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Sample records for hemoglobin

  1. Hemoglobin

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hemoglobin Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Hgb; Hb; H and H (Hemoglobin and Hematocrit) Formal name: Hemoglobin Related tests: Complete ...

  2. Hemoglobin derivatives

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003371.htm Hemoglobin derivatives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemoglobin derivatives are altered forms of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is ...

  3. Hemoglobin (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hemoglobin is the most important component of red blood cells. It is composed of a protein called ... exchanged for carbon dioxide. Abnormalities of an individual's hemoglobin value can indicate defects in the normal balance ...

  4. Hemoglobin electrophoresis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an abnormal form of hemoglobin associated with sickle cell anemia . In people with this condition, the red blood ... symptoms are much milder than they are in sickle cell anemia. Other, less common, abnormal Hb molecules cause other ...

  5. Hemoglobin C disease

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is a type of hemoglobinopathy. The disease is caused by a problem with ...

  6. The optimal target hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ritz, E; Schwenger, V

    2000-07-01

    There is still controversy concerning the optimal target hemoglobin during treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Some evidence suggests that hemoglobin concentrations higher than currently recommended lead to improvements in cognitive function, physical performance, and rehabilitation. At least in patients with advanced cardiac disease, however, one controlled trial failed to show a benefit from normalizing predialysis hemoglobin concentrations. In contrast, preliminary observations in three additional studies (albeit with limited statistical power) failed to show adverse cardiovascular effects from normalization of hemoglobin, but definite benefit with respect to quality of life, physical performance, and cardiac geometry. These observations are consistent with the notion that hemoglobin concentrations higher than those recommended by the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative Anemia Work Group are beneficial, at least in patients without advanced cardiac disease.

  7. Phylogeny of Echinoderm Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ana B.; Herman, Joseph L.; Elphick, Maurice R.; Kober, Kord M.; Janies, Daniel; Linchangco, Gregorio; Semmens, Dean C.; Bailly, Xavier; Vinogradov, Serge N.; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genomic information has revealed that neuroglobin and cytoglobin are the two principal lineages of vertebrate hemoglobins, with the latter encompassing the familiar myoglobin and α-globin/β-globin tetramer hemoglobin, and several minor groups. In contrast, very little is known about hemoglobins in echinoderms, a phylum of exclusively marine organisms closely related to vertebrates, beyond the presence of coelomic hemoglobins in sea cucumbers and brittle stars. We identified about 50 hemoglobins in sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, and used Bayesian inference to carry out a molecular phylogenetic analysis of their relationship to vertebrate sequences, specifically, to assess the hypothesis that the neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages are also present in echinoderms. Results The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus encodes several hemoglobins, including a unique chimeric 14-domain globin, 2 androglobin isoforms and a unique single androglobin domain protein. Other strongylocentrotid genomes appear to have similar repertoires of globin genes. We carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses of 52 hemoglobins identified in sea urchin, brittle star and sea cucumber genomes and transcriptomes, using different multiple sequence alignment methods coupled with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. The results demonstrate that there are two major globin lineages in echinoderms, which are related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages. Furthermore, the brittle star and sea cucumber coelomic hemoglobins appear to have evolved independently from the cytoglobin lineage, similar to the evolution of erythroid oxygen binding globins in cyclostomes and vertebrates. Conclusion The presence of echinoderm globins related to the vertebrate neuroglobin and cytoglobin lineages suggests that the split between neuroglobins and cytoglobins occurred in the deuterostome ancestor shared by echinoderms and

  8. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  9. Interaction between hypericin and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Vardapetyan, H R; Martirosyan, A S; Tiratsuyan, S G; Hovhannisyan, A A

    2010-10-05

    In the present work the hypericin interaction with hemoglobin was studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy both under incubation in dark and visible light exposure. An absorption reduction in Soret band of hemoglobin (407 nm) was revealed under the photodynamic influence and incubation in dark with hypericin that had hypericin concentration and time dependent manner. Hypericin reduced the intensity of the hemoglobin emission peaks at 334 and 421 nm, correlating with hypericin concentration, incubation and irradiation time. An obvious increase in electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin was observed under the incubation with hypericin. Simultaneously, a partial conversion of hemoglobin to met-hemoglobin and a pH decrease in hemoglobin solution were detected. Structural changes of hemoglobin caused by hypericin were accompanied by a change in peroxidase activity of the protein. Thus under the hypericin influence hemoglobin properties as a hydrogen peroxide detector could be improved and an effective determination of peroxide formation could be achieved. This makes hemoglobin an attractive 'recognition' element for construction of third-generation biosensors.

  10. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  11. [Hemoglobin H: laboratory identification].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, V S; de Araújo, J T

    1992-01-01

    Hemoglobin H (Hb H) disease is an alpha thalassemia form characterized by low synthesis of alpha chain and high beta chain concentration; this unbalance induces the beta chain tetramers formation. Hb H is relatively frequent in Thailand and Greece. Isolated cases have been reported in Chinese, Filipinos, Malaysians. In the Near East occasional cases were observed in Greek Cypriots and Jordanian Arabs. Hb H carriers were found in Italy, Spain, Canada, Indonesia and other countries. In Brazil there are descendants of Italians, Chinese and people of negro origin who are carriers of Hb H. We identified the Hb H by electrophoresis, instability and characteristic inclusion bodies.

  12. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  13. THE RENAL HANDLING OF HEMOGLOBIN

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, H. Franklin; Jandl, James H.

    1969-01-01

    The fate of small doses of isotopically labeled isologous hemoglobin was studied in the rat. When haptoglobin depleted animals were given 2.0 mg of 59Fe hemoglobin intravenously, nearly half was trapped by the kidneys. Kidney 59Fe activity disappeared slowly over several weeks. Whatever iron was lost from the kidneys was largely reutilized. In contrast, the porphyrin of hemoglobin absorbed by the kidneys appeared to be rapidly catabolized, since 5 hr after the injection of 14C or 59Fe heme-labeled hemoglobin only a small fraction was recovered as hematin. Likewise, after injection of globin-labeled hemoglobin, rapid disappearance of kidney protein activity indicated that the absorbed globin was readily catabolized in situ. PMID:5778790

  14. Delayed treatment of hemoglobin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Regan, Raymond F; Rogers, Bret

    2003-01-01

    Hemoglobin is an oxidative neurotoxin that may contribute to cell injury after CNS trauma and hemorrhagic stroke. Prior studies have demonstrated that concomitant treatment with iron-chelating antioxidants prevents its neurotoxicity. However, the efficacy of these agents when applied hours after hemoglobin has not been determined, and is the subject of the present investigation. Consistent with prior observations, an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, detected by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin oxidation, was observed when mixed neuronal/astrocyte cultures prepared from mouse cortex were exposed to hemoglobin alone. However, this oxidative stress developed slowly. A significant increase in the dichlorofluorescein signal compared with control, untreated cultures was not observed until four hours after addition of hemoglobin, and was followed by loss of membrane integrity and propidium iodide staining. Treating cultures with the 21-aminosteroid U74500A or the ferric iron chelator deferoxamine four hours after initiating hemoglobin treatment markedly attenuated reactive oxygen species production within 2 h. Continuous exposure to 5 micro M hemoglobin for 24 h resulted in death of about three-quarters of neurons, without injuring astrocytes. Most neuronal loss was prevented by concomitant treatment with U74500A; its effect was not significantly attenuated if treatment was delayed for 2-4 h, and it still prevented over half of neuronal death if treatment was delayed for 8 h. Similar neuroprotection was produced by delayed treatment with deferoxamine or the lipid-soluble iron chelator phenanthroline. None of these agents had any effect on neuronal death when added to cultures 12 h after hemoglobin. These results suggest that hemoglobin is a potent but slowly-acting neurotoxin. The delayed onset of hemoglobin neurotoxicity may make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  16. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-01

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  17. More Refined Experiments with Hemoglobin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Phillippe

    1985-01-01

    Discusses materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained for experiments designed to make a numerical stepwise study of the oxygenation of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other oxygen carriers. (JN)

  18. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  19. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  20. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  1. Hemoglobin Wayne Trait with Incidental Polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Ambelil, Manju; Nguyen, Nghia; Dasgupta, Amitava; Risin, Semyon; Wahed, Amer

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, caused by mutations in the globin genes, are one of the most common inherited disorders. Many of the hemoglobin variants can be identified by hemoglobin analysis using conventional electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography; however hemoglobin DNA analysis may be necessary in other cases for confirmation. Here, we report a case of a rare alpha chain hemoglobin variant, hemoglobin Wayne, in a 47-year-old man who presented with secondary polycythemia. Capillary zone electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography revealed a significant amount of a hemoglobin variant, which was further confirmed by hemoglobin DNA sequencing as hemoglobin Wayne. Since the patient was not homozygous for hemoglobin Wayne, which is associated with secondary polycythemia, the laboratory diagnosis in this case was critical in ruling out hemoglobinopathy as the etiology of his polycythemia.

  2. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E.

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Hemoglobin in a coacervate system.

    PubMed

    Ecanow, J; Ecanow, D; Ecanow, B

    1990-01-01

    Hemoglobin dissolved in a coacervate system shows the properties of a resuscitation fluid. In the coacervate system used, the equilibrium phase was the colloid rich phase. We propose a new definition of the coacervate phase to be that phase in a coacervate system which is most dissimilar to water in its physical chemical properties.

  4. Recombinant Hemoglobins as Artificial Oxygen Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Fronticelli, Clara; Koehler, Raymond C.; Brinigar, William S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the approaches we have taken to construct a) mutant hemoglobins with different oxygen affinities, and b) mutant hemoglobins and myoglobins that polymerize to high molecular weight aggregates in an effort to prevent extravasation and the associated vasoactivity. In vivo testing indicates that exchange transfusion of polymeric hemoglobins in mice does not result in vasoactivity and that polymeric hemoglobins are effective oxygen carriers to ischemic tissues irrespective of their oxygen affinity and cooperativity. PMID:17364470

  5. Carboxyalkylated Hemoglobin as a Potential Blood Substitute

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-20

    chromatography to remove minor and glycosylated hemoglobin components. Carbox) methylation Reaction - Many of the procedures have been described in our early...hemoglobin by peptide mapping after treatment with radiolabeled methyl acetyl phosphate. These binding sites are Met-l(3) and Lys-81(f) for liganded...ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necesary andia entify by block number) Carbox,, methylated hemoglobin is more stable than oxy hemoglobin during some

  6. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c A A A What's in this article? ... de sangre: hemoglobina A1c What It Is A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test is used to monitor long- ...

  7. Hemoglobin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Failure of the right side of the heart ( cor pulmonale ) Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Scarring or ... chronic disease Aplastic anemia Bleeding CBC blood test Cor pulmonale Diabetes Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia Erythropoietin test ...

  8. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  9. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  10. Hemoglobin Brigham (α2Aβ2100 Pro→Leu). HEMOGLOBIN VARIANT ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL ERYTHROCYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Lokich, Jacob J.; Moloney, William C.; Bunn, H. Franklin; Bruckheimer, Sally M.; Ranney, Helen M.

    1973-01-01

    Erythrocytosis associated with the presence of a hemoglobin with increased oxygen affinity has been reported for 10 hemoglobin variants, most of which demonstrate altered electrophoretic mobility. Several members of a family were found to have erythrocytosis, and both the whole blood and the hemoglobin exhibited increased oxygen affinity. Phosphate-free hemoglobin solutions had a normal Bohr effect and reactivity to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The electrophoretic properties of the hemoglobin were normal, but on peptide mapping of a tryptic digest of the isolated β-chains, a normal βT11 peptide and an abnormal βT11 with greater Rf were seen. Analysis of the abnormal peptide showed the substitution of leucine for the normal proline at β100 (helical residue G2). The hemoglobin variant, designated Hb Brigham, serves to emphasize the necessity for detailed evaluation of the structure and function of hemoglobin in familial erythrocytosis even with electrophoretically “normal” hemoglobin. PMID:4719677

  11. Nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H

    2011-09-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging of hemoglobin was performed by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  12. Spectrophotometric Properties of Hemoglobin: Classroom Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frary, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Discusses simple and safe techniques that can be used in the educational laboratory to study hemoglobin. Discusses the spectral properties of hemoglobin, spectral-absorbence curves of oxyhemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin, tracking the conversion of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin, and changing from the oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin conformation.…

  13. Determination of Human Hemoglobin Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Attia, Atef M M; Ibrahim, Fatma A A; Abd El-Latif, Noha A; Aziz, Samir W; Abdelmottaleb Moussa, Sherif A; Elalfy, Mohsen S

    2015-01-01

    The levels of the inactive hemoglobin (Hb) pigments [such as methemoglobin (metHb), carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) and sulfohemoglobin (SHb)] and the active Hb [in the oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) form] as well as the blood Hb concentration in healthy non pregnant female volunteers were determined using a newly developed multi-component spectrophotometric method. The results of this method revealed values of SHb% in the range (0.0727-0.370%), metHb% (0.43-1.0%), HbCO% (0.4-1.52%) and oxyHb% (97.06-98.62%). Furthermore, the results of this method revealed values of blood Hb concentration in the range (12.608-15.777 g/dL). The method is highly sensitive, accurate and reproducible.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  15. Degradation of human hemoglobin by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Guan, Su-Min; Nagata, Hideki; Shizukuishi, Satoshi; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the ability of Prevotella intermedia, an obligate anaerobic rod, to degrade human hemoglobin was determined by SDS-PAGE and the degradation was quantified by scanning densitometry. Both bacterial cells and culture supernatants degraded hemoglobin. The hemoglobin degradation by P. intermedia was time-dependent, heat sensitive, pH related and was not influenced by iron restriction. Inhibition studies demonstrated that a cysteine protease might be involved in hemoglobin degradation and this protease might require metal ions for its activity and it might be thiol-requiring and trypsin-inducible. The results indicate that P. intermedia is capable to release heme from hemoglobin, hence provide a source of iron for its proliferation.

  16. Structure and reactivity of hexacoordinate hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Kakar, Smita; Hoffman, Federico G.; Storz, Jay F.; Fabian, Marian; Hargrove, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The heme prosthetic group in hemoglobins is most often attached to the globin through coordination of either one or two histidine side chains. Those proteins with one histidine coordinating the heme iron are called “pentacoordinate” hemoglobins, a group represented by red blood cell hemoglobin and most other oxygen transporters. Those with two histidines are called “hexacoordinate hemoglobins”, which have broad representation among eukaryotes. Coordination of the second histidine in hexacoordinate Hbs is reversible, allowing for binding of exogenous ligands like oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. Research over the past several years has produced a fairly detailed picture of the structure and biochemistry of hexacoordinate hemoglobins from several species including neuroglobin and cytoglobin in animals, and the nonsymbiotic hemoglobins in plants. However, a clear understanding of the physiological functions of these proteins remains an elusive goal. PMID:20933319

  17. Mutational analysis of hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor.

    PubMed

    Fusco, W G; Choudhary, N R; Council, S E; Collins, E J; Leduc, I

    2013-07-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most living organisms. To acquire iron from their environment, Gram-negative bacteria use TonB-dependent transporters that bind host proteins at the bacterial surface and transport iron or heme to the periplasm via the Ton machinery. TonB-dependent transporters are barrel-shaped outer membrane proteins with 22 transmembrane domains, 11 surface-exposed loops, and a plug domain that occludes the pore. To identify key residues of TonB-dependent transporters involved in hemoglobin binding and heme transport and thereby locate putative protective epitopes, the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi HgbA was used as a model of iron/heme acquisition from hemoglobin. Although all extracellular loops of HgbA are required by H. ducreyi to use hemoglobin as a source of iron/heme, we previously demonstrated that hemoglobin binding by HgbA only involves loops 5 and 7. Using deletion, substitution, and site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to differentiate hemoglobin binding and heme acquisition by HgbA. Deletion or substitution of the GYEAYNRQWWA region of loop 5 and alanine replacement of selected histidines affected hemoglobin binding by HgbA. Conversely, mutation of the phenylalanine in the loop 7 FRAP domain or substitution of the NRQWWA motif of loop 5 significantly abrogated utilization of heme from hemoglobin. Our findings show that hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor involve specific motifs of HgbA.

  18. Preparation of Hemoglobin-Containing Microcapsules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    L -i2 801 PREPARRTION OF HEMOGLOBIN-CONTAINING MICROCAPSULES (U) i/i I SRI INTERNATIONAL MENLO PRK CA Z REYES APR 82 UNLSSFE SRI1-2254-2 DRMDi,7-8@-C...R oI• _ AD I PREPARATION OF HEMOGLOBIN- /2 o ) CONTAINING MICROCAPSULES . 00 ANNUAL AND FINAL REPORT ZOILA REYES, Ph.D. APRIL 1982 Supported by U.S...1/31/82) PREPARATION OF HEMOGLOBIN-CONTAINING MICROCAPSULES 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPOR’ NUMBER 2254-2 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Zoila

  19. Interaction of Human Hemoglobin with Methotrexate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, M.; Gradinaru, R.

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the interaction between methotrexate and human hemoglobin using steady-state ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence quenching methods. Fluorescence quenching was found to be valuable in assessing drug binding to hemoglobin. The quenching of methotrexate is slightly smaller than the quenching observed with related analogs (dihydrofolate and tetrahydrofolate). The quenching studies were performed at four different temperatures and various pH values. The number of binding sites for tryptophan is ~1. Parameter-dependent assays revealed that electrostatic forces play an essential role in the methotrexate-hemoglobin interaction. Furthermore, the complex was easily eluted using gel filtration chromatography.

  20. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  1. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  2. Carboxyalkylated Hemoglobin as a Potential Blood Substitute.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-19

    diisothiocyanatobenzene sulfonic acid. Collaborative studies with investigators at the Letterman Army Institute of Research indicated that carboxy - methylated hemoglobin... crosslinking agents so that we might find the one with the most desirable properties (2,3). In this annual report, we focus on the reagents studied in...can be considered as a mimic for both of these structures. Crosslinking of Hemoglobin A - In the past year we have sought a better crosslinking agent

  3. Hemoglobin parameters from diffuse reflectance data.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Judith R; Marina, Oana C; Hebert, Tiffany M; Kaur, Gurpreet; Smith, Harriet O

    2014-03-01

    Tissue vasculature is altered when cancer develops. Consequently, noninvasive methods of monitoring blood vessel size, density, and oxygenation would be valuable. Simple spectroscopy employing fiber optic probes to measure backscattering can potentially determine hemoglobin parameters. However, heterogeneity of blood distribution, the dependence of the tissue-volume-sampled on scattering and absorption, and the potential compression of tissue all hinder the accurate determination of hemoglobin parameters. We address each of these issues. A simple derivation of a correction factor for the absorption coefficient, μa, is presented. This correction factor depends not only on the vessel size, as others have shown, but also on the density of blood vessels. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the dependence of an effective pathlength of light through tissue which is parameterized as a ninth-order polynomial function of μa. The hemoglobin bands of backscattering spectra of cervical tissue are fit using these expressions to obtain effective blood vessel size and density, tissue hemoglobin concentration, and oxygenation. Hemoglobin concentration and vessel density were found to depend on the pressure applied during in vivo acquisition of the spectra. It is also shown that determined vessel size depends on the blood hemoglobin concentration used.

  4. Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring: how accurate is enough?

    PubMed

    Rice, Mark J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2013-10-01

    Evaluating the accuracy of medical devices has traditionally been a blend of statistical analyses, at times without contextualizing the clinical application. There have been a number of recent publications on the accuracy of a continuous noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device, the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-oximeter, focusing on the traditional statistical metrics of bias and precision. In this review, which contains material presented at the Innovations and Applications of Monitoring Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Ventilation (IAMPOV) Symposium at Yale University in 2012, we critically investigated these metrics as applied to the new technology, exploring what is required of a noninvasive hemoglobin monitor and whether the conventional statistics adequately answer our questions about clinical accuracy. We discuss the glucose error grid, well known in the glucose monitoring literature, and describe an analogous version for hemoglobin monitoring. This hemoglobin error grid can be used to evaluate the required clinical accuracy (±g/dL) of a hemoglobin measurement device to provide more conclusive evidence on whether to transfuse an individual patient. The important decision to transfuse a patient usually requires both an accurate hemoglobin measurement and a physiologic reason to elect transfusion. It is our opinion that the published accuracy data of the Masimo Radical-7 is not good enough to make the transfusion decision.

  5. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  6. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  9. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  11. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  15. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  18. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  19. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5620 - Automated hemoglobin system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated hemoglobin system. 864.5620 Section 864....5620 Automated hemoglobin system. (a) Identification. An automated hemoglobin system is a fully... hemoglobin content of human blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  3. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  4. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  8. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  9. Tangential flow filtration of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Andre F; Sun, Guoyong; Harris, David R

    2009-01-01

    Bovine and human hemoglobin (bHb and hHb, respectively) was purified from bovine and human red blood cells via tangential flow filtration (TFF) in four successive stages. TFF is a fast and simple method to purify Hb from RBCs using filtration through hollow fiber (HF) membranes. Most of the Hb was retained in stage III (100 kDa HF membrane) and displayed methemoglobin levels less than 1%, yielding final concentrations of 318 and 300 mg/mL for bHb and hHb, respectively. Purified Hb exhibited much lower endotoxin levels than their respective RBCs. The purity of Hb was initially assessed via SDS-PAGE, and showed tiny impurity bands for the stage III retentate. The oxygen affinity (P(50)) and cooperativity coefficient (n) were regressed from the measured oxygen-RBC/Hb equilibrium curves of RBCs and purified Hb. These results suggest that TFF yielded oxygen affinities of bHb and hHb that are comparable to values in the literature. LC-MS was used to measure the molecular weight of the alpha (alpha) and beta (beta) globin chains of purified Hb. No impurity peaks were present in the HPLC chromatograms of purified Hb. The mass of the molecular ions corresponding to the alpha and beta globin chains agreed well with the calculated theoretical mass of the alpha- and beta- globin chains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HPLC-grade Hb can be generated via TFF. In general, this method can be more broadly applied to purify Hb from any source of RBCs. This work is significant, since it outlines a simple method for generating Hb for synthesis and/or formulation of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  10. Polyethylene Glycol Camouflaged Earthworm Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Moges, Selamawit; Nacharaju, Parimala; Roche, Camille; Dantsker, David; Palmer, Andre; Friedman, Joel M.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 21 million components of blood and whole blood and transfused annually in the United States, while on average only 13.6 million units of blood are donated. As the demand for Red Blood Cells (RBCs) continues to increase due to the aging population, this deficit will be more significant. Despite decades of research to develop hemoglobin (Hb) based oxygen (O2) carriers (HBOCs) as RBC substitutes, there are no products approved for clinical use. Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin (LtEc) is the large acellular O2 carrying protein complex found in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. LtEc is an extremely stable protein complex, resistant to autoxidation, and capable of transporting O2 to tissue when transfused into mammals. These characteristics render LtEc a promising candidate for the development of the next generation HBOCs. LtEc has a short half-life in circulation, limiting its application as a bridge over days, until blood became available. Conjugation with polyethylene glycol (PEG-LtEc) can extend LtEc circulation time. This study explores PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. To study PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber were subjected to a 40% exchange transfusion with 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc and followed for 48 hours. To study the vascular response of PEG-LtEc, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber received multiple infusions of 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc solution to increase plasma LtEc concentration to 0.5, then 1.0, and 1.5 g/dL, while monitoring the animals’ systemic and microcirculatory parameters. Results confirm that PEGylation of LtEc increases its circulation time, extending the half-life to 70 hours, 4 times longer than that of unPEGylated LtEc. However, PEGylation increased the rate of LtEc oxidation in vivo. Vascular analysis verified that PEG-LtEc showed the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction or systemic hypertension. The molecular size of PEG-LtEc did not change the

  11. The Electrophoretic Pattern of Hemoglobin in Newborn Babies, and Abnormalities of Hemoglobin F Synthesis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Vella, F.; Cunningham, T. A.

    1967-01-01

    On routine electrophoretic analyses on filter paper and starch gel in an alkaline or neutral medium, no abnormal hemoglobin fractions were found in the blood of 600 newborn infants or their mothers. Trace amounts of hemoglobin Barts were noted in many of the blood samples from newborns when the starch gels (phosphate buffer pH 7.0) were stained with a benzidine/H2O2 reagent. In one infant, precocious cessation of synthesis of hemoglobin F was postulated to account for the small amounts of this hemoglobin found in a cord-blood specimen. Analysis of 15,000 blood samples from adults revealed two instances in which the hemoglobin F level was 20 and 35%, respectively. The former was attributed to a hereditary persistence of hemoglobin F, while the latter was associated with acute leukemia. In an addendum, the finding of an infant with an abnormal hemoglobin variant, resembling in many of its properties hemoglobin F Texas, is reported. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:6019054

  12. Classification of the Disorders of Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Bernard G.; Bunn, H. Franklin

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, study of the disorders of hemoglobin has served as a paradigm for gaining insights into the cellular and molecular biology, as well as the pathophysiology, of inherited genetic disorders. To date, more than 1000 disorders of hemoglobin synthesis and/or structure have been identified and characterized. Study of these disorders has established the principle of how a mutant genotype can alter the function of the encoded protein, which in turn can lead to a distinct clinical phenotype. Genotype/phenotype correlations have provided important understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of disease. Before presenting a brief overview of these disorders, we provide a summary of the structure and function of hemoglobin, along with the mechanism of assembly of its subunits, as background for the rationale and basis of the different categories of disorders in the classification. PMID:23378597

  13. A rare hemoglobin variant, Hb Belliard

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Raul

    2017-01-01

    There are many documented variants of hemoglobin; however, other than a limited number (such as sickle cell disease), very few are known to have any clinical significance. As advances in detection and identification continue through gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing, more rare variants are identified. Without case reporting, the significance of these variants will remain unknown or continue to be thought of as insignificant. Here we report a rare hemoglobin variant, Hb Belliard, which was detected in a 68-year-old Indian immigrant to the United States. He presented with elevated hemoglobin and was found to have a unique peak on capillary electrophoresis. The specimen was sent for sequencing and was subsequently found to have Hb Belliard. Currently, Hb Belliard is thought to be insignificant.

  14. [Contributions and prospects of hemoglobin derivatives].

    PubMed

    Remy, B; Deby-Dupont, G; Lamy, M

    1997-06-21

    Anoxia-reoxygenation leads to severe metabolic alterations, which result in a generalized inflammatory reaction and multiple organ dysfunction. Direct blood transfusion limits these alterations, but is accompanied by risk of transmission of infections or viral diseases. To avoid these risks, "blood substitutes" have been designed. The modified hemoglobins are not true blood substitutes because they do not possess the complex functions of erythrocytes. They are only oxygen carriers, with a short intravascular life, adapted for temporary use. They are stable, devoid of toxicity and antigenicity, and are able to carry and deliver O2 without regulation of this oxygen transport and without chemical reaction with O2. They possess rheologic properties and an oncotic pressure like those of blood. The use of natural hemoglobin solutions, obtained after lysis of erythrocytes, remains "at risk" because these solutions easily form methemoglobin, increase the oncotic pressure, present renal toxicity, and possess a too high affinity for O2. For these reasons, 5 types of modified hemoglobin solutions have been designed, prepared from human or bovine hemoglobin or by genetic engineering. These hemoglobins are highly purified to eliminate trace amounts of stroma, lipids and endotoxins, which are responsible for acute toxicity. They are modified by internal cross-linking between the monomers, or by binding to macromolecules. Afterwards, they can be polymerized or encapsulated in liposomes. The purpose of these modifications is to modulate the affinity for O2 (by decreasing the binding of O2 and increasing its delivery to tissue), to reduce the dissociation into monomers and to guard against oxidation into methemoglobin. Encapsulation in liposomes allows co-encapsulation of effector molecules and protective substances. Genetic engineering allows the production of recombinant hemoglobin with selective modifications. The modified hemoglobin solutions are essentially used in hemorrhagic

  15. Hemoglobin D-Punjab: origin, distribution and laboratory diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lidiane de Souza; Okumura, Jéssika Viviani; Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto da; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses hemoglobin D-Punjab, also known as hemoglobin D-Los Angeles, one of the most common hemoglobin variants worldwide. It is derived from a point mutation in the beta-globin gene (HBB: c.364G>C; rs33946267) prevalent in the Punjab region, Northwestern Indian. Hemoglobin D-Punjab can be inherited in heterozygosis with hemoglobin A causing no clinical or hematological alterations, or in homozygosis, the rarest form of inheritance, a condition that is commonly not related to clinical symptomatology. Moreover, this variant can exist in association with other hemoglobinopathies, such as thalassemias; the most noticeable clinical alterations occur when hemoglobin D-Punjab is associated to hemoglobin S. The clinical manifestations of this association can be similar to homozygosis for hemoglobin S. Although hemoglobin D-Punjab is a common variant globally with clinical importance especially in cases of double heterozygosis, hemoglobin S/D-Punjab is still understudied. In Brazil, for example, hemoglobin D-Punjab is the third most common hemoglobin variant. Thus, this paper summarizes information about the origin, geographic distribution, characterization and occurrence of hemoglobin D-Punjab haplotypes to try to improve our knowledge of this variant. Moreover, a list of the main techniques used in its identification is provided emphasizing the importance of complementary molecular analysis for accurate diagnosis. PMID:25818823

  16. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs). Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry. PMID:24278729

  17. Comparative immunology of Galapagos iguana hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P J; Rand, C S

    1975-09-01

    The antigenic properties of the major hemoglobin component of the Galapgaos iguanas were studied using second-approximation qualitative and quantitative immunochemical techniques. Phylogenetic distances, relative to the Galapagos marine iguana. Amblyrhynchus cristatus, were established on the basis of immunological cross-reactions.

  18. Unrecognized hemoglobin SE disease as microcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Barry; Guileyardo, Joseph; Mora, Adan

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin SE disease was first described during the 1950s as a relatively benign microcytosis, but increasing prevalence has revealed a predisposition towards vasoocclusive sickling. Recognition of SE hemoglobinopathies’ potential complications is crucial so medical measures can be utilized to avoid multiorgan injury. PMID:27365881

  19. RGB mapping of hemoglobin distribution in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Spigulis, Janis; Rogule, Laura

    2011-07-01

    An experimental RGB imaging system based on commercial color camera was constructed, and its potential for mapping of hemoglobin distribution in skin was studied. Two types of LEDs (RGB and white "warm" LEDs) were compared as illuminators for acquiring images of vascular and pigmented skin malformations. A novel approach for studies of skin capillary refill by RGB analysis has been proposed and discussed.

  20. Hemoglobin-mediated nitric oxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Christine; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    The rate that hemoglobin reacts with nitric oxide (NO) is limited by how fast NO can diffuse into the heme pocket. The reaction is as fast as any ligand/protein reaction can be and the result, when hemoglobin is in its oxygenated form, is formation of nitrate in what is known as the dioxygenation reaction. As nitrate, at the concentrations made through the dioxygenation reaction, is biologically inert, the only role hemoglobin was once thought to play in NO signaling was to inhibit it. However, there are now several mechanisms that have been discovered by which hemoglobin may preserve, control, and even create NO activity. These mechanisms involve compartmentalization of reacting species and conversion of NO from or into other species such as nitrosothiols or nitrite which could transport NO activity. Despite the tremendous amount of work devoted to this field, major questions concerning precise mechanisms of NO activity preservation as well as if and how Hb creates NO activity remain unanswered. PMID:23624304

  1. Metastable Polymerization of Sickle Hemoglobin in Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Aprelev, Alexey; Weng, Weijun; Zakharov, Mikhail; Rotter, Maria; Yosmanovich, Donna; Kwong, Suzanna; Briehl, Robin W.; Ferrone, Frank A.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell disease arises from a genetic mutation of one amino acid in each of the two hemoglobin β chains, leading to the polymerization of hemoglobin in the red cell upon deoxygenation, and is characterized by vascular crises and tissue damage due to the obstruction of small vessels by sickled cells. It has been an untested assumption that, in red cells that sickle, the growing polymer mass would consume monomers until the thermodynamically well-described monomer solubility was reached. By photolyzing droplets of sickle hemoglobin suspended in oil we find that polymerization does not exhaust the available store of monomers, but stops prematurely, leaving the solutions in a supersaturated, metastable state typically 20% above solubility at 37°C, though the particular values depend on the details of the experiment. We propose that polymer growth stops because the growing ends reach the droplet edge, whereas new polymer formation is thwarted by long nucleation times, since the hemoglobin concentration is lowered by depletion of monomers into the polymers that have formed. This finding suggests a new aspect to the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease, namely, that cells deoxygenated in the microcirculation are not merely undeformable, but will actively wedge themselves tightly against the walls of the microvasculature by a ratchet-like mechanism driven by the supersaturated solution. PMID:17493634

  2. Hemoglobin Hasharon (α247 his(CD5)β2): a hemoglobin found in low concentration

    PubMed Central

    Charache, S.; Mondzac, A. M.; Gessner, U.

    1969-01-01

    Hemoglobin Hasharon (α247 his(CD5)β2) was found to comprise only 16-19% of hemolysates of carriers. These heterozygotes appeared to have mild, compensated, hemolytic anemia. Hb Hasharon was more heat-labile than hemoglobins A, S, or C. Its specific activity was higher than that of Hb A after administration of 59Fe to two carriers. When hemoglobin synthesis by bone marrow cells was studied in vitro, about 18% of incorporated leucine appeared in the Hb Hasharon fraction. It is suggested that Hb Hasharon is unstable in vivo, and that mild hemolytic anemia and a relatively small decrease in its concentration in hemolysates result from its denaturation within red cells. Decreased synthesis, which appears to be the major cause of the small amount of abnormal hemoglobin, may protect heterozygotes from clinically significant hemolytic anemia. Images PMID:5780195

  3. Analysis of bicarbonate binding to crocodilian hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bauer, C; Forster, M; Gros, G; Mosca, A; Perrella, M; Rollema, H S; Vogel, D

    1981-08-25

    Crocodilian hemoglobin has a high intrinsic oxygen affinity but does not react with those organic phosphate esters that normally control the oxygen affinity of blood in higher vertebrates. Instead, its oxygen affinity is greatly lowered by CO2. The present study was undertaken to determine the nature of the CO2 binding to the hemoglobin of a crocodilian species, the Caiman, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The following parameters were measured: (a) carbamino compounds of deoxy- and oxyhemoglobin, (b) the effect of CO2 (at constant pH) on the oxygen affinity of Caiman hemoglobin, (c) total CO2 concentration of hemoglobin solutions at different pH and pCO2 values, and (d) the effect of CO2 on CD spectra of Caiman aquomethemoglobin. An analysis of the results of these measurements revealed that CO2 binding in the form of carbamate was not oxygen-linked and cannot, therefore, mediate the CO2 effect on the oxygen affinity. It was found, however, that 2 mol of bicarbonate can be bound/hemoglobin tetramer and that the association constant of the bicarbonate anion greatly depends upon the state of ligation. At pH 7.02 and 25 degrees C, a numerical value of 2.0 X 10(3) M-1 was obtained for deoxyhemoglobin, while for oxyhemoglobin no significant bicarbonate binding could be observed. At more alkaline pH (pH greater than or equal to 7.5), the association constant for deoxyhemoglobin decreases. Circular dichroism of Caiman aquomethemoglobin decreased considerably in the 287-nm region upon addition of CO2 at constant pH, an effect very similar to the one caused by inositol hexaphosphate in human aquomethemoglobin.

  4. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... hemoglobin polypeptide chains). The hemoglobin determination may be made by methods such as...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... hemoglobin polypeptide chains). The hemoglobin determination may be made by methods such as...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... hemoglobin polypeptide chains). The hemoglobin determination may be made by methods such as...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... hemoglobin polypeptide chains). The hemoglobin determination may be made by methods such as...

  8. Sensitivity of Routine Tests for Urine Protein to Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Barbara S.; Lumsden, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of canine hemoglobin were added to aliquots of urine and saline to determine the relative sensitivity of several hemoglobin and protein detection methods including commercial reagent strips and sulfosalicylic acid. The hemoglobin detection pads of the reagent strips were 50 times more sensitive than the protein detection pads, indicating the presence of hemoglobin at a concentration of 0.001 g/L whereas the protein pads did not react positively unless the hemoglobin concentration exceeded 0.05 g/L. The sulfosalicylic acid test was the least sensitive, detecting hemoglobin only at concentrations of 0.4 g/L or higher. These results were similar for hemoglobin added either in the form of lysed red blood cells, intact red blood cells or associated with plasma proteins in whole blood. It was shown that a urine hemoglobin concentration eliciting less than the maximal score on the hemoglobin detection pad will not be detected as “protein” either with the commercial urinalysis strips or with sulfosalicylic acid. It was also seen that hemoglobin becomes visible as a red pigment when exceeding 0.3-0.5 g/L in a clear, light urine. It follows that a positive urine protein reading in the presence of a positive but less than maximal hemoglobin score or a protein reading exceeding 1.0 g/L in a nonpigmented urine indicates “true” proteinuria in excess of hemoglobin and plasma proteins associated with urinary tract hemorrhage. PMID:17422554

  9. Photopyroelectric Technique for Hemoglobin Assessment in Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Gómez y Gómez, Y. M.; Bautista-Ramírez, M. E.

    2015-06-01

    A new photopyroelectric (PPE) methodology, for optical characterization of general liquids, was used for the assessment of hemoglobin in human blood. The optical absorption coefficient of a hemoglobin reference was measured with this PPE methodology and its corresponding absorptivity, at 532 nm, was obtained. This last reference was used for hemoglobin quantification of blood from a healthy man.

  10. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  12. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7455 - Fetal hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal hemoglobin assay. 864.7455 Section 864.7455...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7455 Fetal hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A fetal hemoglobin assay is a device that is used to determine the...

  14. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  15. Bioimaging techniques for subcellular localization of plant hemoglobins and measurement of hemoglobin-dependent nitric oxide scavenging in planta.

    PubMed

    Hebelstrup, Kim H; Østergaard-Jensen, Erik; Hill, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins are ubiquitous in all plant families. They are expressed at low levels in specific tissues. Several studies have established that plant hemoglobins are scavengers of nitric oxide (NO) and that varying the endogenous level of hemoglobin in plant cells negatively modulates bioactivity of NO generated under hypoxic conditions or during cellular signaling. Earlier methods for determination of hemoglobin-dependent scavenging in planta were based on measuring activity in whole plants or organs. Plant hemoglobins do not contain specific organelle localization signals; however, earlier reports on plant hemoglobin have demonstrated either cytosolic or nuclear localization, depending on the method or cell type investigated. We have developed two bioimaging techniques: one for visualization of hemoglobin-catalyzed scavenging of NO in specific cells and another for visualization of subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged plant hemoglobins in transformed Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

  16. Hemoglobin-Based Nanoarchitectonic Assemblies as Oxygen Carriers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Duan, Li; Li, Junbai

    2016-02-10

    Safe and effective artificial oxygen carriers are the subject of great interest due to the problems of traditional blood transfusion and enormous demand in clinical use. In view of its unique oxygen-transport ability and normal metabolic pathways, hemoglobin is regarded as an ideal oxygen-carrying unit. With advances in nano-biotechnology, hemoglobin assemblies as artificial oxygen carriers achieve great development. Here, recent progress on hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers is highlighted in view of two aspects: acellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers and cellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. These novel oxygen carriers exhibit advantages over traditional carriers and will greatly promote research on reliable and feasible oxygen carriers.

  17. Universal metastability of sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Weijun

    Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) is a natural mutation of the normal hemoglobin (HbA) found in the red blood cells of human body. Polymerization of HbS occurs when the concentration of deoxyHbS exceeds a well-defined solubility, which is the underlying cause of the Sickle Cell Disease. It has long been assumed that thermodynamic equilibrium is reached when polymerization comes to an end. However, in this thesis we demonstrate that in confined volume as well as in bulk solution, HbS polymerization terminates prematurely, leaving the solution in a metastable state. A newly developed Reservoir method as well as modulated excitation method were adopted for the study. This discovery of universal metastability gives us new insights into understanding the mechanism of sickle cell disease.

  18. [Abnormal hemoglobins in Negroid Ecuadorian populations].

    PubMed

    Jara, N O; Guevara Espinoza, A; Guderian, R H

    1989-02-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies was determined in the black race located in two distinct geographical areas in Ecuador; in the coastal province of Esmeraldas, particularly the Santiago basin (Rio Cayapas and Rio Onzoles) and in the province of Imbabura, particularly in the intermoutain valley, Valle de Chota. A total of 2038 blood samples were analyzed, 1734 in Esmeraldas and 304 in Inbabura, of which 23.2% (473 individuals) were found to be carriers of abnormal hemoglobins, 25.4% (441) in Esmeraldas and 10.5% (32) in Imbabura. The abnormal hemoglobins found in Esmeraldas were Hb AS (19.2%), Hb AC (5.0%), Hb SS (0.6%) and Hb SC (0.5%) while in Imbabura only Hb AS (9.5%) and Hb AC (0.9%) were found. The factors that could influence the difference in prevalence found in the two geographical areas are discussed.

  19. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  20. Carboxyalkylated Hemoglobin as a Potential Blood Substitute.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-24

    I- 1.8 MICROCOpy RESOLUTION TEST CHART NAT OWAI BURErAU Of STANDARDS 1963-A OliC FIE COPJ Alit D CARBOXYALKYLATED HEMOGLOBIN AS AN POTENTIAL BLOOD...valine derivatives as the monocarboxymethyl and dicarboxymethyl derivatives, respectively. These derivatives are ninhydrin -negative. The lysine...derivative, wLich was eluted in 1 M acetic acid, was applied to an amino acid analyzer since it is ninhydrin -positive. Its position coincided with that of

  1. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Akinsheye, Idowu; Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Solovieff, Nadia; Ngo, Duyen; Baldwin, Clinton T; Sebastiani, Paola; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-07-07

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the major genetic modulator of the hematologic and clinical features of sickle cell disease, an effect mediated by its exclusion from the sickle hemoglobin polymer. Fetal hemoglobin genes are genetically regulated, and the level of HbF and its distribution among sickle erythrocytes is highly variable. Some patients with sickle cell disease have exceptionally high levels of HbF that are associated with the Senegal and Saudi-Indian haplotype of the HBB-like gene cluster; some patients with different haplotypes can have similarly high HbF. In these patients, high HbF is associated with generally milder but not asymptomatic disease. Studying these persons might provide additional insights into HbF gene regulation. HbF appears to benefit some complications of disease more than others. This might be related to the premature destruction of erythrocytes that do not contain HbF, even though the total HbF concentration is high. Recent insights into HbF regulation have spurred new efforts to induce high HbF levels in sickle cell disease beyond those achievable with the current limited repertory of HbF inducers.

  2. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Mahmood, Faiza; Aandahl, Astrid; Knutsen, Teresa Risopatron; Llohn, Abid Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF) elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females) who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that baseline SF explains approximately 6 to 7% of the variation in baseline hemoglobin. The results also showed that males who had higher (≥150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin levels had a significantly greater reduction in their posttreatment hemoglobin despite requiring fewer phlebotomies to achieve iron depletion than those who had lower (<150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin, regardless of whether baseline SF was below or above 1000 µg/L. There were no significant differences between hemoglobin subgroups regarding baseline and treatment characteristics, except for transferrin saturation between male subgroups with SF above 1000 µg/L. Similar differences were observed when females with higher (≥138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin were compared with those with lower (<138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin. Conclusion. Dividing C282Y-homozygous patients into just two subgroups according to the degree of baseline SF elevation may obscure important subgroup variations.

  3. Hemoglobin allostery: new views on old players.

    PubMed

    Miele, Adriana Erica; Bellelli, Andrea; Brunori, Maurizio

    2013-05-13

    Proteins are dynamic molecular machines whose structure and function are modulated by environmental perturbations and natural selection. Allosteric regulation, discovered in 1963 as a novel molecular mechanism of enzymatic adaptation [Monod, Changeux & Jacob (1963). J. Mol. Biol.6, 306-329], seems to be the leit motiv of enzymes and metabolic pathways, enabling fine and quick responses toward external perturbations. Hemoglobin (Hb), the oxygen transporter of all vertebrates, has been for decades the paradigmatic system to test the validity of the conformational selection mechanism, the conceptual innovation introduced by Monod, Wyman and Changeux. We present hereby the results of a comparative analysis of structure, function and thermodynamics of two extensively investigated hemoglobins: human HbA and trout HbI. They represent a unique and challenging comparison to test the general validity of the stereochemical model proposed by Perutz. Indeed both proteins are ideal for the purpose being very similar yet very different. In fact, T-HbI is a low-ligand-affinity cooperative tetrameric Hb, insensitive to all allosteric effectors. This remarkable feature, besides being physiologically sound, supports the stereochemical model, given that the six residues identified in HbA as responsible for the Bohr and the 2,3-di-phosphoglycerate effects are all mutated. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures of HbA and T-HbI allows unveiling the molecular mechanism whereby the latter has a lower O2 affinity. Moreover, the energetic balance sheet shows that the salt bridges breaking upon allosteric quaternary transition are important yet insufficient to account for the free energy of heme-heme interactions in both hemoglobins.

  4. Universal Metastability of Sickle Hemoglobin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Weijun; Aprelev, Alexey; Briehl, Robin W.; Ferrone, Frank A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymerization occurs when deoxy HbS concentration exceeds a well-defined solubility. In experiments using sickle hemoglobin droplets suspended in oil, it has been shown that when polymerization ceases the monomer concentration is above equilibrium solubility. We find that the final concentration in uniform bulk solutions (i.e. with negligible boundaries) agrees with the droplet measurements, and both exceed the expected solubility. To measure hemoglobin in uniform solutions we used modulated excitation of trace amounts of CO in gels of HbS. In this method, a small amount of CO is introduced to a spatially uniform deoxyHb sample, so that less than 2% of the sample is liganded. The liganded fraction is repeatedly photolyzed and the rate of recombination allows the concentration of deoxyHbS in the solution phase to be determined, even if polymers have formed. Both uniform and droplet samples exhibit the same quantitative behavior, exceeding solubility by an amount that depends on the initial concentration of the sample, as well as conditions under which the gel was formed. We hypothesize that the early termination of polymerization is due to the obstruction in polymer growth, which is consistent with the observation that pressing on slides lowers the final monomer concentration, making it closer to solubility. The thermodynamic solubility in free solution is thus only achieved in conditions with low polymer density or under external forces (such as found in sedimentation) that disrupt polymers. Since we find that only about 67% of the expected polymer mass forms, this result will impact any analysis predicated on predicting the polymer fraction in a given experiment. PMID:18308336

  5. Preparation of Hemoglobin-Containing Microcapsules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    were suspended in saline for storage in a refrigerator. Although in these microencapsulation experiments, the Hb was not denatured, the microcapsules ... microencapsulated Hb, l.O-ml sample of the microcapsule suspension was diluted with 10 ml 0.9% NaCI. The absorption spectrum was taken immediately after dilution...AD A135 634 PREPARATION OF HEMOGLOBIN CONTA NING MICROCAPSULES (U) I/ ,R 224 AM OS NTERNATIDNAL MENOPARKO CA REYES AUNN8 SRI-2254-1 DAMD17-80-C-01?7

  6. Neutral changes during divergent evolution of hemoglobins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of the mRNAs for rabbit and human beta-hemoglobins shows that synonymous changes in codons have accumulated three times as rapidly as nucleotide replacements that produced changes in amino acids. This agrees with predictions based on the so-called neutral theory. In addition, seven codon changes that appear to be single-base changes (according to maximum parsimony) are actually two-base changes. This indicates that the construction of primordial sequences is of limited significance when based on inferences that assume minimum base changes for amino acid replacements.

  7. Multiple hemoglobins of the cutthroat trout, Salmo clarki.

    PubMed

    Southard, J N; Berry, C R; Farley, T M

    1986-07-01

    Nine hemoglobins were purified from blood of Salmo clarki by ion-exchange chromatography and preparative isoelectric focusing. The subunit structures of eight of the purified hemoglobins were studied by electrophoresis of globins in the presence of urea. Six are alpha 2 beta 2 tetramers while two appear to be heterotetramers of the type alpha alpha' beta 2 and alpha alpha' beta beta'. The effects of pH, nucleotides, and temperature on the oxygen equilibria of the purified hemoglobins were studied. Five hemoglobins with isoelectric points from 9.1 to 7.1 and one minor hemoglobin with an isoelectric point of 5.9 appear to have essentially identical oxygen binding properties. All have similar oxygen equilibria which are independent of pH and temperature and not affected by saturating amounts of ATP. Another minor hemoglobin with an isoelectric point below 5.9 has similar oxygen equilibria except for a possible pH dependence. Two hemoglobins, with isoelectric points of 6.5 and 6.4, have oxygen binding properties which are strongly pH and temperature dependent. Addition of ATP or GTP causes a large decrease in the oxygen affinity without affecting the cooperativity of oxygen binding. The effect of GTP is slightly greater than that of ATP. No significant differences were observed in the oxygen equilibria of these two hemoglobins. The red blood cells of S. clarki were found to contain large amounts of both ATP and GTP, with an ATP:GTP ratio of 3:1. Both nucleotides may be important modulators of hemoglobin oxygen affinity in S. clarki, in contrast to the situation in S. gairdneri, in which red blood cell GTP concentrations are considerably lower. The presence of six or possibly seven hemoglobins with identical oxygen binding properties in S. clarki suggests that, to a large extent, the physiological role of multiple hemoglobins in this species involves phenomena not directly related to the oxygen binding properties of the hemoglobins.

  8. Medical Aspects of Sickle Hemoglobin in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Brodine, C. E.; Uddin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) will soon issue a directive to test all incoming military personnel for the presence of hemoglobin S. The military testing program for hemoglobin S is an occupational medicine program. This report includes a discussion of armed services physical standards, a description of the Navy effort to evaluate an automated system for detection of hemoglobin S, and the proposed DOD directive. PMID:833894

  9. Characterization of the hemoglobin of the backswimmer Anisops deanei (Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Wawrowski, Agnes; Matthews, Philip G D; Gleixner, Eva; Kiger, Laurent; Marden, Michael C; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    While O(2)-binding hemoglobin-like proteins are present in many insects, prominent amounts of hemoglobin have only been found in a few species. Backswimmers of the genera Anisops and Buenoa (Notonectidae) have high concentrations of hemoglobin in the large tracheal cells of the abdomen. Oxygen from the hemoglobin is delivered to a gas bubble and controls the buoyant density, which enables the bugs to maintain their position without swimming and to remain stationary in the mid-water zone where they hunt for prey. We have obtained the cDNA sequences of three Anisops deanei hemoglobin chains by RT-PCR and RACE techniques. The deduced amino acid sequences show an unusual insertion of a single amino acid in the conserved helix E, but this does not affect protein stability or ligand binding kinetics. Recombinant A. deanei hemoglobin has an oxygen affinity of P(50) = 2.4 kPa (18 torr) and reveals the presence of a dimeric fraction or two different conformations. The absorption spectra demonstrate that the Anisops hemoglobin is a typical pentacoordinate globin. Phylogenetic analyses show that the backswimmer hemoglobins evolved within Heteroptera and most likely originated from an intracellular hemoglobin with divergent function.

  10. WAXS studies of the structural diversity of hemoglobin in solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Bardhan, J.; Gore, D.; Lal, J.; Mandava, S.; Park, S.; Rodi, D. J.; Ho, N. T.; Ho, C.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Specific ligation states of hemoglobin are, when crystallized, capable of taking on multiple quaternary structures. The relationship between these structures, captured in crystal lattices, and hemoglobin structure in solution remains uncertain. Wide-angle X-ray solution scattering (WAXS) is a sensitive probe of protein structure in solution that can distinguish among similar structures and has the potential to contribute to these issues. We used WAXS to assess the relationships among the structures of human and bovine hemoglobins in different liganded forms in solution. WAXS data readily distinguished among the various forms of hemoglobins. WAXS patterns confirm some of the relationships among hemoglobin structures that have been defined through crystallography and NMR and extend others. For instance, methemoglobin A in solution is, as expected, nearly indistinguishable from HbCO A. Interestingly, for bovine hemoglobin, the differences between deoxy-Hb, methemoglobin and HbCO are smaller than the corresponding differences in human hemoglobin. WAXS data were also used to assess the spatial extent of structural fluctuations of various hemoglobins in solution. Dynamics has been implicated in allosteric control of hemoglobin, and increased dynamics has been associated with lowered oxygen affinity. Consistent with that notion, WAXS patterns indicate that deoxy-Hb A exhibits substantially larger structural fluctuations than HbCO A. Comparisons between the observed WAXS patterns and those predicted on the basis of atomic coordinate sets suggest that the structures of Hb in different liganded forms exhibit clear differences from known crystal structure.

  11. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. Properties of Hemoglobin Decolorized with a Histidine-Specific Protease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; de Roos, Andre; Schouten, Olaf; Zheng, Chaoya; Vink, Collin; Vonk, Brenda; Kliphuis, Annette; Schaap, Albert; Edens, Luppo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the application of Aspergilloglutamic peptidase (AGP) on porcine hemoglobin decolorization. AGP from fungus Aspergillus niger is identified to possess a high preference towards the histidine residues. As histidine residues in hemoglobin are known to coordinate the heme group within the globin molecule, we therefore hypothesized that incubating hemoglobin with a histidine-specific protease would efficiently separate the non-heme peptides from the heme-enriched peptides with a minimum degree of hydrolysis. AGP-decolored porcine hemoglobin hydrolysates were assessed on their functional (for example, color, emulsification, foaming, and water binding) and sensory properties. The results were compared with commercially available blood-derived proteins (subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates and plasma protein). It was observed that AGP is able to effectively decolor hemoglobin. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) increased less than 3% using AGP to achieve 90% color reduction of hemoglobin, whereas a DH increase of more than 20% is needed using subtilisin. The AGP-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (AGP-Hb) possess good emulsification, foaming, and water binding properties, which are better or comparable with the plasma protein, and much better than the subtilisin-decolored hemoglobin hydrolysates (subtilisin-Hb). The model canned meat with addition of AGP-Hb showed the highest value in hardness, springiness, and chewiness from the texture analysis. Furthermore, the canned meat with AGP-Hb was found to have a better sensory profile than the ones with addition of subtilisin-Hb and plasma protein.

  17. A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with hemoglobin A1c measurement.

    PubMed

    Little, Randie R; Roberts, William L

    2009-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used routinely to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus, as HbA1c is related directly to risks for diabetic complications. The accuracy of HbA1c methods can be affected adversely by the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants or elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The effect of each variant or elevated HbF must be examined with each specific method. The most common Hb variants worldwide are HbS, HbE, HbC, and HbD. All of these Hb variants have single amino acid substitutions in the Hb beta chain. HbF is the major hemoglobin during intrauterine life; by the end of the first year, HbF falls to values close to adult levels of approximately 1%. However, elevated HbF levels can occur in certain pathologic conditions or with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. In a series of publications over the past several years, the effects of these four most common Hb variants and elevated HbF have been described. There are clinically significant interferences with some methods for each of these variants. A summary is given showing which methods are affected by the presence of the heterozygous variants S, E, C, and D and elevated HbF. Methods are divided by type (immunoassay, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity, other) with an indication of whether the result is artificially increased or decreased by the presence of a Hb variant. Laboratorians should be aware of the limitations of their method with respect to these interferences.

  18. Hemoglobin alpha in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Joshua T.; Johnson, Tyler; Beers, Jody; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin has been studied and well haracterized in red blood cells for over one hundred years. However, new work has indicated that the hemoglobin alpha subunit (Hbα) is also found within the blood vessel wall, where it appears to localize at the myoendothelial junction (MEJ) and plays a role in regulating nitric oxide (NO) signaling between endothelium and smooth muscle. This discovery has created a new paradigm for control of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, nitric oxide diffusion, and ultimately, control of vascular tone and blood pressure. This review will discuss the current knowledge of hemoglobin’s properties as a gas exchange molecule in the blood stream, and extrapolate the properties of Hbα biology to the MEJ signaling domain. Specifically, we propose that Hbα is present at the MEJ to regulate NO release and diffusion in a restricted physical space, which would have powerful implications for the regulation of blood flow in peripheral resistance arteries. PMID:24832680

  19. Direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Premer, Scott A; Hoy, Julie A; Trent, James T; Hargrove, Mark S

    2003-06-01

    The biological functions of heme proteins are linked to their rate and affinity constants for ligand binding. Kinetic experiments are commonly used to measure equilibrium constants for traditional hemoglobins comprised of pentacoordinate ligand binding sites and simple bimolecular reaction schemes. However, kinetic methods do not always yield reliable equilibrium constants with more complex hemoglobins for which reaction mechanisms are not clearly understood. Furthermore, even where reaction mechanisms are clearly understood, it is very difficult to directly measure equilibrium constants for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to high-affinity (K(D) < 1 micro M) hemoglobins. This work presents a method for direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins that utilizes a competition for ligands between the "target" protein and an array of "scavenger" hemoglobins with known affinities. This method is described for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to two hexacoordinate hemoglobins: rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and Synechocystis hemoglobin. Our results demonstrate that although these proteins have different mechanisms for ligand binding, their affinities for oxygen and carbon monoxide are similar. Their large affinity constants for oxygen, 285 and approximately 100 micro M(-1) respectively, indicate that they are not capable of facilitating oxygen transport.

  20. Computation Of Facilitated Transport of O2 In Hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    Report describes computations of unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen through liquid membrane of hemoglobin. Used here, "facilitated transport" means diffusion of permeant through membrane in which that diffusion enhanced by reversible chemical reaction between permeant and membrane. In this case, reversible reactions between hemoglobin and oxygen.

  1. [Spectroscopic studies of guanidine hydrochloride-induced unfolding of hemoglobin].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Jing; Tang, Qian; Cao, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Xue-Fang

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper, based on the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and stopped flow-fluorescence spectroscopy, the authors studied the protein unfolding process of hemoglobin induced by GdmHcl. The experiments result shows that there were two different procedures about GdmHcl inducing hemoglobin unfolding from the evidences of UV-Vis absorption spectrum and fluorescence phase diagrams. Namely, the hemoglobin subunit exhibits depolymerization, forming the intermediates when incubated with GdmHcl at the concentration of 1. 0 mol x L(-1). With the increase in the concentration, various subunit structure became loose gradually, and the protoheme collapsed eventually. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicates that the addition of reductant can cooperate with the depolymerization of hemoglobin subunit and the disaggregation of protoheme. The reductant results in the unfolding procedure that hemoglobin from "three-state model" turns into "two-state model".

  2. Hemoglobin values: comparative survey of the 1976 Canadian Olympic team.

    PubMed Central

    Clement, D. B.; Asmundson, R. C.; Medhurst, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the role of hemoglobin in oxygen transport, the hemoglobin concentration in whole blood may indicate readiness for maximal physical performance. Hemoglobin concentrations were determined in members of the 1976 Canadian Olympic team and compared with those of the 1975 Canadian general population and with published data for the 1968 Australian and Dutch Olympic teams. The mean hemoglobin concentrations of the 123 male and 64 female Canadian Olympic athletes were 14.7 +/- 1.0 and 12.9 +/- 0.7 g/dL, respectively. Both male and female Canadian Olympic athletes had significantly lower (P less than 0.01) values than the other three groups. The suboptimal hemoglobin concentrations may be related to inadequate dietary intake of protein and iron. PMID:902207

  3. The effect of cationic starch on hemoglobin, and the primary attempt to encapsulate hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Sha, Baoyong; Liu, Yongchun; Wu, Daocheng; Shen, Xin; Jing, Guixia

    2015-06-01

    Though starch has been a common material used for drug delivery, it has not been used as an encapsulation material for hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. In this study, cationic amylose (CA) was synthesized by an etherification reaction. The interaction behaviors between CA and hemoglobin (Hb) were measured by zeta potential, size, and UV-Vis absorption spectra at different pH values. Cationic starch encapsulated Hb by electrostatic adhesion, reverse micelles, and cross-linking, and showed a core shell structure with a size of around 100 nm, when measured immediately after dispersing in PBS solution. However, we found that it was prone to swell, aggregate, and leak Hb with a longer duration of dispersal in PBS.

  4. Bohr effect of hemoglobins: Accounting for differences in magnitude.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde O

    2015-09-07

    The basis of the difference in the Bohr effect of various hemoglobins has remained enigmatic for decades. Fourteen amino acid residues, identical in pairs and located at specific 'Bohr group positions' in human hemoglobin, are implicated in the Bohr effect. All 14 are present in mouse, 11 in dog, eight in pigeon and 13 in guinea pig hemoglobin. The Bohr data for human and mouse hemoglobin are identical: the 14 Bohr groups appear at identical positions in both molecules. The dog data are different from the human because three Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in dog hemoglobin; the pigeon data are vastly different from the human because six Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. The guinea pig data are quite complex. Quantitative analyses showed that only the pigeon data could be fitted with the Wyman equation for the Bohr effect. We demonstrate that, apart from guinea pig hemoglobin, the difference between the Bohr effect of each of the other hemoglobins and of pigeon hemoglobin can be accounted for quantitatively on the basis of the occupation of some of their Bohr group positions by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. We attribute the anomalous guinea pig result to a new salt-bridge formed in its R2 quaternary structure between the terminal NH3(+) group of one β-chain and the COO(-) terminal group of the partner β-chain in the same molecule. The pKas of this NH3(+) group are 6.33 in the R2 and 4.59 in the T state.

  5. Propofol Enhances Hemoglobin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cui, Guiyun; Li, Wenlu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been increasingly suggested that propofol protects against hypoxic-/ischemic-induced neuronal injury. As evidenced by hemorrhage-induced stroke, hemorrhage into the brain may also cause brain damage. Whether propofol protects against hemorrhage-induced brain damage remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of propofol on hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity in cultured mouse cortical neurons. METHODS Neurons were prepared from the cortex of embryonic 15-day-old mice. Hemoglobin was used to induce cytotoxicity in the neurons. The neurons were then treated with propofol for 4 hours. Cytotoxicity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase release assay. Caspase-3 activation was examined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the free radical scavenger U83836E was used to examine the potential involvement of oxidative stress in propofol’s effects on hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity. RESULTS We found that treatment with hemoglobin induced cytotoxicity in the neurons. Propofol enhanced hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity. Specifically, there was a significant difference in the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release between hemoglobin plus saline (19.84% ± 5.38%) and hemoglobin plus propofol (35.79% ± 4.41%) in mouse cortical neurons (P = 0.00058, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney U test, n = 8 in the control group or the treatment group). U83836E did not attenuate the enhancing effects of propofol on hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity in the neurons, and propofol did not significantly affect caspase-3 activation induced by hemoglobin. These data suggested that caspase-3 activation and oxidative stress might not be the underlying mechanisms by which propofol enhanced hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, these data suggested that the neuroprotective effects of propofol would be dependent on the condition of the brain injury, which will need to be confirmed in future studies. CONCLUSIONS These results from our current proof-of-concept study should

  6. Interference of the Hope Hemoglobin With Hemoglobin A1c Results.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Chanda, Dalia; Gain, Mithun; Krishnan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is now considered to be the marker of choice in diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus, based on the results of certain landmark clinical trials. Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old ethnic Southeast Asian Indian man with impaired glucose tolerance whose glycated hemoglobin (ie, HbA1c) levels, as measured via Bio-Rad D10 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Roche Tina-quant immunoassay were 47.8% and 44.0%, respectively. No variant hemoglobin (Hb) peak was observed via the D10 chromatogram. We assayed the patient specimen on the Sebia MINICAP capillary electrophoresis platform; the HbA1c level was 6.8%, with a large variant Hb peak of 42.0%. This finding suggested the possible presence of the heterozygous Hb Hope, which can result in spuriously elevated HbA1c results on HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassays. Although the capillary electrophoresis system was able to identify the variant, the A1c results should not be considered accurate due to overlapping of the variant and adult Hb peaks on the electrophoretogram reading. Hb Hope is usually clinically silent but can present such analytical challenges. Through this case study, we critically discuss the limitations of various HbA1c assay methods, highlighting the fact that laboratory professionals need to be aware of occurrences of Hb Hope, to help ensure patient safety.

  7. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  8. Hemoglobin Ypsilanti: a high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin demonstrated by two automated high-pressure liquid chromatography systems.

    PubMed

    Mais, Daniel D; Boxer, Laurence A; Gulbranson, Ronald D; Keren, David F

    2007-11-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Ypsilanti is a rare high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin. Like other high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobins, Hb Ypsilanti manifests as erythrocytosis. Because the migration of many high-oxygen-affinity variants on alkaline and acid gels does not differ from that of HbA, oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation studies are often used to document their presence. Hb Ypsilanti is a notable exception because its electrophoresis pattern on alkaline gel is highly characteristic, exemplifying the phenomenon of hybrid formation in variant hemoglobins. In the past few years, several laboratories have begun to use high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a screen for hemoglobinopathies. We demonstrate the elution profile of Hb Ypsilanti on the 2 most widely used HPLC methods.

  9. The primary structure of genetic variants of mouse hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, R.A.; Bailiff, E.G.; Skow, L.C.; Whitney, J.B. III

    1982-01-01

    The primary structures of the ..cap alpha.. globins from CE/J, DBA/2J, and a stock of Potter's mice were determined to identify the amino acid substitutions associated with the unique isoelectric focusing patterns of these hemoglobins. In addition, the primary structures of the ..cap alpha.. globins from MOL III and PERU mice were studied in search of amino acid substitutions that may not be detected by isoelectric focusing. CE/J hemoglobin contains a unique kind of ..cap alpha.. globin called chain 5. It differs from the single kind of ..cap alpha.. globin (chain 1) in C57BL/6 by having alanine rather than glycine at position 78. DBA/2J hemoglobin has two kinds of ..cap alpha.. globins: one half is like chain 5 and the other half is like chain 1. The hemoglobin from Potter's stock of Mus musculus molossinus also contains chains 1 and 5, but they are expressed at different levels (i.e., 80% chain 1 and 20% chain 5). MOL III hemoglobin has a single kind of ..cap alpha.. globin identical to that in C57BL/6, and PERU hemoglobin contains approximately 40% chain 1 and 60% chain 4. Chains 1 and 4 have different amino acids at positions 25, 62, and 68. These studies confirm that mouse hemoglobins separable by isoelectric focusing, but not by other means of electrophoresis, have substitutions of neutrally charged amino acids in their ..cap alpha.. chains.

  10. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  11. Development of an immunoassay to detect benzene adducts in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Grassman, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an immunoassay to detect the adducts formed in hemoglobin after exposure to benzene, which is known to cause bone marrow degeneration and acute myelogenous leukemia. The use of benzene-adduct detection as a biological monitoring method would permit measurement of low exposures and exposures sustained weeks earlier. The reactivity of hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite, with blood proteins and amino acids was investigated in order to decide which antigens and analytes were likely to be suitable for immunoassay development. The second section determined the combination of benzene-metabolite and antigen need to produce an immunoassay with the requisite low detection limit and specificity. The immunoassays with the best performance were tested on hemoglobin from benzene-exposed mice. In vitro studies showed that hydroquinone efficiently formed adducts with erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin but not with albumin. Adduction efficiency was greater in incubations using purified hemoglobin than whole blood. Cysteine accounted for 15 to 27% of the adducts formed by hydroquinone. The site of the other adducts were not identified although there was evidence that the hemoglobin heme was adducted. Adducts were found on only 1 of the 2 globin chains. Tryptic digestion of the globin failed to associate the adducts with a specific peptide. Antigens made from hydroquinone-adducted hemoglobin but not hydroquinone-adducted cysteines coupled to carrier proteins effectively elicited adduct-specific antibodies. Interference due to reactivity to hemoglobin was controlled by using uniform quantities of hemoglobin in all wells. The mid-range of the best assays were approximately 12 pmoles HQ per well. Antibodies directed toward hemoglobin adducted with the benzene metabolites phenol, catechol and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were also made. The performance of the anti-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were suitable for quantitative immunoassays.

  12. [Hemoglobin O Arab in Ivory Coast and western Africa].

    PubMed

    Sangare, A; Sanogo, I; Meite, M; Ambofo, Y; Abesopie, V; Segbena, A; Tolo, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors report 44 cases of hemoglobin O Arab share out in 3 phenotypes (A O Arab, C O Arab and S O Arab). The study of this abnormal hemoglobin has allowed the following conclusions: The Hb O Arab is a rare mutant of hemoglobin. The heterozygote form A O Arab and the association Hb C--Hb O Arab do not present any clinical and hematological manifestations. The associations Hb S--Hb O Arab brings about a serious hemoglobinopathy which has clinical and hematological features like the sickle-cell disease (SSFA2).

  13. Polychelated cryogels: hemoglobin adsorption from human blood.

    PubMed

    Erol, Kadir

    2017-02-01

    The separation and purification methods are extremely important for the hemoglobin (Hb) which is a crucial biomolecule. The adsorption technique is popular among these methods and the cryogels have been used quite much due to their macropores and interconnected flow channels. In this study, the Hb adsorption onto the Cu(II) immobilized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA-GMA)-Cu(II), cryogels was investigated under different conditions (pH, interaction time, initial Hb concentration, temperature and ionic strength) to optimize adsorption conditions. The swelling test, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area (BET), elemental and ICP-OES analysis were performed for the characterization of cryogels. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecule was used as a Cu(II)-chelating ligand. The Hb adsorption capacity of cryogels was determined as 193.8 mg Hb/g cryogel. The isolation of Hb from human blood was also studied under optimum adsorption conditions determined and the Hb (124.5 mg/g cryogel) was isolated. The adsorption model was investigated in the light of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models and it was determined to be more appropriate to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  14. Hyperspectral imaging for dermal hemoglobin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Peter J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    It has been shown previously that images collected at selected wavelengths in a sufficiently narrow bandwidth can be used to produce maps of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the dermis. A four-wavelength algorithm has been developed based on a two-layer model of the skin, in which the blood is contained in the lower layer (dermis), while the upper layer attenuates some of the reflection and adds a clutter term. In the present work, the algorithm is compared analytically to simpler algorithms using three wavelengths and based on a single-layer model. It is shown through Monte-Carlo models that, for typical skin, the single-layer model is adequate to analyze data from fiber-optical reflectance spectroscopy, but the two-layer model produces better results for imaging systems. Although the model does not address the full complexity of reflectance of a two-layer skin, it has proven to be sufficient to recover the oxygen saturation, and perhaps other medically relevant information. The algorithm is demonstrated on a suction blister, where the epidermis is removed to reveal the underlying dermis. Applications for this imaging modality exist in dermatology, in surgery, and in developing treatment plans for various diseases.

  15. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roy E

    2007-09-30

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O(2) transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O(2) loading and unloading tensions and the O(2)-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin's intrinsic O(2)-affinity and its allosteric interaction with cellular effectors (organic phosphates, protons and chloride). Whereas short-term altitudinal adaptations predominantly involve adjustments in allosteric interactions, long-term, genetically-coded adaptations typically involve changes in the structure of the haemoglobin molecules. The latter commonly comprise substitutions of amino acid residues at the effector binding sites, the heme-protein contacts, or at intersubunit contacts that stabilize either the low-affinity ('Tense') or the high-affinity ('Relaxed') structures of the molecules. Molecular heterogeneity (multiple isoHbs with differentiated oxygenation properties) can further broaden the range of physico-chemical conditions where Hb functions under altitudinal hypoxia. This treatise reviews the molecular and cellular mechanisms that adapt haemoglobin-oxygen affinities in mammals, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude.

  16. MP4, a vasodilatory PEGylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Russell H; Vandegriff, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    A vasodilatory hemoglobin (Hb)-based O(2) carrier (HBOC) has been developed by surface conjugation polyethylene glycol to tetrameric human Hb (MP4, Sangart, San Diego). Because the NO-binding kinetics of MP4 are similar to vasoconstrictive HBOCs, we propose that the decoupling of NO scavenging from vascular response is a consequence of MP4's high O(2) affinity (p50 = 5 mmHg) and unique surface chemistry. The release of ATP from erythrocytes is vasodilatory and the application of a high O(2) affinity HBOC minimizes ATP interference with intravascular ATP signaling. A second potential mechanism of action for MP4 involves the surface conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to tetrameric human Hb. It has been shown that the addition of unconjugated high molecular weight (Mw) PEG to cultured lung endothelial cells causes an immediate and significant reduction in endothelial permeability; an effect opposite to that of endothelial agonists such as cell-free Hb. It appears that some of the benefits of the PEG-endothelium interaction are carried onto molecules such as PEGylated Hb and PEGylated albumin, as demonstrated by favorable hemodynamic responses in vivo. PEGylation of ß93 cysteine residues, as in MP4, has also been reported to increase the nitrite reductase activity of Hb and enhance conversion of endogenous nitrite to bioactive NO.

  17. NITRO MUSK BOUND TO CARP HEMOGLOBIN ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitroaromatic compounds including synthetic nitro musks are important raw materials and intermediates in the synthesis of explosives, dyes, and pesticides, pharmaceutical and personal care-products (PPCPs). The nitro musks such as musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) are extensively used as fragrance ingredients in PPCPs and other commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (4-AMX) metabolite as well as a 2- amino-MK (2-AMK) metabolite were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry' (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM) in both the electron ionization (ElMS) and electron capture (EC) negative ion chemical ionization (NICIMS) modes. Detection of 4-AMX and 2-AMK occurred after the cysteine adducts in carp hemoglobin, derived from the nitroso metabolites, were released by alkaline hydrolysis. The released metabolites were extracted into n-hexane. The extract was preconcentrated by evaporation, and analyzed by GC-SIM-MS. A comparison between the El and EC approaches was made. EC NICIMS detected both metabolites whereas only 4-AMX was detected by ElMS. The EC NICIMS approach exhibited fewer matrix responses and provided a lower detection limit. Quantitation in both approaches was based on internal standard and a calibration plot. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Q

  18. Selenium binding to human hemoglobin via selenotrisulfide.

    PubMed

    Haratake, Mamoru; Fujimoto, Katsuyoshi; Ono, Masahiro; Nakayama, Morio

    2005-05-25

    Selenotrisulfide (e.g., glutathione selenotrisulfide (GSSeSG)) is an important intermediate in the metabolism of selenite. However, its reactivity with biological substances such as peptides and proteins in the subsequent metabolism is still far from clearly understood, because of its chemical instability under physiological conditions. Penicillamine (Pen) is capable of generating a chemically stable and isolatable selenotrisulfide, PenSSeSPen. To explore the metabolic fate of selenite in red blood cells (RBC), we investigated the reaction of selenotrisulfide with human hemoglobin (Hb) using PenSSeSPen as a model. PenSSeSPen rapidly reacted with Hb under physiological conditions. From the analysis of selenium binding using the Langmuir type binding equation, the apparent binding number of selenium per Hb tetramer almost corresponded to the number of reactive thiol groups of Hb. The thiol group blockade of Hb by iodoacetamide treatment completely inhibited the reaction of PenSSeSPen with Hb. In addition, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of the selenium-bound Hb revealed that PenSSe moiety binds to the beta subunits of Hb. Overall, the reaction of PenSSeSPen with Hb appears to involve the thiol exchange between Pen and the cysteine residues on the beta subunit of Hb.

  19. Erythropoiesis in the Absence of Adult Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shanrun; McConnell, Sean C.

    2013-01-01

    During erythropoiesis, hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis increases from early progenitors to mature enucleated erythrocytes. Although Hb is one of the most extensively studied proteins, the role of Hb in erythroid lineage commitment, differentiation, and maturation remains unclear. In this study, we generate mouse embryos and embryonic stem (ES) cells with all of the adult α and β globin genes deleted (Hb Null). While Hb Null embryos die in midgestation, adult globin genes are not required for primitive or definitive erythroid lineage commitment. In vitro differentiation of Hb Null ES cells generates viable definitive proerythroblasts that undergo apoptosis upon terminal differentiation. Surprisingly, all stages of Hb Null-derived definitive erythroblasts develop normally in vivo in chimeric mice, and Hb Null erythroid cells undergo enucleation to form reticulocytes. Free heme toxicity is not observed in Hb Null-derived erythroblasts. Transplantation of Hb Null-derived bone marrow cells provides short-term radioprotection of lethally irradiated recipients, whose progressive anemia results in an erythroid hyperplasia composed entirely of Hb Null-derived erythroblasts. This novel experimental model system enables the role played by Hb in erythroid cell enucleation, cytoskeleton maturation, and heme and iron regulation to be studied. PMID:23530053

  20. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin renders Enterobacter aerogenes highly susceptible to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Geckil, Hikmet; Arman, Ahmet; Gencer, Salih; Ates, Burhan; Yilmaz, H Ramazan

    2004-12-01

    When expressed in heterologous microorganisms Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) acts as oxygen storage and causes a higher oxygen uptake. In this study, the effect of this protein on growth, sensitivity and antioxidant properties of Enterobacter aerogenes exposed to metal stress was investigated. The strain expressing VHb was more sensitive to mercury and cadmium as the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for these metals was up to 2-fold lower in this strain than the host and the recombinant strain carrying a comparable plasmid. At lower concentrations than MIC, the metals partially limited growth and caused an inhibition proportional to metal concentration applied. The growth pattern of VHb expressing strain was also distinctly different from other two non-hemoglobin strains. The hemoglobin containing strain showed substantially higher superoxide dismuates (SOD) activity than the non-hemoglobin strains, while catalase levels were similar in all strains. All strains exposed to copper, however, showed similar MIC values, growth patterns, and SOD and catalase levels.

  1. Solid hemoglobin-polymer phantoms for evaluation of biophotonic systems.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyounguk; Pfefer, T Joshua; Chen, Yu

    2015-09-15

    Stable tissue phantoms that incorporate the spectral absorption properties of hemoglobin would benefit a wide range of biophotonic technologies. Toward this end, we have developed and validated a novel polymer material incorporating hemoglobin. Our solid hemoglobin-polymer (SHP) material is fabricated by mixing liquid silicone base with a hemoglobin solution, followed by sonication and low temperature curing. The optical properties of samples were determined over 450-1000 nm using the inverse adding-doubling method and the Beer-Lambert law. Measurements indicated SHP optical stability over four months. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging measurements of SHP samples were performed to demonstrate the utility of this approach. SHP materials have the potential to improve tissue-simulating phantoms used for development, evaluation, and standardization of optical devices for oximetry and other applications.

  2. Weak binding gases as modulators of hemoglobin function

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B P; Saxena, A; North, B E

    1980-01-01

    Studies are reported in which the mechanisms of binding of inert gaseous agents to hemoglobin and myoglobin are investigated. Specific binding sites are mapped. Possible effects on sickle cell formation and oxygen binding are discussed. (ACR)

  3. Increased Vascular Resistance with Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    vascular resistance. Swine resuscitated with otofHb exhibited the rapid onset of marked systemic hypertension . The blood pressure rose within seconds...virtual absence of red blood cells (3), hemoglobin solutions have produced hypertension irn animals or have not supported an increase in cardiac output...with blood volume expansion. Half of all the humans administered hemoglobin in published trials demonstrated hypertension (4), and a recent human

  4. The Manufacture and Study of Hemoglobin-Saline Solution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-25

    The saturation, as measured with the Co-oximeter, was corrected for the proportion of methemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin , to reflect the per... measurements of the chemical characteristics of the solution during total-exchange transfusion in baboons. These included the monitoring of plasma and...methemoglobin values studied was 7 to 53% of total hemoglobin. 4 A plot of hemoglobin values obtained with the IL 282 (y) vs those measured by the

  5. Neohemoglobins and Cross-Linked Hemoglobins as Blood Substitute.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    normal SFH. For bovine hemoglobi, cross-linking of the oxy and carboxy derivatives increased substantially the oxygen affinity and eliminated the oxygen...hemoglobins were prepared by the filtration method. The respective heme-free proteins (apohemoglobins) were prepared by extraction with methyl ...protein. Recombined neohemoglogins and cross-linked hemoglobins were purified by chromatography on CM cellulose using a linear gradient formed by equal

  6. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  7. [Clinical and hematological profile of Lepore Hemoglobin in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Sangare, A; Sanogo, I; Meite, M; Segbena, A; Toure, A H; Elenga, J P; Siransy, L; Allangba, O

    1994-01-01

    Out of 97320 hemoglobin electrophoreses performed in Abidjan between January 1976 and January 1991, all subjects with hemoglobin Lepore were isolated. This trait was identified by three techniques, i.e., alkaline pH electrophoresis, acid pH electrophoresis, and isoelectric focusing. Seventy-nine cases of hemoglobin Lepore were observed. All were heterozygotes with type HbA-Lepore (n = 54), HbC-Lepore (n = 8) or HbS Lepore (n = 17). Where heterozygosis A and C had clinically silent, heterozygosis Hb-S Lepore resulted in a moderate chronic hemolytic anemia and, in all cases, painful episodes similar to those observed during homozygote sickle-cell disease. However the onset of episodes was later and their occurrence was less frequent. On hemograms, the Lepore trait (HbA Lepore) appeared as a pseudo-polyglobulia with microcytosis; similar features were observed for heterozygosis HbC Lepore. Heterozygosis HbS Lepore caused moderate anemia (mean hemoglobin level: 10.66 g/dl) and microcytosis (MGV = 68.8 fl). The characteristics show that the clinical and hematological behavior of hemoglobin Lepore, a rare hemoglobin, is similar to heterozygous beta-thalassemia.

  8. Cell volume regulation in hemoglobin CC and AA erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, L.R.; Orringer, E.P.

    1987-03-01

    Swelling hemoglobin CC erythrocytes stimulates a ouabain-insensitive K flux that restores original cell volume. Studies were performed with the K analog, /sup 86/Rb. This volume regulatory pathway was characterized for its anion dependence, sensitivity to loop diuretics, and requirement for Na. The swelling-induced K flux was eliminated if intracellular chloride was replaced by nitrate and both swelling-activated K influx and efflux were partially inhibited by 1 mM furosemide or bumetanide. K influx in swollen hemoglobin CC cells was not diminished when Na in the incubation medium was replaced with choline, indicating Na independence of the swelling-induced flux. Identical experiments with hemoglobin AA cells also demonstrated a swelling-induced increase in K flux, but the magnitude and duration of this increase were considerably less than that seen with hemoglobin CC cells. The increased K flux in hemoglobin AA cells was likewise sensitive to anion replacement and to loop diuretics and did not require the presence of Na. These data indicate that a volume-activated K pathway with similar transport characteristics exists in both hemoglobin CC and AA red cells.

  9. Nitric oxide in plants: the roles of ascorbate and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Hargrove, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbic acid and hemoglobins have been linked to nitric oxide metabolism in plants. It has been hypothesized that ascorbic acid directly reduces plant hemoglobin in support of NO scavenging, producing nitrate and monodehydroascorbate. In this scenario, monodehydroascorbate reductase uses NADH to reduce monodehydroascorbate back to ascorbate to sustain the cycle. To test this hypothesis, rates of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin reduction by ascorbate were measured directly, in the presence and absence of purified rice monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. Solution NO scavenging was also measured methodically in the presence and absence of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and monodehydroascorbate reductase, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, in an effort to gauge the likelihood of these proteins affecting NO metabolism in plant tissues. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid slowly reduces rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin at a rate identical to myoglobin reduction. The product of the reaction is monodehydroascorbate, which can be efficiently reduced back to ascorbate in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. However, our NO scavenging results suggest that the direct reduction of plant hemoglobin by ascorbic acid is unlikely to serve as a significant factor in NO metabolism, even in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase. Finally, the possibility that the direct reaction of nitrite/nitrous acid and ascorbic acid produces NO was measured at various pH values mimicking hypoxic plant cells. Our results suggest that this reaction is a likely source of NO as the plant cell pH drops below 7, and as nitrite concentrations rise to mM levels during hypoxia.

  10. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  11. Increased nitrite reductase activity of fetal versus adult ovine hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Arlin B.; Tiso, Mauro; Verma, Shilpa T.; Lo, Jennifer; Joshi, Mahesh S.; Azarov, Ivan; Longo, Lawrence D.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Power, Gordon G.

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nitrite, NO2−, serves as a circulating reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is activated during physiological and pathological hypoxia. One of the intravascular mechanisms for nitrite conversion to NO is a chemical nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin. The rate of NO production from this reaction is increased when hemoglobin is in the R conformation. Because the mammalian fetus exists in a low-oxygen environment compared with the adult and is exposed to episodes of severe ischemia during the normal birthing process, and because fetal hemoglobin assumes the R conformation more readily than adult hemoglobin, we hypothesized that nitrite reduction to NO may be enhanced in the fetal circulation. We found that the reaction was faster for fetal than maternal hemoglobin or blood and that the reactions were fastest at 50–80% oxygen saturation, consistent with an R-state catalysis that is predominant for fetal hemoglobin. Nitrite concentrations were similar in blood taken from chronically instrumented normoxic ewes and their fetuses but were elevated in response to chronic hypoxia. The findings suggest an augmented nitrite reductase activity of fetal hemoglobin and that the production of nitrite may participate in the regulation of vascular NO homeostasis in the fetus. PMID:19028797

  12. Relative phase of oscillations of cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierro, Michele L.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    We present a near-infrared spectroscopy study of the instantaneous phase difference between spontaneous oscillations of cerebral deoxy-hemoglobin and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb] and [HbO], respectively) in the low-frequency range, namely 0.04-0.12 Hz. We report phase measurements during the transitions between different sleep stages in a whole-night study of a human subject. We have found that the phase difference between [Hb] and [HbO] low-frequency oscillations tends to be greater in deep sleep (by ~96° on average) and REM sleep (by ~77° on average) compared to the awake state. In particular, we have observed progressive phase increases as the subject transitions from awake conditions into non-REM sleep stages N1, N2, and N3. Corresponding phase decreases were recorded in the reversed transitions from sleep stages N3 to N2, and N2 to awake. These results illustrate the physiological information content of phase measurements of [Hb] and [HbO] oscillations that reflect the different cerebral hemodynamic conditions of the different sleep stages, and that can find broader applicability in a wide range of near-infrared spectroscopy brain studies.

  13. Generating S-Nitrosothiols from Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Camille J.; Cassera, Maria B.; Dantsker, David; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro, ferrous deoxy-hemes in hemoglobin (Hb) react with nitrite to generate nitric oxide (NO) through a nitrite reductase reaction. In vivo studies indicate Hb with nitrite can be a source of NO bioactivity. The nitrite reductase reaction does not appear to account fully for this activity because free NO is short lived especially within the red blood cell. Thus, the exporting of NO bioactivity both out of the RBC and over a large distance requires an additional mechanism. A nitrite anhydrase (NA) reaction in which N2O3, a potent S-nitrosating agent, is produced through the reaction of NO with ferric heme-bound nitrite has been proposed (Basu, S., Grubina, R., Huang, J., Conradie, J., Huang, Z., Jeffers, A., Jiang, A., He, X., Azarov, I., Seibert, R., Mehta, A., Patel, R., King, S. B., Hogg, N., Ghosh, A., Gladwin, M. T., and Kim-Shapiro, D. B. (2007) Nat. Chem. Biol. 3, 785–794) as a possible mechanism. Legitimate concerns, including physiological relevance and the nature of the mechanism, have been raised concerning the NA reaction. This study addresses these concerns demonstrating NO and nitrite with ferric hemes under near physiological conditions yield an intermediate having the properties of the purported NA heme-bound N2O3 intermediate. The results indicate that ferric heme sites, traditionally viewed as a source of potential toxicity, can be functionally significant, especially for partially oxygenated/partially met-R state Hb that arises from the NO dioxygenation reaction. In the presence of low levels of nitrite and either NO or a suitable reductant such as l-cysteine, these ferric heme sites can function as a generator for the formation of S-nitrosothiols such as S-nitrosoglutathione and, as such, should be considered as a source of RBC-derived and exportable bioactive NO. PMID:23775069

  14. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rana; Thukral, Anubhav; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Roy, Ajitesh; Goswami, Soumik; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC) turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover) were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism. PMID:28217494

  15. Dithionite Tube Test - A Rapid, Inexpensive Technique for the Detection of Hemoglobin S and Non-S Sickling Hemoglobin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    hemoglobinopathies of low solubility such as Kings County and Stanleyville II. The dithionite and urea-dithionite tests, however, will provide rapid, accurate, reliable, and inexpensive screening for hemoglobin S. (Author)

  16. Identification of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the Alaskan Least Cisco (Coregonus sardinella).

    PubMed

    Wahl, S M; Boger, J K; Michael, V; Duffy, L K

    1992-01-01

    The hemoglobin and a hemoglobin binding protein have been characterized in the Arctic fish (Coregonus sardinella). The evolutionary significance of the hemoglobin and plasma protein differences between fish and mammals is still unresolved. Blood samples from the Alaskan Least Cisco were separated into plasma and hemoglobin fractions and the proteins in these fractions were analyzed both by alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis, by isolelectric focusing, and by capillary electrophoresis. Staining the plasma proteins gels with o-dianisidine revealed hemoglobin containing protein complexes. A hemoglobin-containing band was observed in hemolyzed plasma which did not migrate with free hemoglobin, and is believed to be hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. Size exclusion chromatography further characterized the hemoglobin as disassociating freely into dimers, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex having a molecular weight greater then 200,000 daltons.

  17. Lyophilized bovine hemoglobin as a possible reference material for the determination of hemoglobin derivatives in human blood.

    PubMed

    Maas, B H; Buursma, A; Ernst, R A; Maas, A H; Zijlstra, W G

    1998-11-01

    We investigated the suitability of a lyophilized bovine hemoglobin (LBH) preparation containing various fractions of oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb), carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and methemoglobin (MetHb) for quality assessment in multicomponent analysis (MCA) of hemoglobin derivatives. It was demonstrated that a stable preparation of these components after reconstitution yields a hemoglobin solution that is spectrophotometrically equivalent with a fresh bovine hemoglobin solution. The preparation was found to be stable for at least 1 year when it is kept at 2-8 degrees C and for 1 h after reconstitution. We determined the fractions of O2Hb, COHb, and MetHb of several LBH preparations, using the complete spectra of 480-650 nm with 2-nm intervals and absorptivities as determined for pure LBH solutions. A field trial involving various types of multiwavelength hemoglobin photometers showed the suitability of LBH as a quality-control material. Computer models of the various common multiwavelength hemoglobin photometers may be useful for establishing more accurate target values of LBH preparations for each type of photometer and for studying the importance of the influence of specific factors such as wavelength selection, absorptivity values, and interfering dyes.

  18. Hemoglobin Wood beta97(FG4) His replaced by Leu. A new high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin associated with familial erythrocytosis.

    PubMed

    Taketa, F; Huang, Y P; Libnoch, J A; Dessel, B H

    1975-08-19

    The characterization of hemoglobin Wood (beta97(FG4) His replaced by Leu), a high oxygen affinity hemoglobin with reduced Hill constant is described. The amino acid substitution occurs at the alpha1beta2 interface, in the same position as in hemoglobin Malmö (beta97(FG4) His replaced by Gln) and in an homologous position when compared with hemoglobins Chesapeake (alpha92(FG4) Arg replaced by Leu) and J. Capetown (alpha92(fg4) arg replaced by Gln).

  19. Structural transition temperature of hemoglobins correlates with species' body temperature.

    PubMed

    Zerlin, Kay Frank Thorsten; Kasischke, Nicole; Digel, Ilya; Maggakis-Kelemen, Christina; Temiz Artmann, Aysegül; Porst, Dariusz; Kayser, Peter; Linder, Peter; Artmann, Gerhard Michael

    2007-12-01

    Human red blood cells (RBCs) exhibit sudden changes in their biophysical properties at body temperature (T (B)). RBCs were seen to undergo a spontaneous transition from blockage to passage at T (C) = 36.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C, when the temperature dependency of RBC-passages through 1.3 mum narrow micropipettes was observed. Moreover, concentrated hemoglobin solutions (45 g/dl) showed a viscosity breakdown between 36 and 37 degrees C. With human hemoglobin, a structural transition was observed at T (B) as circular dichroism (CD) experiments revealed. This leads to the assumption that a species' body temperature occupies a unique position on the temperature scale and may even be imprinted in the structure of certain proteins. In this study, it was investigated whether hemoglobins of species with a T (B) different from those of human show temperature transitions and whether those were also linked to the species' T (B). The main conclusion was drawn from dynamic light scattering (DLS) and CD experiments. It was observed that such structural temperature transitions did occur in hemoglobins from all studied species and were correlated linearly (slope 0.81, r = 0.95) with the species' body temperature. We presumed that alpha-helices of hemoglobin were able to unfold more readily around T (B). alpha-helical unfolding would initiate molecular aggregation causing RBC passage and viscosity breakdown as mentioned above. Thus, structural molecular changes of hemoglobin could determine biophysical effects visible on a macroscopic scale. It is hypothesized that the species' body temperature was imprinted into the structure of hemoglobins.

  20. A PEGylated bovine hemoglobin as a potent hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Linli; Yu, Weili; Gao, Dawei; You, Guoxing; Li, Penglong; Zhang, Shan; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Tao; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been used as blood substitutes in surgery medicine and oxygen therapeutics for ischemic stroke. As a potent HBOC, the PEGylated Hb has received much attention for its oxygen delivery and plasma expanding ability. Two PEGylated Hbs, Euro-Hb, and MP4 have been developed for clinical trials, using human adult hemoglobin (HbA) as the original substrate. However, HbA was obtained from outdated human blood and its quantity available from this source may not be sufficient for mass production of PEGylated HbA. In contrast, bovine Hb (bHb) has no quantity constraints for its ample resource. Thus, bHb is of potential to function as an alternative substrate to obtain a PEGylated bHb (bHb-PEG). bHb-PEG was prepared under the same reaction condition as HbA-PEG, using maleimide chemistry. The structural, functional, solution and physiological properties of bHb-PEG were determined and compared with those of HbA-PEG. bHb-PEG showed higher hydrodynamic volume, colloidal osmotic pressure, viscosity and P50 than HbA-PEG. The high P50 of bHb can partially compensate the PEGylation-induced perturbation in the R to T state transition of HbA. bHb-PEG was non-vasoactive and could efficiently recover the mean arterial pressure of mice suffering from hemorrhagic shock. Thus, bHb-PEG is expected to function as a potent HBOC for its high oxygen delivery and strong plasma expanding ability. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:252-260, 2017.

  1. Selection of aptamers specific for glycated hemoglobin and total hemoglobin using on-chip SELEX.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-I; Wu, Ching-Chu; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Chang, Ko-Wei; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Shiesh, Shu-Chu

    2015-01-21

    Blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels reflecting average glucose concentrations over the past three months are fundamental for the diagnosis, monitoring, and risk assessment of diabetes. It has been hypothesized that aptamers, which are single-stranded DNAs or RNAs that demonstrate high affinity to a large variety of molecules ranging from small drugs, metabolites, or proteins, could be used for the measurement of HbA1c. Aptamers are selected through an in vitro process called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), and they can be chemically synthesized with high reproducibility at relatively low costs. This study therefore aimed to select HbA1c- and hemoglobin (Hb)-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers using an on-chip SELEX protocol. A microfluidic SELEX chip was developed to continuously and automatically carry out multiple rounds of SELEX to screen specific aptamers for HbA1c and Hb. HbA1c and Hb were first coated onto magnetic beads. Following several rounds of selection and enrichment with a randomized 40-mer DNA library, specific oligonucleotides were selected. The binding specificity and affinity were assessed by competitive and binding assays. Using the developed microfluidic system, the incubation and partitioning times were greatly decreased, and the entire process was shortened dramatically. Both HbA1c- and Hb-specific aptamers selected by the microfluidic system showed high specificity and affinity (dissociation constant, Kd = 7.6 ± 3.0 nM and 7.3 ± 2.2 nM for HbA1c and Hb, respectively). With further refinements in the assay, these aptamers may replace the conventional antibodies for in vitro diagnostics applications in the near future.

  2. Hemoglobin research and the origins of molecular medicine

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Much of our understanding of human physiology, and of many aspects of pathology, has its antecedents in laboratory and clinical studies of hemoglobin. Over the last century, knowledge of the genetics, functions, and diseases of the hemoglobin proteins has been refined to the molecular level by analyses of their crystallographic structures and by cloning and sequencing of their genes and surrounding DNA. In the last few decades, research has opened up new paradigms for hemoglobin related to processes such as its role in the transport of nitric oxide and the complex developmental control of the α-like and β-like globin gene clusters. It is noteworthy that this recent work has had implications for understanding and treating the prevalent diseases of hemoglobin, especially the use of hydroxyurea to elevate fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell disease. It is likely that current research will also have significant clinical implications, as well as lessons for other aspects of molecular medicine, the origin of which can be largely traced to this research tradition. PMID:18988877

  3. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric characterization of acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.L.; Goheen, S.C.; Edmonds, C.G. ); Bull, R.J.; Sylvester, D.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The most common procedure to identify hemoglobin adducts has been to cleave the adducts from the protein and characterize the adducting species, by, for example, derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To extend these approaches we used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to characterize adducted hemoglobin. For this we incubated [[sup 14]C]acrylamide with the purified human hemoglobin (type A[sub 0]) under conditions that yielded high adduct levels. When the hemoglobin was separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), 65% of the radioactivity copurified with the [beta]-subunit. Three adducted species were prominent in the ESI mass spectrum of the intact [beta]-subunit, indicating acrylamide adduction (i.e., mass increase of 71 Da) and two addition unidentified moieties with mass increments of 102 and 135 Da. Endoproteinase Glu-C digestion of the adducted [beta]-subunit resulted in a peptide mixture that, upon reversed-phase HPLC separation, provided several radiolabeled peptides. Using ESI-MS we identified these as the V[sub 91-101] and V[sub 102-122] peptides that represent the cysteine-containing peptides of the [beta]-subunit. These results provide definitive information on acrylamide-modified human hemoglobin and demonstrate that ESI-MS provides valuable structure information on chemically adducted proteins. 30 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Plant hemoglobins: important players at the crossroads between oxygen and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Mur, Luis A J; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2011-12-15

    Plant hemoglobins constitute a diverse group of hemeproteins and evolutionarily belong to three different classes. Class 1 hemoglobins possess an extremely high affinity to oxygen and their main function consists in scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) at very low oxygen levels. Class 2 hemoglobins have a lower oxygen affinity and they facilitate oxygen supply to developing tissues. Symbiotic hemoglobins in nodules have mostly evolved from class 2 hemoglobins. Class 3 hemoglobins are truncated and represent a clade with a very low similarity to class 1 and 2 hemoglobins. They may regulate oxygen delivery at high O(2) concentrations. Depending on their physical properties, hemoglobins belong either to hexacoordinate non-symbiotic or pentacoordinate symbiotic groups. Plant hemoglobins are plausible targets for improving resistance to multiple stresses.

  5. Membrane-associated sickle hemoglobin: a major determinant of sickle erythrocyte rigidity.

    PubMed

    Evans, E A; Mohandas, N

    1987-11-01

    Micropipette aspiration tests on single erythrocytes have previously shown that the static rigidity (membrane shear modulus) of oxygenated sickle cells increased with increasing hemoglobin concentration, whereas the rigidity of normal cells was independent of hemoglobin concentration. Moreover, it was observed that after mechanical extension, sickle cells exhibited persistent deformation more frequently and to a greater extent than normal cells. To ascertain if differences in association of normal and sickle hemoglobin with the membrane could account for these observations, we measured rheologic properties of normal membranes reconstituted with sickle hemoglobin and sickle membranes reconstituted with normal hemoglobin. The static rigidity of normal ghosts reloaded with sickle hemoglobin was higher than those of either normal ghosts reloaded with normal hemoglobin or native normal cells. On the other hand, the increased rigidity of native sickle cells decreased to near-normal values following reconstitution with normal hemoglobin. Furthermore, we observed that normal ghosts reconstituted with sickle hemoglobin exhibited persistent bumps after mechanical extension, but no bumps formed on normal ghosts reconstituted with normal hemoglobin. Moreover residual bumps were not produced on sickle cells reloaded with normal hemoglobin. Since mechanical characteristics peculiar to sickle cells could be induced in normal cells by incorporation of sickle hemoglobin, and since normal characteristics could be restored to sickle cells by incorporation of normal hemoglobin, we suggest that the interaction of sickle hemoglobin with the cell membrane is responsible for augmented static rigidity of oxygenated sickle erythrocytes.

  6. Mastomys (rodentia: muridae) species distinguished by hemoglobin pattern differences.

    PubMed

    Robbins, C B; Krebs, J W; Johnson, K M

    1983-05-01

    Hemoglobin electrophoresis patterns were found to be reliable markers for distinguishing two species of Mastomys in Sierra Leone having 32 and 38 chromosomes. All 32-chromosome animals exhibited a single hemoglobin pattern, whereas those with 38-chromosomes had four distinguishable patterns. Both karyotypes were present throughout Sierra Leone. The 38-chromosome species was more prevalent in the Guinea savanna zone to the north, while the 32-chromosome species was most dominant in human-modified high forest areas of the eastern and southern parts of the country. In almost all situations the 32-chromosome species was more common in houses than in bush habitats; the reverse was true for Mastomys having 38 chromosomes. Analysis of hemoglobin patterns thus becomes useful for species identification, and is necessary to understand the roles of the different Mastomys forms as reservoirs of human diseases, such as Lassa fever in West Africa.

  7. Hemoglobin Koya Dora: high frequency of a chain termination mutant.

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, W W; Meera Khan, P; Bernini, L F

    1975-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the members of the Koya Dora tribe from Andhra Pradesh (India) carry an alpha chain hemoglobin variant, Hb Koya Dora (Hb KD), usually in amounts of 0.5%-2% of total hemoglobin. In four presumed homozygotes for Hb KD, up to 10% of the abnormal hemoglobin was present. The alpha chain of Hb KD was found to be elongated by at least 16 residues, possibly as a result of a mutation of the normal alpha chain termination codon UAA TO UCA, coding for serine. A pedigree in which two individuals possess Hb KD as well as the alpha chain variant Hb Rampa and normal Hb A proves the existence of two alpha chain loci in this population. Hb DK resembles the previously described Hb Constant Spring [6, 7] in many aspects, probably also in its alpha thalassemia-like expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1155453

  8. Electrochemical behavior of immobilized hemoglobin in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jović-Jovičić, Nataša; Mojović, Zorica; Mojović, Miloš; Banković, Predrag; Ajduković, Marija; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    2017-04-01

    Glassy carbon electrode was modified with different synthesized hybrid clay-based materials and tested in alkaline solution with and without H2O2. The hybrid materials were obtained by immobilizing hemoglobin (Hb) on acid activated (AA) clay, or on AA clay modified with different sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) loadings. The obtained materials were characterized using DR UV-vis and ESR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and SEM. The characterization confirmed higher degree of hemoglobin incorporation in the presence of SDS. The presence of SDS on the surface of clay particles resulted in the partial oxidation/denaturation of hemoglobin and formation of hemichrome. Cyclic voltammetry was used for the investigation of the electrochemical behavior of immobilized hemoglobin in alkaline solution. Two cathodic peaks at -0.45 V and -0.70 V were recorded and ascribed to the reduction of heme Fe(III)/Fe(II), and formation of HbFe(I) - highly reduced form of hemoglobin - respectively. The latter peak reflects hemoglobin denaturation. The presence of H2O2 in the alkaline solution increased current intensities corresponding to both peaks (-0.45 V and -0.7 V). Linear response of peak current intensity vs. H2O2 concentration was monitored for all investigated samples within different H2O2 concentration ranges. The AA-SDS1.0-Hb electrode exhibited the highest current response with linear regression equation in the following form: I(μA) = 7.99 + 1.056 × [H2O2] (mM) (R = 0.996). The limit of detection of 28 μM was estimated using the 3 sigma method. Different modified electrodes exhibited different degrees of denaturation resistance. The obtained values of Michaelis-Menten constant indicated that prolonged cycling in the presence of SDS increases protein denaturation.

  9. Nitric Oxide in Plants: The Roles of Ascorbate and Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Hargrove, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbic acid and hemoglobins have been linked to nitric oxide metabolism in plants. It has been hypothesized that ascorbic acid directly reduces plant hemoglobin in support of NO scavenging, producing nitrate and monodehydroascorbate. In this scenario, monodehydroascorbate reductase uses NADH to reduce monodehydroascorbate back to ascorbate to sustain the cycle. To test this hypothesis, rates of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin reduction by ascorbate were measured directly, in the presence and absence of purified rice monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. Solution NO scavenging was also measured methodically in the presence and absence of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and monodehydroascorbate reductase, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, in an effort to gauge the likelihood of these proteins affecting NO metabolism in plant tissues. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid slowly reduces rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin at a rate identical to myoglobin reduction. The product of the reaction is monodehydroascorbate, which can be efficiently reduced back to ascorbate in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. However, our NO scavenging results suggest that the direct reduction of plant hemoglobin by ascorbic acid is unlikely to serve as a significant factor in NO metabolism, even in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase. Finally, the possibility that the direct reaction of nitrite/nitrous acid and ascorbic acid produces NO was measured at various pH values mimicking hypoxic plant cells. Our results suggest that this reaction is a likely source of NO as the plant cell pH drops below 7, and as nitrite concentrations rise to mM levels during hypoxia. PMID:24376554

  10. A hemoglobin A1C immunoassay method not affected by carbamylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rose, A M; Tongate, C; Valdes, R

    1995-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) methods based on charge separation of Hb species are subject to interference from carbamylated Hb (carb Hb). Carb Hb adducts are formed via interaction of terminal amino groups of HbA with isocyanic acid, after the spontaneous dissociation of urea to cyanate. It is hypothesized that a new immunoassay method, using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the N-terminus of the Hb beta-chain and its sugar moiety, should be refractory to cross-reactive interference from carb Hb. To test this hypothesis, Hb was carbamylated in vitro and co-migration of carb Hb assessed with HbA1C using an electrophoretic method. Densitometric scans - post sodium cyanate incubation and electrophoretic separation - showed a 5 to 7 fold elevation of the HbA1C peak only, while HbA1C values obtained using immunoassay were unaffected. Also assessed was carbamylation interference in vivo, and a positive proportional bias with the electrophoretic system (Y) was observed compared to the immunoassay system (X) (y = 1.2x - 0.21 percent). Others have shown that carb Hb may cause a clinically significant false elevation in patient HbA1C values, when methods based on charge separation of Hb species are used. It is our conclusion, however, that while carb Hb may play a role, the differences observed in this study are largely due to calibration.

  11. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... polypeptide chains). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... polypeptide chains). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... polypeptide chains). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A 2 assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin A 2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... polypeptide chains). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A 2 assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin A 2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... polypeptide chains). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. CO cage recombination in hemoglobin : Picosecond photolysis and nanosecond observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, S.; Valat, P.; Tourbez, H.; Alpert, B.

    1986-07-01

    Carboxy hemoglobin in aqueous solution was photodissociated by laser pulses of 30 ps at 532 nm. Kinetic studies show that only upon complete photodissociation can the pure CO geminate binding process be revealed. The protein region of the iron cage, where the geminate ligand diffuses before reaching the heme, is smaller than a single subunit and larger than the heme pocket.

  17. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  18. MP4, a new nonvasoactive polyethylene glycol-hemoglobin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Robert M

    2004-09-01

    A new hemoglobin derivative, MP4, for use as a temporary oxygen-carrying plasma expander, has been prepared. The design of the molecule is based on novel criteria for optimized efficacy and safety, which include increased molecular radius, increased viscosity, increased oncotic pressure, and reduced p50. The chemical entity, MalPEG-Hb, is formulated at 4.2 g/dL in lactated Ringer's solution (MP4). It has a p50 of 5-6 mm Hg, oncotic pressure of 49 mm Hg and viscosity of 2.2 cPs. After 50% exchange transfusion with MP4, rats survive a 60% controlled hemorrhage in spite of total hemoglobin of 7.8 g/dL and plasma hemoglobin concentration of 1.6 g/dL. Although its binding affinity for NO is not different from that of purified hemoglobin A, it does not produce hypertension in a number of animal models and does not cause vasoconstriction in hamster microcirculation. Oxygen supply to tissue has been confirmed by direct observation in the hamster skinfold model, in which O2 release in precapillary and capillary vessels was quantified. The data demonstrate that the effectiveness of MP4 results from its ability to conserve O2 in precapillary vessels and release O2 in capillaries, thereby "targeting" O2 to hypoxic tissue. Preservation of functional capillary density and prevention of vasoconstriction further contribute to the effectiveness of this new formulation. MP4 is currently being tested in humans.

  19. Ultrasonic processing for recovery of chicken erythrocyte hemoglobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobin from chicken blood has been shown to be a good substitute for synthetic polymeric flocculants. One stage of processing the blood entails breaking open the cells and releasing the cytoplasmic contents; in the present study, we investigate the use of ultrasonic processing at this stage. Was...

  20. Correlations between oxygen affinity and sequence classifications of plant hemoglobins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants express three phylogenetic classes of hemoglobins (Hb) based on sequence analyses. Class 1 and 2 Hbs are full length globins with the classical 8 helix Mb-like fold, whereas Class 3 plant Hbs resemble the truncated globins found in bacteria. With the exception of the specialized leghemoglobin...

  1. Using a Poetry Reading on Hemoglobin to Enhance Subject Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Richard S.; Cording, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    student interest in the beauty and mystery of chemistry. A reading of the poem "Jerry-Built Forever" (on various aspects of hemoglobin) is used as an example; the poem is included in the article. Details of how the reading was performed and reactions of the…

  2. Hemoglobin, Growth, and Attention of Infants in Southern Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubuchon-Endsley, Nicki L.; Grant, Stephanie L.; Berhanu, Getenesh; Thomas, David G.; Schrader, Sarah E.; Eldridge, Devon; Kennedy, Tay; Hambidge, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Male and female infants from rural Ethiopia were tested to investigate relations among hemoglobin (Hb), anthropometry, and attention. A longitudinal design was used to examine differences in attention performance from 6 (M = 24.9 weeks, n = 89) to 9 months of age (M = 40.6 weeks, n = 85), differences hypothesized to be related to changes in iron…

  3. The Relationship Between Hemoglobin Level and Intellectual Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Nancy

    In a study to learn whether or not poor nutrition, as indicated by low hemoglobin levels, affects intelligence and behavior, 113 Head Start children in Missoula, Montana took part. Group testing with the Lorge Thorndike Intelligence Test and individual testing with the Wechsler and Primary Scale of Intelligence or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for…

  4. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  5. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. For the treatment of anemia in dogs by increasing systemic oxygen content (plasma hemoglobin concentration) and improving the clinical signs associated with anemia, regardless of the cause of anemia (hemolysis, blood loss, or ineffective erythropoiesis). (3) Limitations. For intravenous use...

  6. Plant Hemoglobins: A Molecular Fossil Record for the Evolutin of Oxygen Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy,J.; Robinson, H.; Trent, lll, J.; Kakar, S.; Smagghe, B.; Hargrove, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins occurred on at least two independent occasions. The earliest event led to myoglobin and red blood cell hemoglobin in animals. In plants, oxygen transport 'leghemoglobins' evolved much more recently. In both events, pentacoordinate heme sites capable of inert oxygen transfer evolved from hexacoordinate hemoglobins that have unrelated functions. High sequence homology between hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate hemoglobins in plants has poised them for potential structural analysis leading to a molecular understanding of this important evolutionary event. However, the lack of a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin structure in the exogenously ligand-bound form has prevented such comparison. Here we report the crystal structure of the cyanide-bound hexacoordinate hemoglobin from barley. This presents the first opportunity to examine conformational changes in plant hexacoordinate hemoglobins upon exogenous ligand binding, and reveals structural mechanisms for stabilizing the high-energy pentacoordinate heme conformation critical to the evolution of reversible oxygen binding hemoglobins.

  7. Plant hemoglobins: a molecular fossil record for the evolution of oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Julie A; Robinson, Howard; Trent, James T; Kakar, Smita; Smagghe, Benoit J; Hargrove, Mark S

    2007-08-03

    The evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins occurred on at least two independent occasions. The earliest event led to myoglobin and red blood cell hemoglobin in animals. In plants, oxygen transport "leghemoglobins" evolved much more recently. In both events, pentacoordinate heme sites capable of inert oxygen transfer evolved from hexacoordinate hemoglobins that have unrelated functions. High sequence homology between hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate hemoglobins in plants has poised them for potential structural analysis leading to a molecular understanding of this important evolutionary event. However, the lack of a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin structure in the exogenously ligand-bound form has prevented such comparison. Here we report the crystal structure of the cyanide-bound hexacoordinate hemoglobin from barley. This presents the first opportunity to examine conformational changes in plant hexacoordinate hemoglobins upon exogenous ligand binding, and reveals structural mechanisms for stabilizing the high-energy pentacoordinate heme conformation critical to the evolution of reversible oxygen binding hemoglobins.

  8. Manipulation of hemoglobin expression affects Arabidopsis shoot organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Over the past few years non-symbiotic plant hemoglobins have been described in a variety of plant species where they fulfill several functions ranging from detoxification processes to basic aspects of plant growth and post-embryonic development. To date no information is available on the role of hemoglobins during in vitro morphogenesis. Shoot organogenesis was induced in Arabidopsis lines constitutively expressing class 1, 2 and 3 hemoglobins (GLB1, 2 and 3) and lines in which the respective genes were either downregulated by RNAi (GLB1) or knocked out (GLB2 and GLB3). The process was executed by culturing root explants on an initial auxin-rich callus induction medium (CIM) followed by a transfer onto a cytokinin-containing shoot induction medium (SIM). While the repression of GLB2 inhibited organogenesis the over-expression of GLB1 or GLB2 enhanced the number of shoots produced in culture, and altered the transcript levels of genes participating in cytokinin perception and signalling. The up-regulation of GLB1 or GLB2 activated CKI1 and AHK3, genes encoding cytokinin receptors and affected the transcript levels of cytokinin responsive regulators (ARRs). The expression of Type-A ARRs (ARR4, 5, 7, 15, and 16), feed-back repressors of the cytokinin pathway, was repressed in both hemoglobin over-expressors whereas that of several Type-B ARRs (ARR2, 12, and 13), transcription activators of cytokinin-responsive genes, was induced. Such changes enhanced the sensitivity of the root explants to cytokinin allowing the 35S::GLB1 and 35S::GLB2 lines to produce shoots at low cytokinin concentrations which did not promote organogenesis in the WT line. These results show that manipulation of hemoglobin can modify shoot organogenesis in Arabidopsis and possibly in those systems partially or completely unresponsive to applications of exogenous cytokinins.

  9. Low NO Concentration Dependence of Reductive Nitrosylation Reaction of Hemoglobin*

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Jesús; Basu, Swati; Helms, Christine; Hogg, Neil; King, S. Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    The reductive nitrosylation of ferric (met)hemoglobin is of considerable interest and remains incompletely explained. We have previously observed that at low NO concentrations the reaction with tetrameric hemoglobin occurs with an observed rate constant that is at least 5 times faster than that observed at higher concentrations. This was ascribed to a faster reaction of NO with a methemoglobin-nitrite complex. We now report detailed studies of this reaction of low NO with methemoglobin. Nitric oxide paradoxically reacts with ferric hemoglobin with faster observed rate constants at the lower NO concentration in a manner that is not affected by changes in nitrite concentration, suggesting that it is not a competition between NO and nitrite, as we previously hypothesized. By evaluation of the fast reaction in the presence of allosteric effectors and isolated β- and α-chains of hemoglobin, it appears that NO reacts with a subpopulation of β-subunit ferric hemes whose population is influenced by quaternary state, redox potential, and hemoglobin dimerization. To further characterize the role of nitrite, we developed a system that oxidizes nitrite to nitrate to eliminate nitrite contamination. Removal of nitrite does not alter reaction kinetics, but modulates reaction products, with a decrease in the formation of S-nitrosothiols. These results are consistent with the formation of NO2/N2O3 in the presence of nitrite. The observed fast reductive nitrosylation observed at low NO concentrations may function to preserve NO bioactivity via primary oxidation of NO to form nitrite or in the presence of nitrite to form N2O3 and S-nitrosothiols. PMID:22493289

  10. Induction of Hemoglobin Accumulation in Human K562 Cells by Hemin is Reversible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Ann; Erard, Francois; Schneider, Arthur B.; Schechter, Alan N.

    1981-04-01

    Twenty micromolar hemin causes no change in the rate of division of K562 cells but results in accumulation of 11 to 14 picograms of embryonic and fetal hemoglobins per cell. This effect is reversible, and hemoglobin induction in response to hemin, and loss of hemoglobin upon removal of hemin, can be cyclically repeated. The cells can be indefinitely subcultured in the presence of the inducer. Thus, the control of hemoglobin levels in K562 cells does not depend on irreversible differentiation.

  11. Error in noninvasive spectrophotometric measurement of blood hemoglobin concentration under conditions of blood loss.

    PubMed

    Naftalovich, Rotem; Naftalovich, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses a current misinterpretation between different parameters of hemoglobin concentration measurement and its amplification under conditions of blood loss. The paper details the distinction between microcirculatory hematocrit and the hematocrit of the macrocirculation to analyze clinical use of real-time patient hemoglobin concentration measurement by noninvasive point-of-care devices such as the Rainbow Pulse CO-Oximetry™ (Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA). The hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit values have clinical significance such as for diagnosing anemia or as indicators to when a blood transfusion is needed. The device infers hemoglobin concentration from spectrophotometry of the fingertip and therefore the measured absorption is due to hemoglobin present in capillaries as well as in larger vessels, and the device accordingly reports the hemoglobin concentration as 'total hemoglobin' in a proprietary SpHb parameter. SpHb and macro hemoglobin concentration are different parameters. However, the numerical resemblance of SpHb values to values of macro hemoglobin concentrations, combined with the widely used unspecified term "Hb" in the medical setting, suggests that SpHb values are often interpreted by the clinician as macro hematocrit values. The claim of this paper is that under conditions of blood loss the portion of the SpHb total hemoglobin measure that is contributed from microcirculation increases, due to the decrease of macro hematocrit while microcirculatory hematocrit remains constant when above a critical value. The device is calibrated from phlembotomy drawn blood (from a vein in the arm), which is the gold standard in blood collection, and hence this changing contribution of microcirculatory hemoglobin to the SpHb value would distort the gap between macro hemoglobin and total hemoglobin, SpHb. The hypothesis is that if clinicians indeed interpret the SpHb values as macro hemoglobin values then there is an unreported discrepancy between

  12. Phase characterization of oscillatory components of the cerebral concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierro, Michele; Sassaroli, Angelo; Zheng, Feng; Fantini, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    We present a study of the relative phase of oscillations of cerebral oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations in the low-frequency range, namely 0.04-0.12 Hz. We have characterized the potential contributions of noise to the measured phase distributions, and we have performed phase measurements on the brain of a human subject at rest, and on the brain of a human subject during stage I sleep. While phase distributions of pseudo hemodynamic oscillations generated from noise (obtained by applying to two independent sets of random numbers the same linear transformation that converts absorption coefficients at 690 and 830 nm into concentrations of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin) are peaked at 180º, those associated with real hemodynamic changes can be peaked around any value depending on the underlying physiology and hemodynamics. In particular, preliminary results reported here indicate a greater phase lead of deoxy-hemoglobin vs. oxy-hemoglobin low-frequency oscillations during stage I sleep (82º +/- 55º) than while the subject is awake (19º +/- 58º).

  13. Targeted O2 delivery by low-p50 hemoglobin: a new basis for hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    We have proposed new criteria for a successful cell-free, hemoglobin-based O2 carrier. These include increased molecular radius, increased viscosity, increased oncotic pressure, and reduced p50. A new molecule, MalPEG-Hb, formulated at 4.2g/dL in lactated Ringer's solution (MP4), has been produced according to these new criteria. MP4 has a p50 of 5-6 mm Hg, oncotic pressure of 49mm Hg and viscosity of 2.2cPs. After 50% exchange transfusion with MP4, rats survive a 60% controlled hemorrhage in spite of total hemoglobin of 7.8 g/dL and plasma hemoglobin concentration of 1.6 g/dL. This model results in 50% mortality in control animals and 100% mortality in animals exchange-transfused with either crosslinked or polymerized hemoglobin. Oxygen supply to tissue was measured directly in the hamster skinfold model, in which O2 release in precapillary and capillary vessels can be quantified. The data demonstrate that the effectiveness of MP4 results from its ability to conserve O2 in precapillary vessels and release O2 in capillaries, thereby "targeting" O2 to hypoxic tissue. Preservation of functional capillary density and prevention of vasoconstriction further contribute to the effectiveness of this new formulation.

  14. Crystal structure of hemoglobin from the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Valmir; Canduri, Fernanda; Olivieri, Johnny R; Smarra, André L S; Colombo, Marcio F; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2003-12-01

    Crystal structure of hemoglobin isolated from the Brazilian maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) was determined using standard molecular replacement technique and refined using maximum-likelihood and simulated annealing protocols to 1.87A resolution. Structural and functional comparisons between hemoglobins from the Chrysocyon brachyurus and Homo sapiens are discussed, in order to provide further insights in the comparative biochemistry of vertebrate hemoglobins.

  15. Two-dimensional analysis of glycated hemoglobin heterogeneity in pediatric type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Hempe, James M; McGehee, Amanda M; Chalew, Stuart A

    2013-11-15

    Interindividual and ethnic variation in glycated hemoglobin levels, unrelated to blood glucose variation, complicates the clinical use of glycated hemoglobin assays for the diagnosis and management of diabetes. Assessing the types and amounts of glycated hemoglobins present in erythrocytes could provide insight into the mechanism. Blood samples and self-monitored mean blood glucose (MBG) levels were obtained from 85 pediatric type 1 diabetes patients. Glycated hemoglobin levels were measured using three primary assays (boronate-affinity chromatography, capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), and standardized DCA2000+ immunoassay) and a two-dimensional (2D) analytical system consisting of boronate-affinity chromatography followed by CIEF. The 2D system separated hemoglobin into five subfractions, four of which contained glycated hemoglobins. Glycated hemoglobin measurements were compared in patients with low, moderate, or high hemoglobin glycation index (HGI), a measure of glycated hemoglobin controlled for blood glucose variation. MBG was not significantly different between HGI groups. Glycated hemoglobin levels measured by all three primary assays and in all four glycated 2D subfractions were significantly different between HGI groups and highest in high HGI patients. These results show that interindividual variation in glycated hemoglobin levels was evident in diabetes patients with similar blood glucose levels regardless of which glycated hemoglobins were measured.

  16. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  17. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Hemoglobin... discuss blood donor hemoglobin and hematocrit qualification standards in the United States, its impact...

  18. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  19. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  20. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  2. Phenotypic expression of hemoglobins A₂, E and F in various hemoglobin E related disorders.

    PubMed

    Sae-ung, Nattaya; Srivorakun, Hataichanok; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Yamsri, Supawadee; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2012-01-15

    Study on the phenotypic expression of hemoglobin (Hb) A(2) and Hb E in Hb E disorders has been difficult due to the co-separation of Hb A(2) and Hb E in most Hb analysis assays. Because these two Hbs are separated on capillary electrophoresis, we studied phenotypic expression of Hbs A(2), E and F in various Hb E disorders using this system. This was done on 362 subjects with several Hb E disorders including heterozygous Hb E, homozygous Hb E, β-thalassemia/Hb E, δβ-thalassemia/Hb E, and Hb Lepore/Hb E and those of these disorders with several forms of α-thalassemia. Normal controls showed Hb A(2) of 2.7 ± 0.3%. Heterozygous Hb E and homozygous Hb E had elevated Hb A(2) i.e. 3.8 ± 0.3% and 4.8 ± 0.5%, respectively. Further elevations were observed for β(0)-thalassemia/Hb E (6.1 ± 1.9%) and β(+)-thalassemia/Hb E (7.1 ± 1.2%). Interestingly, no elevation of Hb A(2) was found in the δβ-thalassemia/Hb E, and Hb Lepore/Hb E (2.3 ± 0.3%) but higher Hb F levels were noted which could be useful diagnostic markers. The levels of Hb E were variable. Co-inheritance of these Hb E disorders with α-thalassemia were associated with lower outputs of Hb E and Hb F but the levels of Hb A(2) were not altered. Different phenotypic expression of Hb A(2), Hb E and Hb F could help in differential diagnosis of these Hb E related disorders commonly encountered in the regions where access to molecular techniques is limited.

  3. Noninvasive investigation of skin local hypothermia influence upon local oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douplik, Alexandre Y.; Kessler, Manfred D.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, Alfons

    1997-08-01

    Functional evaluation of local hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation based on back scattering spectra from human skin in vivo have been obtained in visible range (502 - 628 nm) by a rapid microlightguide spectrometer (EMPHO II) with step 250 micrometer. Analysis of received results has shown that during local cooling there is two nearly simultaneous reactions: reduction of hemoglobin concentration and increase of hemoglobin oxygenation level. In a case when one has used previous heating of planning place for cooling, reduction of hemoglobin concentration is expressed higher by 22 - 33%.

  4. Double filaments in fibers and crystals of deoxygenated hemoglobin S

    SciTech Connect

    Magdoff-Fairchild, B.; Chiu, C.C.

    1980-10-01

    Sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) molecules in solution or in SS erythrocytes (those from individuals homozygous for the sickle hemoglobin gene), when deoxygenated, aggregate to form fibers that pack into paracrystalline arrays. The diminished oxygen affinity of HbS is produced by the polymerization, and the distortion of the pliant erythrocyte membrane is produced by the polymerization, and the distortion of the pliant erythrocyte membrane in sickle cell disease results from the elongation of polymers and their subsequent alignment. One of the important problems to be solved in sickle cell disease is the definition of the intermolecular interactions that stabilize the fiber structure. Knowledge of these interactions might lead to the design of stereospecific antisickling agents for clinical use that could inhibit polymerization or could at least destabilize the fiber.

  5. Virucidal levels of ozone induce hemolysis and hemoglobin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.J.; Wagner, K.F.; Friedman, L.I.; Benade, L.F. )

    1991-10-01

    The animal virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and the bacterial virus, phi 6, were inactivated by greater than 4 log10 in response to incubation with 13 to 14 mL of 1.4 mmol per L (65 micrograms/mL) to 1.6 mmol per L (75 micrograms/mL) of overlaid ozone in virus-spiked, dilute, red cell suspensions. Virus inactivation was greatly inhibited when ozone was overlaid in the presence of high-hematocrit red cells or, to a lesser degree, high levels of plasma. At hematocrits at which 5 to 6 log10 of VSV were inactivated, ozone caused 30-percent hemolysis, as measured by the loss of total cellular hemoglobin. Unexpectedly, this level of hemolysis could not be observed in supernatants because of the ozone-induced destruction (bleaching) of extracellular hemoglobin. These results suggest that ozone may have little biological specificity for damaging viruses over red cells.

  6. Predictable convergence in hemoglobin function has unpredictable molecular underpinnings.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Hoffmann, Federico G; Weber, Roy E; Fago, Angela; Witt, Christopher C; Storz, Jay F

    2016-10-21

    To investigate the predictability of genetic adaptation, we examined the molecular basis of convergence in hemoglobin function in comparisons involving 56 avian taxa that have contrasting altitudinal range limits. Convergent increases in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity were pervasive among high-altitude taxa, but few such changes were attributable to parallel amino acid substitutions at key residues. Thus, predictable changes in biochemical phenotype do not have a predictable molecular basis. Experiments involving resurrected ancestral proteins revealed that historical substitutions have context-dependent effects, indicating that possible adaptive solutions are contingent on prior history. Mutations that produce an adaptive change in one species may represent precluded possibilities in other species because of differences in genetic background.

  7. [The critical hemoglobin/hematocrit value in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Huch, R

    1992-01-01

    During pregnancy, there are characteristics changes in the hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Compared with the norm for nonpregnant women, there is an increase in the total number of erythrocytes and in the plasma volume. An overproportional increase of the latter results in hydremia. The normal physiologic range for hemoglobin during pregnancy is 11.5-13.0 (13.5) g/dl; anemia is, by definition, present when the values are under 11 g/dl and is quite common in pregnancy. Since it is caused almost exclusively (95%) by iron deficiency, iron therapy or routine iron supplementation can influence its incidence. Values outside the norm range are associated with complications during pregnancy and with growth retardation of the fetus.

  8. Effects of porcine hemoglobin on serum lipid content and fecal lipid excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of dietary hemoglobin on serum and liver lipid contents in rats, and the ability of hemoglobin hydrolysates to disrupt lipid absorption. After rats had been fed on casein- or porcine hemoglobin-containing diets for 4 weeks, their serum and liver lipid contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion were measured. To elucidate the mechanism of lipid absorption by dietary hemoglobin, we also examined lipase activity, micellar solubility of cholesterol, and bile acid binding activity in the presence of hemoglobin hydrolysates. Dietary hemoglobin decreased serum and liver triglyceride and cholesterol contents and increased fecal fatty acid, cholesterol, and bile acid excretion. In addition, hemoglobin hydrolysates inhibited lipase activity compared with casein hydrolysates in an in vitro study. These results suggested that the hypolipidemic effect of hemoglobin is mediated by increased fecal lipid excretion, and that decreased lipase activity by hemoglobin is at least partially responsible for this result. The observed effects were documented with an 8 g/kg hemoglobin diet, which is lower than in other studies; therefore. hemoglobin may be useful in the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.

  9. Hemoglobin is present as a canonical α2β2 tetramer in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberta; Zucchelli, Silvia; Codrich, Marta; Marcuzzi, Federica; Verde, Cinzia; Gustincich, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Hemoglobin is the oxygen carrier in blood erythrocytes. Oxygen coordination is mediated by α2β2 tetrameric structure via binding of the ligand to the heme iron atom. This structure is essential for hemoglobin function in the blood. In the last few years, expression of hemoglobin has been found in atypical sites, including the brain. Transcripts for α and β chains of hemoglobin as well as hemoglobin immunoreactivity have been shown in mesencephalic A9 dopaminergic neurons, whose selective degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease. To gain further insights into the roles of hemoglobin in the brain, we examined its quaternary structure in dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that (i) in mouse dopaminergic cell line stably over-expressing α and β chains, hemoglobin exists as an α2β2 tetramer; (ii) similarly to the over-expressed protein, endogenous hemoglobin forms a tetramer of 64kDa; (iii) hemoglobin also forms high molecular weight insoluble aggregates; and (iv) endogenous hemoglobin retains its tetrameric structure in mouse mesencephalon in vivo. In conclusion, these results suggest that neuronal hemoglobin may be endowed with some of the biochemical activities and biological function associated to its role in erythroid cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  10. Site-specific semisynthetic variant of human hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hefta, S.A.; Lyle, S.B.; Busch, M.R.; Harris, D.E.; Matthew, J.B.; Gurd, F.R.N.

    1988-02-01

    A single round of Edman degradation was employed to remove the NH/sub 2/-terminal valine from isolated ..cap alpha.. chains of human hemoglobin. Reconstitution of normal ..beta.. chains with truncated or substituted ..cap alpha.. chains was used to form truncated (des-Val/sup 1/-..cap alpha..1) and substituted (((1-/sup 13/C)Gly/sup 1/)..cap alpha..1) tetrameric hemoglobin analogs. Structural homology of the analogs with untreated native hemoglobin was established by using several spectroscopic and physical methods. Functional studies indicate that the reconstituted tetrameric protein containing des-Val/sup 1/-..cap alpha.. chains has a higher affinity for oxygen, is less influenced by chloride ions or 2,3-biphosphoglycerate, and shows lower cooperativity than native hemoglobin. These results confirm the key functional role of the ..cap alpha..-chain NH/sub 2/ terminus in mediating cooperative oxygen binding across the dimer interface. The NH/sub 2/-terminal pK/sub 1/2/ value was determined for the (/sup 13/C)glycine-substituted analog to be 7.46 +/- 0.09 at 15/sup 0/C in the carbon monoxide-liganded form. This value, measured directly by /sup 13/C NMR, agrees with the determination made by the less-direct /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ method and confirms the role of this residue as a contributor to the alkaline Bohr effect; however, it is consistent with the presence of an NH/sub 2/-terminal salt bridge to the carboxylate of Arg-141 of the ..cap alpha.. chain in the liganded form.

  11. Hepcidin level predicts hemoglobin concentration in individuals undergoing repeated phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E; Schlumpf, Karen S; Wright, David J; Johnson, Bryce; Glynn, Simone A; Busch, Michael P; Olbina, Gordana; Westerman, Mark; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2013-08-01

    Dietary iron absorption is regulated by hepcidin, an iron regulatory protein produced by the liver. Hepcidin production is regulated by iron stores, erythropoiesis and inflammation, but its physiology when repeated blood loss occurs has not been characterized. Hepcidin was assayed in plasma samples obtained from 114 first-time/reactivated (no blood donations in preceding 2 years) female donors and 34 frequent (≥3 red blood cell donations in preceding 12 months) male donors as they were phlebotomized ≥4 times over 18-24 months. Hepcidin levels were compared to ferritin and hemoglobin levels using multivariable repeated measures regression models. Hepcidin, ferritin and hemoglobin levels declined with increasing frequency of donation in the first-time/reactivated females. Hepcidin and ferritin levels correlated well with each other (Spearman's correlation of 0.74), but on average hepcidin varied more between donations for a given donor relative to ferritin. In a multivariable repeated measures regression model the predicted inter-donation decline in hemoglobin varied as a function of hepcidin and ferritin; hemoglobin was 0.51 g/dL lower for subjects with low (>45.7 ng/mL) or decreasing hepcidin and low ferritin (>26 ng/mL), and was essentially zero for other subjects including those with high (>45.7 ng/mL) or increasing hepcidin and low ferritin (>26 ng/mL) levels (P<0.001). In conclusion, hepcidin levels change rapidly in response to dietary iron needed for erythropoiesis. The dynamic regulation of hepcidin in the presence of a low levels of ferritin suggests that plasma hepcidin concentration may provide clinically useful information about an individual's iron status (and hence capacity to tolerate repeated blood donations) beyond that of ferritin alone. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00097006.

  12. Relationship of Hemoglobin to Arterial Oxygen Desaturation during Aeromedical Evacuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-02

    shock). Hemorrhagic anemia 1 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Case Number: 88ABW-2015-2159, 4 May 2015...and/or elevated alveolar/arterial gradient. Current Air Force AE standards call for correction of anemia in patients with pre-flight hemoglobin of...potential impact of this relationship. This study was also intended to evaluate the potential impact of preexisting anemia on patient physiology during

  13. Hemoglobin Status and Externalizing Behavioral Problems in Children

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianhua; Cui, Naixue; Zhou, Guoping; Ai, Yuexian; Sun, Guiju; Zhao, Sophie R.; Liu, Jianghong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Still considered one of the most prevalent nutritional problems in the world, anemia has been shown in many studies to have deleterious effects on neurobehavioral development. While most research efforts have focused on investigating the effects of anemia on social and emotional development of infants by using a cross-sectional design, research is still needed to investigate whether early childhood anemia, beyond infantile years, is linked with behavioral problems. Objective: This study assessed whether (1) hemoglobin (Hb) levels in early childhood are associated with externalizing behavior; and (2) this relationship is confounded by social adversity. Methods: Hemoglobin levels were taken from children (N = 98) of the China Jintan Cohort Study at age 4 years, and externalizing behaviors (attention and aggression) were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist (ASEBA-CBCL) at age 6 years (mean age 5.77 ± 0.39 years old). Results: Compared with other children in the sample, children with relatively lower Hb levels at age 4 had more behavioral problems in both attention and aggression at age 6, independent of social adversity. For boys, this association was significant for attention problems, which did not interact with social adversity. For girls, the association was significant for aggression, which interacted with social adversity. While girls on average exhibited higher social adversity than boys, the main effect of Hb was only significant in girls with low social adversity. Conclusions: These results indicate that there is an inverse association between hemoglobin levels and later behavioral problems. Findings of this study suggest that regular monitoring of children’s hemoglobin levels and appropriate intervention may help with early identification of behavioral problems. PMID:27472352

  14. 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance studies to the binding of isocyanides to various hemoglobins and myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Dill, K; Satterlee, J D; Richards, J H

    1978-10-03

    Interactions between ethyl and isopropyl isocyanides and various hemoglobins and myoglobins have been studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. The results indicate that the chemical shift of the bound isocyanide depends on the structure of the hemoglobin subunit or myoglobin. The resonances exhibited by isocyanides bound to myoglobin are sensitive to pH in contrast to the situation with rabbit and human hemoglobins. beta subunits of opossum, rabbit, and human hemoglobins show a significantly greater preferential affinity for CO relative to EIC than do alpha subunits which have allowed the assignment of resonances. Rabbit, human, and opossum hemoglobin subunits bind ethyl isocyanide without observable preferences and an excess of DPG does not appear to affect this random order of ligation. In contrast, an excess of IHP seems to cause preferential ligation of the alpha subunits in these hemoglobins. The results have been used to gain insights into the differing characteristics of the ligand binding pockets of these various hemoglobins.

  15. Methodologies for detection of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Catrin; Alma, Chris; Howe, Chris; Kazlauskas, Rymantas; Trout, Graham

    2005-01-01

    Blood substitutes based on hemoglobin or hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) are oxygen-carrying therapeutic agents developed for use in operations and emergencies in place of donated blood. Increased oxygen-carrying capacity through the use of blood substitutes could help elite athletes to lengthen endurance capacity and improve their performance. As blood substitutes become more readily available, it is essential that a qualitative detection method for their abuse in sport is available. Ideally, such a method would be simple and inexpensive. This study investigates methods that could be used as screening procedures to easily detect HBOCs in plasma and develops tests that can unequivocally confirm their presence. The investigation into the screening method indicates that the direct visual screening of plasma discoloration is the most appropriate with detection limits of less than 1% HBOC in plasma. Two methods are shown to confirm the presence of exogenous hemoglobin in plasma samples, size-exclusion chromatography with photodiode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of enzymatic digests with detection by electrospray mass spectrometry. This work emphasizes the need for cooperation between drug developers and sports testing laboratories to ensure that methods for the detection of putative doping agents are available prior to product release.

  16. Methylation of cysteine in hemoglobin following exposure to methylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, E.; Connors, T.A.; Farmer, P.B.; Gorf, S.M.; Rickard, J.

    1981-06-01

    In addition to reacting with biologically important nucleophilic sites in DNA, alkylating agents also interact with amino acids in proteins. Measurements of the extent of formation of these alkyl amino acids may be used as a means of determining exposure to these compounds. The degree of S-methylation of cysteine in hemoglobin was studied following in vivo exposure of rats to methyl methanesulfonate, dimethylnitrosamine, and 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide. A linear dose-response curve was observed for methyl methanesulfonate over a 100-fold dose range. For dimethylnitrosamine, there was a threshold of doses where no methylation could be detected, and a curved dose-response curve was obtained. At high doses, the degree of methylation of hemoglobin cysteine was 7-fold lower than that with methyl methanesulfonate. In vivo, no alkylation could be observed with 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide; however, the existence of naturally occurring S-methylcysteine in the rat hemoglobin may have overshadowed small increases in alkylation arising from exposure to this compound. The natural occurrence of S-methylcysteine was studied in 13 species, and amounts ranging from 5.6 nmol/g globin (hamster) to 481 nmol/g globin (partridge) were observed. The reason for its occurrence is unknown but is under investigation.

  17. Direct estimation of evoked hemoglobin changes by multimodality fusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Diamond, Solomon G.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, both diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD)-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods have been developed as noninvasive tools for imaging evoked cerebral hemodynamic changes in studies of brain activity. Although these two technologies measure functional contrast from similar physiological sources, i.e., changes in hemoglobin levels, these two modalities are based on distinct physical and biophysical principles leading to both limitations and strengths to each method. In this work, we describe a unified linear model to combine the complimentary spatial, temporal, and spectroscopic resolutions of concurrently measured optical tomography and fMRI signals. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate that concurrent optical and BOLD measurements can be used to create cross-calibrated estimates of absolute micromolar deoxyhemoglobin changes. We apply this new analysis tool to experimental data acquired simultaneously with both DOT and BOLD imaging during a motor task, demonstrate the ability to more robustly estimate hemoglobin changes in comparison to DOT alone, and show how this approach can provide cross-calibrated estimates of hemoglobin changes. Using this multimodal method, we estimate the calibration of the 3 tesla BOLD signal to be −0.55% ± 0.40% signal change per micromolar change of deoxyhemoglobin. PMID:19021411

  18. Hemoglobin dynamics in red blood cells: correlation to body temperature.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Digel, I; Artmann, G M; Embs, J P; Zaccai, G; Büldt, G

    2008-12-01

    A transition in hemoglobin behavior at close to body temperature has been discovered recently by micropipette aspiration experiments on single red blood cells (RBCs) and circular dichroism spectroscopy on hemoglobin solutions. The transition temperature was directly correlated to the body temperatures of a variety of species. In an exploration of the molecular basis for the transition, we present neutron scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of hemoglobin dynamics in whole human RBCs in vivo. The data reveal a change in the geometry of internal protein motions at 36.9 degrees C, at human body temperature. Above that temperature, amino acid side-chain motions occupy larger volumes than expected from normal temperature dependence, indicating partial unfolding of the protein. Global protein diffusion in RBCs was also measured and the findings compared favorably with theoretical predictions for short-time self-diffusion of noncharged hard-sphere colloids. The results demonstrated that changes in molecular dynamics in the picosecond time range and angstrom length scale might well be connected to a macroscopic effect on whole RBCs that occurs at body temperature.

  19. Chronic mountain sickness, optimal hemoglobin, and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Enrique; Spielvogel, Hilde

    2006-01-01

    For the male inhabitants of La Paz, Bolivia (3200-4100 m), and other high altitude regions in America and Asia, chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is a major health problem. Since CMS was first described by Carlos Monge in the Peruvian Andes in 1925, numerous research papers have been devoted to this topic, but many unanswered questions still exist with respect to the beginning of the disease and its cause(s). The experience with CMS has shown that an excessively high hemoglobin concentration is not favorable for high altitude acclimatization, and the hypothesis of theoretically "optimal" hematocrit and "optimal" hemoglobin has been made. The calculated optimal hemoglobin concentration of 14.7 g/dL for resting men in the Andes is discussed as theoretical and not applicable in real life. The most frequent congenital and acquired heart diseases are discussed, such as patent ductus, atrial septum defect, ventricle septum defect among congenital heart diseases and the still very frequent rheumatic valve cardiopathies and Chagas disease as acquired cardiopathies. Among the typical acquired heart diseases of the high altitude dweller, special attention is given to chronic cor pulmonale as a consequence of severe CMS with pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Geminate combination of oxygen with iron-cobalt hybrid hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Morris, R J; Gibson, Q H; Ikeda-Saito, M; Yonetani, T

    1984-06-10

    Photodissociation of oxygen from the ferrous subunits of hybrid hemoglobins in which the heme of either the alpha or the beta chain has been replaced by cobalt protoporphyrin IX shows large differences between the subunits. With a 25-ns light pulse, the apparent quantum yield at the end of the flash is greater for the beta-iron hybrid than for the alpha-iron hybrid. With the beta-iron hybrid, the yield is greater when solution conditions favor the T-state. After the flash, a part of the oxygen which has been dissociated recombines with a half-time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The proportion is greatest in the R-state at low temperature and least in the T-state. With the alpha-iron hybrid, oxygen is much less readily removed, and the rapid recombination is slight or absent. It is seen most clearly at low temperatures in conditions which favor the T-state. The long term (greater than 100 ns) effect is that oxygen is much more readily removed from the beta-iron hybrid in the T-state than under any other condition. Analogous flash experiments performed with human hemoglobin A may be closely simulated by superposition of the results obtained with the two hybrid hemoglobins under the same conditions. Isolated human alpha and beta--SH chains show differences similar to, but less marked than, those of the iron-cobalt hybrids.

  1. A model for ligand binding to hexacoordinate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Trent, J T; Hvitved, A N; Hargrove, M S

    2001-05-22

    Hexacoordinate hemoglobins are heme proteins capable of reversible intramolecular coordination of the ligand binding site by an amino acid side chain from within the heme pocket. Examples of these proteins are found in many living organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. The nonsymbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) are a class of hexacoordinate heme proteins present in all plants. The nsHb from rice (rHb1) has been used as a model system to develop methods for determining rate constants characterizing binding and dissociation of the His residue responsible for hexacoordination. Measurement of these reactions exploits laser flash photolysis to initiate the reaction from the unligated, pentacoordinate form of the heme protein. A model for ligand binding is presented that incorporates the reaction following rapid mixing with the reaction starting from the pentacoordinate hemoglobin (Hb). This model is based on results indicating that ligand binding to hexacoordinate Hbs is not a simple combination of competing first order (hexacoordination) and second order (exogenous ligand binding) reactions. Ligand binding following rapid mixing is a multiphasic reaction displaying time courses ranging from milliseconds to minutes. The new model incorporates a "closed", slow reacting form of the protein that is not at rapid equilibrium with the reactive conformation. It is also demonstrated that formation of the closed protein species is not dependent on hexacoordination.

  2. Application of glycated hemoglobin in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiyan; Qi, Xiaorong; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a special fragment formed by the binding of glucose to the C chain or D chain of hemoglobin A and as a result of non-enzymatic catalysis of mature hemoglobin and glucose, which is an indicator used to evaluate the blood glucose control in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Recent researches indicated that HbA1c could be applied in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pregnancy combined DM, and increasing of HbA1c was close associated with adverse outcomes of women with pregnancy combined DM and GDM. HbA1c was reported to have a significant importance in monitoring congenital malformation, abortion, perinatal mortality, preeclampsia, postpartum abnormal glucose metabolism, vascular complications and so on, which could be a test item during the second trimester. Sensitivity of HbA1c in diagnoses of DM is lower than oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), thus OGTT is still the golden standard of GDM. Emphasis should be put on standardization of detection and threshold of HbA1c and establishment of HbA1c normal ranges of different trimesters, when HbA1c is used to diagnose pregnancy combined DM and GDM, and evaluate effects of treatments. PMID:25663962

  3. Relationship of Hemoglobin Concentration in Adult Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, S; Nessa, A; Islam, M F; Husain, M F; Khatun, N; Wahed, F; Zannat, M R; Tajkia, T

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Asthma is one of the most common diseases globally and currently affects 300 million people. The epidemic rise in anemia, asthma, and related allergic disease is a common major public health problem worldwide. Asthma and anemia associated with acute infections occur both in children and adults. This descriptive type of cross sectional study was done to find out the levels of hemoglobin concentration in adult asthmatic patients and carried out in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2014 to January 2016. Fifty (50) male and 50 (fifty) female adult asthmatic patients aged 18-60 years were included in the study group. They are enrolled from the Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh and also from locality. For comparison age matched 50 male and 50 female apparently healthy persons were also studied as control. Hemoglobin concentration was estimated by Cyanmethemoglobin method. For statistical analysis unpaired student's 't' test was used. Mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly decreased in study group in comparison to control group and the result was statistically significant (p<0.001). The study findings showed a high prevalence of anemia among asthmatic patients than non asthmatic healthy persons.

  4. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships in the Truncated Hemoglobin Family

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Juan P.; Radusky, Leandro; Boechi, Leonardo; Estrin, Darío A.; ten Have, Arjen; Martí, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting function from sequence is an important goal in current biological research, and although, broad functional assignment is possible when a protein is assigned to a family, predicting functional specificity with accuracy is not straightforward. If function is provided by key structural properties and the relevant properties can be computed using the sequence as the starting point, it should in principle be possible to predict function in detail. The truncated hemoglobin family presents an interesting benchmark study due to their ubiquity, sequence diversity in the context of a conserved fold and the number of characterized members. Their functions are tightly related to O2 affinity and reactivity, as determined by the association and dissociation rate constants, both of which can be predicted and analyzed using in-silico based tools. In the present work we have applied a strategy, which combines homology modeling with molecular based energy calculations, to predict and analyze function of all known truncated hemoglobins in an evolutionary context. Our results show that truncated hemoglobins present conserved family features, but that its structure is flexible enough to allow the switch from high to low affinity in a few evolutionary steps. Most proteins display moderate to high oxygen affinities and multiple ligand migration paths, which, besides some minor trends, show heterogeneous distributions throughout the phylogenetic tree, again suggesting fast functional adaptation. Our data not only deepens our comprehension of the structural basis governing ligand affinity, but they also highlight some interesting functional evolutionary trends. PMID:26788940

  5. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation

  6. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Mueser, Timothy C; Griffith, Wendell P; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean; Langan, Paul; Hanson, B Leif

    2010-11-01

    Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  7. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins

    SciTech Connect

    Mueser, Timothy C. Griffith, Wendell P.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean; Langan, Paul; Hanson, B. Leif

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of cyanomethemoglobin are being used to evaluate the structural waters within the dimer–dimer interface involved in quaternary-state transitions. Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  8. Identification of a Small Molecule that Increases Hemoglobin Oxygen Affinity and Reduces SS Erythrocyte Sickling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the oxygen affinity of human hemoglobin may reduce sickling of red blood cells in patients with sickle cell disease. We screened 38 700 compounds using small molecule microarrays and identified 427 molecules that bind to hemoglobin. We developed a high-throughput assay for evaluating the ability of the 427 small molecules to modulate the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. We identified a novel allosteric effector of hemoglobin, di(5-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)disulfide (TD-1). TD-1 induced a greater increase in oxygen affinity of human hemoglobin in solution and in red blood cells than did 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), or diformamidine disulfide. The three-dimensional structure of hemoglobin complexed with TD-1 revealed that monomeric units of TD-1 bound covalently to β-Cys93 and β-Cys112, as well as noncovalently to the central water cavity of the hemoglobin tetramer. The binding of TD-1 to hemoglobin stabilized the relaxed state (R3-state) of hemoglobin. TD-1 increased the oxygen affinity of sickle hemoglobin and inhibited in vitro hypoxia-induced sickling of red blood cells in patients with sickle cell disease without causing hemolysis. Our study indicates that TD-1 represents a novel lead molecule for the treatment of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:25061917

  9. Hemoglobin C Trait Provides Protection From Clinical Falciparum Malaria in Malian Children

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Laurens, Matthew B.; Dembélé, Ahmadou; Tolo, Youssouf; Koné, Abdoulaye K.; Traoré, Karim; Niangaly, Amadou; Guindo, Aldiouma; Wu, Yukun; Berry, Andrea A.; Jacob, Christopher G.; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Adams, Matthew; Shrestha, Biraj; Mu, Amy Z.; Kouriba, Bourema; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Diallo, Dapa A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.; Thera, Mahamadou A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hemoglobin C trait, like hemoglobin S trait, protects against severe malaria in children, but it is unclear whether hemoglobin C trait also protects against uncomplicated malaria. We hypothesized that Malian children with hemoglobin C trait would have a lower risk of clinical malaria than children with hemoglobin AA. Methods. Three hundred children aged 0–6 years were enrolled in a cohort study of malaria incidence in Bandiagara, Mali, with continuous passive and monthly active follow-up from June 2009 to June 2010. Results. Compared to hemoglobin AA children (n = 242), hemoglobin AC children (n = 39) had a longer time to first clinical malaria episode (hazard ratio [HR], 0.19; P = .001; 364 median malaria-free days vs 181 days), fewer episodes of clinical malaria, and a lower cumulative parasite burden. Similarly, hemoglobin AS children (n = 14) had a longer time to first clinical malaria episode than hemoglobin AA children (HR, 0.15; P = .015; 364 median malaria-free days vs 181 days), but experienced the most asymptomatic malaria infections of any group. Conclusions. Both hemoglobin C and S traits exerted a protective effect against clinical malaria episodes, but appeared to do so by mechanisms that differentially affect the response to infecting malaria parasites. PMID:26019283

  10. Unexpectedly low pulse oximetry measurements associated with variant hemoglobins: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verhovsek, Madeleine; Henderson, Matthew P A; Cox, Gerard; Luo, Hong-yuan; Steinberg, Martin H; Chui, David H K

    2010-11-01

    Pulse oximetry estimates arterial blood oxygen saturation based on light absorbance of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin at 660 and 940 nm wavelengths. Patients with unexpectedly low SpO₂ often undergo cardio-pulmonary testing to ascertain the cause of their hypoxemia. However, in a subset of patients, a variant hemoglobin is responsible for low SpO₂ measurements. The extent of this problem is unclear. We performed a systematic literature review for reports of low SpO₂ associated with variant hemoglobins. We also reviewed unpublished cases from an academic hemoglobin diagnostic reference laboratory. Twenty-five publications and four unpublished cases were identified, representing 45 patients with low SpO₂ and confirmed variant hemoglobin. Fifty-seven family members of patients had confirmed or suspected variant hemoglobin. Three low oxygen affinity variant hemoglobins had concordantly low SpO₂ and SaO₂. Eleven variant hemoglobins were associated with unexpectedly low SpO₂ measurements but normal SaO₂. Hemoglobin light absorbance testing was reported in three cases, all of which showed abnormal absorption spectra between 600 and 900 nm. Seven other variant hemoglobins had decreased SpO₂, with unreported or uncertain SaO₂. Twenty-one variant hemoglobins were found to be associated with low SpO₂. Most variant hemoglobins were associated with spuriously low SpO₂. Abnormal absorption spectra explain the discrepancy between SpO₂ and SaO(2) for some variants. The differential diagnosis of possible variant hemoglobin ought to be considered in asymptomatic patients found to have unexpectedly low SpO₂. The correct diagnosis will help to spare patients from unnecessary investigations and anxiety.

  11. Hemoglobin correction for near-infrared pH determination in lysed blood solutions.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Kathleen; Franke, James E; Rohrscheib, Mark R; Nunez, David; Abate, Vincent; Maynard, John D; Kemeny, Gabor J

    2003-09-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) measurement of blood pH relies on the spectral signature of histidine residing on the hemoglobin molecule. If the amount of hemoglobin in solution varies, the size of the histidine signal can vary depending on changes in either the pH or hemoglobin concentration. Multivariate calibration models developed using the NIR spectra collected from blood at a single hemoglobin concentration are shown to predict data from different hemoglobin levels with a bias and slope. A simple, scalar path length correction of the spectral data does not correct this problem. However, global partial least-square (PLS) models built with data encompassing a range of hemoglobin concentration have a cross-validated standard error of prediction (CVSEP) similar to the CVSEP of data obtained from a single hemoglobin level. It will be shown that the prediction of pH of an unknown sample using a global PLS model requires that the unknown have a hemoglobin concentration falling within the range encompassed by the global model. An alternative method for correcting the predicted pH for hemoglobin levels is also presented. The alternative method updates the single-hemoglobin-level models with slope and intercept estimates from the pH predictions of data collected at alternate hemoglobin levels. The slope and intercept correction method gave SEP values averaging to 0.034 pH units. Since both methods require some knowledge of the hemoglobin concentration in order for a pH prediction to be made, a model for hemoglobin concentration is developed using spectral data and is used for pH correction.

  12. Differential expression of murine adult hemoglobins in early ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzyniak, C.J.; Lewis, S.E.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A hemoglobin mutation is described that permits study of the expression of the two adult ..beta..-globin genes throughout fetal and postnatal development. Mice with a mutation at the Hbb/sup s/, ..beta..-globin locus, were used to study the relative levels of ..beta..-s2major and ..beta..-sminor globins specified by the mutant Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype during development. At 11.5 days of gestation ..beta..-sminor comprised over 80% and ..beta..-s2major under 20% of the adult beta-globin. The relative level of ..beta..-sminor decreased through fetal development; at birth ..beta..-sminor represented 33.7% of the ..beta..-globin. The adult values of 71.0% ..beta..-s2major and 29.0% ..beta..-sminor globin are expressed in mice six days after birth. Because the two ..beta..-globin genes are expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup 2s/ haplotype, both the ..beta..-smajor and ..beta..-sminor genes must be expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype. Expression of the ..beta..-sminor gene is elevated to 35.6% in Hbb/sup s2/ mice that have been bled repeatedly. Thus, the 5' ..beta..-s2major and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype and, presumably the 5' ..beta..-smajor and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype, are regulated independently and are homologous to the 5' ..beta..-dmajor and 3' ..beta..-dminor genes of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotype. Mice of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype are better than mice of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotytpe for studying the mechanisms of hemoglobin switching because the Hbb/sup s2/ each of the three embryonic and two adult hemoglobins can be separated by electrophoresis. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  13. New-old hemoglobin-like proteins of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rosic, Nedeljka N; Leggat, William; Kaniewska, Paulina; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates are unicellular photosynthetic algae that live in mutualistic symbioses with many marine organisms. Within the transcriptome of coral endosymbionts Symbiodinium sp. (type C3), we discovered the sequences of two novel and highly polymorphic hemoglobin-like genes and proposed their 3D protein structures. At the protein level, four isoforms shared between 87 and 97% sequence identity for Hb-1 and 78–99% for Hb-2, whereas between Hb-1 and Hb-2 proteins, only 15–21% sequence homology has been preserved. Phylogenetic analyses of the dinoflagellate encoding Hb sequences have revealed a separate evolutionary origin of the discovered globin genes and indicated the possibility of horizontal gene transfer. Transcriptional regulation of the Hb-like genes was studied in the reef-building coral Acropora aspera exposed to elevated temperatures (6–7°C above average sea temperature) over a 24-h period and a 72-h period, as well as to nutrient stress. Exposure to elevated temperatures resulted in an increased Hb-1 gene expression of 31% after 72 h only, whereas transcript abundance of the Hb-2 gene was enhanced by up to 59% by both 1-day and 3-day thermal stress conditions. Nutrient stress also increased gene expression of Hb-2 gene by 70%. Our findings describe the differential expression patterns of two novel Hb genes from symbiotic dinoflagellates and their polymorphic nature. Furthermore, the inducible nature of Hb-2 gene by both thermal and nutrient stressors indicates a prospective role of this form of hemoglobin in the initial coral–algal responses to changes in environmental conditions. This novel hemoglobin has potential use as a stress biomarker. PMID:23610627

  14. Early diagnosis of sepsis using serum hemoglobin subunit Beta.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hayoung; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Shin-Woo; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-02-01

    The development of new sepsis-specific biomarkers is mandatory to improve the detection and monitoring of the disease. Hemoglobin is the main oxygen and carbon dioxide carrier in cells of the erythroid lineage and is responsible for oxygen delivery to the respiring tissues of the body. Hemoglobin subunit beta (HBβ) is a component of a larger protein called hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to evaluate blood levels of HBβ in septic patients. A prospective study of 82 patients with sepsis was conducted. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Alternatively, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or C57BL/6 mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml to HUVECs or 10 mg/kg to mice). The data showed that LPS induced upregulation of the synthesis and secretion of HBβ in LPS-treated HUVECs and in LPS-injected and CLP mice. In patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, circulating levels of HBβ were significantly high (sepsis, 64.93-114.76 ng/ml, n = 30; severe sepsis, 157.37-268.69 ng/ml, n = 22; septic shock, 309.98-427.03 ng/ml, n = 30) when compared to the levels of control donors (9.76-12.28 ng/ml, n = 21). Patients with septic shock had higher HBβ levels when compared to patients with severe sepsis. Furthermore, the HBβ levels in septic patients were higher than those in healthy volunteers. These results suggest that in septic patients, HBβ blood level is related to the severity of sepsis and may represent a novel endothelial cell dysfunction marker. Moreover, HBβ can be used as a biomarker to determine the severity of sepsis.

  15. THE ENZYMATIC DEGRADATION OF HEMOGLOBIN TO BILE PIGMENTS BY MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Pimstone, Neville R.; Tenhunen, Raimo; Seitz, Paul T.; Marver, Harvey S.; Schmid, Rudi

    1971-01-01

    Recent studies have identified and characterized the enzymatic mechanism by which hemoglobin-heme is converted to bilirubin. Under physiologic conditions the enzyme system, microsomal heme-oxygenase, is most active in the spleen followed by the liver and bone marrow, all of which are tissues that normally are involved in the sequestration and metabolism of red cells. Indirect evidence suggested that the reticuloendothelial system is important in this process. To test this hypothesis, conversion of heme to bilirubin was studied in macrophages obtained by chemical or immunological means from the peritoneal cavity or from the lungs of rodents. Homogenates of pure populations of these cells were devoid of heme-oxygenase activity, unless before harvesting the macrophages had been exposed to methemalbumin, microcrystalline hemin, or hemoglobin in vivo. In macrophages exposed to heme pigments, the specific activity of heme-oxygenase was far in excess of that in the spleen or liver. Enzyme activity was also present in the granulomatous tissue surrounding subcutaneous hematomas. The heme-oxygenase system in macrophages resembles that in the spleen and liver in that it is localized in the microsomal fraction, has an absolute requirement for molecular oxygen and NADPH, is inhibited by carbon monoxide, and has a similar Km. These findings indicate that cells of the reticuloendothelial system, presumably including the Kupffer cells of the liver and the macrophages of the spleen, possess the enzymatic machinery for converting hemoglobin-heme to bilirubin. The reaction is a mixed function oxidation, probably involving cytochrome P450 as the terminal oxidase. Enzyme activity in macrophages is capable of regulatory adaptation in response to substrate loads. In the standard assay system for the enzyme, disappearance of heme always was in excess of the amount of bilirubin formed, suggesting the simultaneous presence of alternate routes of heme degradation not involving bilirubin as

  16. Sickle cell anemia: targeting the role of fetal hemoglobin in therapy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Emma; Inusa, Baba

    2007-06-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from the single amino acid substitution of valine for glutamic acid in the beta-chain owing to a nucleotide defect that causes the production of abnormal beta-chains in hemoglobin S. Abnormal hemoglobin chains form polymers in the deoxygenated state, leading to the characteristic sickle cells. The polymerization of deoxygenated hemoglobin S accounts for the pathologic changes in sickle cell disease. The main-stay of therapy in sickle cell disease aims to reduce the amount of sickled hemoglobin present through the prevention of polymerization and reversal of this process. One way of discouraging polymerization is to increase the level of fetal hemoglobin, which because of its high oxygen affinity, does not participate in the polymerization process. Fetal hemoglobin production may be induced pharmacologically or by the use of gene therapy and genetic engineering techniques.

  17. Modeling hemoglobin at optical frequency using the unconditionally stable fundamental ADI-FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Heh, Ding Yu; Tan, Eng Leong

    2011-04-12

    This paper presents the modeling of hemoglobin at optical frequency (250 nm - 1000 nm) using the unconditionally stable fundamental alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (FADI-FDTD) method. An accurate model based on complex conjugate pole-residue pairs is proposed to model the complex permittivity of hemoglobin at optical frequency. Two hemoglobin concentrations at 15 g/dL and 33 g/dL are considered. The model is then incorporated into the FADI-FDTD method for solving electromagnetic problems involving interaction of light with hemoglobin. The computation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a half space hemoglobin medium using the FADI-FDTD validates the accuracy of our model and method. The specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution of human capillary at optical frequency is also shown. While maintaining accuracy, the unconditionally stable FADI-FDTD method exhibits high efficiency in modeling hemoglobin.

  18. Photodynamic effect occurance in photosensitizer mixtures with albumin or blood serum, or hemoglobin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Posypanova, Anna M.; Volkova, Anna I.

    1996-05-01

    Under laser irradiation of different photosensitizers (PS) mixtures with pure albumin or without hemolysis blood serum the photodynamic effect (PE) is scarcely to be manifested. The coupling of PS with albumins prevents the interactions of dissolved oxygen molecules with PS molecules and formation of active oxygen forms. In order to promote the PE it is necessary to add the solution of hemoglobin. The PE is readily recognized in mixtures of PS with the blood. Such mixing leads to the erythrocytes' destruction and yields uncombined hemoglobin in blood plasma. The irradiation of hemoglobin mixtures with PS leads to the destruction of hemoglobin. In this case the direct combination of oxygen molecules with hemoglobin is important for PE performance (the deoxy hemoglobin can not promote PE otherwise).

  19. Long-term variation in hemoglobin concentration in nestling great tits Parus major.

    PubMed

    Kaliński, Adam; Bańbura, Mirosława; Glądalski, Michał; Markowski, Marcin; Skwarska, Joanna; Wawrzyniak, Jarosław; Zieliński, Piotr; Cyżewska, Iwona; Bańbura, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have previously proposed that blood hemoglobin concentration in nestling passerines is a reliable index of individual condition and nutritional state. In this paper we present results concerning variation in hemoglobin concentration in the blood of ca. 14-day-old nestling great tits Parus major in central Poland in an 11-year-long period, 2003-2013, in two distinct habitat types: urban park and deciduous forest. The most important findings of the study were: (i) variation in hemoglobin concentration was consistent within broods, (ii) hemoglobin concentration of nestlings varied markedly across years, (iii) hemoglobin concentration was significantly higher in the forest study site which is richer in terms of food abundance during the short period of tits breeding season and (iv) high hemoglobin level was a predictor of nestling survival from hatching to fledging.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Stanker, Larry H.; Branscomb, Elbert W.; Grabske, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

  2. Modeling hemoglobin at optical frequency using the unconditionally stable fundamental ADI-FDTD method

    PubMed Central

    Heh, Ding Yu; Tan, Eng Leong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling of hemoglobin at optical frequency (250 nm – 1000 nm) using the unconditionally stable fundamental alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (FADI-FDTD) method. An accurate model based on complex conjugate pole-residue pairs is proposed to model the complex permittivity of hemoglobin at optical frequency. Two hemoglobin concentrations at 15 g/dL and 33 g/dL are considered. The model is then incorporated into the FADI-FDTD method for solving electromagnetic problems involving interaction of light with hemoglobin. The computation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a half space hemoglobin medium using the FADI-FDTD validates the accuracy of our model and method. The specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution of human capillary at optical frequency is also shown. While maintaining accuracy, the unconditionally stable FADI-FDTD method exhibits high efficiency in modeling hemoglobin. PMID:21559129

  3. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2009-10-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  4. Interference of fetal hemoglobin with the spectrophotometric measurement of carboxyhemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Vreman, H J; Ronquillo, R B; Ariagno, R L; Schwartz, H C; Stevenson, D K

    1988-05-01

    We measured the concentration of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in blood samples from 32 neonates by spectrophotometry (IL282 CO-Oximeter) and gas chromatography, finding a strong positive correlation (r = 0.89) between the concentration of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) and HbCO as measured by spectrophotometry, but not by gas chromatography. Thus, Hb F interferes with the determination of HbCO by spectrophotometric techniques by falsely increasing apparent HbCO in direct proportion to Hb F. We conclude that, when Hb F is known or suspected to be present, blood HbCO cannot be reliably determined by methods based on spectrophotometry.

  5. Mössbauer studies of hemoglobin in high altitude polycythemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiufang, Zhang; Linming, Shen; Songsen, Chen; Yuanyuan, Liu; Naifei, Gao; Yuanming, Zheng; Zhaohui, Ao; Liangquan, Shong

    1990-07-01

    The Mössbauer spectra have been measured in erythrocytes from normal adults and the patients with high altitude polycythemia (HAPC). The results indicated that two subspectra “a” and “b”, corresponding to oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin respectively, were present in all blood samples, and a third subspectrum “c” was found to exist in almost all samples from the patients. The parameters of the third subspectra “cl” in most samples from the patients were similar to those of carbon monoxyhemoglobin. The components were considered to be the denatured hemoglobin in RBCs (red blood cells). Together with clinical analysis, a possible mechanism of HAPC has been discussed.

  6. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  7. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, R.G.

    1987-02-01

    Results of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of the iron atom in deoxygenated hemoglobin are reviewed. It is shown that the iron-porphinato nitrogen distance has been determined to be 2.06 +/- 0.01 A by two independent investigations. Difficulties experienced in using this distance to calculate the iron's distance above the plane by triangulation are shown to be due to ignoring differences between ferrous and ferric hemes. It is concluded that the iron is 0.2 +/- 0.1/0.2 A above the plane of the nitrogens as originally shown.

  8. Computation of the unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen in hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    The transport of a reacting permeant diffusing through a thin membrane is extended to more realistic dissociation models. A new nonlinear analysis of the reaction-diffusion equations, using implicit finite-difference methods and direct block solvers, is used to study the limits of linearized and equilibrium theories. Computed curves of molecular oxygen permeating through hemoglobin solution are used to illustrate higher-order reaction models, the effect of concentration boundary layers at the membrane interfaces, and the transient buildup of oxygen flux.

  9. Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy assessment of hemorrhage- and hemoglobin-based blood substitute resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G; Mahon, Sari; Tromberg, Bruce J; Mukai, David; Kreuter, Kelly; Saltzman, Darin; Patino, Renee; Goldberg, Robert; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) are solutions of cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) that have been developed for replacement or augmentation of blood transfusion. It is important to monitor in vivo tissue hemoglobin content, total tissue hemoglobin [THb], oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([OHb], [RHb]), and tissue oxygen saturation (S(t)O(2)=[OHb][THb]x100%) to evaluate effectiveness of HBOC transfusion. We designed and constructed a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) prototype system to measure bulk tissue absorption and scattering spectra between 650 and 1000 nm capable of accurately determining these tissue hemoglobin component concentrations in vivo. Our purpose was to assess the feasibility of using DOS to optically monitor tissue [OHb], [RHb], S(t)O(2), and total tissue hemoglobin concentration ([THb]=[OHb]+[RHb]) during HBOC infusion using a rabbit hypovolemic shock model. The DOS prototype probe was placed on the shaved inner thigh muscle of the hind leg to assess concentrations of [OHb], [RHb], [THb], as well as S(t)O(2). Hemorrhagic shock was induced in intubated New Zealand white rabbits (N=6) by withdrawing blood via a femoral arterial line to 20% blood loss (10-15 cckg). Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (Hb-200) 1:1 volume resuscitation was administered following the hemorrhage. These values were compared against traditional invasive measurements, serum hemoglobin concentration (sHGB), systemic blood pressure, heart rate, and blood gases. DOS revealed increases of [THb], [OHb], and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation after Hb-200 infusion, while blood total hemoglobin values continued did not increase; we speculate, due to hyperosmolality induced hemodilution. DOS enables noninvasive in vivo monitoring of tissue hemoglobin and oxygenation parameters during shock and volume expansion with HBOC and potentially enables the assessment of efficacy of resuscitation efforts using artificial blood substitutes.

  10. RGB imaging system for mapping and monitoring of hemoglobin distribution in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Rubins, Uldis; Spigulis, Janis

    2011-10-01

    A prototype R-G-B imaging system for mapping of skin hemoglobin distribution has been designed and tested. Device basically consists of a commercial RGB sensor (CMOS, max. frame rate 87 fps for VGA resolution), RGB LED ringlight illuminator and orthogonally orientated polarizers for reducing specular reflectance. The system was examined for monitoring of hemoglobin concentration changes during specific provocations - arterial/venous occlusions and heat test. Hemoglobin distribution maps of several skin malformations were obtained, as well.

  11. Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy assessment of hemorrhage- and hemoglobin-based blood substitute resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Mukai, David; Kreuter, Kelly; Saltzman, Darin; Patino, Renee; Goldberg, Robert; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) are solutions of cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) that have been developed for replacement or augmentation of blood transfusion. It is important to monitor in vivo tissue hemoglobin content, total tissue hemoglobin [THb], oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations ([OHb], [RHb]), and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2=[OHb]/[THb]×100%) to evaluate effectiveness of HBOC transfusion. We designed and constructed a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) prototype system to measure bulk tissue absorption and scattering spectra between 650 and 1000 nm capable of accurately determining these tissue hemoglobin component concentrations in vivo. Our purpose was to assess the feasibility of using DOS to optically monitor tissue [OHb], [RHb], StO2, and total tissue hemoglobin concentration ([THb]=[OHb]+[RHb]) during HBOC infusion using a rabbit hypovolemic shock model. The DOS prototype probe was placed on the shaved inner thigh muscle of the hind leg to assess concentrations of [OHb], [RHb], [THb], as well as StO2. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in intubated New Zealand white rabbits (N=6) by withdrawing blood via a femoral arterial line to 20% blood loss (10-15 cc/kg). Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (Hb-200) 1:1 volume resuscitation was administered following the hemorrhage. These values were compared against traditional invasive measurements, serum hemoglobin concentration (sHGB), systemic blood pressure, heart rate, and blood gases. DOS revealed increases of [THb], [OHb], and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation after Hb-200 infusion, while blood total hemoglobin values continued did not increase; we speculate, due to hyperosmolality induced hemodilution. DOS enables noninvasive in vivo monitoring of tissue hemoglobin and oxygenation parameters during shock and volume expansion with HBOC and potentially enables the assessment of efficacy of resuscitation efforts using artificial blood substitutes.

  12. The acetylation of hemoglobin by aspirin. In vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, K R; Schmidt, G J; Jensen, M; Cerami, A; Bunn, H F

    1975-01-01

    The chemical modification of hemoglobin by aspirin (ASA) has been studied, both in intact human red cells and in purified hemoglobin solutions. After incubation of red cells with 20 mM [acetyl-1minus14C]ASA, incorporation of radioactivity into hemoglobin was observed in agreement with the results of Klotz and Tam (1973. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70: 1313-1315). In contrast, no labeling of hemoglobin was seen when [carbosyl-14-C]ASA was used. These results indicate that ASA acetylates hemoglobin. The acetylated hemoglobin was readily separated from unmodified hemoglobin by both gel electrofocusing and by column chromatography. Quantitation of the extent of acetylation by densitometric scanning of gels agreed very well with estimates obtained from radioactivity measurements. Hemolysates prepared from red cells incubated with ASA showed normal oxygen affinity and heme-heme interaction. Purified acetylated hemoglobin had a slightly increased oxygen affinity and decreased heme-heme interaction. There was no difference in the rate of acetylation of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin. ASA acetylated column-purified hemoglobin A more readily than hemoglobin in crude hemolysate, but less rapidly than purified human serum albumin. The rate of acetylation of hemoglobulin increased with pH up to approximately pH 8,5. Structural studies were done on hemoglobin incubated with 2.0 mM and 20 mM [acetyl-1-14-C]ASA. Alpha- and beta-chains were acetylated almost equally. Tryptic digests of purified acetylated subunits were fingerprinted on cellulose thin layer plates and autoradiographed. Both alpha- and beta-chains showed a number of radioactive spots that were either ninhydrin negative or weakly ninhydrin positive. These results indicate that hemoglobin is acetylated at a number of sites, probably at the epislon-amino group of lysine residues. To determine whether ASA acetylates hemoglobin in vivo, hemolysates of 14 patients on long-term high-dose ASA therapy were analyzed by gel

  13. Methyglyoxal administration induces modification of hemoglobin in experimental rats: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sauradipta

    2017-02-01

    Methylglyoxal, a highly reactive α-oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition and reacts with proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) following Maillard-like reaction. In the present study, the effect of methylglyoxal on experimental rat hemoglobin in vivo has been investigated with respect to structural alterations and amino acid modifications, after external administration of the α-dicarbonyl compound in animals. Different techniques, mostly biophysical, were used to characterize and compare methylglyoxal-treated rat hemoglobin with that of control, untreated rat hemoglobin. In comparison with methylglyoxal-untreated, control rat hemoglobin, hemoglobin of methylglyoxal-treated rats (32mg/kgbodywt.dose) exhibited slightly decreased absorbance around 280nm, reduced intrinsic fluorescence and lower surface hydrophobicity. The secondary structures of hemoglobin of control and methylglyoxal-treated rats were more or less identical with the latter exhibiting slightly increased α-helicity compared to the former. Compared to control rat hemoglobin, methylglyoxal-treated rat hemoglobin showed higher stability. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis revealed modifications of Arg-31α, Arg-92α and Arg-104β of methylglyoxal-treated rat hemoglobin to hydroimidazolone adducts. The modifications thus appear to be associated with the observed structural alterations of the heme protein. Considering the increased level of methylglyoxal in diabetes mellitus as well as its high reactivity, AGE-induced modifications may have physiological significance.

  14. The temperature dependence of refractive index of hemoglobin at the wavelengths 930 and 1100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazareva, Ekaterina N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the refractive index of hemoglobin was measured at different temperatures within a physiological range and above that is characteristic to light-blood interaction at laser therapy. Measurements were carried out using the multi-wavelength Abbe refractometer (Atago, Japan). The refractive index was measured at two NIR wavelengths of 930 nm and 1100 nm. Samples of hemoglobin solutions with concentration of 80, 120 and 160 g/l were investigated. The temperature was varied between 25 and 55 °C. It was shown that the dependence of the refractive index of hemoglobin is nonlinear with temperature, which may be associated with changes in molecular structure of hemoglobin.

  15. Aggregation of normal and sickle hemoglobin in high concentration phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejing; Ballas, Samir K; Hantgan, Roy R; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2004-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S, that polymerizes under hypoxic conditions. The extent and mechanism of polymerization are thus the subject of many studies of the pathophysiology of the disease and potential treatment strategies. To facilitate such studies, a model system using high concentration phosphate buffer (1.5 M-1.8 M) has been developed. To properly interpret results from studies using this model it is important to understand the similarities and differences in hemoglobin S polymerization in the model compared to polymerization under physiological conditions. In this article, we show that hemoglobin S and normal adult hemoglobin, hemoglobin A, aggregate in high concentration phosphate buffer even when the concentration of hemoglobin is below the solubility defined for polymerization. This phenomenon was not observed using 0.05 M phosphate buffer or in another model system we studied that uses dextran to enhance polymerization. We have used static light scattering, dynamic light scattering, and differential interference contrast microscopy to confirm aggregation of deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobins below their solubility and have shown that this aggregation is not observable using turbidity measurements, a common technique for assessing polymerization. We have also shown that the aggregation increases with increasing temperature in the range of 15 degrees -37 degrees C and that it increases as the concentration of phosphate increases. These studies contribute to the working knowledge of how to properly apply studies of hemoglobin S polymerization that are conducted using the high phosphate model.

  16. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, plasma copper and hemoglobin types in anemic and poikilocytic calves.

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, S R; Searcy, G P; Hirsch, V M

    1985-01-01

    Ninety-eight calves were studied to determine if anemia and poikilocytosis were related to iron or copper status or hemoglobin type. No significant differences were found in serum iron, total iron binding capacity, marrow iron, plasma copper or hemoglobin type between affected and normal calves. Poikilocytes were strongly inversely correlated (-0.9177) with age. Calves less than six weeks of age had more poikilocytes, lower serum iron, higher total iron binding capacity, less adult hemoglobin and more neonatal and fetal hemoglobin than calves greater than six weeks of age. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2412677

  17. Oxidative stress in preeclampsia and the role of free fetal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Stefan R.; Nääv, Åsa; Erlandsson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of pregnancy complications and affects 3–7% of pregnant women. This review summarizes the current knowledge of a new potential etiology of the disease, with a special focus on hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, we also suggest hemoglobin as a potential target for therapy. Gene and protein profiling studies have shown increased expression and accumulation of free fetal hemoglobin in the preeclamptic placenta. Predominantly due to oxidative damage to the placental barrier, fetal hemoglobin leaks over to the maternal circulation. Free hemoglobin and its metabolites are toxic in several ways; (a) ferrous hemoglobin (Fe2+) binds strongly to the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) and reduces the availability of free NO, which results in vasoconstriction, (b) hemoglobin (Fe2+) with bound oxygen spontaneously generates free oxygen radicals, and (c) the heme groups create an inflammatory response by inducing activation of neutrophils and cytokine production. The endogenous protein α1-microglobulin, with radical and heme binding properties, has shown both ex vivo and in vivo to have the ability to counteract free hemoglobin-induced placental and kidney damage. Oxidative stress in general, and more specifically fetal hemoglobin-induced oxidative stress, could play a key role in the pathology of preeclampsia seen both in the placenta and ultimately in the maternal endothelium. PMID:25628568

  18. Structural and redox behavior of OxyVita, a zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin: comparison with natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Harrington, John P; Orlik, Kseniya; Orlig, Kseniya; Zito, Samantha L; Wollocko, Jacek; Wollocko, Hanna

    2010-04-01

    A zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin (OxyVita Hb) has been developed for application as an acellular therapeutic hemoglobin-based-oxygen-carrier (HBOC). For effective and safe oxygen binding, transport and delivery, an HBOC must meet essential molecular requirements related to its structural integrity and redox stability. OxyVita is a super polymer possessing an average M.wt. of 17 x 10(6) Da. Structural integrity was determined by unfolding studies of OxyVita in the presence of increasing concentrations of urea. The unfolding midpoints (D(1/2)) of different preparations of OxyVita (solution and powder forms) were compared to Lumbricus Hb (LtHb) and Arenicola Hb (ArHb), natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins, which are serving as models for an effective and safe acellular HBOC. Reduction studies of OxyVita Hb using endogenous reducing agents were also investigated. Results from these studies indicate that: 1) OxyVita Hb exhibits greater resistance to conformational change than either LtHb or ArHb in the reduced (oxyHb) state; and 2) the reduction of met OxyVita Hb to oxyHb occurs slowly in the presence of either ascorbic acid (70% reduction in 560 min.) or beta-NADH (40% reduction in 90 min.). These studies provide consistent evidence that OxyVita Hb possesses physiochemical properties that exhibit structural integrity and redox behavior necessary for functioning as an effective and safe HBOC within clinical applications. These results are in agreement with observations made by other investigators as to the reduction in heme-loss of OxyVita Hb, essential for the reversible binding/release of molecular oxygen within the circulatory system.

  19. Carbon monoxide binding by hemoglobin and myoglobin under photodissociating conditions.

    PubMed

    Brunori, M; Bonaventura, J; Bonaventura, C; Antonini, E; Wyman, J

    1972-04-01

    Carbon monoxide binding by myoglobin and hemoglobin has been studied under conditions of constant illumination. For hemoglobin, the homotropic heme-heme interaction (cooperativity) and the heterotropic Bohr effect are invariant with light intensity over a 1000-fold change of c((1/2)). The dissociation constant, measured as c((1/2)), increases linearly with light intensity, indicating that photodissociation is a one-quantum process. At sufficiently high illumination the apparent enthalpy of ligand binding becomes positive, although in the absence of light it is known to be negative. This finding indicates that light acts primarily by increasing the "off" constants by an additive factor. The invariance of both cooperativity and Bohr effect raises a perplexing issue. It would appear to demand either that the "off" constants for the various elementary steps are all alike (which is contrary to current ideas) or that the additive factor is in each case proportional to the particular "off" constant to which it is added (a seemingly improbable alternative).

  20. Red blood cell lifespan, erythropoiesis and hemoglobin control.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Anja; Uehlinger, Dominik E; Gotch, Frank; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and iron deficiency as causes of anemia in patients with limited renal function or end-stage renal disease are well addressed. The concomitant impairment of red blood cell (RBC) survival has been largely neglected. Properties of the uremic environment like inflammation, increased oxidative stress and uremic toxins seem to be responsible for the premature changes in RBC membrane and cytoskeleton. The exposure of antigenic sites and breakdown of the phosphatidylserine asymmetry promote RBC phagocytosis. While the individual response to treatment with EPO-stimulating agents (ESA) depends on both the RBC's lifespan and the production rate, uniform dosing algorithms do not meet that demand. The clinical use of mathematical models predicting ESA-induced changes in hematocrit might be greatly improved once independent estimates of RBC production rate and/or lifespan become available, thus making the concomitant estimation of both parameters unnecessary. Since heme breakdown by the hemoxygenase pathway results in carbon monoxide (CO) which is exhaled, a simple CO breath test has been used to calculate hemoglobin turnover and therefore RBC survival and lifespan. Future research will have to be done to validate and implement this method in patients with kidney failure. This will result in new insights into RBC kinetics in renal patients. Eventually, these findings are expected to improve our understanding of the hemoglobin variability in response to ESA.

  1. Carnivora: primary structure of the hemoglobins from ratel (Mellivora capensis).

    PubMed

    Rodewald, K; Braunitzer, G; Göltenboth, R

    1988-10-01

    The erythrocytes of adult ratel contain two hemoglobin components, with two alpha- and one beta-chains. In this paper, their complete amino acid sequences are presented. The two alpha-chains differ in one residue at position 34 (Ala----Val) only. The primary structure of the chains was determined by sequencing the N-terminal regions (45 steps) and the tryptic peptides after their isolation from the digests by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The alignment of these peptides was deduced from homology with other carnivora globins. The alpha-chains show 21 and the beta-chains 11 exchanges compared with human globin chains. In the alpha-chains, one heme- and two alpha 1/beta 1 contacts are exchanged. In the beta-chains there are three exchanges which involve one alpha 1/beta 1-, one alpha 1/beta 2- and one heme-contact. Between the ratel hemoglobin and those of carnivora a high degree of homology was found.

  2. Structure of Greyhound hemoglobin: origin of high oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Veer S; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Harris, David R; Couto, C Guillermo; Wang, Peng G; Palmer, Andre F

    2011-05-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of Greyhound hemoglobin (GrHb) determined to 1.9 Å resolution. GrHb was found to crystallize with an α₁β₁ dimer in the asymmetric unit and belongs to the R2 state. Oxygen-affinity measurements combined with the fact that GrHb crystallizes in the R2 state despite the high-salt conditions used for crystallization strongly indicate that GrHb can serve as a model high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin (Hb) for higher mammals, especially humans. Structural analysis of GrHb and its comparison with the R2-state of human Hb revealed several regions that can potentially contribute to the high oxygen affinity of GrHb and serve to rationalize the additional stability of the R2-state of GrHb. A previously well studied hydrophobic cluster of bar-headed goose Hb near α119 was also incorporated in the comparison between GrHb and human Hb. Finally, a structural comparison with generic dog Hb and maned wolf Hb was conducted, revealing that in contrast to GrHb these structures belong to the R state of Hb and raising the intriguing possibility of an additional allosteric factor co-purifying with GrHb that can modulate its quaternary structure.

  3. Hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahdi; Faraoni, David

    2015-07-26

    Although red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion is sometimes associated with adverse reactions, anemia could also lead to increased morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. For these reasons, the definition of perioperative strategies that aims to detect and treat preoperative anemia, prevent excessive blood loss, and define "optimal" transfusion algorithms is crucial. Although the treatment with preoperative iron and erythropoietin has been recommended in some specific conditions, several controversies exist regarding the benefit-to-risk balance associated with these treatments. Further studies are needed to better define the indications, dosage, and route of administration for preoperative iron with or without erythropoietin supplementation. Although restrictive transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery have been shown to effectively reduce the incidence and the amount of RBCs transfusion without increase in side effects, some high-risk patients (e.g., symptomatic acute coronary syndrome) could benefit from higher hemoglobin concentrations. Despite all efforts made last decade, a significant amount of work remains to be done to improve hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of photodissociation of carbon monoxide from hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, E.R.; Levitt, M.; Eaton, W.A.

    1985-04-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of the photodissociation of carbon monoxide from the alpha subunit of hemoglobin is described. To initiate photodissociation, trajectories of the liganded molecule were interrupted, the iron-carbon monoxide bond was broken, and the parameters of the iron-nitrogen bonds were simultaneously altered to produce a deoxyheme conformation. Heme potential functions were used that reproduce the energies and forces for the iron out-of-plane motion obtained from quantum mechanical calculations. The effect of the protein on the rate and extent of the displacement of the iron from the porphyrin plane was assessed by comparing the results with those obtained for an isolated complex of heme with imidazole and carbon monoxide. The half-time for the displacement of the iron from the porphyrin plane was found to be 50-150 fs for both the protein and the isolated complex. These results support the interpretation of optical absorption studies using 250-fs laser pulses that the iron is displaced from the porphyrin plane within 350 fs in both hemoglobin and a free heme complex in solution.

  5. Iron absorption from concentrated hemoglobin hydrolysate by rat.

    PubMed

    Vaghefi, Nikta; Nedjaoum, Fuzia; Guillochon, Didier; Bureau, François; Arhan, Pierre; Bouglé, Dominique

    2005-06-01

    Although heme iron is highly bioavailable, the low iron content of hemoglobin prevents its use for dietary fortification; on the other hand, purified heme has low solubility and absorption rate. The present study was designed to assess the interactions between concentrated heme iron and peptides released during globin hydrolysis and cysteine and their relation with iron absorption. Hemoglobin was hydrolyzed by pepsin or subtilisin, and then, heme iron was concentrated by ultrafiltration. Iron absorption was studied in a Ussing chamber; gluconate was used as control. Iron uptake from nonconcentrated pepsin hydrolysate and gluconate was lower than from other groups. Cysteine significantly enhanced iron uptake except from the concentrated subtilisin hydrolysate. There was no significant difference between cysteine-supplemented groups. According to the different hydrolysis pathways of enzymes, it is assumed that the presence of hydrophobic peptides and the strength of heme-peptide interactions are both determining factors of heme iron absorption. These interactions occur mainly before iron uptake, as emphasized by the effect of cysteine.

  6. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  7. Kinetic studies on the cupric ion oxidation of sheep hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Brittain, T; Ivanetich, K M

    1980-11-01

    The oxidation of sheep hemoglobin, in both the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms, by cuprous ions have been studied by spectrophotometric and stopped-flow techniques. Mixing of both the oxy and deoxy forms with excess Cu2+ leads to the rapid oxidation of the iron atoms of all four of the hem groups of the tetrameric protein, followed by the slow formation of hemichromes (low spin FeIII forms of hemoglobin). Stopped-flow studies show that the oxidations follow simple monophasic kinetics with second-order rate constants of 65 and 310 M-1 sec-1 for the oxy and deoxy forms, respectively. Variable temperature studies yield Arrhenius activation energies of 43 for the oxy form and 113 kJ mole-1 for the deoxy form. For each form of the protein the activation energy is very similar to the activation enthalpy. While the deoxy form is characterized by an activation energy and enthalpy that is more than twice the corresponding value in the oxy form. The activation entropies show highly significant differences being -128 e.u. and 136 e.u. at 25 degrees C for the oxy and deoxy forms, respectively.

  8. Modulation of hemoglobin dynamics by an allosteric effector

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Marco; Fouquet, Peter; Ho, Nancy T.; Ho, Chien; Makowski, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hemoglobin (Hb) is an extensively studied paradigm of proteins that alter their function in response to allosteric effectors. Models of its action have been used as prototypes for structure‐function relationships in many proteins, and models for the molecular basis of its function have been deeply studied and extensively argued. Recent reports suggest that dynamics may play an important role in its function. Relatively little is known about the slow, correlated motions of hemoglobin subunits in various structural states because experimental and computational strategies for their characterization are challenging. Allosteric effectors such as inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) bind to both deoxy‐Hb and HbCO, albeit at different sites, leading to a lowered oxygen affinity. The manner in which these effectors impact oxygen binding is unclear and may involve changes in structure, dynamics or both. Here we use neutron spin echo measurements accompanied by wide‐angle X‐ray scattering to show that binding of IHP to HbCO results in an increase in the rate of coordinated motions of Hb subunits relative to one another with little if any change in large scale structure. This increase of large‐scale dynamics seems to be coupled with a decrease in the average magnitude of higher frequency modes of individual residues. These observations indicate that enhanced dynamic motions contribute to the functional changes induced by IHP and suggest that they may be responsible for the lowered oxygen affinity triggered by these effectors. PMID:27977887

  9. A Mouse Model for Human Unstable Hemoglobin Santa Ana.

    PubMed

    Miyashiro, Samantha I; Massironi, Silvia M G; Mori, Claudia M C; Cruz, Carolina C; Hagiwara, Mitika K; Maiorka, Paulo C

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we described the phenotype, histologic morphology, and molecular etiology of a mouse model of unstable hemoglobin Santa Ana. Hematologic evaluation of anemic mice (Anem/+) discovered after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis revealed moderate anemia with intense reticulocytosis and polychromasia, followed by anisocytosis, macrocytosis, hypochromia, and intraerythrocytic inclusion and Heinz bodies. The mice also demonstrated hemoglobinuria, bilirubinemia, and erythrocytic populations with differing resistance to osmotic lysis. Splenomegaly (particularly in older mutant mice) and jaundice were apparent at necropsy. Histopathologic examination revealed dramatically increased hematopoiesis and hemosiderosis in hematopoietic organs and intracellular iron deposition in tubular renal cells. These data are characteristic of a congenital hemolytic regenerative anemia, similar to human anemias due to unstable hemoglobin. Genetic mapping assigned the affected gene to mouse chromosome 7, approximately 50 cM from the Hbb locus. The sequence of the mutant Hbb gene exhibited a T→C transversion at nucleotide 179 in Hbb-b1, leading to the substitution of proline for leucine at amino acid residue 88 and thus homologous to the genetic defect underlying Santa Ana anemia in humans.

  10. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: a glass half full?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H; Chui, David H K; Dover, George J; Sebastiani, Paola; Alsultan, Abdulrahman

    2014-01-23

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) modulates the phenotype of sickle cell anemia by inhibiting deoxy sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymerization. The blood concentration of HbF, or the number of cells with detectable HbF (F-cells), does not measure the amount of HbF/F-cell. Even patients with high HbF can have severe disease because HbF is unevenly distributed among F-cells, and some cells might have insufficient concentrations to inhibit HbS polymerization. With mean HbF levels of 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30%, the distribution of HbF/F-cell can greatly vary, even if the mean is constant. For example, with 20% HbF, as few as 1% and as many as 24% of cells can have polymer-inhibiting, or protective, levels of HbF of ∼10 pg; with lower HbF, few or no protected cells can be present. Only when the total HbF concentration is near 30% is it possible for the number of protected cells to approach 70%. Rather than the total number of F-cells or the concentration of HbF in the hemolysate, HbF/F-cell and the proportion of F-cells that have enough HbF to thwart HbS polymerization is the most critical predictor of the likelihood of severe sickle cell disease.

  11. Interaction of recombinant octameric hemoglobin with endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Caroline; Domingues-Hamdi, Élisa; Prin-Mathieu, Christine; Menu, Patrick; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may generate oxidative stress, vasoconstriction and inflammation. To reduce these undesirable vasoactive properties, we increased hemoglobin (Hb) molecular size by genetic engineering with octameric Hb, recombinant (r) HbβG83C. We investigate the potential side effects of rHbβG83C on endothelial cells. The rHbβG83C has no impact on cell viability, and induces a huge repression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transcription, a marker of vasomotion. No induction of Intermolecular-Adhesion Molecule 1 and E-selectin (inflammatory markers) transcription was seen. In the presence of rHbβG83C, the transcription of heme oxygenase-1 (oxidative stress marker) is weakly increased compared to the two other HBOCs (references) or Voluven (control). This genetically engineered octameric Hb, based on a human Hb βG83C mutant, leads to little impact at the level of endothelial cell inflammatory response and thus appears as an interesting molecule for HBOC development.

  12. Optical mammography: bilateral breast symmetry in hemoglobin saturation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kalli, Sirishma; Makim, Shital S.; Graham, Roger A.; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of the bilateral symmetry of human breast hemoglobin saturation maps measured with a broadband optical mammography instrument. We have imaged 21 patients with unilateral breast cancer, 32 patients with unilateral benign lesions, and 27 healthy patients. An image registration process was applied to the bilateral hemoglobin saturation (SO2) images by assigning each pixel to the low, middle, or high range of SO2 values, where the thresholds for the categories were the 15th and 85th percentiles of the individual saturation range. The Dice coefficient, which is a measure of similarity, was calculated for each patient's pair of right and left breast SO2 images. The invasive cancer patients were found to have an average Dice coefficient value of 0.55±0.07, which was significantly lower than the benign and healthy groups (0.61±0.11 and 0.62±0.12, respectively). Although differences were seen in a group analysis, the healthy patient Dice coefficients spanned a wide range, limiting the diagnostic capabilities of this SO2 symmetry analysis on an individual basis. Our results suggest that for assessing the SO2 contrast of breast lesions, it may be better to select a reference tissue in the ipsilateral rather than the contralateral breast.

  13. Autofluorescence characterization of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Bijukumar, Gopalakrishnapillai; Karmakar, Nivedita; Anand, Sneh; Misra, Anoop

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the analysis of autofluorescence of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin (Hb-AGE). Formed as a result of slow, spontaneous and non-enzymatic glycation reactions, Hb-AGE possesses a characteristic autofluorescence at 308/345 nm ( λex/ λem). Even in the presence of heme as a quenching molecule, the surface presence of the glycated adduct gave rise to autofluorescence with the quantum yield of 0.19. The specificity of monoclonal antibody developed against common AGE structure with Hb-AGE was demonstrated using reduction in fluorescence polarization value due to increased molecular volume while binding. The formation of fluorescent adduct in hemoglobin in the advanced stage of glycation and the non-fluorescent HbA 1c will be of major use in distinguishing and to know the past status of diabetes mellitus. While autofluorescence correlated highly with HbA 1c value under in vivo condition ( r=0.85), it was moderate in the clinical samples ( r=0.55). The results suggest a non-linear relation between glycemia and glycation, indicating the application of Hb-AGE as a measure of susceptibility to glycation rather than glycation itself.

  14. Biphasic Oxidation of Oxy-Hemoglobin in Bloodstains

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Rolf H.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; de Joode, Maarten; Buma, Wybren Jan; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Background In forensic science, age determination of bloodstains can be crucial in reconstructing crimes. Upon exiting the body, bloodstains transit from bright red to dark brown, which is attributed to oxidation of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) to met-hemoglobin (met-Hb) and hemichrome (HC). The fractions of HbO2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain can be used for age determination of bloodstains. In this study, we further analyze the conversion of HbO2 to met-Hb and HC, and determine the effect of temperature and humidity on the conversion rates. Methodology The fractions of HbO2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain, as determined by quantitative analysis of optical reflectance spectra (450–800 nm), were measured as function of age, temperature and humidity. Additionally, Optical Coherence Tomography around 1300 nm was used to confirm quantitative spectral analysis approach. Conclusions The oxidation rate of HbO2 in bloodstains is biphasic. At first, the oxidation of HbO2 is rapid, but slows down after a few hours. These oxidation rates are strongly temperature dependent. However, the oxidation of HbO2 seems to be independent of humidity, whereas the transition of met-Hb into HC strongly depends on humidity. Knowledge of these decay rates is indispensable for translating laboratory results into forensic practice, and to enable bloodstain age determination on the crime scene. PMID:21789186

  15. Multiwavelength pulse oximetry in the measurement of hemoglobin fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzke, Bernd; Schwider, Johannes; Lutter, Norbert O.; Engelhardt, Kai; Stork, Wilhelm

    1996-04-01

    The two wavelength design of the majority of pulse oximeters assumes only two absorbing hemoglobin fractions, oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb), and reduced hemoglobin (HHb) irrespective of the presence of methemoglobin (MetHb) and carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). If MetHb or COHb is present, it contributes to the pulse-added absorbance signal and will be interpreted as either HHb or O2Hb or some combination of the two. In this paper we describe a noninvasive multi-wavelength pulse oximeter measuring O2Hb, HHb, MetHb, and COHb at a specified accuracy of 1.0%. The system was designed with respect to the results of numerical simulations. It consists of 9 laserdiodes (LDs) and 7 light emitting diodes (LEDs), a 16-bit analog-digital converter (ADC) and has a sampling rate of 16 kHz. The laser didoes and LEDs were coupled into multi-mode fibers and led with a liquid lightguide to the finger clip and then the photodiode. It also presents the results of a clinical study, including a setup with a quartz tungsten halogen lamp (with fiber output) and a diode array spectrometer, a standard pulse oximeter and two in-vitro oximeters (radiometer OSM3 and radiometer ABL 520) as references.

  16. Hemoglobin variability and hyporesponsiveness: much ado about something or nothing?

    PubMed

    Yee, Jerry; Zasuwa, Gerard; Frinak, Stanley; Besarab, Anatole

    2009-03-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) variability is considered a discrete clinical entity that when present may presage poor clinical outcomes. However, Hb variability is an intrinsic property of biological systems and is present in all patients, those with and without the anemia of chronic kidney disease. Taken together, variability actually represents the integration of multiple influences at multiple levels in the life of a red cell, namely the summation of positive and negative influences on erythropoiesis. Thus, Hb variability may be interpreted as a mathematic function of time and is the result of a host of influences including definition of the normal Hb range, native erythron responsiveness/hyporesponsiveness, temporal changes in endogenous and exogenous erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) levels, the algorithms used to dose ESAs and their duration of action, the presence of biologically available iron, red cell turnover, and recyclable and non-recyclable blood loss and gain. When viewed within this construct of matrixed determinants, the source of hemoglobin variability is more readily identified. When variability is present but the etiology is not easily discerned, erythropoietic hyporesponsiveness must be considered and evaluated. Finally, integration of all of these concepts is possible within the context of an anemia management protocol.

  17. Stability of blood carbon monoxide and hemoglobins during heating.

    PubMed

    Seto, Y; Kataoka, M; Tsuge, K

    2001-09-15

    The effects of heating on hemoglobin (Hb) and carbon monoxide (CO) levels in human blood were investigated by in vitro experiments. Head-space gas chromatography (HS-GC) using a molecular sieve 5A stationary phase and thermal conductivity detection was adopted for the measurement of CO gas, and spectrophotometric methods were used for the measurement of various Hb forms, protein and heme contents. Deteriorated absorbance spectra were observed for heat-treated blood samples, and double wavelength spectrophotometry was proven to give wrong percent saturation of carboxyhemoglobin content (% CO-Hb). The blood sample taken from one fatal fire casualty gave significantly higher % CO-Hb measured spectrophotometrically, compared to that by HS-GC. Control blood or purified Hb solution, which was saturated with CO in designated extent, was heated in a sealed vial. Under the incubation below 54 degrees C, all Hb forms were stable, except for oxyhemoglobin (Hb-O(2)), which was partially oxidized to met-hemoglobin (Met-Hb). In contrast, under the incubation at 65 degrees C, Met-Hb was denatured completely to be insoluble, and Hb-O(2) was partially denatured via Met-Hb formation. CO-Hb was resistant against heating. The difference of heat susceptibility and precipitability among Hb forms resulted in artificial increase of % CO-Hb. During heating, spontaneous CO was produced from blood.

  18. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  19. Metastable Mesoscopic Clusters in Solutions of Sickle-Cell Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weichun; Galkin, Oleg; Filobelo, Luis; Nagel, Ronald L.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) is a mutant, whose polymerization while in deoxy state in the venous circulation underlies the debilitating sickle cell anemia. It has been suggested that the nucleation of the HbS polymers occurs within clusters of dense liquid, existing in HbS solutions. We use dynamic light scattering with solutions of deoxy-HbS, and, for comparison, of oxy-HbS and oxy-normal adult hemoglobin, HbA. We show that solutions of all three Hb variants contain clusters of dense liquid, several hundred nanometers in size, which are metastable with respect to the Hb solutions. The clusters form within a few seconds after solution preparation and their sizes and numbers remain relatively steady for up to 3 h. The lower bound of the cluster lifetime is 15 ms. The clusters exist in broad temperature and Hb concentration ranges, and occupy 10−5–10−2 of the solution volume. The results on the cluster properties can serve as test data for a potential future microscopic theory of cluster stability and kinetics. More importantly, if the clusters are a part of the nucleation mechanism of HbS polymers, the rate of HbS polymerization can be controlled by varying the cluster properties. PMID:17040989

  20. [Hemoglobin beta S haplotype in the Kebili region (southern Tunisia)].

    PubMed

    Frikha, M; Fakhfakh, F; Mseddi, S; Gargouri, J; Ghali, L; Labiadh, Z; Harrabi, M; Souissi, T; Ayadi, H

    1998-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a monogenic hereditary disease characterized by a mutation in the beta globin gene. Five major haplotypes associated with the beta S mutation have been defined: Benin, Bantu, Senegalian, Camerounian, and Arabo-Indian. Previous studies in northern Tunisia showed that sickle cell anemia was of Benin origin in this region. Patients from the south of Tunisia, mainly from the Kebili region, were not previously concerned. In this study, we have determined the beta S haplotype and evaluated phenotypical expression of the disease in 14 patients from this latter region. The use of four restriction endonucleases having polymorphic sites in the beta globin gene showed that all patients had the Benin haplotype, confirming the Benin origin of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia. This haplotype is associated with an heterogeneous expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) with extremes varying from 2.4 to 16.3% and a mean expression rate of 8.16%, which is in accordance with literature data. In spite of the haplotype homogeneity in our patients, clinical heterogeneity was noted. A unique case of alpha-thalassemia could not explain this heterogeneity. In contrast, we found a certain correlation between fetal hemoglobin expression and clinical severity.

  1. Screening for Structural Hemoglobin Variants in Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Wellington Santos; de Oliveira, Roberto Ferreira; Ribeiro, Sanzia Bezerra; da Silva, Isabel Batista; de Araújo, Edna Maria; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2016-01-01

    Brazil was the country that received the largest number of Africans during the time of colonization, and Bahia was the Brazilian state that received the largest number of slaves from Africa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the coverage of the newborn screening program for sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region of the state of Bahia, and to show the frequency of the subjects with hemoglobin variants in the 2006–2009 period. Blood samples from neonates in twelve cities in the Recôncavo Baiano region were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. A total of 16,402 children were born in this period, 14,773 of which underwent newborn screening. In this period 1416 children were born carrying hemoglobin variants HbS and HbC. Forty-seven patients—20 HbSS genotype and 27 HbSC genotype—were diagnosed in eleven of the twelve cities surveyed. The proportion of children born with sickle cell disease in the Recôncavo Baiano region was 1/314, which was higher than the 1/650 rate for the state of Bahia. The data presented in this study confirm the high frequency of sickle cell disease in Recôncavo Baiano, demonstrating the need to create a referral center for the care of patients with sickle cell diseases in the region. PMID:26901212

  2. 17α-Ethinylestradiol can disrupt hemoglobin catabolism in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Garmshausen, Josefin; Kloas, Werner; Hoffmann, Frauke

    2015-05-01

    Different chemical substances, which enter the environment due to anthropogenic influences, can affect the endocrine system and influence development and physiology of aquatic animals. One of these endocrine disrupting chemicals is the synthetic estrogen, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), which is a main component of various oral contraceptives and demonstrably affects many different aquatic vertebrates at extremely low concentrations by feminization phenomena. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a four week exposure to three different concentrations of EE2 (0.3 ng/L, 29.6 ng/L and 2960 ng/L) affects the catabolism of hemoglobin of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time that beside an increase of the hepatic vitellogenin gene expression, exposure to EE2 also decreases the gene expression of the hepatic heme oxygenase 1 and 2 (HO1, HO2), degrading heme of different heme proteins to biliverdin, as well as of the biliverdin reductase A (BLVRA), which converts biliverdin to bilirubin. The results further suggest that EE2 already at the environmentally relevant concentration of (29.6 ng/L) can disrupt hemoglobin catabolism, indicated by decreased gene expression of HO2, which becomes evident at the highest EE2 concentration that led to a severe increase of biliverdin in plasma.

  3. Light scattering from Sickle Cell Hemoglobin: Polarized and Unpolarized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejing; Hantgan, Roy R.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    1999-11-01

    Sickle cell polymers form due to aggregation of a mutant form of hemoglobin (HbS). The polymerization of HbS leads to microvascular occlusion characteristic of Sickle Cell Disease. A good understanding of HbS polymerization requires a way to quantify the degree of polymerization. As our calculations show, total intensity light scattering is not always linearly dependent on the amount of polymer. Polarized light scattering has been proposed as a more accurate way to measure polymer content. We use a new modulation method to measure all 16 Mueller Matrix elements, which completely describe how the Polarization State of light is altered upon scattering. Preliminary results of light scattering measurements from spheres and hemoglobin show that the instrument works properly. In future experiments, we will attempt to use polarized light scattering as an accurate measure of polymerization. In addition, Polarized light scattering may provide information on the higher order structure of sickle polymer bundles that has not been obtainable by other means.

  4. Optical mammography: bilateral breast symmetry in hemoglobin saturation maps

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kalli, Sirishma; Makim, Shital S.; Graham, Roger A.; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We present a study of the bilateral symmetry of human breast hemoglobin saturation maps measured with a broadband optical mammography instrument. We have imaged 21 patients with unilateral breast cancer, 32 patients with unilateral benign lesions, and 27 healthy patients. An image registration process was applied to the bilateral hemoglobin saturation (SO2) images by assigning each pixel to the low, middle, or high range of SO2 values, where the thresholds for the categories were the 15th and 85th percentiles of the individual saturation range. The Dice coefficient, which is a measure of similarity, was calculated for each patient’s pair of right and left breast SO2 images. The invasive cancer patients were found to have an average Dice coefficient value of 0.55±0.07, which was significantly lower than the benign and healthy groups (0.61±0.11 and 0.62±0.12, respectively). Although differences were seen in a group analysis, the healthy patient Dice coefficients spanned a wide range, limiting the diagnostic capabilities of this SO2 symmetry analysis on an individual basis. Our results suggest that for assessing the SO2 contrast of breast lesions, it may be better to select a reference tissue in the ipsilateral rather than the contralateral breast. PMID:26849841

  5. Light Scattering and Absorption Studies of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    1997-11-01

    The use of physical techniques has been very important in understanding the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. In particular, light scattering and absorption studies have been used to measure the kinetics of sickle cell hemoglobin polymerization and depolymerization (melting). The theory of sickle cell polymerization that has been derived and tested by these methods has not only led to an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease but has also led to improved treatment strategies. Sickle cell disease effects about 1 out of 600 people of African descent born in the United States. The disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin (the oxygen transporting molecule in the blood), hemoglobin S (HbS), which differs from normal adult hemoglobin by the substitution of a single amino acid for another. The polymerization of HbS, which occurs under conditions of low oxygen pressure, causes distortion and increased rigidity of the sickle red blood cell that leads to blockage of the capillaries and a host of resulting complications. The disease is associated with tissue damage, severe painful crises and a high degree of mortality. Light scattering studies of purified HbS and whole cells (conducted by F.A. Ferrone, J. Hofrichter, W.A. Eaton, and their associates) have been used to determine the mechanism of HbS polymerization. Polymerization will generally not occur when the hemoglobin is in an oxygen-rich environment. The question is, when HbS is rapidly deoxygenated (as it is when going from the lungs to the tissues) what is the kinetics of polymerization? Photolysis methods were used to rapidly deoxygenate HbS and light scattering was used as a function of time to measure the kinetics of polymerization. Polarized light scattering may be a more effective way to measure polymer content than total intensity light scattering. It was found that no polymerization occurs during a period of time called the delay time and subsequent polymerization occurs

  6. Nitric oxide from nitrite reduction by hemoglobin in the plasma and erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kejing; Piknova, Barbora; Pittman, Roland N.; Schechter, Alan N.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental evidence has shown that nitrite anion plays a key role in one of the proposed mechanisms for hypoxic vasodilation, in which the erythrocyte acts as a NO generator and deoxygenated hemoglobin in pre-capillary arterioles reduces nitrite to NO, which contributes to vascular smooth muscle relaxation. However, because of the complex reactions among nitrite, hemoglobin, and the NO that is formed, the amount of NO delivered by this mechanism under various conditions has not been quantified experimentally. Furthermore, paracrine NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin, as shown by studies of diseases characterized by extensive hemolysis (e.g., sickle cell disease) and the administration of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. Taking into consideration the free access of cell-free hemoglobin to the vascular wall and its ability to act as a nitrite reductase, we have now examined the hypothesis that in hypoxia this cell-free hemoglobin could serve as an additional endocrine source of NO. In this study, we constructed a multicellular model to characterize the amount of NO delivered by the reaction of nitrite with both intraerythrocytic and cell-free hemoglobin, while intentionally neglecting all other possible sources of NO in the vasculature. We also examined the roles of hemoglobin molecules in each compartment as nitrite reductases and NO scavengers using the model. Our calculations show that: (1) ~0.04 pM NO from erythrocytes could reach the smooth muscle if free diffusion were the sole export mechanism; however, this value could rise to ~43 pM with a membrane-associated mechanism that facilitated NO release from erythrocytes; the results also strongly depend on the erythrocyte membrane permeability to NO; (2) despite the closer proximity of cell-free hemoglobin to the smooth muscle, cell-free hemoglobin reaction with nitrite generates approximately 0.02 pM of free NO that can reach the vascular wall, because of a strong self-capture effect. However, it is worth

  7. Association between hemoglobin and prognosis in patients admitted to hospital for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Toft-Petersen, Anne Pernille; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2016-01-01

    Low concentrations of hemoglobin have previously been demonstrated in many patients with COPD. There is evidence of anemia as a prognostic factor in acute exacerbations, but the detailed relationship between concentrations of hemoglobin and mortality is not known. A register-based cohort of patients admitted for the first time to Danish hospitals for acute exacerbations of COPD from 2007 through 2012 was established. Age, sex, comorbidities, medication, renal function, and concentrations of hemoglobin were retrieved. Sex-specific survival analyses were fitted for different rounded concentrations of hemoglobin. The cohort encompassed 6,969 patients. Hemoglobin below 130 g/L was present in 39% of males and below 120 g/L in 24% of females. The in-hospital mortality rates for patients with hemoglobin below or above these limits were 11.6% and 5.4%, respectively. After discharge, compared to hemoglobin 130 g/L, the hazard ratio (HR) for males with hemoglobin 120 g/L was 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22–1.73), adjusted HR 1.37 (95% CI 1.15–1.64). Compared to hemoglobin 120 g/L, the HR for females with hemoglobin 110 g/L was 1.4 (95% CI 1.17–1.68), adjusted HR 1.28 (95% CI 1.06–1.53). In conclusion, low concentrations of hemoglobin are frequent in COPD patients with acute exacerbations, and predict long-term mortality. PMID:27877035

  8. Effects of Hemoglobin Variants on Hemoglobin A1c Values Measured Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Iglesia, Silvia; Ropero, Paloma; Nogueira-Salgueiro, Patricia; Santana-Benitez, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is routinely used to monitor long-term glycemic control and for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. However, hemoglobin (Hb) gene variants/modifications can affect the accuracy of some methods. The potential effect of Hb variants on HbA1c measurements was investigated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method compared with an immunoturbimetric assay. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in 42 371 blood samples. Samples producing abnormal chromatograms were further analyzed to characterize any Hb variants. Fructosamine levels were determined in place of HbA1c levels when unstable Hb variants were identified. Abnormal HPLC chromatograms were obtained for 160 of 42 371 samples. In 26 samples HbS was identified and HbA1c results correlated with FPG. In the remaining 134 samples HbD, Hb Louisville, Hb Las Palmas, Hb N-Baltimore, or Hb Porto Alegre were identified and HbA1c did not correlate with FPG. These samples were retested using an immunoturbidimetric assay and the majority of results were accurate; only 3 (with the unstable Hb Louisville trait) gave aberrant HbA1c results. Hb variants can affect determination of HbA1c levels with some methods. Laboratories should be aware of Hb variants occurring locally and choose an appropriate HbA1c testing method. PMID:25355712

  9. A Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carrier, Bovine Polymerized Hemoglobin (HBOC-201) versus Hetastarch (HEX) in an Uncontrolled Liver Injury Hemorrhagic Shock Swine Model with Delayed Evacuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    A Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carrier, Bovine Polymerized Hemoglobin (HBOC-201) versus Hetastarch (HEX) in an Uncontrolled Liver Injury Hemorrhagic Shock...Transcutaneous tis- sue oxygenation was restored more rap- idly in HBOC-201 pigs, there was a trend to lower lactic acid, and base deficit was less...lactic acidosis and base deficit (BD) abnormalities, indicating on-going hypoperfusion.2–4 As these abnormalities measured upon hospital arrival

  10. Mapping of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukara, Katarina; Jovanić, Svetlana; Drvenica, Ivana T.; Stančić, Ana; Ilić, Vesna; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Pantelić, Dejan; Jelenković, Branislav; Bugarski, Branko; Krmpot, Aleksandar J.

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes utilization of two photon excitation fluorescence (2PE) microscopy for visualization of the hemoglobin in human and porcine erythrocytes and their empty membranes (i.e., ghosts). High-quality, label- and fixation-free visualization of hemoglobin was achieved at excitation wavelength 730 nm by detecting visible autofluorescence. Localization in the suspension and spatial distribution (i.e., mapping) of residual hemoglobin in erythrocyte ghosts has been resolved by 2PE. Prior to the 2PE mapping, the presence of residual hemoglobin in the bulk suspension of erythrocyte ghosts was confirmed by cyanmethemoglobin assay. 2PE analysis revealed that the distribution of hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes follows the cells' shape. Two types of erythrocytes, human and porcine, characterized with discocyte and echinocyte morphology, respectively, showed significant differences in hemoglobin distribution. The 2PE images have revealed that despite an extensive washing out procedure after gradual hypotonic hemolysis, a certain amount of hemoglobin localized on the intracellular side always remains bound to the membrane and cannot be eliminated. The obtained results open the possibility to use 2PE microscopy to examine hemoglobin distribution in erythrocytes and estimate the purity level of erythrocyte ghosts in biotechnological processes.

  11. Correlation of Oxygenated Hemoglobin Concentration and Psychophysical Amount on Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Akio; Ide, Hideto

    The subjective understanding on oral language understanding task is quantitatively evaluated by the fluctuation of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration measured by the near-infrared spectroscopy. The English listening comprehension test wihch consists of two difficulty level was executed by 4 subjects during the measurement. A significant correlation was found between the subjective understanding and the fluctuation of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration.

  12. Inhibition of pseudoperoxiadse activity of human red blood cell hemoglobin by methocarbamol.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Toofani, Sara; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza; Bakhtiari Ziabari, Kourosh

    2017-01-01

    After red blood cells lysis, hemoglobin is released to blood circulation. Hemoglobin is carried in blood by binding to haptoglobin. In normal individuals, no free hemoglobin is observed in the blood, because most of the hemoglobin is in the form of haptoglobin complex. In some diseases that are accompanied by hemolysis, the amount of released hemoglobin is higher than its complementary haptoglobin. As a result, free hemoglobin appears in the blood, which is a toxic compound for these patients and may cause renal failure, hypertensive response and risk of atherogenesis. Free hemoglobin has been determined to have peroxidase activity and considered a pseudoenzyme. In this study, the effect of methocarbamol on the peroxidase activity of human hemoglobin was investigated. Our results showed that the drug inhibited the pseudoenzyme by un-competitive inhibition. Both Km and Vmax decreased by increasing the drug concentration. Ki and IC50 values were determined as 6 and 10mM, respectively. Docking results demonstrated that methocarbamol did not attach to heme group directly. A hydrogen bond linked NH2 of carbamate group of methocarbamol to the carboxyl group of Asp126 side chain. Two other hydrogen bonds could be also observed between hydroxyl group of the drug and Ser102 and Ser133 residues of the pseudoenzyme.

  13. [Change in the total potassium content, hemoglobin volume and bromine space in Soiuz-14 crewmembers].

    PubMed

    Balakhovskiĭ, I S; Kiselev, R K; Kaplan, M A; Sereda, M G

    1978-01-01

    The specific factors of the 15-day space flight caused the predominance of catabolic over anabolic processes. This was equally true of tissue proteins and hemoglobin. Red blood cell and hemoglobin losses developed in parallel. They were more pronounced in the flight engineer than in the commander. No significant signs of body dehydration were noted.

  14. Prevalence of common hemoglobin variants in an afro-descendent Ecuadorian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemoglobinopathies are among the most studied and frequent pathologies. These genetic disorders are considered a very important health care threat in many tropical countries. Ecuador is a tropical Latin-American country with an important presence of afro-descendants (7.2%). Afro-descendants are among the ethnic groups with higher frequency of hemoglobinopathies reported. Ambuqui is a region within the Imbabura province with an important presence of afro-descendants (>50%). The present study analyzed the frequency of the most common hemoglobin variants in an asymptomatic afro-descendent population using capillary electrophoresis. Findings From 114 individuals, 25 (22%) reported a hemoglobin variant. All individuals that presented hemoglobin variants were heterozygotes (asymptomatic). Hemoglobin S (sickle cell trait) was the most frequent variant found (14%), followed by hemoglobin E (4.4%), Fetal (2.6%) and C (1%). Conclusion Prevalence of hemoglobin S was consistent with populations from other countries, but it was lower than other Ecuadorian afro-descendent populations. Frequency of hemoglobin C was lower than other afro-descendent populations. This data suggests the possibility of gene flow from Native American individuals to the Ambuqui population there by lowering the frequency of their hemoglobin variants compared with other afro-descendant populations. Evaluating the frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Ecuadorian populations is essential. Despite the high frequency of these disorders, very few health care facilities implement hemoglobinopathies tests as a routine practice. PMID:23557107

  15. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Hemoglobin-Beta Gene of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus Rafinesque

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Hemoglobin-y gene of channel catfish , lctalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced . Total RNA from head kidneys was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified . The sequence of the channel catfish hemoglobin-y gene consists of 600 nucleotides . Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals one o...

  16. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  17. A Simple Question to Think about When Considering the Hemoglobin Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Larrea, M. Begona

    2002-01-01

    Hemoglobin is a complex protein formed by various subunits interacting with each other. These noncovalent interactions, quaternary structure, are responsible for hemoglobin functioning as an excellent oxygen transporter, loading up with oxygen in the lungs and delivering it to tissues, where the oxygen pressure is lower. The communications between…

  18. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. We hypothesize that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioav...

  19. Using the Cascade Model to Improve Antenatal Screening for the Hemoglobin Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The inherited hemoglobin disorders constitute a major public health problem. Facilitators (experienced hemoglobin counselors) were trained to deliver knowledge and skills to "frontline" practitioners to enable them to support parents during antenatal screening via a cascade (train-the-trainer) model. Objectives of…

  20. Immunolocalization of Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins During Somatic Embryogenesis in Chicory

    PubMed Central

    Smagghe, Benoît J; Blervacq, Anne-Sophie; Blassiau, Christelle; Decottignies, Jean-Pierre; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Hargrove, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    Hemoglobins are ancient O2-binding proteins, ubiquitously found in eukaryotes. They have been categorized as symbiotic, nonsymbiotic and truncated hemoglobins. We have investigated the cellular localization of nonsymbiotic hemoglobin proteins during somatic embryogenesis in Cichorium hybrid leaves (Cichorium intybus L. var. sativum × C. endivia var. latifolia) using immunolocalization technique. These proteins were detected during the two steps of culture: induction and expression. In leaves, hemoglobins colocalised with plastids, which were dispersed in the parietal cytoplasm as well as in the two guard cells of a stomata, but not in epidermis cells. Upon induction of embryogenesis, in the dark, this pattern disappeared. During the induction phase, where competent cells reinitiate the cell cycle and prepare for mitosis, hemoglobins appeared initially near chloroplasts, and then in the vicinity of vascular vessels especially in the phloem and in cells surrounding the xylem vessels. When leaf fragments were transferred to another medium for the expression phase, hemoglobins were observed in the majority of the leaf blade cells and in small young embryos but not in the older ones. Hemoglobins were also detected in other leaves cells or tissues all along the process. The role of these nonsymbiotic hemoglobins during somatic embryogenesis is discussed. PMID:19516967

  1. Mechanisms of the adjuvant effect of hemoglobin in experimental peritonitis. VII. Hemoglobin does not inhibit clearance of Escherichia coli from the peritoneal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, D.L.; Barke, R.A.; Lee, J.T. Jr.; Condie, R.M.; Humphrey, E.W.; Simmons, R.L.

    1983-09-01

    Hemoglobin has been shown to be a potent adjuvant in experimental Escherichia coli peritonitis, although a satisfactory mechanistic rationale is still obscure. Hemoglobin has been thought to impair intraperitoneal neutrophil function, delay clearance of bacteria from the peritoneal cavity by the normal absorptive mechanisms, or directly enhance bacterial growth. Using highly purified stroma-free hemoglobin (SFHgb), we have largely discounted any direct effect of hemoglobin on peritoneal white blood cell function. In the present study, we confirmed that uncontrolled proliferation of bacteria takes place in the presence of hemoglobin in the peritoneal cavity. Nonviable 5-iododeoxyuridine /sup 125/I-labelled bacteria were then used to directly study peritoneal clearance kinetics, eliminating the problem of bacterial growth. SFHgb had no influence on the removal of intraperitoneal bacteria. The rate of bloodstream appearance of radiolabel was similar with or without intraperitoneal SFHgb. Thus, SFHgb does not prevent clearance of bacteria from the peritoneal cavity by interfering with normal host clearance mechanisms. SFHgb may act as a bacterial growth adjuvant, either by serving as a bacterial nutrient or by suitably modifying the environment so that extensive bacterial proliferation can occur. The latter hypothesis appears to be an area in which investigation concerning the adjuvant effect of hemoglobin may prove most fruitful.

  2. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers for hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Jonathan; Alam, Hasan B; Wilcox, Susan R

    2012-03-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a pathologic state in which intravascular volume and tissue oxygen delivery are impaired, leading to circulatory collapse and cellular ischemia. Resuscitation with hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) is appealing in that their use can both restore intravascular volume and tissue oxygenation, without the limitations in supply and immunomodulatory effects of packed red blood cells. However, the development of safe and effective agents has been elusive. In this article, we briefly discuss the major limitations of traditional resuscitative fluids which have driven the continued interest in HBOCs. We then review the history of early HBOC development and the modern understanding of their mechanisms of toxicity, which has informed the rational design of second-generation agents. Finally, we provide an overview of these second-generation HBOCs that are under active investigation or have recently completed phase 3 clinical trials.

  3. SANS studies of interacting hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, S; Nossal, R

    1988-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate interaction forces between hemoglobin (Hb) molecules contained within human red cells. The scattering separately attributable to cell membranes and intracellular Hb was identified. A series of D2O-H2O contrast variation measurements were made in order to establish conditions for which scattering from the cell membrane is minimized (approximately 15% D2O). Measurements then were performed to examine changes in intermolecular Hb interactions occurring when the cells are contracted or swollen by varying the ionic strength of the suspension buffer. The scattering cross-sections were fitted to structure factors computed by a mean spherical approximation, and molecular parameters thereby extracted. Oxygenation studies on normal cells were performed, and results contrasted with those of similar studies of erythrocytes obtained from sickle cell disease patients. PMID:2829985

  4. SANS studies of interacting hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, S.; Nossal, R.

    1988-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate interaction forces between hemoglobin (Hb) molecules contained within human red cells. The scattering separately attributable to cell membranes and intracellular Hb was identified. A series of D/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/O contrast variation measurements were made in order to establish conditions for which scattering from the cell membrane is minimized (approximately 15% D/sub 2/O). Measurements then were performed to examine changes in intermolecular Hb interactions occurring when the cells are contracted or swollen by varying the ionic strength of the suspension buffer. The scattering cross-sections were fitted to structure factors computed by a mean spherical approximation, and molecular parameters thereby extracted. Oxygenation studies on normal cells were performed, and results contrasted with those of similar studies of erythrocytes obtained from sickle cell disease patients.

  5. A Journey in Science: Early Lessons from the Hemoglobin Field

    PubMed Central

    Weatherall, David J

    2014-01-01

    Real innovations in medicine and science are historic and singular; the stories behind each occurrence are precious. At Molecular Medicine we have established the Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine to document and preserve these histories. The monographs recount the seminal events as told in the voice of the original investigators who provided the crucial early insight. These essays capture the essence of discovery, chronicling the birth of ideas that created new fields of research; and launched trajectories that persisted and ultimately influenced how disease is prevented, diagnosed, and treated. In this volume, the Cerami Award Monograph is by David J Weatherall, Founder, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford University, John Radcliffe Hospital. A visionary in the field of hemoglobin, this is the story of Professor Weatherall’s scientific journey. PMID:25548947

  6. Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers on Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Roghani, Kimia; Holtby, Randall J.; Jahr, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been central in the development of resuscitation agents that might provide oxygen delivery in addition to simple volume expansion. Since 80% of the world population lives in areas where fresh blood products are not available, the application of these new solutions may prove to be highly beneficial (Kim and Greenburg 2006). Many improvements have been made to earlier generation HBOCs, but various concerns still remain, including coagulopathy, nitric oxide scavenging, platelet interference and decreased calcium concentration secondary to volume expansion (Jahr et al. 2013). This review will summarize the current challenges faced in developing HBOCs that may be used clinically, in order to guide future research efforts in the field. PMID:25514567

  7. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D M Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T; Srikanta, S S; Krishnaswamy, P R; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-07

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  8. Picosecond transient absorption study of photodissociated carboxy hemoglobin and myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, S.M.; Dalickas, G.A.; Eaton, W.A.; Hochstrasser, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    The optical transient absorption spectra at 30 ps and 6.5 ns after photolysis are compared for both carboxy hemoglobin (HbCO) and carboxy myoglobin (MbCO). Both 355- and 532-nm excitation pulses were used. In all cases the shapes of the optical difference spectra thus generated are stationary over the complete time-scale studied. The photolysis spectra for MbCO are not significantly different from the equilibrium difference spectra generated on the same picosecond spectrometer when measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.5 nm. In addition, spectral parameters for delegated HbCO generated on the same spectrometer but detected by two different techniques, either by a Vidicon detector or point by point with photomultiplier tubes, are reported; the results are different from some of the previously reported picosecond experiments.

  9. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  10. Brownian dynamics simulation of sickle hemoglobin bundle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Gunton, James; Chakrabarti, Amit

    2010-03-01

    The physical properties of biopolymer fibers, such as their stability and degree of aggregation, are implicated in many diseases, including sickle cell anemia. The natural chirality of protofilaments plays a crucial role in the formation of sickle hemoglobin fiber which leads to the permanent blockage of microvessels. We use Brownian dynamics to investigate the kinetics of fiber aggregation. The geometrical helical structure and chirality of the filaments are modeled by anisotropic patch-like interactions. We present the kinetics of fiber formation and study the possibility of a finite critical fiber bundle size. We compare our results with various experimental and theoretical results. This work is supported by grants from the NSF and the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation.

  11. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-01-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute. PMID:28169325

  12. High hemoglobin mixed disulfide content in hemolysates from stressed shark.

    PubMed

    Dafré, A L; Reischl, E

    1990-01-01

    1. Hemolysate from heavily stressed smooth hammerhead shark, Sphyrna zygaena, shows three electrophoretic components, SZ I, SZ II and SZ III, whose relative concentrations are 36.4 +/- 6.8, 36.4 +/- 5.0 and 20.8 +/- 5.7%, respectively. After reduction with DTE only SZ I remained. 2. SZ I reacted with glutathione disulfide reconstitute SZ II and SZ III. 3. Non-reduced, DTE-reduced, and denatured hemoglobin were found to have 2.0 +/- 0.4, 3.7 +/- 0.6, and 9.4 +/- 0.7-SH groups, respectively. 4. Erythrocyte non-protein--SH (NPSH), including glutathione present as mixed disulfide with SZ II and SZ III, is 1.7 NPSH/Hb.

  13. Facile heme vinyl posttranslational modification in a hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Preimesberger, Matthew R; Wenke, Belinda B; Gilevicius, Lukas; Pond, Matthew P; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2013-05-21

    Iron-protoporphyrin IX, or b heme, is utilized as such by a large number of proteins and enzymes. In some cases, notably the c-type cytochromes, this group undergoes a posttranslational covalent attachment to the polypeptide chain, which adjusts the physicochemical properties of the holoprotein. The hemoglobin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (GlbN), contrary to the archetypical hemoglobin, modifies its b heme covalently. The posttranslational modification links His117, a residue that does not coordinate the iron, to the porphyrin 2-vinyl substituent and forms a hybrid b/c heme. The reaction is an electrophilic addition that occurs spontaneously in the ferrous state of the protein. This apparently facile type of heme modification has been observed in only two cyanobacterial GlbNs. To explore the determinants of the reaction, we examined the behavior of Synechocystis GlbN variants containing a histidine at position 79, which is buried against the porphyrin 4-vinyl substituent. We found that L79H/H117A GlbN bound the heme weakly but nevertheless formed a cross-link between His79 Nε2 and the heme 4-Cα. In addition to this linkage, the single variant L79H GlbN also formed the native His117-2-Cα bond yielding an unprecedented bis-alkylated protein adduct. The ability to engineer the doubly modified protein indicates that the histidine-heme modification in GlbN is robust and could be engineered in different local environments. The rarity of the histidine linkage in natural proteins, despite the ease of reaction, is proposed to stem from multiple sources of negative selection.

  14. Hemoglobin e syndromes: emerging diagnostic challenge in north India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjali; Marwah, Sadhna; Buxi, Gurdeep; Yadav, Rajbala

    2013-03-01

    Hemoglobin E (HbE) is one of the world's most common and important mutations. HbE disorders may be found in heterozygous (AE), homozygous (EE) and compound heterozygous state. It is important to distinguish HbE disorders diagnostically because of marked differences in clinical course among different genotypes. To find out whether RBC indices as obtained from automated cell counter can provide a clue to the diagnosis of HbE disease. This study was carried out in the Department of Clinical Pathology, PGIMER, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi. It included antenatal pregnant females brought for routine check-up as well as referred patients suspected of having hemoglobinopathies. High Performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory test for identification of hemoglobinopathy. Total 20 cases of subtype homozygous HbE (3), HbE trait (12) and Eβ-thalassemia (5) were identified. Statistical analysis was done to find out correlation between levels of HBA2, HBF with RBC indices. (a) There was negative correlation between HbA2/E peak values and RBC indices (Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and Mean corpuscular hemoglobin) among all the three groups taken together. (b) There was positive correlation between HbA2/E and Red cell distribution width (RDW). (c) There was positive correlation between HbF values with MCV. The finding of positive correlation between HbA2/E and RDW may help in differentiating βthal (RDW normal) from HbE/βthal. In a patient with microcytic hypochromic blood picture and increased RDW, diagnosis of HbE/βthal should also be considered along with the more common Iron deficiency anemia. Thus, new insights into the knowledge of these diseases are important because they impart diagnostic challenges to all the experts involved in the treatment of anemic patients.

  15. Glycated Hemoglobin Levels in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study is to determine if HbA1c levels are a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Methods. 200 unique patients referred for liver transplantation at University of Tennessee/Methodist University Transplant Institute with a HbA1c result were included. Three glucose levels prior to the “measured” A1c (MA1c) were input into an HbA1c calculator from the American Diabetes Association website to determine the “calculated” A1c (CA1c). The differences between MA1c and CA1c levels were computed. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, difference of <0.5; group B, 0.51–1.5; and group C, >1.5. Results. 97 (49%) patients had hemoglobin A1c of less than 5%. Discordance between calculated and measured HbA1c of >0.5% was seen in 47% (n = 94). Higher level of discordance of greater than >1.5 was in 12% of patients (n = 24). Hemoglobin was an independent predictor for higher discordance (odds ratio 0.77 95%, CI 0.60–0.99, and p value 0.04). HbA1c was an independent predictor of occurrence of HCC (OR 2.69 955, CI 1.38–5.43, and p value 0.008). Conclusion. HbA1c is not a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, especially in those with severe anemia. PMID:27882051

  16. Low Modulus Biomimetic Microgel Particles with High Loading of Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J.; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E.; Luft, J. Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates) technique. Low crosslinking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained, without a significant effect on particle stability, shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1,000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  17. Hemoglobin genetics: recent contributions of GWAS and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elenoe C; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-10-01

    The β-hemoglobinopathies are inherited disorders resulting from altered coding potential or expression of the adult β-globin gene. Impaired expression of β-globin reduces adult hemoglobin (α2β2) production, the hallmark of β-thalassemia. A single-base mutation at codon 6 leads to formation of HbS (α2β(S)2) and sickle cell disease. While the basis of these diseases is known, therapy remains largely supportive. Bone marrow transplantation is the only curative therapy. Patients with elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF, α2γ2) as adults exhibit reduced symptoms and enhanced survival. The β-globin gene locus is a paradigm of cell- and developmental stage-specific regulation. Although the principal erythroid cell transcription factors are known, mechanisms responsible for silencing of the γ-globin gene were obscure until application of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here, we review findings in the field. GWAS identified BCL11A as a candidate negative regulator of γ-globin expression. Subsequent studies have established BCL11A as a quantitative repressor. GWAS-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms lie within an essential erythroid enhancer of the BCL11A gene. Disruption of a discrete region within the enhancer reduces BCL11A expression and induces HbF expression, providing the basis for gene therapy using gene editing tools. A recently identified, second silencing factor, leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/Pokemon, shares features with BCL11A, including interaction with the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase repressive complex. These findings suggest involvement of a common pathway for HbF silencing. In addition, we discuss other factors that may be involved in γ-globin gene silencing and their potential manipulation for therapeutic benefit in treating the β-hemoglobinopathies.

  18. Investigations on the binding of human hemoglobin with orange I and orange II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2012-08-01

    The interactions between human hemoglobin and orange I (or orange II) were investigated by UV/vis absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra techniques, and molecular modeling method. Orange I and orange II effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of human hemoglobin by static quenching. The processes of the binding orange I and orange II on human hemoglobin were spontaneous molecular interaction procedure with hydrogen bonds, van der Waals force, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions according to van't Hoff equation and molecular modeling. There is a single class of binding site of orange I (orange II) in human hemoglobin and the molecular modeling study shows that orange I and orange II are dipped into α(2) chain. The results of CD, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated a small loss of α-helical secondary structure of human hemoglobin induced by orange I and orange II.

  19. Hemoglobin-based blood substitutes: oxygen carriers, pressor agents, or oxidants?

    PubMed

    Alayash, A I

    1999-06-01

    Hemoglobin-based blood substitutes are being developed as oxygen-carrying agents for the prevention of ischemic tissue damage and hypovolemic (low blood volume) shock. The ability of cell-free hemoglobin blood substitutes to affect vascular tone through the removal of nitric oxide has also prompted an evaluation of their usefulness for maintaining blood pressure in critically ill patients. Before the clinical potential of these substitutes can be fully realized, however, concerns remain as to the intrinsic toxicity of the hemoglobin molecule, particularly the interference of the heme prosthetic group with the tissue oxidant/antioxidant balance. This review provides some insights into the complex redox chemistry of hemoglobin and places an emphasis on how current knowledge may be exploited both to selectively enhance/suppress specific chemical reaction pathway(s) and to ultimately design safer hemoglobin-based therapeutics.

  20. Radiation-induced changes in the optical properties of hemoglobin molecule.

    PubMed

    Selim, Nabila S; El-Marakby, Seham M

    2010-06-01

    Adult male Albino rats were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation from Cs-137 source. Hemoglobin samples were analyzed 24 h after irradiation. The UV-visible spectrum of hemoglobin molecule was measured in the range 200-700 nm. The overall spectrum of the hemoglobin molecule showed hypochromicity that increased with dose increase. To investigate the effect of radiation on the hemoglobin molecule, different parameters of the spectrum were calculated: molar absorption coefficient, absorption cross-section, transition dipole moment, dipole length, the optical energy gap and activation energy for each characteristic peak. The obtained results revealed that the radiation effect can induce rearrangement of the transition dipole moments and change molecular energy levels of the hemoglobin molecule.

  1. Identification of hemoglobin variants by top-down mass spectrometry using selected diagnostic product ions.

    PubMed

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Hartmer, Ralf; Jabs, Wolfgang; Beris, Photis; Clerici, Lorella; Stoermer, Carsten; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis; Tsybin, Yury O; Scherl, Alexander; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Hemoglobin disorder diagnosis is a complex procedure combining several analytical steps. Due to the lack of specificity of the currently used protein analysis methods, the identification of uncommon hemoglobin variants (proteoforms) can become a hard task to accomplish. The aim of this work was to develop a mass spectrometry-based approach to quickly identify mutated protein sequences within globin chain variants. To reach this goal, a top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry method was developed for hemoglobin β chain analysis. A diagnostic product ion list was established with a color code strategy allowing to quickly and specifically localize a mutation in the hemoglobin β chain sequence. The method was applied to the analysis of rare hemoglobin β chain variants and an (A)γ-β fusion protein. The results showed that the developed data analysis process allows fast and reliable interpretation of top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectra by nonexpert users in the clinical area.

  2. Radiation-induced changes in the optical properties of hemoglobin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Nabila S.; El-Marakby, Seham M.

    2010-06-01

    Adult male Albino rats were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation from Cs-137 source. Hemoglobin samples were analyzed 24 h after irradiation. The UV-visible spectrum of hemoglobin molecule was measured in the range 200-700 nm. The overall spectrum of the hemoglobin molecule showed hypochromicity that increased with dose increase. To investigate the effect of radiation on the hemoglobin molecule, different parameters of the spectrum were calculated: molar absorption coefficient, absorption cross-section, transition dipole moment, dipole length, the optical energy gap and activation energy for each characteristic peak. The obtained results revealed that the radiation effect can induce rearrangement of the transition dipole moments and change molecular energy levels of the hemoglobin molecule.

  3. Monitoring the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Xiong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Lu, Tao; Song, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    Time-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy is a novel and potential tool for the noninvasive measurements of chromophore concentrations in vivo. In this study, noninvasive measurement of concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin has been investigated by using photoacoustic method. We detailedly report a home-made photoacoustic experiment system for this study. In our system, a Q-switched ND: YAG pulse laser operating at 1064nm with a 10ns pulse width has been employed to generate photoacoustic signals. The photoacoustic signals, generated by varying the hemoglobin concentration or oxygenation saturation in blood experimentally, were picked up and analyzed. The results show that the photoacoustic technique is a useful and helpful tool for noninvasive monitoring of the total hemoglobin concentration and the oxygen saturation, for it can accurately detect the variation of the total hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, even when the blood vessel is deep in high scattering medium for 1cm.

  4. Development of a Method To Produce Hemoglobin in a Bioreactor Culture of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Transformed with a Plasmid Containing Plesiomonas shigelloides Heme Transport Genes and Modified Human Hemoglobin Genes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B. J. Z.; Gutierrez, P.; Guerrero, E.; Brewer, C. J.; Henderson, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for production of recombinant human hemoglobin by Escherichia coli grown in a bioreactor. E. coli BL21(DE3) transformed with a plasmid containing hemoglobin genes and Plesiomonas shigelloides heme transport genes reached a cell dry weight of 83.64 g/liter and produced 11.92 g/liter of hemoglobin in clarified lysates. PMID:21803893

  5. A disposable amperometric dual-sensor for the detection of hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin in a finger prick blood sample.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Min; Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Moo Hyun; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jung, Dong-Keun; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2017-05-15

    A disposable microfluidic amperometric dual-sensor was developed for the detection of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and total hemoglobin (Hb), separately, in a finger prick blood sample. The accurate level of total Hb was determined through the measurements of the cathodic currents of total Hb catalyzed by a toluidine blue O (TBO)-modified working electrode. Subsequently, after washing unbound Hb in the fluidic channel of dual sensor with PBS, the cathodic current by only HbA1C captured on aptamer was monitored using another aptamer/TBO-modified working electrode in the channel. To modify the sensor probe, poly(2,2´:5´,5″-terthiophene-3´-p-benzoic acid) and a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite layer (pTBA@MWCNT) was electropolymerized on a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), followed by immobilization of TBO for the total Hb probe and aptamer/TBO for the HbA1C probe, respectively. The characterization of each sensor surface was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental conditions affecting the analytical signal were optimized in terms of the amount of TBO, pH, temperature, binding time, applied potential, and the content ratio of monomer and MWCNT. The dynamic ranges of Hb and HbA1C were from 0.1 to 10µM and from 0.006 to 0.74µM, with detection limits of 82(±4.2)nM and 3.7(±0.8)nM, respectively. The reliability of the proposed microfluidic dual-sensor for a finger prick blood sample (1µL) was evaluated in parallel with a conventional method (HPLC) for point-of-care analysis.

  6. Anti- and pro-oxidant effects of (+)-catechin on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Puqing; Yang, Qin; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme proteins as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Flavonoids have been widely used to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and in vitro, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action was usually dependent on their anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of (+)-catechin, a polyphenol identified in tea, cocoa, and red wine, on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage. It was found that (+)-catechin had the capacities to act as a free radical scavenger and reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl hemoglobin, demonstrating apparent anti-oxidant activities. However, the presence of (+)-catechin surprisingly promoted hemoglobin-induced protein oxidation, which was probably due to the ability of this anti-oxidant to rapidly trigger the oxidative degradation of normal hemoglobin. In addition, hemoglobin-H2O2-induced protein carbonyl formation was significantly enhanced by (+)-catechin at lower concentrations, while it was efficiently inhibited when higher concentrations were used. These novel results showed that the dietary intake and therapeutic use of catechins might possess pro-oxidant activity through aggravating hemoglobin-related oxidative damage. The dual effects on hemoglobin redox reactions may provide new insights into the physiological implications of tea extract and wine (catechins) with cellular heme proteins.

  7. Effect of the N-terminal residues on the quaternary dynamics of human adult hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shanyan; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-01

    The protein dynamics of human hemoglobin following ligand photolysis was studied by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra of two kinds of recombinant hemoglobin expressed in Escherichia coli, normal recombinant hemoglobin and the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant, were compared with those of human adult hemoglobin (HbA) purified from blood. A frequency shift of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] band was observed in the time-resolved spectra of all three hemoglobin samples, indicative of tertiary and quaternary changes in the protein following photolysis. The spectral changes of the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant were distinct from those of HbA in the tens of microseconds region, whereas the spectral changes of normal recombinant hemoglobin were similar to those of HbA isolated from blood. These results demonstrated that a structural change in the N-termini is involved in the second step of the quaternary structure change of hemoglobin. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the allosteric pathway of HbA.

  8. Association between hemoglobin variability, serum ferritin levels, and adverse events/mortality in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kuragano, Takahiro; Matsumura, Osamu; Matsuda, Akihiko; Hara, Taiga; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Murata, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Hase, Hiroki; Joki, Nobuhiko; Fukatsu, Atushi; Inoue, Toru; Itakura, Ikuhiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    In recent times, therapy for renal anemia has changed dramatically in that iron administration has increased and doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have decreased. Here we used a prospective, observational, multicenter design and measured the serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels every 3 months for 2 years in 1086 patients on maintenance hemodialysis therapy. The associations of adverse events with fluctuations in ferritin and hemoglobin levels and ESA and iron doses were measured using a Cox proportional hazards model for time-dependent variables. The risks of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (CCVD), infection, and hospitalization were higher among patients who failed to maintain a target-range hemoglobin level and who exhibited high-amplitude fluctuations in hemoglobin compared with patients who maintained a target-range hemoglobin level. Patients with a higher compared with a lower ferritin level had an elevated risk of CCVD and infectious disease. Moreover, the risk of death was significantly higher among patients with high-amplitude ferritin fluctuations compared with those with a low ferritin level. The risks of CCVD, infection, and hospitalization were significantly higher among patients who were treated with high weekly doses of intravenous iron compared with no intravenous iron. Thus, there is a high risk of death and/or adverse events in patients with hemoglobin levels outside the target range, in those with high-amplitude hemoglobin fluctuations, in those with consistently high serum ferritin levels, and in those with high-amplitude ferritin fluctuations.

  9. NO Dioxygenase Activity in Hemoglobins Is Ubiquitous In Vitro, but Limited by Reduction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smagghe, Benoit J.; Trent, James T.; Hargrove, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Genomics has produced hundreds of new hemoglobin sequences with examples in nearly every living organism. Structural and biochemical characterizations of many recombinant proteins reveal reactions, like oxygen binding and NO dioxygenation, that appear general to the hemoglobin superfamily regardless of whether they are related to physiological function. Despite considerable attention to “hexacoordinate” hemoglobins, which are found in nearly every plant and animal, no clear physiological role(s) has been assigned to them in any species. One popular and relevant hypothesis for their function is protection against NO. Here we have tested a comprehensive representation of hexacoordinate hemoglobins from plants (rice hemoglobin), animals (neuroglobin and cytoglobin), and bacteria (Synechocystis hemoglobin) for their abilities to scavenge NO compared to myoglobin. Our experiments include in vitro comparisons of NO dioxygenation, ferric NO binding, NO-induced reduction, NO scavenging with an artificial reduction system, and the ability to substitute for a known NO scavenger (flavohemoglobin) in E. coli. We conclude that none of these tests reveal any distinguishing predisposition toward a role in NO scavenging for the hxHbs, but that any hemoglobin could likely serve this role in the presence of a mechanism for heme iron re-reduction. Hence, future research to test the role of Hbs in NO scavenging would benefit more from the identification of cognate reductases than from in vitro analysis of NO and O2 binding. PMID:18446211

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis: the adhesins AP51 and AP65 bind heme and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Shahed; Lee, B Craig; Garber, Gary E

    2009-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the cause of human trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Although acquisition of iron by binding to host hemoglobin through distinct receptor(s) has been described, no specific heme- or hemoglobin-binding site has been reported in this parasite. To determine the presence of hemoglobin-binding protein(s), membrane proteins were subjected to hemoglobin-affinity chromatography. Eluted proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE. Two protein bands of 48 and 63 kDa were detected. Competition assay with an excess amount of hemoglobin or hemin in hemoglobin-affinity chromatography could block the 63- and 48-kDa bands, respectively. Further analysis by mass spectrometry indicated that the 48- and 63-kDa proteins had identity with two T. vaginalis adhesins: AP51 and AP65, respectively. This study confirms the existence of multifunctional proteins in T. vaginalis, and suggested that AP51 and AP65, besides serving as adhesion molecules, could also act as heme- and hemoglobin-binding proteins.

  11. Megalin and cubilin are endocytic receptors involved in renal clearance of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gburek, Jakub; Verroust, Pierre J; Willnow, Thomas E; Fyfe, John C; Nowacki, Wojciech; Jacobsen, Christian; Moestrup, Søren K; Christensen, Erik I

    2002-02-01

    The kidney is the main site of hemoglobin clearance and degradation in conditions of severe hemolysis. Herein it is reported that megalin and cubilin, two epithelial endocytic receptors, mediate the uptake of hemoglobin in renal proximal tubules. Both receptors were purified by use of hemoglobin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of solubilized renal brush-border membranes. Apparent dissociation constants of 1.7 microM for megalin and 4.1 microM for cubilin were determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The binding was calcium dependent in both cases. Uptake of fluorescence-labeled hemoglobin by BN-16 cells was inhibited by anti-megalin and anti-cubilin antibodies as well as by receptor-associated protein, a chaperone for LDL-receptor family proteins. Partial inhibition by myoglobin was observed, whereas bovine serum albumin, intrinsic factor-cobalamin complexes, and beta2-microglobulin did not affect the uptake. By use of immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that uptake of hemoglobin in proximal tubules of rat, mouse, and dog kidneys occurs under physiologic conditions. Studies on normal and megalin knockout mouse kidney sections showed that megalin is responsible for physiologic clearance of hemoglobin. Labeling intensities in kidneys from normal and cubilin-malexpressing dogs were similar, which suggests that, in the normal state, the role of cubilin in uptake of hemoglobin is rather limited. However, cubilin is likely to assist hemoglobin endocytosis in settings of hemoglobinuria. In conclusion, the study provides a molecular explanation for long-standing observations of hemoglobin uptake in renal proximal tubules that involve the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin. The findings may prove to be essential for further research on the pathophysiology of hemoglobinuric acute renal failure and proteinuria-associated tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  12. Maternal HIV status affects the infant hemoglobin level

    PubMed Central

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Children, especially infants, are highly vulnerable to iron-deficiency anemia because of their rapid growth of the brain and the rest of the body. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive mothers and HIV-negative mothers and to identify the determinants of iron-deficiency anemia in infants. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Bahir Dar city. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Mothers were interviewed; blood samples were collected from mothers and infants to measure the hemoglobin level and anthropometric indicators were obtained from the infants using world health organization standards. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate the prevalence of infantile anemia. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regressions were used to identify the determinants of infant anemia. A total of 1459 infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers were included. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in infants born from HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers was 41.9% (95% CI: 39–44). Infantile iron-deficiency anemia was associated with maternal HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.54 [95% CI: 1.65–3.9]), stunting (AOR 3.46 [95% CI: 2.41–4.97]), low income (AOR 2.72 [95% CI: 2–3.73]), maternal malaria during pregnancy (AOR 1.81 [95% CI: 1.33–2.47]), use of cow milk before 6 month (AOR 1.82 [95% CI: 1.35–2.45]), residence (AOR 0.09 [95% CI: 0.06–0.13]), history of cough or fever 7 days preceding the survey (AOR 2.71 [95% CI: 1.99–3.69]), maternal hemoglobin (B 0.65 [95% CI: 0.61–0.68]), educational status of mother (B 0.22 [95% CI: 0.2–0.23]), age of the mother (B –0.03 [95% CI: –0.03, –0.02]), and family size (B –0.14 [95% CI: –0.18,–0.11]). PMID:27495044

  13. Heme degradation upon production of endogenous hydrogen peroxide via interaction of hemoglobin with sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Salehi, N; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Fotouhi, L; Yousefinejad, S; Shourian, M; Hosseinzadeh, R; Sheibani, N; Habibi-Rezaei, M

    2014-04-05

    In this study the hemoglobin heme degradation upon interaction with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was investigated using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate curve resolution analysis, and chemiluminescence method. Our results showed that heme degradation occurred during interaction of hemoglobin with SDS producing three fluorescent components. We showed that the hydrogen peroxide, produced during this interaction, caused heme degradation. In addition, the endogenous hydrogen peroxide was more effective in hemoglobin heme degradation compared to exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. The endogenous form of hydrogen peroxide altered oxyHb to aquamethemoglobin and hemichrome at low concentration. In contrast, the exogenous hydrogen peroxide lacked this ability under same conditions.

  14. Fluorescent analysis of interaction of flavonols with hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentchouk, V. V.; Bondaryuk, E. V.

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the fluorescent properties of flavonols (quercetin, fisetin, morin, rutin) with the aim of studying possible interaction with hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA). We observed an increase in the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence for all the flavonols except rutin in the presence of BSA. From the changes in the fluorescence spectra, we concluded that tautomeric forms are formed on interaction with hemoglobin. We determined the interconnection between the structure of related flavonols and their fluorescent properties on interaction with proteins, and we determined the binding constants for binding with BSA and hemoglobin.

  15. Hemoglobin Brisbane: beta68 Leu replaced by His. A new high oxygen affinity variant.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S O; Wells, R M; Smith, H; Carrell, R W

    1981-01-01

    Hemoglobin Brisbane is a new hemoglobin variant which produces a mile erythrocytosis. It is not detectable by electrophoresis at pH 8.6 or by isoelectric focusing but it is mildly unstable and gives a positive result with standard stability tests. The new hemoglobin has increased oxygen affinity and reduced co-operativity with a normal Bohr effect and 2,3-DPG binding. Structural analysis shows that a histidine residue has replaced the leucine normally found at position beta 68 (E12).

  16. Sea cucumber sibling species: polypeptide chain types and oxygen equilibrium of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Manwell, C

    1966-06-03

    The hemoglobin of the "thin" sibling species of Thyonella gemmata (phylum: Echinodermata; class: Holothuria) has three electrophoretically distinct polypeptide chains. In "stout" sibling species of T. gemmata there are only two chain types. These results account for the greater number of multiple hemoglobins in "thins" than in "stouts," as well as for differences in the amounts of some of the multiple hemoglobins when comparisons are mnade of hemolyzates of erythrocytes from the water vascular systemn and from the main body cavity of the "thin" but not the "stout" sibling species.

  17. Photothermal spectral-domain optical coherence reflectometry for direct measurement of hemoglobin concentration of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jinyeong; Kim, Hun; Ryu, Suho; Song, Sungwook; Kim, Hyun Ok; Hyun, Kyung-A; Jung, Hyo-Il; Joo, Chulmin

    2014-07-15

    A novel optical detection method for hemoglobin concentration is described. The hemoglobin molecules consisting mainly of iron generate heat upon their absorption of light energy at 532 nm, which subsequently changes the refractive index of the blood. We exploit this photothermal effect to determine the hemoglobin concentration of erythrocytes without any preprocessing of blood. Highly sensitive measurement of refractive index alteration of blood samples is enabled by a spectral-domain low coherence reflectometric sensor with subnanometer-level optical path-length sensitivity. The performance and validity of the sensor are presented by comparing the measured results against the reference data acquired from an automatic hematology analyzer.

  18. A novel dynamic heterogeneous phase polymerization reaction for poly-hemoglobin with narrow molecular weight distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Huang, Lei; Wang, Jin-Feng; Yang, Cheng-Min

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic heterogeneous phase polymerization reaction is found to be efficient for controllable cross-link of hemoglobin with glutaraldehyde. The selective absorption of the immobile phase and asymmetry of protein concentration leads to narrowness of the molecular weight distribution and lowness of the average molecular weight. Using this method, 53% of hemoglobin obtained is intermolecular cross-linked with 12 molecular equivalents of glutaraldehyde. The majority of poly-hemoglobins is in the range of 128 kD to 258 kD.

  19. Long Range Correlation of Hydrophilicity and Flexibility Along the Hemoglobin Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, D.; Isvoran, A.; Avram, N. M.

    2010-08-04

    Within this study, we reveal the long range correlation concerning hydrophilicity and flexibility along sequences of hemoglobins belonging to different organisms and we compare them with the long range correlations properties obtained for other protein families. For all hemoglobins considered, we investigate two discrete spatial series: the hydrophilicity and flexibility respectively. We apply the nonlinear analysis methods to analyze the two spatial series by calculating the spectral coefficient {beta}, the scaling exponent {alpha} and Hurst exponent H. The obtained values for the mentioned coefficients suggest long range correlation within the analyzed sequences of hemoglobins in good agreement with those obtained for the calcium binding proteins and hydrolases.

  20. A Theoretical Study of some Rheological Properties of the Aggregation of the Molecules Deoxy- Hemoglobin S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Francis; Grant, Julius; Thorpe, Arthur

    2010-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is a serious public health problem that affects many people worldwide. In this paper, the Langevin equation is used for hemoglobin's aggregation in sickle cell anemia. Several parameters are explored such as the time-dependent deformation of the aggregates whose plot gives a sigmoid, the time-dependent expressions obtained for the coefficient of viscosity and the elastic modulus which characterize the aggregation of the sickle hemoglobin. Other properties such as the viscoelastic and the elasto-thixotropic properties of the sickle hemoglobin polymer are also described. An attempt is made to approach the polymerization process in terms of a dynamical system. )

  1. Hemoglobin-Based Blood Substitutes and Enhanced Susceptibility to Bacterial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-08

    E . coli peritonitis we have determined that DBBF-HB is equally likely as unmodified Hb (on a mole to mole basis) to lead to a fatal outcome in this model. Further investigations were undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanism of these hemoglobin-driven bacterial infections. The strains of E . coli that exhibit the hemoglobin- adjuvant effect are resistant to phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages. This feature may explain why hemoglobin is necessary (nutritional iron) but not sufficient for the promotion of E . coli

  2. Hemoglobin Solution Effects on the Heart: Review of 19 Research Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    York: Alan R Liss, Inc.] 213-222. niEor 6. Biro GP, Heresford-Kroeger D. 1180. The effect of hemodilut ion with st roma-free hemoglobin and dextran on...1980. The effect of hemodilution with stroma-free hemoglobin and dextran on collateral perfusion of ischemic myocardium in the dog. Am Heart J 99:64-75...Nine dogs received stroma-free hemoglobin solution (Group 1), 9 dogs received their shed blood (Group 2) and 6 dogs received a 6% solution of Dextran -70

  3. A transgenic mouse model of hemoglobin S Antilles disease.

    PubMed

    Popp, R A; Popp, D M; Shinpock, S G; Yang, M Y; Mural, J G; Aguinaga, M P; Kopsombut, P; Roa, P D; Turner, E A; Rubin, E M

    1997-06-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) S Antilles is a naturally occurring form of sickling human Hb but causes a more severe phenotype than Hb S. Two homozygous viable Hb S Antilles transgene insertions from Tg58Ru and Tg98Ru mice were bred into MHOAH mice that express high oxygen affinity (P50 approximately 24.5 mm Hg) rather than normal (P50 approximately 40 mm Hg) mouse Hbs. The rationale was that the high oxygen affinity MHOAH Hb, the lower oxygen affinity of Hb S Antilles than Hb S (P50 approximately 40 v 26.5 mm Hg), and the lower solubility of deoxygenated Hb S Antilles than Hb S (approximately 11 v 18 g/dL) would favor deoxygenation and polymerization of human Hb S Antilles in MHOAH mouse red blood cells (RBCs). The Tg58 x Tg98 mice produced have a high and balanced expression (approximately 50% each) of h alpha and h beta(S Antilles) globins, 25% to 35% of their RBCs are misshapen in vivo, and in vitro deoxygenation of their blood induces 30% to 50% of the RBCs to form classical looking, elongated sickle cells with pointed ends. Tg58 x Tg98 mice exhibit reticulocytosis, an elevated white blood cell count and lung and kidney pathology commonly found in sickle cell patients, which should make these mice useful for experimental studies on possible therapeutic intervention of sickle cell disease.

  4. The hemoglobin O mutation in Indonesia: distribution and phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Daud, D; Harahap, A; Setianingsih, I; Nainggolan, I; Tranggana, S; Pakasi, R; Marzuki, S

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated hemoglobin O Indonesia (HbOIna) in related ethnic populations of the Indonesian archipelago: 1725 individuals of the five ethnic populations of South Sulawesi (Bugis, Toraja, Makassar, Mandar, and Kajang) and 959 individuals of the neighboring islands, who were divided into five phylogenetic groups: (a) Batak; (b) Malay from Padang, Pakanbaru, and Palembang in the island of Sumatra; (c) Javanese-related populations (Java, Tengger, and Bali) from the islands of Java and Bali; (d) populations of the Lesser Sunda Islands of Lombok, Sumba, and Sumbawa; and (e) the Papuan-languagespeaking population of Alor Island. Nineteen individuals heterozygous for HbO(Ina) were identified from the Bugis, Toraja, Makassar, and Kajang ethnic populations, but none from the other populations. In all cases, the underlying mutation was found to be in codon 116 (GAG to AAG) of the alpha1-globin gene, resulting in the Glull6Lys amino acid change. The level of HbO in the 17 individuals plus 12 additional family members carrying the mutation was found to be 11.6 +/- 1.0%, significantly lower than the expected 17%-22%, indicating the instability of HbO.

  5. Extracellular hemoglobin: the case of a friend turned foe

    PubMed Central

    Quaye, Isaac K.

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a highly conserved molecule present in all life forms and functionally tied to the complexity of aerobic organisms on earth in utilizing oxygen from the atmosphere and delivering to cells and tissues. This primary function sustains the energy requirements of cells and maintains cellular homeostasis. Decades of intensive research has presented a paradigm shift that shows how the molecule also functions to facilitate smooth oxygen delivery through the cardiovascular system for cellular bioenergetic homeostasis and signaling for cell function and defense. These roles are particularly highlighted in the binding of Hb to gaseous molecules carbon dioxide (CO2), nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), while also serving indirectly or directly as sources of these signaling molecules. The functional activities impacted by Hb outside of bioenergetics homeostasis, include fertilization, signaling functions, modulation of inflammatory responses for defense and cell viability. These activities are efficiently executed while Hb is sequestered safely within the confines of the red blood cell (rbc). Outside of rbc confines, Hb disaggregates and becomes a danger molecule to cell survival. In these perpectives, Hb function is broadly dichotomous, either a friend in its natural environment providing and facilitating the means for cell function or foe when dislocated from its habitat under stress or pathological condition disrupting cell function. The review presents insights into how this dichotomy in function manifests. PMID:25941490

  6. [Sickle cell syndrome. Association between hemoglobin S and β thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Nehuen P; Agriello, Evangelina E; Zanella, M J Lorena; Iommi, María P; Maradei, Juan; Sandoval, Marisa J

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell syndrome HbS/β thalassemia is an inheritable mendelian type disease where two affected alleles are simultaneously present, one from HbS (βS) and the other from β thalassemia. That situation is mainly linked to individuals who share African and Mediterranean ancestors. The mutation responsible for HbS is a point mutation, whereas for β thalassemia, there are more than 200 mutations that cause different degrees of deficiency synthesis of β globin chain, which justifies the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome. It is presented a clinical case of a young adult man with limited resources that consulted by longstanding bone pain. The patient presented anemia with a marked microcytosis. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed, an abnormal peak in position of HbS and high HbA2 fraction were detected. These last results indicated two possible molecular alterations simultaneously, for this reason the molecular study was performed looking for the most common β thalassemia mutations in our population and, the point mutation responsible for S hemoglobinopathy. Clinical data and biochemical laboratory allowed the diagnosis of sickle cell syndrome. The molecular study confirmed the syndrome carrying mutations IVS-I nt 110 G > A, responsible for β thalassemia and, codon 6 A > T (GAG → GTG: Glu → Val) responsible for S hemoglobinophaty. Since it is a disease of high health impact, it is important to provide genetic counseling to the whole family.

  7. A Review on Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohsen; Asadi, Nasrin; Pouralborz, Yasna; Ghodrat, Mahshid; Habibi, Shaghayegh

    2016-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common reproductive endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age, with a variety of complications and consequences mostly due to hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance (IR). PCOS patients with IR are at risk for metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus (DM) along with its complications such as cardiovascular events. There are several methods for screening IR in patients with PCOS to predict DM and other complications. Fasting plasma glucose test, oral glucose tolerance test, and insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels are some available screening tools for IR. The American Diabetes Association recommended HbA1c to screen for DM because HbA1c is not affected by day-to-day plasma glucose levels and reflects the plasma glucose status during 2-3 months before measurement. Some studies have evaluated the role of HbA1c as a screening method to predict DM in PCOS patients, however, there are still controversies in this matter. Also some studies reported that HbA1c has a correlation with complications of PCOS such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. We found that HbA1c could be a suitable screening test for IR in PCOS patients but more studies are recommended, omitting confounding factors that could affect IR in patients with PCOS, such as antihyperglycemic agents like metformin, or lifestyle modification, which can be effective in reducing IR in patients with PCOS.

  8. Possibility of improvement of hemoglobin properties as biosensors' detection element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, A. S.; Vardapetyan, H. R.; Tiratsuyan, S. G.; Hovhannisyan, A. A.

    2010-04-01

    Biosensors are finding numerous applications in clinical diagnosis, drug discovery, biotechnology, environmental monitoring and etc. Hemoglobin (Hb), a natural heme containing protein, exhibits enzymatic activity towards hydrogen peroxide, which is possible to improve by altering the heme orientation and/or changing the microenvironment in the vicinity of the heme sites. It was shown that hypericin (HY), a naphthodianthrone from Hipericum perforatum and a potent photosensitizer, interacts with Hb and causes conformational changes of the protein. These results were gained both in dark and under visible light exposure by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that photodynamic influence of HY leads to Hb absorption decrease at Soret band, depending on HY concentration and irradiation doze. Excitation of Hb/HY complexes leads to reduction of some emission peaks, correlating with the concentration of HY, incubation and irradiation time. The incubation and irradiation of complexes leads to an increase in electrophoretic mobility of Hb and its peroxidase activity. Under the HY influence Hb properties as a hydrogen peroxide detector could be improved and an effective determination of peroxide formation could be achieved. This makes Hb an attractive 'recognition' element for construction of third-generation biosensors.

  9. Purification of hemoglobin by tangential flow filtration with diafiltration.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Jacob; Harris, David R; Sun, Guoyong; Palmer, Andre F

    2009-01-01

    A recent study by Palmer, Sun, and Harris (Biotechnol. Prog., 25:189-199, 2009) demonstrated that tangential flow filtration (TFF) can be used to produce HPLC-grade bovine and human hemoglobin (Hb). In this current study, we assessed the quality of bovine Hb (bHb) purified by introducing a 10 L batch-mode diafiltration step to the previously mentioned TFF Hb purification process. The bHb was purified from bovine red blood cells (RBCs) by filtering clarified RBC lysate through 50 nm (stage I) and 500 kDa (stage II) hollow fiber (HF) membranes. The filtrate was then passed through a 100 kDa (stage III) HF membrane with or without an additional 10 L diafiltration step to potentially remove additional small molecular weight impurities. Protein assays, SDS-PAGE, and LC-MS of the purified bHb (stage III retentate) reveal that addition of a diafiltration step has no effect on bHb purity or yield; however, it does increase the methemoglobin level and oxygen affinity of purified bHb. Therefore, we conclude that no additional benefit is gained from diafiltration at stage III and a three stage TFF process is sufficient to produce HPLC-grade bHb.

  10. Predictors of Glycated Hemoglobin among Jordanian Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Sawsan; DARAWAD, Muhammad; HOURANI, Eman; DEMEH, Waddah

    2015-01-01

    Background: We explored the level of Jordanian patients' knowledge, diabetes related distress, self-management activities and these effects on the A1C level. Methodology: This descriptive cross-sectional correlational design (conducted in 2013) was utilized to recruit 289 diabetic patients from outpatient diabetes clinics, using self-reported questionnaires (Diabetes Knowledge Test, Diabetes Distress Scale, and Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire) in addition to chart review for selected variables. Results: Participants' had mean glycated hemoglobin of 7.88%. Good glycemic control was significantly associated with higher self-management activities (r= −.147), high income (r= −.171), older age (r= −.252), shorter duration of illness (r= .153), and low levels of distress. Despite these relationships only age, duration of illness and income significantly predicted A1C (F (5, 284) = 11.57, P<.001, R2 = .17). Further, diabetes knowledge, diabetes-related distress, and self-management could not predict A1C level. Conclusion: Only diabetes-related distress and self-management correlated with patients' A1C, with no predictive power. Thus, further research is required to shed the light on the large unexplained components of the A1C variance. PMID:26744705

  11. Hemoglobin S-nitrosylation plays an essential role in cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongli; Hess, Douglas T.; Reynolds, James D.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic control of tissue oxygenation is achieved largely through changes in blood flow that are regulated by the classic physiological response of hypoxic vasodilation. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the control of blood flow is a central tenet of cardiovascular biology. However, extensive evidence now indicates that hypoxic vasodilation entails S-nitrosothiol–based (SNO-based) vasoactivity (rather than NO per se) and that this activity is conveyed substantially by the βCys93 residue in hemoglobin. Thus, tissue oxygenation in the respiratory cycle is dependent on S-nitrosohemoglobin. This perspective predicts that red blood cells (RBCs) may play an important but previously undescribed role in cardioprotection. Here, we have found that cardiac injury and mortality in models of myocardial infarction and heart failure were greatly enhanced in mice lacking βCys93 S-nitrosylation. In addition, βCys93 mutant mice exhibited adaptive collateralization of cardiac vasculature that mitigated ischemic injury and predicted outcomes after myocardial infarction. Enhanced myopathic injury and mortality across different etiologies in the absence of βCys93 confirm the central cardiovascular role of RBC-derived SNO-based vasoactivity and point to a potential locus of therapeutic intervention. Our findings also suggest the possibility that RBCs may play a previously unappreciated role in heart disease. PMID:27841756

  12. Ligand and interfacial dynamics in a homodimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant Kumar; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics of dimeric hemoglobin (HbI) from Scapharca inaequivalvis in different ligand-binding states is studied from atomistic simulations on the μs time scale. The intermediates are between the fully ligand-bound (R) and ligand-free (T) states. Tertiary structural changes, such as rotation of the side chain of Phe97, breaking of the Lys96–heme salt bridge, and the Fe–Fe separation, are characterized and the water dynamics along the R-T transition is analyzed. All these properties for the intermediates are bracketed by those determined experimentally for the fully ligand-bound and ligand-free proteins, respectively. The dynamics of the two monomers is asymmetric on the 100 ns timescale. Several spontaneous rotations of the Phe97 side chain are observed which suggest a typical time scale of 50–100 ns for this process. Ligand migration pathways include regions between the B/G and C/G helices and, if observed, take place in the 100 ns time scale. PMID:26958581

  13. Dual targeted poplar ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase interacts with hemoglobin 1.

    PubMed

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Kastaniotis, Alexander J; Parkash, Vimal; Sundström, Robin; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Nymalm, Yvonne; Blokhina, Olga; Kukkola, Eija; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Salminen, Tiina A; Läärä, Esa; Bülow, Leif; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have connected non-symbiotic and truncated hemoglobins (Hbs) to metabolism of nitric oxide (NO), an important signalling molecule involved in wood formation. We have studied the capability of poplar (Populus tremula × tremuloides) Hbs PttHb1 and PttTrHb proteins alone or with a flavin-protein reductase to relieve NO cytotoxicity in living cells. Complementation tests in a Hb-deficient, NO-sensitive yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Δyhb1 mutant showed that neither PttHb1 nor PttTrHb alone protected cells against NO. To study the ability of Hbs to interact with a reductase, ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase PtthFNR was characterized by sequencing and proteomics. To date, by far the greatest number of the known dual-targeted plant proteins are directed to chloroplasts and mitochondria. We discovered a novel variant of hFNR that lacks the plastid presequence and resides in cytosol. The coexpression of PttHb1 and PtthFNR partially restored NO resistance of the yeast Δyhb1 mutant, whereas PttTrHb coexpressed with PtthFNR failed to rescue growth. YFP fusion proteins confirmed the interaction between PttHb1 and PtthFNR in plant cells. The structural modelling results indicate that PttHb1 and PtthFNR are able to interact as NO dioxygenase. This is the first report on dual targeting of central plant enzyme FNR to plastids and cytosol.

  14. Blood toxic metals and hemoglobin levels in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Galván, Marcos; González-Unzaga, Marco; Hernández Ávila, Juan; Pérez-Labra, M

    2017-04-01

    Metal toxicity can cause hematologic abnormalities and hemolysis. To evaluate the relationship of anemia with metal contamination in children, the following elements were quantified in dry blood: silicon, chromium, lead, titanium, vanadium, nickel, arsenic, manganese, and cadmium. A total of 88 samples of anemic children and 208 of non-anemic children aged 6-12 years were analyzed. Lead (35.1%), chromium (24.3%), vanadium (24.3%), nickel (45.6%), and silicon (48.6%) were identified in the samples, with titanium only detected in anemic children. The average level of arsenic was higher in anemic than non-anemic children (0.041 ± 0.11 wt% vs 0.014 ± 0.05 wt%, p < 0.05) and correlated with the concentration of hemoglobin (r = -0.441, p < 0.01). In conclusion, heavy metals, which confer a health risk, were detected in the dry blood of the children evaluated, and the levels of arsenic and titanium were found to be related to anemia.

  15. Measuring percent oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, percent carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin, and concentrations of total hemoglobin and oxygen in blood of man, dog, and baboon.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R C; Valeri, C R

    1980-08-01

    We used an automated four-wavelength spectrometer to measure the concentration of total hemoglobin, percent oxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, and methemoglobin, and concentration of oxygen bound to hemoglobin in the blood of humans, dogs, and baboons under clinical and various experimental conditions. Measurements of total hemoglobin and methemoglobin with this simple method were comparable to those with standard spectrometric procedures. Carboxyhemoglobin measurements were comparable to those made with gas chromatography, and measurements of oxygen content were comparable to those made with the galvanic cell method. The new instrument is as accurate as the comparison methods used to evaluate it in all parameters, is reliable, and measurements take only 63 s per sample. In addition, it requires minimal operator training, infrequent need for calibration, and no sample preparation.

  16. Evaluation of Electrical and Optical Plethysmography Sensors for Noninvasive Monitoring of Hemoglobin Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Justin P.; Hickey, Michelle; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A.

    2012-01-01

    Completely noninvasive monitoring of hemoglobin concentration has not yet been fully realized in the clinical setting. This study investigates the viability of measuring hemoglobin concentration noninvasively by evaluating the performance of two types of sensor using a tissue phantom perfused with a blood substitute. An electrical sensor designed to measure blood volume changes during the cardiac cycle was used together with an infrared optical sensor for detection of erythrocyte-bound hemoglobin. Both sensors demonstrated sensitivity to changes in pulse volume (plethysmography). The electrical sensor produced a signal referred to as capacitance plethysmograph (CPG) a quantity which was invariant to the concentration of an infrared absorbing dye present in the blood substitute. The optical sensor signal (photoplethysmograph) increased in amplitude with increasing absorber concentration. The ratio PPG:CPG is invariant to pulse pressure. This quantity is discussed as a possible index of in vivo hemoglobin concentration. PMID:22438739

  17. Binding of hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes to two hemoproteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we studied the binding interactions between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin and myoglobin by the use of multi-spectral techniques and molecular modeling. The ultraviolet-vis absorbance and circular dichroism spectral results indicated that the binding interactions existed between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin/myoglobin. These binding interactions partially affected the soret/heme bands of hemoglobin and myoglobin. The secondary structures of hemoproteins were partially destroyed by hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes. Fluorescence studies suggested that the complexes formed between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin/myoglobin by hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic, and π-π stacking interactions. In addition, molecular modeling analysis well supported the experimental results.

  18. Oxygen binding properties of hemoglobin from the white rhinoceros (beta 2-GLU) and the tapir.

    PubMed

    Baumann, R; Mazur, G; Braunitzer, G

    1984-04-01

    The beta-chain of rhinoceros hemoglobin contains glutamic acid at position beta 2, and important site for the binding of organic phosphates. We have investigated the oxygen binding properties of this hemoglobin and its interaction with ATP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, CO2 and chloride. The results show that the presence of GLU at position beta 2 nearly abolishes the effect of organic phosphates and CO2, whereas the oxygen-linked binding of chloride is not affected. Thus rhinoceros hemoglobin has only protons and chloride anions as major allosteric effectors for the control of its oxygen affinity. From the results obtained with hemoglobin solutions it can be calculated that the blood oxygen affinity of the rhinoceros must be rather high with a P50 of about 20 torr at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, which conforms with observations obtained for other large mammals.

  19. Effects of Iron Supplementation and Activity on Serum Iron Depletion and Hemoglobin Levels in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooter, G. Rankin; Mowbray, Kathy W.

    1978-01-01

    Research revealed that a four-month basketball training program did not significantly alter serum iron, total iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, and percent saturation levels in female basketball athletes. (JD)

  20. Substitution of Fingertip Blood for Venous Blood in the Measurement of Hematocrit and Hemoglobin Following Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Thomas D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results from comparative testing indicate that fingertip blood is a valid indicator of antecubital venous hematocrit (hct) and hemoglobin (hgb), and that hct ratios determined on the Coulter counter are comparable to those found by the microhematocrit method. (MB)

  1. Hemoglobin concentration determination based on near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linna; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-10-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method has been proved to be more effective than single point spectroscopy method in the experiment to predict the concentration of the Intralipid diluted solutions. However, Intralipid diluted solution is simple, cannot be the representative of turbid liquids. Blood is a natural and meaningful turbid liquid, more complicate. Hemoglobin is the major constituent of the whole blood. And hemoglobin concentration is commonly used in clinical medicine to diagnose many diseases. In this paper, near infrared spatially resolved transmission spectra (NIRSRTS) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were used to predict the hemoglobin concentration of human blood. The results showed the prediction ability for hemoglobin concentration of the proposed method is better than single point transmission spectroscopy method. This paper demonstrated the feasibility of the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method for practical liquid composition analysis. This research provided a new thinking of practical turbid liquid composition analysis.

  2. The interaction of C.I. acid red 27 with human hemoglobin in solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2010-08-02

    The nature of the interaction between human hemoglobin and C.I. acid red 27 was investigated systematically by ultraviolet-vis absorbance, circular dichroism, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques at pH 7.40. The quenching mechanism, binding constants, and the number of binding sites were determined by the quenching of human hemoglobin fluorescence in presence of C.I. acid red 27. The results showed that the nature of the quenching was of static type and the process of binding acid red 27 on human hemoglobin was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in stabilizing the complex; The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 4.40 nm according to Förster's theory; The effect of acid red 27 on the conformation of human hemoglobin was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra.

  3. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-01-31

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  4. Evaluation of the role hemoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid plays in producing contractions of cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    White, R P; Macleod, R M; Muhlbauer, M S

    1987-03-01

    Many investigators have concluded that hemoglobin is the spasmogen responsible for cerebral vasospasm. The present study was designed to ascertain whether the contractile responses of isolated canine basilar arteries to xanthochromic cerebrospinal fluid from subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was associated with hemoglobin concentration as measured spectrophotometrically. The results clearly showed that spasmogenicity and hemoglobin content were not correlated. The magnitude and duration of the arterial responses varied greatly, further indicating that more than a single factor was responsible. The potent antagonistic, vasodilator effect of such proteins as antithrombin III may account for some of the variation, but the results directly complement clinical findings of others indicating that hemoglobin is not the singular cause of cerebral vasospasm.

  5. Double-layer estimation of intra- and extracerebral hemoglobin concentration with a time-resolved system

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Gauthier, Claudine; Hoge, Rick D.; Lesage, Frédéric; Selb, Juliette; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    We present in vivo measurements of baseline physiology from five subjects with a four-wavelength (690, 750, 800, and 850 nm) time-resolved optical system. The measurements were taken at four distances: 10, 15, 25, and 30 mm. All distances were fit simultaneously with a two-layered analytical model for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient of both layers. The thickness of the first layer, comprising the skin, scalp, and cerebrospinal fluid, was obtained from anatomical magnetic resonance images. The fitting procedure was first tested with simulations before being applied to in vivo measurements and verified that this procedure permits accurate characterization of the hemoglobin concentrations in the extra- and intracerebral tissues. Baseline oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations and oxygen saturation were recovered from in vivo measurements and compared to the literature. We observed a noticeable intersubject variability of the hemoglobin concentrations, but constant values for the cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation. PMID:19021399

  6. Immunochemical identity of the high and low molecular weight forms of Galapagos marine iguana hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P J

    1978-01-01

    1. Two forms of Galapagos marine iguana methemoglobin, with molecular weights of 140,000 and 70,000 daltons, were identified in iguana RBC lysates by Sephadex G-200 molecular sieve fractionation. 2. The 140,000 dalton ferric hemoglobin was isolated by DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography and found to be pure by electrophoretic and immunological criteria. 3. Immunochemical analyses revealed the high and low molecular weight hemoglobins to be antigenically identical.

  7. Demographic Correlates of Low Hemoglobin Deferral among Prospective Whole Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Alan E.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Wright, David J.; Custer, Brian; Spencer, Bryan; Murphy, Edward L.; Simon, Toby L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Approximately 10% of attempted blood donations are not allowed because of low hemoglobin deferral. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Low hemoglobin deferrals were tracked in over 715,000 whole blood donors at six blood centers across the United States. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to comprehensively assess demographic correlates for low hemoglobin deferral. RESULTS Demographic factors significantly associated with low hemoglobin deferral include female gender (11 times greater odds than males), increasing age in men (men over 80 have 29 times greater odds than men under 20); African American race (2–2.5 times greater odds than Caucasians); Hispanic ethnicity in women (1.29 times greater odds than Caucasian women) and weight in men (men under 124 pounds have 2.5 times greater odds than men over 200 pounds). Interestingly, increasing donation frequency is associated with decreased odds for low hemoglobin deferral (women with 1 donation in the previous 12 months have 2 times greater odds than those with 6 donations). CONCLUSIONS Low hemoglobin deferral is associated with female gender, older age, African-American race/ethnicity and lower body weight in men. An inverse association with donation frequency suggests a selection bias in favor of donors able to give more frequently. These data provide useful information that can be utilized to manage blood donors in order to limit low hemoglobin deferrals and assist in policy decisions such as changing the hemoglobin cut-off or permissible frequency of donation. They also generate hypotheses for new research of the causes of anemia in defined groups of donors. PMID:20412525

  8. Ligand binding processes in hemoglobin. Chemical reactivity of iron studied by XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Pin, S; Valat, P; Cortes, R; Michalowicz, A; Alpert, B

    1985-01-01

    K-absorption edge of coordinated ions exhibits a fine structure (through the use of XANES, or x-ray absorption near edge structures) that reflects the electronic repartition and the chemical reactivity of these ions. Comparative analysis of iron K-absorption-edge shape for hemoglobin derivatives with different ligand affinity suggests strongly that in hemoglobin, iron-forms with high and low affinity are highly improbable. PMID:4092074

  9. [A new case of hemoglobin J Capetown alpha 92 (FG 4) Arg replaced by gln].

    PubMed

    Gacon, G; Amegnizin, K E; Belkhodja, O; Denis, P; Krishnamoorthy, R; Labie, D; Lefrancois, R; Michel, Y; Pasquis, P; Wajcman, H

    1977-01-01

    Hemoglobin J Capetown was found incidentally in a patient of french origin suffering from urticaria with delayed pressure oedema. Using a preparative finger-print technique, the structural determination was easy. A functional study of the purified component confirmed the high oxygen affinity of hemoglobin J Capetown and demonstrated a low reactivity for organic phosphates. These results may explain the perturbations observed in the whole blood.

  10. Investigation of Hemoglobin/Gold Nanoparticle Heterolayer on Micro-Gap for Electrochemical Biosensor Application

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Yoon, Jinho; Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we fabricated a hemoglobin/gold nanoparticle (Hb/GNP) heterolayer immobilized on the Au micro-gap to confirm H2O2 detection with a signal-enhancement effect. The hemoglobin which contained the heme group catalyzed the reduction of H2O2. To facilitate the electron transfer between hemoglobin and Au micro-gap electrode, a gold nanoparticle was introduced. The Au micro-gap electrode that has gap size of 5 µm was fabricated by conventional photolithographic technique to locate working and counter electrodes oppositely in a single chip for the signal sensitivity and reliability. The hemoglobin was self-assembled onto the Au surface via chemical linker 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (6-MHA). Then, the gold nanoparticles were adsorbed onto hemoglobin/6-MHA heterolayers by the layer-by-layer (LbL) method. The fabrication of the Hb/GNP heterolayer was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The redox property and H2O2 detection of Hb/GNP on the micro-gap electrode was investigated by a cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiment. Taken together, the present results show that the electrochemical signal-enhancement effect of a hemoglobin/nanoparticle heterolayer was well confirmed on the micro-scale electrode for biosensor applications. PMID:27171089

  11. A spectroscopic study on the interaction between gold nanoparticles and hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Garabagiu, Sorina

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction was studied using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence emission of hemoglobin solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding and thermodynamic constants were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major impact: electrochemical applications of the complex onto a substrate. -- Abstract: The interaction between horse hemoglobin and gold nanoparticles was studied using optical spectroscopy. UV-vis and fluorescence spectra show that a spontaneous binding process occurred between hemoglobin and gold nanoparticles. The Soret band of hemoglobin in the presence of gold nanoparticles does not show significant changes, which proves that the protein retained its biological function. A shift to longer wavelengths appears in the plasmonic band of gold nanoparticles upon the attachment of hemoglobin molecules. Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence emission of tryptophan residues in the structure of hemoglobin. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding was mainly due to hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Insensitivity of cerebral oxygen transport to oxygen affinity of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Raymond C.; Fronticelli, Clara; Bucci, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    The cerebrovascular effects of exchange transfusion of various cell-free hemoglobins that possess different oxygen affinities are reviewed. Reducing hematocrit by transfusion of a non-oxygen-carrying solution dilates pial arterioles on the brain surface and increases cerebral blood flow to maintain a constant bulk oxygen transport to the brain. In contrast, transfusion of hemoglobins with P50 of 4–34 Torr causes constriction of pial arterioles that offsets the decrease in blood viscosity to maintain cerebral blood flow and oxygen transport. The autoregulatory constriction is dependent on synthesis of 20-HETE from arachidonic acid. This oxygen-dependent reaction is apparently enhanced by facilitated oxygen diffusion from the red cell to the endothelium arising from increased plasma oxygen solubility in the presence of low or high-affinity hemoglobin. Exchange transfusion of recombinant hemoglobin polymers with P50 of 3 and 18 Torr reduces infarct volume from experimental stroke. Cell-free hemoglobins do not require a P50 as high as red blood cell hemoglobin to facilitate oxygen delivery. PMID:18230370

  13. Analysis of hemoglobin F production in Saudi Arabian families with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Miller, B A; Salameh, M; Ahmed, M; Olivieri, N; Antognetti, G; Orkin, S H; Huisman, T H; Nathan, D G

    1987-09-01

    Erythrocytes and progenitor-derived erythroblasts of sickle cell anemia patients from the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia contain increased fetal hemoglobin and G gamma globin. A distinctive DNA polymorphism haplotype in the beta globin gene cluster (++- +-), tightly coupled to a C----T substitution at position -158 5' to the cap site of the G gamma globin gene, is strongly associated with sickle cell disease in this region. To determine whether the increased fetal hemoglobin production and/or elevated G gamma globin content are tightly linked to this haplotype, we studied 55 members of five Saudi families in which sickle cell disease is present. The results did not suggest a tight linkage of the haplotype to increased fetal hemoglobin production. On the other hand, several sickle trait family members heterozygous for the haplotype had normal fetal hemoglobin production in culture but elevated G gamma to A gamma ratios in peripheral blood. This observation suggests that in this genetic background increased expression of the G gamma globin gene may occur without a measurable increase in total fetal hemoglobin production. The family studies also clearly demonstrate that increased fetal hemoglobin production by erythroid progenitors is dependent on zygosity for the sickle gene in this population. These findings strongly suggest that other factors, such as the products of genes stimulated by hemolytic stress or other genetic determinants associated with the Saudi beta S chromosome, may interact with the -158 C----T substitution and influence gamma globin gene expression in this population.

  14. EHMT1 and EHMT2 inhibition induces fetal hemoglobin expression

    PubMed Central

    Renneville, Aline; Van Galen, Peter; Canver, Matthew C.; McConkey, Marie; Krill-Burger, John M.; Dorfman, David M.; Holson, Edward B.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bauer, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF, α2γ2) induction is a well-validated strategy for sickle cell disease (SCD) treatment. Using a small-molecule screen, we found that UNC0638, a selective inhibitor of EHMT1 and EHMT2 histone methyltransferases, induces γ-globin expression. EHMT1/2 catalyze mono- and dimethylation of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9), raising the possibility that H3K9Me2, a repressive chromatin mark, plays a role in silencing γ-globin expression. In primary human adult erythroid cells, UNC0638 and EHMT1 or EHMT2 short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown significantly increased γ-globin expression, HbF synthesis, and the percentage of cells expressing HbF. At effective concentrations, UNC0638 did not alter cell morphology, proliferation, or erythroid differentiation of primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in culture ex vivo. In murine erythroleukemia cells, UNC0638 and Ehmt2 CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout both led to a marked increase in expression of embryonic β-globin genes Hbb-εy and Hbb-βh1. In primary human adult erythroblasts, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing analysis revealed that UNC0638 treatment leads to genome-wide depletion in H3K9Me2 and a concomitant increase in the activating mark H3K9Ac, which was especially pronounced at the γ-globin gene region. In RNA-sequencing analysis of erythroblasts, γ-globin genes were among the most significantly upregulated genes by UNC0638. Further increase in γ-globin expression in primary human adult erythroid cells was achieved by combining EHMT1/2 inhibition with the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat or hypomethylating agent decitabine. Our data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that EHMT1 and EHMT2 are epigenetic regulators involved in γ-globin repression and represent a novel therapeutic target for SCD. PMID:26320100

  15. EHMT1 and EHMT2 inhibition induces fetal hemoglobin expression.

    PubMed

    Renneville, Aline; Van Galen, Peter; Canver, Matthew C; McConkey, Marie; Krill-Burger, John M; Dorfman, David M; Holson, Edward B; Bernstein, Bradley E; Orkin, Stuart H; Bauer, Daniel E; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2015-10-15

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF, α2γ2) induction is a well-validated strategy for sickle cell disease (SCD) treatment. Using a small-molecule screen, we found that UNC0638, a selective inhibitor of EHMT1 and EHMT2 histone methyltransferases, induces γ-globin expression. EHMT1/2 catalyze mono- and dimethylation of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9), raising the possibility that H3K9Me2, a repressive chromatin mark, plays a role in silencing γ-globin expression. In primary human adult erythroid cells, UNC0638 and EHMT1 or EHMT2 short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown significantly increased γ-globin expression, HbF synthesis, and the percentage of cells expressing HbF. At effective concentrations, UNC0638 did not alter cell morphology, proliferation, or erythroid differentiation of primary human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in culture ex vivo. In murine erythroleukemia cells, UNC0638 and Ehmt2 CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout both led to a marked increase in expression of embryonic β-globin genes Hbb-εy and Hbb-βh1. In primary human adult erythroblasts, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing analysis revealed that UNC0638 treatment leads to genome-wide depletion in H3K9Me2 and a concomitant increase in the activating mark H3K9Ac, which was especially pronounced at the γ-globin gene region. In RNA-sequencing analysis of erythroblasts, γ-globin genes were among the most significantly upregulated genes by UNC0638. Further increase in γ-globin expression in primary human adult erythroid cells was achieved by combining EHMT1/2 inhibition with the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat or hypomethylating agent decitabine. Our data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that EHMT1 and EHMT2 are epigenetic regulators involved in γ-globin repression and represent a novel therapeutic target for SCD.

  16. Functional and Spectroscopic Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Truncated Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Droghetti, Enrica; Tundo, Grazia R.; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Polticelli, Fabio; Visca, Paolo; Smulevich, Giulietta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii harbors twelve truncated hemoglobins (Cr-TrHbs). Cr-TrHb1-1 and Cr-TrHb1-8 have been postulated to be parts of the nitrogen assimilation pathway, and of a NO-dependent signaling pathway, respectively. Here, spectroscopic and reactivity properties of Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4, all belonging to clsss 1 (previously known as group N or group I), are reported. The ferric form of Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 displays a stable 6cLS heme-Fe atom, whereas the hexa-coordination of the ferrous derivative appears less strongly stabilized. Accordingly, kinetics of azide binding to ferric Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are independent of the ligand concentration. Conversely, kinetics of CO or NO2− binding to ferrous Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are ligand-dependent at low CO or NO2− concentrations, tending to level off at high ligand concentrations, suggesting the presence of a rate-limiting step. In agreement with the different heme-Fe environments, the pH-dependent kinetics for CO and NO2−binding to ferrous Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are characterized by different ligand-linked protonation events. This raises the question of whether the simultaneous presence in C. reinhardtii of multiple TrHb1s may be related to different regulatory roles. PMID:25993270

  17. Structural and functional characterization of Delphinus delphis hemoglobin system.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Barbara; Messana, Irene; Maggiani, Federica; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Crnjar, Roberto; Castagnola, Massimo; Giardina, Bruno; Sanna, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    Structural analysis of the hemoglobin (Hb) system of Delphinus delphis revealed a high globin multiplicity: HPLC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis evidenced three major beta (beta1 16,022 Da, beta2 16,036 Da, beta3 16,036 Da, labeled according to their progressive elution times) and two major alpha globins (alpha1 15,345 Da, alpha2 15,329 Da). ESI-tandem mass and nucleotide sequence analyses showed that beta2 globin differs from beta1 for the substitution Val126 --> Leu, while beta3 globin differs from beta2 for the isobaric substitution Lys65 --> Gln. The alpha2 globin differs from the alpha1 for the substitution Ser15 --> Ala. Anion-exchange chromatography allowed the separation of two Hb fractions and HPLC-ESI-MS analysis revealed that the fraction with higher pI (HbI) contained beta1, beta2 and both the alpha globins, and the fraction with lower pI (HbII) contained beta3 and both the alpha globins. Both D. delphis Hb fractions displayed a lower intrinsic oxygen affinity, a decreased effect of 2,3-BPG and a reduced cooperativity with respect to human HbA(0), with HbII showing the more pronounced differences. With respect to HbA(0), either the substitution Probeta5 --> Gly or the Probeta5 --> Ala is present in all the cetacean beta globins sequenced so far, and it has been hypothesized that position 5 of beta globins may have a role in the interaction with 2,3-BPG. Regarding the particularly lowered cooperativity of HbII, it is interesting to observe that the variant human HbA, characterized by the substitution Lysbeta65 --> Gln (HbJ-Cairo) has a decreased cooperativity with respect to HbA(0).

  18. Measuring and modeling hemoglobin aggregation below the freezing temperature.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mónica; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P; Singh, Satish K; Geraldes, Vitor; Rodrigues, Miguel A

    2013-08-01

    Freezing of protein solutions is required for many applications such as storage, transport, or lyophilization; however, freezing has inherent risks for protein integrity. It is difficult to study protein stability below the freezing temperature because phase separation constrains solute concentration in solution. In this work, we developed an isochoric method to study protein aggregation in solutions at -5, -10, -15, and -20 °C. Lowering the temperature below the freezing point in a fixed volume prevents the aqueous solution from freezing, as pressure rises until equilibrium (P,T) is reached. Aggregation rates of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) increased at lower temperature (-20 °C) and higher BHb concentration. However, the addition of sucrose substantially decreased the aggregation rate and prevented aggregation when the concentration reached 300 g/L. The unfolding thermodynamics of BHb was studied using fluorescence, and the fraction of unfolded protein as a function of temperature was determined. A mathematical model was applied to describe BHb aggregation below the freezing temperature. This model was able to predict the aggregation curves for various storage temperatures and initial concentrations of BHb. The aggregation mechanism was revealed to be mediated by an unfolded state, followed by a fast growth of aggregates that readily precipitate. The aggregation kinetics increased for lower temperature because of the higher fraction of unfolded BHb closer to the cold denaturation temperature. Overall, the results obtained herein suggest that the isochoric method could provide a relatively simple approach to obtain fundamental thermodynamic information about the protein and the aggregation mechanism, thus providing a new approach to developing accelerated formulation studies below the freezing temperature.

  19. Hemoglobin A1c in predicting progression to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Tomoko; Tajima, Naoko; Oizumi, Toshihide; Karasawa, Shigeru; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Susa, Shinji; Kato, Takeo; Daimon, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The predictive value of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in comparison to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is evaluated for 5-year incident diabetes (DM), as HbA1c may be more practical than FPG in the screening for DM in the future. Of 1189 non-DM subjects aged 35-89 years old from the Funagata Study, 57 subjects (4.8%) had developed DM on the WHO criteria at 5-year follow-up. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval: CI) for a one standard deviation increase in FPG/HbA1c was 3.40 (2.44-4.74)/3.49 (2.42-5.02). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for FPG/HbA1c was 0.786 (95% CI: 0.719-0.853)/0.785 (0.714-0.855). The HbA1c corresponding to FPG 5.56 mmol/l was HbA1c 5.3%. There was no statistical difference in sensitivity between FPG 5.56 mmol/l and HbA1c 5.3% (61.4% vs. 56.1%), while specificity was higher in HbA1c 5.3% than FPG 5.56 mmol/l (87.8% vs. 82.5%, p-value<0.001). The fraction of incident case from those with baseline IGT was similar between the groups, however the fraction of people above the cut-off was significantly lower in HbA1c 5.3% than FPG 5.56 mmol/l (14.3% vs. 19.6%, p-value<0.001). HbA1c is similar to FPG to evaluate DM risk, and HbA1c could be practical and efficient to select subjects for intervention.

  20. Hemoglobin Variability Does Not Predict Mortality in European Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph; Kronenberg, Florian; Aljama, Pedro; Anker, Stefan D.; Canaud, Bernard; Molemans, Bart; Stenvinkel, Peter; Schernthaner, Guntram; Ireland, Elizabeth; Fouqueray, Bruno; Macdougall, Iain C.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with CKD exhibit significant within-patient hemoglobin (Hb) level variability, especially with the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) and iron. Analyses of dialysis cohorts in the United States produced conflicting results regarding the association of Hb variability with patient outcomes. Here, we determined Hb variability in 5037 European hemodialysis (HD) patients treated over 2 years to identify predictors of high variability and to evaluate its association with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. We assessed Hb variability with various methods using SD, residual SD, time-in-target (11.0 to 12.5 g/dl), fluctuation across thresholds, and area under the curve (AUC). Hb variability was significantly greater among incident patients than prevalent patients. Compared with previously described cohorts in the United States, residual SD was similar but fluctuations above target were less frequent. Using logistic regression, age, body mass index, CVD history, dialysis vintage, serum albumin, Hb, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) use, ESA use, dialysis access type, dialysis access change, and hospitalizations were significant predictors of high variability. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression showed that SD, residual SD, time-in-target, and AUC did not predict all-cause or CVD mortality during a median follow-up of 12.4 months (IQR: 7.7 to 17.4). However, patients with consistently low levels of Hb (<11 g/dl) and those who fluctuated between the target range and <11 g/dl had increased risks for death (RR 2.34; 95% CI: 1.24 to 4.41 and RR 1.74; 95% CI: 1.00 to 3.04, respectively). In conclusion, although Hb variability is common in European HD patients, it does not independently predict mortality. PMID:20798262

  1. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform. PMID:26354849

  2. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E

    2015-11-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform.

  3. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  4. Distribution, adaptation and physiological meaning of thiols from vertebrate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Reischl, Evaldo; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; Franco, Jeferson Luis; Wilhelm Filho, Danilo

    2007-01-01

    In the present review, the sequences of hemoglobins (Hb) of 267 adult vertebrate species belonging to eight major vertebrate taxa are examined for the presence and location of cysteinyl residues in an attempt at correlation with their ecophysiology. Essentially, all vertebrates have surface cysteinyl residues in Hb molecules whereby their thiol groups may become highly reactive. Thiol-rich Hbs may display eight or more thiols per tetramer. In vertebrates so far examined, the cysteinyl residues occur in 44 different sequence positions in alpha chains and 41 positions in beta chains. Most of them are conservatively located and occur in only a few positions in Teleostei, Aves and Mammalia, whereas they are dispersed in Amphibia. The internal cysteinyl residue alpha104 is ubiquitous in vertebrates. Residue beta93 is highly conserved in reptiles, birds and mammals. The number of cysteine residues per tetramer with solvent access varies in vertebrates, mammalians and bony fish having the lowest number of external residues, whereas nearly all external cysteine residues in Aves and Lepidosauria are of the surface crevice type. In cartilaginous fish, amphibians, Crocodylidae and fresh water turtles, a substantial portion of the solvent accessible thiols are of the totally external type. Recent evidence shows that some Hb thiol groups are highly reactive and undergo extensive and reversible S-thiolation, and that they may be implicated in interorgan redox equilibrium processes. Participation of thiol groups in nitric oxide ((*)NO) metabolism has also been proved. The evidence argues for a new physiologically relevant role for Hb via involvement in free radical and antioxidant metabolism.

  5. Plant hemoglobins: what we know six decades after their discovery.

    PubMed

    Garrocho-Villegas, Verónica; Gopalasubramaniam, Sabarinathan Kuttalingam; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2007-08-15

    This review describes contributions to the study of plant hemoglobins (Hbs) from a historical perspective with emphasis on non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHbs). Plant Hbs were first identified in soybean root nodules, are known as leghemoglobins (Lbs) and have been characterized in detail. It is widely accepted that a function of Lbs in nodules is to facilitate the diffusion of O(2) to bacteroids. For many years Hbs could not be identified in plants other than N(2)-fixing legumes, however in the 1980s a Hb was isolated from the nodules of the non-legume dicot plant Parasponia, a hb gene was cloned from the non-nodulating Trema, and Hbs were detected in nodules of actinorhizal plants. Gene expression analysis showed that Trema Hb transcripts exist in non-symbiotic roots. In the 1990s nsHb sequences were also identified in monocot and primitive (bryophyte) plants. In addition to Lbs and nsHbs, Hb sequences that are similar to microbial truncated (2/2) Hbs were also detected in plants. Plant nsHbs have been characterized in detail. These proteins have very high O(2)-affinities because of an extremely low O(2)-dissociation constant. Analysis of rice Hb1 showed that distal His coordinates heme Fe and stabilizes bound O(2); this means that O(2) is not released easily from oxygenated nsHbs. Non-symbiotic hb genes are expressed in specific plant tissues, and overexpress in organs of stressed plants. These observations suggest that nsHbs have functions additional to O(2)-transport, such as to modulate levels of ATP and NO.

  6. Measurements of nitric oxide on the heme iron and -93 thiol of human hemoglobin during cycles of oxygenation and deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiuli; Cho, Man; Spencer, Netanya Y.; Patel, Neil; Huang, Zhi; Shields, Howard; King, S. Bruce; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hogg, Neil; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2003-09-01

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to be transported by hemoglobin as a third respiratory gas and to elicit vasodilation by an oxygen-linked (allosteric) mechanism. For hemoglobin to transport nitric oxide bioactivity it must capture nitric oxide as iron nitrosyl hemoglobin rather than destroy it by dioxygenation. Once bound to the heme iron, nitric oxide has been reported to migrate reversibly from the heme group of hemoglobin to the -93 cysteinyl residue, in response to an oxygen saturation-dependent conformational change, to form an S-nitrosothiol. However, such a transfer requires redox chemistry with oxidation of the nitric oxide or -93 cysteinyl residue. In this article, we examine the ability of nitric oxide to undergo this intramolecular transfer by cycling human hemoglobin between oxygenated and deoxygenated states. Under various conditions, we found no evidence for intramolecular transfer of nitric oxide from either cysteine to heme or heme to cysteine. In addition, we observed that contaminating nitrite can lead to formation of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin in deoxygenated hemoglobin preparations and a radical in oxygenated hemoglobin preparations. Using 15N-labeled nitrite, we clearly demonstrate that nitrite chemistry could explain previously reported results that suggested apparent nitric oxide cycling from heme to thiol. Consistent with our results from these experiments conducted in vitro, we found no arterial/venous gradient of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our results do not support a role for allosterically controlled intramolecular transfer of nitric oxide in hemoglobin as a function of oxygen saturation.

  7. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes: identification, phylogenetic and syntenic analysis, and specific induction in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Shikai; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Ruijia; Zhang, Jiaren; Jiang, Yanliang; Li, Chao; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Li, Jiale; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-03-01

    Hemoglobins transport oxygen from gill to inner organs in fish, and this process is affected by temperature, one of the major environmental factors for fish. The hemoglobin gene clusters have been well studied in humans and several model fish species, but remain largely unknown in catfish. Here, eight α- and six β-hemoglobin genes were identified and characterized in channel catfish. Genomic synteny analysis showed that these hemoglobin genes were separated into two unlinked clusters, the MN cluster containing six α- and six β-hemoglobin genes, and the LA cluster consisting of two α-hemoglobin genes. Channel catfish hemoglobin genes were ubiquitously expressed in all the 10 tested tissues from healthy fish, but exhibited higher expression level in spleen, head kidney, and trunk kidney. In response to heat stress, hemoglobin genes, especially MN Hbα4, MN Hbα5, MN Hbα6, MN Hbβ4, MN Hbβ5, MN Hbβ6, LA Hbα1, and LA Hbα2, presumably the embryonic hemoglobin genes, were drastically up-regulated in the gill and head kidney of heat-tolerant fishes, but not in these tissues of the heat-intolerant fish, suggesting the importance of the embryonic hemoglobin genes in coping with the low oxygen conditions under heat stress.

  8. Cloning and Characterization of a Caesalpinoid (Chamaecrista fasciculate) Hemoglobin: The Structural Transition from a Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobin to a Leghemoglobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) and leghemoglobins (Lbs) are plant proteins that can reversibly bind O2 and other ligands. The nsHbs are hexacoordinate and appear to modulate cellular concentrations of NO and maintain energy levels under hypoxic conditions. The Lbs are pentacoordinate and facilita...

  9. Structural characterization of hemoglobins from Monilifera and Frenulata tubeworms (Siboglinids): first discovery of giant hexagonal-bilayer hemoglobin in the former "Pogonophora" group.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Cédric; Andersen, Ann C; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Le Guen, Dominique; Terrier, Peran; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Zal, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Siboglinids are symbiotic polychete annelids having hemoglobins as essential oxygen- and sulfide-carriers for their endosymbiotic bacteria. We analyzed the structure of the hemoglobins from two species of siboglinids: the monilifera Sclerolinum contortum and the frenulata Oligobrachia webbi (i.e. haakonmosbiensis) from Norwegian cold seeps. Measured by Multi-Angle Laser Light Scattering (MALLS), Sclerolinum shows a 3190+/-50 kDa hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) and a 461+/-46 kDa ring-Hb, just as vestimentifera, whereas Oligobrachia has a 409+/-3.7 kDa ring-Hb only. Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) showed Sclerolinum HBL-Hb composed of seven monomeric globins (15-16 kDa), three disulfide-bonded globin heterodimers and three linkers. The heterodimers always contain globin-b (15814.4+/-1.5 Da). Sclerolinum ring-Hb is composed of globins and dimers with identical masses as its HBL-Hb, but lacks linkers. Oligobrachia ring-Hb has three globin monomers (14-15 kDa) only, with no disulfide-bonded dimers. Comparison of Sclerolinum hemoglobins between Storegga and Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, using the normalized height of deconvoluted ESI-MS peaks, shows differences in globin monomers abundances that could reflect genetic differences or differential gene expression between distinct seep populations. The discovery of HBL-Hb in Sclerolinum is a new element supporting the hypothesis of monilifera being phylogenetically more closely related to vestimentifera, than to frenulata.

  10. Effects of Stroma Free Hemoglobin on Blood Pressure and Renal Function in the Hypotensive Rat: Potential Role of Nitric Oxide Inactivation by Hemoglobin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    METHODS Male Sprague-Dawley rats ( Charles River , Wilmington, MA), weighing between 250-350g were used for all experiments. Rats were fed regular Purina...BONAVENTURA. Cell-free hemoglobin reverses the endotoxin mediated hyporesponsivity of rat aortic rings to a-adrenergic agents. Biochem. Biophys

  11. Identification of Hemoglobin Levels Based on Anthropometric Indices in Elderly Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Anemia is independently and strongly associated with an increased risk of mortality in older people and is also strongly associated with obesity. The objectives of the present study were to examine the associations between the hemoglobin level and various anthropometric indices, to predict low and normal hemoglobin levels using combined anthropometric indices, and to assess differences in the hemoglobin level and anthropometric indices between Korean men and women. Methods A total of 7,156 individuals ranging in age from 53–90 years participated in this retrospective cross-sectional study. Binary logistic regression (LR) and naïve Bayes (NB) models were used to identify significant differences in the anthropometric indices between subjects with low and normal hemoglobin levels and to assess the predictive power of these indices for the hemoglobin level. Results Among all of the variables, age displayed the strongest association with the hemoglobin level in both men (p < 0.0001, odds ratio [OR] = 0.487, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve based on the LR [LR-AUC] = 0.702, NB-AUC = 0.701) and women (p < 0.0001, OR = 0.636, LR-AUC = 0.625, NB-AUC = 0.624). Among the anthropometric indices, weight and body mass index (BMI) were the best predictors of the hemoglobin level. The predictive powers of all of the variables were higher in men than in women. The AUC values for the NB-Wrapper and LR-Wrapper predictive models generated using combined anthropometric indices were 0.734 and 0.723, respectively, for men and 0.649 and 0.652, respectively, for women. The use of combined anthropometric indices may improve the predictive power for the hemoglobin level. Discussion Among the various anthropometric indices, with the exception of age, we did not identify any indices that were better predictors than weight and BMI for low and normal hemoglobin levels. In addition, none of the ratios between pairs of indices were good indicators of the

  12. Maternal hemoglobin level and fetal outcome at low and high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Steenland, Kyle; Tapia, Vilma

    2009-01-01

    Both, low (<7 g/dl) and high (>14.5 g/dl), maternal hemoglobin (Hb) levels have been related to poor fetal outcome. Most studies have been done at low altitude (LA). Here, we have sought to determine whether this relationship exists at both high and low altitude, and also whether there is an adverse effect of high altitude (HA) on fetal outcome independent of level of maternal hemoglobin. The study is based on a retrospective multicenter analysis of 35,449 pregnancies at LA and six other cities above 3000 meters. In analyses of all women at both LA and HA, those with Hb <9 g/dl had odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 4.4 (CI: 2.8–6.7), 2.5 (CI: 1.9–3.2), and 1.4 (CI: 1.1–1.9) for stillbirths, preterm, and small for gestational age (SGA) births, respectively, compared with women with 11–12.9 g/dl of Hb, after adjustment for confounders. These risks by hemoglobin level differed little between women at LA and HA, suggesting that no correction of the definition of anemia is necessary for women at HA. Women living at high altitude with hemoglobin >15.5 g/dl had higher risks for stillbirths (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.05–1.3), preterm (OR: 1.5; CI 1.3–1.8), and SGA births (OR: 2.1, CI 1.8–2.3). There was also a significant adverse effect of living at HA, independent of hemoglobin level for all three outcomes (OR: 3.9, 1.7, and 2.3; CI: 2.8–5.2, 1.5–1.9, and 2.1–2.5) for stillbirths, preterms, and SGA respectively, after adjusting for hemoglobin level. Both, high and low maternal hemoglobin levels were related to poor pregnancy outcome, with similar effect of low hemoglobin in both LA and HA. Our data suggest, that maternal hemoglobin above 11 g/dl but below 13 g/dl is the area of minimal risk of poor adverse outcomes. Living at HA had an adverse effect independent of hemoglobin level. PMID:19741055

  13. Cloning and characterization of a caesalpinoid (Chamaecrista fasciculata) hemoglobin: the structural transition from a nonsymbiotic hemoglobin to a leghemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gopalasubramaniam, Sabarinathan K; Kovacs, Frank; Violante-Mota, Fernando; Twigg, Paul; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Sarath, Gautam

    2008-07-01

    Nonsymbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) and leghemoglobins (Lbs) are plant proteins that can reversibly bind O(2) and other ligands. The nsHbs are hexacoordinate and appear to modulate cellular concentrations of NO and maintain energy levels under hypoxic conditions. The Lbs are pentacoordinate and facilitate the diffusion of O(2) to symbiotic bacteroids within legume root nodules. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that all plant Hbs evolved from a common ancestor and that Lbs originated from nsHbs. However, little is known about the structural intermediates that occurred during the evolution of pentacoordinate Lbs from hexacoordinate nsHbs. We have cloned and characterized a Hb (ppHb) from the root nodules of the ancient caesalpinoid legume Chamaecrista fasciculata. Protein sequence, modeling data, and spectral analysis indicated that the properties of ppHb are intermediate between that of nsHb and Lb, suggesting that ppHb resembles a putative ancestral Lb. Predicted structural changes that appear to have occurred during the nsHb to Lb transition were a compaction of the CD-loop and decreased mobility of the distal His inhibiting its ability to coordinate directly with the heme-Fe, leading to a pentacoordinate protein. Other predicted changes include shortening of the N- and C-termini, compaction of the protein into a globular structure, disappearance of positive charges outside the heme pocket and appearance of negative charges in an area located between the N- and C-termini. A major consequence for some of these changes appears to be the decrease in O(2)-affinity of ancestral nsHb, which resulted in the origin of the symbiotic function of Lbs.

  14. Maternal Hemoglobin Levels during Pregnancy and their Association with Birth Weight of Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam Tabrizi, F; Barjasteh, S

    2015-01-01

    Back ground Anemia in pregnancy is associated with increased rates of maternal and perinatal mortality, premature delivery, low birth weight, and other adverse outcomes Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted on 1405 Iranian pregnant women who delivered during 2015. Blood was collected from all the subjects to measure the hemoglobin (Hb) during 16-19 weeks, 22-24 weeks, and 34-36 weeks of gestation. According to the level of hemoglobin, it is divided into 4 groups. Group 1; Hb > 10.1 gm/100ml (control group), Group 2; Hb= 8.1-10 gm/100ml (mild anemia) Group 3; Hb= 6.5-8 gm/100ml (moderate anemia) Group 4; Hb <6.5 gm/100ml (severe anemia). After delivery, the neonates were weighted within 24 hours after birth. Maternal hemoglobin and birth weights were compared. Results The anemia prevalence was 20.2% (Hb<10g/dl). Out of them, 16.2 % hadmoderate anemia (Hb=6.5-8 g/dl) and 83.8% had mild anemia (Hb=8.1-10 g/dl). Severe anemia did not detect in pregnant women. The hemoglobin levels in non anemic group showed a drop in the second trimester. Pregnant women with hemoglobin less than 10 g/dl, considered as anemic gave birth to neonates with birth weight of 2.6kg, while pregnant women with higher hemoglobin level (>10 g/dl), considered as normal gave birth to heavier and normal babies (3.3 kg). The severity of anemia during three trimesters was closely associated with birth weight of newborns. Conclusion The low hemoglobin values during three trimesters of pregnancy were associated with low birth weight in Iran. The anemia can lead to intra uterine growth retardation. PMID:26985354

  15. [Research on Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer by the Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Human Hemoglobin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Zhi-feng; Tang, Wei-yue; Li, Yun-tao; Fan, Chun-zhen

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis have great positive effect on the treatment of gastric cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy can provide a useful monitor for hemoglobin dynamics. Besides, Raman spectroscopy has notable advantages in the fields of abnormal hemoglobin diagnosis, hemoglobin oxygen saturation deter mination and blood methemoglobin analysis. In this paper, novel silver colloid was synthesized by microwave heated method. The surface enhanced Raman spectrums of hemoglobin from 11 normal persons and 20 gastric cancer patients are measured and analyzed in order to obtain spectrums which are high repeatability and characteristic peaks protruding. By analyzing the assignations of the SERS bands, it found that the content of asparagine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in the hemoglobin are significantly lower than healthy people. Discussing the structure of hemoglobin, when hemoglobin combines with oxygen, Fe²⁺ is in a low spin state, ionic radius shrinks and moves 0. 075 nm and fall into the pore in the middle of the heme porphyrin ring plane. This spatial variation affects F8His connected with the iron, will narrow the gap between the globin in the two strands of the helix, as a result, HC2 tyrosine pushed out of the void. Using this mechanism, the absorption peak of 1 560 cm⁻¹ confirmed that the tyrosine content in patients with gastric cancer was lower than that of normal people. Principal component analysis(PCA) is employed to get a three-dimensional scatter plot of PC scores for the health and cancer groups, and it can be learned that they are distributed in separate areas. By using the method of discriminate analysis, it is found that the diagnostic algorithm separates the two groups with sensitivity of 90.0% and diagnostic specificity of 90.9%, the overall diagnostic accuracy was 90.3%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrate that, SERS detection of oxyhemoglobin combined with multivariate analysis would be an effective method for early diagnosis of gastric

  16. Association between Hemoglobin Concentration and the Progression or Development of Albuminuria in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Goji; Tanaka, Muhei; Osaka, Takafumi; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Narumiya, Hiromichi; Inoue, Mamoru; Nakano, Koji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Aims Anemia, which might contribute to pathogenesis of kidney dysfunction, is a common finding in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate if hemoglobin concentration is associated with the degree of change in urinary albumin-creatinine ratio or the development of albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We measured hemoglobin concentration in 470 (296 men and 174 women) consecutive type 2 diabetic patients without albuminuria. We performed a follow-up study to assess the progression or development of albuminuria, the interval of which was 3.0 years. Then we evaluated relationships between hemoglobin concentration and albuminuria, using multivariate linear regression analyses and logistic regression analyses. Results Eighty four patients developed albuminuria during follow-up duration. In multivariate analyses, hemoglobin concentration was negatively associated with a change in urinary albumin-creatinine ratio in men (ß = -0.259, P = 0.0002) and women (ß = -0.194, P = 0.030). Moreover, multivariate adjusted odds ratio associated with 1 g/L in hemoglobin for the development of albuminuria was 0.93 (95% confidence interval; 0.89-0.96) in men and 0.94 (95% confidence interval; 0.88-0.99) in women, respectively. And, multivariate analyses revealed that adjusted odds ratios for the development of albuminuria were 4.78 (95% confidence interval; 1.65-13.91) in men and 4.62 (95% confidence interval; 1.34-16.68) in women with anemia (hemoglobin < 130 g/L for men and < 120 g/L for women), which were higher than those without anemia. Conclusions Low hemoglobin concentration could be a predictor for the progression and development of albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26023923

  17. Evaluation and interference study of hemoglobin A1c measured by turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Hoke, C; Ettinger, B; Penerian, G

    1998-03-01

    The technical performance of the turbidimetric immunoinhibition (TI) assay for hemoglobin (Hb) A1c (Tina-quant Hb A1c, Boehringer Mannheim, Indianapolis, Ind) was evaluated by using the BM/Hitachi 911 analyzer. Intra-assay imprecision was less than 2.7%, and interassay imprecision was less than 2.8% as measured by coefficient of variation. In 93 subjects with diabetes who did not have hemoglobin variants, results of the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with those obtained by using a high-performance liquid chromatography analyzer (Diamat, BioRad Laboratories, Hercules, Calif). Among 241 subjects who had or did not have hemoglobin variants, the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with results of affinity chromatography for total glycated hemoglobin (Glyc-Affin GHb, IsoLab, Akron, Ohio). We also studied the effect of various percentages of hemoglobin S, C, E, and F on the accuracy of the TI Hb A1c assay. Only high hemoglobin F percentages caused interference. More than 14 times as many samples can be analyzed per hour by using the TI Hb A1c assay than can be analyzed by using the HPLC assay. For high-volume reference laboratories, using the fully automated TI Hb A1c assay to monitor glycemic control in patients with diabetes may be preferable to using the conventional ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography Hb A1c assay because the TI assay measures Hb A1c more accurately in patients with diabetes who have hemoglobin variants, and it requires less time.

  18. Ex vivo hemoglobin status study using photoacoustic computed tomography small animal scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to calibrate the PCT scanner to quantify the hemoglobin status utilizing a blood flow phantom. Materials and Methods: A blood circulation system was designed and constructed to control the oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration of blood. As a part of the circulation system, a 1.1mm FEP tube was placed in the center of imaging tank of PCT scanner as the imaging object. Photoacoustic spectra (690-950 nm) was acquired for different hemoglobin concentrations (CtHb) and oxygen saturation levels (SaO2), where the formers was formed by diluting blood samples with PBS and the latter by mixing blood with gases at different oxygen content. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the photon energy depositions in the phantom tube, which took into account photon losses in water and blood. A Kappa value which represents the energy transfer efficiency of hemoglobin molecule was calculated based on the PCT measurement and simulation result. The final SaO2 value of each blood sample was calculated based on the PCT spectrum and Kappa value. These oxygen saturation results were compared with co-oximeter measurements to obtain systematic errors. Results and Conclusion: The statistic error of calculating Kappa value from hemoglobin concentration experiment was less than 5%. The systematic error between PCT spectra analysis and co-oximeter analysis for hemoglobin oxygen saturation was -4.5%. These calibration techniques used to calculate Kappa and hemoglobin absorption spectra would be used in hypoxia measurements in tumors as well as for endogenous biomarkers studies.

  19. Hemoglobin A1c and Self-Monitored Average Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Breton, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previously we have introduced the eA1c—a new approach to real-time tracking of average glycemia and estimation of HbA1c from infrequent self-monitoring (SMBG) data, which was developed and tested in type 2 diabetes. We now test eA1c in type 1 diabetes and assess its relationship to the hemoglobin glycation index (HGI)—an established predictor of complications and treatment effect. Methods: Reanalysis of previously published 12-month data from 120 patients with type 1 diabetes, age 39.15 (14.35) years, 51/69 males/females, baseline HbA1c = 7.99% (1.48), duration of diabetes 20.28 (12.92) years, number SMBG/day = 4.69 (1.84). Surrogate fasting BG and 7-point daily profiles were derived from these unstructured SMBG data and the previously reported eA1c method was applied without any changes. Following the literature, we calculated HGI = HbA1c – (0.009 × Fasting BG + 6.8). Results: The correlation of eA1c with reference HbA1c was r = .75, and its deviation from reference was MARD = 7.98%; 95% of all eA1c values fell within ±20% from reference. The HGI was well approximated by a linear combination of the eA1c calibration factors: HGI = 0.007552*θ1 + 0.007645*θ2 – 3.154 (P < .0001); 73% of low versus moderate-high HGIs were correctly classified by the same factors as well. Conclusions: The eA1c procedure developed in type 2 diabetes to track in real-time changes in average glycemia and present the results in HbA1c-equivalent units has shown similar performance in type 1 diabetes. The eA1c calibration factors are highly predictive of the HGI, thereby explaining partially the biological variation causing discrepancies between HbA1c and its linear estimates from SMBG data. PMID:26553023

  20. Gene cooption and convergent evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins in jawed and jawless vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Storz, Jay F.

    2010-01-01

    Natural selection often promotes evolutionary innovation by coopting preexisting genes for new functions, and this process may be greatly facilitated by gene duplication. Here we report an example of cooptive convergence where paralogous members of the globin gene superfamily independently evolved a specialized O2 transport function in the two deepest branches of the vertebrate family tree. Specifically, phylogenetic evidence demonstrates that erythroid-specific O2 transport hemoglobins evolved independently from different ancestral precursor proteins in jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and jawless fish (cyclostomes, represented by lamprey and hagfish). A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily revealed that the erythroid hemoglobins of cyclostomes are orthologous to the cytoglobin protein of gnathostome vertebrates, a hexacoordinate globin that has no O2 transport function and that is predominantly expressed in fibroblasts and related cell types. The phylogeny reconstruction also revealed that vertebrate-specific globins are grouped into four main clades: (i) cyclostome hemoglobin + cytoglobin, (ii) myoglobin + globin E, (iii) globin Y, and (iv) the α- and β-chain hemoglobins of gnathostomes. In the hemoglobins of gnathostomes and cyclostomes, multisubunit quaternary structures provide the basis for cooperative O2 binding and allosteric regulation by coupling the effects of ligand binding at individual subunits with interactions between subunits. However, differences in numerous structural details belie their independent origins. This example of convergent evolution of protein function provides an impressive demonstration of the ability of natural selection to cobble together complex design solutions by tinkering with different variations of the same basic protein scaffold. PMID:20660759

  1. Selective Removal of Hemoglobin from Blood Using Hierarchical Copper Shells Anchored to Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaokun; Yan, Mingyang

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical copper shells anchored on magnetic nanoparticles were designed and fabricated to selectively deplete hemoglobin from human blood by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Briefly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles coated with polyacrylic acid were first synthesized by a one-pot solvothermal method. Hierarchical copper shells were then deposited by immobilizing Cu2+ on nanoparticles and subsequently by reducing between the solid CoFe2O4@COOH and copper solution with NaBH4. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The particles were also tested against purified bovine hemoglobin over a range of pH, contact time, and initial protein concentration. Hemoglobin adsorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and reached equilibrium in 90 min. Isothermal data also fit the Langmuir model well, with calculated maximum adsorption capacity 666 mg g−1. Due to the high density of Cu2+ on the shell, the nanoparticles efficiently and selectively deplete hemoglobin from human blood. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the particles with hierarchical copper shells effectively remove abundant, histidine-rich proteins, such as hemoglobin from human blood, and thereby minimize interference in diagnostic and other assays. PMID:28316987

  2. Hypoxic survival requires a 2-on-2 hemoglobin in a process involving nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Düner, Melis; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2013-06-25

    Hemoglobins are recognized today as a diverse family of proteins present in all kingdoms of life and performing multiple reactions beyond O2 chemistry. The physiological roles of most hemoglobins remain elusive. Here, we show that a 2-on-2 ("truncated") hemoglobin, termed THB8, is required for hypoxic growth and the expression of anaerobic genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. THB8 is 1 of 12 2-on-2 hemoglobins in this species. It belongs to a subclass within the 2-on-2 hemoglobin class I family whose members feature a remarkable variety of domain arrangements and lengths. Posttranscriptional silencing of the THB8 gene results in the mis-regulation of several genes and a growth defect under hypoxic conditions. The latter is intensified in the presence of an NO scavenger, which also impairs growth of wild-type cells. As recombinant THB8 furthermore reacts with NO, the results of this study indicate that THB8 is part of an NO-dependent signaling pathway.

  3. Hypoxic survival requires a 2-on-2 hemoglobin in a process involving nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Düner, Melis; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobins are recognized today as a diverse family of proteins present in all kingdoms of life and performing multiple reactions beyond O2 chemistry. The physiological roles of most hemoglobins remain elusive. Here, we show that a 2-on-2 (“truncated”) hemoglobin, termed THB8, is required for hypoxic growth and the expression of anaerobic genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. THB8 is 1 of 12 2-on-2 hemoglobins in this species. It belongs to a subclass within the 2-on-2 hemoglobin class I family whose members feature a remarkable variety of domain arrangements and lengths. Posttranscriptional silencing of the THB8 gene results in the mis-regulation of several genes and a growth defect under hypoxic conditions. The latter is intensified in the presence of an NO scavenger, which also impairs growth of wild-type cells. As recombinant THB8 furthermore reacts with NO, the results of this study indicate that THB8 is part of an NO-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:23754374

  4. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-15

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  5. Smartphone spectrometer for non-invasive diffuse reflectance spectroscopy based hemoglobin sensing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Perry S.

    2016-10-01

    Fiber-optic based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is shown to be a highly specific and highly sensitive method for non-invasive detection of various cancers (e.g. cervical and oral) as well as many other diseases. Fiber-optic DRS diagnosis relies on non-invasive biomarker detection (e.g. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin) and can be done without the need for sophisticated laboratory analysis of samples. Thus, it is highly amenable for clinical adoption especially in resource scarce regions that have limited access to such developed laboratory infrastructure. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of fiber-optic DRS, such systems remain cost prohibitive in many of these regions, mainly due to the use of bulky and expensive spectrometers. Here, a fiber-optic DRS system is coupled to a smartphone spectrometer and is proposed as a low-cost solution for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing. The performance of the system is assessed by measuring tissue phantoms with varying hemoglobin concentrations. A DRS retrieval algorithm is used to extract hemoglobin parameters from the measurements and determine the accuracy of the system. The results are then compared with those of a previously reported fiber-optic DRS system which is based on a larger more expensive spectrometer system. The preliminary results are encouraging and indicate the potential of the smartphone spectrometer as a viable low-cost option for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing.

  6. Multispectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the binding of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-11-15

    Interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin was studied using multispectroscopic and microcalorimetric techniques to gain insights into the binding mechanism and thereby the toxicity aspects. Hemoglobin spectrum showed hypochromic changes in the presence of tartrazine. Quenching of the fluorescence of hemoglobin occurred and the quenching mechanism was through a static mode as revealed from temperature dependent and time-resolved fluorescence studies. According to the FRET theory the distance between β-Trp37 of hemoglobin and bound tartrazine was evaluated to be 3.44nm. Synchronous fluorescence studies showed that tartrazine binding led to alteration of the microenvironment around the tryptophans more in comparison to tyrosines. 3D fluorescence and FTIR data provided evidence for conformational changes in the protein on binding. Circular dichroism studies revealed that the binding led to significant loss in the helicity of hemoglobin. The esterase activity assay further complemented the circular dichroism data. Microcalorimetric study using isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the binding to be exothermic and driven largely by positive entropic contribution. Dissection of the Gibbs energy change proposed the protein-dye complexation to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Negative heat capacity change also corroborated the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding process.

  7. Multichannel spectroreflectometry: a noninvasive method for assessment of on-line hemoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Vasile

    2009-04-01

    The goal of the current study was to introduce a mathematical method to derive hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and carboxyl-hemoglobin absorption factors from full spectrum reflectometry measurements of retinal microcapillaries. The mathematical equation that describes the spectral reflectometry function was expressed as a linear combination of several terms of S(i)(lambda) representing the spectral signature functions of hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, carboxyl-hemoglobin, ocular media, melanin, and a scattering factor. Contrary to the classical model, where the reflectometry function was expressed as an absorbance Ab(lambda)=log?(incident light(lambda)/reflected light(lambda)), in this model and system, it is proposed to express the reflectometry function from the eye structures as an absorption factor A(lambda)%=incident light(lambda)/reflected light(lambda). To increase confidence in the estimation of hemoglobin derivatives, the mathematical model was applied to only a part of the spectral function of reflectometry, while the results of the model were used to explain the other part of the reflectometry function. The results demonstrate that for the visible spectral field, the model that explains the absorption of the light by the blood contained in the microcapillaries of biological structures is not compatible with the Beer-Lambert law.

  8. Quantitative absorption cytometry for measuring red blood cell hemoglobin mass and volume.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Malka, Roy; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Schaak, Diane; Higgins, John M

    2014-04-01

    We present an optical system, called the quantitative absorption cytometer (QAC), to measure the volume and hemoglobin mass of red blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. In contrast to clinical hematology analyzers, where cells are sphered in order for both volume and hemoglobin to be measured accurately, the QAC measures cells in their normal physiological shape. Human red blood cells are suspended in a refractive index-matching absorbing buffer, driven through a microfluidic channel, and imaged using a transmission light microscope onto a color camera. A red and a blue LED illuminate cells and images at each color are used to independently retrieve cell volume and hemoglobin mass. This system shows good agreement with red blood cell indices retrieved by a clinical hematology analyzer and in fact measures a smaller coefficient of variation of hemoglobin concentration. In addition to cell indices, the QAC returns height and mass maps of each measured cell. These quantitative images are valuable for analyzing the detailed morphology of individual cells as well as statistical outliers found in the data. We also measured red blood cells in hypertonic and hypotonic buffers to quantify the correlation between volume and hemoglobin mass under osmotic stress. Because this method is invariant to cell shape, even extremely nonspherical cells in hypertonic buffers can be measured accurately.

  9. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation.

  10. Detecting free hemoglobin in blood plasma and serum with luminescent terbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Morgner, Frank; Lecointre, Alexandre; Charbonnière, Loïc J; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2015-01-21

    Hemolysis, the rupturing of red blood cells, can result from numerous medical conditions (in vivo) or occur after collecting blood specimen or extracting plasma and serum out of whole blood (in vitro). In clinical laboratory practice, hemolysis can be a serious problem due to its potential to bias detection of various analytes or biomarkers. Here we present the first "mix-and-measure" method to assess the degree of hemolysis in biosamples using luminescence spectroscopy. Luminescent terbium complexes (LTC) were studied in the presence of free hemoglobin (Hb) as indicators for hemolysis in TRIS-buffer, and in fresh human plasma with absorption, excitation and emission measurements. Our findings indicate dynamic as well as resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the LTC and the porphyrin ligand of hemoglobin. This transfer leads to a decrease in luminescence intensity and decay time even at nanomolar hemoglobin concentrations either in buffer or plasma. Luminescent terbium complexes are very sensitive to free hemoglobin in buffer and blood plasma. Due to the instant change in luminescence properties of the LTC in presence of Hb it is possible to access the concentration of hemoglobin via spectroscopic methods without incubation time or further treatment of the sample thus enabling a rapid and sensitive detection of hemolysis in clinical diagnostics.

  11. Estimation of glycated hemoglobin by 2,6-dimethylphenol: Sulphuric acid conventional method.

    PubMed

    Mallya, H M; Pattabiraman, T N

    2001-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin levels in hemolysate of normal and diabetic patients were determined by the 2,6-dimethylphenol:57.5% sulphuric acid conventional method and the values were 0.39±025 and 0.69±0.21 moles of hydroxymethylfurfural(HMF)/mole of globin, respectively. The mean increase in glycated hemoglobin values in diabetics (1.8fold) was highly significant (p<0.001). A good correlation (r=0.95) was found between the glycated hemoglobin values obtained by this method and the phenol:sulphuric acid method. The values obtained by former method were about 1.2-1.4 times the values by the phenol:sulphuric acid method. This study indicates that conventional 2,6-dimethylphenol: 57.5% sulphuric acid method is more sensitive for the estimation of glycated hemoglobin than any other method based on the same principle. It is less time consuming, reliable and hence can be employed for the routine laboratory estimation of glycated hemoglobin for the assessment of glycemic control.

  12. Molecular Mechanism of AHSP-Mediated Stabilization of Alpha-Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Feng,L.; Gell, D.; Zhou, S.; Gu, L.; Kong, Y.; Li, J.; Hu, M.; Yan, N.; Lee, C.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin A (HbA), the oxygen delivery system in humans, comprises two alpha and two beta subunits. Free alpha-hemoglobin (alphaHb) is unstable, and its precipitation contributes to the pathophysiology of beta thalassemia. In erythrocytes, the alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds alphaHb and inhibits its precipitation. The crystal structure of AHSP bound to Fe(II)-alphaHb reveals that AHSP specifically recognizes the G and H helices of alphaHb through a hydrophobic interface that largely recapitulates the alpha1-beta1 interface of hemoglobin. The AHSP-alphaHb interactions are extensive but suboptimal, explaining why beta-hemoglobin can competitively displace AHSP to form HbA. Remarkably, the Fe(II)-heme group in AHSP bound alphaHb is coordinated by the distal but not the proximal histidine. Importantly, binding to AHSP facilitates the conversion of oxy-alphaHb to a deoxygenated, oxidized [Fe(III)], nonreactive form in which all six coordinate positions are occupied. These observations reveal the molecular mechanisms by which AHSP stabilizes free alphaHb.

  13. NITRITE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY OF NON-SYMBIOTIC HEMOGLOBINS FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA†

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Tejero, Jesús; Kenney, Claire; Frizzell, Sheila; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant non-symbiotic hemoglobins possess hexa-coordinate heme geometry similar to the heme protein neuroglobin. We recently discovered that deoxygenated neuroglobin converts nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule involved in many processes in plants. We sought to determine whether Arabidopsis thaliana non-symbiotic hemoglobins class 1 and 2 (AHb1 and AHb2) might function as nitrite reductases. We found that the reaction of nitrite with deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 generates NO gas and iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin species. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO are 19.8 ± 3.2 and 4.9 ± 0.2 M−1s−1, at pH = 7.4 and 25°C, respectively. We determined the pH dependence of these bimolecular rate constants and found a linear correlation with the concentration of protons, indicating the requirement for one proton in the reaction. Release of free NO gas during reaction in anoxic and hypoxic (2% oxygen) conditions was confirmed by chemiluminescence detection. These results demonstrate that deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 reduce nitrite to form NO via a mechanism analogous to that observed for hemoglobin, myoglobin and neuroglobin. Our findings suggest that during severe hypoxia and in the anaerobic plant roots, especially in water submerged species, non-symbiotic hemoglobins provide a viable pathway for NO generation via nitrite reduction. PMID:22620259

  14. Preparation of Cu(2+)-mediated magnetic imprinted polymers for the selective sorption of bovine hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Cui, Xihui; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a novel Cu(2+)-mediated core-shell bovine hemoglobin imprinted superparamagnetic polymers were synthesized. First, carboxyl group directly-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles were produced by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. Next, copper ions were introduced to chelate with carboxyl groups and further bonded with template bovine hemoglobin as co-functional monomer. Then, functional monomers 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane and octyltrimethoxysilane were adopted to form the thin polymer layers. Finally, after removal of the templates, the imprinting shells with specific recognition cavities for bovine hemoglobin were obtained on Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The resultant molecularly imprinted polymers have high adsorption capacity and satisfactory selectivity for bovine hemoglobin with the help of copper ions. The obtained magnetic nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The measurements demonstrated that the as-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited good dispersion, high crystallinity, and satisfactory superparamagnetic properties. The feasibility of this method was further confirmed by using the imprinted nanomaterials to specifically extract bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood samples.

  15. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Anastasia L; Proulx, Amy K; Scott, M Paul; Beavers, Alyssa; Reddy, Manju B

    2013-07-31

    Maize ( Zea mays ) is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable, and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. It was hypothesized that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioavailable iron source and that biofortification of maize with iron can be accomplished by overexpression of maize globin in the endosperm. Maize was transformed with a gene construct encoding a translational fusion of maize globin and green fluorescent protein under transcriptional control of the maize 27 kDa γ-zein promoter. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin produced in Escherichia coli and of stably transformed seeds expressing the maize globin-GFP fusion was determined using an in vitro Caco-2 cell culture model. Maize flour fortified with maize hemoglobin was found to have iron bioavailability that is not significantly different from that of flour fortified with ferrous sulfate or bovine hemoglobin but is significantly higher than unfortified flour. Transformed maize grain expressing maize globin was found to have iron bioavailability similar to that of untransformed seeds. These results suggest that maize globin produced in E. coli may be an effective iron fortificant, but overexpressing maize globin in maize endosperm may require a different strategy to increase bioavailable iron content in maize.

  16. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  17. Development of hemoglobin A1c certified reference material by liquid chromatography isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiaming; Wu, Liqing; Yang, Bin; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    We report the development of a National Institute of Metrology (NIM) hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) certified reference material (CRM). Each CRM unit contains about 10 μL of hemoglobin. Both hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin were quantitatively determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) with synthesized VHLTPE and glycated VHLTPE as standards. The mass fraction of synthesized VHLTPE or glycated VHLTPE was also quantitatively determined by HPLC-IDMS with NIM amino acid CRMs as standards. The homogeneity and stability of the CRMs were examined with a commercial HbA(1c) analyzer based on the HPLC principle. Fifteen units were randomly selected for homogeneity examination, and statistical analysis showed there was no inhomogeneity. Examination of the stability showed that the CRM was stable for at least 6 months at -80 °C. Uncertainty components of the balance, amino acid purity, hydrolysis and proteolysis efficiency, method reproducibility, homogeneity, and stability were taken into consideration for uncertainty evaluation. The certified value of NIM HbA(1c) CRM was expressed as the ratio of HbA(1c) to total hemoglobin in moles, and was (9.6 ± 1.9)%. The CRM can be used as a calibration or validation standard for clinical diagnostics. It is expected to improve the comparability for HbA(1c) measurement in China.

  18. Penta- and hexa-coordinate ferric hemoglobins display distinct pH titration profiles measured by Soret peak shifts.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Sheetal; Kumar, Amit; Shandilya, Manish; Mukhi, Nitika; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kateriya, Suneel; Kaur, Jagreet; Kundu, Suman

    2016-10-01

    Hemoglobins with diverse characteristics have been identified in all kingdoms of life. Their ubiquitous presence indicates that these proteins play important roles in physiology, though function for all hemoglobins are not yet established with certainty. Their physiological role may depend on their ability to bind ligands, which in turn is dictated by their heme chemistry. However, we have an incomplete understanding of the mechanism of ligand binding for these newly discovered hemoglobins and the measurement of their kinetic parameters depend on their coordination at the heme iron. To gain insights into their functional role, it is important to categorize the new hemoglobins into either penta- or hexa-coordinated varieties. We demonstrate that simple pH titration and absorbance measurements can determine the coordination state of heme iron atom in ferric hemoglobins, thus providing unambiguous information about the classification of new globins. This method is rapid, sensitive and requires low concentration of protein. Penta- and hexa-coordinate hemoglobins displayed distinct pH titration profiles as observed in a variety of hemoglobins. The pentacoordinate distal histidine mutant proteins of hexacoordinate hemoglobins and ligand-bound hexacoordinate forms of pentacoordinate hemoglobins reverse the pH titration profiles, thus validating the sensitivity of this spectroscopic technique.

  19. Hemoglobin digestion in Blood-Feeding Ticks: Mapping a Multi-Peptidase Pathway by Functional Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Martin; Nussbaumerová, Martina; Šanda, Miloslav; Kovářová, Zuzana; Srba, Jindřich; Franta, Zdeněk; Sojka, Daniel; Bogyo, Matthew; Caffrey, Conor R.; Kopáček, Petr; Mareš, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Hemoglobin digestion is an essential process for blood-feeding parasites. Using chemical tools, we deconvoluted the intracellular hemoglobinolytic cascade in the tick Ixodes ricinus, a vector of Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis. In tick gut tissue, a network of peptidases was demonstrated through imaging with specific activity-based probes and activity profiling with peptidic substrates/inhibitors. This peptidase network is induced upon blood feeding and degrades hemoglobin at acidic pH. Selective inhibitors were applied to dissect the roles of the individual peptidases and determine the peptidase-specific cleavage map of the hemoglobin molecule. The degradation pathway is initiated by endopeptidases of aspartic and cysteine class (cathepsin D supported by cathepsin L and legumain) and continued by cysteine amino- and carboxy-dipeptidases (cathepsins C and B). The identified enzymes are potential targets to developing novel anti-tick vaccines. PMID:19875079

  20. Reaction of nitric oxide with heme proteins and model compounds of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.S.; Traylor, T.G.; Gardiner, R.; Mizukami, H.

    1987-06-30

    Rates for the reaction of nitric oxide with several ferric heme proteins and model compounds have been measured. The NO combination rates are markedly affected by the presence or absence of distal histidine. Elephant myoglobin in which the E7 distal histidine has been replaced by glutamine reacts with NO 500-1000 times faster than do the native hemoglobins or myoglobins. By contrast, there is not difference in the CO combination rate constants of sperm whale and elephant myoglobins. Studies on ferric model compounds for the R and T states of hemoglobin indicate that their NO combination rate constants are similar to those observed for the combination of CO with the corresponding ferro derivatives. The last observation suggests that the presence of an axial water molecule at the ligand binding site of ferric hemoglobin A prevents it from exhibiting significant cooperativity in its reactions with NO.

  1. Quantitative microvascular hemoglobin mapping using visible light spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shau Poh; Merkle, Conrad W.; Leahy, Conor; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of chromophore concentrations in reflectance mode remains a major challenge for biomedical optics. Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) provides depth-resolved spectroscopic information necessary for quantitative analysis of chromophores, like hemoglobin, but conventional SOCT analysis methods are applicable only to well-defined specular reflections, which may be absent in highly scattering biological tissue. Here, by fitting of the dynamic scattering signal spectrum in the OCT angiogram using a forward model of light propagation, we quantitatively determine hemoglobin concentrations directly. Importantly, this methodology enables mapping of both oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentration, or alternatively, oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration, simultaneously. Quantification was verified by ex vivo blood measurements at various pO2 and hematocrit levels. Imaging results from the rodent brain and retina are presented. Confounds including noise and scattering, as well as potential clinical applications, are discussed. PMID:25909026

  2. Carnivora: the primary structure of the Pacific Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens, Pinnipedia) hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Lin, H X; Kleinschmidt, T; Johnson, M L; Braunitzer, G

    1989-02-01

    The primary structure of the alpha- and beta-chains of the hemoglobin from the Pacific Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens, Pinnipedia) is presented. Sequence analysis revealed only one hemoglobin component whereas two bands were found in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The globin chains were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the sequences determined by automatic liquid- and gas-phase sequencing of the chains and their tryptic peptides. The alpha-chains show 20 and the beta-chains 12 exchanges compared to the corresponding human chains. In the alpha-chains one heme- and two alpha 1/beta 1-contacts were exchanged whereas in the beta-chains one alpha 1/beta 1-, one alpha 1/beta 2-and one heme-contact are substituted. Compared to Harbour Seal (Phoca vitulina) the Walrus hemoglobin shows 9 amino-acid replacements in the alpha-chains and 5 in the beta-chains. The relation between Pinnipedia and Arctoidea is discussed.

  3. Discovery of GBT440, an Orally Bioavailable R-State Stabilizer of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Brian; Chuang, Chihyuan; Dufu, Kobina; Patel, Mira P; Silva-Garcia, Abel; Johnson, Carl; Lu, Qing; Partridge, James R; Patskovska, Larysa; Patskovsky, Yury; Almo, Steven C; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hua, Lan; Xu, Qing; Gwaltney, Stephen L; Yee, Calvin; Harris, Jason; Morgan, Bradley P; James, Joyce; Xu, Donghong; Hutchaleelaha, Athiwat; Paulvannan, Kumar; Oksenberg, Donna; Li, Zhe

    2017-03-09

    We report the discovery of a new potent allosteric effector of sickle cell hemoglobin, GBT440 (36), that increases the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen and consequently inhibits its polymerization when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Unlike earlier allosteric activators that bind covalently to hemoglobin in a 2:1 stoichiometry, 36 binds with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Compound 36 is orally bioavailable and partitions highly and favorably into the red blood cell with a RBC/plasma ratio of ∼150. This partitioning onto the target protein is anticipated to allow therapeutic concentrations to be achieved in the red blood cell at low plasma concentrations. GBT440 (36) is in Phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of sickle cell disease (NCT03036813).

  4. Hemoglobin Willamette (β51Pro → Arg): Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Dias, Matheus Martins; Távora, Saymon Medeiros; de Galiza Neto, Gentil Claudino; de Souza, Jacqueline Holanda; da Silva, Herivaldo Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of hemoglobin (Hb) Willamette (β51 Pro → Arg) in the Hematology Department of a tertiary hospital in Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil. A literature review of the cases described in health sciences databases using as a descriptor Hb Willamette was performed, revealing 12 reported cases, of which only one presented with anemia. Herein, we describe a case of a female 29 years old, with hemoglobinopathy Willamette presenting clinically with anemia, having the lowest hemoglobin rate of the published cases. The relatives of the patient were evaluated andthe patient’s mother corresponded to the first description of the association between Hb Willamette and HbC. Among the hemoglobinopathies, hemoglobin Willamette is an extremely rare disease; therefore it is important to analyze its clinical and laboratory manifestations for accurate diagnosis and assessment of potential interactions with other genetic variants. PMID:28286631

  5. Red cell substitutes from hemoglobin--do we start all over again?

    PubMed

    Kluger, Ronald

    2010-08-01

    Red cells are the oxygen-carrying components of blood. In modern medical practice, transfusions are given as suspensions of type-matched red cells in saline to replace lost blood, preventing organ damage and allowing for recovery. Since red cells cannot be stored for more than about 40 days and because they can transmit infections, alternative materials for transfusions were developed to replace the oxygenation function of the red cells. One approach involves chemically stabilizing hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein of the red cell, while also adjusting its oxygenation properties to replicate that of the red cell. Evaluation of clinical trials of all products led to the conclusion that none that were tested would be suitable for clinical use [Natanson C, Kern SJ, Lurie P, Banks SM, Wolfe SM: Cell-free hemoglobin-based blood substitutes and risk of myocardial infarction and death: a meta-analysis. J Am Med Assoc 2008, 299:2304-2312]. Most notably, the materials increased blood pressure and some were associated with increased risk of heart attacks. More recently, it was found that materials from covalent addition of polyethylene glycol polymers (PEG) to hemoglobin do not elicit the undesired effects on blood pressure [Vandegriff K, Bellelli A, Samaja M, Malavalli A, Brunori M, Winslow RM: Rates of NO binding to MP4, a non-hypertensive polyethylene glycol-conjugated hemoglobin. FASEB J 2003, 17:A183; Vandegriff KD, Malavalli A, Wooldridge J, Lohman J, Winslow RM: MP4: a new nonvasoactive PEG-Hb conjugate. Transfusion 2003, 43:509-516]. Also, materials with higher oxygen affinity than red cells are able to provide oxygenation at the sites in capillaries that have the most critical need for oxygen [Villela NR, Cabrales P, Tsai AG, Intaglietta M: Microcirculatory effects of changing blood hemoglobin oxygen affinity during hemorrhagic shock resuscitation in an experimental model. Shock 2009, 31:645-652]. It had been considered that the origin of the negative effects

  6. [Noninvasive total hemoglobin monitoring based on multiwave spectrophotometry in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Pyregov, A V; Ovechkin, A Iu; Petrov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Results of prospective randomized comparative research of 2 total hemoglobin estimation methods are presented. There were laboratory tests and continuous noninvasive technique with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET. Research was carried out in two stages. At the 1st stage (gynecology)--67 patients were included and in second stage (obstetrics)--44 patients during and after Cesarean section. The standard deviation of noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation from absolute values (invasive) was 7.2 and 4.1%, an standard deviation in a sample--5.2 and 2.7 % in gynecologic operations and surgical delivery respectively, that confirms lack of reliable indicators differences. The method of continuous noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET technology can be recommended for use in obstetrics and gynecology.

  7. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  8. The effect of gamma-rays on the hemoglobin of whole-body irradiated mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashry, H. A.; Selim, N. S.; El-Behay, A. Z.

    1994-07-01

    Changes in the UV-visible absorption spectrum of mouse hemoglobin as a result of whole body irradiation were studied. White albino adult mice were exposed to a Cs-137 γ-source at a dose rate of 47.5 Gy/h to different absorbed dose values ranging from 1 to 8 Gy. Blood specimens were taken 24 h after irradiation. The UV-visible absorption spectra of hemoglobin of irradiated and control mice were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The obtained results showed significant changes in the bands measured at 340 nm, in the Soret band measured at 410 nm, also, the α- and β-bands measured at 537 and 572 nm showed significant decrease in intensity with the absorbed dose increase. The absorbance measured at 630 nm showed no significant changes. The radiation effect on the animal hemoglobin was discussed on the basis of the obtained results.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman spectra of hemoglobin for esophageal cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xue; Diao, Zhenqi; Fan, Chunzhen; Guo, Huiqiang; Xiong, Yang; Tang, Weiyue

    2014-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of hemoglobin from 30 esophageal cancer patients and 30 healthy persons have been detected and analyzed. The results indicate that, there are more iron ions in low spin state and less in high for the hemoglobin of esophageal cancer patients than normal persons, which is consistent with the fact that it is easier to hemolyze for the blood of cancer patients. By using principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminate analysis, we can get a three-dimensional scatter plot of PC scores from the SERS spectra of healthy persons and cancer patients, from which the two groups can be discriminated. The total accuracy of this method is 90%, while the diagnostic specificity is 93.3% and sensitivity is 86.7%. Thus SERS spectra of hemoglobin analysis combined with PCA may be a new technique for the early diagnose of esophageal cancer.

  10. [Hemoglobins, XXXVII. The primary structure of a monomeric insect hemoglobin (Erythrocruorin), component CTT IIIa of Chironomus thummi thummi. An anomalous Heme complex: E7 Gln, E11 Ile].

    PubMed

    Steer, W; Braunitzer, G

    1981-01-01

    The primary structure of the monomeric hemoglobin CTT IIIa of the midge larva of Chironomus thummi thummi is presented. Cyanogenbromide peptides and tryptic peptides were used for sequence analysis. The primary structure was established with a small number of large peptides. The complete sequencing of the cyanogen bromide peptides was enabled by the C-terminal fixation of arginine. The primary structure of CTT IIIa is compared to the beta-chains of human and to the monomeric component CTT III: CTT IIIa possesses a "tail" of 9 amino acids on the N-terminus, and shows only a small number of identical residues compared to the number that other CTT hemoglobins share with each other. Also the heme complex is unusual: E7 Gln and E11 Ile.

  11. Hemoglobin Status Associate with Performance IQ but not Verbal IQ in Chinese Pre-school Children

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yuexian; Zhao, Sophie R.; Zhou, Guoping; Ma, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jianghong

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the body of literature that links anemia with poorer cognition in children and the evidence that the severity of the effects of anemia on children’s cognition vary in different populations, few studies have investigated the effects of anemia on the cognitive development of Chinese children. Study Design This longitudinal cohort includes 171 children from a developing region of China. Hemoglobin and iron levels were taken when the children were 4 years old. At age 6, the children’s cognition was tested with Chinese WPPSI. Psychosocial information was also used in analyses. Results Results showed that the children who had low Hb levels had significantly lower scores in PIQ, but not VIQ. Although blood Fe levels were not shown to moderate the link between hemoglobin levels and IQ, we found children who performed the best on IQ tests exhibited low iron levels concurrent with high hemoglobin levels, whereas the group who performed the worst exhibited high iron but low hemoglobin levels. We also found that psychosocial adversity did not differ significantly between children who had normal or low hemoglobin levels, although the effect of hemoglobin on PIQ became only suggestive after controlling for psychosocial adversity, therefore the relationship is not causal but only a suggestive association. Conclusion Our findings are in agreement with literature on the negative effects of anemia on children’s cognition and point to the possibility that the portions of the brain associated with PIQ components are particularly affected by low Hb during crucial periods of development. PMID:22507306

  12. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Rammos, Christos; Zeus, Tobias; Balzer, Jan; Kubatz, Laura; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Veulemans, Verena; Hellhammer, Katharina; Totzeck, Matthias; Luedike, Peter; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%). Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03) and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001). PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02) and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusion We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function. PMID:26986059

  13. Cross-sectional and longitudinal association between hemoglobin concentration and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Hyun; Lee, Ju-Mi; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Joo-Young; Yeom, Hyungseon; Lee, Jung Hyun; Suh, Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between hemoglobin concentration and hypertension in a Korean population. Between 2006 and 2013, we examined 4899 participants with mean age of 56.6 years (range 35–88 years) from a rural community. We excluded 298 participants with a history of myocardial infarction or stroke and 264 participants with very low hemoglobin levels (men: <13.3 g/dL; women: <11.6 g/dL). Finally, we performed a cross-sectional analysis on 1629 men and 2708 women. Longitudinal associations were evaluated in 654 men and 1099 women, after excluding 2584 people with hypertension at baseline and those who did not participate in follow-up examinations. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg, or use of antihypertensive treatment. The mean hemoglobin level was significantly higher in people with hypertension than in those without hypertension (P = 0.002 for men, P = 0.006 for women). On cross-sectional analysis, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for hypertension per 1 standard deviation increase in hemoglobin concentration (1.2 g/dL) was 1.11 (1.05–1.18) before adjustment and 1.20 (1.09–1.32) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, kidney markers, lifestyle factors, and comorbidities. On longitudinal analysis, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) for incident hypertension per 1 standard deviation increase in hemoglobin concentration was 1.09 (0.96–1.23) before adjustment and 0.91 (0.78–1.08) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, lifestyle factors, baseline blood pressure, baseline comorbidities, and baseline kidney markers. This study suggests that hemoglobin per se does not cause hypertension development. PMID:27741113

  14. High Presence of Extracellular Hemoglobin in the Periventricular White Matter Following Preterm Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ley, David; Romantsik, Olga; Vallius, Suvi; Sveinsdóttir, Kristbjörg; Sveinsdóttir, Snjolaug; Agyemang, Alex A.; Baumgarten, Maria; Mörgelin, Matthias; Lutay, Nataliya; Bruschettini, Matteo; Holmqvist, Bo; Gram, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Severe cerebral intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants continues to be a major clinical problem, occurring in about 15–20% of very preterm infants. In contrast to other brain lesions the incidence of IVH has not been reduced over the last decade, but actually slightly increased. Currently over 50% of surviving infants develop post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation and about 35% develop severe neurological impairment, mainly cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. To date there is no therapy available to prevent infants from developing either hydrocephalus or serious neurological disability. It is known that blood rapidly accumulates within the ventricles following IVH and this leads to disruption of normal anatomy and increased local pressure. However, the molecular mechanisms causing brain injury following IVH are incompletely understood. We propose that extracellular hemoglobin is central in the pathophysiology of periventricular white matter damage following IVH. Using a preterm rabbit pup model of IVH the distribution of extracellular hemoglobin was characterized at 72 h following hemorrhage. Evaluation of histology, histochemistry, hemoglobin immunolabeling and scanning electron microscopy revealed presence of extensive amounts of extracellular hemoglobin, i.e., not retained within erythrocytes, in the periventricular white matter, widely distributed throughout the brain. Furthermore, double immunolabeling together with the migration and differentiation markers polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) demonstrates that a significant proportion of the extracellular hemoglobin is distributed in areas of the periventricular white matter with high extracellular plasticity. In conclusion, these findings support that extracellular hemoglobin may contribute to the pathophysiological processes that cause irreversible damage to the immature brain following IVH. PMID:27536248

  15. Inhibitory potential of pure isoflavonoids, red clover, and alfalfa extracts on hemoglobin glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohsen; Asgary, Sedigheh; Najafi, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-enzymatic glycosylation of hemoglobin is complications of diabetes. Antioxidant system imbalance can result in the emergence of free radicals’ destructive effects in the long-term. Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) contain isoflavonoids and have antioxidant activity. This experimental study evaluated the inhibitory activity of pure isoflavonoids (daidzein and genistein), red clover and alfalfa extracts on hemoglobin glycosylation. METHODS This study was performed in Iran. Stock solution of hydroalcoholic extracts of red clover and alfalfa in concentrations of 1 and 10 g/100 ml and stock solution of daidzein and genistein in concentrations of 250 ng, 500 ng, 25 µg and 250 µg/100 ml were prepared as case groups. Control group was without hydroalcoholic extracts of plants and pure isoflavonoids. All experiments were performed in triplicate. Hemoglobin was prepared and antioxidant activities were investigated to estimate degree of nonenzymatic hemoglobin glycosylation. RESULTS There was no significantly difference between used extracts (extract of red clover and alfalfa) and control of the hemoglobin glycosylation but using daidzein (P = 0.046, 0.029 and 0.021, respectively) and genistein (P = 0.034, 0.036 and 0.028) significantly inhibited (P < 0.050) this reaction in 25 µg/100 ml, 250 and 500 ng/100 ml concentrations when compared to control. in 25 µg/100 ml, 250 ng and 500 ng/100 ml concentrations percentage of inhibition were 32, 80 and 74.5% respectively with used of daidzein and were 21, 83 and 76% respectively with consumption of genistein. CONCLUSION According to decrease of glycation of hemoglobin with isoflavonoids, two used plant in this study containing isoflavonoid may be useful on diabetes. PMID:26405442

  16. Glutathione transferases and glutathionylated hemoglobin in workers exposed to low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Primavera, Alessandra; Fustinoni, Silvia; Biroccio, Antonino; Ballerini, Sabrina; Urbani, Andrea; Bernardini, Sergio; Federici, Giorgio; Capucci, Enrico; Manno, Maurizio; Lo Bello, Mario

    2008-11-01

    We evaluated glutathione transferase (GST) activities and the levels of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the RBC of 42 workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene in a petrochemical plant, using 43 workers not exposed to 1,3-butadiene and 82 foresters as internal and external controls, respectively. Median 1,3-butadiene exposure levels were 1.5, 0.4, and 0.1 microg/m3 in 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers, in workers not directly exposed to 1,3-butadiene, and in foresters, respectively. In addition, we determined in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of the same individuals the presence of GST polymorphic genes GSTT1 and GSTM1 and the distribution of GSTP1 allelic variants. Comparing the mean values observed in petrochemical workers with those of control foresters, we found a marked decrease of GST enzymatic activity and a significant increase of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the petrochemical workers. A weak but significant negative correlation was found between levels of 1,3-butadiene exposure and GST activity, whereas a positive correlation was found between 1,3-butadiene exposure and glutathionylated hemoglobin. A negative correlation was also observed between GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin. No influence of confounders was observed. Using a multiple linear regression model, up to 50.6% and 41.9% of the variability observed in glutathionylated hemoglobin and GST activity, respectively, were explained by 1,3-butadiene exposure, working setting, and GSTT1 genotype. These results indicate that occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene induces an oxidative stress that impairs the GST balance in RBC, and suggest that GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin could be recommended as promising biomarkers of effect in petrochemical workers.

  17. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  18. Conformational heterogeneity in hemoglobin as determined by picosecond fluorescence decay measurements of the tryptopran residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, A. G.; Kpajcarski, D.; Zuker, M.; Alpert, B.

    1984-06-01

    The fluorescence decay of the tryptophan residues in different derivatives of human hemoglobin (HbO. HbCO, Hb(deoxy), Hb(Met)) were examined in aqueous solutions at 20°C. Each derivative exhibited triple-exponential decay, kinetics with decay times between 70 and 90 ps. 1.8 and 1.9 ns, and 4.9 and 5.4 ns. The fractional fluorescence contribution of each component was different for each derivative. The results suggest that the different hemoglobin derivatives exist in solution as a mixture of at least three average conformations having different tryptoplian-heme orientations.

  19. Hemoglobin magnetism in aqueous solution probed by muon spin relaxation and future applications to brain research.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Kanetada; Shimomura, Koichiro; Miyadera, Haruo; Kim, Yong-Jae; Scheicher, Ralph Hendrik; Das, Tara Prasad; Schultz, Jerome Samson

    2007-05-01

    A marked difference in spin relaxation behavior due to hemoglobin magnetism was found for positive muons (μ(+)) in deoxyhemoglobin in comparison with that observed in oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under zero and external longitudinal magnetic fields upto 0.4 Tesla. At the same time, small but significant unique relaxation pattern was observed in nonmagnetic oxyhemoglobin. Combined with our previous measurements on hemoglobin in human blood, application of this type of measurement to the studies of the level of oxygenation in various regions of the human brain is suggested.

  20. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  1. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  2. The Present and Future Global Burden of the Inherited Disorders of Hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B

    2016-04-01

    The inherited disorders of hemoglobin represent the most common monogenic diseases. This article provides a brief description of the main inherited disorders of hemoglobin and their classification, and summarizes progress made in the last decade toward a better awareness and recognition of these disorders as a global health problem. Also presented are the main demographic, genetic, and environmental factors that influence the present and future health burden of these disorders. The strengths and limitations of existing estimates and current health policies in high-, low-, and middle-income countries are discussed.

  3. Polymer/hemoglobin assemblies: biodegradable oxygen carriers for artificial red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Taihang; Jing, Xiabin; Huang, Yubin

    2011-07-07

    In routine clinical procedures, blood transfusion is now suffering from the defects of the blood products, like cross-matching, short storage time and virus infection. Various blood substitutes have been designed by researchers through continual efforts. With recent progress in nanotechnology, new types of artificial red blood cells with cellular structure are available. This article aims to describe some artificial red blood cells which encapsulate or conjugate hemoglobin molecules through various approaches, especially the nanoscale self-assembly technique, to mitigate the adverse effects of free hemoglobin molecules. These types of artificial red blood cell systems, which make use of biodegradable polymers as matrix materials, show advantages over the traditional types.

  4. Endogenous contrast blood flow imaging in embryonic hearts using hemoglobin contrast subtraction angiography

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Engin; Jonas, Stephan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of congenital heart disease (CHD) is yet to be defined, and the interactions between the malformed heart and biomechanical cardiac performance remain poorly understood. Functional optical imaging enables detailed biomechanical phenotyping of cardiac dysfunction in small animal models, which in turn enables specific gene-phenotype relationship. We have developed a new microangiography technique based on flow imaging using endogenous hemoglobin contrast enabling in vivo assessment and biomechanical phenotyping of Xenopus tropicalis embryonic heart. We demonstrated that hemoglobin contrast angiography can be used to quantify physiological response to treatment with well-established cardioactive drugs. PMID:22825198

  5. Treatment of β-Thalassemia/Hemoglobin E with Antioxidant Cocktails Results in Decreased Oxidative Stress, Increased Hemoglobin Concentration, and Improvement of the Hypercoagulable State

    PubMed Central

    Yanpanitch, Orn-uma; Hatairaktham, Suneerat; Charoensakdi, Ratiya; Panichkul, Narumol; Fucharoen, Suthat; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Kalpravidh, Ruchaneekorn W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the antioxidant treatment for thalassemia have reported variable outcomes. However, treatment of thalassemia with a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic antioxidants and an iron chelator has not been studied. This study investigated the effects of antioxidant cocktails for the treatment of β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E (HbE), which is the most common form of β-thalassemia in Southeast Asia. Sixty patients were divided into two groups receiving N-acetylcysteine, deferiprone, and either curcuminoids (CUR) or vitamin E (Vit-E), and their hematological parameters, iron load, oxidative stress, and blood coagulation potential were evaluated. Patients were classified as responders if they showed the improvements of the markers of iron load and oxidative stress, otherwise as nonresponders. During treatment, the responders in both groups had significantly decreased iron load, oxidative stress, and coagulation potential and significantly increased antioxidant capacity and hemoglobin concentration. The significantly maximum increase (P < 0.01) in hemoglobin concentration was 11% at month 4 in CUR group responders and 10% at month 10 in Vit-E group responders. In conclusion, the two antioxidant cocktails can improve anemia, iron overload, oxidative stress, and hypercoagulable state in β-thalassemia/HbE. PMID:26078808

  6. Development and characterization of K562 cell clones expressing BCL11A-XL: Decreased hemoglobin production with fetal hemoglobin inducers and its rescue with mithramycin

    PubMed Central

    Finotti, Alessia; Gasparello, Jessica; Breveglieri, Giulia; Cosenza, Lucia Carmela; Montagner, Giulia; Bresciani, Alberto; Altamura, Sergio; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Martini, Elisa; Gallerani, Eleonora; Borgatti, Monica; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is considered a promising strategy in the treatment of β-thalassemia, in which production of adult hemoglobin (HbA) is impaired by mutations affecting the β-globin gene. Recent results indicate that B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 11A (BCL11A) is a major repressor of γ-globin gene expression. Therefore, disrupting the binding of the BCL11A transcriptional repressor complex to the γ-globin gene promoter provides a novel approach for inducing expression of the γ-globin genes. To develop a cellular screening system for the identification of BCL11A inhibitors, we produced K562 cell clones with integrated copies of a BCL11A-XL expressing vector. We characterized 12 K562 clones expressing different levels of BCL11A-XL and found that a clear inverse relationship does exist between the levels of BCL11A-XL and the extent of hemoglobinization induced by a panel of HbF inducers. Using mithramycin as an inducer, we found that this molecule was the only HbF inducer efficient in rescuing the ability to differentiate along the erythroid program, even in K562 cell clones expressing high levels of BCL11A-XL, suggesting that BCL11A-XL activity is counteracted by mithramycin. PMID:26342260

  7. Hemoglobins of reptiles. The primary structures of the alpha I- and beta I-chains of common iguana (Iguana iguana) hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rücknagel, K P; Braunitzer, G; Wiesner, H

    1988-10-01

    The primary structures of alpha I- and beta I-chains from the hemoglobins of the Common Iguana (Iguana iguana) are presented. The globin chains were separated on CM-cellulose in 8 M urea buffer. The amino-acid sequences were established by automatic Edman degradation of the native chains, the tryptic peptides and a peptide obtained by cyanogen bromide cleavage. The sequences are compared with human hemoglobin. Amino-acid replacements at positions critical for structure and function of the hemoglobin are discussed. The requirements for binding of ATP and also of DPG as allosteric effectors at the beta-chains seem to be fulfilled. Comparison of the alpha-chains with those of the Viper (Vipera aspis) shows 66 amino-acid substitutions. This number is in the same order of magnitude as the ones found by comparison with alpha-chains of crocodiles and mammals as well as with alpha A-chains of a turtle and birds. This result points towards a period of independent evolution of the reptile lines leading to the Common Iguana on one hand and to the Viper on the other. This time span is comparable to the one separating mammals from reptiles.

  8. Feasibility of direct oxygenation of primary-cultured rat hepatocytes using polyethylene glycol-decorated liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH).

    PubMed

    Naruto, Hirosuke; Huang, Hongyun; Nishikawa, Masaki; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Mizuno, Atsushi; Ohta, Katsuji; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2007-10-01

    We tested the short-term efficacy of liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) in cultured rat hepatocytes. Supplementation with LEH (20% of the hemoglobin concentration of blood) did not lower albumin production in static culture, and completely reversed the cell death and deterioration in albumin production caused by an oxygen shortage in 2D flat-plate perfusion bioreactors.

  9. Hemoglobin E and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kerry L; Ahmed, Sabeena; Rahman, Hafizur; Prue, Chai S; Khyang, Jacob; Ram, Malathi; Haq, M Zahirul; Chowdhury, Ashish; Akter, Jasmin; Glass, Gregory E; Shields, Timothy; Nyunt, Myaing M; Khan, Wasif A; Sack, David A; Sullivan, David J

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobin E is largely confined to south and southeast Asia. The association between hemoglobin E (HbE) and malaria is less clear than that of hemoglobin S and C. As part of a malaria study in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh, an initial random sample of 202 individuals showed that 39% and 49% of Marma and Khyang ethnic groups, respectively, were positive for either heterozygous or homozygous hemoglobin E. In this group, 6.4% were also found to be severely deficient and 35% mildly deficient for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In a separate Plasmodium falciparum malaria case-uninfected control study, the odds of having homozygous hemoglobin E (HbEE) compared with normal hemoglobin (HbAA) were higher among malaria cases detected by passive surveillance than age and location matched uninfected controls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-46.93). The odds of heterozygous hemoglobin E (HbAE) compared with HbAA were similar between malaria cases and uninfected controls (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.42-1.19). No association by hemoglobin type was found in the initial parasite density or the proportion parasite negative after 2 days of artemether/lumefantrine treatment. HbEE, but not HbAE status was associated with increased passive case detection of malaria.

  10. Racial Contrasts in Hemoglobin Levels and Dietary Patterns Related to Hematopoiesis in Children: The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklas, Theresa A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Racial differences in hemoglobin were explored in pre-adolescent and adolescent children. After controlling for variations in dietary patterns, race accounted for a notable proportion of hemoglobin variance in both age groups. These differences exist independently of nutrient intake and maturational changes. (Author/VM)

  11. Predicting the morphology of sickle red blood cells using coarse-grained models of intracellular aligned hemoglobin polymers†

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-01-01

    Sickle red blood cells (SS-RBCs) exhibit heterogeneous cell morphologies (sickle, holly leaf, granular, etc.) in the deoxygenated state due to the polymerization of the sickle hemoglobin. Experimental evidence points to a close relationship between SS-RBC morphology and intracellular aligned hemoglobin polymers. Here, we develop a coarse-grained (CG) stochastic model to represent the growth of the intracellular aligned hemoglobin polymer domain. The CG model is calibrated based on the mechanical properties (Young’s modulus, bending rigidity) of the sickle hemoglobin fibers reported in experiments. The process of the cell membrane transition is simulated for physiologic aligned hemoglobin polymer configurations and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Typical SS-RBC morphologies observed in experiments can be obtained from the current model as a result of the intracellular aligned hemoglobin polymer development without introducing any further ad hoc assumptions. It is found that the final shape of SS-RBCs is primarily determined by the angular width of the aligned hemoglobin polymer domain, but it also depends, to a lesser degree, on the polymer growth rate and the cell membrane rigidity. Cell morphologies are quantified by structural shape factors, which agree well with experimental results from medical images. PMID:24307912

  12. Electron self-exchange in hemoglobins revealed by deutero-hemin substitution.

    PubMed

    Athwal, Navjot Singh; Alagurajan, Jagannathan; Sturms, Ryan; Fulton, D Bruce; Andreotti, Amy H; Hargrove, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Hemoglobins (phytoglobins) from rice plants (nsHb1) and from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis (PCC 6803) (SynHb) can reduce hydroxylamine with two electrons to form ammonium. The reaction requires intermolecular electron transfer between protein molecules, and rapid electron self-exchange might play a role in distinguishing these hemoglobins from others with slower reaction rates, such as myoglobin. A relatively rapid electron self-exchange rate constant has been measured for SynHb by NMR, but the rate constant for myoglobin is equivocal and a value for nsHb1 has not yet been measured. Here we report electron self-exchange rate constants for nsHb1 and Mb as a test of their role in hydroxylamine reduction. These proteins are not suitable for analysis by NMR ZZ exchange, so a method was developed that uses cross-reactions between each hemoglobin and its deutero-hemin substituted counterpart. The resulting electron transfer is between identical proteins with low driving forces and thus closely approximates true electron self-exchange. The reactions can be monitored spectrally due to the distinct spectra of the prosthetic groups, and from this electron self-exchange rate constants of 880 (SynHb), 2900 (nsHb1), and 0.05M(-1) s(-1) (Mb) have been measured for each hemoglobin. Calculations of cross-reactions using these values accurately predict hydroxylamine reduction rates for each protein, suggesting that electron self-exchange plays an important role in the reaction.

  13. Soil-transmitted helminths in relation to hemoglobin status among school children of the Kashmir Valley.

    PubMed

    Wani, Showkat Ahmad; Ahmad, Fayaz; Zargar, Showkat A; Dar, Zubair Ahmad; Dar, Parvaiz Ahmad; Tak, Hidayatullah; Fomda, Bashir Ahmad

    2008-06-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) remain a major threat to the health of children throughout the world, mostly in developing nations. The aim of the present study was to determine any relationship between STHs and hemoglobin status in school children of Kashmir Valley (India). Stool and blood samples were collected from 382 male and female school children in the age group of 5-15 yr from all 6 school districts of the Kashmir Valley. Finger-prick blood samples were used to collect the hemoglobin, which was then measured on-site by Sahli's acid hematin method; stool samples were processed using both simple smear and zinc sulphate concentration methods. Of the 382 children surveyed, 299 (78.27%) were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, or both. Children infected by STHs were found to have lower mean values of hemoglobin than uninfected children. The present study reveals that STHs are abundant among school children of Kashmir Valley, creating a negative effect on the hemoglobin values and indicating the necessity of implementing control measures.

  14. Pomalidomide and lenalidomide regulate erythropoiesis and fetal hemoglobin production in human CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Moutouh-de Parseval, Laure A; Verhelle, Dominique; Glezer, Emilia; Jensen-Pergakes, Kristen; Ferguson, Gregory D; Corral, Laura G; Morris, Christopher L; Muller, George; Brady, Helen; Chan, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Sickle-cell disease (SCD) and beta thalassemia constitute worldwide public health problems. New therapies, including hydroxyurea, have attempted to augment the synthesis of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and improve current treatment. Lenalidomide and pomalidomide are members of a class of immunomodulators used as anticancer agents. Because clinical trials have demonstrated that lenalidomide reduces or eliminates the need for transfusions in some patients with disrupted blood cell production, we investigated the effects of lenalidomide and pomalidomide on erythropoiesis and hemoglobin synthesis. We used an in vitro erythropoiesis model derived from human CD34+ progenitor cells from normal and SCD donors. We found that both compounds slowed erythroid maturation, increased proliferation of immature erythroid cells, and regulated hemoglobin transcription, resulting in potent induction of HbF without the cytotoxicity associated with other HbF inducers. When combined with hydroxyurea, pomalidomide and, to a lesser extent, lenalidomide were found to have synergistic effects on HbF upregulation. Our results elucidate what we believe to be a new mechanism of action of pomalidomide and lenalidomide and support the hypothesis that pomalidomide, used alone or in combination with hydroxyurea, may improve erythropoiesis and increase the ratio of fetal to adult hemoglobin. These findings support the evaluation of pomalidomide as an innovative new therapy for beta-hemoglobinopathies.

  15. Interaction of Jet Fuel Hydrocarbon Components with Red Blood Cells and Hemoglobin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-24

    such study using benzene , a component of JP-8, indicated that bioactivation of the chemical led to the formation of ROS decreasing antioxidant...concomitant oxidative stress, benzene exposures have demonstrated strong associations with altered hemoglobin and red cell indices. Hematological...surveillance study of petrochemical workers exposed to benzene . Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. (2004) 40:67-73. 15. Andrade CT. Purification and

  16. High-resolution capillary isoelectric focusing-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for hemoglobin variants analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Q.; Harrata, A.K.; Lee, C.S. |

    1996-08-01

    On-line capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF)-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) as a two-dimensional separation system is employed for high-resolution analysis of hemoglobin variants A, C, S, and F. The effects of moving ionic boundary inside the CIEF capillary and MS scan rate on the separation resolution and mass detection of hemoglobin variants are investigated. The formation of a moving ionic boundary due to the replacement of background electrolyte counterions with sheath liquid counterions can be minimized by combining cathodic mobilization with a gravity-induced hydrodynamic flow. Hemoglobin variants F and A, with a pI difference of 0.05 pH unit, are almost baseline resolved and identified in CIEF-ESIMS. The concentration detection limit for each hemoglobin variant is in the range of 10{sup -8} M, comparable to that obtained in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using silver staining. Initial preconcentration during the focusing step and the use of single-ion monitoring scan mode are responsible for improving detection limits. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear.

  18. Substitutions in woolly mammoth hemoglobin confer biochemical properties adaptive for cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kevin L; Roberts, Jason E E; Watson, Laura N; Stetefeld, Jörg; Sloan, Angela M; Signore, Anthony V; Howatt, Jesse W; Tame, Jeremy R H; Rohland, Nadin; Shen, Tong-Jian; Austin, Jeremy J; Hofreiter, Michael; Ho, Chien; Weber, Roy E; Cooper, Alan

    2010-06-01

    We have genetically retrieved, resurrected and performed detailed structure-function analyses on authentic woolly mammoth hemoglobin to reveal for the first time both the evolutionary origins and the structural underpinnings of a key adaptive physiochemical trait in an extinct species. Hemoglobin binds and carries O(2); however, its ability to offload O(2) to respiring cells is hampered at low temperatures, as heme deoxygenation is inherently endothermic (that is, hemoglobin-O(2) affinity increases as temperature decreases). We identify amino acid substitutions with large phenotypic effect on the chimeric beta/delta-globin subunit of mammoth hemoglobin that provide a unique solution to this problem and thereby minimize energetically costly heat loss. This biochemical specialization may have been involved in the exploitation of high-latitude environments by this African-derived elephantid lineage during the Pleistocene period. This powerful new approach to directly analyze the genetic and structural basis of physiological adaptations in an extinct species adds an important new dimension to the study of natural selection.

  19. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  20. Modeling changes in the hemoglobin concentration of skin with total diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, Diana L.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Farrell, Thomas J.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to monitor changes in the concentration of hemoglobin in the blood of the skin in real time is a key component to personalized patient care. Since hemoglobin has a unique absorption spectrum in the visible light range, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is the most common approach. Although the collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an integrating sphere (IS) has several calibration challenges, this collection method is sufficiently user-friendly that it may be worth overcoming the initial difficulty. Once the spectrum is obtained, it is commonly interpreted with a log-inverse-reflectance (LIR) or "absorbance" analysis that can only accurately monitor changes in the hemoglobin concentration when there are no changes to the nonhemoglobin chromophore concentrations which is not always the case. We address the difficulties associated with collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an IS and propose a model capable of retrieving relative changes in hemoglobin concentration from the visible light spectrum. The model is capable of accounting for concentration changes in the nonhemoglobin chromophores and is first characterized with theoretical spectra and liquid phantoms. The model is then used in comparison with a common LIR analysis on temporal measurements from blanched and reddened human skin.

  1. The attachment affinity of hemoglobin toward silver-containing bioactive glass functionalized with glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Gruian, C; Vulpoi, A; Vanea, E; Oprea, B; Steinhoff, H-J; Simon, S

    2013-12-27

    Bioactive glasses belonging to the 56SiO2·(40 - x)CaO·4P2O5·xAg2O system, with x = 0, 2, and 8 mol %, were surface functionalized with the protein coupling agent glutaraldehyde (GA) and further evaluated in terms of hemoglobin affinity. The bare and GA-functionalized samples were investigated before and after protein attachment, by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with spin-labeling procedure. Methanethiosulfonate spin label was used to explore the local environment of β-93 cysteine in horse hemoglobin, in terms of spin label side chain mobility. The EPR simulation methods were employed to quantify the rotational correlational times and fraction of the immobilized spin labels. The EPR absorption spectrum was further exploited to estimate the amount of hemoglobin loaded on the substrates. The surface elemental composition obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed similar tendency in terms of surface coverage. Changes in surface architecture, that is, changes in surface morphology after protein coverage, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. It was concluded that GA improves the stability of protein attachment and induces polymerization of hemoglobin molecules.

  2. Hemoglobins Likely Function as Peroxidase in Blood Clam Tegillarca granosa Hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Yu, Xiaopei; Lin, Zhihua; Zhang, Shunqin; Xue, Liangyi; Xue, Qinggang; Bao, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobins are a group of respiratory proteins principally functioning in transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in red blood cells of all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The blood clam T. granosa is one of the few invertebrates that have hemoglobin-containing red hemocytes. In the present research, the peroxidase activity of T. granosa hemoglobins (Tg-Hbs) was characterized and the associated mechanism of action was deciphered via structural comparison with other known peroxidases. We detected that purified Tg-Hbs catalyzed the oxidation of phenolic compounds in the presence of exogenous H2O2. Tg-Hbs peroxidase activity reached the maximum at pH 5 and 35°C and was inhibited by Fe(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, urea, and sodium azide. Tg-Hbs shared few similarities in amino acid sequence and overall structural characteristics with known peroxidases. However, the predicted structure at their heme pocket was highly similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This research represented the first systemic characterization of hemoglobin as a peroxidase.

  3. Hemoglobins Likely Function as Peroxidase in Blood Clam Tegillarca granosa Hemocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaopei; Lin, Zhihua; Xue, Liangyi

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobins are a group of respiratory proteins principally functioning in transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in red blood cells of all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The blood clam T. granosa is one of the few invertebrates that have hemoglobin-containing red hemocytes. In the present research, the peroxidase activity of T. granosa hemoglobins (Tg-Hbs) was characterized and the associated mechanism of action was deciphered via structural comparison with other known peroxidases. We detected that purified Tg-Hbs catalyzed the oxidation of phenolic compounds in the presence of exogenous H2O2. Tg-Hbs peroxidase activity reached the maximum at pH 5 and 35°C and was inhibited by Fe2+, Cu2+, SDS, urea, and sodium azide. Tg-Hbs shared few similarities in amino acid sequence and overall structural characteristics with known peroxidases. However, the predicted structure at their heme pocket was highly similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This research represented the first systemic characterization of hemoglobin as a peroxidase. PMID:28182094

  4. HMGA2 Moderately Increases Fetal Hemoglobin Expression in Human Adult Erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Lee, Y. Terry; Byrnes, Colleen; Tumburu, Laxminath; Rabel, Antoinette; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) has therapeutic importance for patients with beta-hemoglobin disorders. Previous studies showed that let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly regulated in erythroid cells during the fetal-to-adult developmental transition, and that targeting let-7 mediated the up-regulation of HbF to greater than 30% of the total globin levels in human adult cultured erythroblasts. HMGA2 is a member of the high-mobility group A family of proteins and a validated target of the let-7 family of miRNAs. Here we investigate whether expression of HMGA2 directly regulates fetal hemoglobin in adult erythroblasts. Let-7 resistant HMGA2 expression was studied after lentiviral transduction of CD34(+) cells. The transgene was regulated by the erythroid-specific gene promoter region of the human SPTA1 gene (HMGA2-OE). HMGA2-OE caused significant increases in gamma-globin mRNA expression and HbF to around 16% of the total hemoglobin levels compared to matched control transductions. Interestingly, no significant changes in KLF1, SOX6, GATA1, ZBTB7A and BCL11A mRNA levels were observed. Overall, our data suggest that expression of HMGA2, a downstream target of let-7 miRNAs, causes moderately increased gamma-globin gene and protein expression in adult human erythroblasts. PMID:27861570

  5. Delay time of hemoglobin S polymerization prevents most cells from sickling in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mozzarelli, A.; Hofrichter, J.; Eaton, W.A.

    1987-07-31

    A laser photolysis technique has been developed to assess the quantitative significance of the delay time of hemoglobin S gelation to the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. Changes in the saturation of hemoglobin S with carbon monoxide produced by varying the intensity of a photolytic laser beam were used to simulate changes in the saturation of oxyhemoglobin S produced by variations in oxygen pressure. The presence of polymer at steady-state saturation with carbon monoxide was determined by measurement of the kinetics of gelation after complete photodissociation. The kinetics are a very sensitive probe for polymer since small amounts of polymerized hemoglobin increase the rate of nucleation sufficiently to eliminate the delay period. First, the equilibrium gelation properties of partially photodissociated carbonmonoxyhemoglobin S were shown to be the same as partially oxygenated hemoglobin S, and the method was then used to determine the effect of saturation on the formation and disappearance of polymers in individual sickle cells. The saturation at which polymers first formed upon deoxygenation was much lower than the saturation at which polymers disappeared upon reoxygenation. The results indicate that at venous saturations with oxygen, gelation takes place in most cells at equilibrium, but is prevented from occurring in vivo because the delay times are sufficiently long that most cells return to the lungs and are reoxygenated before polymerization has begun.

  6. Using the NCBI Genome Databases to Compare the Genes for Human & Chimpanzee Beta Hemoglobin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The beta hemoglobin protein is identical in humans and chimpanzees. In this tutorial, students see that even though the proteins are identical, the genes that code for them are not. There are many more differences in the introns than in the exons, which indicates that coding regions of DNA are more highly conserved than non-coding regions.

  7. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  8. FORMATION OF NITRO MUSK ADDUCTS OF RAINBOW TROUT HEMOGLOBIN FOR POTENTIAL USE AS BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The high use of nitro musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) as fragrances, and their persistence and bioaccumulation potential make them ubiquitous environmental contaminants. The 4-amino-MX (AMX) and 2-amino-MK (AMK) metabolites have been detected in trout fish hemoglobin (Hb) s...

  9. Body temperature-related structural transitions of monotremal and human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Digel, I; Maggakis-Kelemen, Ch; Zerlin, K F; Linder, Pt; Kasischke, N; Kayser, P; Porst, D; Temiz Artmann, A; Artmann, G M

    2006-10-15

    In this study, temperature-related structural changes were investigated in human, duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, body temperature T(b) = 31-33 degrees C), and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus, body temperature T(b) = 32-33 degrees C) hemoglobin using circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The average hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) and fractional (normalized) change in the ellipticity (F(obs)) at 222 +/- 2 nm of hemoglobin were measured. The temperature was varied stepwise from 25 degrees C to 45 degrees C. The existence of a structural transition of human hemoglobin at the critical temperature T(c) between 36-37 degrees C was previously shown by micropipette aspiration experiments, viscosimetry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on light-scattering measurements, this study proves the onset of molecular aggregation at T(c). In two different monotremal hemoglobins (echidna and platypus), the critical transition temperatures were found between 32-33 degrees C, which are close to the species' body temperature T(b). The data suggest that the correlation of the structural transition's critical temperature T(c) and the species' body temperature T(b) is not mere coincidence but, instead, is a more widespread structural phenomenon possibly including many other proteins.

  10. Modeling changes in the hemoglobin concentration of skin with total diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Diana L; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    The ability to monitor changes in the concentration of hemoglobin in the blood of the skin in real time is a key component to personalized patient care. Since hemoglobin has a unique absorption spectrum in the visible light range, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is the most common approach. Although the collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an integrating sphere (IS) has several calibration challenges, this collection method is sufficiently user-friendly that it may be worth overcoming the initial difficulty. Once the spectrum is obtained, it is commonly interpreted with a log-inverse-reflectance (LIR) or “absorbance” analysis that can only accurately monitor changes in the hemoglobin concentration when there are no changes to the nonhemoglobin chromophore concentrations which is not always the case. We address the difficulties associated with collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an IS and propose a model capable of retrieving relative changes in hemoglobin concentration from the visible light spectrum. The model is capable of accounting for concentration changes in the nonhemoglobin chromophores and is first characterized with theoretical spectra and liquid phantoms. The model is then used in comparison with a common LIR analysis on temporal measurements from blanched and reddened human skin.

  11. Comparison of Pre- and Postoperative Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels in Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seijas, Roberto; Espinosa, Wenceslao; Sallent, Andrea; Cuscó, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón; Ares, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : to assess the loss in hematocrit and hemoglobin, if any, 24 hours after hip arthroscopy. Methods : thirty-five patients were included. Laboratory tests including complete blood count and white blood cells were performed one week prior to surgery and 24 hours after. Surgical time, volume of saline perfusion and pump perfusion was also recorded. Results : mean preoperative hematocrit was 42.01% (4.63 SD), whereas mean postoperative hematocrit at 24 h decreased to 36.78% (SD 5.11) (p <0.021.). Mean preoperative hemoglobin was 14.23 g/dL (1.73 SD), and mean postoperative hemoglobin at 24 h decreased to 12.40 g/dL (SD 1.92) (p =0.03.). Platelets and white blood cells, as well as the remaining biochemical parameters showed no significant difference between preoperative and postoperative samples. Lost blood volume worked out with the logarithmic method for estimated blood loss was which 0.78 liters (SD 0.45). Lost blood volume taking into account, the red blood cell mass was also 0.78 liters (SD 0.45). Conclusion : a significant decrease in hemoglobin and hematocrit after hip arthroscopy was observed. Although patients did not show clinical signs of anemia or bleeding, blood loss should be considered when planning a hip arthroscopy, especially in patients at risk of anemia. According to our results, we recommend a postoperative control analysis at 24 h. Level of Evidence : level II, Diagnostic Study. PMID:26401169

  12. Conformational Changes and Competitive Adsorption between Serum Albumin and Hemoglobin on Bioceramic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Gruian, Cristina Mihaela; Rickert, Christian; Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Vanea, Emilia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Simon, Simion

    2017-01-05

    Traditional methods to analyze interactions and conformational changes of proteins adsorbed onto biomaterials are limited by the protein's associations with the substrate material and the complexity of the surrounding media. We have used EPR spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) to investigate single protein and competitive adsorption kinetics of horse hemoglobin (Hgb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on a silica-calcium-phosphate bioceramic substrate. Combined continuous wave and pulsed (DEER) EPR techniques were employed to monitor local mobility/flexibility changes within the proteins and tertiary structure dynamics upon adsorption. An alternate labeling technique was introduced to allow for specific quantification of each protein adsorbed to the bioceramic surface. We show that at buffer pH 7.4 and 4.7 the amount of adsorbed hemoglobin was increased by a factor of 4-5 compared with BSA. The tertiary structure of hemoglobin was strongly affected upon adsorption, leading to a dissociation of the tetrameric molecule into monomers or αβ dimers. When the bioceramic substrate was previously functionalized with a layer of BSA, dissociation was reduced by 71 % compared with the untreated surface, indicating a "primer" effect of BSA for better adhesion of the globular hemoglobin.

  13. Smartphone dongle for simultaneous measurement of hemoglobin concentration and detection of HIV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tiffany; Patnaik, Ritish; Kuhlmann, Kevin; Rai, Alex J; Sia, Samuel K

    2015-09-07

    It is traditionally difficult to incorporate two classes of diagnostic tests into a single platform. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic-based smartphone dongle that simultaneously measures concentration of hemoglobin and detects HIV antibodies. Specifically, we demonstrate how a previously published immunoassay device, which measured optical density of silver precipitation on gold colloids, can be expanded to quantitatively measure hemoglobin concentration via a colorimetric assay. By lysing whole blood components with CHAPS detergent, we achieved highly reproducible measurement of hemoglobin concentration with the device. We tested this dual test on 38 patient samples from Columbia University Medical Center. Compared with the Hemocue Hb 201+ analyzer, hemoglobin concentrations from our device were accurate within 1.2 g dL(-1), while the HIV immunoassay (in the presence of CHAPS detergent) showed 95% sensitivity and 95% specificity, comparable to our previous studies. This work demonstrates the feasibility of integrating two classes of diagnostic tests (a colorimetric-based quantitative measurement and an immunoassay based on silver precipitation on gold colloids) into a low-cost, fast, and low-power dongle that works with smartphones, and creates a novel dual panel with clinical utility for antenatal-care settings.

  14. Simultaneous Optical Spectroscopic Measurement of Hemoglobin and Myoglobin Saturations and Cytochrome aa3 Oxidation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Lorilee S. L.; Ciesielski, Wayne A.; Thackray, Brett D.; Feigl, Eric O.; Schenkman, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    A method to simultaneously measure oxygenation in vascular, intracellular, and mitochondrial spaces from optical spectra acquired from muscle has been developed. In order to validate the method, optical spectra in the visible and near infrared regions (600–850 nm) were acquired from solutions of myoglobin, hemoglobin, and cytochrome oxidase that included Intralipid as a light scatterer. Spectra were also acquired from the rabbit forelimb during ischemia. Three partial least squares (PLS) analyses were performed on second-derivative spectra, each separately calibrated to myoglobin saturation, hemoglobin saturation, or cytochrome aa3 oxidation. The three variables were measured from in vitro and in vivo spectra that contained all three chromophores. In the in vitro studies, measured values of myoglobin saturation, hemoglobin saturation, and cytochrome aa3 oxidation had standard errors of 7.4%, 3.8%, and 3.9%, respectively, with little cross-talk between the measurements. During ischemia in the rabbit forelimb, hemoglobin desaturated first, followed by myoglobin, while cytochrome aa3 reduction occurred last. The ability to simultaneously measure oxygenations in the vascular, intracellular, and mitochondrial compartments will be valuable in physiological studies of muscle metabolism and in clinical studies when oxygen supply or utilization are compromised. PMID:20828433

  15. Hemoglobin S and C affect protein export in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Nicole; Srismith, Sirikamol; Dittmer, Martin; Ouermi, Djeneba; Bisseye, Cyrille; Simpore, Jacques; Cyrklaff, Marek; Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Lanzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malaria is a potentially deadly disease. However, not every infected person develops severe symptoms. Some people are protected by naturally occurring mechanisms that frequently involve inheritable modifications in their hemoglobin. The best studied protective hemoglobins are the sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) and hemoglobin C (HbC) which both result from a single amino acid substitution in β-globin: glutamic acid at position 6 is replaced by valine or lysine, respectively. How these hemoglobinopathies protect from severe malaria is only partly understood. Models currently proposed in the literature include reduced disease-mediating cytoadherence of parasitized hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasite, dampened inflammatory responses, or a combination thereof. Using a conditional protein export system and tightly synchronized Plasmodium falciparum cultures, we now show that export of parasite-encoded proteins across the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane is delayed, slower, and reduced in amount in hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes as compared to parasitized wild type red blood cells. Impaired protein export affects proteins targeted to the host cell cytoplasm, Maurer's clefts, and the host cell plasma membrane. Impaired protein export into the host cell compartment provides a mechanistic explanation for the reduced cytoadherence phenotype associated with parasitized hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes. PMID:25701664

  16. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  17. A novel chimera: the "truncated hemoglobin-antibiotic monooxygenase" from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Attili, Andrea; Arenghi, Fabio; Catacchio, Bruno; Chiancone, Emilia; Morea, Veronica; Boffi, Alberto

    2007-08-15

    Novel chimeric proteins made of a globin domain fused with a "cofactor free" monooxygenase domain have been identified within the Streptomyces avermitilis and Frankia sp. genomes by means of bioinformatics methods. Structure based sequence alignments show that the globin domains of both proteins can be unambiguously assigned to the truncated hemoglobin family, in view of the striking similarity to the truncated hemoglobins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Thermobifida fusca and Bacillus subtilis. In turn, the non-heme domains belong to a family of small (about 100 aminoacids) homodimeric proteins annotated as antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenases, despite the lack of a cofactor (e.g., a metal, a flavin or a heme) necessary for oxygen activation. The chimeric protein from S. avermitilis has been cloned, expressed and characterized. The protein is a stable dimer in solution based on analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The heme ligand binding properties with oxygen and carbonmonoxide resemble those of other Group II truncated hemoglobins. In addition, an oxygen dependent redox activity has been demonstrated towards easily oxidizable substrates such as menadiol and p-aminophenol. These findings suggest novel functional roles of truncated hemoglobins, which might represent a vast class of multipurpose oxygen activating/scavenging proteins whose catalytic action is mediated by the interaction with cofactor free monooxygenases.

  18. Broadband Optical Mammography: Chromophore Concentration and Hemoglobin Saturation Contrast in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Homer, Marc J.; Graham, Roger A.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the optical characterization and quantitative oximetry of human breast cancer using spectrally-resolved images collected with a broadband, continuous-wave optical mammography instrument. On twenty-six cancer patients, we collected two-dimensional optical mammograms and created maps of the concentrations of hemoglobin, water, and lipids, as well as the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin. For each cancerous breast, we analyzed the difference between the tumor region (as identified by x-ray and optical mammography) and the remainder of breast tissue. With respect to the surrounding tissue, we found that cancer regions have significantly higher concentrations of total hemoglobin (+2.4±0.4 μM) and water (+7±1% v/v), and significantly lower lipid concentration (8±2% v/v) and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (5±1%). We also found a significant correlation between the tumor optical contrast and the grade of breast cancer as quantified by the Nottingham histologic score; this demonstrates how optical signatures may be representative of metabolic and morphological features, as well as the aggressive potential of the tumor. PMID:25781469

  19. Decreased damage from transient focal cerebral ischemia by transfusion of zero-link hemoglobin polymers in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Toshiaki; Nemoto, Masaaki; Kwansa, Herman; Sampei, Kenji; Habeeb, Murtuza; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Bucci, Enrico; Koehler, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transfusion of large polymers of hemoglobin avoids the peripheral extravasation and hypertension associated with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin transfusion and may be more effective in rescuing brain from focal ischemia. Effects of transfusion of high-oxygen affinity, bovine hemoglobin polymers of different weight ranges were determined. Methods Hypervolemic exchange transfusion was performed during two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Results Compared to transfusion with a 5% albumin solution or no transfusion, infarct volume was reduced 40% by transfusion of a 6% solution containing hemoglobin polymers in the nominal range 500–14000 kDa. Infarct volume was not significantly reduced by transfusion of a lower concentration of 2–3% of this size range of polymers, 6% hemoglobin solutions without removal of polymers <500 kDa or >14000 kDa, or crosslinked hemoglobin tetramers with normal oxygen affinity. Exchange transfusion with the 6% solution of the 500–14000 kDa hemoglobin polymers did not improve the distribution of cerebral blood flow during focal ischemia and, in mice without ischemia, did not affect flow to brain or other major organs. Conclusion An intermediate size range of polymerized bovine hemoglobin possessing high oxygen affinity appears optimal for rescuing mouse brain from transient focal cerebral ischemia. A minimum concentration of a 6% solution is required, the rescue is superior to that obtained with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin possessing normal oxygen affinity, and tissue salvage is not associated with increased blood flow. This polymer solution avoids the adverse effects of severe renal and splanchnic vasoconstriction seen with crosslinked tetrameric hemoglobin. PMID:18988905

  20. Clinical effectiveness of hemoglobin spray (Granulox®) as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sharon D.; Elg, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemoglobin spray (Granulox®) comprises purified hemoglobin and is a novel approach for increasing oxygen availability in the wound bed in diabetic foot ulcer patients. Its mode of action is to bind oxygen from the atmosphere and diffuse it into the wound bed to accelerate wound healing in slow-healing wounds. Patients and methods Wound healing outcomes, that is, wound size, pain, percentage of slough, and exudate levels, were compared retrospectively to a similar cohort of patients treated over the same period the previous year. The same inclusion and exclusion criteria applied to both groups. Results All 20 (100%) hemoglobin spray-treated patients and 15 (75%) control patients experienced some wound healing by week 4, with 5 (25%) and 1 (5%), respectively, achieving complete wound closure. At week 4, mean wound size reduction was 63% in the hemoglobin spray group versus 26% for controls, increasing to 95% reduction at week 28 in the hemoglobin spray group versus 63% for controls (p<0.05 at all timepoints). Hemoglobin spray was associated with substantially lower pain scores using a 10-cm visual analogue scale, with 19/19 patients (100%) being pain-free from week 12 onwards, compared to 6/18 patients (33%) in the control group. At week 28, 2/18 patients (11%) in the control group still had pain. Both groups had similar baseline slough levels, but hemoglobin spray-treated wounds had slough completely eliminated after 4 weeks versus 10% mean reduction in the control group (p<0.001). Hemoglobin spray was associated with markedly reduced exudate levels; within 4 weeks, no patients had high exudate levels in the hemoglobin spray group versus 5 in the control group. Conclusion Standard wound care plus hemoglobin spray results in improvements in wound closure, wound size reduction, pain, slough, and exudate levels compared to control patients for chronic diabetic foot ulcer treatment. PMID:27829487

  1. Challenges in HbA1c Analysis and Reporting in Patients with Variant Hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Sultana, T A; Sheme, Z A; Sultana, G S; Sultana, B; Mishu, F A; Khan, N Z; Sarkar, B C; Muttalib, M A; Khan, S A; Choudhury, S; Mahtab, H

    2016-04-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1)c) is a well-established indicator of mean glycemia. The presence of genetic variants of hemoglobin can profoundly affect the accuracy of HbA(1)c measurements. Variants of hemoglobin especially Hemoglobin E (HbE) is prevalent in South East Asia including Bangladesh. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA(1)c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay (TINIA) in diabetic patients with variant hemoglobins including HbE. A total of 7595 diabetic patients receiving treatment at BIRDEM General Hospital were analyzed for HbA(1)c results within a period of two months from December 2013 to January 2014. Seventy two cases out of 7595 (0.95%) had either undetectable or below normal HbA(1)c levels (males-33 and females-39; ratio = 0.82:1) by HPLC method. In 34(0.45%) cases, HbA(1)c value was undetectable by HPLC method but was in the reportable range by TINIA method. In the other 38 (0.55%) cases, HbA(1)c levels were below the reportable range (<4%) by HPLC method but were in the normal or higher range by TINIA method. TINIA method did not agree with HPLC method on Bland Altman plot in the 38 cases with below normal HbA(1)c levels, [Mean bias -5.2(-9.3 to 1.0), 95% CI] but agreed very well [mean bias -0.21 (-0.84 to 0.42), y=1.1037+0.776X; r(2)=0.30, p<0.01] in controls. In control group mean MCV was 83.80±7.48 and in study group was 73.65±10.44. Alkaline electrophoresis confirmed the variant hemoglobin to be HbE. The fasting blood sugar levels of all the 72 cases correlated strongly with TINIA method (r(2) =0.75, p<0.0001) but not with HPLC (r = 0.24, p=0.13). In our regions where populations have a high prevalence of Hb variant, proper knowledge of hemoglobin variants which affect the measurements HbA(1)c level is essential. MCV of 80fl or below may serve as a rough guide to select samples that require analysis by TINIA method. Moreover, HPLC may be a convenient and inexpensive

  2. Intestinal Absorption of Hemoglobin Iron-Heme Cleavage by Mucosal Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffin, Steven B.; Woo, Choong H.; Roost, Kenneth T.; Price, David C.; Schmid, Rudi

    1974-01-01

    Hemoglobin and myoglobin are a major source of dietary iron in man. Heme, separated from these hemoproteins by intraluminal proteolysis, is absorbed intact by the intestinal mucosa. The absorbed heme is cleaved in the mucosal cell releasing inorganic iron. Although this mucosal heme-splitting activity initially was ascribed to xanthine oxidase, we investigated the possibility that it is catalyzed by microsomal heme oxygenase, an enzyme which converts heme to bilirubin, CO, and inorganic iron. Microsomes prepared from rat intestinal mucosa contain enzymatic activity similar to that of heme oxygenase in liver and spleen. The intestinal enzyme requires NADPH; is completely inhibited by 50% CO; and produces bilirubin IX-α, identified spectrophotometrically and chromatographically. Moreover, duodenal heme oxygenase was shown to release inorganic 55Fe from 55Fe-heme. Along the intestinal tract, enzyme activity was found to be highest in the duodenum where hemoglobin iron absorption is reported to be most active. Furthermore, when rats were made iron deficient, duodenal heme oxygenase activity and hemoglobin-iron absorption rose to a comparable extent. Upon iron repletion of iron-deficient animals, duodenal enzyme activity returned towards control values. In contrast to heme oxygenase, duodenal xanthine oxidase activity fell sharply in iron deficiency and rose towards base line upon iron repletion. Our findings suggest that mucosal heme oxygenase catalyzes the cleavage of heme absorbed in the intestinal mucosa and thus plays an important role in the absorption of hemoglobin iron. The mechanisms controlling this intestinal enzyme activity and the enzyme's role in the overall regulation of hemoglobin-iron absorption remain to be defined. PMID:4436436

  3. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier and convection enhanced oxygen transport in a hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Palmer, Andre F

    2009-04-15

    A mathematical model was developed to study O(2) transport in a convection enhanced hepatic hollow fiber (HF) bioreactor, with hemoglobin-based O(2) carriers (HBOCs) present in the flowing cell culture media stream of the HF lumen. In this study, four HBOCs were evaluated: PEG-conjugated human hemoglobin (MP4), human hemoglobin (hHb), bovine hemoglobin (BvHb) and polymerized bovine hemoglobin (PolyBvHb). In addition, two types of convective flow in the HF extra capillary space (ECS) were considered in this study. Starling flow naturally occurs when both of the ECS ports are closed. If one of the ECS ports is open, forced convective flow through the ECS will occur due to the imposed pressure difference between the lumen and ECS. This type of flow is referred to as cross-flow in this work, since some of the fluid entering the HF lumen will pass across the HF membrane and exit via the open ECS port. In this work, we can predict the dissolved O(2) concentration profile as well as the O(2) transport flux in an individual HF of the bioreactor by solving the coupled momentum and mass transport equations. Our results show that supplementation of the cell culture media with HBOCs can dramatically enhance O(2) transport to the ECS (containing hepatocytes) and lead to the formation of an in vivo-like O(2) spectrum for the optimal culture of hepatocytes. However, both Starling flow and cross-flow have a very limited effect on O(2) transport in the ECS. Taken together, this work represents a novel predictive tool that can be used to design or analyze HF bioreactors that expose cultured cells to defined overall concentrations and gradients of O(2).

  4. Impact of Elevated Hemoglobin and Serum Protein on Vasovagal Reaction from Blood Donation.

    PubMed

    Odajima, Takeshi; Takanashi, Minoko; Sugimori, Hiroki; Tanba, Taiko; Yoshinaga, Kentaro; Motoji, Toshiko; Munakata, Masaya; Nakajima, Kazunori; Minami, Mutsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to elucidate factors contributing to vasovagal reaction (VVR), the most frequent side effect following whole blood and apheresis donations. Complications recorded at the collection sites after voluntary donations by the Japanese Red Cross Tokyo Blood Center (JRC), in the 2006 and 2007 fiscal years, were analyzed by both univariate analysis and the multivariate conditional logistic regression model. Of 1,119,716 blood donations over the full two years, complications were recorded for 13,320 donations (1.18%), among which 67% were VVR. There were 4,303 VVR cases which had sufficient information and could be used for this study. For each VVR case, two sex- and age-matched controls (n = 8,606) were randomly selected from the donors without complications. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), predonation blood pressure, pulse and blood test results, including total protein, albumin, and hemoglobin, were compared between the VVR group and the control group. In univariate analysis, the VVR group was significantly younger, with a lower BMI, higher blood pressure and higher blood protein and hemoglobin levels than the control group (p<0.001). Furthermore, blood protein and hemoglobin levels showed dose-dependent relationships with VVR incidences by the Cochran-Armitage trend test (p<0.01). For both sexes, after adjusting for confounders with the multivariate conditional logistic regression model, the higher than median groups for total protein (male: OR 1.97; 95%CI 1.76,-2.21; female: OR 2.29; 95%CI 2.05-2.56), albumin (male: 1.75; 1.55-1.96; female: 1.76; 1.57-1.97) and hemoglobin (male: 1.98; 1.76-2.22; female: 1.62; 1.45-1.81) had statistically significant higher risk of VVR compared to the lower than median groups. These elevated serum protein and hemoglobin levels might offer new indicators to help understand VVR occurrence.

  5. Haptoglobin genotype modulates the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines produced by macrophages exposed to free hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Guetta, Julia; Strauss, Merav; Levy, Nina S; Fahoum, Lana; Levy, Andrew P

    2007-03-01

    The haptoglobin genotype has been demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for CVD in multiple epidemiological studies. The primary function of haptoglobin is to mitigate the deleterious effects of extracorpuscular hemoglobin. We sought to determine if the protein products of the two haptoglobin alleles differed in their ability to modulate the cytokine profile produced by macrophages in response to hemoglobin. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from normal human volunteers and cultured in the presence of complexes formed by the protein products of the two different haptoglobin alleles with hemoglobin. The release of specific cytokines in the conditioned media of these cells was assessed by ELISA. We found that the haptoglobin 1 allele protein product-hemoglobin complex stimulated the secretion of significantly more Il-6 and Il-10 than the haptoglobin 2 allele protein product-hemoglobin complex. We demonstrate that the release of these cytokines is dependent on the liganding of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex to the CD163 receptor and the activity of casein kinase II. Haptoglobin genotype modulates the balance of inflammatory (Th1) and anti-inflammatory (Th2) cytokines produced by macrophages exposed to free hemoglobin. This may have implications in understanding inter-individual differences in the inflammatory response to hemorrhage.

  6. New method of tracing blood hemoglobin concentration to hematocrit ratio for monitoring plasma dilution and osmotic origin shifts in blood.

    PubMed

    Andrijauskas, Audrius; Ivaskevicius, Juozas

    2006-01-01

    Blood hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit are probably the most widely used parameters for outpatient and inpatient examination. In addition to their inherent significance for evaluation of blood viscosity and oxygen carrying capacity, these parameters are traditionally used as tracers of plasma dilution. Blood test derived results are conventionally recorded on multiple pages in patient's medical records making dynamical investigations tedious and time-consuming. In addition, research results describing plasma dilution by means of hemoglobin or hematocrit are presented in a clinically unpractical way. A new method, referred to as HBS Graphics (patent pending--USA serial # 60/712809) is introduced for the first time in this article. This method of evaluation of dynamical hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration value deploys interfering parameter shifts for the evaluation of plasma dilution in relation to osmotic dynamics. The HBS Graphics complements two coordinate systems--hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit--with incorporated mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration value specific trends referred to as radiating lines. Isosmotic plasma dilution and erythrocyte volume shifts follow radiating lines, while osmotic shifts induce intertrend shifts. This article also reviews other methods of tracing plasma dilution by means of blood hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit dynamics.

  7. pH effects on the binding of oxygen to non-vertebrate monomeric hemoglobins. A linked function model.

    PubMed

    Saroff, Harry A

    2004-07-07

    Monomeric invertabrate hemoglobins with high oxygen affinity usually contain a tyrosine in the distal region of the heme. This feature has stimulated investigations revealing that one of the properties resulting from the presence of the distal tyrosines is a decreased off rate on the binding of oxygen, thus developing the high affinity. Despite that fact that the pK value of the tyrosine group differs significantly from the groups it replaces little attention has been paid to the pH dependence of the binding of oxygen to the high affinity hemoglobins. Such a pH dependence has been reported on two of the monomeric hemoglobins with relatively low oxygen affinity and one monomeric hemoglobin of intermediate affinity. The pH data of these hemoglobins has been analysed with a linked function model involving the hydrogen ion. pK values required for the low-affinity hemoglobins vary from 4.5 to 7.5. When applied to the high-affinity hemoglobins, the linked function model provides reasonable values for the binding parameters. These pK values vary from 3.0 to 9.0.

  8. Sulfide binding is mediated by zinc ions discovered in the crystal structure of a hydrothermal vent tubeworm hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jason F; Fisher, Charles R; Carney, Susan L; Green, Brian N; Freytag, John K; Schaeffer, Stephen W; Royer, William E

    2005-02-22

    Key to the remarkable ability of vestimentiferan tubeworms to thrive in the harsh conditions of hydrothermal vents are hemoglobins that permit the sequestration and delivery of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen to chemoautotrophic bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that zinc ions, not free cysteine residues, bind sulfide in vestimentiferan hemoglobins. The crystal structure of the C1 hemoglobin from the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila has been determined to 3.15 A and revealed the unexpected presence of 12 tightly bound Zn(2+) ions near the threefold axes of this D(3) symmetric hollow sphere. Chelation experiments on R. pachyptila whole-coelomic fluid and purified hemoglobins reveal a role for Zn(2+) ions in sulfide binding. Free cysteine residues, previously proposed as sulfide-binding sites in vestimentiferan hemoglobins, are found buried in surprisingly hydrophobic pockets below the surface of the R. pachyptila C1 molecule, suggesting that access of these residues to environmental sulfide is restricted. Attempts to reduce the sulfide-binding capacities of R. pachyptila hemoglobins by addition of a thiol inhibitor were also unsuccessful. These findings challenge the currently accepted paradigm of annelid hemoglobin evolution and adaptation to reducing environments.

  9. Correlation of low levels of nitrite and high levels of fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease at baseline

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Darcielle Bruna Dias; Rocha, Lilianne Brito da Silva; Cavalcante, Maritza Barbosa; Pedrosa, Alano Martins; Justino, Izabel Cristina Bandeira; Gonçalves, Romélia Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolytic anemia, increased susceptibility to infections and recurrent vaso-occlusive crises that reduces the quality of life of sufferers. Objective To evaluate the correlation of the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, malonaldehyde and nitrite to fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease not under treatment with hydroxyurea in outpatients at a university hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Methods Forty-four patients diagnosed with sickle cell disease were enrolled at baseline. Diagnosis was confirmed by evaluating the beta globin gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The concentration of fetal hemoglobin was obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Serum levels of nitrite, malonaldehyde and lactate dehydrogenase were measured by biochemical methods. Results Significantly higher levels of lactate dehydrogenase, nitrite and malonaldehyde were observed in patients with sickle cell disease compared to a control group. The study of the correlation between fetal hemoglobin levels and these variables showed a negative correlation with nitrite levels. No correlation was found between fetal hemoglobin and malonaldehyde or lactate dehydrogenase. When the study population was stratified according to fetal hemoglobin levels, a decrease in the levels of nitrite was observed with higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (p-value = 0.0415). Conclusion The results show that, similar to fetal hemoglobin levels, the concentration of nitrite can predict the clinical course of the disease, but should not be used alone as a modulator of prognosis in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:23049438

  10. Variant hemoglobin phenotypes may account for differential erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosing in African-American hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Derebail, Vimal K; Nachman, Patrick H; Key, Nigel S; Ansede, Heather; Falk, Ronald J; Rosamond, Wayne D; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V

    2011-11-01

    African-American patients with end-stage renal disease have historically lower hemoglobin concentrations and higher requirements of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA). While disparities in health-care access may partially explain these findings, the role of variant hemoglobin, such as sickle trait, has not been investigated. To clarify this, we evaluated 154 African-American patients receiving in-center hemodialysis with available hemoglobin phenotyping. The primary exposure was any abnormal hemoglobin variant and the primary outcome of higher-dose ESA was defined as a dose of 6500 or more units per treatment. Logistic regression assessed the association between variant hemoglobin and higher-dose ESA. Covariates included age, gender, diabetes, iron parameters, intravenous iron dose, parathyroid hormone, albumin, phosphorus, body mass index, vascular access type, hospitalization/missed treatments, smoking status, alcohol abuse, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Of 33 patients with variant hemoglobin, 24 had HbAS and 9 had HbAC. Univariate odds of higher-dose ESA among those with hemoglobin variants were twice that of those with the normal HbAA phenotype (odds ratio 2.05). In multivariate models, the likelihood of higher-dose ESA had an odds ratio of 3.31 and the nature of this relationship did not change in Poisson regression or sensitivity analyses. Hence, our findings may explain, in part, the difference in ESA dosing between Caucasians and African-Americans with end-stage renal disease but await further study.

  11. Pore development in carbonized hemoglobin by concurrently generated MgO template for activity enhancement as fuel cell cathode catalyst.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Jun; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Amano, Taiji; Muramatsu, Yasuji; Gullikson, Eric M; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2011-12-01

    Various carbon materials with a characteristic morphology and pore structure have been produced using template methods in which a carbon-template composite is once formed and the characteristic features derived from the template are generated after the template removal. In this study, hemoglobin, which is a natural compound that could be abundantly and inexpensively obtained, was used as the carbon material source to produce a carbonaceous noble-metal-free fuel cell cathode catalyst. Magnesium oxide was used as the template concurrently generated with the hemoglobin carbonization from magnesium acetate mixed with hemoglobin as the starting material mixture to enable pore development for improving the activity of the carbonized hemoglobin for the cathodic oxygen reduction. After removal of the MgO template, the substantially developed pores were generated in the carbonized hemoglobin with an amorphous structure observed by total-electron-yield X-ray absorption. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure at the Fe-K edge indicated that Fe was coordinated with four nitrogen atoms (Fe-N(4) moiety) in the carbonized hemoglobin. The oxygen reduction activity of the carbonized hemoglobin evaluated using rotating disk electrodes was dependent on the pore structure. The highly developed pores led to an improved activity.

  12. Hemoglobin Concentration and Cognitive Impairment in the Renal REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wadley, Virginia G.; Newsome, Britt B.; Zakai, Neil A.; McClure, Leslie A.; Howard, George; Warnock, David G.; McClellan, William

    2010-01-01

    Background. There is growing interest in determining the degree of anemia, which is clinically significant. The goal of this study was to determine the association between hemoglobin concentration and cognitive impairment in a large sample of U.S. adults. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from 19,701 adults participating in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke study. Cognitive impairment was defined as a score of 4 or less on the six-item screener. Hemoglobin was analyzed in 1 g/dL increments relative to the World Health Organization (WHO) threshold (<13 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women). Results. The mean hemoglobin concentration was 13.7 ± 1.5 g/dL. The prevalence of cognitive impairment increased from 4.3% among individuals with a hemoglobin >3 g/dL above the WHO threshold to 16.8% for those with a hemoglobin ≥2 g/dL below the WHO threshold. After adjustment for demographics, chronic health conditions, health status, and inflammation, the association between reduced hemoglobin and cognitive impairment was attenuated and no longer significant, including among those with hemoglobin ≥2 g/dL below the WHO threshold (odds ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval = 0.94–2.04). A test for linear trend was of borderline significance (p value = .06). For 94% of the sample within 2 g/dL of the WHO threshold, there was no relationship between hemoglobin concentration and the odds of cognitive impairment. The associations did not differ by sex and race. Conclusions. Within a large sample of community-dwelling adults, there was no significant association between hemoglobin concentration and cognitive impairment after multivariable adjustment. PMID:20634281

  13. Targeted O2 delivery by low-P50 hemoglobin: a new basis for O2 therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Amy G; Vandegriff, Kim D; Intaglietta, Marcos; Winslow, Robert M

    2003-10-01

    To assess O2 delivery to tissue by a new surface-modified, polyethylene glycol-conjugated human hemoglobin [MP4; Po2 at 50% saturation of hemoglobin (P50); 5.4 mmHg], we studied microcirculatory hemodynamics and O2 release in golden Syrian hamsters hemodiluted with MP4 or polymerized bovine hemoglobin (PolyBvHb; P50 54.2 mmHg). Comparisons were made with the animals' hemodiluted blood with a non-O2 carrying plasma expander with similar solution properties (Dextran-70). Systemic hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure and heart rate) and acid-base parameters were not correlated with microhemodynamics (arteriolar and venular diameter, red blood cell velocity, and flow). Microscopic measurements of Po2 and the O2 equilibrium curves permitted analysis of O2 release in precapillary and capillary vessels by red blood cells and plasma hemoglobin separately. No significant differences between the groups of animals with respect to arteriolar diameter, flow, or flow velocity were observed, but the functional capillary density was significantly higher in the MP4-treated animals (67%) compared with PolyBvHb-treated animals (37%; P < 0.05) or dextran-treated animals (53%). In the PolyBvHb-treated animals, predominant O2 release (both red blood cells and plasma hemoglobin) occurred in precapillary vessels, whereas in MP4 animals most of the O2 was released from both red blood cells and plasma hemoglobin in capillaries. Base excess correlated directly with capillary O2 release but not systemic O2 content or total O2 release. Higher O2 extraction of both red blood cell and plasma hemoglobin in capillaries represents a new mechanism of action of cell-free hemoglobin. High O2 affinity appears to be an important property for cell-free hemoglobin solutions.

  14. Direct sGC Activation Bypasses NO Scavenging Reactions of Intravascular Free Oxy-Hemoglobin and Limits Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabima, D. Marcela; Specht, Patricia A.C.; Tejero, Jesús; Champion, Hunter C.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Baust, Jeff; Mik, Egbert G.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Becker, Eva-Maria; Truebel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) provide a potential alternative to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Their clinical application has been limited by adverse effects, in large part thought to be mediated by the intravascular scavenging of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) by cell-free plasma oxy-hemoglobin. Free hemoglobin may also cause endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation in hemolytic diseases and after transfusion of aged stored RBCs. The new soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator Bay 41-8543 and sGC activator Bay 60-2770 directly modulate sGC, independent of NO bioavailability, providing a potential therapeutic mechanism to bypass hemoglobin-mediated NO inactivation. Results: Infusions of human hemoglobin solutions and the HBOC Oxyglobin into rats produced a severe hypertensive response, even at low plasma heme concentrations approaching 10 μM. These reactions were only observed for ferrous oxy-hemoglobin and not analogs that do not rapidly scavenge NO. Infusions of L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a competitive NO synthase inhibitor, after hemoglobin infusion did not produce additive vasoconstriction, suggesting that vasoconstriction is related to scavenging of vascular NO. Open-chest hemodynamic studies confirmed that hypertension occurred secondary to direct effects on increasing vascular resistance, with limited negative cardiac inotropic effects. Intravascular hemoglobin reduced the vasodilatory potency of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and sildenafil, but had no effect on vasodilatation by direct NO-independent activation of sGC by BAY 41-8543 and BAY 60-2770. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that both sGC stimulators and sGC activators could be used to restore cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent vasodilation in conditions where cell-free plasma hemoglobin is sufficient to inhibit endogenous NO signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2232–2243. PMID:23697678

  15. Primary structure of the hemoglobins from Sphenodon (Sphenodon punctatus, Tuatara, Rynchocephalia). Evidence for the expression of alpha D-gene.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, A; Wells, R M; Brittain, T; Braunitzer, G

    1988-08-01

    Sphenodon is the sole representative of the "beakhead" reptiles which were widely distributed during the Triassic period before the spectacular rise of dinosaurs. Sphenodon punctatus is the only survivor ("living fossil") of this period. The morphological features of Sphenodon are remarkably conservative and differ little from reptiles living 200 million years ago. In the present paper the determination of the primary structure of the tetrameric hemoglobins is described: three components are identified: hemoglobin A' (alpha A2 beta II2), hemoglobin A (alpha A2 beta I2) and hemoglobin D (alpha D2 beta II2). The components were characterized electrophoretically, the four different peptide chains were characterized by Triton electrophoresis as well as by high-performance liquid chromatography. The hemoglobins and--under dissociating conditions--also the chains, were isolated on columns of cellulose ion exchangers. Sequence determination was carried out after cleavage of the individual chains with trypsin and after a specific chemical cleavage of the Asp-Pro bond. For sequence determination the film technique and gas-phase method were employed. The data are compared with the sequence of the human hemoglobin, and interpretations of the amino-acid sequences are given. Particularly notable is the evidence of hemoglobin D: this hemoglobin (alpha D2 beta II2) is found only in birds, and in two cases in turtles. However, this component is not found in other reptiles. The results make possible an interpretation of the relatively high oxygen affinity and explain the lack of cooperativity (myoglobin properties) of these tetrameric hemoglobins.

  16. Correlation Between Blood Lead Level and Hemoglobin Level in Mitrovica Children

    PubMed Central

    Kutllovci-Zogaj, Drita; Krasniqi, Selvete; Elezaj, Isa; Ramadani, Naser; Gjergji, Tahire; Zogaj, Dukagjin; Kutllovci, Arben; Jaka, Arbëresha; Ukëhaxhaj, Antigona; Gashi, Sanije; Bince, Ergyl

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Lead toxicity is a serious health threat, especially in developing countries due to environmental pollution. It was thus aimed to investigate correlation between blood lead level and concentration level of hemoglobin in the blood of children involved in research. Material and methods: The research included 250 children of which 31(12.4%) kindergarten children, 166 (66.4%) of primary school pupils in Mitrovica and 53(21.2%) of primary school pupils in Shtime as control group. From the 250 children included in the survey 129 or 51.6% were female children and 48.4% male children. Children were selected randomly, while tests for concentration of Pb and blood hemoglobin were done at the National Institute of Public Health. Results: The average value of blood lead level of Mitrovica pupils was 2.4 µg/dL (SD±1.9µg/dL), range 0.5 to 16.3µg/dL. The average value of blood lead level of Shtime pupils was 2.3µg/dL (SD±0.7µg/dL), range 1.2 to 5.2 µg/dL with no statistical difference (P = 0.191). The average value of blood lead level in kindergarten children of Mitrovica was 3.8µg/dL (SD±1.3µg/dL), range 2.2 to 7.7µg/dL with significant difference between the average values of blood lead levels of pupils and kindergarten children of Mitrovica (P <0.0001). The average value of hemoglobin in the pupils of Mitrovica was 14.0g/dL(SD± 3.7g/dL), range 9.4 to 25.6 g/dL. The average value of hemoglobin to pupils of Shtime was 11.4g/dl(SD±0.8 g/dl), range 9.2 to 13.0 g/dl with significant difference between mean values of hemoglobin pupils of Mitrovica and Shtime (U ‘= 6440.0, P <0.0001). With Spearman correlation is found significant correlation of a medium scale (r = -0.305, df = 248, p <0.0001) between blood lead levels and hemoglobin level in the blood. PMID:25568564

  17. Lack of bioavailability of dichlorobenzidine form diarylide azo pigments: molecular dosimetry for hemoglobin and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Sagelsdorff, P; Haenggi, R; Heuberger, B; Joppich-Kuhn, R; Jung, R; Weideli, H J; Joppich, M

    1996-03-01

    The hypothetical release of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine (DCB) from two insoluble azo pigments and from a soluble azo dye was investigated in female Wistar rats for a 4 week treatment with 0.2% (w/w) Colour Index Pigment 13 (PY13) or 0.2% (w/w) Colour Index Pigment Yellow 17 (PY17) in the diet or 0.06% (w/v) Colour Index Direct Red 46 (DR46) in the drinking water. Steady-state DCB-hemoglobin adduct levels were determined by GC/MS with negative chemical ionization as well as DCB-DNA adduct levels in the liver by (32)P-postlabelling and compared with the respective adduct levels obtained in animals after treatment for 4 weeks with 0.00024, 0.0012 or 0.006% (w/v) DCB in the drinking water. A dose-proportional increase in adduct levels from 8.1 ng/g hemoglobin and 2.6 ng/g DNA (relative adduct level, RAL, 3.3x10(-9)) to 160 ng/g hemoglobin and 45.4 ng/g DNA (RAL 56.1x10(-9)) was observed in the DCB-treated rats. In rats treated with DR46 total adduct levels of 17.7 ng/g hemoglobin and 5.2 ng/g DNA (RAL 6.4x10(-9))were determined. No hemoglobin of DNA adducts were found in rats treated with PY17 in the diet, at a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/g hemoglobin and 0.08 ng/g DNA (RAL 0.1x10(-9)). In animals treated with PY13 in the diet no adducts or only minimal amounts slightly above the limit of detection could be identified. Taking into consideration that PY13 was contaminated with 0.02% of the respective soluble monoazo compound, it is concluded that the small amounts of DCB detected have been released from the contaminating soluble monoazo compound and not from insoluble PY13. The results of the present study demonstrate the lack of bioavailability of DCB from the diarylide azo pigments PY17 and PY13.

  18. Hemoglobin Villejuif [beta 123(H1) Thr----Ile]: a new variant found in coincidence with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Wajcman, H; Mrad, A; Blouquit, Y; Parmentier, C; Riou, J; Galacteros, F

    1989-12-01

    A new abnormal hemoglobin, Hb Villejuif [beta 123(H1) Thr----Ile] has been discovered during the exploration of a polycythemia in a 87-year-old patient of French origin. The isoelectric focusing of the lysate revealed the presence of a variant hemoglobin with an isoelectric point very close to that of HbA. The oxygen binding properties of the patient's red blood cells being normal, it was clear that the polycythemia was not a consequence of the presence of this hemoglobin. In fact, the red blood cell morphology and the involvement of the other blood cell lines, demonstrating excessive hemopoiesis, led to the diagnosis of polycythemia vera.

  19. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-07-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with (3H)folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin.

  20. [FECAL NONINVASIVE TESTS (CALPROTECTIN, TRANSFERRIN, HEMOGLOBIN) IN COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF DISEASES OF INTESTINES].

    PubMed

    Livzan, M A; Lyalukova, E A; Nechaeva, G; Osipenko, M F; Dolgih, T I

    2015-01-01

    A research objective was the assessment of informational content of fecal noninvasive tests (calprotectin, transferrin, hemoglobin) in complex diagnosis of diseases of intestines. Open kogortny research by method of a cross cut included 52 patients (middle age - 38,6 years) with IBS-like symptoms (abdominal pain or discomfort, change of frequency and/or character of a chair). Sensitivity of dough on calprotectin for diagnosis of organic pathology of intestines made (89%), for dough on calprotectin and hemoglobin - also 89%. At patients at incomplete compliance of clinical signs to diagnostic criteria of IBS and lack of endoscopic signs of damage of a large intestine research on fecal biomarkers allows to increase efficiency of diagnostics.