iron transport and homeostasis, and immune response.

  5. Expression of stimulator of Fe transport is not enhanced in Hfe knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Knutson, M D; Levy, J E; Andrews, N C; Wessling-Resnick, M

    2001-05-01

    Hfe knockout (-/-) mice recapitulate many of the biochemical abnormalities of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), but the molecular mechanisms involved in the etiology of iron overload in HH remain poorly understood. It was found previously that livers of patients with HH contained 5-fold higher SFT (stimulator of Fe transport) mRNA levels relative to subjects without HH. Because this observation suggests a possible role for SFT in HH, we investigated SFT mRNA expression in Hfe(-/-) mice. The 4- and 10-wk-old Hfe(-/-) mice do not have elevated levels of hepatic SFT transcripts relative to age-matched Hfe(+/+) mice, despite having 2.2- and 3.3-fold greater hepatic nonheme iron concentrations, respectively. Northern blot analyses of various mouse tissues revealed that SFT is widely expressed. The novel observation that SFT transcripts are abundant in brain prompted a comparison of SFT transcript levels and nonheme iron levels in the brains of Hfe(+/+) and Hfe(-/-) mice. Neither SFT mRNA levels nor nonheme iron levels differed between groups. Further comparisons of Hfe(-/-) and Hfe(+/+) mouse tissues revealed no significant differences in SFT mRNA levels in duodenum, the site of increased iron absorption in HH. Important distinctions between Hfe(-/-) mice and HH patients include not only differences in the relative rate and magnitude of iron loading but also the lack of fibrosis and phlebotomy treatment in the knockout animals.

  6. Antioxidants as Therapeutic Agents for Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Ashwani K.; Jampana, Sarat C.; Weinman, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly associated with a number of liver diseases and is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C, alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hemochromatosis and Wilson’s disease. Antioxidant therapy has thus been considered to have the possibility of beneficial effects in the management of these liver diseases. In spite of this promise, antioxidants have produced mixed results in a number of clinical trials of efficacy. This review summarizes the results of clinical trials of antioxidants as sole or adjuvant therapy of chronic hepatitis C, alcoholic liver disease and NASH. Overall, the most promising results to date are for vitamin E therapy of NASH but some encouraging results have been obtained with antioxidant therapy of acute alcoholic hepatitis as well. In spite of evidence for small reductions of serum ALT, there is as yet no convincing evidence that antioxidant therapy itself is beneficial to patients with chronic hepatitis C. Problems such as small sample size, short follow up duration, inadequate end points, failure to demonstrate tissue delivery and antioxidant efficacy, and heterogeneous nature of the “antioxidant” compounds used have complicated interpretation of results of the clinical studies. These limitations and their implications for future trial design are discussed. PMID:22093324

  7. An update on "special stain" histochemistry with emphasis on automation.

    PubMed

    Grogan, T; Reinhardt, K; Jaramillo, M; Lee, D

    2000-03-01

    For nearly 100 years, pathologists have utilized "special histochemical stains" to assist in tissue-based diagnosis. As illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, histochemical stains have been used to identify infectious microorganisms (e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis with acid-fast bacillus (AFB) stain), to detail inflammatory stromal or structural alterations (e.g., fibrosis in liver cirrhosis with Masson trichrome), to identify microanatomic sites of disease (e.g., basement membrane in glomerulonephritis with Jones methenamine silver), to identify abnormal chemical deposits (e.g., iron in hemochromatosis with Prussian blue stain), or abnormal immune deposits (e.g., amyloid via Congo red stain). The current surgical pathology laboratory may employ a repertoire of 20 to 25 "special stains" to ensure the full diagnostic complement. While the diagnostic repertoire and the biochemical recipes for the stains are now a well-established, codified part of surgical pathology, there is an ever-moving, leading edge of new developments including new reagents, applications, and methods. This review seeks to update the reader on some of the new applications including both new reagents and methods. Particular emphasis will be placed on the recent technologic advance of automating special stains in kinetic-mode (1-4). The authors consider in turn: 1. In brief, the "news" (recent literature review) of new staining applications; 2. In greater detail, two new applications for detection of Microsporidia and Helicobacer pylori; 3. The new technologic advancement of kinetic mode automation of special stains.

  8. Room-temperature susceptometry predicts biopsy-determined hepatic iron in patients with elevated serum ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Maliken, Bryan D.; Avrin, William F.; Nelson, James E.; Mooney, Jody; Kumar, Sankaran; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing clinical need for novel methods to measure hepatic iron content (HIC) noninvasively. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) methods have previously shown promise for estimation of HIC, but these methods can be expensive and are not widely available. Room-temperature susceptometry (RTS) represents an inexpensive alternative and was previously found to be strongly correlated with HIC estimated by SQUID measurements among patients with transfusional iron overload related to thalassemia. Aim The goal of the current study was to examine the relationship between RTS and biochemical HIC measured in liver biopsy specimens in a more varied patient cohort. Methods Susceptometry was performed in a diverse group of patients with hyperferritinemia due to hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) (n=2), secondary iron overload (n=3), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n=2), and chronic viral hepatitis (n=3) within one month of liver biopsy in the absence of iron depletion therapy. Results The correlation coefficient between HIC estimated by susceptometry and by biochemical iron measurement in liver tissue was 0.71 (p=0.022). Variance between liver iron measurement and susceptometry measurement was primarily related to reliance on the patient’s body-mass index (BMI) to estimate the magnetic susceptibility of tissue overlying the liver. Conclusions In conclusion, we believe RTS holds promise for noninvasive measurement of HIC. Improved measurement techniques, including more accurate overlayer correction, may further improve the accuracy of liver susceptometry in patients with liver disease. PMID:22166564

  9. Haplotype Fine Mapping by Evolutionary Trees

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Johnny C.; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, B.

    2000-01-01

    Summary To refine the location of a disease gene within the bounds provided by linkage analysis, many scientists use the pattern of linkage disequilibrium between the disease allele and alleles at nearby markers. We describe a method that seeks to refine location by analysis of “disease” and “normal” haplotypes, thereby using multivariate information about linkage disequilibrium. Under the assumption that the disease mutation occurs in a specific gap between adjacent markers, the method first combines parsimony and likelihood to build an evolutionary tree of disease haplotypes, with each node (haplotype) separated, by a single mutational or recombinational step, from its parent. If required, latent nodes (unobserved haplotypes) are incorporated to complete the tree. Once the tree is built, its likelihood is computed from probabilities of mutation and recombination. When each gap between adjacent markers is evaluated in this fashion and these results are combined with prior information, they yield a posterior probability distribution to guide the search for the disease mutation. We show, by evolutionary simulations, that an implementation of these methods, called “FineMap,” yields substantial refinement and excellent coverage for the true location of the disease mutation. Moreover, by analysis of hereditary hemochromatosis haplotypes, we show that FineMap can be robust to genetic heterogeneity. PMID:10677324

  10. Current Status in the Therapy of Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Philipp; Fricker, Gert; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic diseases, like viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Wilson’s disease, play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis and, hence, hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, the current treatment options and the molecular mechanisms of action of the drugs are summarized. Unfortunately, the treatment options for most of these hepatic diseases are limited. Since hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infections are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, they are the focus of the development of new drugs. The current treatment of choice for HBV/HCV infection is an interferon-based combination therapy with oral antiviral drugs, like nucleos(t)ide analogues, which is associated with improving the therapeutic success and also preventing the development of resistances. Currently, two new protease inhibitors for HCV treatment are expected (deleobuvir, faldaprevir) and together with the promising drug, daclatasvir (NS5A-inhibitor, currently in clinical trials), adequate therapy is to be expected in due course (circumventing the requirement of interferon with its side-effects), while in contrast, efficient HBV therapeutics are still lacking. In this respect, entry inhibitors, like Myrcludex B, the lead substance of the first entry inhibitor for HBV/HDV (hepatitis D) infection, provide immense potential. The pharmacokinetics and the mechanism of action of Myrcludex B are described in detail. PMID:24786290

  11. Treatment of Nongout Joint Deposition Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  12. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhash K.; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca2+ homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload. PMID:26638758

  13. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A; Miller, Jack J J; Christian, Helen C; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Larner, Fiona; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-03-10

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation.

  14. Hepatic iron deprivation prevents spontaneous development of fulminant hepatitis and liver cancer in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Kobune, M; Kohgo, Y; Sugawara, N; Hisai, H; Nakamura, T; Sakamaki, S; Sawada, N; Niitsu, Y

    1996-08-15

    Several clinical studies have suggested that excess hepatic iron accumulation is a progressive factor in some liver diseases including chronic viral hepatitis and hemochromatosis. However, it is not known whether iron-induced hepatotoxicity may be directly involved in hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, which accumulates excess copper in the liver as in patients with Wilson's disease, is of a mutant strain displaying spontaneous hemolysis, hepatitis, and liver cancer. We found previously that LEC rats harbored an additional abnormality: accumulation of as much iron as copper in the liver. In the present study, we compared the occurrence of hepatitis and liver cancer in LEC rats fed an iron-deficient diet (ID) with those in rats fed a regular diet (RD). The RD group showed rapid increments of hepatic iron concentrations as the result of hemolysis, characteristics of fulminant hepatitis showing apoptosis, and a 53% mortality rate. However, no rats in the ID group died of fulminant hepatitis. Hepatic iron, especially "free" iron concentration and the extent of hepatic fibrosis in the ID group were far less than those of the RD group. At week 65, all rats in the RD group developed liver cancer, whereas none did in the ID group. These results suggest that the accumulation of iron, possibly by virtue of synergistic radical formation with copper, plays an essential role in the development of fulminant hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis, and subsequent hepatocarcinogenesis in LEC rats.

  15. Intracellular Iron Transport and Storage: From Molecular Mechanisms to Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Elizabeth L.; Iwasaki, Kenta

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Maintenance of proper “labile iron” levels is a critical component in preserving homeostasis. Iron is a vital element that is a constituent of a number of important macromolecules, including those involved in energy production, respiration, DNA synthesis, and metabolism; however, excess “labile iron” is potentially detrimental to the cell or organism or both because of its propensity to participate in oxidation–reduction reactions that generate harmful free radicals. Because of this dual nature, elaborate systems tightly control the concentration of available iron. Perturbation of normal physiologic iron concentrations may be both a cause and a consequence of cellular damage and disease states. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulation of iron absorption, transport, and storage through the roles of key regulatory proteins, including ferroportin, hepcidin, ferritin, and frataxin. In addition, we present an overview of the relation between iron regulation and oxidative stress and we discuss the role of functional iron overload in the pathogenesis of hemochromatosis, neurodegeneration, and inflammation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 997–1030. PMID:18327971

  16. Pharmacological Targeting of the Hepcidin/Ferroportin Axis

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiani, Giada; Wilkinson, Nicole; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The iron regulatory hormone hepcidin limits iron fluxes to the bloodstream by promoting degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin in target cells. Hepcidin insufficiency causes hyperabsorption of dietary iron, hyperferremia and tissue iron overload, which are hallmarks of hereditary hemochromatosis. Similar responses are also observed in iron-loading anemias due to ineffective erythropoiesis (such as thalassemias, dyserythropoietic anemias and myelodysplastic syndromes) and in chronic liver diseases. On the other hand, excessive hepcidin expression inhibits dietary iron absorption and leads to hypoferremia and iron retention within tissue macrophages. This reduces iron availability for erythroblasts and contributes to the development of anemias with iron-restricted erythropoiesis (such as anemia of chronic disease and iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia). Pharmacological targeting of the hepcidin/ferroportin axis may offer considerable therapeutic benefits by correcting iron traffic. This review summarizes the principles underlying the development of hepcidin-based therapies for the treatment of iron-related disorders, and discusses the emerging strategies for manipulating hepcidin pathways. PMID:27445804

  17. Manual labor metacarpophalangeal arthropathy in a truck driver: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present an unusual and rarely described case of occupational hand arthropathy involving the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. Clinical Features A 62-year-old male truck driver (of 35 years) presented to a chiropractic clinic with pain and stiffness along the third metacarpal and MCP joint of the left hand. Examination revealed severe pain and limited flexion at the third MCP joint. Bilateral radiographs demonstrated severe osteoarthritis (OA) of this joint in the left (nondominant) hand and mild-to-moderate (asymptomatic) OA in the same joint on the right. Results of laboratory blood tests were unremarkable for metabolic, inflammatory, or infectious joint disease. Intervention and Outcome The patient was diagnosed with bilateral, third MCP joint OA associated with manual labor. He was treated unsuccessfully with a short course of low-level laser therapy, MCP joint mobilization, and hand-stretching exercises. After 3½ years, the patient continues to work despite ongoing and worsening symptoms. Three serial left hand radiographs are presented, highlighting the progressive nature of this arthropathy. Conclusion The differential diagnosis in patients presenting with manual labor MCP joint OA should include hemochromatosis and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease. Because of the increased risk of serious systemic disease, it is imperative that these latter 2 disorders are ruled out before the former is diagnosed. PMID:22027112

  18. Zebrafish in the sea of mineral (iron, zinc, and copper) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu; Xia, Zhidan; Wang, Fudi

    2014-01-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, and eight other minerals are classified as essential trace elements because they present in minute in vivo quantities and are essential for life. Because either excess or insufficient levels of trace elements can be detrimental to life (causing human diseases such as iron-deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis, Menkes syndrome and Wilson's disease), the endogenous levels of trace minerals must be tightly regulated. Many studies have demonstrated the existence of systems that maintain trace element homeostasis, and these systems are highly conserved in multiple species ranging from yeast to mice. As a model for studying trace mineral metabolism, the zebrafish is indispensable to researchers. Several large-scale mutagenesis screens have been performed in zebrafish, and these screens led to the identification of a series of metal transporters and the generation of several mutagenesis lines, providing an in-depth functional analysis at the system level. Moreover, because of their developmental advantages, zebrafish have also been used in mineral metabolism-related chemical screens and toxicology studies. Here, we systematically review the major findings of trace element homeostasis studies using the zebrafish model, with a focus on iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, and iodine. We also provide a homology analysis of trace mineral transporters in fish, mice and humans. Finally, we discuss the evidence that zebrafish is an ideal experimental tool for uncovering novel mechanisms of trace mineral metabolism and for improving approaches to treat mineral imbalance-related diseases. PMID:24639652

  19. Contributions of beta2-microglobulin-dependent molecules and lymphocytes to iron regulation: insights from HfeRag1(-/-) and beta2mRag1(-/-) double knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Carlos J; Makui, Hortence; Andrews, Nancy C; Santos, Manuela M

    2004-04-01

    Genetic causes of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) include mutations in the HFE gene, coding for a beta2-microglobulin (beta2m)-associated major histocompatibility complex class I-like protein. However, iron accumulation in patients with HH can be highly variable. Previously, analysis of beta2mRag1(-/-) double-deficient mice, lacking all beta2m-dependent molecules and lymphocytes, demonstrated increased iron accumulation in the pancreas and heart compared with beta2m single knock-out mice. To evaluate whether the observed phenotype in beta2mRag1(-/-) mice was due solely to the absence of Hfe or to other beta2m-dependent molecules, we generated HfeRag1(-/-) double-deficient mice. Our studies revealed that introduction of Rag1 deficiency in Hfe knock-out mice leads to heightened iron overload, mainly in the liver, whereas the heart and pancreas are relatively spared compared with beta2mRag1(-/-) mice. These results suggest that other beta2m-interacting protein(s) may be involved in iron regulation and that in the absence of functional Hfe molecules lymphocyte numbers may influence iron overload severity.

  20. Copper Accumulates in Hemosiderins in Livers of Patients with Iron Overload Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yukiya; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Wakusawa, Shinya; Hayashi, Hisao; Kumagai, Kotaro; Morotomi, Natsuko; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Kawanaka, Miwa; Watanabe, Minemori; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Tai, Mayumi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Kentarou; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-06-28

    In biology, redox reactions are essential and sometimes harmful, and therefore, iron metabolism is tightly regulated by cuproproteins. Since the state of copper in iron overload syndromes remains unclear, we investigated whether copper metabolism is altered in these syndromes. Eleven patients with iron overload syndromes participated in this study. The clinical diagnoses were aceruloplasminemia (n=2), hemochromatosis (n=5), ferroportin disease (n=2), and receiving excess intravenous iron supplementation (n=2). Liver specimens were analyzed using a light microscope and transmission electron microscope equipped with an X-ray analyzer. In addition to a large amount of iron associated with oxygen and phosphorus, the iron-rich hemosiderins of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells contained small amounts of copper and sulfur, regardless of disease etiology. Two-dimensional imaging clearly showed that cuproproteins were distributed homogenously with iron complexes within hemosiderins. Copper stasis was unlikely in noncirrhotic patients. The enhanced induction of cuproproteins by excess iron may contribute to copper accumulation in hemosiderins. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that copper accumulates in hemosiderins in iron overload conditions, perhaps due to alterations in copper metabolism. PMID:26356991

  1. Idiopathic neonatal iron storage involving the liver, pancreas, heart, and endocrine and exocrine glands.

    PubMed

    Goldfischer, S; Grotsky, H W; Chang, C H; Berman, E L; Richert, R R; Karmarkar, S D; Roskamp, J O; Morecki, R

    1981-01-01

    Autopsy studies of two infants, one a newborn, the other 4 months old, revealed massive amounts of iron in lysosomes of hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. Iron, which had been transported across the placenta, accumulated in the same cell types as in adults with primary and secondary hemochromatosis. Hemosiderin was found in cardiac muscle cells, gastric and intestinal glands, and endocrine and exocrine organs including pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, islets of Langerhans, and sublingual and sweat glands. The liver was the most affected organ and the normal hepatic architecture was replaced by hepatocytes which were arranged in cluster, pseudoacinar structures, and multinucleated giant cells embedded in a collagen matrix. The islets of Langerhans were hyperplastic and hypertrophic. Ten similar cases, in five families, have been described; no patients liver longer than 4 months. Neonatal iron storage disease is clinically and pathologically distinct from Zellweger's cerebrohepatorenal syndrome and hypermethioninemia (tyrosinemia) neonatal diseases in which large stores of iron are present in hepatocytes. No abnormalities in serum iron, ferritin, or transferrin concentrations were detected in five parents of the affected children. PMID:7286889

  2. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ashraf; Kowdley, Gopal C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals is typically performed by endoscopic ultrasound and should begin at least 10 years prior to the age of the youngest affected relative. Disease states known to be associated with increased risk of hepatocellular cancer include hereditary hemochromatosis, autoimmune hepatitis, porphyria, and α1-antitrypsin deficiency, with relative risks as high as 36-fold. Although much less is known about hereditary bile-duct cancers, Muir-Torre syndrome and bile salt export pump deficiency are diseases whose association with hereditary carcinogenesis is under investigation. PMID:22312493

  3. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and polymorphisms in iron homeostasis genes: new insights from a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, Alessandro; Ciorba, Andrea; Aimoni, Claudia; Orioli, Elisa; Zeri, Giulia; Vigliano, Marco; Gemmati, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Background. Even if various pathophysiological events have been proposed as explanations, the putative cause of sudden hearing loss remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate and to reveal associations (if any) between the main iron-related gene variants and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Case-control study. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients (median age 63.65 years; range 10-92) were compared with 400 healthy control subjects. The following genetic variants were investigated: the polymorphism c.-8CG in the promoter of the ferroportin gene (FPN1; SLC40A1), the two isoforms C1 and C2 (p.P570S) of the transferrin protein (TF), the amino acidic substitutions p.H63D and p.C282Y in the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE), and the polymorphism c.-582AG in the promoter of the HEPC gene, which encodes the protein hepcidin (HAMP). Results. The homozygous genotype c.-8GG of the SLC40A1 gene revealed an OR for ISSNHL risk of 4.27 (CI 95%, 2.65-6.89; P = 0.001), being overrepresented among cases. Conclusions. Our study indicates that the homozygous genotype FPN1 -8GG was significantly associated with increased risk of developing sudden hearing loss. These findings suggest new research should be conducted in the field of iron homeostasis in the inner ear.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of HFE gene polymorphic variants (C282Y, H63D and S65C) in the population of Espírito Santo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, L N R; Santos, E V W; Stur, E; Silva Conforti, A M A; Louro, I D

    2016-04-27

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder that leads to progressive iron accumulation and may cause cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, diabetes, and heart failure. Most cases of HH have been linked to mutations in genes associated with iron homeostasis. There have been three major variants in the high Fe (HFE) gene associated with the disease: C282Y, H63D and S65C. In this context, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of the polymorphic variants (C282Y, H63D and S65C) of the HFE gene in the population of the Espírito Santo State (ES), Brazil by analyzing three different groups: general population (N = 120), Pomeranian descendants (N = 59), and patients with HH (N = 20). Using genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood, polymorphic variant identification was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Statistically significant differences were observed for genotype distribution of C282Y (P < 0.001) and H63D (P = 0.013) between the general population and the patients diagnosed with HH. This is the first study to analyze HFE gene allele frequencies for the general population, Pomeranian subpopulation, and patients with HH of ES, Brazil.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of HFE gene polymorphic variants (C282Y, H63D and S65C) in the population of Espírito Santo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, L N R; Santos, E V W; Stur, E; Silva Conforti, A M A; Louro, I D

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder that leads to progressive iron accumulation and may cause cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, diabetes, and heart failure. Most cases of HH have been linked to mutations in genes associated with iron homeostasis. There have been three major variants in the high Fe (HFE) gene associated with the disease: C282Y, H63D and S65C. In this context, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of the polymorphic variants (C282Y, H63D and S65C) of the HFE gene in the population of the Espírito Santo State (ES), Brazil by analyzing three different groups: general population (N = 120), Pomeranian descendants (N = 59), and patients with HH (N = 20). Using genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood, polymorphic variant identification was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Statistically significant differences were observed for genotype distribution of C282Y (P < 0.001) and H63D (P = 0.013) between the general population and the patients diagnosed with HH. This is the first study to analyze HFE gene allele frequencies for the general population, Pomeranian subpopulation, and patients with HH of ES, Brazil. PMID:27173269

  6. Recent insights on risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hamid, Nabil Mohie

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a disease prevalent in many populations worldwide. It initiates many economic and health problems in management modalities and leads to increasing mortality rates. Worldwide, trials have attempted to discover specific early markers for detection and prediction of the disease, hoping to set a more precise strategy for liver cancer prevention. Unfortunately, many economic, cultural and disciplinary levels contribute to confounding preventive strategies. Many risk factors contribute to predisposition to HCC, which can present individually or simultaneously. Previous articles discussed many risk factors for hepatocellular carcinogenesis; however, most of them didn't consider collectively the most recent data relating to causes. In this article, the pathogenesis and risk factors of HCC are discussed. Most of the intermediary steps of HCC involve molecular and transcriptional events leading to hepatocyte malignant transformation. These steps are mainly triggered by hepatitis B, C or transfusion-transmitted virus, either alone, or with other factors. Diabetes seems to be a major contributing risk factor. Schistosomiasis, a blood infestation, mostly affects Nile basin inhabitants leading to bladder, renal and hepatic cancers. Alcoholism, food and water pollutants and some drugs can also lead to HCC. Additionally, some hereditary diseases, as hemochromatosis, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency and tyrosinaemia are known to lead to the development of HCC, if not well managed. PMID:21160959

  7. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhash K; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B; Hajjar, Roger J; Dyck, Jason R B; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-12-07

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca(2+) homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload.

  8. The effects of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) on the cellular events associated with Alzheimer's disease in a stably expressed HFE neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.

    PubMed

    Mairuae, Nootchanat; Connor, James R; Lee, Sang Y; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp; Tongjaroenbuangam, Walaiporn

    2015-08-31

    It has been reported that persons carrying the H63D variant in their hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the possibility that okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) and quercetin could mitigate this risk factor by examining its effect on AD-associated cellular events in HFE stably expressing SH-SY5Y cells. Treatment of H63D HFE cells either with okra or quercetin significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and protein oxidation compared to untreated cells. The levels of tau phosphorylation at serine-199, serine-202, and serine-396 sites were also significantly decreased when cells were treated with okra. Exposure of the H63D and wild type (WT) cells to iron increased tau phosphorylation, but this response was decreased significantly when cells were treated with okra. The mechanism responsible for these changes appears to be related to decreased glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β activity, an upstream signaling kinase of tau phosphorylation. We also established that okra treatment dramatically decreases intracellular iron levels in H63D cells compared to untreated cells. Our results provide important in vitro data on the effects of okra on various AD-associated cellular processes in H63D variant HFE cells. These results suggest okra may be beneficial in people expressing the H63D variant to reduce the risk of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases related to oxidative stress. Further in vivo studies would help confirm this.

  9. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization. PMID:26292972

  10. Ancestral association between HLA and HFE H63D and C282Y gene mutations from northwest Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Libia M; Giraldo, Mabel C; Velasquez, Laura I; Alvarez, Cristiam M; Garcia, Luis F; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    A significant association between HFE gene mutations and the HLA-A*03-B*07 and HLA-A*29-B*44 haplotypes has been reported in the Spanish population. It has been proposed that these mutations are probably connected with Celtic and North African ancestry, respectively. We aimed to find the possible ancestral association between HLA alleles and haplotypes associated with the HFE gene (C282Y and H63D) mutations in 214 subjects from Antioquia, Colombia. These were 18 individuals with presumed hereditary hemochromatosis (“HH”) and 196 controls. The HLA-B*07 allele was in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with C282Y, while HLA-A*23, A*29, HLA-B*44, and B*49 were in LD with H63D. Altogether, our results show that, although the H63D mutation is more common in the Antioquia population, it is not associated with any particular HLA haplotype, whereas the C282Y mutation is associated with HLA-A*03-B*07, this supporting a northern Spaniard ancestry. PMID:25983618

  11. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P < .05) decrease in serum iron and ferritin levels by 57% and 40%, respectively, as compared with nondepleted control animals. Significant changes in the expression (0.5- to100-fold) of liver hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin, transferrin receptor-2, hemochromatosis type 2, ferroportin 1, ceruloplasmin, and ferritin-H were recorded in iron-depleted and iron-repleted rats, as compared with nondepleted rats (P < .05). Dietary iron from Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency. PMID:25150122

  12. Cardiovascular diseases and other evidence for primary care clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This issue includes several articles about various cardiovascular illnesses.(1-4) and another on a disease with increased risk for heart disease: hereditary hemochromatosis.(5) Yet another explores some myth busting about mortality and diabetes.(6) Two articles provide data with the support of patient and/or family organizations (Parent Heart Watch(1) and the Iron Disorders Institute(5)). Another 2 articles address maternal-child health, one considers treatment of hyperbilirubinemia,(7) and one describes an innovative team structure for pre-, post-, and intrapartum care.(8) We also provide preliminary data on azithromycin for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Pop quiz: What is the common contaminant with cocaine that causes serious side effects? What are these side effects? And another: What nonliver disease should be considered for children with elevated transaminase levels? (See the brief reports for answers.) Two reviews provide up-to-the minute practical facts for vaccinations and treatment-resistant hypertension that can be immediately incorporated into clinical practice. We also have an update on physician perspectives after 2 years of electronic medical record use and another with insights about the satisfaction of family physicians who are working in health centers in the first few years out of their residency. PMID:22773706

  13. 'A man can be destroyed but not defeated': Ernest Hemingway's near-death experience and declining health.

    PubMed

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Ernest Hemingway is one of the most popular and widely acclaimed American writers of the 20th century. His works and life epitomize the image of the hyper-masculine hero, facing the cruelties of life with 'grace under pressure'. Most of his writings have a quasi-autobiographical quality, which allowed many commentators to draw comparisons between his personality and his art. Here, we examine the psychological and physical burdens that hindered Hemingway's life and contributed to his suicide. We first take a look at his early years, and review his psychopathology as an adult. A number of authors have postulated specific diagnoses to explain Hemingway's behavior: borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression, multiple head trauma, and alcoholism. The presence of hemochromatosis, an inherited metabolic disorder, has also been suggested. We describe the circumstances of his suicide at 61 as the outcome of accumulated physical deterioration, emotional distress and cognitive decline. Special attention is paid to the war wound he suffered in 1918, which seemed to involve a peculiar altered state of consciousness sometimes called 'near-death experience'. The out-of-body experience, paradoxical analgesia and conviction that dying is 'the easiest thing' seemed to infl uence his future work. The constant presence of danger, death, and violence in his works, as well as the emphasis on the typical Hemingway 'code hero', can all be traced to particular psychological and neurological disorders, as well as his early brush with death.

  14. Iron status and cellular immune competence.

    PubMed

    Good, M F; Powell, L W; Halliday, J W

    1988-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that both iron overload and iron deficiency are associated with significant abnormalities of immune function. In diseases associated with iron overload there is increased susceptibility to both infection and neoplasia. The precise mechanisms are still being unravelled but iron overload has been shown to impair antigen-specific immune responses and to reduce the number of functional helper precursor cells. Similarly, iron in vitro in concentrations reported to be present in the serum of patients with iron overload impairs the generation of cytotoxic T-cells, enhances suppressor T-cell activity and reduces the proliferative capacity of helper T-cells. The predominant tumor seen in iron overload is primary hepatocellular carcinoma; however other aetiological factors appear to be involved in addition to iron overload, especially hepatic cirrhosis. Nevertheless, primary liver cancer occurs much more frequently in hemochromatosis than in other forms of cirrhosis. Iron deficiency is associated with an altered response to infection but the relationship is again a complex one. The cellular mechanisms involved have yet to be clearly defined, although impaired T and B cell function have been demonstrated.

  15. [Iron deficiency and overload. Implications in oxidative stress and cardiovascular health].

    PubMed

    Toxqui, L; De Piero, A; Courtois, V; Bastida, S; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Vaquero, Ma P

    2010-01-01

    Although iron is an essential mineral for maintaining good health, excessive amounts are toxic. Nowadays, much interest is focused on the mechanisms and regulation of iron metabolism by down-regulation of the hormone hepcidin. The HAMP gene encodes for hepcidin appears to be exceptionally preserved. Disorders of iron metabolism could lead to iron overload, mainly causing the rare disease hereditary hemochromatosis, or on the other hand, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. Currently, these alterations constitute an important problem of public health. The genetic variation implicated in iron overload and iron deficiency anaemia, involves mutations in several genes such as HFE, TFR2,HAMP, HJV, Tf and TMPRSS6. Iron has the capacity to accept and donate electrons easily and can catalyze reactions of free radicals production. Therefore, iron overload causes lipid peroxidation and increases cardiovascular risk. Recently, a relationship between iron metabolism and insulin resistance and obesity has been described. In contrast, regarding a possible relationship between iron deficiency anaemia and cardiovascular disease, many aspects remain controversial. This review presents an overview of the most recent information concerning iron metabolism, iron bioavailability and iron overload/deficiency related diseases. The relation between iron and cardiovascular risk, in iron overload and in iron deficiency situations, is also examined. Finally, strategies to modify dietary iron bioavailability in order to prevent iron deficiency or alleviate iron overload are suggested.

  16. The effects of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) on the cellular events associated with Alzheimer's disease in a stably expressed HFE neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.

    PubMed

    Mairuae, Nootchanat; Connor, James R; Lee, Sang Y; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp; Tongjaroenbuangam, Walaiporn

    2015-08-31

    It has been reported that persons carrying the H63D variant in their hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the possibility that okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) and quercetin could mitigate this risk factor by examining its effect on AD-associated cellular events in HFE stably expressing SH-SY5Y cells. Treatment of H63D HFE cells either with okra or quercetin significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and protein oxidation compared to untreated cells. The levels of tau phosphorylation at serine-199, serine-202, and serine-396 sites were also significantly decreased when cells were treated with okra. Exposure of the H63D and wild type (WT) cells to iron increased tau phosphorylation, but this response was decreased significantly when cells were treated with okra. The mechanism responsible for these changes appears to be related to decreased glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β activity, an upstream signaling kinase of tau phosphorylation. We also established that okra treatment dramatically decreases intracellular iron levels in H63D cells compared to untreated cells. Our results provide important in vitro data on the effects of okra on various AD-associated cellular processes in H63D variant HFE cells. These results suggest okra may be beneficial in people expressing the H63D variant to reduce the risk of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases related to oxidative stress. Further in vivo studies would help confirm this. PMID:26170247

  17. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P < .05) decrease in serum iron and ferritin levels by 57% and 40%, respectively, as compared with nondepleted control animals. Significant changes in the expression (0.5- to100-fold) of liver hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin, transferrin receptor-2, hemochromatosis type 2, ferroportin 1, ceruloplasmin, and ferritin-H were recorded in iron-depleted and iron-repleted rats, as compared with nondepleted rats (P < .05). Dietary iron from Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency.

  18. Iron sufficient to cause hepatic fibrosis and ascites does not cause cardiac arrhythmias in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lana; Davis, John M; Patterson, Jon; Johnson, Abby L; Bohart, George; Olivier, N Bari; Schwartz, Kenneth A

    2009-10-01

    Chronic iron overload associated with hereditary hemochromatosis or repeated red cell transfusions is known to cause cardiac failure. Cardiac arrhythmias have been incidentally noted in patients with iron overload, but they are often dismissed as being related to comorbid conditions. Studies with anesthetized iron-loaded gerbils using short recordings suggest a role for iron in the development of arrhythmias. Our goal was to characterize iron-induced arrhythmias in the chronically instrumented, untethered, telemetered gerbil. Electrocardiograms were recorded for 10 s every 30 min for approximately 6 months in iron-loaded (n=23) and control (n=8) gerbils. All gerbils in both groups showed evidence of frequent sinus arrhythmia. There was no difference in heart rate, electrocardiographic parameters, or number of arrhythmias per minute between groups. Gerbils rarely showed significant arrhythmias. Body weight and heart weight were not significantly different between groups, whereas liver weight increased with increasing iron dose in the treated group. Cardiac and hepatic iron concentrations were significantly increased in iron-loaded gerbils. Eight of 14 gerbils loaded to 6.2 g/kg body weight developed ascites. We conclude that an iron load sufficient to cause clinical liver disease does not cause cardiac arrhythmias in the gerbil model of iron overload.

  19. Genetic Aspects of Scurvy and the European Famine of 1845–1848

    PubMed Central

    Delanghe, Joris R.; De Buyzere, Marc L.; Speeckaert, Marijn M.; Langlois, Michel R.

    2013-01-01

    The view of scurvy being exclusively a nutritional disorder needs to be updated. Genetic polymorphisms of HFE and haptoglobin (Hp) may explain the geographic variability of mortality caused by the European famine of the mid-19th century. In this period, potatoes had fallen victim to the potato blight and Ireland was more severely hit than continental Europe. Hereditary hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder with mutations in the HFE gene, characterized by iron overload (with a reduced vitamin C stability) and with a predominance of affected men. The Irish have the world’s highest frequency of the C282Y mutation and the particular iron metabolism of the Irish helps to understand the size of the catastrophe and the observed overrepresentation of male skeletons showing scurvy. Hp is a plasma α2-glycoprotein characterized by 3 common phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2). When the antioxidant capacity of Hp is insufficient, its role is taken over by hemopexin and vitamin C. The relative number of scurvy victims corresponds with the Hp 2-2 frequency, which is associated with iron conservation and has an impact on vitamin C stability. As iron is more abundant in males, males are overrepresented in the group of skeletons showing scurvy signs. PMID:24036531

  20. Aluminum and bone: Review of new clinical circumstances associated with Al(3+) deposition in the calcified matrix of bone.

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Bizot, P; Mabilleau, G; Hubert, L

    2016-06-01

    Several decades ago, aluminum encephalopathy associated with osteomalacia has been recognized as the major complication of chronic renal failure in dialyzed patients. Removal of aluminum from the dialysate has led to a disappearance of the disease. However, aluminum deposit occurs in the hydroxyapatite of the bone matrix in some clinical circumstances that are presented in this review. We have encountered aluminum in bone in patients with an increased intestinal permeability (coeliac disease), or in the case of prolonged administration of aluminum anti-acid drugs. A colocalisation of aluminum with iron was also noted in cases of hemochromatosis and sickle cell anemia. Aluminium was also identified in a series of patients with exostosis, a frequent benign bone tumor. Corrosion of prosthetic implants composed of grade V titanium (TA6V is an alloy containing 6% aluminum and 4% vanadium) was also observed in a series of hip or knee revisions. Aluminum can be identified in undecalcified bone matrix stained by solochrome azurine, a highly specific stain allowing the detection of 0.03 atomic %. Colocalization of aluminum and iron does not seem to be the fruit of chance but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Histochemistry is superior to spectroscopic analyses (EDS and WDS in scanning electron microscopy).

  1. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  2. Second international round robin for the quantification of serum non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron in patients with iron-overload disorders.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Louise; Hendriks, Jan C M; van der Vorm, Lisa N; Cabantchik, Z Ioav; Evans, Patricia J; Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Furman, Yael; Wojczyk, Boguslaw; Janssen, Mirian C H; Porter, John B; Mattijssen, Vera E J M; Biemond, Bart J; MacKenzie, Marius A; Origa, Raffaella; Galanello, Renzo; Hider, Robert C; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron and its labile (redox active) plasma iron component are thought to be potentially toxic forms of iron originally identified in the serum of patients with iron overload. We compared ten worldwide leading assays (6 for non-transferrin-bound iron and 4 for labile plasma iron) as part of an international inter-laboratory study. Serum samples from 60 patients with four different iron-overload disorders in various treatment phases were coded and sent in duplicate for analysis to five different laboratories worldwide. Some laboratories provided multiple assays. Overall, highest assay levels were observed for patients with untreated hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia intermedia, patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes and patients with transfusion-dependent and chelated β-thalassemia major. Absolute levels differed considerably between assays and were lower for labile plasma iron than for non-transferrin-bound iron. Four assays also reported negative values. Assays were reproducible with high between-sample and low within-sample variation. Assays correlated and correlations were highest within the group of non-transferrin-bound iron assays and within that of labile plasma iron assays. Increased transferrin saturation, but not ferritin, was a good indicator of the presence of forms of circulating non-transferrin-bound iron. The possibility of using non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron measures as clinical indicators of overt iron overload and/or of treatment efficacy would largely depend on the rigorous validation and standardization of assays.

  3. Diabetes and haemochromatosis: current concepts, management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Yaouanq, J M

    1995-12-01

    Haemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism caused by a gene in tight linkage with HLA class I genes. Despite intensive research, the molecular defect and underlying biochemical anomaly are still unknown. Diabetes, a serious complication of haemochromatosis, is frequently associated with cirrhosis which reduces life expectancy. Its development is related to iron excess, directly or through associated liver involvement, although the precise mechanisms of iron toxicity remain unclear. New concepts concerning its pathogenesis include insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction which are apparent well before insulin deficiency and can be reversed if iron depletion is promptly initiated. Today, earlier recognition of iron overload through active diagnostic approaches has a direct impact in reducing the frequency of diabetes among hemochromatosis patients. Presymptomatic diagnosis in the general population and among relatives of affected subjects currently relies on the detection of increased iron stores through medical awareness and family screening. Indirect gene diagnosis with serological and molecular markers of the HLA region can be provided for relatives of proven cases. As part of a genetic counselling process, this allows the identification of at-risk subjects before the onset of iron accumulation. Isolation of the gene and identification of the metabolic defect leading to increased iron absorption may have significant implications for future diagnostic procedures and preventive strategies in haemochromatosis. PMID:8586148

  4. Endocrine manifestations related to inherited metabolic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are recessive, genetically transmitted diseases and are classified into 3 main groups according to their mechanisms: cellular intoxication, energy deficiency, and defects of complex molecules. They can be associated with endocrine manifestations, which may be complications from a previously diagnosed IEM of childhood onset. More rarely, endocrinopathies can signal an IEM in adulthood, which should be suspected when an endocrine disorder is associated with multisystemic involvement (neurological, muscular, hepatic features, etc.). IEM can affect all glands, but diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism are the most frequent disorders. A single IEM can present with multiple endocrine dysfunctions, especially those involving energy deficiency (respiratory chain defects), and metal (hemochromatosis) and storage disorders (cystinosis). Non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter and sometimes hypoparathyroidism should steer the diagnosis towards a respiratory chain defect. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequent in haemochromatosis (often associated with diabetes), whereas primary hypogonadism is reported in Alström disease and cystinosis (both associated with diabetes, the latter also with thyroid dysfunction) and galactosemia. Hypogonadism is also frequent in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (with adrenal failure), congenital disorders of glycosylation, and Fabry and glycogen storage diseases (along with thyroid dysfunction in the first 3 and diabetes in the last). This is a new and growing field and is not yet very well recognized in adulthood despite its consequences on growth, bone metabolism and fertility. For this reason, physicians managing adult patients should be aware of these diagnoses. PMID:22284844

  5. Determination of Serum Ferritin Glycosylation in Hyperferritinemia Associated to Iron Overload and Inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Bethina Isasi

    2009-01-01

    Background Serum ferritin is a commonly used clinical biochemical parameter and hyperferritinemia is used as a surrogate marker for iron overload, acute or chronic inflammation, malignancy or cell death. The aim of the present study was to develop purification strategies of ferritin from sera to determine if micro-heterogeneity of serum ferritin can be used to differentiate the underlying cause of the hyperferritinemia. Patients, Materials and Methods Sera from patients with hemochromatosis, rheumatologic diseases, aceruloplasminemia, ferroportin disease or iron loading anemia have been collected and stored and ferritin purified by negative affinity followed by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Purified serum ferritin was analyzed by western blotting and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry and the spectra compared with the results from ferritin isolated from human liver, spleen and placenta. Results By Western blotting a major band of 19kD has been found in most sera, suggesting that the L-ferritin is the predominant isoform present in serum regardless of the cause of hyperferritinemia. Multistep chromatography can be used for significant enrichment and purification of ferritin from serum, which can be further analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Tryptic digestion and peptide mass finger-printing by MALDI TOF MS of ferritin purified from human tissues shows differential spectra. Discussion and conclusions Analysis of ferritin micro-heterogeneity by MALDI TOF allows determination of the tissue origin of ferritin, which could be applied in the differential diagnostic workup of hyperferritinemia.

  6. A high-fat diet modulates iron metabolism but does not promote liver fibrosis in hemochromatotic Hjv⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Gkouvatsos, Konstantinos; Guido, Maria; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2015-02-15

    Hemojuvelin (Hjv) is a membrane protein that controls body iron metabolism by enhancing signaling to hepcidin. Hjv mutations cause juvenile hemochromatosis, a disease of systemic iron overload. Excessive iron accumulation in the liver progressively leads to inflammation and disease, such as fibrosis, cirrhosis, or hepatocellular cancer. Fatty liver (steatosis) may also progress to inflammation (steatohepatitis) and liver disease, and iron is considered as pathogenic cofactor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological implications of parenchymal iron overload due to Hjv ablation in the fatty liver. Wild-type (WT) and Hjv(-/-) mice on C57BL/6 background were fed a standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with 2% carbonyl iron (HFD+Fe) for 12 wk. The animals were analyzed for iron and lipid metabolism. As expected, all Hjv(-/-) mice manifested higher serum and hepatic iron and diminished hepcidin levels compared with WT controls. The HFD reduced iron indexes and promoted liver steatosis in both WT and Hjv(-/-) mice. Notably, steatosis was attenuated in Hjv(-/-) mice on the HFD+Fe regimen. Hjv(-/-) animals gained less body weight and exhibited reduced serum glucose and cholesterol levels. Histological and ultrastructural analysis revealed absence of iron-induced inflammation or liver fibrosis despite early signs of liver injury (expression of α-smooth muscle actin). We conclude that parenchymal hepatic iron overload does not suffice to trigger progression of liver steatosis to steatohepatitis or fibrosis in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:25501544

  7. High-speed DNA genotyping using microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis chips

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, A.T.; Sensabaugh, G.F.; Mathies, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    Capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) chips have been designed and fabricated with the capacity to rapidly (<160 s) analyze 12 different samples in parallel. Detection of all lanes with 0.3 s temporal resolution was achieved using a laser-excited confocal-fluorescence scanner. The operation and capabilities of these CAE microdevices were first determined by performing electrophoretic separations of pBR322 MspI DNA samples. Genotyping of HLA-H, a candidate gene for the diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis, was then performed to demonstrate the rapid analysis of biologically relevant samples. Two-color multiplex fluorescence detection of HLA-H genotypes was accomplished by prelabeling the standard pBR322 MspI DNA ladder with a red emitting bisintercalation dye (butyl TOTIN) and on-column labeling of the HLA-H DNA with thiazole orange. This work establishes the feasibility of using CAE chips for high-speed, high-throughput genotyping. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  8. [Between evidence and negligence: coverage and invisibilityof health topics in the Portuguese printed media].

    PubMed

    Cavaca, Aline Guio; Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Ferreira, Patrícia; Nunes, João Arriscado

    2015-11-01

    The scope of this study is to conduct an assessment of the media coverage and dissemination of health issues in Portugal in order to problematize the aspects of coverage and invisibility of health topics and establish the themes neglected in media coverage. To achieve this, the coverage on health issues in the Portuguese daily newspaper Público was compared with the epidemiological context regarding health priorities and the perceptions of key players on media dissemination and the themes that are relevant to the Portuguese population. The results showed that the recurrent health-associated themes do not deal with diseases per se, but with the politics and economics of health and medication. The themes neglected in media coverage identified in the Portuguese context include: communicable diseases, such as hepatitis and tuberculosis; issues related to mental health and suicide; and ailments and social consequences associated with the economic crisis that has beset Portugal recently. From the standpoint of the people interviewed, other neglected diseases include hemochromatosis and other rare diseases. In tandem with this, the study highlights the well covered media themes that revolve around the lives and activities of celebrities, which are exhaustively aired in the communication media in the country. PMID:26602734

  9. Potential applications for cell regulatory factors in liver progenitor cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shupe, Thomas; Petersen, Bryon E.

    2010-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplant represent the state of the art treatment for terminal liver pathologies such as cirrhosis in adults and hemochromatosis in neonates. A limited supply of transplantable organs in relationship to the demand means that many patients will succumb to disease before an organ becomes available. One promising alternative to liver transplant is therapy based on the transplant of liver progenitor cells. These cells may be derived from the patient, expanded in vitro, and transplanted back to the diseased liver. Inborn metabolic disorders represent the most attractive target for liver progenitor cell therapy, as many of these disorders may be corrected by repopulation of only a portion of the liver by healthy cells. Another potential application for liver progenitor cell therapy is the seeding of bio-artificial liver matrix. These ex vivo bioreactors may someday be used to bridge critically ill patients to other treatments. Conferring a selective growth advantage to the progenitor cell population remains an obstacle to therapy development. Understanding the molecular signaling mechanisms and micro-environmental cues that govern liver progenitor cell phenotype may someday lead to strategies for providing this selective growth advantage. The discovery of a population of cells within the bone marrow possessing the ability to differentiate into hepatocytes may provide an easily accessible source of cells for liver therapies. PMID:20851776

  10. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  11. Quantitative imaging of chemical composition using dual-energy, dual-source CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Primak, Andrew N.; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Morin, Richard L.

    2008-03-01

    Dual-energy x-ray material decomposition has been proposed as a noninvasive quantitative imaging technique for more than 20 years. In this paper, we summarize previously developed dual-energy material decomposition methods and propose a simple yet accurate method for quantitatively measuring chemical composition in vivo. In order to take advantage of the newly developed dual-source CT, the proposed method is based upon post reconstruction (image space) data. Different from other post reconstruction methods, this method is designed to directly measure element composition (mass fraction) in a tissue by a simple table lookup procedure. The method has been tested in phantom studies and also applied to a clinical case. The results showed that this method is capable of accurately measuring elemental concentrations, such as iron in tissue, under low noise imaging conditions. The advantage of this method lies in its simplicity and fast processing times. We believe that this method can be applied clinically to measure the mass fraction of any chemical element in a two-material object, such as to quantify the iron overload in the liver (hemochromatosis). Further investigations on de-noising techniques, as well as clinical validation, are merited.

  12. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  13. Genetic aspects of scurvy and the European famine of 1845-1848.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; De Buyzere, Marc L; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Langlois, Michel R

    2013-09-01

    The view of scurvy being exclusively a nutritional disorder needs to be updated. Genetic polymorphisms of HFE and haptoglobin (Hp) may explain the geographic variability of mortality caused by the European famine of the mid-19th century. In this period, potatoes had fallen victim to the potato blight and Ireland was more severely hit than continental Europe. Hereditary hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder with mutations in the HFE gene, characterized by iron overload (with a reduced vitamin C stability) and with a predominance of affected men. The Irish have the world's highest frequency of the C282Y mutation and the particular iron metabolism of the Irish helps to understand the size of the catastrophe and the observed overrepresentation of male skeletons showing scurvy. Hp is a plasma α2-glycoprotein characterized by 3 common phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2). When the antioxidant capacity of Hp is insufficient, its role is taken over by hemopexin and vitamin C. The relative number of scurvy victims corresponds with the Hp 2-2 frequency, which is associated with iron conservation and has an impact on vitamin C stability. As iron is more abundant in males, males are overrepresented in the group of skeletons showing scurvy signs. PMID:24036531

  14. In situ detection of lipid peroxidation by-products in chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Paradis, V; Kollinger, M; Fabre, M; Holstege, A; Poynard, T; Bedossa, P

    1997-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an autocatalytic mechanism leading to oxidative destruction of cellular membranes. The deleterious consequences of this mechanism are related in part to the formation of reactive aldehydic products that bind to intra- or extracellular molecules to form adducts. Specific antibodies directed against malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) adducts, major aldehydic metabolites of lipid peroxidation, allowed us to investigate in situ, with an immunohistochemical procedure, the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in a panel of different chronic liver diseases. Intracellular HNE and MDA adducts were detected respectively in 24 of 39 cases (62%) and in 12 of 34 cases investigated (35%). They were localized mainly in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, with the strongest staining observed in hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, and in areas of acute alcoholic hepatitis in cases of alcoholic liver diseases. A peculiar pattern of immunostaining was observed in primary biliary cirrhosis where biliary cells of destroyed but also intact bile ducts strongly expressed HNE adducts. The liver extracellular matrix also displayed MDA adducts (30 of 34 cases, 88%) and HNE adducts (23 of 39 cases, 59%). While HNE adducts were specifically localized on large bundles of collagen fibers, MDA adducts were detected in a thin reticular network and in sinusoidal cells around portal tracts or fibrous septa. In conclusion, lipid peroxidation by-products are detectable in chronic liver diseases. Immunohistochemical results suggest that this mechanism is implicated very early in the pathogenesis of some of these diseases.

  15. Current status in the therapy of liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Philipp; Fricker, Gert; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic diseases, like viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Wilson's disease, play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis and, hence, hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, the current treatment options and the molecular mechanisms of action of the drugs are summarized. Unfortunately, the treatment options for most of these hepatic diseases are limited. Since hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infections are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, they are the focus of the development of new drugs. The current treatment of choice for HBV/HCV infection is an interferon-based combination therapy with oral antiviral drugs, like nucleos(t)ide analogues, which is associated with improving the therapeutic success and also preventing the development of resistances. Currently, two new protease inhibitors for HCV treatment are expected (deleobuvir, faldaprevir) and together with the promising drug, daclatasvir (NS5A-inhibitor, currently in clinical trials), adequate therapy is to be expected in due course (circumventing the requirement of interferon with its side-effects), while in contrast, efficient HBV therapeutics are still lacking. In this respect, entry inhibitors, like Myrcludex B, the lead substance of the first entry inhibitor for HBV/HDV (hepatitis D) infection, provide immense potential. The pharmacokinetics and the mechanism of action of Myrcludex B are described in detail.

  16. Normal Glucose Metabolism in Carnivores Overlaps with Diabetes Pathology in Non-Carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Schermerhorn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Carnivores, such as the dolphin and the domestic cat, have numerous adaptations that befit consumption of diets with high protein and fat content, with little carbohydrate content. Consequently, nutrient metabolism in carnivorous species differs substantially from that of non-carnivores. Important metabolic pathways known to differ between carnivores and non-carnivores are implicated in the development of diabetes and insulin resistance in non-carnivores: (1) the hepatic glucokinase (GCK) pathway is absent in healthy carnivores yet GCK deficiency may result in diabetes in rodents and humans, (2) healthy dolphins and cats are prone to periods of fasting hyperglycemia and exhibit insulin resistance, both of which are risk factors for diabetes in non-carnivores. Similarly, carnivores develop naturally occurring diseases such as hemochromatosis, fatty liver, obesity, and diabetes that have strong parallels with the same disorders in humans. Understanding how evolution, environment, diet, and domestication may play a role with nutrient metabolism in the dolphin and cat may also be relevant to human diabetes. PMID:24348462

  17. Fiber evanescent wave spectroscopy using the mid-infrared provides useful fingerprints for metabolic profiling in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anne, Marie-Laure; Le Lan, Caroline; Monbet, Valérie; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Ropert, Martine; Sire, Olivier; Pouchard, Michel; Jard, Christine; Lucas, Jacques; Adam, Jean Luc; Brissot, Pierre; Bureau, Bruno; Loréal, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    Fiber evanescent wave spectroscopy (FEWS) explores the mid-infrared domain, providing information on functional chemical groups represented in the sample. Our goal is to evaluate whether spectral fingerprints obtained by FEWS might orientate clinical diagnosis. Serum samples from normal volunteers and from four groups of patients with metabolic abnormalities are analyzed by FEWS. These groups consist of iron overloaded genetic hemochromatosis (GH), iron depleted GH, cirrhosis, and dysmetabolic hepatosiderosis (DYSH). A partial least squares (PLS) logistic method is used in a training group to create a classification algorithm, thereafter applied to a test group. Patients with cirrhosis or DYSH, two groups exhibiting important metabolic disturbances, are clearly discriminated from control groups with AUROC values of 0.94+/-0.05 and 0.90+/-0.06, and sensibility/specificity of 86/84% and 87/87%, respectively. When pooling all groups, the PLS method contributes to discriminate controls, cirrhotic, and dysmetabolic patients. Our data demonstrate that metabolic profiling using infrared FEWS is a possible way to investigate metabolic alterations in patients.

  18. Association Studies of HFE C282Y and H63D Variants with Oral Cancer Risk and Iron Homeostasis Among Whites and Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nathan R.; Ashmore, Joseph H.; Lee, Sang Y.; Richie, John P.; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are associated with excessive iron absorption from the diet, and pro-oxidant effects of iron accumulation are thought to be a risk factor for several types of cancer. Methods: The C282Y (rs1800562) and H63D (rs1799945) polymorphisms were genotyped in 301 oral cancer cases and 437 controls and analyzed in relation to oral cancer risk, and serum iron biomarker levels from a subset of 130 subjects. Results: Individuals with the C282Y allele had lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC) (321.2 ± 37.2 µg/dL vs. 397.7 ± 89.0 µg/dL, p = 0.007) and higher percent transferrin saturation (22.0 ± 8.7 vs. 35.6 ± 22.9, p = 0.023) than wild type individuals. Iron and ferritin levels approached significantly higher levels for the C282Y allele (p = 0.0632 and p = 0.0588, respectively). Conclusions: Iron biomarker levels were elevated by the C282Y allele, but neither (rs1800562) nor (rs1799945) was associated with oral cancer risk in blacks and whites. PMID:26690219

  19. Pharmacogenetics of nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-associated peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Hulgan, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is an important complication of antiretroviral therapy. Nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and nutritional factors are implicated in its pathogenesis. Pharmacogenetic and genomic studies investigating NRTI neurotoxicity have only recently become possible via the linkage of HIV clinical studies to large DNA repositories. Preliminary case–control studies using these resources suggest that host mitochondrial DNA haplogroup polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis gene and proinflammatory cytokine genes may influence the risk of peripheral neuropathy during antiretroviral therapy. These putative risk factors await confirmation in other HIV-infected populations but they have strong biological plausibility. Work to identify underlying mechanisms for these associations is ongoing. Large-scale studies incorporating clearly defined and validated methods of neuropathy assessment and the use of novel laboratory models of NRTI-associated neuropathy to clarify its pathophysiology are now needed. Such investigations may facilitate the development of more effective strategies to predict, prevent and ameliorate this debilitating treatment toxicity in diverse clinical settings. PMID:19374518

  20. Genetic aspects of scurvy and the European famine of 1845-1848.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; De Buyzere, Marc L; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Langlois, Michel R

    2013-09-12

    The view of scurvy being exclusively a nutritional disorder needs to be updated. Genetic polymorphisms of HFE and haptoglobin (Hp) may explain the geographic variability of mortality caused by the European famine of the mid-19th century. In this period, potatoes had fallen victim to the potato blight and Ireland was more severely hit than continental Europe. Hereditary hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder with mutations in the HFE gene, characterized by iron overload (with a reduced vitamin C stability) and with a predominance of affected men. The Irish have the world's highest frequency of the C282Y mutation and the particular iron metabolism of the Irish helps to understand the size of the catastrophe and the observed overrepresentation of male skeletons showing scurvy. Hp is a plasma α2-glycoprotein characterized by 3 common phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2). When the antioxidant capacity of Hp is insufficient, its role is taken over by hemopexin and vitamin C. The relative number of scurvy victims corresponds with the Hp 2-2 frequency, which is associated with iron conservation and has an impact on vitamin C stability. As iron is more abundant in males, males are overrepresented in the group of skeletons showing scurvy signs.

  1. Electron nanodiffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy studies of the structure and composition of physiological and pathological ferritin.

    PubMed

    Quintana, C; Cowley, J M; Marhic, C

    2004-08-01

    Structures of core nanocrystals of physiological (horse spleen, human liver, and brain) and pathological human brain of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) ferritin molecules were determined using electron nanodiffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The poly-phasic structure of the ferritin cores is confirmed. There are significant differences in the mineral composition between the physiological and pathological ferritins. The physiological ferritin cores mainly consist of single nanocrystals containing hexagonal ferrihydrite (Fh) and hematite (Hm) and some cubic magnetite/maghemite phase. In the pathological cores, Fh is present but only as a minor phase and Hm is absent. The major phases are a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure with a = 0.43 nm and a high degree of disorder, related to wustite, and a cubic magnetite-like structure. These two cubic phases are also present in human aged normal brain. Evidence for the presence of hemosiderin together with ferritin in the pathological brains is deduced from the similarities of the diffraction patterns with those from patients with primary hemochromatosis, and differences in the shapes and protein composition of the protein shell. These findings suggest a disfunction of the ferritin associated with PSP and AD, associated with an increase in the concentration of brain ferrous toxic iron.

  2. Direct-to-consumer sales of genetic services on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Hull, Sara Chandros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The increasing use of the Internet to obtain genetics information and to order medical services without a prescription, combined with a rise in direct-to-consumer marketing for genetic testing, suggests the potential for the Internet to be used to sell genetic services. Methods A systematic World Wide Web search was conducted in May 2002 to assess the availability of genetic services sold directly to consumers on the Internet. Results Out of 105 sites that offered genetic services directly, most offered non–health-related services, including parentage confirmation testing (83%), identity testing (56%), and DNA banking (24%); however, health-related genetic tests were offered through 14 sites (13%). The health-related genetic tests available ranged from standard tests, such as hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis, to more unconventional tests related to nutrition, behavior, and aging. Of these 14 sites, 5 described risks associated with the genetic services and 6 described the availability of counseling. Conclusions The availability of direct sales of health-related genetic tests creates the potential for inadequate pretest decision making, misunderstanding test results, and access to tests of questionable clinical value. PMID:12865763

  3. Direct-to-consumer sales of genetic services on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Gollust, Sarah E; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Hull, Sara Chandros

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE The increasing use of the Internet to obtain genetics information and to order medical services without a prescription, combined with a rise in direct-to-consumer marketing for genetic testing, suggests the potential for the Internet to be used to sell genetic services. METHODS A systematic World Wide Web search was conducted in May 2002 to assess the availability of genetic services sold directly to consumers on the Internet. RESULTS Out of 105 sites that offered genetic services directly, most offered non-health-related services, including parentage confirmation testing (83%), identity testing (56%), and DNA banking (24%); however, health-related genetic tests were offered through 14 sites (13%). The health-related genetic tests available ranged from standard tests, such as hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis, to more unconventional tests related to nutrition, behavior, and aging. Of these 14 sites, 5 described risks associated with the genetic services and 6 described the availability of counseling. CONCLUSIONS The availability of direct sales of health-related genetic tests creates the potential for inadequate pretest decision making, misunderstanding test results, and access to tests of questionable clinical value. PMID:12865763

  4. The second transferrin receptor regulates red blood cell production in mice.

    PubMed

    Nai, Antonella; Lidonnici, Maria Rosa; Rausa, Marco; Mandelli, Giacomo; Pagani, Alessia; Silvestri, Laura; Ferrari, Giuliana; Camaschella, Clara

    2015-02-12

    Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) contributes to hepcidin regulation in the liver and associates with erythropoietin receptor in erythroid cells. Nevertheless, TFR2 mutations cause iron overload (hemochromatosis type 3) without overt erythroid abnormalities. To clarify TFR2 erythroid function, we generated a mouse lacking Tfr2 exclusively in the bone marrow (Tfr2(BMKO)). Tfr2(BMKO) mice have normal iron parameters, reduced hepcidin levels, higher hemoglobin and red blood cell counts, and lower mean corpuscular volume than normal control mice, a phenotype that becomes more evident in iron deficiency. In Tfr2(BMKO) mice, the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow is higher and the apoptosis lower than in controls, irrespective of comparable erythropoietin levels. Induction of moderate iron deficiency increases erythroblasts number, reduces apoptosis, and enhances erythropoietin (Epo) levels in controls, but not in Tfr2(BMKO) mice. Epo-target genes such as Bcl-xL and Epor are highly expressed in the spleen and in isolated erythroblasts from Tfr2(BMKO) mice. Low hepcidin expression in Tfr2(BMKO) is accounted for by erythroid expansion and production of the erythroid regulator erythroferrone. We suggest that Tfr2 is a component of a novel iron-sensing mechanism that adjusts erythrocyte production according to iron availability, likely by modulating the erythroblast Epo sensitivity. PMID:25499454

  5. Adipocyte iron regulates leptin and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Li, Zhonggang; Gabrielsen, J. Scott; Simcox, Judith A.; Lee, Soh-hyun; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Bob; Stoddard, Gregory; Cefalu, William T.; McClain, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary iron supplementation is associated with increased appetite. Here, we investigated the effect of iron on the hormone leptin, which regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. Serum ferritin was negatively associated with serum leptin in a cohort of patients with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the same inverse correlation was observed in mice fed a high-iron diet. Adipocyte-specific loss of the iron exporter ferroportin resulted in iron loading and decreased leptin, while decreased levels of hepcidin in a murine hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) model increased adipocyte ferroportin expression, decreased adipocyte iron, and increased leptin. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with iron decreased leptin mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We found that iron negatively regulates leptin transcription via cAMP-responsive element binding protein activation (CREB activation) and identified 2 potential CREB-binding sites in the mouse leptin promoter region. Mutation of both sites completely blocked the effect of iron on promoter activity. ChIP analysis revealed that binding of phosphorylated CREB is enriched at these two sites in iron-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared with untreated cells. Consistent with the changes in leptin, dietary iron content was also directly related to food intake, independently of weight. These findings indicate that levels of dietary iron play an important role in regulation of appetite and metabolism through CREB-dependent modulation of leptin expression. PMID:26301810

  6. Magnetic resonance and CT of the normal and diseased pancreas: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Stark, D D; Moss, A A; Goldberg, H I; Davis, P L; Federle, M P

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen patients with proven pancreatic disease and 50 control subjects were examined by magnetic resonance (MR) using a variety of spin echo and inversion recovery techniques. The MR results were then compared with CT scans. The normal pancreatic head, body, and tail were identified by MR in approximately 60% of patients. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and retroperitoneal lymphoma were detected using morphologic criteria similar to those used in CT. Differentiating bowel from pancreas was difficult on MR in patients with little retroperitoneal fat, and tissue relaxation times were usually not helpful in differentiating adenocarcinoma or lymphoma from normal pancreatic tissue. However, MR intensity, T1, and T2 were useful in differentiating pancreatic islet cell tumors from normal pancreatic tissue. MR accurately identified retroperitoneal invasion, vascular involvement, and liver metastases. In pancreatitis, tissue T1 and T2 relaxation times were prolonged and complications such as ductal dilatation, pseudocyst, phlegmon, and ascites were identified. Small pancreatic calcifications were not detected by MR. Pancreatic iron overload was seen in patients with hemochromatosis. Although respiratory motion and spatial resolution are currently limiting factors, MR is a versatile and unique modality for the evaluation of pancreatic disease.

  7. Sequence variation and haplotype structure at the human HFE locus.

    PubMed Central

    Toomajian, Christopher; Kreitman, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The HFE locus encodes an HLA class-I-type protein important in iron regulation and segregates replacement mutations that give rise to the most common form of genetic hemochromatosis. The high frequency of one disease-associated mutation, C282Y, and the nature of this disease have led some to suggest a selective advantage for this mutation. To investigate the context in which this mutation arose and gain a better understanding of HFE genetic variation, we surveyed nucleotide variability in 11.2 kb encompassing the HFE locus and experimentally determined haplotypes. We fully resequenced 60 chromosomes of African, Asian, or European ancestry as well as one chimpanzee, revealing 41 variable sites and a nucleotide diversity of 0.08%. This indicates that linkage to the HLA region has not substantially increased the level of HFE variation. Although several haplotypes are shared between populations, one haplotype predominates in Asia but is nearly absent elsewhere, causing higher than average genetic differentiation among the three major populations. Our samples show evidence of intragenic recombination, so the scarcity of recombination events within the C282Y allele class is consistent with selection increasing the frequency of a young allele. Otherwise, the pattern of variability in this region does not clearly indicate the action of positive selection at this or linked loci. PMID:12196404

  8. Continuous in vitro propagation of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Golenda, C F; Li, J; Rosenberg, R

    1997-06-24

    The difficulty in controlling Plasmodium vivax, the most common cause of human malaria, has been complicated by growing drug resistance. We have established a method to cycle parasite generations in continuous culture using human blood cells. Chesson strain parasites were passaged from owl monkey erythrocytes to human reticulocytes in McCoy's 5A medium modified with L-glutamine with 25 mM Hepes buffer supplemented with 20% AB+ human serum. Reticulocytes were separated by differential centrifugation in homologous plasma from the peripheral blood of a hemochromatosis patient. Parasites were grown during each 48-hr cycle in a static candle jar environment until the beginning of schizogony, at about 36-40 hr, when reticulocytes were added and cultures transferred to a shaker for 10-12 hr. The addition of a concentration of 10% reticulocytes resulted in stabilizing parasite densities between 0.28 and 0.57 after cycle 3 and increasing the total number of parasites at least 2-fold with each generational cycle. Cultured parasites successfully infected an owl monkey. The morphology of cultured parasites was typical of P. vivax, with highly ameboid trophozoites evident; however, infected erythrocytes were enlarged and distorted on thin film preparations. The species identity of cultivated parasites was confirmed by analysis of the A and C 18S rRNA genes from genomic DNA and expression of only the A gene during erythrocytic asexual growth. The ability to culture P. vivax opens new opportunities to develop vaccines, test drugs, and clone parasites for genome sequencing.

  9. Characterization of hepcidin response to holotransferrin in novel recombinant TfR1 HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kosha; Busbridge, Mark; Renshaw, Derek; Evans, Robert W; Farnaud, Sebastien; Patel, Vinood B

    2016-10-01

    Hepcidin is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The iron-sensing mechanisms and the role of intracellular iron in modulating hepatic hepcidin secretion are unclear. Therefore, we created a novel cell line, recombinant-TfR1 HepG2, expressing iron-response-element-independent TFRC mRNA to promote cellular iron-overload and examined the effect of excess holotransferrin (5g/L) on cell-surface TfR1, iron content, hepcidin secretion and mRNA expressions of TFRC, HAMP, SLC40A1, HFE and TFR2. Results showed that the recombinant cells exceeded levels of cell-surface TfR1 in wild-type cells under basal (2.8-fold; p<0.03) and holotransferrin-supplemented conditions for 24h and 48h (4.4- and 7.5-fold, respectively; p<0.01). Also, these cells showed higher intracellular iron content than wild-type cells under basal (3-fold; p<0.03) and holotransferrin-supplemented conditions (6.6-fold at 4h; p<0.01). However, hepcidin secretion was not higher than wild-type cells. Moreover, holotransferrin treatment to recombinant cells did not elevate HAMP responses compared to untreated or wild-type cells. In conclusion, increased intracellular iron content in recombinant cells did not increase hepcidin responses compared to wild-type cells, resembling hemochromatosis. Furthermore, TFR2 expression altered within 4h of treatment, while HFE expression altered later at 24h and 48h, suggesting that TFR2 may function prior to HFE in HAMP regulation. PMID:27667164

  10. HFE Gene Variants Modify the Association between Maternal Lead Burden and Infant Birthweight: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study in Mexico City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Neonatal growth is a complex process involving genetic and environmental factors. Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) iron regulatory genes have been shown to modify transport and toxicity of lead which is known to affect birth weight. Methods We investigated the role of HFE C282Y, HFE H63 D, and transferrin (TF) P570 S gene variants in modifying the association of lead and infant birthweight in a cohort of Mexican mother-infant pairs. Subjects were initially recruited between 1994-1995 from three maternity hospitals in Mexico City and 411 infants/565 mothers had archived blood available for genotyping. Multiple linear regression models, stratified by either maternal/infant HFE or TF genotype and then combined with interaction terms, were constructed examining the association of lead and birthweight after controlling for covariates. Results 3.1%, 16.8% and 17.5% of infants (N = 390) and 1.9%, 14.5% and 18.9% of mothers (N = 533) carried the HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, and TF P570 S variants, respectively. The presence of infant HFE H63 D variants predicted 110.3 g (95% CI -216.1, -4.6) decreases in birthweight while maternal HFE H63 D variants predicted reductions of 52.0 g (95% CI -147.3 to 43.2). Interaction models suggest that both maternal and infant HFE H63 D genotype may modify tibia lead's effect on infant birthweight in opposing ways. In our interaction models, maternal HFE H63 D variant carriers had a negative association between tibia lead and birthweight. Conclusions These results suggest that the HFE H63 D genotype modifies lead's effects on infant birthweight in a complex fashion that may reflect maternal-fetal interactions with respect to the metabolism and transport of metals. PMID:20659343

  11. Distribution of manganese and other biometals in flatiron mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ah; Elkhader, Jamal A; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2016-02-01

    Flatiron (ffe) mice display features of "ferroportin disease" or Type IV hereditary hemochromatosis. While it is known that both Fe and Mn metabolism are impaired in flatiron mice, the effects of ferroportin (Fpn) deficiency on physiological distribution of these and other biometals is unknown. We hypothesized that Fe, Mn, Zn and/or Cu distribution would be altered in ffe/+ compared to wild-type (+/+) mice. ICP-MS analysis showed that Mn, Zn and Cu levels were significantly reduced in femurs from ffe/+ mice. Bone deposits reflect metal accumulation, therefore these data indicate that Mn, Zn and Cu metabolism are affected by Fpn deficiency. The observations that muscle Cu, lung Mn, and kidney Cu and Zn levels were reduced in ffe/+ mice support the idea that metal metabolism is impaired. While all four biometals appeared to accumulate in brains of flatiron mice, significant gender effects were observed for Mn and Zn levels in male ffe/+ mice. Metals were higher in olfactory bulbs of ffe/+ mice regardless of gender. To further study brain metal distribution, (54)MnCl2 was administered by intravenous injection and total brain (54)Mn was measured over time. At 72 h, (54)Mn was significantly greater in brains of ffe/+ mice compared to +/+ mice while blood (54)Mn was cleared to the same levels by 24 h. Taken together, these results indicate that Fpn deficiency decreases Mn trafficking out of the brain, alters body Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu levels, and promotes metal accumulation in olfactory bulbs.

  12. The D519G Polymorphism of Glyceronephosphate O-Acyltransferase Is a Risk Factor for Familial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colin P.; Overbey, Jessica R.; Naik, Hetanshi; Nance, Danielle; McLaren, Gordon D.; McLaren, Christine E.; Zhou, Luming; Desnick, Robert J.; Parker, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Both familial and sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) are iron dependent diseases. Symptoms of PCT resolve when iron stores are depleted by phlebotomy, and a sequence variant of HFE (C282Y, c.843G>A, rs1800562) that enhances iron aborption by reducing hepcidin expression is a risk factor for PCT. Recently, a polymorphic variant (D519G, c.1556A>G, rs11558492) of glyceronephosphate O-acyltransferase (GNPAT) was shown to be enriched in male patients with type I hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE C282Y homozygotes) who presented with a high iron phenotype, suggesting that GNPAT D519G, like HFE C282Y, is a modifier of iron homeostasis that favors iron absorption. To challenge this hypothesis, we investigated the frequency of GNPAT D519G in patients with both familial and sporadic PCT. Patients were screened for GNPAT D519G and allelic variants of HFE (both C282Y and H63D). Nucleotide sequencing of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) identified mutant alleles. Patients with low erythrocyte URO-D activity or a damaging URO-D variant were classified as familial PCT (fPCT) and those with wild-type URO-D were classified as sporadic PCT (sPCT). GNPAT D519G was significantly enriched in the fPCT patient population (p = 0.0014) but not in the sPCT population (p = 0.4477). Both HFE C282Y and H63D (c.187C>G, rs1799945) were enriched in both PCT patient populations (p<0.0001) but showed no greater association with fPCT than with sPCT. Conclusion: GNPAT D519G is a risk factor for fPCT, but not for sPCT. PMID:27661980

  13. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  14. Discovery and characterization of a novel non-competitive inhibitor of the divalent metal transporter DMT1/SLC11A2.

    PubMed

    Montalbetti, Nicolas; Simonin, Alexandre; Simonin, Céline; Awale, Mahendra; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Hediger, Matthias A

    2015-08-01

    Divalent metal transporter-1 (SLC11A2/DMT1) uses the H(+) electrochemical gradient as the driving force to transport divalent metal ions such as Fe(2+), Mn(2+) and others metals into mammalian cells. DMT1 is ubiquitously expressed, most notably in proximal duodenum, immature erythroid cells, brain and kidney. This transporter mediates H(+)-coupled transport of ferrous iron across the apical membrane of enterocytes. In addition, in cells such as to erythroid precursors, following transferrin receptor (TfR) mediated endocytosis; it mediates H(+)-coupled exit of ferrous iron from endocytic vesicles into the cytosol. Dysfunction of human DMT1 is associated with several pathologies such as iron deficiency anemia hemochromatosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, as well as colorectal cancer and esophageal adenocarcinoma, making DMT1 an attractive target for drug discovery. In the present study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of the Princeton database (700,000 commercially available compounds) to search for pharmacophore shape analogs of recently reported DMT1 inhibitors. We discovered a new compound, named pyrimidinone 8, which mediates a reversible linear non-competitive inhibition of human DMT1 (hDMT1) transport activity with a Ki of ∼20μM. This compound does not affect hDMT1 cell surface expression and shows no dependence on extracellular pH. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence that hDMT1 can be allosterically modulated by pharmacological agents. Pyrimidinone 8 represents a novel versatile tool compound and it may serve as a lead structure for the development of therapeutic compounds for pre-clinical assessment.

  15. Association between the HFE C282Y, H63D Polymorphisms and the Risks of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 5,758 Cases and 14,741 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wei-Li; Wang, Feng-Mei; Han, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting results have been obtained for the association between two common polymorphisms (C282Y, H63D) of human HFE (hereditary hemochromatosis) gene and the risks of the liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods An updated systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential role of HFE polymorphisms in the susceptibility to NAFLD, liver cirrhosis and HCC. After retrieving articles from online databases, eligible studies were enrolled according to the selection criteria. Stata/SE 12.0 software was utilized to perform the statistical analysis. Results In total, 43 articles with 5,758 cases and 14,741 controls were selected. Compared with the control group, a significantly increased risk of NAFLD was observed for the C282Y polymorphism in the Caucasian population under all genetic models and for the H63D polymorphism under the allele, heterozygote and dominant models (all OR>1, Passociation<0.05). However, no significant difference between liver cirrhosis cases and the control group was observed for HFE C282Y and H63D (all Passociation>0.05). In addition, we found that HFE C282Y was statistically associated with increased HCC susceptibility in the overall population, while H63D increased the odds of developing non-cirrhotic HCC in the African population (all OR>1, Passociation<0.05). Moreover, a positive association between compound heterozygosity for C282Y/H63D and the risk of NAFLD and HCC, but not liver cirrhosis, was observed. Conclusion Our meta-analysis provides evidence that the HFE C282Y and H63D polymorphisms confer increased genetic susceptibility to NAFLD and HCC but not liver cirrhosis. Additional well-powered studies are required to confirm our conclusion. PMID:27657935

  16. Neolithic and Bronze Age migration to Ireland and establishment of the insular Atlantic genome

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Lara M.; Martiniano, Rui; Murphy, Eileen M.; Teasdale, Matthew D.; Mallory, James; Hartwell, Barrie; Bradley, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    The Neolithic and Bronze Age transitions were profound cultural shifts catalyzed in parts of Europe by migrations, first of early farmers from the Near East and then Bronze Age herders from the Pontic Steppe. However, a decades-long, unresolved controversy is whether population change or cultural adoption occurred at the Atlantic edge, within the British Isles. We address this issue by using the first whole genome data from prehistoric Irish individuals. A Neolithic woman (3343–3020 cal BC) from a megalithic burial (10.3× coverage) possessed a genome of predominantly Near Eastern origin. She had some hunter–gatherer ancestry but belonged to a population of large effective size, suggesting a substantial influx of early farmers to the island. Three Bronze Age individuals from Rathlin Island (2026–1534 cal BC), including one high coverage (10.5×) genome, showed substantial Steppe genetic heritage indicating that the European population upheavals of the third millennium manifested all of the way from southern Siberia to the western ocean. This turnover invites the possibility of accompanying introduction of Indo-European, perhaps early Celtic, language. Irish Bronze Age haplotypic similarity is strongest within modern Irish, Scottish, and Welsh populations, and several important genetic variants that today show maximal or very high frequencies in Ireland appear at this horizon. These include those coding for lactase persistence, blue eye color, Y chromosome R1b haplotypes, and the hemochromatosis C282Y allele; to our knowledge, the first detection of a known Mendelian disease variant in prehistory. These findings together suggest the establishment of central attributes of the Irish genome 4,000 y ago. PMID:26712024

  17. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J. P.; Costa, Tamara G. F.; Silva, Lilian N. D.; Renó, Cristiane O.; Oliveira, Eneida S.; Tilelli, Cristiane Q.; Santos, Luciana L.; Cortes, Vanessa F.; Santos, Herica L.; Barbosa, Leandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels. PMID:26197432

  18. Genetic Variants Influencing Biomarkers of Nutrition Are Not Associated with Cognitive Capability in Middle-Aged and Older Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Tamuno; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Deary, Ian J.; Elliott, Jane; Harris, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Maddock, Jane; Power, Chris; Starr, John M.; Kuh, Diana; Day, Ian N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Several investigations have observed positive associations between good nutritional status, as indicated by micronutrients, and cognitive measures; however, these associations may not be causal. Genetic polymorphisms that affect nutritional biomarkers may be useful for providing evidence for associations between micronutrients and cognitive measures. As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) program, men and women aged between 44 and 90 y from 6 UK cohorts were genotyped for polymorphisms associated with circulating concentrations of iron [rs4820268 transmembrane protease, serine 6 (TMPRSS6) and rs1800562 hemochromatosis (HFE)], vitamin B-12 [(rs492602 fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2)], vitamin D ([rs2282679 group-specific component (GC)] and β-carotene ([rs6564851 beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1)]. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study effects of the associations between these polymorphisms and the following measures of cognitive capability: word recall, phonemic fluency, semantic fluency, and search speed. Among the several statistical tests conducted, we found little evidence for associations. We found the minor allele of rs1800562 was associated with poorer word recall scores [pooled β on Z-score for carriers vs. noncarriers: −0.05 (95% CI: −0.09, −0.004); P = 0.03, n = 14,105] and poorer word recall scores for the vitamin D–raising allele of rs2282679 [pooled β per T allele: −0.03 (95% CI: −0.05, −0.003); P = 0.03, n = 16,527]. However, there was no evidence for other associations. Our findings provide little evidence to support associations between these genotypes and cognitive capability in older adults. Further investigations are required to elucidate whether the previous positive associations from observational studies between circulating measures of these micronutrients and cognitive performance are due to confounding and reverse causality. PMID:23468552

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and high plasma homocysteine in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infected patients from the Northeast of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim Hyperhomocysteinemia due to Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) gene, in particular the C677T (Ala222Val) polymorphism were recently associated to steatosis and fibrosis. We analyzed the frequency of MTHFR gene in a cross-sectional study of patients affected by Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) from Northeast of Brazil. Method One hundred seven-four untreated patients with CHC were genotyped for the C677T MTHFR. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells and the C677T MTHFR polymorphism was identified by PCR-RFLP. The homocysteine (Hcy) levels were determined by chemiluminescence method. All patients were negative for markers of Wilson's disease, hemochromatosis and autoimmune diseases and have current and past daily alcohol intake less than 100 g/week. Results Among subjects infected with CHC genotype non-1 the frequency of MTHFR genotypes TT was 9.8% versus 4.4% genotype 1 (p = 0.01). Nevertheless, association was found between the MTHFR genotype TT × CT/CC polymorphism and the degree of steatosis and fibrosis in both hepatitis C genotype (p < 0.05). A significant difference was found on plasma Hcy levels in patients with steatosis regardless of HCV genotype (p = 0.03). Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma Hcy levels is highly prevalent in subjects with chronic hepatits C with steatosis regardless of HCV genotype and vitamin deficiency. The presence of genotype TT of MTHFR C677T polymorphism was more common in CHC genotype non-1 infected patient regardless of histopathological classification and genotype TT+CT frequencies were significant in the presence of fibrosis grade 1+2 and of steatosis in CHC infected patients from the northeast of Brazil regardless of HCV genotype. The genetic susceptibility of MTHFR C677T polymorphism should be confirmed in a large population. PMID:21854603

  20. β2-Microglobulin-mediated Signaling as a Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Takeo; Huang, Wen-Chin; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Josson, Sajni; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Kaur, Mandeep

    2014-01-01

    β2-microglobulin (β2-m) has become the focus of intense scrutiny since the discovery of its undesirable roles promoting osteomimicry and cancer progression. β2-m is a well-known housekeeping protein that forms complexes with the heavy chain of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, which are heterodimeric cell surface proteins that present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. On recognition of foreign peptide antigens on cell surfaces, T cells actively bind and lyse antigen-presenting cancer cells. In addition to its roles in tumor immunity, β2-m has two different functions in cancer cells, either tumor promoting or tumor suppressing, in cancer cell context-dependent manner. Our studies have demonstrated that β2-m is involved extensively in the functional regulation of growth, survival, apoptosis, and even metastasis of cancer cells. We found that β2-m is a soluble growth factor and a pleiotropic signaling molecule which interacts with its receptor, hemochromatosis protein, to modulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through iron-responsive pathways. Specific antibodies against β2-m have remarkable tumoricidal activity in cancer, through β2-m action on iron flux, alterations of intracellular reactive oxygen species, DNA damage and repair enzyme activities, β-catenin activation and cadherin switching, and tumor responsiveness to hypoxia. These novel functions of β2-m and β2-m signaling may be common to several solid tumors including human lung, breast, renal, and prostate cancers. Our experimental results could lead to the development of a novel class of antibody-based pharmaceutical agents for cancer growth control. In this review, we briefly summarize the recent data regarding β2-m as a promising new cancer therapeutic target and discuss antagonizing this therapeutic target with antibody therapy for the treatment of localized and disseminated cancers. PMID:23848204

  1. Iron and the liver.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Humans have evolved to retain iron in the body and are exposed to a high risk of iron overload and iron-related toxicity. Excess iron in the blood, in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs, can saturate the buffering capacity of serum transferrin and result in non-transferrin-bound highly reactive forms of iron that can cause damage, as well as promote fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in the parenchymatous organs. A number of hereditary or acquired diseases are associated with systemic or local iron deposition or iron misdistribution in organs or cells. Two of these, the HFE- and non-HFE hemochromatosis syndromes represent the paradigms of genetic iron overload. They share common clinical features and the same pathogenic basis, in particular, a lack of synthesis or activity of hepcidin, the iron hormone. Before hepcidin was discovered, the liver was simply regarded as the main site of iron storage and, as such, the main target of iron toxicity. Now, as the main source of hepcidin, it appears that the loss of the hepcidin-producing liver mass or genetic and acquired factors that repress hepcidin synthesis in the liver may also lead to iron overload. Usually, there is low-grade excess iron which, through oxidative stress, is sufficient to worsen the course of the underlying liver disease or other chronic diseases that are apparently unrelated to iron, such as chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In the future, modulation of hepcidin synthesis and activity or hepcidin hormone-replacing strategies may become therapeutic options to cure iron-related disorders.

  2. Molecular and cellular aspects of iron-induced hepatic cirrhosis in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Pietrangelo, A; Gualdi, R; Casalgrandi, G; Montosi, G; Ventura, E

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis are common findings in humans with hemochromatosis. In this study we investigated the molecular pathways of iron-induced hepatic fibrosis and evaluated the anti-fibrogenic effect of vitamin E. Male gerbils were treated with iron-dextran and fed a standard diet or a alpha-tocopherol enriched diet (250 mg/Kg diet). In gerbils on the standard diet at 6 wk after dosing with iron, in situ hybridization analysis documented a dramatic increase of signal for collagen mRNA around iron foci onto liver fat storing cells (FSC), as identified by immunocytochemistry with desmin antibody. After 4 mo, micronodular cirrhosis developed in these animals, with nonparenchymal cells surrounding hepatocyte nodules and expressing high level of TGF beta mRNA. In this group, in vivo labeling with [3H]-thymidine showed a marked proliferation of nonparenchymal cells, including FSC. In iron-dosed gerbils on the vitamin E-enriched diet for 4 mo, in spite of a severe liver iron burden, a normal lobular architecture was found, with a dramatic decrease of collagen mRNA accumulation and collagen deposition. At the molecular level, a total suppression of nonparenchymal cell proliferation was appreciable, although expression of collagen and TGF beta mRNAs was still present into microscopic iron-filled nonparenchymal cell aggregates scattered throughout the hepatic lobule. In conclusion, our study shows that anti-oxidant treatment during experimental hepatic fibrosis arrests fibrogenesis and completely prevents iron induced hepatic cirrhosis mainly through inhibition of nonparenchymal cell proliferation induced by iron. Images PMID:7706489

  3. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J P; Costa, Tamara G F; Silva, Lilian N D; Renó, Cristiane O; Oliveira, Eneida S; Tilelli, Cristiane Q; Santos, Luciana L; Cortes, Vanessa F; Santos, Herica L; Barbosa, Leandro A

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels.

  4. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of primary liver cancer in the United States: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Tania M.; Graubard, Barry I.; Zeuzem, Stefan; El-Serag, Hashem B.; Davila, Jessica A.; McGlynn, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Incidence rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) have increased in the United States. Metabolic syndrome is recognized as a risk factor for HCC and a postulated one for ICC. The magnitude of risk, however, has not been investigated on a population level in the U.S. We therefore examined the association between metabolic syndrome and the development of these cancers. All persons diagnosed with HCC and ICC between 1993 and 2005 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database. For comparison, a 5% sample of individuals residing in the same regions as the SEER registries of the cases was selected. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome as defined by the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and other risk factors for HCC (hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, alcoholic liver disease, liver cirrhosis, biliary cirrhosis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease) and ICC (biliary cirrhosis, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, choledochal cysts, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, alcoholic liver disease, cirrhosis, inflammatory bowel disease) were compared among persons who developed cancer and those who did not. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The inclusion criteria were met by 3649 HCC cases, 743 ICC cases and 195,953 comparison persons. Metabolic syndrome was significantly more common among persons who developed HCC (37.1%) and ICC (29.7%) than the comparison group (17.1%, p<0.0001). In adjusted multiple logistic regression analyses, metabolic syndrome remained significantly associated with increased risk of HCC (odds ratio=2.13; 95%CI=1.96–2.31, p<0.0001) and ICC (odds ratio=1.56; 95% CI= 1.32–1.83, p<0.0001). Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is a significant risk factor for development of HCC and ICC in the general U.S. population. PMID:21538440

  5. Aluminum and iron can be deposited in the calcified matrix of bone exostoses.

    PubMed

    Chappard, Daniel; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Moukoko, Didier; Henric, Nicolas; Steiger, Vincent; Le Nay, Patrick; Frin, Jean-Marie; De Bodman, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    Exostosis (or osteochondroma) is the most common benign bone tumor encountered in children and adults. Exostoses may occur as solitary or multiple tumors (in the autosomal syndromes of hereditary multiple exostoses). Exostoses are composed of cortical and medullary bone covered by an overlying hyaline cartilage cap. We have searched iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) in the matrix of cortical and trabecular bone of 30 patients with exostosis. Al(3+) and Fe(3+) are two cations which can substitute calcium in the hydroxyapatite crystals of the bone matrix. The bone samples were removed surgically and were studied undecalcified. Perls' Prussian blue staining (for Fe) and solochrome azurine B (for Al) were used on the histological sections of the tumors. Al(3+) was detected histochemically in 21/30 patients as linear bands deposited by the osteoblasts. Fe(3+) was detected in 10 out of these 21 patients as linear bands in the same locations. Fe(3+) and Al(3+) were not identified in the bone matrix of a control group of 20 osteoporotic patients. Energy X-ray Dispersive Spectrometry failed to identify Fe and Al in bone of these tumors due to the low sensitivity of the method. Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry identified them but the concentrations were very low. Histochemistry appears a very sensitive method for Fe(3+) and Al(3+) in bone.The presence of these two metals in the exostoses advocates for a disturbed metabolism of osteoblasts which can deposit these metals into the bone matrix, similar to which is observed in case of hemochromatosis with Fe(3+).

  6. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Prevalence, Characteristics, and Prognostic Significance of HFE Gene Mutations in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Timothy M.E.; Beilby, John; Davis, Wendy A.; Olynyk, John K.; Jeffrey, Gary P.; Rossi, Enrico; Boyder, Conchita; Bruce, David G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relationship between iron status, hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) gene mutations, and clinical features and outcomes of type 2 diabetes in a well-characterized representative sample of community-based patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—HFE genotype data were available for 1,245 type 2 diabetic patients from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study (FDS), representing 96.2% of the total FDS type 2 diabetes cohort. Data were collected at recruitment between 1993 and 1996 and annually until the end of June 2001. Hospitalization and mortality data were available until the end of June 2006. The presence of the C282Y HFE mutation was determined in all subjects and H63D in C282Y heterozygotes. Fasting serum iron, transferrin, and ferritin were measured in all C282Y homozygotes and C282Y/H63D heterozygotes and in 286 randomly selected wild-type subjects. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine independent baseline associates of prevalent complications (myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular disease, retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy), as was Cox proportional hazards modeling to determine predictors of incident complications and mortality. RESULTS—Although there were expected positive associations between HFE gene mutations and serum iron and transferrin saturation, there were no independent positive associations between HFE gene status and either microvascular or macrovascular complications in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. HFE gene status did not independently predict cardiac or all-cause mortality. Measures of iron metabolism including serum ferritin were not associated with combined microvascular or macrovascular end points. CONCLUSIONS—Directed screening for iron overload and/or HFE mutations appears unwarranted in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:18566337

  8. Identification and characterization of a new multigene family in the human MHC: A candidate autoimmune disease susceptibility element (3.8-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.M.; Venditti, C.P.; Chorney, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    An association between idiopathic hemochromatosis (HFE) and the HLA-A3 locus has been previously well-established. In an attempt to identify potential HFE candidate genes, a genomic DNA fragment distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint was used to screen a B cell cDNA library; a member (3.8-1) of a new multigene family, composed of five distinct genomic cross-reactive fragments, was identified. Clone 3.8-1 represents the 3{prime} end of 9.6 kb transcript which is expressed in multiple tissues including the spleen, thymus, lung and kidney. Sequencing and genome database analysis indicate that 3.8-1 is unique, with no homology to any known entries. The genomic residence of 3-8.1, defined by polymorphism analysis and physical mapping using YAC clones, appears to be absent from the genomes of higher primates, although four other cross-reactivities are maintained. The absence of this gene as well as other probes which map in the TNF to HLA-B interval, suggest that this portion of the human HMC, located between the Class I and Class III regions, arose in humans as the result of a post-speciation insertional event. The large size of the 3.8-1 gene and the possible categorization of 3.8-1 as a human-specific gene are significant given the genetic data that place an autoimmune susceptibility element for IDDM and myasthenia gravis in the precise region where this gene resides. In an attempt to isolate the 5{prime} end of this large transcript, we have constructed a cosmid contig which encompasses the genomic locus of this gene and are progressively isolating coding sequences by exon trapping.

  9. Evaluation of serum levels in T3, T4 and TSH in beta-thalassemic patients referred to the Abuzar hospital in Ahwaz

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Zari Tahannejad; Ghazanfari, Majid; Naleini, Seyyed Nima; Sabagh, Azam; Kooti, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Regarding the functioning of the endocrine system, and especially in the thyroid of patients with thalassemia, multiple studies in different parts of the world have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of thyroid hormones and TSH in beta-thalassemic patients in the city of Ahwaz. Methods In this matched case-control study, 105 patients in the case group and 105 subjects as controls were randomly selected from clients referred to the Abuzar hospital in 2015–2016. Serum levels of T3, T4, and TSH hormones were measured using ELISA. Data was processed with the SPSS15 software and tested by using independent t-tests and logistic regression. Results The study results showed that the serum level of T3 hormone did not significantly differ between the two groups (p> 0.05). Whereas the serum level of T4 was lower in the case group, compared to the controls, which was statistically significant (p <0.05). The serum level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in the case group was higher than the control group, and this difference was statistically significant (p <0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed significant differences in serum levels of T4 (OR: 0.58) and TSH (OR: 1.57) between the case and control groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Hypothyroidism is clear in patients with beta thalassemia. With regard to the possible effect of iron on the disorder, a blood transfusion schedule should be performed at intervals, and the desferal injection program should be done regularly to prevent hemochromatosis in patients with thalassemia major due to the effect of accumulation of iron on thyroid function and detection of hypothyroidism. This course of action will prevent incidence of this complication in patients with thalassemia major.

  10. Neolithic and Bronze Age migration to Ireland and establishment of the insular Atlantic genome.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Lara M; Martiniano, Rui; Murphy, Eileen M; Teasdale, Matthew D; Mallory, James; Hartwell, Barrie; Bradley, Daniel G

    2016-01-12

    The Neolithic and Bronze Age transitions were profound cultural shifts catalyzed in parts of Europe by migrations, first of early farmers from the Near East and then Bronze Age herders from the Pontic Steppe. However, a decades-long, unresolved controversy is whether population change or cultural adoption occurred at the Atlantic edge, within the British Isles. We address this issue by using the first whole genome data from prehistoric Irish individuals. A Neolithic woman (3343-3020 cal BC) from a megalithic burial (10.3× coverage) possessed a genome of predominantly Near Eastern origin. She had some hunter-gatherer ancestry but belonged to a population of large effective size, suggesting a substantial influx of early farmers to the island. Three Bronze Age individuals from Rathlin Island (2026-1534 cal BC), including one high coverage (10.5×) genome, showed substantial Steppe genetic heritage indicating that the European population upheavals of the third millennium manifested all of the way from southern Siberia to the western ocean. This turnover invites the possibility of accompanying introduction of Indo-European, perhaps early Celtic, language. Irish Bronze Age haplotypic similarity is strongest within modern Irish, Scottish, and Welsh populations, and several important genetic variants that today show maximal or very high frequencies in Ireland appear at this horizon. These include those coding for lactase persistence, blue eye color, Y chromosome R1b haplotypes, and the hemochromatosis C282Y allele; to our knowledge, the first detection of a known Mendelian disease variant in prehistory. These findings together suggest the establishment of central attributes of the Irish genome 4,000 y ago. PMID:26712024

  11. Evaluation of serum levels in T3, T4 and TSH in beta-thalassemic patients referred to the Abuzar hospital in Ahwaz

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Zari Tahannejad; Ghazanfari, Majid; Naleini, Seyyed Nima; Sabagh, Azam; Kooti, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Regarding the functioning of the endocrine system, and especially in the thyroid of patients with thalassemia, multiple studies in different parts of the world have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of thyroid hormones and TSH in beta-thalassemic patients in the city of Ahwaz. Methods In this matched case-control study, 105 patients in the case group and 105 subjects as controls were randomly selected from clients referred to the Abuzar hospital in 2015–2016. Serum levels of T3, T4, and TSH hormones were measured using ELISA. Data was processed with the SPSS15 software and tested by using independent t-tests and logistic regression. Results The study results showed that the serum level of T3 hormone did not significantly differ between the two groups (p> 0.05). Whereas the serum level of T4 was lower in the case group, compared to the controls, which was statistically significant (p <0.05). The serum level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in the case group was higher than the control group, and this difference was statistically significant (p <0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed significant differences in serum levels of T4 (OR: 0.58) and TSH (OR: 1.57) between the case and control groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Hypothyroidism is clear in patients with beta thalassemia. With regard to the possible effect of iron on the disorder, a blood transfusion schedule should be performed at intervals, and the desferal injection program should be done regularly to prevent hemochromatosis in patients with thalassemia major due to the effect of accumulation of iron on thyroid function and detection of hypothyroidism. This course of action will prevent incidence of this complication in patients with thalassemia major. PMID:27648188

  12. [A clinicopathological study of primary liver cancer associated with alcoholic liver injury].

    PubMed

    Kohgo, Y; Ohhira, M; Ono, M

    1996-04-01

    We described a clinicopathological study of primary hepatoma associated with alcoholic liver diseases without viral liver diseases. In 150 patients with primary hepatoma, 6 patients (4%) have hepatoma associated with pure alcoholic liver disease, although 143 hepatoma were associated with chronic viral liver diseases and one was with primary biliary cirrhosis. All patients were male. The diagnosis of hepatoma was obtained at the age of 54 to 67 years old, and the duration of ethanol intake was 33 to 40 years. Three cases had a history of temperance. As an underlying liver disease, liver fibrosis was found in 3 cases and liver cirrhosis was in 3 cases. Chronic infections of hepatitis B and C viruses were ruled out by assaying serum virus markers. Autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis were neglected by serum autoantibody. Hemochromatosis and Wilson's disease were also excluded. Hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed histologically in all the cases. Serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II were positive in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. In cases with small hepatoma, the tumor was resected surgically in two cases and percutaneous ethanol injection against hepatoma was performed in one case. In these cases with small hepatoma, the patients were alive without tumor recurrence during observation period. In advanced hepatoma, transcatheter arterial infusion of anticancer agent was performed in two cases and no therapy was performed due to poor general condition in one case. One case was alive with recurrent hepatoma for 27 months, during which a therapy was repeated five times. Other 2 cases were died. The clinicopathological features of hepatoma associated with alcoholic liver disease were essentially same as those associated with chronic viral infection, although the incidence of hepatoma in alcoholic liver disease was lower than in viral liver disease. The mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis in alcoholic liver disease was unclear and, therefore

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the major malignant tumors in the world today. The number of new cases of the tumor increases year by year, and hepatocellular carcinoma almost always runs a fulminant course and carries an especially grave prognosis. It has a low resectability rate and a high recurrence rate after surgical intervention, and responds poorly to anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma does not have a uniform geographical distribution: rather, very high incidences occur in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and in sub-Saharan Black Africans. In these regions and populations, the tumor shows a distinct shift in age distribution toward the younger ages, seen to greatest extent in sub-Saharan Black Africans. In all populations, males are more commonly affected. The most common risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in resource-poor populations with a high incidence of the tumor are chronic hepatitis B virus infection and dietary exposure to the fungal hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B1. These two causative agents act either singly or synergistically. Both the viral infection and exposure to the fungus occur from early childhood, and the tumor typically presents at an early age. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is an important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in resource-rich countries with a low incidence of the tumor. The infection is acquired in adulthood and hepatocellular carcinoma occurs later than it does with hepatitis B virus-induced tumors. In recent years, obesity and the metabolic syndrome have increased markedly in incidence and importance as a cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in some resource-rich regions. Chronic alcohol abuse remains an important risk factor for malignant transformation of hepatocytes, frequently in association with alcohol-induced cirrhosis. Excessive iron accumulation in hereditary hemochromatosis and dietary iron overload in the Black African population and membranous obstruction of the inferior cava

  14. Plague gives surprises in the first decade of the 21st century in the United States and worldwide.

    PubMed

    Butler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Plague is an ancient disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and transmitted by rodent flea bites that continues to surprise us with first-ever events. This review documents plague in human cases in the 1st decade of the 21st century and updates our knowledge of clinical manifestations, transmission during outbreaks, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial treatment, and vaccine development. In the United States, 57 persons were reported to have the disease, of which seven died. Worldwide, 21,725 persons were affected with 1,612 deaths, for a case-fatality rate of 7.4%. The Congo reported more cases than any other country, including two large outbreaks of pneumonic plague, surpassing Madagascar, which had the most cases in the previous decade. Two United States scientists suffered fatal accidental exposures: a wildlife biologist, who carried out an autopsy on a mountain lion in Arizona in 2007, and a geneticist with subclinical hemochromatosis in Chicago, who was handling an avirulent strain of Y. pestis in 2009. Antimicrobial drugs given early after the onset of symptoms prevented many deaths; those recommended for treatment and prophylaxis included gentamicin, doxycycline, and fluoroquinolones, although fluoroquinolones have not been adequately tested in humans. Fleas that do not have their guts blocked by clotted blood meals were shown to be better transmitters of plague than blocked fleas. Under development for protection against bioterrorist use, a subunit vaccine containing F1 and V antigens of Y. pestis was administered to human volunteers eliciting antibodies without any serious side effects. These events, although showing progress, suggest that plague will persist in rodent reservoirs mostly in African countries burdened by poverty and civil unrest, causing death when patients fail to receive prompt antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24043686

  15. In vivo time-harmonic multifrequency elastography of the human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Guo, Jing; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-04-01

    Elastography is capable of noninvasively detecting hepatic fibrosis by imposing mechanical stress and measuring the viscoelastic response in the liver. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) relies on time-harmonic vibrations, while most dynamic ultrasound elastography methods employ transient stimulation methods. This study attempts to benefit from the advantages of time-harmonic tissue stimulation, i.e. relative insensitivity to obesity and ascites and mechanical approachability of the entire liver, and the advantages of ultrasound, i.e. time efficiency, low costs, and wide availability, by introducing in vivo time-harmonic elastography (THE) of the human liver using ultrasound and a broad range of harmonic stimulation frequencies. THE employs continuous harmonic shear vibrations at 7 frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz in a single examination and determines the elasticity and the viscosity of the liver from the dispersion of the shear wave speed within the applied frequency range. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the livers of eight healthy volunteers and a patient with cirrhosis. Multifrequency MRE at the same drive frequencies was used as elastographic reference method. Similar values of shear modulus and shear viscosity according the Kelvin-Voigt model were obtained by MRE and THE, indicating that the new method is suitable for in vivo quantification of the shear viscoelastic properties of the liver, however, in real-time and at a fraction of the costs of MRE. In conclusion, THE may provide a useful tool for fast assessment of the viscoelastic properties of the liver at low costs and without limitations in obesity, ascites or hemochromatosis.

  16. Modification of the association between lead exposure and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by iron and oxidative stress related gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Eum, Ki-Do; Seals, Ryan M; Taylor, Kathryn M; Grespin, Matthew; Umbach, David M; Hu, Howard; Sandler, Dale P; Kamel, Freya; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to examine whether functional polymorphisms in hemochromatosis (HFE; H63D and C282Y), transferrin (TfC2), and glutathione-s-transferase Pi1 (GSTP1; Ile105Val) genes modify any lead-ALS association. We measured blood lead using atomic absorption spectroscopy and bone lead - a biomarker of cumulative lead exposure - using K-shell-X-ray fluorescence in 100 neurologist-confirmed ALS cases and 194 controls, the latter recruited as part of two separate studies; all subjects lived in New England. Participants were considered variant carriers or wild-type for each polymorphism. To assess effect modification, we included cross-product terms between lead biomarkers and each polymorphism in separate adjusted polytomous logistic regression models. Compared with wild-type, the odds ratio (OR) per 15.6 μg/g patella lead (interquartile range; IQR) was 8.24 (95% CI 0.94-72.19) times greater among C282Y variant carriers, and 0.34 (95% CI 0.15-0.78) times smaller among H63D variant carriers. Results were weaker for tibia lead. Compared with wild-type the OR per 2 μg/dl blood lead (IQR) was 0.36 (95% CI 0.19-0.68) times smaller among H63D variant carriers, and 1.96 (95% CI 0.98-3.92) times greater among GSTP1 variant carriers. In conclusion, we found that HFE and GSTP1 genotypes modified the association between lead biomarkers and ALS. Contrasting modification by the HFE polymorphisms H63D and C282Y may suggest that the modification is not simply the result of increased iron. PMID:25293352

  17. HEPCIDIN AND IRON HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    Despite fluctuations in dietary iron intake and intermittent losses through bleeding, the plasma iron concentrations in humans remain stable at 10–30 μM. While most of the iron entering blood plasma comes from recycling, appropriate amount of iron is absorbed from the diet to compensate for losses and maintain nontoxic amounts in stores. Plasma iron concentration and iron distribution are similarly regulated in laboratory rodents. The hepatic peptide hepcidin was identified as the systemic iron-regulatory hormone. In the efferent arc, hepcidin regulates intestinal iron absorption, plasma iron concentrations, and tissue iron distribution by inducing degradation of its receptor, the cellular iron exporter ferroportin. Ferroportin exports iron into plasma from absorptive enterocytes, from macrophages that recycle the iron of senescent erythrocytes, and from hepatocytes that store iron. In the more complex and less well understood afferent arc, hepatic hepcidin synthesis is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations through a molecular complex of bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their iron-specific ligands, modulators and iron sensors. Through as yet undefined pathways, hepcidin is also homeostatically regulated by the iron requirements of erythroid precursors for hemoglobin synthesis. In accordance with the role of hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution in host defense, hepcidin production is regulated by inflammation as well. Increased hepcidin concentrations in plasma are pathogenic in iron-restrictive anemias including anemias associated with inflammation, chronic kidney disease and some cancers. Hepcidin deficiency causes iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis and ineffective erythropoiesis. Hepcidin, ferroportin and their regulators represent potential targets for the diagnosis and treatment of iron disorders and anemias. PMID:22306005

  18. Pleiotropic actions of iron balance in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Fang, Xuexian; Wang, Fudi

    2015-03-01

    As an essential element, iron plays a central role in many physiological processes, including redox balance, inflammation, energy metabolism, and environment sensing. Perturbations in iron homeostasis are associated with several conditions, including hyperglycemia and diabetes, both of which have been studied in patients and animal models. To clarify the pleiotropic role of iron homeostasis in diabetes development, the early studies on diseases with iron-overload, studies on clinical iron depletion therapies, associations between iron-related genetic polymorphisms and diabetes, and etiological mechanisms underlying iron perturbations-impaired insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were carefully reviewed and discussed. Hereditary hemochromatosis, transfusion-dependent thalassemia, and excess heme iron intake can increase the risk of developing diabetes. Genetically modified mice and mice fed a high-iron diet present with discrepant phenotypes due to differences in tissue iron distribution. Moreover, several genetic polymorphisms related to iron homeostasis have been associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Tightly controlled iron metabolism is essential for insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, and iron overload in pancreatic islets alters reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, as well as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stability and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, thereby impairing the function and viability of β-cells. Decreased levels of adiponectin, macrophage-mediated inflammation, and ROS-mediated liver kinase B1 (LKB1)/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation can contribute to iron overload-induced insulin resistance, whereas iron deficiency could also participate in obesity-related inflammation, hypoxia, and insulin resistance. Because iron homeostasis is closely correlated with many metabolic processes, future studies are needed in order to elucidate the finely tuned network among iron

  19. Codanin-1, the protein encoded by the gene mutated in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I (CDAN1), is cell cycle-regulated

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Lotan, Sharon; Dgany, Orly; Lahmi, Roxane; Marcoux, Nathaly; Krasnov, Tanya; Yissachar, Nissan; Ginsberg, Doron; Motro, Benny; Resnitzky, Peretz; Yaniv, Isaac; Kupfer, Gary M.; Tamary, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    Background Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I is an inherited autosomal recessive macrocytic anemia associated with ineffective erythropoiesis and the development of secondary hemochromatosis. Distinct erythroid precursors with internuclear chromatin bridges and spongy heterochromatin are pathognomonic for the disease. The mutated gene (CDAN1) encodes a ubiquitously expressed protein of unknown function, codanin-1. Based on the morphological features of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I erythroblasts and data on a role in cell cycle progression of codanin-1 homolog in Drosophila we investigated the cellular localization and possible involvement of codanin-1 during the cell cycle. Design and Methods Codanin-1 localization was studied by immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy. Cell cycle expression of codanin-1 was evaluated using synchronized HeLa cells. E2F proteins are the main regulator of G1/S transition. An E2F1-inducible cell line (U20S-ER-E2F1) enabled us to study codanin-1 expression following ectopic E2F1 induction. Direct binding of E2F1 to codanin-1 promoter was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We used a luciferase-reporter plasmid to study activation of CDAN1 transcription by E2F1. Results We localized codanin-1 to heterochromatin in interphase cells. During the cell cycle, high levels of codanin-1 were observed in the S phase. At mitosis, codanin-1 underwent phosphorylation, which coincided with its exclusion from condensed chromosomes. The proximal CDAN1 gene promoter region, containing five putative E2F binding sites, was found to be a direct target of E2F1. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that codanin-1 is a cell cycle-regulated protein active in the S phase. The exact role of codanin-1 during the S phase remains to be determined. Nevertheless this represents the first step towards understanding the function of the proteins involved in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. PMID:19336738

  20. Monogenic diseases that can be cured by liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Daina, Erica; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Colledan, Michele; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    While the prevalence of most diseases caused by single-gene mutations is low and defines them as rare conditions, all together, monogenic diseases account for approximately 10 in every 1000 births according to the World Health Organisation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) could offer a therapeutic option in monogenic diseases in two ways: by substituting for an injured liver or by supplying a tissue that can replace a mutant protein. In this respect, LT may be regarded as the correction of a disease at the level of the dysfunctional protein. Monogenic diseases that involve the liver represent a heterogeneous group of disorders. In conditions associated with predominant liver parenchymal damage (i.e., genetic cholestatic disorders, Wilson's disease, hereditary hemochromatosis, tyrosinemia, α1 antitrypsin deficiency), hepatic complications are the major source of morbidity and LT not only replaces a dysfunctional liver but also corrects the genetic defect and effectively cures the disease. A second group includes liver-based genetic disorders characterised by an architecturally near-normal liver (urea cycle disorders, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome-1). In these defects, extrahepatic complications are the main source of morbidity and mortality while liver function is relatively preserved. Combined transplantation of other organs may be required, and other surgical techniques, such as domino and auxiliary liver transplantation, have been attempted. In a third group of monogenic diseases, the underlying genetic defect is expressed at a systemic level and liver involvement is just one of the clinical manifestations. In these conditions, LT might only be partially curative since the abnormal phenotype is maintained by extrahepatic synthesis of the toxic metabolites (i.e., methylmalonic acidemia, propionic acidemia). This review focuses on principles of diagnosis, management

  1. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Weisskopf, Marc G.; Sparrow, David; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hemochromatosis (HFE), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1), apolipoprotein E (APOE),angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead. Objectives We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS) on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study. Results Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50–3.42) with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data. PMID:27584680

  2. Normal systemic iron homeostasis in mice with macrophage-specific deletion of transferrin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Gautam; Secondes, Eriza S; Wallace, Daniel F; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2016-02-01

    Iron is an essential element, since it is a component of many macromolecules involved in diverse physiological and cellular functions, including oxygen transport, cellular growth, and metabolism. Systemic iron homeostasis is predominantly regulated by the liver through the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin expression is itself regulated by a number of proteins, including transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2). TFR2 has been shown to be expressed in the liver, bone marrow, macrophages, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Studies from our laboratory have shown that mice with a hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tfr2 recapitulate the hemochromatosis phenotype of the global Tfr2 knockout mice, suggesting that the hepatic expression of TFR2 is important in systemic iron homeostasis. It is unclear how TFR2 in macrophages contributes to the regulation of iron metabolism. We examined the role of TFR2 in macrophages by analysis of transgenic mice lacking Tfr2 in macrophages by crossing Tfr2(f/f) mice with LysM-Cre mice. Mice were fed an iron-rich diet or injected with lipopolysaccharide to examine the role of macrophage Tfr2 in iron- or inflammation-mediated regulation of hepcidin. Body iron homeostasis was unaffected in the knockout mice, suggesting that macrophage TFR2 is not required for the regulation of systemic iron metabolism. However, peritoneal macrophages of knockout mice had significantly lower levels of ferroportin mRNA and protein, suggesting that TFR2 may be involved in regulating ferroportin levels in macrophages. These studies further elucidate the role of TFR2 in the regulation of iron homeostasis and its role in regulation of ferroportin and thus macrophage iron homeostasis.

  3. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism revisited.

    PubMed

    Fraietta, Renato; Zylberstejn, Daniel Suslik; Esteves, Sandro C

    2013-01-01

    Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic) or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic). Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome) and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in which specific

  4. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Reboussin, David M; McLaren, Christine E; Barton, James C; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Gordon D; Harris, Emily L; Reiss, Jacob A; Adams, Paul C; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W

    2008-08-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 microg/L (men), >200 microg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 microg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 microg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but <4 g. In conclusion, serum ferritin >900 microg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 microg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. PMID:18429050

  5. Automated DNA extraction, quantification, dilution, and PCR preparation for genotyping by high-resolution melting.

    PubMed

    Seipp, Michael T; Herrmann, Mark; Wittwer, Carl T

    2010-12-01

    Genotyping by high-resolution amplicon melting uses only two PCR primers per locus and a generic, saturating DNA dye that detects heteroduplexes as well as homoduplexes. Heterozygous genotypes have a characteristic melting curve shape and a broader width than homozygous genotypes, which are usually differentiated by their melting temperature (T(m)). The H63D mutation, associated with hemochromatosis, is a single nucleotide polymorphism, which is impossible to genotype based on T(m), as the homozygous WT and mutant amplicons melt at the same temperature. To distinguish such homozygous variants, WT DNA can be added to controls and unknown samples to create artificial heterozygotes with all genotypes distinguished by quantitative heteroduplex analysis. By automating DNA extraction, quantification, and PCR preparation, a hands-off integrated solution for genotyping is possible. A custom Biomek® NX robot with an onboard spectrophotometer and custom programming was used to extract DNA from whole blood, dilute the DNA to appropriate concentrations, and add the sample DNA to preprepared PCR plates. Agencourt® Genfind™ v.2 chemistry was used for DNA extraction. PCR was performed on a plate thermocycler, high-resolution melting data collected on a LightScanner-96, followed by analysis and automatic genotyping using custom software. In a blinded study of 42 H63D samples, 41 of the 42 sample genotypes were concordant with dual hybridization probe genotyping. The incorrectly assigned genotype was a heterozygote that appeared to be a homozygous mutant as a result of a low sample DNA concentration. Automated DNA extraction from whole blood with quantification, dilution, and PCR preparation was demonstrated using quantitative heteroduplex analysis. Accuracy is critically dependent on DNA quantification.

  6. Carriers of the Complex Allele HFE c.[187C>G;340+4T>C] Have Increased Risk of Iron Overload in São Miguel Island Population (Azores, Portugal)

    PubMed Central

    Bulhões, Sara; Brilhante, Maria José; Pereirinha, Tânia; Cabral, Rita; Rego, Ana Catarina; Fraga, Cristina; Miguel, António G.; Brasil, Gracinda; Macedo, Paula; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload is associated with acquired and genetic conditions, the most common being hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type-I, caused by HFE mutations. Here, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study of 41 patients from the São Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal), six belonging to a family with HH type-I pseudodominant inheritance, and 35 unrelated individuals fulfilling the biochemical criteria of iron overload compatible with HH type-I. For this purpose, we analyzed the most common HFE mutations– c.845G>A [p.Cys282Tyr], c.187C>G [p.His63Asp], and c.193A>T [p.Ser65Cys]. Results revealed that the family’s HH pseudodominant pattern is due to consanguineous marriage of HFE-c.845G>A carriers, and to marriage with a genetically unrelated spouse that is a -c.187G carrier. Regarding unrelated patients, six were homozygous for c.845A, and three were c.845A/c.187G compound heterozygous. We then performed sequencing of HFE exons 2, 4, 5 and their intron-flanking regions. No other mutations were observed, but we identified the -c.340+4C [IVS2+4C] splice variant in 26 (74.3%) patients. Functionally, the c.340+4C may generate alternative splicing by HFE exon 2 skipping and consequently, a protein missing the α1-domain essential for HFE/ transferrin receptor-1 interactions. Finally, we investigated HFE mutations configuration with iron overload by determining haplotypes and genotypic profiles. Results evidenced that carriers of HFE-c.187G allele also carry -c.340+4C, suggesting in-cis configuration. This data is corroborated by the association analysis where carriers of the complex allele HFE-c.[187C>G;340+4T>C] have an increased iron overload risk (RR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.40−2.94, p<0.001). Therefore, homozygous for this complex allele are at risk of having iron overload because they will produce two altered proteins—the p.63Asp [c.187G], and the protein lacking 88 amino acids encoded by exon 2. In summary, we provide evidence that the complex allele HFE-c.[187C

  7. Plasmatic higher levels of homocysteine in Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease, which includes a spectrum of hepatic pathology such as simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The increased serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy) may be associated with hepatic fat accumulation. Genetic mutations in the folate route may only mildly impair Hcy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between liver steatosis with plasma homocysteine level and MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in Brazilian patients with NAFLD. Methods Thirty-five patients diagnosed with NAFLD by liver biopsy and forty-five healthy controls neither age nor sex matched were genotyped for C677T and A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms using PCR-RFLP and PCR-ASA, respectively, and Hcy was determined by HPLC. All patients were negative for markers of Wilson’s, hemochromatosis and autoimmune diseases. Their daily alcohol intake was less than 100 g/week. A set of metabolic and serum lipid markers were also measured at the time of liver biopsies. Results The plasma Hcy level was higher in NAFLD patients compared to the control group (p = 0.0341). No statistical difference for genotypes 677C/T (p = 0.110) and 1298A/C (p = 0.343) in patients with NAFLD and control subjects was observed. The genotypes distribution was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (677C/T p = 0.694 and 1298 A/C p = 0.188). The group of patients and controls showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) for BMI and HOMA_IR, similarly to HDL cholesterol levels (p < 0,006), AST, ALT, γGT, AP and triglycerides levels (p < 0.001). A negative correlation was observed between levels of vitamin B12 and Hcy concentration (p = 0.005). Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma Hcy was higher in NAFLD than controls. The MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms did not differ significantly between groups, despite the 677TT homozygous frequency was higher in patients (17

  8. Icariin regulates systemic iron metabolism by increasing hepatic hepcidin expression through Stat3 and Smad1/5/8 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jing; Guo, Wenli; Liu, Xin; Liu, Sijin; Yin, Huijun

    2016-05-01

    Systemic iron homeostasis is strictly controlled under normal conditions to ensure a balance between the absorption, utilization, storage and recycling of iron. The hepcidin-ferroportin (FPN) axis is of critical importance in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Hepcidin deficiency gives rise to enhanced dietary iron absorption, as well as to increased iron release from macrophages, and this in turn results in iron accumulation in the plasma and organs, and is associated with a range of tissue pathologies. Low hepcidin levels have been demonstrated in most forms of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), as well as in β-thalassemia. Therapies that increase hepcidin concentrations may potentially play a role in the treatment of these iron overload-related diseases. To date, natural compounds have not been extensively investigated for this purpose, to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in the present study, we screened natural compounds that have the potential to regulate hepcidin expression. By performing hepcidin promoter-luciferase assay, RT-qPCR and animal experiments, we demonstrated that icariin and berberine were potent stimulators of hepcidin transcription. Mechanistic experiments indicated that icariin and berberine increased hepcidin expression by activating the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Smad1/5/8 signaling pathways. The induction of hepcidin was confirmed in mice following icariin administration, coupled with associated changes in serum and tissue iron concentrations. In support of these findings, the icariin analogues, epimedin A, B and C, also increased hepatic hepcidin expression. However, these changes were not observed in hepcidin-deficient [Hamp1-/- or Hamp1‑knockout (KO)] mice following icariin administration, thereby verifying hepatic hepcidin as the target of icariin. Although berberine exhibited a robust capacity to promote hepcidin expression in vitro, it failed to alter hepcidin expression in mice. Taken together

  9. Quantitating Iron in Serum Ferritin by Use of ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Gillman, Patricia L.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory method has been devised to enable measurement of the concentration of iron bound in ferritin from small samples of blood (serum). Derived partly from a prior method that depends on large samples of blood, this method involves the use of an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Ferritin is a complex of iron with the protein apoferritin. Heretofore, measurements of the concentration of serum ferritin (as distinguished from direct measurements of the concentration of iron in serum ferritin) have been used to assess iron stores in humans. Low levels of serum ferritin could indicate the first stage of iron depletion. High levels of serum ferritin could indicate high levels of iron (for example, in connection with hereditary hemochromatosis an iron-overload illness that is characterized by progressive organ damage and can be fatal). However, the picture is complicated: A high level of serum ferritin could also indicate stress and/or inflammation instead of (or in addition to) iron overload, and low serum iron concentration could indicate inflammation rather than iron deficiency. Only when concentrations of both serum iron and serum ferritin increase and decrease together can the patient s iron status be assessed accurately. Hence, in enabling accurate measurement of the iron content of serum ferritin, the present method can improve the diagnosis of the patient s iron status. The prior method of measuring the concentration of iron involves the use of an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer with a graphite furnace. The present method incorporates a modified version of the sample- preparation process of the prior method. First, ferritin is isolated; more specifically, it is immobilized by immunoprecipitation with rabbit antihuman polyclonal antibody bound to agarose beads. The ferritin is then separated from other iron-containing proteins and free iron by a series of centrifugation and wash steps. Next, the ferritin is digested with nitric acid

  10. Core Measures for Congestive Heart Failure in a Tertiary Care Setting in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Rizwan; Haris, Muhammad; Shabbir, Muhammad Usman; Ghazanfar, Haider; Malik, Sarah A; Khalid, Tehreem; Abbas, Ali H; Saleem, Asad A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Heart failure presents a huge burden for individual patients and the healthcare system as a whole. This study aims to assess the adherence to these core measures as identified by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO)/ American Heart Association (AHA) by physicians of Pakistan. Materials and Methodology: We conducted a cross-sectional study in Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan from the period of April 2013 to April 2016. Patients with a primary diagnosis of heart failure were drawn from a coding section of hospital’s record department. Data was evaluated to assess how strictly doctors were following core measures identified by JCAHO/AHA for the given diagnosis. Inclusion criteria for this study were patients ≥ 17 years of age and patients with a primary diagnosis of heart failure according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Patients with congenital anomalies and structural heart wall problems, like sarcoidosis, hemochromatosis, and amyloidosis, were excluded from the study. Results: Mean ejection fraction (EF) was found to be 27.23 ± 11.72 percent. Symptoms assessment of heart failure was done in 16/421 (3.8%) patients according to NYHA classification and in 405/421 (96.2%) patients according to outpatient-based heart failure assessment based on physician's experience other than NYHA classification. Left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed in 411/421 (97%) patients. Out of these, 336/411 (81.7%) patients had EF < 40%. Mean EF was found to be significantly higher in females as compared to males (p < 0.001). Three hundred and thirty-six out of 411 (81.7%) patients with EF < 40% needed angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and beta-blocker (BB) prescriptions. ACEi were prescribed only to 230/336 (68.7%) patients and 248/336 (73.8%) patients were given BB with documented contraindication to ACEi and BB in 7.36% and 17% patients, respectively. There was no

  11. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy in patients with iron overload after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Krahl, Rainer; Jaekel, Nadja; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Excess body iron could persist for years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with possible deleterious sequels. An iron depletive therapy with phlebotomy seems rational. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy without erythropoietin support in non-thalassemic adult patients with iron overload after HCT and the impact of pre- and post-HCT hemochromatosis (HFE) genotype on iron mobilization were investigated. Patients and methods: Phlebotomy was initiated in 61 recipients of allografts due to hematologic malignancies (median age 48 years) after a median of 18 months. The prephlebotomy median serum ferritin (SF) was 1697ng/ml and the median number of blood transfusions 28 units. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphates (AP), and bilirubin were elevated in 55.7%, 64% and 11.5% patients respectively. HFE-genotype was elucidated by polymerase chain reaction using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. Results: Phlebotomy was well-tolerated irrespective of age or conditioning. A negative iron balance in 80% of patients (median SF 1086 ng/ml) and a rise in hemoglobin were observed (p<0.0001). Higher transfusional burden and SF were associated with a greater iron mobilization per session (p=0.02). In 58% of patients, a plateau after an initial steady decline in SF was followed by a second decline under further phlebotomy. The improvement in ALT (p=0.002), AST (p=0.03), AP (p=0.01), and bilirubin (p<0.0001) did not correlate with the decline in SF. Mutant HFE-gene variants were detected in 14/55 (25%) pre-HCT and 22/55 (40%) patients post-HCT. Overall, dissimilar pre- and posttransplantational HFE-genotypes were detected in 20/55 (40%) patients. Posttransplantational mutant HFE variants correlated with a slower decline in SF (p=0.007). Conclusions: Phlebotomy is a convenient therapy of iron overload in survivors of HCT. A negative iron balance and a rise in hemoglobin were observed in the majority of

  12. Epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Dantona, Fabio; Terranova, Angela; Castagnetta, Luigi A M

    2002-06-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is increasing in many countries. The estimated number of new cases annually is over 500,000, and the yearly incidence comprises between 2.5 and 7% of patients with liver cirrhosis. The incidence varies between different geographic areas, being higher in developing areas; males are predominantly affected, with a 2:3 male/female ratio. The heterogeneous geographic distribution reflects the epidemiologic impact of the main etiologic factors and environmental risk, which are the hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses. The percentage of cases of hepatocellular carcinoma attributable to HBV worldwide is 52.3% and is higher in Asia where the seroprevalence of HBsAg in the population is high. However, the vaccination campaign against this virus in some eastern countries has tended to lower the incidence of new cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. The percentage of cases of hepatocellular carcinoma attributable to HCV is 25%, and it is more prevalent in Japan, Spain, and Italy where the association between hepatocellular carcinoma and antibodies to HCV ranges between 50 and 70%. In most cases hepatocellular carcinoma develops in cirrhotic livers, where the persistent proliferation of liver cells represents the key factor of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma independent of the etiology. Another minor risk factor is aflatoxin B1 consumption, which is responsible for most cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in Africa, where the consumption of contaminated foods is common. Other known risk factors are some hereditary diseases, such as hemochromatosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, hereditary tyrosinemia, and alpha1 anti-trypsin deficiency. The natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma is heterogeneous and is influenced by nodule dimension, the mono- or plurifocality of lesions at diagnosis, the growth rate of the tumor, and the stage of the underlying cirrhosis. Available data to date suggest that tumor growth in a cirrhotic

  13. Post mortem identification of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations combined with impaired glucose homeostasis and iron overload features in four infants with severe progressive liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Węglewska-Jurkiewicz, Anna; Taybert, Joanna; Pronicki, Maciej; Szymańska-Dębińska, Tamara; Karkucińska-Więckowska, Agnieszka; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kowalski, Paweł; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Pajdowska, Magdalena; Socha, Piotr; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency (dGK) is a frequent cause of the hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial depletion syndrome (MDS). A group of 28 infants with severe progressive liver failure of unknown cause was recruited for post mortem search for deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations. Four affected patients (14% of the studied group), two homozygotes, one compound heterozygote, and one heterozygote, with DGUOK mutation found on only one allele, were identified. Three known pathogenic mutations in the DGUOK gene were detected, c.3G>A (p.Met1Ile), c.494A>T (p.Glu165Val), and c.766_767insGATT (p.Phe256X), and one novel molecular variant of unknown pathogeneity, c.813_814insTTT (p.Asn271_Thr272insPhe). Profound mitochondrial DNA depletion was confirmed in available specimens of the liver (4%, 15%, and 10% of the normal value) and in the muscle (4%, 23%, 45%, and 6%, respectively). The patients were born with low weights for gestational age and they presented adaptation trouble during the first days of life. Subsequently, liver failure developed, leading to death at the ages of 18, 6, 5.5, and 2.25 months, respectively. Mild neurological involvement was observed in all children (hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, and ptosis). Hypoglycemia (hypoketotic) and lactic acidosis were the constant laboratory findings. Elevated transferrin saturation, high ferritin, and alpha-fetoprotein levels resembled, in two cases, a neonatal hemochromatosis. Liver histopathology showed severe hepatic damage ranging from micronodular formation and cirrhosis to the total loss of liver architecture with diffuse fibrosis and neocholangiolar proliferation. Pancreatic islet cell hyperplasia with numerous confluent giant islets was found in both autopsied infants. Analysis of the natural history of the disease in our patients and the literature data led us to the following observations: (i) islet cell hyperplasia (and hyperinsulinism) may contribute to MDS-associated hypoglycemia; (ii

  14. Association of renal injury with increased oxygen free radical activity and altered nitric oxide metabolism in chronic experimental hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X J; Laszik, Z; Wang, X Q; Silva, F G; Vaziri, N D

    2000-12-01

    Chronic iron (Fe) overload is associated with a marked increase in renal tissue iron content and injury. It is estimated that 10% of the American population carry the gene for hemochromatosis and 1% actually suffer from iron overload. The mechanism of iron overload-associated renal damage has not been fully elucidated. Iron can accelerate lipid peroxidation leading to organelle membrane dysfunction and subsequent cell injury/death. Iron-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is responsible for initiating the peroxidatic reaction. We investigated the possible association of oxidative stress and its impact on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in iron-overload-associated renal injury. Rats were randomized into Fe-loaded (given 0.5 g elemental iron/kg body weight as iron dextran; i.v.), Fe-depleted (given an iron-free diet for 20 weeks), and control groups. Renal histology, tissue expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and iNOS), renal tissue expression of nitrotyrosine, plasma, and renal tissue lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA), and plasma and urinary NO metabolites (NOx) were examined. Iron overload was associated with mild proteinuria, tissue iron deposition together with significant glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Rare focal glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial changes were noted in normal controls. No renal lesions were observed in Fe-depleted rats. Iron deposits were seen in glomeruli, proximal tubules, and interstitium. The iron staining in the distal tubules was negligible. Both plasma and renal tissue MDA and renal tissue nitrotyrosine were increased significantly in Fe-loaded rats compared with control rats. In contrast, Fe-depleted animals showed a marked reduction in plasma and renal tissue MDA and nitrotyrosine together with significant elevation of urinary NOx excretion. In addition, iron-overload was associated with up-regulation of renal eNOS and i

  15. Palmar erythema.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Rocco; Zirwas, Matthew; English, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Palmar erythema (PE), an often overlooked physical finding, is due to several physiologic or systemic pathologic states. PE can exist as a primary physiologic finding or as a secondary marker of systemic pathology. Primary or physiologic PE can be due to heredity, occurs in at least 30% of pregnant women as a result of associated alterations in the function of the skin and its microvasculature, or may be a diagnosis of exclusion (i.e. idiopathic PE). Secondary PE from systemic pathology encompasses a wide range of disease states. Twenty-three percent of patients with liver cirrhosis, from varying causes, can manifest PE as a result of abnormal serum estradiol levels. Patients with a rare neonatal liver disease such as Wilson disease and hereditary hemochromatosis may exhibit PE along with the other systemic manifestations of the genodermatoses. PE has been reported to occur in >60% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and is associated with a favorable prognosis. Up to 18% of patients with thyrotoxicosis and 4.1% of patients with diabetes mellitus can have PE. This cutaneous manifestation of diabetes occurs more often than the more classic diseases such as necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (0.6%). PE can be seen in early gestational syphilis and among patients with human T-lymphotrophic virus-1-associated myelopathy. Drug-induced PE with hepatic damage has been documented with use of amiodarone, gemfibrozil, and cholestyramine, while topiramate and albuterol (salbutamol) have been reported to cause PE in the setting of normal liver function. Fifteen percent of patients with both metastatic and primary brain neoplasms may have PE. Increased levels of angiogenic factors and estrogens from solid tumors have been postulated as the cause of PE in such cases. Erythema ab igne can mimic PE, and patients with atopic diathesis are more likely to have PE than matched control subjects. Smoking and chronic mercury poisoning are environmental causes of PE.No treatment of

  16. Core Measures for Congestive Heart Failure in a Tertiary Care Setting in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Rizwan; Haris, Muhammad; Shabbir, Muhammad Usman; Ghazanfar, Haider; Malik, Sarah A; Khalid, Tehreem; Abbas, Ali H; Saleem, Asad A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Heart failure presents a huge burden for individual patients and the healthcare system as a whole. This study aims to assess the adherence to these core measures as identified by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO)/ American Heart Association (AHA) by physicians of Pakistan. Materials and Methodology: We conducted a cross-sectional study in Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan from the period of April 2013 to April 2016. Patients with a primary diagnosis of heart failure were drawn from a coding section of hospital’s record department. Data was evaluated to assess how strictly doctors were following core measures identified by JCAHO/AHA for the given diagnosis. Inclusion criteria for this study were patients ≥ 17 years of age and patients with a primary diagnosis of heart failure according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Patients with congenital anomalies and structural heart wall problems, like sarcoidosis, hemochromatosis, and amyloidosis, were excluded from the study. Results: Mean ejection fraction (EF) was found to be 27.23 ± 11.72 percent. Symptoms assessment of heart failure was done in 16/421 (3.8%) patients according to NYHA classification and in 405/421 (96.2%) patients according to outpatient-based heart failure assessment based on physician's experience other than NYHA classification. Left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed in 411/421 (97%) patients. Out of these, 336/411 (81.7%) patients had EF < 40%. Mean EF was found to be significantly higher in females as compared to males (p < 0.001). Three hundred and thirty-six out of 411 (81.7%) patients with EF < 40% needed angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and beta-blocker (BB) prescriptions. ACEi were prescribed only to 230/336 (68.7%) patients and 248/336 (73.8%) patients were given BB with documented contraindication to ACEi and BB in 7.36% and 17% patients, respectively. There was no

  17. High iron accumulation in hair and nail of people living in iron affected areas of Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Banerjee, Saumen; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Bhattacharjee, Chira R; Raul, Prasanta; Borah, Kusum

    2014-12-01

    Human populace of Assam, India repeatedly exposed to high concentration of iron in groundwater results in adverse health effects like hemochromatosis, liver cirrhosis and siderosis. In the present study, human hair and nail analysis were carried out to establish a possible relationship between iron toxicity and its deposition among the residents. Nail and hair iron concentrations ranged from 28.2 to 1046μgg(-1) (n=114) and 26.5-838 (n=108)μgg(-1) levels, respectively, among all the study participants. The iron content of the groundwater (421-5340μgL(-1)) (n=64) used for drinking purposes was positively correlated with both nail (r=0.788, p<0.0001) and hair (r=0.709, p<0.0001) iron concentrations. Age- and sex-matched controls corresponding to each group were selected from population residing in other parts of the country where groundwater does not have excess iron. All the study groups included population drinking iron-contaminated water above the WHO/BIS limit (>300µgL(-1)) for 5 years (Group 1), for more than 5-10 years (Group 2) and for more than 10 years (Group 3). Results suggested that the participants consuming groundwater exceeding the WHO limit of iron had significantly more iron accumulation than those using groundwater containing ≤300μgL(-1) iron (p<0.01). There was statistically higher concentration of iron in the nail samples than the hair samples in all the study groups (p<0.01). There was a positive correlation in iron concentration and the residence time of the participants (p<0.01). Iron levels in the male participants were significantly higher than the female participants in the present study (p<0.01). The current findings are sufficiently compelling to warrant more extensive study of iron exposure through drinking water and adverse effects to the human in the areas where iron concentration is high.

  18. Ratiometric Measurements of Adiponectin by Mass Spectrometry in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with Iron Overload Reveal an Association with Insulin Resistance and Glucagon

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Benjamin A.; Carlin, Kevin P.; Arthur, John M.; McFee, Wayne E.; Janech, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    High molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels are reduced in humans with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Similar to humans with insulin resistance, managed bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) diagnosed with hemochromatosis (iron overload) have higher levels of 2 h post-prandial plasma insulin than healthy controls. A parallel reaction monitoring assay for dolphin serum adiponectin was developed based on tryptic peptides identified by mass spectrometry. Using identified post-translational modifications, a differential measurement was constructed. Total and unmodified adiponectin levels were measured in sera from dolphins with (n = 4) and without (n = 5) iron overload. This measurement yielded total adiponectin levels as well as site specific percent unmodified adiponectin that may inversely correlate with HMW adiponectin. Differences in insulin levels between iron overload cases and controls were observed 2 h post-prandial, but not during the fasting state. Thus, post-prandial as well as fasting serum adiponectin levels were measured to determine whether adiponectin and insulin would follow similar patterns. There was no difference in total adiponectin or percent unmodified adiponectin from case or control fasting animals. There was no difference in post-prandial total adiponectin levels between case and control dolphins (mean ± SD) at 763 ± 298 and 727 ± 291 pmol/ml, respectively (p = 0.91); however, percent unmodified adiponectin was significantly higher in post-prandial cases compared to controls (30.0 ± 6.3 versus 17.0 ± 6.6%, respectively; p = 0.016). Interestingly, both total and percent unmodified adiponectin were correlated with glucagon levels in controls (r = 0.999, p  < 0.001), but not in cases, which is possibly a reflection of insulin resistance. Although total adiponectin levels were not significantly different, the elevated percent unmodified adiponectin follows a trend similar to

  19. Incidence and Risks of Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract in Newborns: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Luh, Hsing; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2016-02-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are 1 of the major factors in young adults needing renal replacement therapy, but there is little extensive assessment of their incidence and risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate trends in the incidence of and risk factors for CAKUT among all births in Taiwan.This population-based case-control study design was conducted using the Taiwan national births registry, which contains detailed information about maternal health and characteristics of newborns, supplied by health professionals. Of 1,603,794 newborns registered between 2004 and 2014, 668 infants were reported to have CAKUT. Newborns without congenital anomalies were matched with CAKUT cases by birth year, month, and Apgar score in a ratio of 5:1. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for developing CAKUT were calculated using a conditional multivariate logistic regression model.The incidence of CAKUT was approximately 4.2 per 10,000 births. The adjusted ORs for CAKUT in newborns associated with maternal age of 20 to 29 (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.11-4.28), or 30 to 39 (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.17-4.51), maternal gestational diabetes (OR, 2.22, 95% CI, 1.06-4.67), maternal thalassemia/hemochromatosis (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.35-5.27), polyhydramnios or oligohydramnios (OR, 9.16; 95% CI, 5.46-15.37), birth parity >1 (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.15-0.50), having a gestational age <37 weeks (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23-1.78), and being a boy (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.53-2.19). Infants of mother with gestational diabetes were more likely to have congenital anomalies, small gestational age (<37 weeks) and low birth weight.CAKUT are associated with several maternal health risk factors. As Taiwan has the highest prevalence and incidence rates of end-stage renal disease in the world, these findings strongly support the need to develop professional guidelines for prenatal counseling and management of women at risk of adverse birth outcomes, to prevent kidney disease

  20. Cumulative lead exposure is associated with reduced olfactory recognition performance in elderly men: the Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Grashow, Rachel; Sparrow, David; Hu, Howard; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Olfactory dysfunction has been identified as an early warning sign for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and more. A few occupational and environmental exposures have also been associated with reduced olfactory function, although the effects of long term environmental exposure to lead on olfactory dysfunction have not been explored. Here we performed olfactory recognition testing in elderly men in a community-dwelling cohort and examined the association with cumulative lead exposure, as assessed by lead in tibial and patellar bone. Methods Olfactory recognition was measured in 165 men from the Normative Aging Study (NAS) who had previously taken part in bone lead measurements using K-X-Ray fluorescence (KXRF). Olfactory recognition was measured using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Associations between olfactory recognition, global cognition and cumulative lead exposure were estimated using linear regression, with additional adjustment for age, smoking, and functional polymorphism status for hemochromatosis (HFE), transferrin (TfC2), glutathione-s-transferase Pi1 (GSTP1) and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes. Sensitivity analyses explored olfactory recognition in men with high global cognitive function as measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE). Results The average age of the NAS participants at the time of olfactory recognition testing was 80.3 (standard deviation or SD = 5.7) years. Mean tibia lead was 16.3 (SD = 12.0) μg/g bone, mean patella lead was 22.4 (SD = 14.4) μg/g bone, and mean UPSIT score was 26.9 out of 40 (SD = 7.0). Consistent with previous findings, age at olfaction testing was negatively associated with UPSIT score. Tibia (but not patella) bone lead was negatively associated with olfaction recognition (per 15 μg/g tibia lead: β = −1.57; 95% CI: −2.93, −0.22; p = 0.02) in models adjusted for smoking and age. Additional adjustment for education did not

  1. STUDIES ON EXPERIMENTAL PLETHORA IN DOGS AND RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Krumbhaar, Edward B.; Chanutin, Alfred

    1922-01-01

    only in the acute cases, but their occurrence may be greatly masked by the coexistent congestion. 8. In splenectomized dogs the tendency to "plethoric anemia" is much more apparent, although a direct connection between the two events is not established. In rabbits, whose spleens constitute only 0.05 per cent of body weight, "plethoric anemia" is more easily produced. 9. In splenectomized animals pigment-bearing phagocytes are especially prominent in the liver, although lymph nodes and bone marrow apparently share in the extra work caused by the absence of the spleen. Lymph nodes with some of the characteristics of hemolymph nodes were found in various localities in all animals that had been made plethoric. 10. In rabbits blood pigment is deposited in the hemopoietic organs in large amounts, but under the conditions of our experiments, the picture and the experiment have been constantly complicated by early fatal intravascular agglutination and thrombosis. In the rabbit, as in human hemochromatosis, the pigment is found in two forms: hemosiderin granules, and smaller, dark spicules that do not react to the usual iron stains (probably hernofuscin). The latter pigment is also found seeded through the cells of the liver parenchyma. PMID:19868649

  2. Etiopathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Chitturi, S; Farrell, G C

    2001-01-01

    rodents with experimental NASH and those of ob/ob genetically obese mice that have uncomplicated steatosis. Administration of endotoxin, through the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), provokes liver inflammation with hepatocyte injury in the steatotic liver. This may be particularly relevant in JIB and has been suggested as a pathogenic mechanism in primary NASH. It has been proposed that inheriting one or more copies of the hemochromatosis gene, C282Y, promotes fibrotic progression in NASH because of increased hepatic iron deposition, but recent studies have failed to confirm this. The relationship between the severity of hepatitis in NASH and progression to cirrhosis implies that products of the inflammatory infiltrate play a role in fibrogenesis. In summary, NASH can be regarded as the hepatic consequence of the metabolic syndrome (or syndrome X). Attention should now shift from steatosis, a generally benign process that is less evident in the advanced stages of cirrhosis, to the mechanisms for hepatocellular injury, inflammation, and hepatic fibrosis. In particular, the genetic, molecular, and cellular factors that ordain and moderate fibrosis in the context of steatohepatitis will be of greatest relevance to effective therapy and clinical outcome.

  3. T2 relaxation time is related to liver fibrosis severity

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Luiz; Uppal, Ritika; Alford, Jamu; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Yamada, Suguru; Tanabe, Kenneth; Chung, Raymond T.; Lauwers, Gregory; Chew, Michael L.; Boland, Giles W.; Sahani, Duhyant V.; Vangel, Mark; Hahn, Peter F.; Caravan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    echo T2 weighted data. Statistical comparison was performed using ANOVA. Results (I) Histopathologic evaluation of both rat and human livers demonstrated no evidence of steatosis or hemochromatosis There was a monotonic increase in mean T2 value with increasing degree of fibrosis (control 65.4±2.9 ms, n=6 patients); mild (Ishak 1–2) 66.7±1.9 ms (n=30); moderate (Ishak 3–4) 71.6±1.7 ms (n=26); severe (Ishak 5–6) 72.4±1.4 ms (n=61); with relatively low standard error (~2.9 ms). There was a statistically significant difference between degrees of mild (Ishak <4) vs. moderate to severe fibrosis (Ishak >4) (P=0.03) based on logistic regression of T2 and Ishak, which became insignificant (P=0.07) when using inflammatory markers as covariates. Expanding on this model using ordinal logistic regression, there was significance amongst all 4 groups comparing T2 to Ishak (P=0.01), with significance using inflammation as a covariate (P=0.03) and approaching statistical significance amongst all groups by ANOVA (P=0.07); (II) there was a monotonic increase in T2 and statistical significance (ANOVA P<0.0001) between each rat subgroup [phosphate buffer solution (PBS) 25.2±0.8, DEN 5-week (31.1±1.5), and DEN 9-week (49.4±0.4) ms]; (III) the phantoms that had T2 values within the relevant range for the human liver (e.g., 20–100 ms), demonstrated no statistical difference between two point fits on turbo spin echo (TSE) data and multi-echo CPMG data (P=0.9). Conclusions The finding of increased T2 with liver fibrosis may relate to inflammation that may be an alternative or adjunct to other noninvasive MR imaging based approaches for assessing liver fibrosis. PMID:27190762

  4. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    autosomique récessive. La forme typique associe 5 signes cliniques: une diarrhée grave rebelle nécessitant dans la majorité des cas une nutrition parentérale du fait de la malnutrition, une dysmorphie avec un front large et bombé, une racine du nez large et un hypertélorisme, des anomalies des cheveux qui sont fragiles, cassants, incoiffables et qualifiés de « laineux », un retard de croissance intra utérine et des anomalies de l’immunité à type de déficit en immunoglobuline ou d’absence de réponse aux antigènes vaccinaux. Des anomalies de deux protéines peuvent être à l’origine du syndrome SD/THE: TTC37, une protéine à motif TPR et SKIV2L, une hélicase à ARN, toutes 2 étant des constituants du complexe SKI humain. Le complexe SKI est un co-facteur de l’exosome cytoplasmique qui assure la dégradation des ARN aberrants ou exogènes. Le diagnostic est d’abord clinique puis confirmé par le séquençage des gènes TTC37 et SKIV2L. Le diagnostic différentiel avec les autres formes de diarrhées intraitables est fait grâce aux analyses anatomopathologiques qui montrent dans les autres formes, des lésions spécifiques. La prise en charge clinique repose sur la nutrition parentérale et la supplémentation en immunoglobuline si nécessaire. Un certain nombre d’enfants peuvent être sevrés de la nutrition parentérale et des supplémentations en immunoglobulines. En cas d’atteinte hépatique, celle-ci peut être sévère et conduire au décès. Même avec une prise en charge optimale, les enfants présentent une petite taille et, dans la moitié des cas, un retard mental modéré. Disease name/synonyms – Syndromic diarrhea – Phenotypic diarrhea – Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome – Intractable diarrhea of infancy with facial dysmorphism – Trichorrhexis nodosa and cirrhosis – Neonatal hemochromatosis phenotype with intractable diarrhea and hair abnormalities – Intractable infant diarrhea associated with phenotypic abnormalities and