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Sample records for hemolysins

  1. Fungal hemolysins

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Hemolysins are a class of proteins defined by their ability to lyse red cells but have been described to exhibit pleiotropic functions. These proteins have been extensively studied in bacteria and more recently in fungi. Within the last decade, a number of studies have characterized fungal hemolysins and revealed a fascinating yet diverse group of proteins. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of the known fungal hemolysins with an emphasis on those belonging to the aegerolysin protein family. New insight and perspective into fungal hemolysins in biotechnology and health are additionally presented. PMID:22769586

  2. Hemolysins of Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J J; White, F H

    1979-01-01

    Isolates of Edwardsiella tarda from four sources produced nonfilterable hemolsin in trypticase soy broth. The cell-associated hemolysin was partially heat labile, destroyed by formalin and sensitive to treatment with trypsin. These characteristics, and the observation that Ca++ or Mg++ ions enhanced activity, suggest that a proteinaceous, enzymic component may be responsible for the hemolytic activity. PMID:34473

  3. POSSIBLE ROLE OF FUNGAL HEMOLYSINS IN SICK BUILDING SYNDROME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi produce proteinaceous hemolytic agents. Like bacterial hemolysins, fungal hemolysins create pores or holes in membranes. Depending on which membranes are damaged, fungal hemolysins can produce a variety of effects. Fungal hemolysins can cause histamine release from ...

  4. Purification and sensitivity of Clostridium chauvoei hemolysin to various erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mudenda Hang'ombe, Bernard; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Kozaki, Shunji

    2006-07-01

    Using ammonium sulphate fractionation, the Clostridium chauvoei hemolysin was purified by cation exchange chromatography and sephacryl S-100 gel filtration. The molecular mass of the hemolysin, determined by SDS-PAGE was found to be approximately 27kDa. The activity of the hemolysin was determined in erythrocytes of various animals, with sensitivities observed in the order of cow, sheep, chicken, rabbit, rat, mouse, dog and horse. Temperature affected the sensitivity of erythrocytes to C. chauvoei hemolysin. These results may reflect distinct characteristics of the hemolytic activity of C. chauvoei hemolysin and that the hemolysin may be pore-forming.

  5. Extracellular hemolysins of aerobic sporogenic bacilli.

    PubMed

    Bernheimer, A W; Grushoff, P

    1967-05-01

    Forty-five strains, representing 18 species of the genus Bacillus, were surveyed for production of hemolysin against rabbit erythrocytes. Broth cultures of B. cereus, B. alvei, and B. laterosporus contained lysins that closely resembled streptolysin O. B. subtilis and a single strain of B. cereus may produce lysins having characteristics different from those of streptolysin O.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HEMOLYSIN, FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a toxigenic fungus that has been associated with human health concerns, including pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis. This fungus produces a hemolysin, stachylysin, which in its apparent monomeric form has a molecular mass of 11,920
    Da as determ...

  7. Cross-Neutralization of Leptospiral Hemolysins from Different Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, A. D.; Wood, G.; Yancey, F.; Byrne, R. J.; Yager, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Cross-neutralization studies on leptospiral hemolysins from strains of two antigenically different serotypes, pomona and canicola, were conducted in sheep. A third strain of serotype hardjo that does not produce hemolysin and is antigenically distinct was included for control purposes. Concentrated hemolysins, prepared from supernatant fluids of canicola or pomona cultures, produced hemolytic anemia in sheep after intravenous injection. Sheep previously infected with hemolysin-producing strains were refractory to effects of homologous or heterologous hemolysins. On the other hand, infection with hardjo did not confer immunity to the action of hemolysins. Hemolysin-neutralizing antibodies were demonstrable in sheep previously infected with pomona or canicola only after challenge with homologous or heterologous hemolysins. Cross-neutralization between two hemolysins were demonstrable in vitro. Hemolysin-neutralizing antibody titers did not correlate with agglutinin titers. Concentrated supernatant fluid of the hardjo culture provoked toxic reactions predominantly in sheep previously infected with pomona or canicola. The causes of these untoward reactions were not determined. PMID:5154879

  8. Roles of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Pendru

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood borne bacterial gastroenteritis in the world, often associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. However, not all strains of V. parahaemolyticus are pathogenic. The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) encoded by tdh and trh genes, respectively, are considered major virulence factors in V. parahaemolyticus. However, about 10% of clinical strains do not contain tdh and/or trh. Environmental isolates of V. parahaemolyticus lacking tdh and/or trh are also highly cytotoxic to human gastrointestinal cells. Even in the absence of these hemolysins, V. parahaemolyticus remains pathogenic indicating other virulence factors exist. This mini review aims at discussing the possible roles of tdh and trh genes in clinical and environmental isolates of V. parahaemolyticus.

  9. Roles of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Raghunath, Pendru

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood borne bacterial gastroenteritis in the world, often associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. However, not all strains of V. parahaemolyticus are pathogenic. The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) encoded by tdh and trh genes, respectively, are considered major virulence factors in V. parahaemolyticus. However, about 10% of clinical strains do not contain tdh and/or trh. Environmental isolates of V. parahaemolyticus lacking tdh and/or trh are also highly cytotoxic to human gastrointestinal cells. Even in the absence of these hemolysins, V. parahaemolyticus remains pathogenic indicating other virulence factors exist. This mini review aims at discussing the possible roles of tdh and trh genes in clinical and environmental isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:25657643

  10. Cell Vacuolation Caused by Vibrio cholerae Hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Arredondo, Paula; Heuser, John E.; Akopyants, Natalia S.; Morisaki, J. Hiroshi; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Enríquez-Rincón, Fernando; Berg, Douglas E.

    2001-01-01

    Non-O1 strains of Vibrio cholerae implicated in gastroenteritis and diarrhea generally lack virulence determinants such as cholera toxin that are characteristic of epidemic strains; the factors that contribute to their virulence are not understood. Here we report that at least one-third of diarrhea-associated nonepidemic V. cholerae strains from Mexico cause vacuolation of cultured Vero cells. Detailed analyses indicated that this vacuolation was related to that caused by aerolysin, a pore-forming toxin of Aeromonas; it involved primarily the endoplasmic reticulum at early times (∼1 to 4 h after exposure), and resulted in formation of large, acidic, endosome-like multivesicular vacuoles (probably autophagosomes) only at late times (∼16 h). In contrast to vacuolation caused by Helicobacter pylori VacA protein, that induced by V. cholerae was exacerbated by agents that block vacuolar proton pumping but not by endosome-targeted weak bases. It caused centripetal redistribution of endosomes, reflecting cytoplasmic alkalinization. The gene for V. cholerae vacuolating activity was cloned and was found to correspond to hlyA, the structural gene for hemolysin. HlyA protein is a pore-forming toxin that causes ion leakage and, ultimately, eukaryotic cell lysis. Thus, a distinct form of cell vacuolation precedes cytolysis at low doses of hemolysin. We propose that this vacuolation, in itself, contributes to the virulence of V. cholerae strains, perhaps by perturbing intracellular membrane trafficking or ion exchange in target cells and thereby affecting local intestinal inflammatory or other defense responses. PMID:11179335

  11. Cloning of a hemolysin gene from Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo.

    PubMed Central

    del Real, G; Segers, R P; van der Zeijst, B A; Gaastra, W

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment encoding both hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C activity was cloned from the pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. Initial clones were obtained by screening a genomic library in EMBL3 for hemolytic activity. Both hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities were coded for by a 3.9-kilobase BamHI fragment. The hemolysin was expressed from its own promoter in Escherichia coli K-12. Similar DNA sequences were also present in the serovars tarassovi and ballum. Images PMID:2744864

  12. Nucleotide sequence of an Escherichia coli chromosomal hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Felmlee, T; Pellett, S; Welch, R A

    1985-01-01

    We determined the DNA sequence of an 8,211-base-pair region encompassing the chromosomal hemolysin, molecularly cloned from an O4 serotype strain of Escherichia coli. All four hemolysin cistrons (transcriptional order, C, A, B, and D) were encoded on the same DNA strand, and their predicted molecular masses were, respectively, 19.7, 109.8, 79.9, and 54.6 kilodaltons. The identification of pSF4000-encoded polypeptides in E. coli minicells corroborated the assignment of the predicted polypeptides for hlyC, hlyA, and hlyD. However, based on the minicell results, two polypeptides appeared to be encoded on the hlyB region, one similar in size to the predicted molecular mass of 79.9 kilodaltons, and the other a smaller 46-kilodalton polypeptide. The four hemolysin gene displayed similar codon usage, which is atypical for E. coli. This reflects the low guanine-plus-cytosine content (40.2%) of the hemolysin DNA sequence and suggests the non-E. coli origin of the hemolysin determinant. In vitro-derived deletions of the hemolysin recombinant plasmid pSF4000 indicated that a region between 433 and 301 base pairs upstream of the putative start of hlyC is necessary for hemolysin synthesis. Based on the DNA sequence, a stem-loop transcription terminator-like structure (a 16-base-pair stem followed by seven uridylates) in the mRNA was predicted distal to the C-terminal end of hlyA. A model for the general transcriptional organization of the E. coli hemolysin determinant is presented. Images PMID:3891743

  13. Effects of Escherichia coli hemolysin on endothelial cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, N; Flöer, B; Schnittler, H; Seeger, W; Bhakdi, S

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin is considered an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections. The present study demonstrates that cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells are susceptible to attack by low concentrations of E. coli hemolysin (greater than or equal to 0.05 hemolytic units/ml; greater than or equal to 5 ng/ml). Sublytic amounts of hemolysin increased the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The hydraulic conductivity increased approximately 30-fold and the reflection coefficient for large molecules dropped from 0.71 to less than 0.05, indicating a toxin-induced loss of endothelial barrier function. The alterations of endothelial monolayer permeability were accompanied by cell retraction and interendothelial gap formation. In addition, E. coli hemolysin stimulated prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells. This effect was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not of Mg2+. An enhanced passive influx of 45Ca2+ and 3H-sucrose but not of tritiated inulin and dextran was noted in toxin-treated cells, indicating that small transmembrane pores comparable to those detected in rabbit erythrocytes had been generated in endothelial cell membranes. These pores may act as nonphysiologic Ca2+ gates, thereby initiating different Ca2+-dependent cellular processes. We conclude that endothelial cells are highly susceptible to E. coli hemolysin and that two major endothelial cell functions are altered by very low concentrations of hemolysin. Images PMID:2121650

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the hemolysin I gene from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Meier, R; Gygi, D; Nicolet, J

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene encoding the structural protein of hemolysin I (HlyI) of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 strain 4074 was analyzed. The nucleotide sequence shows a 3,072-bp reading frame encoding a protein of 1,023 amino acids with a calculated molecular size of 110.1 kDa. This corresponds to the HlyI protein, which has an apparent molecular size on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels of 105 kDa. The structure of the protein derived from the DNA sequence shows three hydrophobic regions in the N-terminal part of the protein, 13 glycine-rich domains in the second half of the protein, and a hydrophilic C-terminal area, all of which are typical of the cytotoxins of the RTX (repeats in the structural toxin) toxin family. The derived amino acid sequence of HlyI shows 42% homology with the hemolysin of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5, 41% homology with the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica, and 56% homology with the Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin. The 13 glycine-rich repeats and three hydrophobic areas of the HlyI sequence show more similarity to the E. coli alpha-hemolysin than to either the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 hemolysin or the leukotoxin (while the last two are more similar to each other). Two types of RTX hemolysins therefore seem to be present in A. pleuropneumoniae, one (HlyI) resembling the alpha-hemolysin and a second more closely related to the leukotoxin. Ca(2+)-binding experiments using HlyI and recombinant A. pleuropneumoniae prohemolysin (HlyIA) that was produced in E. coli shows that HlyI binds 45Ca2+, probably because of the 13 glycine-rich repeated domains. Activation of the prohemolysin is not required for Ca2+ binding. Images PMID:1879928

  15. Detection of Clostridium septicum hemolysin gene by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, S; Hashizume, N; Kinoshita, T; Kaidoh, T; Tamura, Y

    1997-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of the hemolysin (alpha toxin) gene of Clostridium septicum. The PCR primers were designed from the sequence of the hemolysin gene and synthesized. A DNA fragment of 270 bp was amplified from 10 strains of C. septicum, but was not from strains of C. chauvoei, C. perfringens, C. novyi, or C. haemolyticum. When the PCR product was digested with Sau3AI, two DNA fragments of the expected 148 bp and 122 bp were recognized. The lowest detectable threshold of PCR for the hemolysin gene was 3.8 x 10(3) cells/ml. The PCR technique may be useful for rapid detection or identification of C. septicum associated with malignant edema.

  16. Synergistic hemolysins of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS).

    PubMed

    Różalska, Małgorzata; Derczyńska, Anna; Maszewska, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    A total of 104 coagulase negative staphylococci, belonging to S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus and S. warneri, originating from the collection of the Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology (ZMF), Medical University of Lodz, Poland, were tested for their synergistic hemolytic activity. 83% of strains produced δ-hemolysin, however, the percentage of positive strains of S. haemolyticus, S. warneri, S. capitis and S. hominis was different - 98%, 78%, 75% and 68%, respectively. Highly pure hemolysins were obtained from culture supernatants by protein precipitation with ammonium sulphate (0-70% of saturation) and extraction by using a mixture of organic solvents. The purity and molecular mass of hemolysins was determined by TRIS/Tricine PAGE. All CoNS hemolysins were small peptides with a molar mass of about 3.5 kDa; they possessed cytotoxic activity against the line of human foreskin fibroblasts ATCC Hs27 and lysed red cells from different mammalian species, however, the highest activity was observed when guinea pig, dog and human red blood cells were used. The cytotoxic effect on fibroblasts occurred within 30 minutes. The S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus strain was used as a control. The antimicrobial activity was examined using hemolysins of S. capitis, S. hominis, S. cohnii ssp. cohnii and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus. Hemolysins of the two S. cohnii subspecies did not demonstrate antimicrobial activity. Cytolysins of S. capitis and S. hominis had a very narrow spectrum of action; out of 37 examined strains, the growth of only Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pasteurella multocida was inhibited.

  17. Production and properties of heat-stable extracellular hemolysin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M K; Boese-Marrazzo, D

    1980-01-01

    Of 12 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were found to produce heat-stable extracellular hemolysin in highly aerated peptone broth supplemented with glycerol, fructose, or mannitol. Glucose supported good hemolysin production only in medium that was highly buffered. The yield of both cells and hemolysin was lower with organic acids as supplement. Growth-limiting phosphate concentrations produced maximum hemolysin levels. Purified hemolysin preparations contained two hemolytic glycolipids. The kinetics of hemolysis at various levels of purified lysin and the effects of variation in lysin and erythrocyte concentration are described. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6776058

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HEMOLYSIN, STACHYLYSIN, FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a toxigenic fungus that has been associated with human health concerns, including pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis. This fungus produces a hemolysin, stachylysin, which in its monomeric form, has a molecular wieght of 11,920 daltons as determined by m...

  19. HEMOLYSIN, CHRYSOLYSIN FROM PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM PROMOTES INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some strains of Penicillium chrysogenum produce a proteinaceous hemolysin, chrysolysin, when incubated on sheep's blood agar at 37 �C but not at 23 �C. Chrysolysin is an aggregating protein composed of approximately 2 kDa monomers, contains one cysteine amino acid, and has an is...

  20. The alpha-hemolysin of Streptococcus gordonii is hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, J P; Stinson, M W

    1996-01-01

    The alpha-hemolysin of viridans group streptococci, which causes greening of intact erythrocytes, is a potential virulence factor as well as an important criterion for the laboratory identification of these bacteria; however, it has never been purified and characterized. The alpha-hemolysin of Streptococcus gordonii CH1 caused characteristic shifts in the A403, A430, A578, and A630 of sheep hemoglobin. A spectrophotometric assay was developed and used to monitor purification of alpha-hemolysin during extraction in organic solvents and separation by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The alpha-hemolysin was identical to hydrogen peroxide with respect to its effects on erythrocyte hemoglobin, oxygen-dependent synthesis by streptococci, insensitivity to proteases, inactivation by catalase, differential solubility, failure to adsorb to ion-exchange chromatography resins, and retention time on a reverse-phase HPLC column. The amount of hydrogen peroxide present in HPLC-fractionated spent culture medium was sufficient to account for all alpha-hemolytic activity observed. PMID:8751938

  1. Water transport by the bacterial channel alpha-hemolysin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Akeson, M.; Deamer, D.

    1999-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the ability of the bacterial channel alpha-hemolysin to facilitate water permeation across biological membranes. alpha-Hemolysin channels were incorporated into rabbit erythrocyte ghosts at varying concentrations, and water permeation was induced by mixing the ghosts with hypertonic sucrose solutions. The resulting volume decrease of the ghosts was followed by time-resolved optical absorption at pH 5, 6, and 7. The average single-channel permeability coefficient of alpha-hemolysin for water ranged between 1.3x10-12 cm/s and 1.5x10-12 cm/s, depending on pH. The slightly increased single-channel permeability coefficient at lower pH-values was attributed to an increase in the effective pore size. The activation energy of water transport through the channel was low (Ea=5.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that the properties of water inside the alpha-hemolysin channel resemble those of bulk water. This conclusion was supported by calculations based on macroscopic hydrodynamic laws of laminar water flow. Using the known three-dimensional structure of the channel, the calculations accurately predicted the rate of water flow through the channel. The latter finding also indicated that water permeation data can provide a good estimate of the pore size for large channels.

  2. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  3. Cloning of the cytotoxin-hemolysin gene of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A C; Morris, J G; Maneval, D R; Richardson, K; Kaper, J B

    1985-01-01

    Genes encoding the cytotoxin-hemolysin of Vibrio vulnificus were cloned in Escherichia coli by using the lytic cloning vector, lambda 1059. Subcloning in plasmid pBR325 resulted in the isolation of a 3.2-kilobase DNA fragment containing the cytotoxin gene. By using this fragment as a DNA probe, homologous gene sequences were detected in all 54 V. vulnificus strains studied; homologous sequences were present in none of 96 isolates from 29 other bacterial species. PMID:4066036

  4. Properties of Bacillus cereus hemolysin II: a heptameric transmembrane pore.

    PubMed

    Miles, George; Bayley, Hagan; Cheley, Stephen

    2002-07-01

    The gene encoding hemolysin II (HlyII) was amplified from Bacillus cereus genomic DNA and a truncated mutant, HlyII(DeltaCT), was constructed lacking the 94 amino acid extension at the C terminus. The proteins were produced in an E. coli cell-free in vitro transcription and translation system, and were shown to assemble into SDS-stable oligomers on rabbit erythrocyte membranes and liposomes. The hemolytic activity of HlyII was measured with rabbit erythrocytes yielding an HC(50) value of 1.64 ng mL(-1), which is over 15 times more potent than staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin. HlyII(DeltaCT) was about eight times less potent than HlyII in this assay. Limited proteolysis of the oligomers formed by HlyII and HlyII(DeltaCT) on red cell membranes showed that the C-terminal extension is sensitive to digestion, while HlyII(DeltaCT) is protease resistant and migrates with an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of digested HlyII. HlyII forms moderately anion selective, rectifying pores (I(+80)/I(-80) = 0.57, 1 M KCl, pH 7.4) in planar lipid bilayers of diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine with a unitary conductance of 637 pS (1 M KCl, 5 mM HEPES, pH 7.4) and exhibits no gating over a wide range of applied potentials (-160 to +160 mV). In addition, it was demonstrated that HlyII forms a homoheptameric pore by using gel shift electrophoresis aided by a genetically encoded oligoaspartate tag. Although they share limited primary sequence identity (30%), these data confirm that HlyII is a structural and functional homolog of staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin.

  5. Erythrocyte Lysis and Xenopus laevis Oocyte Rupture by Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Hemolysin III

    PubMed Central

    Moonah, Shannon; Sanders, Natalie G.; Persichetti, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills more than 1 million people per year worldwide, with severe malaria anemia accounting for the majority of the deaths. Malaria anemia is multifactorial in etiology, including infected erythrocyte destruction and decrease in erythrocyte production, as well as destruction or clearance of noninfected erythrocytes. We identified a panspecies Plasmodium hemolysin type III related to bacterial hemolysins. The identification of a hemolysin III homologue in Plasmodium suggests a potential role in host erythrocyte lysis. Here, we report the first characterization of Plasmodium falciparum hemolysin III, showing that the soluble recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III is a pore-forming protein capable of lysing human erythrocytes in a dose-, time-, and temperature-dependent fashion. The recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III-induced hemolysis was partially inhibited by glibenclamide, a known channel antagonist. Studies with polyethylene glycol molecules of different molecular weights indicated a pore size of approximately 3.2 nm. Heterologous expression of recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated early hypotonic lysis similar to that of the pore-forming aquaporin control. Live fluorescence microscopy localized transfected recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged P. falciparum hemolysin III to the essential digestive vacuole of the P. falciparum parasite. These transfected trophozoites also possessed a swollen digestive vacuole phenotype. Native Plasmodium hemolysin III in the digestive vacuole may contribute to lysis of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane derived from the host erythrocyte. After merozoite egress from infected erythrocytes, remnant P. falciparum hemolysin III released from digestive vacuoles could potentially contribute to lysis of uninfected erythrocytes to contribute to severe life-threatening anemia. PMID:25148832

  6. Proteolysis of truncated hemolysin A yields a stable dimerization interface.

    PubMed

    Novak, Walter R P; Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; Grilley, Daniel P; Weaver, Todd M

    2017-03-01

    Wild-type and variant forms of HpmA265 (truncated hemolysin A) from Proteus mirabilis reveal a right-handed, parallel β-helix capped and flanked by segments of antiparallel β-strands. The low-salt crystal structures form a dimeric structure via the implementation of on-edge main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 243-263 of adjacent monomers. Surprisingly, in the high-salt structures of two variants, Y134A and Q125A-Y134A, a new dimeric interface is formed via main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 203-215 of adjacent monomers, and a previously unobserved tetramer is formed. In addition, an eight-stranded antiparallel β-sheet is formed from the flap regions of crystallographically related monomers in the high-salt structures. This new interface is possible owing to additional proteolysis of these variants after Tyr240. The interface formed in the high-salt crystal forms of hemolysin A variants may mimic the on-edge β-strand positioning used in template-assisted hemolytic activity.

  7. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  8. Purification of Staphylococcal β-Hemolysin and Its Action on Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Chesbro, William R.; Heydrick, Fred P.; Martineau, Roland; Perkins, Gail N.

    1965-01-01

    Chesbro, William R. (University of New Hampshire, Durham), Fred P. Heydrick, Roland Martineau, and Gail N. Perkins. Purification of staphylococcal β-hemolysin and its action on staphylococcal and streptococcal cell walls. J. Bacteriol. 89:378–389. 1965.—After growth of bovine-derived strains of Staphylococcus aureus in a completely dialyzable medium, the β-hemolysin in the culture supernatant fluids was purified by gradient-elution chromatography on cellulose phosphate. The purified hemolysin contained two components, demonstrable by immunodiffusion or electrophoresis, but was free from α-hemolysin, coagulase, Δ-hemolysin, enterotoxins A and B, glucuronidase, hyaluronidase, lipase, muramidase, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, phosphatase, and protease. The hemolysin was heat-labile and sulfhydryl-dependent, and the preparation was leukocidal for guinea pig macrophages. When rabbit red blood cell (RBC) stroma and staphylococcal or enterococcal cell walls were treated with the purified hemolysin, it liberated mucopolysaccharides from the rabbit RBC stroma, polysaccharides and mucopolysaccharides (or mucopeptides) from the staphyloccoal cell walls, and rhamnose, glucose, an unidentified monosaccharide, N-acetylglucosamine, and at least two polysaccharides from the enterococcal cell walls. The hemolytic and cell-wall degradative activities had similar thermal inactivation kinetics, pH optima, sedimentation coefficients, and chromatographic and electrophoretic mobilities; both required Mg and were inhibited by thiol-inactivating agents. Consequently, it seems likely that both activities are expressions of the same enzyme. PMID:14255704

  9. Relationship between heat-induced fibrillogenicity and hemolytic activity of thermostable direct hemolysin and a related hemolysin of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Kiyouhisa; Nakahira, Kumiko; Unzai, Satoru; Mayanagi, Kouta; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Shiraki, Kentaro; Honda, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Itaru

    2011-05-01

    The formation of nonspecific ion channels by small oligomeric amyloid intermediates is toxic to the host's cellular membranes. Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) are major virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We have previously reported the crystal structure of TDH tetramer with the central channel. We have also identified the molecular mechanism underlying the paradoxical responses to heat treatment of TDH, known as the Arrhenius effect, which is the reversible amyloidogenic property. In the present report, we describe the biophysical properties of TRH, which displays 67% amino acid similarity with TDH. Molecular modeling provided a good fit of the overall structure of TDH and TRH. Size-exclusion chromatography, ultracentrifugation, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that TRH formed tetramer in solution. These toxins showed similar hemolytic activity on red blood cells. However, TRH had less amyloid-like structure than TDH analyzed by thioflavin T-binding assay and far-UV circular dichroism spectra. These data indicated that amyloidogenicity upon heating is not essential for the membrane disruption of erythrocytes, but the maintenance of tetrameric structure is indispensable for the hemolytic activity of the TDH and TRH.

  10. Delta Hemolysin and Phenol-Soluble Modulins, but Not Alpha Hemolysin or Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Induce Mast Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hodille, Elisabeth; Cuerq, Charlotte; Badiou, Cédric; Bienvenu, Françoise; Steghens, Jean-Paul; Cartier, Régine; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Plesa, Adriana; Le, Vien T. M.; Diep, Binh A.; Lina, Gérard; Dumitrescu, Oana

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are located at host interfaces, such as the skin, and contribute to the first-line defense against pathogens by releasing soluble mediators, including those that induce itching and scratching behavior. Here, we show that delta-hemolysin (Hld) and phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) PSMα1 and PSMα3, but not alpha-hemolysin (Hla) or Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), induce dose-dependent tryptase, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release by the HMC-1 human mast cell line. Using supernatants from isogenic strains, we verified that tryptase and LDH release was Hld- and PSMα-dependent. PSMα1 and Hld production was detected in 65 and 17% of human Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin abscess specimens, respectively, but they were produced in vitro by all clinical isolates. The results suggest that Hld and PSM-α1 produced in vivo during S. aureus skin infections induce the release of mast cell mediators responsible for itching and scratching behavior, which may enhance skin to skin transmission of S. aureus via the hands. As Hld and PSMs are upregulated by accessory gene regulator (agr), their association may contribute to the elective transmission of S. aureus strains with a functional agr system. PMID:28018862

  11. Structure and Functional Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Thermostable Direct Hemolysin*

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, Itaru; Nakahira, Kumiko; Yamane, Tsutomu; Kaieda, Shuji; Mayanagi, Kouta; Hamada, Daizo; Fukui, Takashi; Ohnishi, Kiyouhisa; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Sato, Mamoru; Ikegami, Takahisa; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Honda, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is a major virulence factor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that causes pandemic foodborne enterocolitis mediated by seafood. TDH exists as a tetramer in solution, and it possesses extreme hemolytic activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TDH tetramer at 1.5 Å resolution. The TDH tetramer forms a central pore with dimensions of 23 Å in diameter and ∼50 Å in depth. π-Cation interactions between protomers comprising the tetramer were indispensable for hemolytic activity of TDH. The N-terminal region was intrinsically disordered outside of the pore. Molecular dynamic simulations suggested that water molecules permeate freely through the central and side channel pores. Electron micrographs showed that tetrameric TDH attached to liposomes, and some of the tetramer associated with liposome via one protomer. These findings imply a novel membrane attachment mechanism by a soluble tetrameric pore-forming toxin. PMID:20335168

  12. Structure and functional characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Itaru; Nakahira, Kumiko; Yamane, Tsutomu; Kaieda, Shuji; Mayanagi, Kouta; Hamada, Daizo; Fukui, Takashi; Ohnishi, Kiyouhisa; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Sato, Mamoru; Ikegami, Takahisa; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Honda, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-05-21

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is a major virulence factor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that causes pandemic foodborne enterocolitis mediated by seafood. TDH exists as a tetramer in solution, and it possesses extreme hemolytic activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TDH tetramer at 1.5 A resolution. The TDH tetramer forms a central pore with dimensions of 23 A in diameter and approximately 50 A in depth. Pi-cation interactions between protomers comprising the tetramer were indispensable for hemolytic activity of TDH. The N-terminal region was intrinsically disordered outside of the pore. Molecular dynamic simulations suggested that water molecules permeate freely through the central and side channel pores. Electron micrographs showed that tetrameric TDH attached to liposomes, and some of the tetramer associated with liposome via one protomer. These findings imply a novel membrane attachment mechanism by a soluble tetrameric pore-forming toxin.

  13. Expression of gamma-hemolysin regulated by sae in Staphylococcus aureus strain Smith 5R.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuko; Kato, Fuminori; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Kaneko, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strain Smith 5R produces a two-component pore-forming toxin and forms a rough-surfaced colony with hemolytic haloes on human red blood cell plates (R[+]). Serial subcultures of the strain in broth caused the appearance of gamma-hemolysin negative variants with a smooth colony shape (S[-]), and the S[-] valiant became predominant in culture. The R[+] strain, in which agrA is naturally disrupted by an insertion of IS1181, produced high levels of gamma-hemolysin. In the S[-] variant, expression of both hlg and lukS-F mRNAs was strongly reduced. Nucleotide sequencing of the sae locus revealed that all isolated S[-] variants had spontaneous mutations in the sae locus. Recovery of gamma-hemolysin productivity in S[-] by transformation of the wild-type sae allele strongly suggested that the expression of gamma-hemolysin is positively regulated by sae in an agr-independent manner.

  14. Occurrence of urease-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Kanagawa, Japan, with specific reference to presence of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related-hemolysin genes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, R; Okitsu, T; Morozumi, H; Yamai, S

    1996-02-01

    A total of 132 strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from patients and from the suspected causal food items of past food poisoning cases occurring in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, were examined for the ability to hydrolyze urea, with specific reference to the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) and the gene for thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh). Ten strains belonging to five different O-antigen serotypes were positive for urea hydrolysis (UH+), and four of these strains did not carry tdh. A total of 106 strains carried tdh, but less than 6% of them were UH+, whereas all trh-carrying strains were UH+. The evidence suggests that urea hydrolysis is not a reliable marker for identifying tdh-carrying V. parahaemolyticus strains in Japan (the Pacific Northeast) but may be a marker for trh-carrying strains.

  15. Imaging alpha-hemolysin with molecular dynamics: ionic conductance, osmotic permeability, and the electrostatic potential map.

    PubMed

    Aksimentiev, Aleksij; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-06-01

    alpha-Hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus is a self-assembling toxin that forms a water-filled transmembrane channel upon oligomerization in a lipid membrane. Apart from being one of the best-studied toxins of bacterial origin, alpha-hemolysin is the principal component in several biotechnological applications, including systems for controlled delivery of small solutes across lipid membranes, stochastic sensors for small solutes, and an alternative to conventional technology for DNA sequencing. Through large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the permeability of the alpha-hemolysin/lipid bilayer complex for water and ions. The studied system, composed of approximately 300,000 atoms, included one copy of the protein, a patch of a DPPC lipid bilayer, and a 1 M water solution of KCl. Monitoring the fluctuations of the pore structure revealed an asymmetric, on average, cross section of the alpha-hemolysin stem. Applying external electrostatic fields produced a transmembrane ionic current; repeating simulations at several voltage biases yielded a current/voltage curve of alpha-hemolysin and a set of electrostatic potential maps. The selectivity of alpha-hemolysin to Cl(-) was found to depend on the direction and the magnitude of the applied voltage bias. The results of our simulations are in excellent quantitative agreement with available experimental data. Analyzing trajectories of all water molecule, we computed the alpha-hemolysin's osmotic permeability for water as well as its electroosmotic effect, and characterized the permeability of its seven side channels. The side channels were found to connect seven His-144 residues surrounding the stem of the protein to the bulk solution; the protonation of these residues was observed to affect the ion conductance, suggesting the seven His-144 to comprise the pH sensor that gates conductance of the alpha-hemolysin channel.

  16. Beta-hemolysin promotes skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, Sa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage Sa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes.

  17. Beta-Hemolysin Promotes Skin Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yuki; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, ϕSa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage ϕSa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes. PMID:23292775

  18. Epidemiological evidence of lesser role of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-related hemolysin (TRH) than TDH on Vibrio parahaemolyticus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shioko; Iwade, Yoshito; Tokuoka, Eisuke; Nishio, Tomohiro; Otomo, Yoshimitsu; Araki, Emiko; Konuma, Hirotaka; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Kanji; Hasegawa, Akio; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2015-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying the tdh gene, encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), or the trh gene, encoding the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), are both considered virulent strains. There are, however, disproportionally fewer reports of infections caused by seafood contaminated with trh-positive strains than by seafood contaminated with tdh-positive strains. Bivalves such as clams and oysters are the major seafood varieties associated with the infections. In this study, the prevalence of strains possessing the tdh and trh genes was investigated in Japan in 74 samples collected in 2007-2008 and in 177 samples collected in 2010 of domestic bivalves, bloody clams, hen clams, short-neck clams, and rock oysters. The tdh-positive and trh-negative, tdh-negative and trh-positive, and tdh-positive and trh-positive samples represented 5.4%, 12.2%, and 4.1% of all samples collected in 2007-2008, and 5.1%, 18.6%, and 5.6% of all samples collected in 2010, respectively. As determined by polymerase chain reaction, the prevalence of tdh negative and trh positive in all samples was two to four times higher than that of tdh positive and trh negative. In the samples collected in 2010, the tdh-negative and trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus (20 samples) was more often isolated than tdh-positive and trh-negative V. parahaemolyticus (7 samples). The most common serotype of tdh-positive isolates (22 of 24 strains) was pandemic O3:K6. The trh-positive isolates (61 strains) were various serotypes including OUT:KUT. In 330 V. parahaemolyticus outbreaks and sporadic infections in Japan, most outbreaks and sporadic infections were caused by tdh-positive and trh-negative strains (89.4%). The frequencies of infections caused by tdh-negative and trh-positive, and both tdh- and trh-positive strains were 1.2% and 3.0%, respectively. This finding suggests that the virulence of trh might be less than that of tdh, although trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus frequently contaminated bivalves.

  19. Unzipping of Double-stranded DNA in Engineered α-Hemolysin Pores.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aihua; Zhao, Qitao; Krishantha, D M Milan; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-06-12

    Biological protein α-hemolysin nanopore is under intense investigation as a potential platform for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing. However, due to its narrow constriction, analysis of DNA in the α-hemolysin pore has long time been restricted to single strands. In this paper, we report that by introducing new surface functional groups into the α-hemolysin pore, facilitated unzipping of double-stranded DNA through the channel could be achieved. Since the mean residence time of the DNA events is dependent on the length of the duplex, and also varies with the nucleotide base composition, the modified protein pore approach offers the potential for rapid double-stranded DNA analysis, including sequencing.

  20. Unzipping of Double-stranded DNA in Engineered α-Hemolysin Pores

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aihua; Zhao, Qitao; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-01-01

    Biological protein α-hemolysin nanopore is under intense investigation as a potential platform for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing. However, due to its narrow constriction, analysis of DNA in the α-hemolysin pore has long time been restricted to single strands. In this paper, we report that by introducing new surface functional groups into the α-hemolysin pore, facilitated unzipping of double-stranded DNA through the channel could be achieved. Since the mean residence time of the DNA events is dependent on the length of the duplex, and also varies with the nucleotide base composition, the modified protein pore approach offers the potential for rapid double-stranded DNA analysis, including sequencing. PMID:21709813

  1. Urea hydrolysis and suppressed production of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) by Vibrio parahaemolyticus associated with presence of TDH-related hemolysin genes.

    PubMed

    Okitsu, T; Osawa, R; Pornruangwong, S; Yamai, S

    1997-05-01

    A total of 18 strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from patients of past food poisoning cases occurring in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, were assayed for presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) genes (trh 1 and trh 2) with specific reference to their ability to hydrolyze urea and TDH production. A polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that all urea-hydrolyzing strains (9 strains) carried either trh 1 gene or trh 2 gene. The strains carrying the trh genes as well as the tdh gene produced TDH less by a factor of 4 to 16 than those carrying only the tdh gene, suggesting the expression of the tdh gene was suppressed by the presence of trh gene through a mechanism yet to be defined.

  2. The urease gene cluster of Vibrio parahaemolyticus does not influence the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene or the TDH-related hemolysin gene.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Okuda, Jun; Iida, Tetsuya; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate why the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are produced at low levels from urease-positive strains, the effect of the functional urease gene cluster of V. parahaemolyticus on the expression of the tdh and trh genes was examined. Transcriptional lacZ fusions with the tdh1, tdh2, trh1 and trh2 genes representing variants of the tdh and trh genes were integrated into the chromosome of an Escherichia coli strain and a urease-negative V. parahaemolyticus strain. The plasmid-borne urease gene cluster introduced and expressed in these constructs did not affect expression of any of the fusion genes. The amount of TDH produced from a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive V. parahaemolyticus did not change by introduction of the urease gene cluster either. It was concluded therefore that the urease gene cluster is not involved in the regulation of tdh and trh expression.

  3. Evaluation of two assay kits for thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) as an indicator of TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Yoh, M; Kawakami, N; Funakoshi, Y; Okada, K; Honda, T

    1995-01-01

    Reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits with beads (Bead-ELISA) are commercially available in Japan to detect the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates. We evaluated whether these kits can be used to assay the pathogenic toxin, TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), produced by some so-called Kanagawa phenomenon-negative V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from patients with diarrhea. Our results showed that the two kits, RPLA and Bead-ELISA, can detect TRH, although they were originally developed for detection of TDH. This may be due to the use of polyclonal anti-TDH antisera that cross react with TRH. Although the sensitivity for TDH detection by RPLA and Bead-ELISA differed tenfold, that for TRH detection was essentially equal. The minimum concentration of TRH required for detection by the two assay kits was about 10 ng/ml.

  4. INITIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE FUNGAL HEMOLYSIN STACHYLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum is known to produce the hemolysin stachylysin and its detection in human serum has been proposed as a biomarker for exposure to the fungus. In this study we report the initial characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against stachylysin and the dev...

  5. The amino acid sequences and activities of synergistic hemolysins from Staphylococcus cohnii.

    PubMed

    Mak, Pawel; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rozalska, Malgorzata

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus are a coagulase-negative staphylococci considered for a long time as unable to cause infections. This situation changed recently and pathogenic strains of these bacteria were isolated from hospital environments, patients and medical staff. Most of the isolated strains were resistant to many antibiotics. The present work describes isolation and characterization of several synergistic peptide hemolysins produced by these bacteria and acting as virulence factors responsible for hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. Amino acid sequences of respective hemolysins from S. cohnii ssp. cohnii (named as H1C, H2C and H3C) and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus (H1U, H2U and H3U) were identical. Peptides H1 and H3 possessed significant amino acid homology to three synergistic hemolysins secreted by Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to putative antibacterial peptide produced by Staphylococcus saprophyticus ssp. saprophyticus. On the other hand, hemolysin H2 had a unique sequence. All isolated peptides lysed red cells from different mammalian species and exerted a cytotoxic effect on human fibroblasts.

  6. X-ray Crystal Structure of the B Component of Hemolysin BL from Bacillus cereus

    SciTech Connect

    Madegowda,M.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus cereus Hemolysin BL enterotoxin, a ternary complex of three proteins, is the causative agent of food poisoning and requires all three components for virulence. The X-ray structure of the binding domain of HBL suggests that it may form a pore similar to other soluble channel forming proteins. A putative pathway of pore formation is discussed.

  7. In vitro activation of the hemolysin in Prevotella nigrescens ATCC 33563 and Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Noronha, Fátima Soares M; de Macêdo Farias, Luiz; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora R

    2004-01-01

    Hemolytic activity was evaluated in the putative periodontopathogens Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. Whole cells of both species present weak hemolytic activity evidenced only by solid media assays after 48 h of bacterial growth or after 5 h of interaction with erythrocytes at 37 degrees C in liquid assays. In this work we show that the use of crude extract allowed the detection of a higher hemolytic activity for P. intermedia, but surprisingly not for P. nigrescens. Incubation at 37 degrees C for 9 h, or treatment with trypsin or proteinase K, increased or exposed the hemolytic activity of P. intermedia and P. nigrescens crude extract, respectively. The activation process was inhibited by TLCK and PMSF but not by EDTA, E-64 or pepstatin A, indicating the serino-protease nature of the factor involved in activation of P. intermedia and P. nigrescens hemolysins. Both the buffer and the pH employed for cell fractionation influenced the activation of hemolysin, and the best results were obtained with Universal buffer at pH 8.0. The activated hemolysins acted optimally at pH 6.5 at 37 degrees C and the maximum hemolytic activity was detected at the early log phase of growth. The results of this study show for the first time a strong hemolytic activity for P. nigrescens and evidence of proteolytic activation of hemolysins produced by periodontopathogens.

  8. NIGERLYSINTM, HEMOLYSIN PRODUCED BY ASPERGILLUS NIGER, CAUSES LETHALITY OF PRIMARY RAT CORTICAL NEURONAL CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspergillus niger produced a proteinaceous hemolysin, nigerlysinTM when incubated on sheep's blood agar at both 23° C and 37°C. Nigerlysin was purified from tryptic soy broth culture filtrate. Purified nigerlysin has a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa, with an...

  9. Inflammatory lipid mediator generation elicited by viable hemolysin- forming Escherichia coli in lung vasculature

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin, a transmembrane pore-forming exotoxin, is considered an important virulence factor for E. coli-related extraintestinal infections and sepsis. The possible significance of hemolysin liberation for induction of inflammatory lipid mediators was investigated in isolated rabbit lungs infused with viable bacteria (concentration range, 10(4)-10(7)/ml). Hemolysin-secreting E. coli (E. coli-Hly+), but not an E. coli strain that releases an inactive form of the exotoxin, induced marked lung leukotriene (LT) generation with predominance of cysteinyl LTs. Eicosanoid synthesis was not inhibited in the presence of plasma with toxin-neutralizing capacity. Pre- application of 2 x 10(8) human granulocytes, which sequestered in the lung microvasculature, caused a severalfold increase in leukotriene generation in response to E. coli-Hly+ challenge both in the absence and presence of plasma. Data are presented indicating neutrophil- endothelial cell cooperation in arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolism as an underlying mechanism. We conclude that liberation of hemolysin from viable E. coli induces marked lipid mediator generation in lung vasculature, which is potentiated in the presence of neutrophil sequestration and may contribute to microcirculatory disturbances during the course of severe infections. PMID:2120384

  10. Leukotriene and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid generation elicited by low doses of Escherichia coli hemolysin in rabbit lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Grimminger, F; Walmrath, D; Birkemeyer, R G; Bhakdi, S; Seeger, W

    1990-01-01

    Low doses of Escherichia coli hemolysin cause thromboxane-mediated hypertension and vascular leakage in blood-free perfused rabbit lungs (W. Seeger, H. Walter, N. Suttorp, M. Muhly, and S. Bhakdi, J. Clin. Invest. 84:220-227, 1989). The recirculating buffer medium and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from lungs exposed to hemolysin (2.5 hemolytic units per ml) in the presence of cyclooxygenase inhibitor were analyzed for leukotrienes (LTs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) by reverse-phase and straight-phase high-pressure liquid chromatographic techniques combined with UV spectrum analysis and post-high-pressure liquid chromatography radioimmunoassay. A rapid release of large amounts of cysteinyl-LTs and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) into the intravascular space was noted (total sum, approximately 4 to 5 micrograms). Similar quantities have hitherto been elicited only by high concentrations of the artificial calcium ionophore A 23187. Moreover, a marked liberation of 5-HETE and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid into the buffer medium occurred, whereas LTB4 represented the predominant compound in the lavage fluid. The hemolysin-induced burst of LT and HETE generation preceded the onset of vascular leakage. The outstanding capacity of E. coli hemolysin to produce the liberation of potent lipid mediators is probably relevant to the pathways of vascular injury and amplification of inflammatory events during severe infection with hemolytic E. coli strains. PMID:2115026

  11. Sclareol protects Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung cell injury via inhibiting alpha-hemolysin expression.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ping; Sun, Mao; He, Xuewen; Wang, Kaiyu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Fu, Hualin; Li, Yinglun; Geng, Yi; Shu, Gang; He, Changliang; Liang, Xiaoxia; Lai, Weiming; Li, Lixia; Zou, Yuanfeng; Song, Xu; Yin, Lizi

    2016-09-23

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common Gram-positive bacterium that causes serious infections in human and animals. With the continuous emergence of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, antibiotics have limited efficacy in treating MRSA infections. Accordingly, novel agents that act on new targets are desperately needed to combat these infections. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin plays an indispensable role in its pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrate that sclareol, a fragrant chemical compound found in clary sage, can prominently decrease alpha-hemolysin secretion in S. aureus strain USA300 at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Hemolysis assays, western-blotting and RT-PCR were used to detect the production of alpha-hemolysin in the culture supernatant. When USA300 was co-cultured with and A549 epithelial cells, sclareol could protect A549 cells at a final concentration of 8 µg/ml. The protective capability of sclareol against the USA300-mediated injury of A549 cells was further shown by cytotoxicity assays and live/dead analysis. In conclusion, sclareol was shown to inhibit the production of S. aureus alpha-hemolysin. Sclareol has potential for development as a new agent to treat S. aureus infections.

  12. Prophylactic strategies for acute hemolysis secondary to plasma-incompatible platelet transfusions: correlation between qualitative hemolysin test and isohemagglutinin titration

    PubMed Central

    Landim, Cinthia Silvestre; Gomes, Francisco Carlos Almeida; Zeza, Bernardete Martin; Mendrone-Júnior, Alfredo; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brazilian legislation has recently suggested the use of the qualitative hemolysin test instead of isohemagglutinin titers as prophylaxis for acute hemolysis related to plasma-incompatible platelet transfusions. The efficacy of this test in preventing hemolytic reactions has never been evaluated while isohemagglutinin titers have been extensively studied. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the results of these two tests. The impact of each type of prophylaxis on the platelet inventory management and the ability of the qualitative hemolysin test to prevent red cell sensitization after the transfusion of incompatible units were also studied. Methods A total of 246 donor blood samples were evaluated using both isohemagglutinin titers and the qualitative hemolysin test, and the results were statistically compared. Subsequently, 600 platelet units were tested using the hemolysin assay and the percentage of units unsuitable for transfusion was compared to historical data using isohemagglutinin titers (cut-off: 100). Moreover, ten patients who received units with minor ABO incompatibilities that were negative for hemolysis according to the qualitative hemolysin test were evaluated regarding the development of hemolysis and red cell sensitization (anti-A or anti-B). Results Isohemagglutinin titration and the results of qualitative hemolysin test did not correlate. The routine implementation of the qualitative hemolysin test significantly increased the percentage of platelet units found unsuitable for transfusions (15–65%; p-value <0.001). Furthermore the qualitative hemolysin test did not prevent red blood cell sensitization in a small exploratory analysis. Conclusion Qualitative hemolysin test results do not correlate to those of isohemagglutinin titers and its implementation as the prophylaxis of choice for hemolysis associated with plasma-incompatible platelet transfusions lacks clinical support of safety and

  13. Secretion of Alpha-Hemolysin by Escherichia coli Disrupts Tight Junctions in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten; Charbon, Godefroid; Karczewski, Jurgen; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to damage the integrity of the intestinal epithelium was investigated. Methods: E. coli strains isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were tested for virulence capacity by molecular techniques and cytotoxic assays and transepithelial electric resistance (TER). E. coli isolate p19A was selected, and deletion mutants were created for alpha-hemolysin (α-hemolysin) (hly) clusters and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (cnf1). Probiotic E. coli Nissle and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. Results: E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (P<0.001). Conclusions: UC-associated E. coli producing α-hemolysin can cause rapid loss of tight junction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished in a mutant unable to express α-hemolysin. These results suggest that high Hly expression may be a mechanism by which specific strains of E. coli pathobionts can contribute to epithelial barrier dysfunction and pathophysiology of disease in IBD. PMID:26938480

  14. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Thymol Reduce Enterotoxins A and B and α-Hemolysin Production in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hua; Feng, Haihua; Jiang, Youshuai; Xia, Lijie; Dong, Jing; Lu, Jing; Yu, Lu; Deng, Xuming

    2010-01-01

    Background Targeting bacterial virulence factors is now gaining interest as an alternative strategy to develop new types of anti-infective agents. It has been shown that thymol, when used at low concentrations, can inhibit the TSST-1 secretion in Staphylococcus aureus. However, there are no data on the effect of thymol on the production of other exotoxins (e.g., α-hemolysin and enterotoxins) by S. aureus. Methodology/Principal Findings Secretion of α-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates cultured with graded subinhibitory concentrations of thymol was detected by immunoblot analysis. Hemolysin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in α-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion induced by thymol. In addition, the influence of thymol on the transcription of hla, sea, and seb (the genes encoding α-hemolysin, SEA and SEB, respectively) was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Thymol inhibited transcription of hla, sea and seb in S. aureus, resulting in a reduction of α-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion and, thus, a reduction in hemolytic and TNF-inducing activities. Conclusions/Significance Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol decreased the production of α-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both MSSA and MRSA in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that thymol may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with β-lactams and glycopeptide antibiotics, which induce expression of α-hemolysin and enterotoxins at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, the structure of thymol may potentially be used as a basic structure for development of drugs aimed against these bacterial virulence factors. PMID:20305813

  15. Cloning, expression, and mapping of the Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin determinant in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, M; Duncan, J; Foster, T; Fairweather, N; Dougan, G

    1983-01-01

    A fragment of Staphylococcus aureus DNA encoding the alpha-hemolysin determinant was cloned from strain Wood 46 by inserting Sau3A-generated genomic DNA fragments between the BamHI sites of the lambda replacement vector L47.1. Phages expressing alpha-hemolysin were detected by overlaying plaques formed from several thousand independent recombinant phage with erythrocytes and looking for zones of hemolysis. One phage expressing alpha-hemolysin was purified and named lambda w alpha 3. This was subsequently shown to contain a 10.2-kilobase pair insert of S. aureus DNA. A 7.6-kilobase pair HindIII fragment encoding the alpha-hemolysin was subcloned from lambda w alpha 3 into the plasmid vector pACYC184 to form the hybrid plasmid pDU1148. Escherichia coli K-12 cells harboring pDU1148 synthesized a low level of alpha-hemolysin which remained associated with the cells and was not secreted into culture supernatants. When the same strain was stabbed onto blood agar plates, no zones of hemolysis were detected after overnight growth at 37 degrees C but hemolysis developed if the plates were left at room temperature for 48 h. By introducing specific deletions or Tn5 insertions into plasmid pDU1148, the alpha-hemolysin gene was mapped to a region within a 3.3-kilobase pair EcoRI-HindIII fragment which was subcloned onto the vector plasmid pBR322. A specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with peroxidase-labeled rabbit anti-alpha-hemolysin antibodies was used to measure the levels of alpha-hemolysin antigen expressed in E. coli K-12 cells harboring pDU1148 or a variety of pDU1148::Tn5 and pDU1148 deletion mutants. PMID:6350179

  16. Soft-agar-coated filter method for early detection of viable and thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)- or TDH-related hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Sachiko; Okura, Masatoshi; Osawa, Ro

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for detecting viable and thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-producing or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood was developed. The method involved (i) enrichment culture, selective for viable, motile cells penetrating a soft-agar-coated filter paper, and (ii) a multiplex PCR assay targeting both the TDH gene (tdh) and TRH gene (trh) following DNase pretreatment on the test culture to eradicate any incidental DNAs that might have been released from dead cells of tdh- or trh-positive (tdh+ trh+) strains and penetrated the agar-coated filter. A set of preliminary laboratory tests performed on 190 ml of enrichment culture that had been inoculated simultaneously with ca. 100 viable cells of a strain of tdh+ trh+ V. parahaemolyticus and dense populations of a viable strain of tdh- and trh-negative V. parahaemolyticus or Vibrio alginolyticus indicated that the method detected the presence of viable tdh+ trh+ strains. Another set of preliminary tests on 190 ml of enrichment culture that had been initially inoculated with a large number of dead cells of the tdh+ trh+ strain together with dense populations of the tdh- and trh-negative strains confirmed that the method did not yield any false-positive results. Subsequent quasi-field tests using various seafood samples (ca. 20 g), each of which was experimentally contaminated with either or both hemolysin-producing strains at an initial density of ca. 5 to 10 viable cells per gram, demonstrated that contamination could be detected within 2 working days.

  17. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed

    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  18. ADAM10 Mediates Vascular Injury Induced by Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Michael E.; Kim, Hwan Keun; Wang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia and sepsis. The interaction of S. aureus with the endothelium is central to bloodstream infection pathophysiology yet remains ill-understood. We show herein that staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin, is required for full virulence in a murine sepsis model. The α-hemolysin binding to its receptor A-disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) upregulates the receptor’s metalloprotease activity on endothelial cells, causing vascular endothelial–cadherin cleavage and concomitant loss of endothelial barrier function. These cellular injuries and sepsis severity can be mitigated by ADAM10 inhibition. This study therefore provides mechanistic insight into toxin-mediated endothelial injury and suggests new therapeutic approaches for staphylococcal sepsis. PMID:22474035

  19. Inhibitory effect of totarol on exotoxin proteins hemolysin and enterotoxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Meng, Rizeng; Liu, Zonghui; Liu, Mingyuan; Guo, Na; Yu, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a wide variety of infections, which are of major concern worldwide. S. aureus produces multiple virulence factors, resulting in food infection and poisoning. These virulence factors include hyaluronidases, proteases, coagulases, lipases, deoxyribonucleases and enterotoxins. Among the extracellular proteins produced by S. aureus that contribute to pathogenicity, the exotoxins α-hemolysin, staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are thought to be of major significance. Totarol, a plant extract, has been revealed to inhibit the proliferation of several pathogens effectively. However, there are no reports on the effects of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin, SEA or SEB secreted by S. aureus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of totarol on these three exotoxins. Hemolysis assay, western blotting and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay were performed to identify the influence of graded subinhibitory concentrations of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin and the two major enterotoxins, SEA and SEB, by S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the TNF-α production of RAW264.7 cells stimulated by S. aureus supernatants was inhibited by subinhibitory concentrations of totarol. Form the data, we propose that totarol could potentially be used as a promising natural compound in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  20. Ionic current blockades from DNA and RNA molecules in the alpha-hemolysin nanopore.

    PubMed

    Butler, Tom Z; Gundlach, Jens H; Troll, Mark

    2007-11-01

    We characterize the substate structure of current blockades produced when single-stranded polynucleotide molecules were electrophoretically driven into the alpha-hemolysin protein pore. We frequently observe substates where the ionic current is reduced by approximately 50%. Most of these substates can be associated with a molecular configuration where a polymer occupies only the vestibule region of the pore, though a few appear related to a polymer occupying only the transmembrane beta-barrel region of the pore. The duration of the vestibule configuration depends on polymer composition and on which end of the polymer, 3' or 5', subsequently threads into the narrowest constriction and initiates translocation. Below approximately 140 mV a polymer is more likely to escape from the vestibule against the applied voltage gradient, while at higher voltages a polymer is more likely to follow the voltage gradient by threading through the narrowest constriction and translocating through the pore. Increasing the applied voltage also increases the duration of the vestibule configuration. A semiquantitative model of these trends suggests that escape has stronger voltage dependence than threading, and that threading is sensitive to polymer orientation while escape is not. These results emphasize the utility of alpha-hemolysin as a model system to study biologically relevant physical and chemical processes at the single-molecule level.

  1. [Cloning and expression of a hemolysin gene of Aeromonas hydrophila and the immunogenicity of the toxoid].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuijuan; Yu, Zhouliang; Tian, Liying; Zhao, Baohua

    2009-02-01

    According to the GenBank sequences (GenBank Accession No. AF539467), one pair of primers was designed to amplify hly gene of Aeromonas hydrophila by PCR. After sequencing, homology analysis indicated that a DNA fragment of 1485 bp was amplified from isolated DNA from Aeromonas hydrophila, and it shared more than 99% homology in nucleotide sequence compared with other reference strains in GenBank. The gene was cloned in pET-28a vector to construct a recombinant plasmid pET-28a-hly, which was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the recombinant strain BL21(DE3)(pET-28a-hly) was obtained. The hemolysin was highly expressed when the recombinant strain BL21 (DE3) (pET-28a-hly) was induced by IPTG. The expressed protein was 56 kD as estimated by 15% SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The immunogenicity of the expressed Hly protein was confirmed by Western blotting. Mice were immunized with inactivated whole bacteria vaccine and the genetic engineering vaccines showing promise that all these vaccines have a high protective ability. The results showed that the recombinant strain BL21 (DE3)(pET-28a-hly) could be candidate of hemolysin toxoid vaccine to provide protective immunity against diseases caused by Aeromonas hydrophila.

  2. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A D; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-03-30

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin's activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types.

  3. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A.D.; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin’s activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types. PMID:27043625

  4. Demonstration and characterization of simultaneous production of a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH/I) and a TDH-related hemolysin (TRHx) by a clinically isolated Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain, TH3766.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Iida, T; Yamamoto, K; Takarada, Y; Miwatani, T; Honda, T

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous production of a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-like toxin (TDHx) and a TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-like toxin (TRHx) by a clinical isolate (strain TH3766) of Kanagawa phenomenon-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus was demonstrated and characterized. The two hemolysins were differentially purified by column chromatography on hydroxyapatite and immunoaffinity columns. The molecular weight of the two hemolysins were estimated to be 23,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The purified TDHx was indistinguishable from the previously reported TDH/I (from strain TH012) but was different from the authentic TDH of a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strain (T4750) physicochemically. The mobility of TRHx in nondenaturing PAGE differed from all the known TDHs and TRHs. The genes (tdhX and trhX) coding for TDHx and TRHx were cloned and sequenced. Homologies of nucleotide sequences of the coding regions between tdhX and tdhA (a gene for the authentic TDH) and between trhX and trh (a gene for the authentic TRH) were 98.1 and 99.1%, respectively, and homology between tdhX and trhX was 68.1%. At the amino acid level, TdhX was completely identical to TDH/I, although two base differences were found in the nucleotide sequences between tdhX and tdh/I. Two amino acid differences were observed between TrhX and Trh. Thus, these findings suggest that the TH3766 strain produces two types of hemolysins simultaneously. This is the first evidence that a strain of V. parahaemolyticus produces two types of toxins of the TDH-TRH family at the same time.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus hijacks a skin commensal to intensify its virulence: immunization targeting β-hemolysin and CAMP factor.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chih-Wei; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2011-02-01

    The need for a new anti-Staphylococcus aureus therapy that can effectively cripple bacterial infection, neutralize secretory virulence factors, and lower the risk of creating bacterial resistance is undisputed. Here, we propose what is, to our knowledge, a previously unreported infectious mechanism by which S. aureus may commandeer Propionibacterium acnes, a key member of the human skin microbiome, to spread its invasion and highlight two secretory virulence factors (S. aureus β-hemolysin and P. acnes CAMP (Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson) factor) as potential molecular targets for immunotherapy against S. aureus infection. Our data demonstrate that the hemolysis and cytolysis by S. aureus were noticeably augmented when S. aureus was grown with P. acnes. The augmentation was significantly abrogated when the P. acnes CAMP factor was neutralized or β-hemolysin of S. aureus was mutated. In addition, the hemolysis and cytolysis of recombinant β-hemolysin were markedly enhanced by recombinant CAMP factor. Furthermore, P. acnes exacerbated S. aureus-induced skin lesions in vivo. The combination of CAMP factor neutralization and β-hemolysin immunization cooperatively suppressed the skin lesions caused by coinfection of P. acnes and S. aureus. These observations suggest a previously unreported immunotherapy targeting the interaction of S. aureus with a skin commensal.

  6. Hemolysin-producing Listeria monocytogenes affects the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hage-Chahine, C M; Del Giudice, G; Lambert, P H; Pechere, J C

    1992-01-01

    A murine experimental infection with a hemolysin-producing (Hly+) strain of Listeria monocytogenes and a non-hemolysin-producing (Hly-) mutant was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the role of hemolysin production in the immune response. No antilisterial antibodies were detectable following sublethal infection with Hly+ bacteria, but consistent antilisterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody production was observed following sublethal infection with the Hly- mutant. Hly+ but not Hly- L. monocytogenes induced transient inhibition of antibody response to Hly- bacteria and to unrelated T-cell-dependent (tetanus toxoid) and T-cell-independent (pneumococcal polysaccharide 3) antigens. Transient inhibition of the activation of an antigen-specific T-cell clone was also observed following Hly+ infection of antigen-presenting cells but not following Hly- infection. These results suggest that hemolysin production by L. monocytogenes is an important factor in modulating the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens in infected individuals. Images PMID:1548067

  7. Impact of brief exposure to antifungal agents on the post-antifungal effect and hemolysin activity of oral Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    ELLEPOLA, Arjuna Nishantha; KHAJAH, Rana; JAYATILAKE, Sumedha; SAMARANAYAKE, Lakshman; SHARMA, Prem; KHAN, Zia

    2015-01-01

    Post-antifungal effect (PAFE) of Candida and its production of hemolysin are determinants of candidal pathogenicity. Candida albicans is the foremost aetiological agent of oral candidosis, which can be treated with polyene, azole, and echinocandin antifungals. However, once administered, the intraoral concentrations of these drugs tend to be subtherapeutic and transient due to the diluent effect of saliva and cleansing effect of the oral musculature. Hence, intra-orally, Candida may undergo a brief exposure to antifungal drugs. Objective Therefore, the PAFE and hemolysin production of oral C. albicans isolates following brief exposure to sublethal concentrations of the foregoing antifungals were evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 50 C. albicans oral isolates obtained from smokers, diabetics, asthmatics using steroid inhalers, partial denture wearers and healthy individuals were exposed to sublethal concentrations of nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin, ketoconazole and fluconazole for 60 min. Thereafter, the drugs were removed and the PAFE and hemolysin production were determined by previously described turbidometric and plate assays, respectively. Results Nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin and ketoconazole induced mean PAFE (hours) of 2.2, 2.18, 2.2 and 0.62, respectively. Fluconazole failed to produce a PAFE. Hemolysin production of these isolates was suppressed with a percentage reduction of 12.27, 13.47, 13.33, 8.53 and 4.93 following exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin, ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. Conclusions Brief exposure to sublethal concentrations of antifungal drugs appears to exert an antifungal effect by interfering with the growth as well as hemolysin production of C. albicans. PMID:26398514

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: homology to the alpha-hemolysin/leukotoxin gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, E; Dailey, T; Kolodrubetz, D

    1990-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of localized juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis into the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned its gene, lktA. We now present the complete nucleotide sequence of the lktA gene from A. actinomycetemcomitans. When the deduced amino acid sequence of the leukotoxin protein was compared with those of other proteins, it was found to be homologous to the leukotoxin from Pasteurella haemolytica and to the alpha-hemolysins from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Each alignment showed at least 42% identity. As in the other organisms, the lktA gene of A. actinomycetemcomitans was linked to another gene, lktC, which is thought to be involved in the activation of the leukotoxin. The predicted LktC protein was related to the leukotoxin/hemolysin C proteins from the other bacteria, since they shared a minimum of 49% amino acid identity. Surprisingly, although actinobacillus species are more closely related to pasteurellae than to members of the family Enterobacteriaciae, LktA and LktC from A. actinomycetemcomitans shared significantly greater sequence identity with the E. coli alpha-hemolysin proteins than with the P. haemolytica leukotoxin proteins. Despite the overall homology to the other leukotoxin/hemolysin proteins, the LktA protein from A. actinomycetemcomitans has several unique properties. Most strikingly, it is a very basic protein with a calculated pI of 9.7; the other toxins have estimated pIs around 6.2. The unusual features of the A. actinomycetemcomitans protein are discussed in light of the different species and target-cell specificities of the hemolysins and the leukotoxins. Images PMID:2318535

  9. Itraconazole-resistant Candida auris with phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity from a case of vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-15

    Since the emergence of pathogenic non-albicans Candida species, a number of new isolates have been added to the list. One such unusual species is Candida auris (C. auris), recently isolated and studied in few reports. In this study, a case of vulvovaginitis caused by Candida auris incidentally identified by molecular methods using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS PCR) is described. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the isolate to be resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 2 µg/ml) and expressed important virulence factors including phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity. The patient was successfully treated with oral fluconazole and did not have any invasive fungemia. Very few cases of this emerging pathogen have been reported. However, its isolation from clinical specimens reveals the significance of non-albicans candida species over C. albicans and the diversity of Candida spp causing infections.

  10. The RTX pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Travis J; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Members of the RTX family of protein toxins are functionally conserved among an assortment of bacterial pathogens. By disrupting host cell integrity through their pore-forming and cytolytic activities, this class of toxins allows pathogens to effectively tamper with normal host cell processes, promoting pathogenesis. Here, we focus on the biology of RTX toxins by describing salient properties of a prototype member, α-hemolysin, which is often encoded by strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. It has long been appreciated that RTX toxins can have distinct effects on host cells aside from outright lysis. Recently, advances in modeling and analysis of host-pathogen interactions have led to novel findings concerning the consequences of pore formation during host-pathogen interactions. We discuss current progress on longstanding questions concerning cell specificity and pore formation, new areas of investigation that involve toxin-mediated perturbations of host cell signaling cascades and perspectives on the future of RTX toxin investigation.

  11. Colony immunoblot assay for the detection of hemolysin BL enterotoxin producing Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Moravek, Maximilian; Wegscheider, Monika; Schulz, Anja; Dietrich, Richard; Bürk, Christine; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2004-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strains involved in food poisoning cases of the diarrheal type may produce two different enterotoxin complexes. To facilitate the identification of hemolysin BL-enterotoxin complex (HBL) and/or the nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE) producing colonies a colony immunoblot procedure was developed, which allows a fast and easy identification of the respective colonies from blood agar plates. The enterotoxins were transferred from the blood agar medium to a nitrocellulose membrane and the immobilized toxins were probed with monoclonal antibodies. The antibodies 2A3 and 1A8 allowed the specific detection of the B component of HBL and the nheA component of NHE. The assay enabled the reliable identification of HBL expressing colonies and differentiation from NHE producing but HBL negative colonies.

  12. Controlling the translocation of single-stranded DNA through alpha-hemolysin ion channels using viscosity.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Ryuji; Schibel, Anna E P; Cauley, Christopher; White, Henry S

    2009-01-20

    Translocation of single-stranded DNA through alpha-hemolysin (alpha-HL) channels is investigated in glycerol/water mixtures containing 1 M KCl. Experiments using glass nanopore membranes as the lipid bilayer support demonstrate that the translocation velocities of poly(deoxyadenylic acid), poly(deoxycytidylic acid), and poly(deoxythymidylic acid) 50-mers are decreased by a factor of approximately 20 in a 63/37 (vol %) glycerol/water mixture, relative to aqueous solutions. The ion conductance of alpha-HL and the entry rate of the polynucleotides into the protein channel also decrease with increasing viscosity. Precise control of translocation parameters by adjusting viscosity provides a potential means to improve sequencing methods based on ion channel recordings.

  13. Size-dependent forced PEG partitioning into channels: VDAC, OmpC, and α-hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Aksoyoglu, M. Alphan; Podgornik, Rudolf; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Gurnev, Philip A.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Nonideal polymer mixtures of PEGs of different molecular weights partition differently into nanosize protein channels. Here, we assess the validity of the recently proposed theoretical approach of forced partitioning for three structurally different β-barrel channels: voltage-dependent anion channel from outer mitochondrial membrane VDAC, bacterial porin OmpC (outer membrane protein C), and bacterial channel-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Our interpretation is based on the idea that relatively less-penetrating polymers push the more easily penetrating ones into nanosize channels in excess of their bath concentration. Comparison of the theory with experiments is excellent for VDAC. Polymer partitioning data for the other two channels are consistent with theory if additional assumptions regarding the energy penalty of pore penetration are included. The obtained results demonstrate that the general concept of “polymers pushing polymers” is helpful in understanding and quantification of concrete examples of size-dependent forced partitioning of polymers into protein nanopores. PMID:27466408

  14. Multi-isotype antibody responses against the multimeric Salmonella Typhi recombinant hemolysin E antigen.

    PubMed

    Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ignatius, Joshua; Anthony, Amy Amilda; Aziah, Ismail; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-01-01

    The detection and measurement of different antibody isotypes in the serum provide valuable indicators of the different stages of typhoid infection. Here, the ability of S. Typhi recombinant hemolysin E (HlyE) to detect multi-isotype antibody responses in sera of patients with typhoid and paratyphoid A was investigated using an indirect antibody immunoassay. Nanogram amounts of HlyE were found to be sufficient for detection of IgG and IgA isotypes and, in a study of individuals' sera (n = 100), the immunoassay was able to distinguish between typhoid and non-typhoid sera. The overall sensitivity, specificity and efficiency of the ELISA were 70% (39/56), 100% (44/44) and 83% respectively.

  15. Size-dependent forced PEG partitioning into channels: VDAC, OmpC, and α-hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Aksoyoglu, M Alphan; Podgornik, Rudolf; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Gurnev, Philip A; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2016-08-09

    Nonideal polymer mixtures of PEGs of different molecular weights partition differently into nanosize protein channels. Here, we assess the validity of the recently proposed theoretical approach of forced partitioning for three structurally different β-barrel channels: voltage-dependent anion channel from outer mitochondrial membrane VDAC, bacterial porin OmpC (outer membrane protein C), and bacterial channel-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Our interpretation is based on the idea that relatively less-penetrating polymers push the more easily penetrating ones into nanosize channels in excess of their bath concentration. Comparison of the theory with experiments is excellent for VDAC. Polymer partitioning data for the other two channels are consistent with theory if additional assumptions regarding the energy penalty of pore penetration are included. The obtained results demonstrate that the general concept of "polymers pushing polymers" is helpful in understanding and quantification of concrete examples of size-dependent forced partitioning of polymers into protein nanopores.

  16. Isorhamnetin Attenuates Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Lung Cell Injury by Inhibiting Alpha-Hemolysin Expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lanxiang; Li, Hongen; Wang, Laiying; Song, Zexin; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenhua; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, like other gram-positive pathogens, has evolved a large repertoire of virulence factors as a powerful weapon to subvert the host immune system, among which alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a secreted pore-forming cytotoxin, plays a preeminent role. We observed a concentration-dependent reduction in Hla production by S. aureus in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of isorhamnetin, a flavonoid from the fruits of Hippophae rhamnoides L., which has little antibacterial activity. We further evaluate the effect of isorhamnetin on the transcription of the Hla-encoding gene hla and RNAIII, an effector molecule in the agr system. Isorhamnetin significantly down-regulated RNAIII expression and subsequently inhibited hla transcription. In a co-culture of S. aureus and lung cells, topical isorhamnetin treatment protected against S. aureus-induced cell injury. Isorhamnetin may represent a leading compound for the development of anti-virulence drugs against S. aureus infections.

  17. Structure and Function of Thermostable Direct Hemolysin (TDH) from Vibrio Parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Yamane, Tsutomu; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Nakahira, Kumiko; Yanagihara, Itaru

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is a major virulence factor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that causes pandemic food-borne enterocolitis mediated by seafood. TDH exists as a tetramer in solution, and it possesses extreme hemolytic activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TDH tetramer at 1.5 Å resolution. The TDH tetramer forms a central pore with dimensions of 23 Å in diameter and ∼50 Å in depth. π-cation interactions between protomers comprising the tetramer were indispensable for hemolytic activity of TDH. The N-terminal region was intrinsically disordered outside the pore. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggested that water molecules permeate freely through the central and side channel pores. These findings imply a novel membrane attachment mechanism by a soluble tetrameric pore-forming toxin.

  18. Structure of Functional Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin Channels in Tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Frank; Valincius, Gintaras; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Ignatjev, Ilja; Kasianowicz, John J.; Loesche, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate the functional reconstitution of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin channel in membranes tethered to gold. Electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements show that the pores have essentially the same properties as those formed in free-standing bilayer lipid membranes. Neutron reflectometry (NR) provides high-resolution structural information on the interaction between the channel and the disordered membrane, and validates predictions based on the channel x-ray crystal structure. NR also shows that the proximity of the solid interface does not affect the molecular architecture of the protein-membrane complex. The results suggest that this technique could be used to elucidate molecular details about the association of other proteins with membranes. It also may provide structural information on domain organization and stimuli-responsive reorganization for transmembrane proteins in membrane mimics.

  19. Cell-free synthesis of functional thermostable direct hemolysins of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Bechlars, Silke; Wüstenhagen, Doreen A; Drägert, Katja; Dieckmann, Ralf; Strauch, Eckhard; Kubick, Stefan

    2013-12-15

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a recognized enteropathogen causing diarrhea in humans and is one of the major causes of seafoodborne gastroenteritis. An important virulence factor is thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a pore-forming toxin, which is able to lyse eukaryotic cells. The active toxin is a tetramer of four identical protein subunits, which is secreted by the pathogen after cleavage of a signal peptide. To establish diagnostic detection systems for TDH we expressed the hemolysin with and without the signal peptide in a prokaryotic cell-free system to obtain pure toxin. In order to purify and to facilitate the isolation from cell lysates we synthesized TDH variants with different tags. Important regulatory sequences for cell-free protein synthesis as well as sequences for N-terminal Strep-tag and C-terminal 6xHis-tag were added by a two-step PCR. For the expression in the cell-free system these linear tdh templates were subjected directly to prokaryotic cell extracts. Protein yields were in the range of 500-600 μg/ml for the preproteins and approx. 300-400 μg/ml for the mature proteins. The identities of expressed proteins were further confirmed by SDS-PAGE, immunological and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analyses. The functionality of newly synthesized toxin variants was tested by performing qualitative and semiquantitative hemolysis assays. Cell-free produced mature TDH and its variants were active while the preprotein and its derivatives lacked hemolytic activity. A C-terminal 6xHis-tag showed less influence on functionality compared to the N-terminal Strep-tag.

  20. Hybrid MD-Nernst Planck Model of Alpha-hemolysin Conductance Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozmuta, Ioana; O'Keefer, James T.; Bose, Deepak; Stolc, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by experiments in which an applied electric field translocates polynucleotides through an alpha-hemolysin protein channel causing ionic current transient blockade, a hybrid simulation model is proposed to predict the conductance properties of the open channel. Time scales corresponding to ion permeation processes are reached using the Poisson-Nemst-Planck (PNP) electro-diffusion model in which both solvent and local ion concentrations are represented as a continuum. The diffusion coefficients of the ions (K(+) and Cl(-)) input in the PNP model are, however, calculated from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD). In the MD simulations, a reduced representation of the channel is used. The channel is solvated in a 1 M KCI solution, and an external electric field is applied. The pore specific diffusion coefficients for both ionic species are reduced 5-7 times in comparison to bulk values. Significant statistical variations (17-45%) of the pore-ions diffusivities are observed. Within the statistics, the ionic diffusivities remain invariable for a range of external applied voltages between 30 and 240mV. In the 2D-PNP calculations, the pore stem is approximated by a smooth cylinder of radius approx. 9A with two constriction blocks where the radius is reduced to approx. 6A. The electrostatic potential includes the contribution from the atomistic charges. The MD-PNP model shows that the atomic charges are responsible for the rectifying behaviour and for the slight anion selectivity of the a-hemolysin pore. Independent of the hierarchy between the anion and cation diffusivities, the anionic contribution to the total ionic current will dominate. The predictions of the MD-PNP model are in good agreement with experimental data and give confidence in the present approach of bridging time scales by combining a microscopic and macroscopic model.

  1. Orientation discrimination of single-stranded DNA inside the α-hemolysin membrane channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathé, Jérôme; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Nelson, David R.; Schulten, Klaus; Meller, Amit

    2005-08-01

    We characterize the voltage-driven motion and the free motion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules captured inside the ≈1.5-nm α-hemolysin pore, and show that the DNA-channel interactions depend strongly on the orientation of the ssDNA molecules with respect to the pore. Remarkably, the voltage-free diffusion of the 3‧-threaded DNA (in the trans to cis direction) is two times slower than the corresponding 5‧-threaded DNA having the same poly(dA) sequence. Moreover, the ion currents flowing through the blocked pore with either a 3‧-threaded DNA or 5‧ DNA differ by ≈30%. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of our system reveal a microscopic mechanism for the asymmetric behavior. In a confining pore, the ssDNA straightens and its bases tilt toward the 5‧ end, assuming an asymmetric conformation. As a result, the bases of a 5‧-threaded DNA experience larger effective friction and forced reorientation that favors co-passing of ions. Our results imply that the translocation process through a narrow pore is more complicated than previously believed and involves base tilting and stretching of ssDNA molecules inside the confining pore. Author contributions: K.S. and A.M. designed research; J.M., A.A., D.R.N., K.S., and A.M. performed research; J.M., A.A., and A.M. analyzed data; J.M., A.A., D.R.N., K.S., and A.M. wrote the paper; A.A. and K.S. performed molecular dynamics simulations; and D.R.N. performed calculations.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: α-HL, α-hemolysin MD, molecular dynamics; ssDNA, single-stranded DNA.

  2. Identification and partial characterization of a novel hemolysin from Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Kim, K A; Park, Y G; Seong, I W; Kim, M J; Lee, Y J

    2000-08-22

    It has been suggested that leptospiral hemolysins are important in the virulence and pathogenesis of leptospirosis. We have isolated an Escherichia coli clone carrying the 7.8kb DNA insert from a genomic library of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai by plaque hybridization using a sequence derived from the sphingomyelinase C gene (sphA) of L. borgpetersenii. The clone showed a clear beta-hemolytic zone on sheep blood agar and high hemolytic activities on both human and sheep erythrocytes in liquid assays. The clone carried at least two genes responsible for the hemolytic activities, encoded by two open reading frames of 1662 and 816 nucleotides, which are named sphH and hap-1 (hemolysis associated protein-1), respectively. The SphH showed 75% homology to the SphA at the amino acid level, and the Hap-1 showed no significant homology in major databases. Interestingly, however, E. coli cells harboring sphH did not show sphingomyelinase or phospholipase activities. Moreover, SphH-mediated hemolysis was osmotically protected by polyethylene glycol 5000, suggesting that the hemolysis is likely to be caused by pore formation on the membrane. The SphH was successfully expressed in E. coli as a histidine (His)-SphH fusion protein. Both sphH and hap-1 were highly conserved among the Leptospira species, except for the absence of sphH in non-pathogenic L. biflexa serovar patoc. We concluded that the SphH is a novel hemolysin of a pathogenic Leptospira species, which may be a putative pore-forming protein.

  3. Proteus virulence: involvement of the pore forming alpha-hemolysin (a short review).

    PubMed

    Tóth, V; Emódy, L

    2000-01-01

    The genus Proteus belongs to the tribe of Proteae in the family of Enterobacteriaceae, and consists of five species: P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris, P. morganii, P. penneri and P. myxofaciens. They are distinguished from the rest of Enterobacteriaceae by their ability to deaminate phenylalanine and tryptophane. They hydrolyze urea and gelatin and fail to ferment lactose, mannose, dulcitol and malonate; and do not form lysine and arginine decarboxylase or beta-galactosidase [1]. Colonies produce distinct "burned chocolate" odor and frequently show the characteristics of swarming motility on solid media. P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. morganii are widely recognized human pathogens. They have been isolated from urinary tract infections, wounds, ear, and nosocomial bacteremic infections, often in immuncompromised patients [2-6]. P. myxofaciens has no clinical interest to this time. P. penneri as species nova was nominated by the recommendation of Hickman and co-workers [7]. Formerly it was recognized as P. vulgaris biogroup 1 or indole negative P. vulgaris [8, 9]. Although it has been less commonly isolated from clinical samples than the other three human pathogenic Proteus species, it has nevertheless been connected with infections of the urinary tract, wounds and has been isolated from the feces of both healthy and diarrheic individuals [10-12]. Potential virulence factors responsible for virulence of Proteae are: IgA protease, urease, type3 fimbriae associated with MR/K haemagglutinins of at least two antigenic types, endotoxin, swarming motility and HlyA and/or HpmA type hemolysins [for review see ref. 13]. In the followings we give a survey of accumulated concepts about the position and characteristics of HlyA type alpha-hemolysins both in general and with emphasis on virulence functions in the tribe of Proteae.

  4. Hemolysin and K antigens in relation to serotype and hemagglutination type of Escherichia coli isolated from extraintestinal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G; Höhne, C; Noble, M A; Haldane, E V; Lior, H; Young, L S

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolated from cases of bacteremia and from a variety of urinary tract infections were characterized according to serotype (O:H antigenicity), K type (possession of K1, K2, K3, K12, or K13), hemagglutination (HA) type, and production of beta-hemolysin. Results obtained with the bacteremia and urinary tract infection isolates were similar except for more hemolytic isolated from urine than from blood (42 versus 29%) and more K1+ isolates from blood than from urine (50 versus 29%). A close correlation was found between Ha type VI (production of fimbriae which mediate mannose-resistant HA of human and African green monkey erythrocytes) and the production of hemolysin or K1 capsular antigen or both. Most (95 of 98, or 95%) of the HA type VI+ blood isolates and most (146 of 164, or 89%) of the HA type VI+ urine isolates produced hemolysin or K1 or both, in contrast to 22 and 26%, respectively, of those belonging to HA types other than HA type VI. Also, 76% of all hemolytic and 70% of all K1+ isolates belonged to HA type VI. Remarkably few of the HA type VI+ isolates (13%) and even fewer of the HA type VI- isolates (3%) produced both K1 and hemolysin; these belonged mainly to serotypes O16:H6, O18:H7 and O2:H4. Other major serogroups were usually K1+/hemolysin- (O1, O7) or K1-/hemolysin+ (O2, O4, O6). At least 74% (262 of 351) and possibly as many as 83% (293 of 351) of those isolates which produced mannose-resistant HA of human erythrocytes were classified as HA type VI+; 31 isolates produced mannose-resistant HA with all erythrocytes tested. Taking serogroup and serotype into consideration, we conclude that the E. coli fimbrial hemagglutinin(s) responsible for the HA type VI phenotype will prove to be the same as the virulence-associated mannose-resistant adhesins of uropathogenic E. coli which other investigators have characterized as unique fimbrial antigens detectable by mannose-resistant HA of human erythrocytes. PMID:7007421

  5. Antibody-Forming Cells and Serum Hemolysin Responses of Pastel and Sapphire Mink Inoculated with Aleutian Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lodmell, Donald L.; Bergman, R. Kaye; Hadlow, William J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) on serum hemolysin titers and antibody-forming cells in lymph nodes and spleens of sapphire and pastel mink inoculated with goat erythrocytes (G-RBC) was investigated. ADV injected 1 day after primary antigenic stimulation with G-RBC did not depress the immune responses of either color phase for a period of 26 days. However, when G-RBC were injected 47 days after ADV, both the number of antibody-forming cells and hemolysin titers were more markedly depressed in sapphire than in pastel mink. The results are discussed in relation to the greater susceptibility of sapphire mink and the variable susceptibility of pastel mink to the Pullman isolate of ADV. PMID:4584051

  6. Regulation of Hemolysin Expression and Virulence of Staphylococcus aureus by a Serine/Threonine Kinase and Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Lembo, Annalisa; de los Reyes, Melissa; Iliuk, Anton; BinhTran, Nguyen-Thao; Connelly, James E.; Lin, Wan-Jung; Schmidt, Byron Z.; Richardson, Anthony R.; Fang, Ferric C.; Tao, Weiguo Andy; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Exotoxins, including the hemolysins known as the alpha (α) and beta (β) toxins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A random transposon library was screened for S. aureus mutants exhibiting altered hemolysin expression compared to wild type. Transposon insertions in 72 genes resulting in increased or decreased hemolysin expression were identified. Mutations inactivating a putative cyclic di-GMP synthetase and a serine/threonine phosphatase (Stp1) were found to reduce hemolysin expression, and mutations in genes encoding a two component regulator PhoR, LysR family transcriptional regulator, purine biosynthetic enzymes and a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1) increased expression. Transcription of the hla gene encoding α toxin was decreased in a Δstp1 mutant strain and increased in a Δstk1 strain. Microarray analysis of a Δstk1 mutant revealed increased transcription of additional exotoxins. A Δstp1 strain is severely attenuated for virulence in mice and elicits less inflammation and IL-6 production than the Δstk1 strain. In vivo phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that threonine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to Stk1, DNA binding histone like protein (HU), serine-aspartate rich fibrinogen/bone sialoprotein binding protein (SdrE) and a hypothetical protein (NWMN_1123) were present in the wild type and not in the Δstk1 mutant. Collectively, these studies suggest that Stk1 mediated phosphorylation of HU, SrdE and NWMN_1123 affects S. aureus gene expression and virulence. PMID:20552019

  7. Detection of total and hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shellfish using multiplex PCR amplification of tl, tdh and trh.

    PubMed

    Bej, A K; Patterson, D P; Brasher, C W; Vickery, M C; Jones, D D; Kaysner, C A

    1999-06-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen which can cause gastroenteritis when consumed in raw or partially-cooked seafood. A multiplex PCR amplification-based detection of total and virulent strains of V. parahaemolyticus was developed by targeting thermolabile hemolysin encoded by tl, thermostable direct hemolysin encoded by tdh, and thermostable direct hemolysin-related trh genes. Following optimization using oligonucleotide primers targeting tl, tdh and trh genes, the multiplex PCR was applied to V. parahaemolyticus from 27 clinical, 43 seafood, 15 environmental, 7 strains obtained from various laboratories and 19 from oyster plants. All 111 V. parahaemolyticus isolates showed PCR amplification of the tl gene; however, only 60 isolates showed amplification of tdh, and 43 isolates showed amplification of the trh gene. Also, 18 strains showed amplification of the tdh gene, but these strains did not show amplification of the trh gene. However, one strain exhibited amplification for the trh but not the tdh gene, suggesting both genes need to be targeted in a PCR amplification reaction to detect all hemolysin-producing strains of this pathogen. The multiplex PCR approach was successfully used to detect various strains of V parahaemolyticus in seeded oyster tissue homogenate. Sensitivity of detection for all three target gene segments was at least between 10(1)-10(2) cfu per 10 g of alkaline peptone water enriched seeded oyster tissue homogenate. This high level of sensitivity of detection of this pathogen within 8 h of pre-enrichment is well within the action level (10(4) cfu per 1 g of shell stock) suggested by the National Seafood Sanitation Program guideline. Compared to conventional microbiological culture methods, this multiplex PCR approach is rapid and reliable for accomplishing a comprehensive detection of V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish.

  8. Cytotoxic activities of Leptospira interrogans hemolysin SphH as a pore-forming protein on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Sangduk; Park, Seung Chul; Kim, Min Ja

    2002-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a spirochetal zoonosis that causes an acute febrile systemic illness in humans. Leptospira sp. hemolysins have been shown to be virulence factors for the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. Previously, we cloned a hemolysin SphH of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai, a homologue of L. borgpetersenii sphingomyelinase (SphA), from a genomic library (S. H. Lee, K. A. Kim, Y. K. Kim, I. W. Seong, M. J. Kim, and Y. J. Lee, Gene 254:19-28, 2000). Escherichia coli lysate harboring the sphH showed high hemolytic activities on sheep erythrocytes. However, it neither showed sphingomyelinase nor phospholipase activities, in contrast to SphA which was known to have sphingomyelinase activity. Interestingly, the SphH-mediated hemolysis on erythrocytes was osmotically protected by PEG 5000, suggesting that the SphH might have caused pore formation on the erythrocyte membrane. In the present study, we have prepared the Leptospira hemolysin SphH and investigated its hemolytic and cytotoxic activities on mammalian cells. SphH was shown to be a pore-forming protein on several mammalian cells: When treated with the SphH, the sheep erythrocyte membranes formed pores, which were morphologically confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the SphH-mediated cytotoxicities on mammalian cells were demonstrated by the release of LDH and by inverted microscopic examinations. Finally, the immune serum against the full-length hemolysin could effectively neutralize the SphH-mediated hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that the virulence of Leptospira SphH was due to the pore formation on mammalian cell membranes.

  9. Hyperexpression of α-hemolysin explains enhanced virulence of sequence type 93 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) ST93 clone is becoming dominant in Australia and is clinically highly virulent. In addition, sepsis and skin infection models demonstrate that ST93 CA-MRSA is the most virulent global clone of S. aureus tested to date. While the determinants of virulence have been studied in other clones of CA-MRSA, the basis for hypervirulence in ST93 CA-MRSA has not been defined. Results Here, using a geographically and temporally dispersed collection of ST93 isolates we demonstrate that the ST93 population hyperexpresses key CA-MRSA exotoxins, in particular α-hemolysin, in comparison to other global clones. Gene deletion and complementation studies, and virulence comparisons in a murine skin infection model, showed unequivocally that increased expression of α-hemolysin is the key staphylococcal virulence determinant for this clone. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics of strains with divergent exotoxin profiles demonstrated that, like other S. aureus clones, the quorum sensing agr system is the master regulator of toxin expression and virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA. However, we also identified a previously uncharacterized AraC/XylS family regulator (AryK) that potentiates toxin expression and virulence in S. aureus. Conclusions These data demonstrate that hyperexpression of α-hemolysin mediates enhanced virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA, and additional control of exotoxin production, in particular α-hemolysin, mediated by regulatory systems other than agr have the potential to fine-tune virulence in CA-MRSA. PMID:24512075

  10. Single-molecule study of thymidine glycol and i-motif through the alpha-hemolysin ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lidong

    Nanopore-based devices have emerged as a single-molecule detection and analysis tool for a wide range of applications. Through electrophoretically driving DNA molecules across a nanosized pore, a lot of information can be received, including unfolding kinetics and DNA-protein interactions. This single-molecule method has the potential to sequence kilobase length DNA polymers without amplification or labeling, approaching "the third generation" genome sequencing for around $1000 within 24 hours. alpha-Hemolysin biological nanopores have the advantages of excellent stability, low-noise level, and precise site-directed mutagenesis for engineering this protein nanopore. The first work presented in this thesis established the current signal of the thymidine glycol lesion in DNA oligomers through an immobilization experiment. The thymidine glycol enantiomers were differentiated from each other by different current blockage levels. Also, the effect of bulky hydrophobic adducts to the current blockage was investigated. Secondly, the alpha-hemolysin nanopore was used to study the human telomere i-motif and RET oncogene i-motif at a single-molecule level. In Chapter 3, it was demonstrated that the alpha-hemolysin nanopore can differentiate an i-motif form and single-strand DNA form at different pH values based on the same sequence. In addition, it shows potential to differentiate the folding topologies generated from the same DNA sequence.

  11. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Salles, Hévila Oliveira; Braga, Ana Carolina Linhares; Nascimento, Maria Thayana dos Santos Canuto do; Sousa, Ana Márjory Paiva; Lima, Adriano Rodrigues; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Cavalcante, Antônio Cézar Rocha; Egito, Antonio Silvio do; Andrade, Lúcia Betânia da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (<12 kDa) for Albizia lebbeck, Ipomoea asarifolia, Jatropha curcas, Libidibia ferrea, Moringa oleifera and Ricinus communis (P<0.05, Bonferroni test). The two fractions of Crotalaria spectabilis showed the same ovicidal activity (P>0.05, Bonferroni test). Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties.

  12. Membrane-Pore Forming Characteristics of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin Domain.

    PubMed

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-04-30

    Previously, the 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA pore-forming/hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was shown to retain its hemolytic activity causing lysis of susceptible erythrocytes. Here, we have succeeded in producing, at large quantity and high purity, the His-tagged CyaA-Hly domain over-expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble hemolytically-active form. Quantitative assays of hemolysis against sheep erythrocytes revealed that the purified CyaA-Hly domain could function cooperatively by forming an oligomeric pore in the target cell membrane with a Hill coefficient of ~3. When the CyaA-Hly toxin was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) under symmetrical conditions at 1.0 M KCl, 10 mM HEPES buffer (pH 7.4), it produced a clearly resolved single channel with a maximum conductance of ~35 pS. PLB results also revealed that the CyaA-Hly induced channel was unidirectional and opened more frequently at higher negative membrane potentials. Altogether, our results first provide more insights into pore-forming characteristics of the CyaA-Hly domain as being the major pore-forming determinant of which the ability to induce such ion channels in receptor-free membranes could account for its cooperative hemolytic action on the target erythrocytes.

  13. Translocation of single stranded DNA through the α-hemolysin protein nanopore in acidic solutions

    PubMed Central

    de Zoysa, Ranulu Samanthi S.; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Zhao, Qitao; Gupta, Jyoti; Guan, Xiyun

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acidic pH on the translocation of single-stranded DNA through the α-hemolysin pore is investigated. Two significantly different types of events, i.e., deep blockades and shallow blockades, are observed at low pH. The residence times of the shallow blockades are not significantly different from those of the DNA translocation events obtained at or near physiological pH, while the deep blockades have much larger residence times and blockage amplitudes. With a decrease in the pH of the electrolyte solution, the percentage of the deep blockades in the total events increases. Furthermore, the mean residence time of these long-lived events is dependent on the length of DNA, and also varies with the nucleotide base, suggesting that they are appropriate for use in DNA analysis. In addition to be used as an effective approach to affect DNA translocation in the nanopore, manipulation of the pH of the electrolyte solution provides a potential means to greatly enhance the sensitivity of nanopore stochastic sensing. PMID:21997574

  14. Pore formation of thermostable direct hemolysin secreted from Vibrio parahaemolyticus in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira; Yamamoto, Chiyo; Kodama, Toshio; Yamashita, Kanami; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakano, Masayuki; Honda, Takeshi; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus secretes thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a major virulence factor. Earlier studies report that TDH is a pore-forming toxin. However, the characteristics of pores formed by TDH in the lipid bilayer, which is permeable to small ions, remain to be elucidated. Ion channel-like activities were observed in lipid bilayers containing TDH. Three types of conductance were identified. All the channels displayed relatively low ion selectivity, and similar ion permeability. The Cl- channel inhibitors, DIDS, glybenclamide, and NPPB, did not affect the channel activity of pores formed by TDH. R7, a mutant toxin of TDH, also forms pores with channel-like activity in lipid bilayers. The ion permeability of these channels is similar to that of TDH. R7 binds cultured cells and liposomes to a lower extent, compared to TDH. R7 does not display significant hemolytic activity and cell cytotoxicity, possibly owing to the difficulty of insertion into lipid membranes. Once R7 is assembled within lipid membranes, it may assume the same structure as TDH. The authors propose that the single glycine at position 62, substituted with serine in the R7 mutant toxin, plays an important role in TDH insertion into the lipid bilayer.

  15. Potential antitumor therapeutic application of Grimontia hollisae thermostable direct hemolysin mutants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Cih; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Wan-Ting; Kuo, Tsam-Ming; Yip, Bak-Sau; Li, Tien-Hsiung Thomas; Wu, Tung-Kung

    2015-04-01

    We report on the preparation of a new type of immunotoxin by conjugation of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-binding peptide and an R46E mutation of thermostable direct hemolysin from Grimontia hollisae, (Gh-TDH(R) (46E) /EB). The hybrid immunotoxin was purified to homogeneity and showed a single band with slight slower mobility than that of Gh-TDH(R) (46E) . Cytotoxicity assay of Gh-TDH(R) (46E) /EB on EGFR highly, moderately, low, and non-expressed cells, A431, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and HEK293 cells, respectively, showed apparent cytotoxicity on A431 and MDA-MB-231 cells but not on HeLa or HEK293 cells. In contrast, no cytotoxicity was observed for these cells treated with either Gh-TDH(R) (46E) or EB alone, indicating enhanced cytotoxic efficacy of Gh-TDH(R) (46E) by the EGFR binding moiety. Further antitumor activity assay of Gh-TDH(R) (46E) /EB in a xenograft model of athymic nude mice showed obvious shrinkage of tumor size and degeneration, necrosis, and lesions of tumor tissues compared to the normal tissues. Therefore, the combination of Gh-TDH(R) (46E) with target affinity agents opens new possibilities for pharmacological treatment of cancers and potentiates the anticancer drug's effect.

  16. Driven diffusion against electrostatic or effective energy barrier across α-hemolysin

    SciTech Connect

    Ansalone, Patrizio; Chinappi, Mauro; Rondoni, Lamberto; Cecconi, Fabio

    2015-10-21

    We analyze the translocation of a charged particle across an α-Hemolysin (αHL) pore in the framework of a driven diffusion over an extended energy barrier generated by the electrical charges of the αHL. A one-dimensional electrostatic potential is extracted from the full 3D solution of the Poisson’s equation. We characterize the particle transport under the action of a constant forcing by studying the statistics of the translocation time. We derive an analytical expression of translocation time average that compares well with the results from Brownian dynamic simulations of driven particles over the electrostatic potential. Moreover, we show that the translocation time distributions can be perfectly described by a simple theory which replaces the true barrier by an equivalent structureless square barrier. Remarkably, our approach maintains its accuracy also for low-applied voltage regimes where the usual inverse-Gaussian approximation fails. Finally, we discuss how the comparison between the simulated time distributions and their theoretical prediction results to be greatly simplified when using the notion of the empirical Laplace transform technique.

  17. Directionality of substrate translocation of the hemolysin A Type I secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, Michael H. H.; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) of Gram-negative bacteria are responsible for the secretion of various proteases, lipases, S-layer proteins or toxins into the extracellular space. The paradigm of these systems is the hemolysin A (HlyA) T1SS of Escherichia coli. This multiple membrane protein complex is able to secrete the toxin HlyA in one step across both E. coli membranes. Common to all secreted T1SS substrates is a C-terminal secretion sequence being necessary as well as sufficient for secretion. However, it is not known whether transport occurs directionally, i.e. the N- or the C-terminus of T1SS substrates is secreted first. We have addressed this question by constructing HlyA fusions with the rapidly folding eGFP resulting in a stalled T1SS. Differential labeling and subsequent fluorescence microscopic detection of C- and N-terminal parts of the fusions allowed us to demonstrate vectorial transport of HlyA through the T1SS with the C-terminus appearing first outside the bacterial cells. PMID:26212107

  18. Imperatorin inhibits the expression of alpha-hemolysin in Staphylococcus aureus strain BAA-1717 (USA300).

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ping; Chen, Junjie; Sun, Mao; Yin, Zhongqiong; Lin, Juchun; Fu, Hualin; Shu, Gang; He, Changliang; Lv, Cheng; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Kaiyu; Geng, Yi; Yin, Lizi

    2016-07-01

    Both community-associated and hospital-acquired infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been increasingly reported around the world in the past 20 years. In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 64 % of MRSA isolates were of the USA300 clonal type in infected patients in USA. The aim of our study was to estimate the in vitro effect of imperatorin on MRSA strain BAA-1717 (USA300). The effects of imperatorin on alpha-hemolysin (Hla) production, when strain BAA-1717 was co-cultured with sub-inhibitory concentrations of imperatorin, were analysed using susceptibility testing, hemolysis assays, western blotting and real-time PCR. Live/Dead analysis and cytotoxicity assays were employed to examine the protective effect of imperatorin against the strain BAA-1717-mediated injury of human alveolar epithelial cells (A549). The results showed that imperatorin has no anti-S. aureus activity at the tested concentrations in vitro. However, imperatorin can observably inhibit the production of Hla in culture supernatants and reduce the transcriptional levels of hla (the gene encoding Hla) and arg (the accessory gene regulator). Imperatorin prevented Hla-mediated A549 epithelial cell injury in a co-culture system. In conclusion, our results suggested that imperatorin has the potential to be developed as a new anti-virulence drug candidate for managing S. aureus infection.

  19. Interaction of the noncovalent molecular adapter, beta-cyclodextrin, with the staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin pore.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L Q; Bayley, H

    2000-01-01

    Cyclodextrins act as noncovalent molecular adapters when lodged in the lumen of the alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL) pore. The adapters act as binding sites for channel blockers, thereby offering a basis for the detection of a variety of organic molecules with alphaHL as a biosensor element. To further such studies, it is important to find conditions under which the dwell time of cyclodextrins in the lumen of the pore is extended. Here, we use single-channel recording to explore the pH- and voltage-dependence of the interaction of beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD) with alphaHL. betaCD can access its binding site only from the trans entrance of pores inserted from the cis side of a bilayer. Analysis of the binding kinetics shows that there is a single binding site for betaCD, with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant that varies by >100-fold under the conditions explored. The dissociation rate constant for the neutral betaCD molecule varies with pH and voltage, a result that is incompatible with two states of the alphaHL pore, one of high and the other of low affinity. Rather, the data suggest that the actual equilibrium dissociation constant for the alphaHL. betaCD complex varies continuously with the transmembrane potential. PMID:11023901

  20. Fluctuating bottleneck model studies on kinetics of DNA escape from α-hemolysin nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yukun; Wang, Zilin; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2015-11-14

    We have proposed a fluctuation bottleneck (FB) model to investigate the non-exponential kinetics of DNA escape from nanometer-scale pores. The basic idea is that the escape rate is proportional to the fluctuating cross-sectional area of DNA escape channel, the radius r of which undergoes a subdiffusion dynamics subjected to fractional Gaussian noise with power-law memory kernel. Such a FB model facilitates us to obtain the analytical result of the averaged survival probability as a function of time, which can be directly compared to experimental results. Particularly, we have applied our theory to address the escape kinetics of DNA through α-hemolysin nanopores. We find that our theoretical framework can reproduce the experimental results very well in the whole time range with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters of the kinetics processes. We believe that FB model has caught some key features regarding the long time kinetics of DNA escape through a nanopore and it might provide a sound starting point to study much wider problems involving anomalous dynamics in confined fluctuating channels.

  1. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus. PMID:27030589

  2. Exploring transmembrane transport through alpha-hemolysin with grid-steered molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wells, David B; Abramkina, Volha; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2007-09-28

    The transport of biomolecules across cell boundaries is central to cellular function. While structures of many membrane channels are known, the permeation mechanism is known only for a select few. Molecular dynamics (MD) is a computational method that can provide an accurate description of permeation events at the atomic level, which is required for understanding the transport mechanism. However, due to the relatively short time scales accessible to this method, it is of limited utility. Here, we present a method for all-atom simulation of electric field-driven transport of large solutes through membrane channels, which in tens of nanoseconds can provide a realistic account of a permeation event that would require a millisecond simulation using conventional MD. In this method, the average distribution of the electrostatic potential in a membrane channel under a transmembrane bias of interest is determined first from an all-atom MD simulation. This electrostatic potential, defined on a grid, is subsequently applied to a charged solute to steer its permeation through the membrane channel. We apply this method to investigate permeation of DNA strands, DNA hairpins, and alpha-helical peptides through alpha-hemolysin. To test the accuracy of the method, we computed the relative permeation rates of DNA strands having different sequences and global orientations. The results of the G-SMD simulations were found to be in good agreement in experiment.

  3. Driven diffusion against electrostatic or effective energy barrier across α-hemolysin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansalone, Patrizio; Chinappi, Mauro; Rondoni, Lamberto; Cecconi, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the translocation of a charged particle across an α-Hemolysin (αHL) pore in the framework of a driven diffusion over an extended energy barrier generated by the electrical charges of the αHL. A one-dimensional electrostatic potential is extracted from the full 3D solution of the Poisson's equation. We characterize the particle transport under the action of a constant forcing by studying the statistics of the translocation time. We derive an analytical expression of translocation time average that compares well with the results from Brownian dynamic simulations of driven particles over the electrostatic potential. Moreover, we show that the translocation time distributions can be perfectly described by a simple theory which replaces the true barrier by an equivalent structureless square barrier. Remarkably, our approach maintains its accuracy also for low-applied voltage regimes where the usual inverse-Gaussian approximation fails. Finally, we discuss how the comparison between the simulated time distributions and their theoretical prediction results to be greatly simplified when using the notion of the empirical Laplace transform technique.

  4. In vivo quantification of the secretion rates of the hemolysin A Type I secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, Michael H. H.; Beer, Tobias; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) of Gram-negative bacteria secrete a broad range of substrates into the extracellular space. Common to all substrates is a C-terminal secretion sequence and nonapeptide repeats in the C-terminal part that bind Ca2+ in the extracellular space, to trigger protein folding. Like all T1SS, the hemolysin A (HlyA) T1SS of Escherichia coli consists of an ABC transporter, a membrane fusion protein and an outer membrane protein allowing the one step translocation of the substrate across both membranes. Here, we analyzed the secretion rate of the HlyA T1SS. Our results demonstrate that the rate is independent of substrate-size and operates at a speed of approximately 16 amino acids per transporter per second. We also demonstrate that the rate is independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration raising the question of the driving force of substrate secretion by T1SS in general. PMID:27616645

  5. Isolation of botulinolysin, a thiol-activated hemolysin, from serotype D Clostridium botulinum: A species-specific gene duplication in Clostridia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Mutoh, Shingo; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Botulinolysin (BLY) is a toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum that belongs to a group of thiol-activated hemolysins. In this study, a protein exhibiting hemolytic activity was purified from the culture supernatant of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947. The purified protein displayed a single band by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular mass of 55kDa, and its N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences exhibited high similarity to a group of thiol-activated hemolysins produced by gram-positive bacteria. Thus, the purified protein was identified as the BLY. Using the nucleotide sequences of previously cloned genes for hemolysins, two types of genes encoding BLY-like proteins were cloned unexpectedly. Molecular modeling analysis indicated that the products of both genes displayed very similar structures, despite the low sequence similarity. In silico screening revealed a specific duplication of the hemolysin gene restricted to serotypes C and D of C. botulinum and their related species among thiol-activated hemolysin-producing bacteria. Our findings provide important insights into the genetic characteristics of pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Cloning of a Phosphate-Regulated Hemolysin Gene (Phospholipase C) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Vasil, Michael L.; Berka, Randy M.; Gray, Gregory L.; Nakai, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a phosphate (Pi)-regulated extracellular protein which may be a significant virulence factor of this organism. The gene for this hemolytic enzyme was cloned on a 4.1-megadalton (Mdal) fragment from a BamHI digest of P. aeruginosa PAO1 genomic DNA and was inserted into the BamHI sites of the multicopy Escherichia coli(pBR322) and P. aeruginosa(pMW79) vectors. The E. coli and P. aeruginosa recombinant plasmids were designated pGV26 and pVB81, respectively. A restriction map of the 4.1-Mdal fragment from pGV26 was constructed, using double and single digestions with BamHI and EcoRI and several different restriction enzymes. Based on information from this map, a 2.4-Mdal BamHI/BglII fragment containing the gene for phospholipase C was subcloned to pBR322. The hybrid plasmids pGV26 and pVB81 direct the synthesis of enzymatically active phospholipase C, which is also hemolytic. The plasmid-directed synthesis of phospholipase C in E. coli or P. aeruginosa is not repressible by Pi as is the chromosomally directed synthesis in P. aeruginosa. Data are presented which suggest that the synthesis of phospholipase C from pGV26 and pVB81 is directed from the tetracycline resistance gene promoter. The level of enzyme activity produced by E. coli(pGV26) is slightly higher than the levels produced by P. aeruginosa(pMW79) under repressed conditions. In contrast, the levels produced by P. aeruginosa(pVB81) are at least 600-fold higher than the levels produced by P. aeruginosa(pMW79) under repressed conditions and approximately 20-fold higher than those produced by P. aeruginosa(pMW79) under derepressed conditions. The majority (85%) of the enzyme produced by E. coli(pGV26) remained cell associated, whereas >95% of the enzyme produced by P. aeruginosa(pVB81) was extracellular. Analysis of extracellular proteins from cultures of P. aeruginosa(pMW79) and P. aeruginosa(pVB81) by high-performance liquid chromotography and

  7. Structural basis for pore-forming mechanism of staphylococcal α-hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Takaki; Yamashita, Daichi; Kato, Koji; Peng, Zhao; Ueda, Junki; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Yao, Min

    2015-12-15

    Staphylococcal α-hemolysin (α-HL) is a β-barrel pore-forming toxin (PFT) expressed by Staphylococcus aureus. α-HL is secreted as a water-soluble monomeric protein, which binds to target membranes and forms membrane-inserted heptameric pores. To explore the pore-forming mechanism of α-HL in detail, we determined the crystal structure of the α-HL monomer and prepore using H35A mutant and W179A/R200A mutant, respectively. Although the overall structure of the monomer was similar to that of other staphylococcal PFTs, a marked difference was observed in the N-terminal amino latch, which bent toward the prestem. Moreover, the prestem was fastened by the cap domain with a key hydrogen bond between Asp45 and Tyr118. Prepore structure showed that the transmembrane region is roughly formed with flexibility, although the upper half of the β-barrel is formed appropriately. Structure comparison among monomer, prepore and pore revealed a series of motions, in which the N-terminal amino latch released upon oligomerization destroys its own key hydrogen bond between Asp45-Tyr118. This action initiated the protrusion of the prestem. Y118F mutant and the N-terminal truncated mutant markedly decreased in the hemolytic activity, indicating the importance of the key hydrogen bond and the N-terminal amino latch on the pore formation. Based on these observations, we proposed a dynamic molecular mechanism of pore formation for α-HL.

  8. Pleiotropic effects of a mutation in rfaC on Escherichia coli hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, M E; Welch, R A

    1997-01-01

    Several genes involved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway have been shown to affect the expression or activity of Escherichia coli hemolysin (Hly), a secreted cytotoxin that is the prototype of the RTX family of toxins. To further study this relationship, E. coli K-12 strains harboring mutations in the LPS biosynthetic genes rfaS, rfaQ, rfaJ, rfaP, and rfaC were transformed with a recombinant plasmid harboring the hlyCABD operon and examined for their effects on extracellular expression and hemolytic activity. A mutation in rfaC that affected both extracellular expression and activity of Hly was studied in greater detail. This mutation led to a growth-phase-dependent decrease up to 16-fold in the steady-state level of extracellular HlyA, although transcription and secretion of HlyA were decreased no more than 2-fold. Specific hemolytic activity in toxin produced from the rfaC mutant strain was significantly reduced, in a growth-phase-dependent manner. With the rfaC gene supplied in trans, both the decreased expression and activity of Hly were restored to wild-type levels. Hly from the rfaC mutant strain exhibited much slower kinetics of hemolysis, a more rapid rate of decay of activity, and greater formation of apparently inactive HlyA-containing aggregates in culture supernatants than was exhibited in the wild-type strain. A model is proposed for a physical interaction between LPS and Hly in which LPS with intact inner core participates in forming or maintaining an active conformation of Hly and helps to protect it from aggregation or degradation. PMID:9169754

  9. Python erythrocytes are resistant to α-hemolysin from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Casper K; Skals, Marianne; Wang, Tobias; Cheema, Muhammad U; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2011-12-01

    α-Hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli lyses mammalian erythrocytes by creating nonselective cation pores in the membrane. Pore insertion triggers ATP release and subsequent P2X receptor and pannexin channel activation. Blockage of either P2X receptors or pannexin channels reduces HlyA-induced hemolysis. We found that erythrocytes from Python regius and Python molurus are remarkably resistant to HlyA-induced hemolysis compared to human and Trachemys scripta erythrocytes. HlyA concentrations that induced maximal hemolysis of human erythrocytes did not affect python erythrocytes, but increasing the HlyA concentration 40-fold did induce hemolysis. Python erythrocytes were more resistant to osmotic stress than human erythrocytes, but osmotic stress tolerance per se did not confer HlyA resistance. Erythrocytes from T. scripta, which showed higher osmotic resistance than python erythrocytes, were as susceptible to HlyA as human erythrocytes. Therefore, we tested whether python erythrocytes lack the purinergic signalling known to amplify HlyA-induced hemolysis in human erythrocytes. P. regius erythrocytes increased intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration and reduced cell volume when exposed to 3 mM ATP, indicating the presence of a P2X₇-like receptor. In addition, scavenging extracellular ATP or blocking P2 receptors or pannexin channels reduced the HlyA-induced hemolysis. We tested whether the low HlyA sensitivity resulted from low affinity of HlyA to the python erythrocyte membrane. We found comparable incorporation of HlyA into human and python erythrocyte membranes. Taken together, the remarkable HlyA resistance of python erythrocytes was not explained by increased osmotic resistance, lack of purinergic hemolysis amplification, or differences in HlyA affinity.

  10. Rapid and specific detection of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Jiro; Sugawara, Chiyo; Akahane, Kenji; Hashimoto, Keiji; Kojima, Tadashi; Ikedo, Masanari; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2009-04-01

    Several investigators have reported that thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin are important virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but it has been difficult to detect these factors rapidly in seafood and other environmental samples. A novel nucleic acid amplification method, termed the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which amplifies DNA with high specificity and rapidity under isothermal conditions, was applied. In this study, we designed tdh gene-specific LAMP primers for detection of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus. The specificity of this assay was evaluated with 32 strains of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus, one strain of TDH-producing Grimontia hollisae, 10 strains of TDH-nonproducing V. parahaemolyticus, and 94 strains of TDH-nonproducing bacteria, and the sensitivity was high enough to detect one cell per test. Moreover, to investigate the detection of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus in oysters, the LAMP assay was performed with enrichment culture in alkaline peptone water of oyster samples inoculated with TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus and TDH-nonproducing V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus after enrichment in alkaline peptone water. These results suggest that the LAMP assay targeting tdh gene has high sensitivity and specificity and is useful to detect TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus in oyster after enrichment.

  11. The Nucleotide Capture Region of Alpha Hemolysin: Insights into Nanopore Design for DNA Sequencing from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Manara, Richard M A; Tomasio, Susana; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-27

    Nanopore technology for DNA sequencing is constantly being refined and improved. In strand sequencing a single strand of DNA is fed through a nanopore and subsequent fluctuations in the current are measured. A major hurdle is that the DNA is translocated through the pore at a rate that is too fast for the current measurement systems. An alternative approach is "exonuclease sequencing", in which an exonuclease is attached to the nanopore that is able to process the strand, cleaving off one base at a time. The bases then flow through the nanopore and the current is measured. This method has the advantage of potentially solving the translocation rate problem, as the speed is controlled by the exonuclease. Here we consider the practical details of exonuclease attachment to the protein alpha hemolysin. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to determine the ideal (a) distance from alpha-hemolysin, and (b) the orientation of the monophosphate nucleotides upon release from the exonuclease such that they will enter the protein. Our results indicate an almost linear decrease in the probability of entry into the protein with increasing distance of nucleotide release. The nucleotide orientation is less significant for entry into the protein.

  12. The Nucleotide Capture Region of Alpha Hemolysin: Insights into Nanopore Design for DNA Sequencing from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Richard M. A.; Tomasio, Susana; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore technology for DNA sequencing is constantly being refined and improved. In strand sequencing a single strand of DNA is fed through a nanopore and subsequent fluctuations in the current are measured. A major hurdle is that the DNA is translocated through the pore at a rate that is too fast for the current measurement systems. An alternative approach is “exonuclease sequencing”, in which an exonuclease is attached to the nanopore that is able to process the strand, cleaving off one base at a time. The bases then flow through the nanopore and the current is measured. This method has the advantage of potentially solving the translocation rate problem, as the speed is controlled by the exonuclease. Here we consider the practical details of exonuclease attachment to the protein alpha hemolysin. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to determine the ideal (a) distance from alpha-hemolysin, and (b) the orientation of the monophosphate nucleotides upon release from the exonuclease such that they will enter the protein. Our results indicate an almost linear decrease in the probability of entry into the protein with increasing distance of nucleotide release. The nucleotide orientation is less significant for entry into the protein.

  13. The Staphylococcal Toxins γ-Hemolysin AB and CB Differentially Target Phagocytes by Employing Specific Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Spaan, András N.; Vrieling, Manouk; Wallet, Pierre; Badiou, Cédric; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Ohneck, Elizabeth A.; Benito, Yvonne; de Haas, Carla J.C.; Day, Christopher J.; Jennings, Michael P.; Lina, Gérard; Vandenesch, François; van Kessel, Kok P.M.; Torres, Victor J.; van Strijp, Jos A.G.; Henry, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of the host phagocyte response by Staphylococcus aureus is crucial to successful infection with the pathogen. γ-Hemolysin AB and CB (HlgAB, HlgCB) are bicomponent pore-forming toxins present in almost all human S. aureus isolates. Cellular tropism and contribution of the toxins to S. aureus pathophysiology are poorly understood. Here, we identify the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR2 and CCR2 as targets for HlgAB, and the complement receptors C5aR and C5L2 as targets for HlgCB. The receptor expression patterns allow the toxins to efficiently and differentially target phagocytic cells. Murine neutrophils are resistant to HlgAB and HlgCB. CCR2 is the sole murine receptor orthologue compatible with γ-Hemolysin. In a murine peritonitis model, HlgAB contributes to S. aureus bacteremia in a CCR2-dependent manner. HlgAB-mediated targeting of CCR2+ cells highlights the involvement of inflammatory macrophages during S. aureus infection. Functional quantification identifies HlgAB and HlgCB as major secreted staphylococcal leukocidins. PMID:25384670

  14. Hemolysin coregulated protein 1 as a molecular gluing unit for the assembly of nanoparticle hybrid structures

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Schreiber, Andreas; Sturm (née Rosseeva), Elena V

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hybrid nanoparticle (NP) structures containing organic building units such as polymers, peptides, DNA and proteins have great potential in biosensor and electronic applications. The nearly free modification of the polymer chain, the variation of the protein and DNA sequence and the implementation of functional moieties provide a great platform to create inorganic structures of different morphology, resulting in different optical and magnetic properties. Nevertheless, the design and modification of a protein structure with functional groups or sequences for the assembly of biohybrid materials is not trivial. This is mainly due to the sensitivity of its secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure to the changes in the interaction (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrophilic, electrostatic, chemical groups) between the protein subunits and the inorganic material. Here, we use hemolysin coregulated protein 1 (Hcp1) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a building and gluing unit for the formation of biohybrid structures by implementing cysteine anchoring points at defined positions on the protein rim (Hcp1_cys3). We successfully apply the Hcp1_cys3 gluing unit for the assembly of often linear, hybrid structures of plasmonic gold (Au NP), magnetite (Fe3O4 NP), and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4 NP). Furthermore, the assembly of Au NPs into linear structures using Hcp1_cys3 is investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy, TEM and cryo-TEM. One key parameter for the formation of Au NP assembly is the specific ionic strength in the mixture. The resulting network-like structure of Au NPs is characterized by Raman spectroscopy, showing surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by a factor of 8·104 and a stable secondary structure of the Hcp1_cys3 unit. In order to prove the catalytic performance of the gold hybrid structures, they are used as a catalyst in the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol showing similar catalytic activity as the pure Au NPs. To further extend the functionality

  15. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for direct identification of thermostable direct hemolysin-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Sakata, Junko; Yonekita, Taro; Kumeda, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of an immunochromatographic assay (NH IC TDH) in identifying thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus colonies on selective agar plates. The sensitivity of the NH IC TDH assay was 100% (189 samples) and its specificity was 100% (41 samples) compared with the presence of tdh.

  16. Synergistic and Additive Effects of Chromosomal and Plasmid-Encoded Hemolysins Contribute to Hemolysis and Virulence in Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Balado, Miguel; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae causes infections and fatal disease in marine animals and in humans. Highly hemolytic strains produce damselysin (Dly) and plasmid-encoded HlyA (HlyApl). These hemolysins are encoded by plasmid pPHDD1 and contribute to hemolysis and virulence for fish and mice. In this study, we report that all the hemolytic strains produce a hitherto uncharacterized chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch). Hemolysis was completely abolished in a single hlyAch mutant of a plasmidless strain and in a dly hlyApl hlyAch triple mutant. We found that Dly, HlyApl, and HlyAch are needed for full hemolytic values in strains harboring pPHDD1, and these values are the result of the additive effects between HlyApl and HlyAch, on the one hand, and of the synergistic effect of Dly with HlyApl and HlyAch, on the other hand. Interestingly, Dly-producing strains produced synergistic effects with strains lacking Dly production but secreting HlyA, constituting a case of the CAMP (Christie, Atkins, and Munch-Petersen) reaction. Environmental factors such as iron starvation and salt concentration were found to regulate the expression of the three hemolysins. We found that the contributions, in terms of the individual and combined effects, of the three hemolysins to hemolysis and virulence varied depending on the animal species tested. While Dly and HlyApl were found to be main contributors in the virulence for mice, we observed that the contribution of hemolysins to virulence for fish was mainly based on the synergistic effects between Dly and either of the two HlyA hemolysins rather than on their individual effects. PMID:23798530

  17. Analysis of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene and the tdh-related hemolysin (trh) genes in urease-positive strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated on the West Coast of the United States.

    PubMed

    Okuda, J; Ishibashi, M; Abbott, S L; Janda, J M; Nishibuchi, M

    1997-08-01

    Urease-positive (Ure+) and urease-negative (Ure-) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from patients on the West Coast of the United States between 1979 and 1995 were analyzed for the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene and the tdh-related hemolysin (trh) genes (trh1 and trh2). The DNA colony hybridization method with the polynucleotide probes was used to determine the distribution of the genes. Of 60 Ure+ strains, 59 strains (98%) had the trh (either trh1 or trh2) gene and 54 strains (90%) carried the tdh gene. The absence of the trh gene or a related sequence in an exceptional Ure+ strain was confirmed by Southern blot analyses. The stronger correlation with the trh gene than with the tdh gene was mostly attributable to strains possessing only the trh2 gene. Of 25 Ure- strains, 20 strains (80%) had the tdh gene but none had the trh gene. These results indicate a very strong correlation between the Ure+ phenotype and the trh gene and are consistent with those reported for strains isolated in Asia. The Ure+ strains carrying the trh genes were not restricted to a unique group of the strains. The O4:K12 strains carrying the trh1 gene have predominantly been isolated since 1979. However, strains of various non-O4:K12 serovars carrying either the trh1 or the trh2 gene became predominant after 1992. In addition, analysis by the arbitrarily primed PCR method revealed two subgroups within the selected Ure+ O4:K12 strains. Hybridization tests with oligonucleotide probes demonstrated that the trh1 sequences of the West Coast strains differ to some extent from those of Asian strains. Nevertheless, a PCR method previously established to detect both the trh1 and the trh2 genes in Asian strains could detect 98% of those genes in the West Coast strains.

  18. [Distribution of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)- and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in coastal Shimane Prefecture and TDH and TRH V parahaemolyticus contamination of retail shellfish].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    We studied distribution of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)- and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in coastal sea water, sediment, and shellfish and related retail shellfish contamination in Shimane Prefecture, Japan, between 2002 and 2004. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from > 80% of sea water, sediment, and shellfish. The detection of TDH gene (tdh) and TRH gene (trh)-positive V parahaemolyticus in sea water was 11%, in sediment 16%, and in shellfish 26%. The number of genes and gene-related in seawater was 23 MPN/L, in sediment 29 MPN/100 g, and in shellfish 460 MPN/10 g. TDH- and TRH-producing V. parahaemolyticus detected in seawater was 5%, in sediment 11% and in shellfish 14%. The continuous distribution of TDH-producing O2:K28, O4:K88, O4:K37, and O4:KUT organisms on the western coast and TRH2-producing O5:k30, O5:K43, O10:K19, O10:KUT, O11:K40, O11:KUT, and OUT:KUT organisms on the Oki Island coast suggested the settlement of these organisms in these coastal environments. From 7 (12%) of 59 retail short-necked clam samples, we isolated TDH-producing O 1:KUT, O3:K6 (2 strains from 2 samples imported from Korea), O4:K12, OUT:K8, and TRH2-producing OUT:K40 and OUT:K51 organisms. These findings suggested that TDH- and TRH-producing V. parahaemolyticus are widely distributed along the coast of this prefecture and are transported by contaminated retail shellfish from other areas.

  19. Grafting synthetic transmembrane units to the engineered low-toxicity α-hemolysin to restore its hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ui, Mihoko; Harima, Kousuke; Takei, Toshiaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Endo, Sumire; Akiyama, Kimio; Muraoka, Takahiro; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-12-01

    The chemical modification of proteins to provide desirable functions and/or structures broadens their possibilities for use in various applications. Usually, proteins can acquire new functions and characteristics, in addition to their original ones, via the introduction of synthetic functional moieties. Here, we adopted a more radical approach to protein modification, i.e., the replacement of a functional domain of proteins with alternative chemical compounds to build "cyborg proteins." As a proof of concept model, we chose staphylococcal α-hemolysin (Hla), which is a well-studied, pore-forming toxin. The hemolytic activity of Hla mutants was dramatically decreased by truncation of the stem domain, which forms a β-barrel pore in the membrane. However, the impaired hemolytic activity was significantly restored by attaching a pyrenyl-maleimide unit to the cysteine residue that was introduced in the remaining stem domain. In contrast, negatively charged fluorescein-maleimide completely abolished the remaining activity of the mutants.

  20. Expression of Bacteroides fragilis hemolysins in vivo and role of HlyBA in an intra-abdominal infection model.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leandro A; Jenkins, Audrey L; Jeffrey Smith, C; Rocha, Edson R

    2013-04-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most frequent opportunistic pathogen isolated from anaerobic infections. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the genetic and molecular aspects of gene expression of its virulence factors during extra-intestinal infections. A potential virulence factor that has received little attention is the ability of B. fragilis to produce hemolysins. In this study, an implanted perforated table tennis "ping-pong" ball was used as an intra-abdominal artificial abscess model in the rat. This procedure provided sufficient infected exudate for gene expression studies in vivo. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to quantify the relative expression of hlyA, hlyB, hlyC, hlyD, hlyE, hlyF, hlyG, and hlyIII mRNAs. The hlyA mRNA was induced approximately sixfold after 4 days postinfection compared with the mRNA levels in the inoculum culture prior to infection. The hlyB mRNA increased approximately sixfold after 4 days and 12-fold after 8 days postinfection. Expression of hlyC mRNA increased sixfold after 1 day, 45-fold after 4 days, and 16-fold after 8 days postinfection, respectively. The hlyD and hlyE mRNAs were induced approximately 40-fold and 30-fold, respectively, after 4-days postinfection. The hlyF expression increased approximately threefold after 4-days postinfection. hlyG was induced approximately fivefold after 4 and 8 days postinfection. The hlyIII mRNA levels had a steady increase of approximately four-, eight-, and 12-fold following 1, 4, and 8 days postinfection, respectively. These findings suggest that B. fragilis hemolysins are induced and differentially regulated in vivo. Both parent and hlyBA mutant strains reached levels of approximately 3-8 × 10(9) cfu/mL after 1 day postinfection. However, the hlyBA mutant strain lost 2 logs in viable cell counts compared with the parent strain after 8 days postinfection. This is the first study showing HlyBA is a virulence factor which plays a

  1. Protective efficacy of recombinant hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) of Aeromonas hydrophila in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Wu, Yafeng; Pang, Maoda; Liu, Jin; Lu, Chengping; Liu, Yongjie

    2015-10-01

    Motile aeromonad septicemia (MAS) caused by Aeromonas hydrophila is one of the common bacterial causes of fish mortalities. Prophylactic vaccination against this and other diseases is essential for continued growth of aquaculture. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) plays a crucial role in the virulence of A. hydrophila. The hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) is an integral component of the T6SS apparatus and is considered a hallmark of T6SS function. Here, the T6SS effector Hcp was expressed and characterized, and its immunogenicity and protective efficacy were evaluated in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Hcp secretion was found to be strongly induced by low temperature in A. hydrophila. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that Hcp is conserved among A. hydrophila strains of different origins. The vaccination with recombinant Hcp resulted in an increased survival (46.67%) in common carp during a 10-day challenge time compared to non-vaccinated fish (7.14%). The vaccinated fish also showed the significantly increased levels of IgM antibody in serum and cytokines such as inerleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in kidney, spleen and gills. The recombinant Hcp shows promise as a vaccine candidate against A. hydrophila.

  2. Kinetics of T3-DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Phosphodiester Bond Formation Measured Using the α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cherie S; Riedl, Jan; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2016-12-27

    The latch region of the wild-type α-hemolysin (α-HL) protein channel can be used to distinguish single base modifications in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) via ion channel measurements upon electrophoretic capture of dsDNA in the vestibule of α-HL. Herein, we investigated the use of the latch region to detect a nick in the phosphodiester DNA backbone. The presence of a nick in the phosphodiester backbone of one strand of the duplex results in a significant increase in both the blockade current and noise level relative to the intact duplex. Differentiation between the nicked and intact duplexes based on blockade current or noise, with near baseline resolution, allows real-time monitoring of the rate of T3-DNA ligase-catalyzed phosphodiester bond formation. Under low ionic strength conditions containing divalent cations and a molecular crowding agent (75 mg mL(-1) PEG), the rate of enzyme-catalyzed reaction in the bulk solution was continuously monitored by electrophoretically capturing reaction substrate or product dsDNA in the α-HL protein channel vestibule. Enzyme kinetic results obtained from the nanopore experiments match those from gel electrophoresis under the same reaction conditions, indicating the α-HL nanopore measurement provides a viable approach for monitoring enzymatic DNA repair activity.

  3. Disulphide bond restrains the C-terminal region of thermostable direct hemolysin during folding to promote oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Nidhi; Tichkule, Swapnil; Pandit, Shashi Bhushan; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2017-01-15

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are typically produced as water-soluble monomers, which upon interacting with target cells assemble into transmembrane oligomeric pores. Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is an atypical PFT that exists as a tetramer in solution, prior to membrane binding. The TDH structure highlights a core β-sandwich domain similar to those found in the eukaryotic actinoporin family of PFTs. However, the TDH structure harbors an extended C-terminal region (CTR) that is not documented in the actinoporins. This CTR remains tethered to the β-sandwich domain through an intra-molecular disulphide bond. Part of the CTR is positioned at the inter-protomer interface in the TDH tetramer. Here we show that the truncation, as well as mutation, of the CTR compromise tetrameric assembly, and the membrane-damaging activity of TDH. Our study also reveals that intra-protomer disulphide bond formation during the folding/assembly process of TDH restrains the CTR to mediate its participation in the formation of inter-protomer contact, thus facilitating TDH oligomerization. However, once tetramerization is achieved, disruption of the disulphide bond does not affect oligomeric assembly. Our study provides critical insights regarding the regulation of the oligomerization mechanism of TDH, which has not been previously documented in the PFT family.

  4. The Forgotten Virulence Factor: The 'non-conventional' Hemolysin TlyA And Its Role in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mohammad Bagher; Katzenmeier, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human-specific Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium which colonizes the gastric mucosal layer in the stomach causing diseases such as peptic ulcer, adenocarcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. It is estimated that approximately half of the world's population is infected with H. pylori making it the most intensively characterized microbial pathogen up to now. Hemolysis has been suggested to significantly contribute to colonization of the stomach and disease progression by H. pylori. In a number of earlier studies, TlyA was characterized as a putative pore-forming cytolysin. Although a few observations in the literature suggest a role for TlyA as significant virulence factor of H. pylori, the molecular and structural characterization of this protein is much curtailed at present. Given the intensive characterization of numerous H. pylori virulence factors over the past decade, surprisingly little information exists for the TlyA toxin and its significance for pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview on microbial hemolysis and its role for pathogenesis and discusses recent research efforts aimed at an improved understanding of the role of the 'non-conventional' hemolysin and its associated RNA methyltransferase TlyA from H. pylori.

  5. Cytotoxic activity and probable apoptotic effect of Sph2, a sphigomyelinase hemolysin from Leptospira interrogans strain Lai.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xuan; Geng, Yan; Yang, Jun-Wei; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2008-02-29

    Our previous work confirmed that Sph2/LA1029 was a sphigomyelinase-like hemolyisn of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Lai. Characteristics of both hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of Sph2 were reported in this paper. Sph2 was a heat-labile neutral hemolysin and had similar hemolytic behavior as the typical sphingomyelinase C of Staphylococcus aureus upon sheep erythrocytes. The cytotoxic activity of Sph2 was shown in mammalian cells such as BALB/C mouse lymphocytes and macrophages, as well as human L-02 liver cells. Transmission electron microscopic observation showed that the Sph2 treated BALB/C mouse lymphocytes were swollen and ruptured with membrane breakage. They also demonstrated condensed chromatin as a high-density area. Cytoskeleton changes were observed via fluorescence confocal microscope in Sph2 treated BALB/C mouse lymphocytes and macrophages, where both cytokine IL-1beta and IL-6 were induced. In addition, typical apoptotic morphological features were observed in Sph2 treated L-02 cells via transmission electron microscope and the percentage of apoptotic cells did increase after the Sph2 treatment detected by flow cytometry. Therefore, Sph2 was likely an apoptosis-inducing factor of human L-02 liver cells.

  6. Detection of Benzo[a]pyrene-Guanine Adducts in Single-Stranded DNA using the α-Hemolysin Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Rukshan T.; Fleming, Aaron M.; Johnson, Robert P.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; White, Henry S.

    2017-01-01

    The carcinogenic precursor benzo[a]pyrene (BP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is released into the environment through the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. Metabolism of BP in the human body yields a potent alkylating agent (benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, BPDE) that reacts with guanine (G) in DNA to form an adduct implicated in cancer initiation. We report that the α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore platform can be used to detect a BPDE adduct to G in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Translocation of a 41-mer poly-2′-deoxycytidine strand with a centrally located BPDE adduct to G through αHL in 1 M KCl produces a unique multi-level current signature allowing the adduct to be detected. This readily distinguishable current modulation was observed when the BPDE-adducted DNA strand translocated from either the 5′ or 3′ directions. This study suggests that BPDE adducts and other large aromatic biomarkers can be detected with αHL, presenting opportunities for the monitoring, quantification, and sequencing of mutagenic compounds from cellular DNA samples. PMID:25629967

  7. Detection of benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adducts in single-stranded DNA using the α-hemolysin nanopore.

    PubMed

    Perera, Rukshan T; Fleming, Aaron M; Johnson, Robert P; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2015-02-20

    The carcinogenic precursor benzo[a]pyrene (BP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is released into the environment through the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. Metabolism of BP in the human body yields a potent alkylating agent (benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, BPDE) that reacts with guanine (G) in DNA to form an adduct implicated in cancer initiation. We report that the α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore platform can be used to detect a BPDE adduct to G in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Translocation of a 41-mer poly-2'-deoxycytidine strand with a centrally located BPDE adduct to G through αHL in 1 M KCl produces a unique multi-level current signature allowing the adduct to be detected. This readily distinguishable current modulation was observed when the BPDE-adducted DNA strand translocated from either the 5' or 3' directions. This study suggests that BPDE adducts and other large aromatic biomarkers can be detected with αHL, presenting opportunities for the monitoring, quantification, and sequencing of mutagenic compounds from cellular DNA samples.

  8. Detection of benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adducts in single-stranded DNA using the α-hemolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Rukshan T.; Fleming, Aaron M.; Johnson, Robert P.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; White, Henry S.

    2015-02-01

    The carcinogenic precursor benzo[a]pyrene (BP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is released into the environment through the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. Metabolism of BP in the human body yields a potent alkylating agent (benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, BPDE) that reacts with guanine (G) in DNA to form an adduct implicated in cancer initiation. We report that the α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore platform can be used to detect a BPDE adduct to G in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Translocation of a 41-mer poly-2‧-deoxycytidine strand with a centrally located BPDE adduct to G through αHL in 1 M KCl produces a unique multi-level current signature allowing the adduct to be detected. This readily distinguishable current modulation was observed when the BPDE-adducted DNA strand translocated from either the 5‧ or 3‧ directions. This study suggests that BPDE adducts and other large aromatic biomarkers can be detected with αHL, presenting opportunities for the monitoring, quantification, and sequencing of mutagenic compounds from cellular DNA samples.

  9. Curcumin protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia by interfering with the self-assembly process of α-hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Wenhua; Deng, Xuming; Deng, Yanhong; Niu, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    α-hemolysin (Hla) is a self-assembling extracellular protein secreted as a soluble monomer by most Staphylococcus aureus strains and is an essential virulence factor for the pathogenesis of various S. aureus infections. Here, we show that curcumin (CUR), a natural compound with weak anti-S. aureus activity, can inhibit the hemolysis induced by Hla. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and mutagenesis assays were further employed for the Hla-CUR complex to determine the mechanism of such inhibition. The analysis of this combined approach indicated that the direct binding CUR to Hla blocks the conformational transition of Hla from the monomer to the oligomer, leading to an inhibition of Hla hemolytic activity. We also found that the addition of CUR significantly attenuated Hla-mediated injury of human alveolar cell (A549) co-cultured with S. aureus. The in vivo data further demonstrated that treatment with CUR protects mice from pneumonia caused by S. aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). These findings suggest that CUR inhibits the pore-forming activity of Hla through a novel mechanism, which would pave the way for the development of new and more effective antibacterial agents to combat S. aureus pneumonia. PMID:27345357

  10. Soft Wall Ion Channel in Continuum Representation with Application to Modeling Ion Currents in α-Hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Simakov, Nikolay A.

    2010-01-01

    A soft repulsion (SR) model of short range interactions between mobile ions and protein atoms is introduced in the framework of continuum representation of the protein and solvent. The Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) theory of ion transport through biological channels is modified to incorporate this soft wall protein model. Two sets of SR parameters are introduced: the first is parameterized for all essential amino acid residues using all atom molecular dynamic simulations; the second is a truncated Lennard – Jones potential. We have further designed an energy based algorithm for the determination of the ion accessible volume, which is appropriate for a particular system discretization. The effects of these models of short-range interaction were tested by computing current-voltage characteristics of the α-hemolysin channel. The introduced SR potentials significantly improve prediction of channel selectivity. In addition, we studied the effect of choice of some space-dependent diffusion coefficient distributions on the predicted current-voltage properties. We conclude that the diffusion coefficient distributions largely affect total currents and have little effect on rectifications, selectivity or reversal potential. The PNP-SR algorithm is implemented in a new efficient parallel Poisson, Poisson-Boltzman and PNP equation solver, also incorporated in a graphical molecular modeling package HARLEM. PMID:21028776

  11. Occurrence of chromosome- or plasmid-mediated aerobactin iron transport systems and hemolysin production among clonal groups of human invasive strains of Escherichia coli K1.

    PubMed

    Valvano, M A; Silver, R P; Crosa, J H

    1986-04-01

    The incidence of the aerobactin system and the genetic location of aerobactin genes were investigated in Escherichia coli K1 neonatal isolates belonging to different clonal groups. A functional aerobactin system was found in all members of the O7 MP3, O1 MP5, O1 MP9, and O18 MP9 clonal groups examined and also in K1 strains having O6, O16, and O75 lipopolysaccharide types, which are less frequently associated with neonatal infections. In contrast, the aerobactin system was not detected in strains from the O18 MP6 clone. The combined results of plasmid and colony hybridization experiments showed that the aerobactin genes were located on the chromosome in the majority (75%) of the aerobactin-producing K1 isolates, the genetic location of the aerobactin genes was closely correlated with the outer membrane protein profile rather than the O lipopolysaccharide type, the K1 strains harboring a chromosome-mediated aerobactin system did not possess colicin V genes, and five of six K1 isolates possessing a plasmid-borne aerobactin system contained colicin V genes which were located on the same plasmids carrying the aerobactin genes. The comparison of hemolysin production with possession of the aerobactin system in virulent clones of E. coli K1 strains showed that all of the aerobactin-producing strains from the O18 MP9 and O7 MP3 clonal groups did not synthesize hemolysin, whereas 11 of 12 aerobactin-nonproducing O18 MP6 isolates were hemolytic. Of the K1 strains examined, 92.5% possessed either the aerobactin system or the ability to produce hemolysin or both.

  12. Vaccination with proteus toxic agglutinin, a hemolysin-independent cytotoxin in vivo, protects against Proteus mirabilis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Alamuri, Praveen; Eaton, Kathryn A; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2009-02-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by Proteus mirabilis are associated with severe pathology in the bladder and kidney. To investigate the roles of two established cytotoxins, the HpmA hemolysin, a secreted cytotoxin, and proteus toxic agglutinin (Pta), a surface-associated cytotoxin, mutant analysis was used in conjunction with a mouse model of ascending UTI. Inactivation of pta, but not inactivation of hpmA, resulted in significant decreases in the bacterial loads of the mutant in kidneys (P < 0.01) and spleens (P < 0.05) compared to the bacterial loads of the wild type; the 50% infective dose (ID(50)) of an isogenic pta mutant or hpmA pta double mutant was 100-fold higher (5 x 10(8) CFU) than the ID(50) of parent strain HI4320 (5 x 10(6) CFU). Colonization by the parent strain caused severe cystitis and interstitial nephritis as determined by histopathological examination. Mice infected with the same bacterial load of the hpmA pta double mutant showed significantly reduced pathology (P < 0.01), suggesting that the additive effect of these two cytotoxins is critical during Proteus infection. Since Pta is surface associated and important for the persistence of P. mirabilis in the host, it was selected as a vaccine candidate. Mice intranasally vaccinated with a site-directed (indicated by an asterisk) (S366A) mutant purified intact toxin (Pta*) or the passenger domain Pta-alpha*, each independently conjugated with cholera toxin (CT), had significantly lower bacterial counts in their kidneys ( P = 0.001) and spleens (P = 0.002) than mice that received CT alone. The serum immunoglobulin G levels correlated with protection (P = 0.03). This is the first report describing the in vivo cytotoxicity and antigenicity of an autotransporter in P. mirabilis and its use in vaccine development.

  13. [Isolation of thermostable direct hemolysin producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus from food using screening by PCR in food-borne outbreaks].

    PubMed

    Obata, Hiromi; Shimojima, Yukako; Konishi, Noriko; Monma, Chie; Yano, Kazuyoshi; Kai, Akemi; Morozumi, Satoshi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2006-07-01

    The producibility of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is the most important pathogenic factor in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. TDH (+) V. parahaemolyticus is usually isolated from patients having V. parahaemolyticus food-borne disease. TDH (+) V. parahaemolyticus is, however, very difficult to isolate from food and environmental samples. In the 5 years from 2000 to 2004 in Tokyo, V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from food samples related to 67 of 227 V parahaemolyticus food-borne outbreaks. In these outbreaks, TDH (+) strains were also tried to isolate using PCR as the screening methods. TDH (+) V. parahaemolyticus strains were able to isolate from enrichment broth in which toxR and tdh genes become positive in PCR. TDH (+) strains of the same serotype with patients were able to be isolated from 23 food samples related to 11 outbreaks (16.4%); 3 outbreaks in 2000, 2 in 2001, 2 in 2002, 1 in 2003, and 3 in 2004. The serotypes of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from food were O3 : K6 (10 samples), O3 : K5 (6 samples), O1 : K25 (4 samples), O3 : K29 (2 samples), O4 : K 8 (1 sample), and O4 : K11 (1 sample). The isolation rate of the TDH (+) strain from enrichment broth differed with samples. In several samples TDH (+) strains were isolated easily only by examining 3 colonies, hence no TDH (+) strains were isolated in spite of the examination of 250 colonies. No correlation was seen between the number of V. parahaemolyticus and the isolation rate of TDH (+) strains in food samples. Screening using PCR is very effective method for isolating TDH (+) V. parahaemolyticus from food samples.

  14. Association of Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin with lipid rafts is essential for cytotoxicity but not hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kodama, Toshio; Okada, Natsumi; Okayama, Kanna; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya

    2010-02-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a major virulence factor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, induces cytotoxicity in cultured cells. However, the mechanism of TDH's cytotoxic effect including its target molecules on the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells remains unclear. In this study, we identified the role of lipid rafts, cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains, in TDH cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), a raft-disrupting agent, inhibited TDH cytotoxicity. TDH was associated with detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), and MbetaCD eliminated this association. In contrast, there was no such association between a nontoxic TDH mutant and DRMs. The disruption of lipid rafts neither affected hemolysis nor inhibited Ca(2+) influx into HeLa cells induced by TDH. These findings indicate that the cytotoxicity but not the hemolytic activity of TDH is dependent on lipid rafts. The exogenous and endogenous depletion of cellular sphingomyelin also prevented TDH cytotoxicity, but a direct interaction between TDH and sphingomyelin was not detected with either a lipid overlay assay or a liposome absorption test. Treatment with sphingomyelinase (SMase) at 100 mU/ml disrupted the association of TDH with DRMs but did not affect the localization of lipid raft marker proteins (caveolin-1 and flotillin-1) with DRMs. These results suggest that sphingomyelin is important for the association of TDH with lipid rafts but is not a molecular target of TDH. We hypothesize that TDH may target a certain group of rafts that are sensitive to SMase at a certain concentration, which does not affect other types of rafts.

  15. Detection of a functional insertion sequence responsible for deletion of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Bhoopong, Phuangthip; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2008-09-15

    The thermostable direct hemolysin coded by the tdh gene is a marker of virulent strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The tdh genes are flanked by insertion sequences collectively named as ISVs or their remnants; but the ISVs so far examined have accumulated mutations in the transposase genes and underwent structural arrangements and their transposition activity could not be expected; the tdh gene was thus considered to have been acquired by V. parahaemolyticus through horizontal transfer in the past during evolution. We recently isolated from the same patient tdh+ strains and a tdh(-) strain (PCR examination) that were otherwise indistinguishable. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that the tdh(-) strain was derived from the tdh+ strain by a deletion of the tdh gene mediated by a functional ISV. Southern blot hybridization showed tdh+ sequences in the tdh(-) strain (PSU-1466). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the tdh and its flanking sequences revealed the tdh gene was split into two parts and they were located 3182-bp apart in PSU-1466. The two tdh sequences were flanked by one of the ISVs, named as ISVpa3, in PSU-1466. This genetic structure could be explained by an ISVpa3-mediated partial tdh deletion from a tdh+ strain followed by transposition of the duplicated ISVpa3 and the deleted tdh sequence into a neighboring location. The ISVpa3 of PSU-1466 coded for a full-length transposase and a DDE motif. We were able to demonstrate transposition activity of the ISVpa3 cloned from PSU-1466 using the replicon fusion assay with the conjugal transfer of a cointegrate from Escherichia coli to V. parahaemolyticus. Our data support ISVpa3-mediated partial tdh deletion resulted in the emergence of the tdh(-) strain.

  16. Endotoxin "priming" potentiates lung vascular abnormalities in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin: an example of synergism between endo- and exotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The pore-forming hemolysin of Escherichia coli (HlyA), an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections, causes thromboxane generation and related vasoconstriction in perfused rabbit lungs (Seeger, W., H. Walter, N. Suttorp, M. Muhly, and S. Bhakdi. 1989. J. Clin. Invest. 84:220). We investigated the influence of pulmonary vascular "priming" with endotoxin on the responsiveness of the lung to a low-dose HlyA challenge. Rabbit lungs were perfused with Krebs Henseleit buffer containing 0.1-100 ng/ml Salmonella abortus equii lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 60-180 min. This treatment caused protracted release of tumor necrosis factor into the recirculating medium, but did not induce significant alterations of pulmonary hemodynamics and fluid balance. At a dose of 1 ng/ml, HlyA elicited only moderate thromboxane release (< 200 pg/ml) and pulmonary artery pressure increase (< or = 6 mmHg) in control lungs. Acceleration and potentiation of both the metabolic and vasoconstrictor response occurred in lungs primed with LPS. This priming effect displayed dose (threshold integral of 0.1-1 ng/ml LPS) and time dependencies (threshold integral of 60-90 min LPS incubation). Maximum thromboxane release and pulmonary artery pressure increase surpassed the responses to HlyA in nonprimed lungs by more than 15-fold. Cyclooxygenase inhibition and thromboxane-receptor antagonism blocked these effects. These data demonstrate that LPS priming synergizes with HlyA challenge to provoke vascular abnormalities that are possibly relevant to the pathogenesis of organ failure in severe local and systemic infections. PMID:7931076

  17. Single pyrimidine discrimination during voltage-driven translocation of osmylated oligodeoxynucleotides via the α-hemolysin nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Summary The influence of an electric field on an isolated channel or nanopore separating two compartments filled with electrolytes produces a constant ion flux through the pore. Nucleic acids added to one compartment traverse the pore, and modulate the current in a sequence-dependent manner. While translocation is faster than detection, the α-hemolysin nanopore (α-HL) successfully senses base modifications in ssDNA immobilized within the pore. With the assistance of a processing enzyme to slow down translocation, nanopore-based DNA sequencing is now a commercially available platform. However, accurate base calling is challenging because α-HL senses a sequence, and not a single nucleotide. Osmylated DNA was recently proposed as a surrogate for nanopore-based sequencing. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide 2,2’-bipyridine (OsBp) to the C5–C6 pyrimidine double bond. The process is simple, selective for deoxythymidine (dT) over deoxycytidine (dC), unreactive towards the purines, practically 100% effective, and strikingly independent of length, sequence, and composition. Translocation of an oligodeoxynucleotide (oligo) dA10XdA9 via α-HL is relatively slow, and exhibits distinct duration as well as distinct residual current when X = dA, dT(OsBp), or dC(OsBp). The data indicate that the α-HL constriction zone/β-barrel interacts strongly with both OsBp and the base. A 23 nucleotide long oligo with four dT(OsBp) traverses 18-times slower, and the same oligo with nine (dT+dC)(OsBp) moieties traverses 84-times slower compared to dA20, suggesting an average rate of 40 or 180 μs/base, respectively. These translocation speeds are well above detection limits, may be further optimized, and clear the way for nanopore-based sequencing using osmylated DNA. PMID:26925357

  18. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Hemolysin Employs Outer Membrane Vesicles to Target Mitochondria and Cause Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kunsmann, Lisa; Greune, Lilo; Bauwens, Andreas; Zhang, Wenlan; Kuczius, Thorsten; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mellmann, Alexander; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains cause diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome resulting from toxin-mediated microvascular endothelial injury. EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly), a member of the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family, is an EHEC virulence factor of increasingly recognized importance. The toxin exists as free EHEC-Hly and as EHEC-Hly associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EHEC during growth. Whereas the free toxin is lytic towards human endothelium, the biological effects of the OMV-associated EHEC-Hly on microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells, which are the major targets during EHEC infection, are unknown. Using microscopic, biochemical, flow cytometry and functional analyses of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and Caco-2 cells we demonstrate that OMV-associated EHEC-Hly does not lyse the target cells but triggers their apoptosis. The OMV-associated toxin is internalized by HBMEC and Caco-2 cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and trafficked with OMVs into endo-lysosomal compartments. Upon endosome acidification and subsequent pH drop, EHEC-Hly is separated from OMVs, escapes from the lysosomes, most probably via its pore-forming activity, and targets mitochondria. This results in decrease of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of cytochrome c to the cytosol, indicating EHEC-Hly-mediated permeabilization of the mitochondrial membranes. Subsequent activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 leads to apoptotic cell death as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation in the intoxicated cells. The ability of OMV-associated EHEC-Hly to trigger the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human microvascular endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells indicates a novel mechanism of EHEC-Hly involvement in the pathogenesis of EHEC diseases. The OMV-mediated intracellular delivery represents a newly recognized mechanism for a bacterial toxin to enter host cells in

  19. Importance of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sangha, N; Kaur, S; Sharma, V; Krishnasastry, M V

    1999-04-02

    The physical state of two model mutants of alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL), alphaHL(1-289), a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (CDM), and alphaHL(1-331), a carboxyl-terminal extension mutant (CEM), were examined in detail to identify the role of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of native alphaHL. Denatured alphaHL can be refolded efficiently with nearly total recovery of its activity upon restoration of nondenaturing conditions. Various biophysical and biochemical studies on the three proteins have revealed the importance of an intact carboxyl terminus in the folding of alphaHL. The CDM exhibits a marked increase in susceptibility to proteases as compared with alphaHL. alphaHL and CEM exhibit similar fluorescence emission maxima, and that of the CDM is red-shifted by 9 nm, which indicates a greater solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues of the CDM. In addition, the CDM binds 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) and increases its fluorescence intensity significantly unlike alphaHL and CEM, which show marginal binding. The circular dichroism studies point that the CDM possesses significant secondary structure, but its tertiary structure is greatly diminished as compared with alphaHL. These data show that the CDM has several of the features that characterize a molten globule state. Experiments with freshly translated mutants, using coupled in vitro transcription and translation, have further supported our observations that deletion at the carboxyl terminus leads to major structural perturbations in the water-soluble form of alphaHL. The studies demonstrate a critical role of the carboxyl terminus of alphaHL in attaining the native folded state.

  20. Loss of hemolysin expression in Staphylococcus aureus agr mutants correlates with selective survival during mixed infections in murine abscesses and wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwan, William R; Langhorne, Michael H; Ritchie, Heather D; Stover, C Kendall

    2003-08-18

    During the screening of a Staphylococcus aureus signature-tagged mutagenesis library, it was noted that nonhemolytic bacteria became more abundant as time passed in murine abscess and wound models, but not within organ tissues associated with systemic infections. To examine this further, a mixed population of hyperhemolytic, hemolytic, and nonhemolytic S. aureus strain RN6390 cells were inoculated into mice using abscess, wound, and systemic models of infection. After 7 days in the abscess, the hyperhemolytic group markedly declined, whereas the nonhemolytic population increased significantly. A similar phenomenon occurred in murine wounds, but not during the systemic infection. Sequencing of several of the signature-tagged mutants indicated mutations in the agrC gene or within the agrA-agrC intergenic region. Both alpha-hemolysin and delta-hemolysin activity was curtailed in these mutants, but beta-hemolysin activity was unaffected. Single strain comparisons between wild-type strain 8325-4 and strain DU1090 (hla-) as well as between strain RN6911 (agr) and wild-type strain RN6390 were performed using the same three animal models of infection. The agr mutant strain and the hla mutant strain showed no difference in bacterial counts in murine wounds compared to their respective parent strains. The same held true in murine abscesses at day 4, but strain RN6911 counts then declined at day 7. Considerable clearing of the hla mutant strain and the agr mutant strain occurred in the systemic model of infection. Mixed infections with the DU1090 and 8325-4 strains in the abscess model showed a slight advantage given to the DU1090 population, but a distinct selection for the parental 8325-4 strain in the liver. These results suggest that agr mutations cause reductions in the expression of several secreted proteins, including alpha- and delta-hemolysin, which in turn contribute to a growth advantage of this agr mutant group within a mixed population of S. aureus cells residing

  1. Phylogenetic and in silico functional analyses of thermostable-direct hemolysin and tdh-related encoding genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and other Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Sushanta K; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and spread of pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus have drawn attention to make detailed study on their genomes. The pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus has been associated with thermostable-direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). The present study evaluated characteristics of tdh and trh genes, considering the phylogenetic and in silico functional features of V. parahaemolyticus and other bacteria. Fifty-two tdh and trh genes submitted to the GenBank were analyzed for sequence similarity. The promoter sequences of these genes were also analyzed from transcription start point to -35 regions and correlated with amino acid substitution within the coding regions. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that tdh and trh are highly distinct and also differ within the V. parahaemolyticus strains that were isolated from different geographical regions. Promoter sequence analysis revealed nucleotide substitutions and deletions at -18 and -19 positions among the pandemic, prepandemic, and nonpandemic tdh sequences. Many amino acid substitutions were also found within the signal peptide and also in the matured protein region of several TDH proteins as compared to TDH-S protein of pandemic V. parahaemolyticus. Experimental evidences are needed to recognize the importance of substitutions and deletions in the tdh and trh genes.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic comparisons reveal a broad distribution and heterogeneity of hemolysin BL genes among Bacillus cereus isolates.

    PubMed

    Thaenthanee, Suwicha; Wong, Amy C Lee; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2005-11-25

    The presence of hemolysin BL (HBL; components L(2), L(1), and B)-encoding genes (hblC, hblD, and hblA) from 339 Bacillus cereus strains isolated in Thailand was determined. PCR analysis showed that all three hbl genes were detected in 222 strains (65.5%). Two, one or no hbl genes were detected in 3 (0.9%), 6 (1.8%), and 108 (31.8%) strains, respectively. Among the 222 strains in which all three hbl genes were detected, 210 (61.9%) displayed discontinuous hemolysis (DH) characteristic of HBL producers, while 12 (3.5%) showed continuous hemolysis (CH) on sheep blood agar. Among strains in which none of the hbl genes was detected, 97 (28.6%) displayed CH while 11 (3.2%) did not show hemolytic activity. Three strains in which two hbl genes were detected showed CH. hblC was present in five of six strains where only one hbl gene was detected, and all of them (designated SS-00-15, TG-00-06, TG-00-14, F-00-25, and NR-01-49) showed DH. The HpaII restriction profiles of PCR fragments amplified from the hblC-A region in these five strains using hblC forward (FHC) and hblA reverse (RHA(2)) primers displayed heterogeneous patterns, which indicated sequence variation. Western blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies (Pab) raised against HBL components purified from strain F837/76 showed that three of the five strains produced all three components, whereas strain TG-00-06 did not give a signal for any component, and strain TG-00-14 produced B and L(1) but not L(2). The production of L(2) by these five strains was further analyzed using the Oxoid RPLA test. Three strains gave high titers (>64) whereas strains TG-00-06 and TG-00-14 showed lower titers of 16 and 32, respectively. The data show that HBL-encoding genes are widely distributed among B. cereus isolated in Thailand and there is a high degree of heterogeneity in both the genes and proteins. This is the first report of a B. cereus strain showing DH in which all three hbl genes and their proteins were not detected by both

  3. Functional Contributions of Positive Charges in the Pore-Lining Helix 3 of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin to Hemolytic Activity and Ion-Channel Opening

    PubMed Central

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Prangkio, Panchika; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2017-01-01

    The Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was previously demonstrated to be an important determinant for hemolysis against target erythrocytes and ion-channel formation in planar lipid bilayers (PLBs). Here, net-charge variations in the pore-lining helix of thirteen related RTX cytolysins including CyaA-Hly were revealed by amino acid sequence alignments, reflecting their different degrees of hemolytic activity. To analyze possible functional effects of net-charge alterations on hemolytic activity and channel formation of CyaA-Hly, specific mutations were made at Gln574 or Glu581 in its pore-lining α3 of which both residues are highly conserved Lys in the three highly active RTX cytolysins (i.e., Escherichia coli α-hemolysin, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae toxin, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin). All six constructed CyaA-Hly mutants that were over-expressed in E. coli as 126 kDa His-tagged soluble proteins were successfully purified via immobilized Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Both positive-charge substitutions (Q574K, Q574R, E581K, E581R) and negative-charge elimination (E581Q) appeared to increase the kinetics of toxin-induced hemolysis while the substitution with a negatively-charged side-chain (Q574E) completely abolished its hemolytic activity. When incorporated into PLBs under symmetrical conditions (1.0 M KCl, pH 7.4), all five mutant toxins with the increased hemolytic activity produced clearly-resolved single channels with higher open probability and longer lifetime than the wild-type toxin, albeit with a half decrease in their maximum conductance. Molecular dynamics simulations for 50 ns of a trimeric CyaA-Hly pore model comprising three α2-loop-α3 transmembrane hairpins revealed a significant role of the positive charge at both target positions in the structural stability and enlarged diameter of the simulated pore. Altogether, our present data have disclosed functional contributions of positively-charged side

  4. Functional Contributions of Positive Charges in the Pore-Lining Helix 3 of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin to Hemolytic Activity and Ion-Channel Opening.

    PubMed

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Prangkio, Panchika; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2017-03-16

    The Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was previously demonstrated to be an important determinant for hemolysis against target erythrocytes and ion-channel formation in planar lipid bilayers (PLBs). Here, net-charge variations in the pore-lining helix of thirteen related RTX cytolysins including CyaA-Hly were revealed by amino acid sequence alignments, reflecting their different degrees of hemolytic activity. To analyze possible functional effects of net-charge alterations on hemolytic activity and channel formation of CyaA-Hly, specific mutations were made at Gln(574) or Glu(581) in its pore-lining α3 of which both residues are highly conserved Lys in the three highly active RTX cytolysins (i.e., Escherichia coli α-hemolysin, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae toxin, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin). All six constructed CyaA-Hly mutants that were over-expressed in E. coli as 126 kDa His-tagged soluble proteins were successfully purified via immobilized Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography. Both positive-charge substitutions (Q574K, Q574R, E581K, E581R) and negative-charge elimination (E581Q) appeared to increase the kinetics of toxin-induced hemolysis while the substitution with a negatively-charged side-chain (Q574E) completely abolished its hemolytic activity. When incorporated into PLBs under symmetrical conditions (1.0 M KCl, pH 7.4), all five mutant toxins with the increased hemolytic activity produced clearly-resolved single channels with higher open probability and longer lifetime than the wild-type toxin, albeit with a half decrease in their maximum conductance. Molecular dynamics simulations for 50 ns of a trimeric CyaA-Hly pore model comprising three α2-loop-α3 transmembrane hairpins revealed a significant role of the positive charge at both target positions in the structural stability and enlarged diameter of the simulated pore. Altogether, our present data have disclosed functional contributions of positively

  5. Vibrio parahaemolyticus has a homolog of the Vibrio cholerae toxRS operon that mediates environmentally induced regulation of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Kumagai, K; Baba, K; Mekalanos, J J; Nishibuchi, M

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to identify the regulatory gene controlling the expression of the tdh gene, encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we examined total DNA of AQ3815 (a Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strain) for sequences homologous to that of the toxR gene of Vibrio cholerae. The extracted DNA gave a weak hybridization signal under reduced-stringency conditions with a toxR-specific DNA probe. Cloning and sequence analysis of the probe-positive sequence revealed an operon (Vp-toxRS) which was highly similar to the toxRS operon of V. cholerae (Vc-toxRS) (52 and 62% similarities in the two genes, respectively). The deduced amino acid sequences of the Vp-toxRS gene products (Vp-ToxRS) contained regions similar to the proposed transmembrane and activity domains of the Vc-toxRS gene products (Vc-ToxRS). All clinical and environmental strains of V. parahaemolyticus examined possessed the Vp-toxRS genes. In the presence of Vp-ToxS, Vp-ToxR promoted expression of the tdh2 gene, one of two tdh genes (tdh1 and tdh2) carried by Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains. The DNA sequence located 144 bp upstream of the tdh2 coding region was shown to be important for the Vp-ToxR-stimulated expression of the tdh2 gene in an Escherichia coli background. Comparative analysis of AQ3815 and its isogenic Vp-toxR null mutant gave the following results: (i) Vp-ToxR promoted, in an AQ3815 background, expression of the tdh gene to different degrees in various culture media, with KP broth (2% peptone, 0.5% NaCl, 0.03 M KH2PO4, pH 6.2) being most effective (12-fold); (ii) the promotion of tdh gene expression in KP broth was at the level of transcription; and (iii) Vp-ToxR was essential for demonstration of enterotoxic activity of AQ3815 in the rabbit ileal loop, a model previously used to demonstrate thermostable direct hemolysin-mediated enterotoxic activity of AQ3815. These results demonstrate that Vp-ToxR and Vc-ToxR share a strikingly similar function, i.e., direct

  6. Substrate-triggered recruitment of the TolC channel-tunnel during type I export of hemolysin by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, L; Hughes, C; Koronakis, V

    2001-10-26

    A defining event in type I export of hemolysin by Escherichia coli is the substrate-triggered recruitment of the TolC channel-tunnel by an inner membrane complex. This complex comprises a traffic ATPase (HlyB) and the 478 residue adaptor protein (HlyD), which contacts TolC during recruitment. HlyD has a large periplasmic domain (amino acid residues 81-478) linked by a single transmembrane helix to a small N-terminal cytosolic domain (1-59). Export was disabled by deletion of the ca 60 amino acid residue cytosolic domain of HlyD, even though the truncated HlyD (HlyDDelta45) was, like the wild-type, able to trimerise in the cytosolic membrane, and interact with the traffic ATPase. The mutant HlyB/HlyDDelta45 inner membrane complex engaged the hemolysin substrate, but this substrate-engaged complex failed to trigger recruitment of TolC. Further analyses showed that HlyDDelta45 was specifically unable to bind the substrate. The result suggests that substrate engagement by the traffic ATPase alone is insufficient to trigger TolC recruitment, and that substrate binding to the HlyD cytosolic domain is essential. Analysis of three further N-terminal deletion variants, HlyDDelta26, HlyDDelta26-45 and HlyDDelta34-38, indicated that an extreme N-terminal amphipathic helix and a cytosolic cluster of charged residues are central to the cytosolic domain function. The cytosolic amphipathic helix was not essential for substrate engagement or TolC recruitment, but export was impaired without it. In contrast, when the charged amino acid residues were deleted, the substrate was still engaged by HlyD but engagement was unproductive, i.e. TolC recruitment was not triggered. Our results are compatible with the HlyD cytosolic domain mediating transduction of the substrate binding signal directly, presumably to the HlyD periplasmic domain, to trigger recruitment of TolC and assemble the type I export complex.

  7. Comparative Prevalence of Immune Evasion Complex Genes Associated with β-Hemolysin Converting Bacteriophages in MRSA ST5 Isolates from Swine, Swine Facilities, Humans with Swine Contact, and Humans with No Swine Contact.

    PubMed

    Hau, Samantha J; Sun, Jisun; Davies, Peter R; Frana, Timothy S; Nicholson, Tracy L

    2015-01-01

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) draws concern from the public health community because in some countries these organisms may represent the largest reservoir of MRSA outside hospital settings. Recent studies indicate LA-MRSA strains from swine are more genetically diverse than the first reported sequence type ST398. In the US, a diverse population of LA-MRSA is found including organisms of the ST398, ST9, and ST5 lineages. Occurrence of ST5 MRSA in swine is of particular concern since ST5 is among the most prevalent lineages causing clinical infections in humans. The prominence of ST5 in clinical disease is believed to result from acquisition of bacteriophages containing virulence or host-adapted genes including the immune-evasion cluster (IEC) genes carried by β-hemolysin converting bacteriophages, whose absence in LA-MRSA ST398 is thought to contribute to reduced rates of human infection and transmission associated with this lineage. The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of IEC genes associated with β-hemolysin converting bacteriophages in MRSA ST5 isolates obtained from agricultural sources, including swine, swine facilities, and humans with short- or long-term swine exposure. To gain a broader perspective, the prevalence of these genes in LA-MRSA ST5 strains was compared to the prevalence in clinical MRSA ST5 strains from humans with no known exposure to swine. IEC genes were not present in any of the tested MRSA ST5 strains from agricultural sources and the β-hemolysin gene was intact in these strains, indicating the bacteriophage's absence. In contrast, the prevalence of the β-hemolysin converting bacteriophage in MRSA ST5 strains from humans with no exposure to swine was 90.4%. The absence of β-hemolysin converting bacteriophage in LA-MRSA ST5 isolates is consistent with previous reports evaluating ST398 strains and provides genetic evidence indicating LA-MRSA ST5 isolates may harbor a reduced

  8. The Pore-Forming Toxin β hemolysin/cytolysin Triggers p38 MAPK-Dependent IL-10 Production in Macrophages and Inhibits Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bebien, Magali; Hensler, Mary E.; Davanture, Suzel; Hsu, Li-Chung; Karin, Michael; Park, Jin Mo; Alexopoulou, Lena; Liu, George Y.; Nizet, Victor; Lawrence, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in human newborns and immune-compromised adults. The pore-forming toxin (PFT) β hemolysin/cytolysin (βh/c) is a major virulence factor for GBS, which is generally attributed to its cytolytic functions. Here we show βh/c has immunomodulatory properties on macrophages at sub-lytic concentrations. βh/c-mediated activation of p38 MAPK drives expression of the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and inhibits both IL-12 and NOS2 expression in GBS-infected macrophages, which are critical factors in host defense. Isogenic mutant bacteria lacking βh/c fail to activate p38-mediated IL-10 production in macrophages and promote increased IL-12 and NOS2 expression. Furthermore, targeted deletion of p38 in macrophages increases resistance to invasive GBS infection in mice, associated with impaired IL-10 induction and increased IL-12 production in vivo. These data suggest p38 MAPK activation by βh/c contributes to evasion of host defense through induction of IL-10 expression and inhibition of macrophage activation, a new mechanism of action for a PFT and a novel anti-inflammatory role for p38 in the pathogenesis of invasive bacterial infection. Our studies suggest p38 MAPK may represent a new therapeutic target to blunt virulence and improve clinical outcome of invasive GBS infection. PMID:22829768

  9. A mutant cell line resistant to Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH): its potential in identification of putative receptor for TDH.

    PubMed

    Tang, G; Iida, T; Inoue, H; Yutsudo, M; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    1997-05-24

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a pore-forming toxin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, is cytotoxic to Rat-1, a fibroblast cell line derived from rat embryo. Through mutagenesis of Rat-1 with nitrosoguanidine, we established a mutant cell line, MR-T1. MR-T1 was over 200 times more resistant to the cytotoxic activity of TDH than Rat-1. TDH increased membrane permeability of Rat-1 but not of MR-T1. Binding analysis showed that, while being able to bind to Rat-1. TDH failed to bind to MR-T1, indicating that MR-T1 is deficient in the putative receptor for TDH. Somatic hybrid cells between Rat-1 and MR-T1 were similarly sensitive to TDH as Rat-1. Moreover, TDH could bind to the hybrid cells as well as to Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that MR-T1 is promising for complementation cloning of a gene related to the putative receptor for TDH.

  10. Temperature and Electrolyte Optimization of the α-Hemolysin Latch Sensing Zone for Detection of Base Modification in Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert P.; Fleming, Aaron M.; Jin, Qian; Burrows, Cynthia J.; White, Henry S.

    2014-01-01

    The latch region of the wild-type protein pore α-hemolysin (α-HL) constitutes a sensing zone for individual abasic sites (and furan analogs) in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The presence of an abasic site or furan within a DNA duplex, electrophoretically captured in the α-HL vestibule and positioned at the latch region, can be detected based on the current blockage prior to duplex unzipping. We investigated variations in blockage current as a function of temperature (12–35°C) and KCl concentration (0.15–1.0 M) to understand the origin of the current signature and to optimize conditions for identifying the base modification. In 1 M KCl solution, substitution of a furan for a cytosine base in the latch region results in an ∼8 kJ mol−1 decrease in the activation energy for ion transport through the protein pore. This corresponds to a readily measured ∼2 pA increase in current at room temperature. Optimal resolution for detecting the presence of a furan in the latch region is achieved at lower KCl concentrations, where the noise in the measured blockage current is significantly lower. The noise associated with the blockage current also depends on the stability of the duplex (as measured from the melting temperature), where a greater noise in the measured blockage current is observed for less stable duplexes. PMID:25140427

  11. Escherichia coli α-Hemolysin Triggers Shrinkage of Erythrocytes via KCa3.1 and TMEM16A Channels with Subsequent Phosphatidylserine Exposure*

    PubMed Central

    Skals, Marianne; Jensen, Uffe B.; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Kunzelmann, Karl; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A.

    2010-01-01

    α-Hemolysin from Escherichia coli (HlyA) readily lyse erythrocytes from various species. We have recently demonstrated that this pore-forming toxin provokes distinct shrinkage and crenation before it finally leads to swelling and lysis of erythrocytes. The present study documents the underlying mechanism for this severe volume reduction. We show that HlyA-induced shrinkage and crenation of human erythrocytes occur subsequent to a significant rise in [Ca2+]i. The Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa3.1 (or Gardos channel) is essential for the initial shrinkage, because both clotrimazole and TRAM-34 prevent the shrinkage and potentiate hemolysis produced by HlyA. Notably, the recently described Ca2+-activated Cl− channel TMEM16A contributes substantially to HlyA-induced cell volume reduction. Erythrocytes isolated from TMEM16A−/− mice showed significantly attenuated crenation and increased lysis compared with controls. Additionally, we found that HlyA leads to acute exposure of phosphatidylserine in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. This exposure was considerably reduced by KCa3.1 antagonists. In conclusion, this study shows that HlyA triggers acute erythrocyte shrinkage, which depends on Ca2+-activated efflux of K+ via KCa3.1 and Cl− via TMEM16A, with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure. This mechanism might potentially allow HlyA-damaged erythrocytes to be removed from the bloodstream by macrophages and thereby reduce the risk of intravascular hemolysis. PMID:20231275

  12. Temperature and electrolyte optimization of the α-hemolysin latch sensing zone for detection of base modification in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert P; Fleming, Aaron M; Jin, Qian; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2014-08-19

    The latch region of the wild-type protein pore α-hemolysin (α-HL) constitutes a sensing zone for individual abasic sites (and furan analogs) in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The presence of an abasic site or furan within a DNA duplex, electrophoretically captured in the α-HL vestibule and positioned at the latch region, can be detected based on the current blockage prior to duplex unzipping. We investigated variations in blockage current as a function of temperature (12-35°C) and KCl concentration (0.15-1.0 M) to understand the origin of the current signature and to optimize conditions for identifying the base modification. In 1 M KCl solution, substitution of a furan for a cytosine base in the latch region results in an ∼ 8 kJ mol(-1) decrease in the activation energy for ion transport through the protein pore. This corresponds to a readily measured ∼ 2 pA increase in current at room temperature. Optimal resolution for detecting the presence of a furan in the latch region is achieved at lower KCl concentrations, where the noise in the measured blockage current is significantly lower. The noise associated with the blockage current also depends on the stability of the duplex (as measured from the melting temperature), where a greater noise in the measured blockage current is observed for less stable duplexes.

  13. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  14. Serodiagnosis of Acute Typhoid Fever in Nigerian Pediatric Cases by Detection of Serum IgA and IgG Against Hemolysin E and Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Davies, D Huw; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima, Rie; Liang, Li; Jasinskis, Algis; Supnet, Medalyn; Felgner, Philip L; Teng, Andy; Pablo, Jozelyn; Molina, Douglas M; Obaro, Stephen K

    2016-08-03

    Inexpensive, easy-to-use, and highly sensitive diagnostic tests are currently unavailable for typhoid fever. To identify candidate serodiagnostic markers, we have probed microarrays displaying the full Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) proteome of 4,352 different proteins + lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), with sera from Nigerian pediatric typhoid and other febrile cases, Nigerian healthy controls, and healthy U.S. adults. Nigerian antibody profiles were broad (∼500 seropositive antigens) and mainly low level, with a small number of stronger "hits," whereas the profile in U.S. adults was < 1/5 as broad, consistent with endemic exposure in Nigeria. Nigerian profiles were largely unaffected by clinical diagnosis, although the response against t1477 (hemolysin E) consistently emerged as stronger in typhoid cases. The response to LPS was also a strong discriminator of healthy controls and typhoid, although LPS did not discriminate between typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) disease. As a first step toward the development of a point-of-care diagnostic, t1477 and LPS were evaluated on immunostrips. Both provided good discrimination between healthy controls and typhoid/NTS disease. Such a test could provide a useful screen for salmonellosis (typhoid and NTS disease) in suspected pediatric cases that present with undefined febrile disease.

  15. Above and beyond C5a Receptor Targeting by Staphylococcal Leucotoxins: Retrograde Transport of Panton–Valentine Leucocidin and γ-Hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann-Meisse, Gaëlle; Prévost, Gilles; Jover, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Various membrane receptors associated with the innate immune response have recently been identified as mediators of the cellular action of Staphylococcus aureus leucotoxins. Two of these, the Panton–Valentine leucotoxin LukS-PV/LukF-PV and the γ-hemolysin HlgC/HlgB, bind the C5a complement-derived peptide receptor. These leucotoxins utilize the receptor to induce intracellular Ca2+ release from internal stores, other than those activated by C5a. The two leucotoxins are internalized with the phosphorylated receptor, but it is unknown whether they divert retrograde transport of the receptor or follow another pathway. Immunolabeling and confocal microscopic techniques were used to analyze the presence of leucotoxins in endosomes, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi. The two leucotoxins apparently followed retrograde transport similar to that of the C5a peptide-activated receptor. However, HlgC/HlgB reached the Golgi network very early, whereas LukS-PV/LukF-PV followed slower kinetics. The HlgC/HlgB leucotoxin remained in neutrophils 6 h after a 10-min incubation of the cells in the presence of the toxin with no signs of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was observed 3 h after neutrophils were incubated with LukS-PV/LukF-PV. Such retrograde transport of leucotoxins provides a novel understanding of the cellular effects initiated by sublytic concentrations of these toxins. PMID:28117704

  16. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis—the causative agent of whooping cough—and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity. PMID:27043627

  17. The β-prism lectin domain of Vibrio cholerae hemolysin promotes self-assembly of the β-pore-forming toxin by a carbohydrate-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sreerupa; Mukherjee, Amarshi; Mazumdar, Budhaditya; Ghosh, Amar N; Banerjee, Kalyan K

    2014-02-14

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin/hemolysin (VCC) is an amphipathic 65-kDa β-pore-forming toxin with a C-terminal β-prism lectin domain. Because deletion or point mutation of the lectin domain seriously compromises hemolytic activity, it is thought that carbohydrate-dependent interactions play a critical role in membrane targeting of VCC. To delineate the contributions of the cytolysin and lectin domains in pore formation, we used wild-type VCC, 50-kDa VCC (VCC(50)) without the lectin domain, and mutant VCC(D617A) with no carbohydrate-binding activity. VCC and its two variants with no carbohydrate-binding activity moved to the erythrocyte stroma with apparent association constants on the order of 10(7) M(-1). However, loss of the lectin domain severely reduced the efficiency of self-association of the VCC monomer with the β-barrel heptamer in the synthetic lipid bilayer from ∼83 to 27%. Notably, inactivation of the carbohydrate-binding activity by the D617A mutation marginally reduced oligomerization to ∼77%. Oligomerization of VCC(50) was temperature-insensitive; by contrast, VCC self-assembly increased with increasing temperature, suggesting that the process is driven by entropy and opposed by enthalpy. Asialofetuin, the β1-galactosyl-terminated glycoprotein inhibitor of VCC-induced hemolysis, promoted oligomerization of 65-kDa VCC to a species that resembled the membrane-inserted heptamer in stoichiometry and morphology but had reduced global amphipathicity. In conclusion, we propose (i) that the β-prism lectin domain facilitated toxin assembly by producing entropy during relocation in the heptamer and (ii) that glycoconjugates inhibited VCC by promoting its assembly to a water-soluble, less amphipathic oligomer variant with reduced ability to penetrate the bilayer.

  18. Molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli hemolysin gene (EHEC-hlyA)-harboring isolates from cattle reveals a diverse origin and hybrid diarrheagenic strains.

    PubMed

    Askari Badouei, Mahdi; Morabito, Stefano; Najafifar, Arash; Mazandarani, Emad

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the occurrence of Escherichia coli strains harboring the gene encoding enterohemorrhagic E. coli hemolysin (EHEC-HlyA) in cattle and the association of this gene with various diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes. First, the bovine E. coli isolates were screened for EHEC-hlyA gene by PCR, and then they were characterized for the phylogenetic groups and the presence of the major virulence genes of different DEC pathotypes. In total, 25 virulence gene profiles were observed in 54 EHEC-hlyA+ isolates that reflect a considerable heterogeneity. The EHEC-hlyA+ strains were mostly associated with EHEC (72%), while only 7.4% were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We also showed the presence of estA gene of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in 6 isolates (11.1%). Interestingly, two of the estA+ strains showed hybrid pathotypes with one carrying eae/estA (EPEC/ETEC), and the other one stx2/astA/estA (EHEC/ETEC). None of the isolates were related to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC). The EHEC-plasmid encoded genes occurred in seven different combinations with EHEC-hlyA/saa/subA/espP being the most prevalent (46.3%). All stx-/eae+ strains carried O island 57 (OI-57) molecular marker(s) that may indicate these to be the progenitors of EHEC or strains losing stx. The most prevalent phylogroup was B1 (61.1%), but the most heterogeneous strains including the hybrid strains belonged to A phylogroup. Overall, our results indicate that cattle EHEC-hlyA encoding E. coli isolates consist of diverse diarrheagenic strains with the possible existence of hybrid pathotypes. Future studies are required to clarify the evolutionary aspects and clinical significance of these strains in humans and domestic animals.

  19. Development and evaluation of a rapid, simple, and sensitive immunochromatographic assay to detect thermostable direct hemolysin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus in enrichment cultures of stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kentaro; Ishibashi, Masanori; Tsukamoto, Teizo

    2006-05-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is considered to be a major virulence factor in Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and most cases of V. parahaemolyticus diarrhea in humans are caused by tdh gene-positive strains. In the present study, we developed an immunochromatographic assay to detect TDH (TDH-ICA) and evaluated the utility of TDH-ICA for the diagnosis of V. parahaemolyticus diarrhea. TDH-ICA allowed the detection of 0.2 ng/ml of TDH within 10 min. Fecal homogenates were spiked with various numbers of tdh-positive V. parahaemolyticus organisms, and their enrichment cultures were tested with TDH-ICA. The results of detection of TDH in the enrichment cultures by TDH-ICA were in accord with the results of recovery of the spiked V. parahaemolyticus organisms from the enrichment cultures by plating onto thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar. When enrichment cultures of 217 stool specimens from patients with diarrhea were tested with TDH-ICA, the TDH-ICA results showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared to the results of isolation of V. parahaemolyticus from the stool specimens by a conventional bacterial culture test. Since TDH-ICA was able to detect TDH in a fecal enrichment culture within 10 min, TDH-ICA testing of a fecal enrichment culture could be completed rapidly and easily within approximately 16 h, including incubation time for the fecal enrichment culture. These results indicate that TDH-ICA is a rapid, simple, and sensitive TDH detection method and that TDH-ICA testing of a fecal enrichment culture is useful as an adjunct to facilitate the early diagnosis of V. parahaemolyticus diarrhea.

  20. The deletion of several amino acid stretches of Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin (HlyA) suggests that the channel-forming domain contains beta-strands.

    PubMed

    Benz, Roland; Maier, Elke; Bauer, Susanne; Ludwig, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli α-hemolysin (HlyA) is a pore-forming protein of 110 kDa belonging to the family of RTX toxins. A hydrophobic region between the amino acid residues 238 and 410 in the N-terminal half of HlyA has previously been suggested to form hydrophobic and/or amphipathic α-helices and has been shown to be important for hemolytic activity and pore formation in biological and artificial membranes. The structure of the HlyA transmembrane channel is, however, largely unknown. For further investigation of the channel structure, we deleted in HlyA different stretches of amino acids that could form amphipathic β-strands according to secondary structure predictions (residues 71-110, 158-167, 180-203, and 264-286). These deletions resulted in HlyA mutants with strongly reduced hemolytic activity. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that HlyAΔ71-110 and HlyAΔ264-286 formed channels with much smaller single-channel conductance than wildtype HlyA, whereas their channel-forming activity was virtually as high as that of the wildtype toxin. HlyAΔ158-167 and HlyAΔ180-203 were unable to form defined channels in lipid bilayers. Calculations based on the single-channel data indicated that the channels generated by HlyAΔ71-110 and HlyAΔ264-286 had a smaller size (diameter about 1.4 to 1.8 nm) than wildtype HlyA channels (diameter about 2.0 to 2.6 nm), suggesting that in these mutants part of the channel-forming domain was removed. Osmotic protection experiments with erythrocytes confirmed that HlyA, HlyAΔ71-110, and HlyAΔ264-286 form defined transmembrane pores and suggested channel diameters that largely agreed with those estimated from the single-channel data. Taken together, these results suggest that the channel-forming domain of HlyA might contain β-strands, possibly in addition to α-helical structures.

  1. The Deletion of Several Amino Acid Stretches of Escherichia coli Alpha-Hemolysin (HlyA) Suggests That the Channel-Forming Domain Contains Beta-Strands

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Roland; Maier, Elke; Bauer, Susanne; Ludwig, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli α-hemolysin (HlyA) is a pore-forming protein of 110 kDa belonging to the family of RTX toxins. A hydrophobic region between the amino acid residues 238 and 410 in the N-terminal half of HlyA has previously been suggested to form hydrophobic and/or amphipathic α-helices and has been shown to be important for hemolytic activity and pore formation in biological and artificial membranes. The structure of the HlyA transmembrane channel is, however, largely unknown. For further investigation of the channel structure, we deleted in HlyA different stretches of amino acids that could form amphipathic β-strands according to secondary structure predictions (residues 71–110, 158–167, 180–203, and 264–286). These deletions resulted in HlyA mutants with strongly reduced hemolytic activity. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that HlyAΔ71–110 and HlyAΔ264–286 formed channels with much smaller single-channel conductance than wildtype HlyA, whereas their channel-forming activity was virtually as high as that of the wildtype toxin. HlyAΔ158–167 and HlyAΔ180–203 were unable to form defined channels in lipid bilayers. Calculations based on the single-channel data indicated that the channels generated by HlyAΔ71–110 and HlyAΔ264–286 had a smaller size (diameter about 1.4 to 1.8 nm) than wildtype HlyA channels (diameter about 2.0 to 2.6 nm), suggesting that in these mutants part of the channel-forming domain was removed. Osmotic protection experiments with erythrocytes confirmed that HlyA, HlyAΔ71–110, and HlyAΔ264–286 form defined transmembrane pores and suggested channel diameters that largely agreed with those estimated from the single-channel data. Taken together, these results suggest that the channel-forming domain of HlyA might contain β-strands, possibly in addition to α-helical structures. PMID:25463653

  2. What controls open-pore and residual currents in the first sensing zone of alpha-hemolysin nanopore? Combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Biase, Pablo M.; Ervin, Eric N.; Pal, Prithwish; Samoylova, Olga; Markosyan, Suren; Keehan, Michael G.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The electrophoretic transport of single-stranded DNA through biological nanopores such as alpha-hemolysin (αHL) is a promising and cost-effective technology with the potential to revolutionize genomics. The rational design of pores with the controlled polymer translocation rates and high contrast between different nucleotides could improve significantly nanopore sequencing applications. Here, we apply a combination of theoretical and experimental methods in an attempt to elucidate several selective modifications in the pore which were proposed to be central for the effective discrimination between purines and pyrimidines. Our nanopore test set includes the wild type αHL and six mutants (E111N/M113X/K147N) in which the cross-section and chemical functionality of the first constriction zone of the pore are modified. Electrophysiological recordings were combined with all-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations (MD) and a recently developed Brownian Dynamics (BROMOC) protocol to investigate residual ion currents and pore-DNA interactions for two homo-polymers e.g. poly(dA)40 or poly(dC)40 blocking the pore. The calculated residual currents and contrast in the poly(dA)40/poly(dC)40 blocked pore are in qualitative agreement with the experimental recordings. We showed that a simple structural metric allows rationalization of key elements in the emergent contrast between purines and pyrimidines in the modified αHL mutants. The shape of the pore and its capacity for hydrogen bonding to a translocated polynucleotide are two essential parameters for contrast optimization. To further probe the impact of these two factors in the ssDNA sensing, we eliminated the effect of the primary constriction using serine substitutions (i.e. E111S/M113S/T145S/K147S) and increased the hydrophobic volume of the central residue in the secondary constriction (L135I). This pore modification sharply increased the contrast between Adenine (A) and Cytosine (C).The electrophoretic transport of single

  3. A standard immunoglobulin preparation produced from bovine colostra shows antibody reactivity and neutralization activity against Shiga-like toxins and EHEC-hemolysin of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Lissner, R; Schmidit, H; Karch, H

    1996-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes a variety of clinical conditions, the most important being hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. A curative therapy of EHEC diseases is not yet feasible. This study investigates the antibody reactivity of Lactobin, a standardized immunoglobulin (Ig) preparation, obtained from the colostra of non-immunized cows. Three different batches of Lactobin exhibited equally high titers of specific antibodies against Shiga-like toxins (SLTs, verocytotoxins) and EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly) produced by E. coli O157. In addition, Lactobin blocked the cytotoxic effect of SLT-I and SLT-II on Vero cell monolayers and inhibited the cytolytic effects of EHEC-Hly on human erythrocytes. Since Lactobin contains high levels of antibodies and neutralizing activity against important virulence factors of EHEC O157, this drug has potential use in the treatment of diarrhea and the prevention of EHEC-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  4. The thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) of Vibrio hollisae is dissimilar in prevalence to and phylogenetically distant from the tdh genes of other vibrios: implications in the horizontal transfer of the tdh gene.

    PubMed

    Nishibuchi, M; Janda, J M; Ezaki, T

    1996-01-01

    Vibrio hollisae strains isolated recently from patients in various locations were examined for the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh) using nucleic acid hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays. The results were consistent with the previous finding that all strains of V. hollisae carry the tdh gene. In contrast, the tdh gene has been detected in a minority of strains for other Vibrio species (V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae non-O1, and V. mimicus). Detailed phylogenetic analysis showed that the tdh genes of the non-V. hollisae species were very closely related to each other and that the tdh gene of V. hollisae was distantly related to the tdh genes of the non-V. hollisae species. These results and the proposed insertion sequence-mediated tdh transfer mechanism suggest that the tdh gene may have been maintained stably in V. hollisae and that the tdh genes of the non-V. hollisae species may have been involved in recent horizontal transfer.

  5. Adaptation of the Endogenous Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi clyA-Encoded Hemolysin for Antigen Export Enhances the Immunogenicity of Anthrax Protective Antigen Domain 4 Expressed by the Attenuated Live-Vector Vaccine Strain CVD 908-htrA

    PubMed Central

    Galen, James E.; Zhao, Licheng; Chinchilla, Magaly; Wang, Jin Yuan; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Green, Jeffrey; Levine, Myron M.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial live-vector vaccines aim to deliver foreign antigens to the immune system and induce protective immune responses, and surface-expressed or secreted antigens are generally more immunogenic than cytoplasmic constructs. We hypothesize that an optimum expression system will use an endogenous export system to avoid the need for large amounts of heterologous DNA encoding additional proteins. Here we describe the cryptic chromosomally encoded 34-kDa cytolysin A hemolysin of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (ClyA) as a novel export system for the expression of heterologous antigens in the supernatant of attenuated Salmonella serovar Typhi live-vector vaccine strains. We constructed a genetic fusion of ClyA to the reporter green fluorescent protein and showed that in Salmonella serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA, the fusion protein retains biological activity in both domains and is exported into the supernatant of an exponentially growing live vector in the absence of detectable bacterial lysis. The utility of ClyA for enhancing the immunogenicity of an otherwise problematic antigen was demonstrated by engineering ClyA fused to the domain 4 (D4) moiety of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA). A total of 11 of 15 mice immunized intranasally with Salmonella serovar Typhi exporting the protein fusion manifested fourfold or greater rises in serum anti-PA immunoglobulin G, compared with only 1 of 16 mice immunized with the live vector expressing cytoplasmic D4 (P = 0.0002). In addition, the induction of PA-specific gamma interferon and interleukin 5 responses was observed in splenocytes. This technology offers exceptional versatility for enhancing the immunogenicity of bacterial live-vector vaccines. PMID:15557633

  6. Copurification of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Bernheimer, A W; Bey, R F

    1986-01-01

    The hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities of supernatants of cultures of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona tended to copurify when isoelectric fractionation was carried out. Both activities focused primarily at pH 8.1. Considered in conjunction with other circumstantial evidence, the results led to the conclusion that sphingomyelinase C is responsible for hemolysis. PMID:3019890

  7. POSSIBLE ROLES OF FUNGAL HEMOLYSINS IN SICK BUILDING SYNDROME

    EPA Science Inventory

    The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of SBS includes such symptoms in the occupants as headache, distraction, dizziness, fatigue, watery eyes, runny or blocked or bleeding nose, dry or sore throat and skin irritation. The WHO has set a criterion for a healthy building ...

  8. Experiments of salt concentration effects on translocation dynamics of polyelectrolytes passing through alpha-hemolysin pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Byoung-Jin; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    We use polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the Raman susceptibility (χ (ω ,T,x)) of the x-T phase diagram of NaFe1-xCoxAs. Above the structural TS(x) and the superconducting Tc(x) transition, χ (ω ,T,x) is dominated by a low-frequency quasielastic peak in B2g symmetry displaying critical behavior across the entire phase diagram. Below Tc(x), sharp ingap modes emerge for x >=0.0165 in A1g (~65 cm-1) and B2g (~25 and ~55 cm-1) symmetry. The critical charge fluctuations are interpreted in terms of plasma waves of quadrupole excitations which below Tc(x) undergo a metamorphosis into the ingap modes. The A1g mode is a particle-hole (p-h) charge exciton consistent with a non-conventional s +- superconducting groundstate. The minor B2g mode is a Bardasis-Schrieffer Cooper pair exciton of d-wave symmetry which exists only in a narrow doping window of density wave and superconductivity coexistence. The major B2g mode is a bound state of d +- p-h plasma oscillations. We use polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the Raman susceptibility (χ (ω ,T,x)) of the x-T phase diagram of NaFe1-xCoxAs. Above the structural TS(x) and the superconducting Tc(x) transition, χ (ω ,T,x) is dominated by a low-frequency quasielastic peak in B2g symmetry displaying critical behavior across the entire phase diagram. Below Tc(x), sharp ingap modes emerge for x >=0.0165 in A1g (~65 cm-1) and B2g (~25 and ~55 cm-1) symmetry. The critical charge fluctuations are interpreted in terms of plasma waves of quadrupole excitations which below Tc(x) undergo a metamorphosis into the ingap modes. The A1g mode is a particle-hole (p-h) charge exciton consistent with a non-conventional s +- superconducting groundstate. The minor B2g mode is a Bardasis-Schrieffer Cooper pair exciton of d-wave symmetry which exists only in a narrow doping window of density wave and superconductivity coexistence. The major B2g mode is a bound state of d +- p-h plasma oscillations. VKT and GB acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1104884 and from U.S. DOE, BES, Award DE-SC0005463. CZ, SVC and PD acknowledge support from U.S. DOE, BES, Contract DE-FG02-05ER46202.

  9. [Levels of thermostable direct hemolysin production by Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains carrying both tdh and trh genes].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Hashimoto, S; Ishibashi, M; Kim, Y B; Okuda, J; Nishibuchi, M

    1997-12-01

    One hundred and twenty-five strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying both the tdh and trh genes were selected from the strains isolated from the travelers with diarrhea by an hybridization test using polynucleotide probes. The levels of TDH produced by these strains and the association between the TDH levels and related characteristics in these strains were analyzed. The TDH level varied greatly from strain to strain, but none of the levels was as high as that of the typical Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains. The strains were classified into "TDH producer" (18 strains), "Low-level TDH producer" (85 strains), and "No TDH producer" (22 strains) based on the results of a modified Elek test and the hemolysis assay on Wagatsuma agar. The highest TDH level achieved by the "TDH producer" was twofold lower than that of the Kanagawa phenomenon-positive strains as assayed by the RPLA method. All strains possessed the toxR gene. The trh1 and trh2 genes were detected in, respectively, 105 and 20 strains, and no correlation existed between the type of the trh gene and the levels of TDH produced. Considerable restriction fragment length polymorphism was observed with the tdh gene-bearing HindIII DNA fragment in different strains, but it was not related with the TDH level.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Hemolysin-Containing Carnobacterium sp. Strain CP1 Isolated from the Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sidong; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Di; Jing, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Carnobacterium sp. strain CP1 was isolated from Antarctic sandy soil and predicted to be a novel species belonging to the genus Carnobacterium. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence, which consists of a circular 2,605,518-bp chromosome and an 8,883-bp plasmid with G+C contents of 38.13% and 31.63%, respectively. PMID:27445381

  11. PolyA Single Strand DNA Translocation Through an Alpha-Hemolysin Pore Stem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OKeeffe, James; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stolc, Viktor

    2003-01-01

    A new model for the polymer-pore interaction energy is introduced, based on an atomic-scale description of coulombic polymer-pore interaction. The enhanced drift velocity, experimentally observed for short polymers, is successfully accounted for, using this interaction energy model. For R/R(sub 0)>4 (R(sub 0)=7 angstroms) the translocation velocity approaches the free space drift velocity v(sub 0). This motivates the need to appropriately derivatize artificial nanopores, where R>R(sub 0).

  12. Immunization with recombinant aerolysin and hemolysin protected channel catfish against virulent Aeromonas hydrophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeromonas hydrophila is emerging as one of the major concerns in catfish aquaculture in the Southeastern United States due to recent outbreaks of motile aeromonad septicemia (MAS) caused by virulent clonal isolates. There is no effective vaccine currently available for the prevention of MAS. In this...

  13. Real-time PCR detection of the thermostable direct hemolysin and thermolabile hemolysin genes in a Vibrio parahaemolyticus cultured from mussels and mussel homogenate associated with a foodborne outbreak.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carisa R; Heller, Loree C; Peak, K Kealy; Wingfield, David L; Goldstein-Hart, Cynthia L; Bodager, Dean W; Cannons, Andrew C; Amuso, Philip T; Cattanii, Jacqueline

    2004-05-01

    Molecular methods have become vital epidemiological tools in the detection and characterization of bacteria associated with a foodborne outbreak. We used both culture and real-time PCR to detect a Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolate associated with a foodborne outbreak. The outbreak occurred in July 2002 in Polk County, Florida, and originated at a Chinese buffet, with one person being hospitalized. The hospital isolated V. parahaemolyticus from the patient but destroyed the sample after diagnosis. From an onsite visit of the restaurant, food samples that possibly contributed to the outbreak were collected and sent to the Florida Department of Health, Tampa Branch Laboratory. Crab legs, crabsticks, and mussel samples were homogenized and incubated according to the Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual culture protocol. Three sets of primers and a TaqMan probe were designed to target the tdh, trh, and tlh genes and used for real-time PCR. This study was successful in isolating V. parahaemolyticus from a mussel sample and detecting two of its genes (tdh and tlh) in food and pure culture by real-time PCR.

  14. Vibrio parahaemolyticus CalR down regulates the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene transcription and thereby inhibits hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiquan; Zhang, Ying; Gao, He; Zhang, Lingyu; Yin, Zhe; Huang, Xinxiang; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Li

    2017-03-04

    TDH, encoded by tdh gene, is a major virulent determinant of V. parahaemolyticus that controls various biological activities, such as hemolytic activity, cytotoxicity, and enterotoxicity. The hemolytic activity on Wagatsuma agar ascribed to TDH is called Kanagawa phenomenon (KP). All KP positive strains contain tdh1 and tdh2 genes, but tdh2 is predominantly responsible for KP. CalR is a regulatory protein that was originally identified as a repressor of swarming motility and T3SS1 gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus. In the present study, the regulation of tdh2 by CalR was investigated using a set of experiments including qRT-PCR, primer extension, LacZ fusion, hemolytic phenotype, EMSA, and DNase I footprinting assays. The results showed that His-CalR protected a single region from 224bp to 318bp upstream of tdh2 against DNase I digestion, and a transcriptional start site located at 42bp upstream of tdh2 was detected and its transcribed activity was inhibited by CalR. Moreover, the KP test results showed that the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus is also under negative control of CalR. The data demonstrated that CalR is a repressor of the tdh2 transcription and thereby inhibits the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  15. The α-Hemolysin nanopore transduction detector – single-molecule binding studies and immunological screening of antibodies and aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Background Nanopore detection is based on observations of the ionic current threading a single, highly stable, nanometer-scale channel. The dimensions are such that small biomolecules and biopolymers (like DNA and peptides) can translocate or be captured in the channel. The identities of translocating or captured molecules can often be discerned, one from another, based on their channel blockade "signatures". There is a self-limiting aspect to a translocation-based detection mechanism: as the channel fits tighter around the translocating molecule the dynamic range of the ionic current signal is reduced. In this study, a lengthy, highly structure, high dynamic-range, molecular capture is sought as a key component of a transduction-based nanopore detection platform. Results A specialized role, or device augmentation, involving bifunctional molecules has been explored. The bifunctional molecule has one function to enter and blockade the channel in an information-rich self-modulating manner, while the other function is for binding (usually), located on a non-channel-captured portion of the molecule. Part of the bifunctional molecule is, thus, external to the channel and is free to bind or rigidly link to a larger molecule of interest. What results is an event transduction detector: molecular events are directly transduced into discernible changes in the stationary statistics of the bifunctional molecule's channel blockade. Several results are presented of nanopore-based event-transduction detection. Conclusion It may be possible to directly track the bound versus unbound state of a huge variety of molecules using nanopore transduction detection. PMID:18047732

  16. The CpAL quorum sensing system regulates production of hemolysins CPA and PFO to build Clostridium perfringens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jorge E; Shak, Joshua R; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms.

  17. The CpAL Quorum Sensing System Regulates Production of Hemolysins CPA and PFO To Build Clostridium perfringens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  18. The Listeria monocytogenes hemolysin has an acidic pH optimum to compartmentalize activity and prevent damage to infected host cells.

    PubMed

    Glomski, Ian J; Gedde, Margaret M; Tsang, Albert W; Swanson, Joel A; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2002-03-18

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that escapes from a phagosome and grows in the host cell cytosol. The pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, listeriolysin O (LLO), mediates bacterial escape from vesicles and is approximately 10-fold more active at an acidic than neutral pH. By swapping dissimilar residues from a pH-insensitive orthologue, perfringolysin O (PFO), we identified leucine 461 as unique to pathogenic Listeria and responsible for the acidic pH optimum of LLO. Conversion of leucine 461 to the threonine present in PFO increased the hemolytic activity of LLO almost 10-fold at a neutral pH. L. monocytogenes synthesizing LLO L461T, expressed from its endogenous site on the bacterial chromosome, resulted in a 100-fold virulence defect in the mouse listeriosis model. These bacteria escaped from acidic phagosomes and initially grew normally in cells and spread cell to cell, but prematurely permeabilized the host membrane and killed the cell. These data show that the acidic pH optimum of LLO results from an adaptive mutation that acts to limit cytolytic activity to acidic vesicles and prevent damage in the host cytosol, a strategy also used by host cells to compartmentalize lysosomal hydrolases.

  19. QUANTIFICATION OF SIDEROPHORE AND HEMOLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM STRAINS, INCLUDING A STRAIN ISOLATED FROM THE LUNG OF A CHILD WITH PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AND HEMOSIDEROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strain of Stachybotrys chartarum was recently isolated from the lung of a pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis (PH) patient in Texas (designated the Houston strain). This is the first time that S. chartarum has been isolated from the lung of a PH patient. In this study, the ...

  20. Mutations in the Histone-like Nucleoid Structuring Regulatory Gene (hns) Decrease the Adherence of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli 091:H21 Strain B2F1 to Human Colonic Epithelial Cells and Increase the Production of Hemolysin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-19

    rabbits (Cantey and Blake. 1977). calves ( Fischer et aI.., 1994), pigs (Zhu et al~ 1994) and dogs (Drolet et al~ 1994). F. Enterohemorrhaaie E. col; (EHEC...syndrome: a family outbreak. Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. IS: 1008-1011. Barth, M., C. Marschall, A. Mumer, D. Fischer , and :R. Henggearonis. 1995. Role for the...osmoregulation of outer membrane proteins and virulence determinants in Vibrio cholerae requires toxR. J. Bacteriol. 170:2575-2583. Mobley, H. L., D. M. Green

  1. Comparative prevalence of immune evasion complex genes associated with beta-hemolysin converting bacteriophages in MRSA ST5 isolates from swine, swine facilities, humans with swine contact, and humans with no swine contact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) draws concern from the public health community because in some countries these organisms may represent the largest reservoir of MRSA outside hospital settings. Recent studies indicate LA-MRSA strains from swine are more genet...

  2. Cholesterol-dependent hemolytic activity of Passiflora quadrangularis leaves.

    PubMed

    Yuldasheva, L N; Carvalho, E B; Catanho, M-T J A; Krasilnikov, O V

    2005-07-01

    Plants used in traditional medicine are rich sources of hemolysins and cytolysins, which are potential bactericidal and anticancer drugs. The present study demonstrates for the first time the presence of a hemolysin in the leaves of Passiflora quadrangularis L. This hemolysin is heat stable, resistant to trypsin treatment, has the capacity to froth, and acts very rapidly. The hemolysin activity is dose-dependent, with a slope greater than 1 in a double-logarithmic plot. Polyethylene glycols of high molecular weight were able to reduce the rate of hemolysis, while liposomes containing cholesterol completely inhibited it. In contrast, liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine were ineffective. The Passiflora hemolysin markedly increased the conductance of planar lipid bilayers containing cholesterol but was ineffective in cholesterol-free bilayers. Successive extraction of the crude hemolysin with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol resulted in a 10-fold purification, with the hemolytic activity being recovered in the n-butanol fraction. The data suggest that membrane cholesterol is the primary target for this hemolysin and that several hemolysin molecules form a large transmembrane water pore. The properties of the Passiflora hemolysin, such as its frothing ability, positive color reaction with vanillin, selective extraction with n-butanol, HPLC profile, cholesterol-dependent membrane susceptibility, formation of a stable complex with cholesterol, and rapid erythrocyte lysis kinetics indicate that it is probably a saponin.

  3. Properties of the Hemolytic Activities of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Short, Everett C.; Kurtz, Harold J.

    1971-01-01

    Some properties of the cell-free and cell-associated hemolysins of Escherichia coli were studied. Several strains of E. coli that were isolated from intestines of pigs with edema disease produce large quantities of cell-free hemolysin when grown in the presence of an extract of meat. The component of meat that stimulates production of cell-free hemolysin is not extracted by lipid solvents and is not dialyzable. The cell-free hemolysin is an acidic substance that occurs in two forms. It is inactivated by trypsin but not by lecithinase, lysozyme, ribonuclease, or deoxyribonuclease, shows optimum activity between pH 7 and 8, and requires calcium ion for activity. It does not appear to be an enzyme. The kinetics of the lytic reaction are most consistent with the hypothesis that one molecule of cell-free hemolysin is sufficient to lyse one erythrocyte and that it is inactivated in the lytic reaction. The cell-free hemolysin does not sufficiently damage the cell during the prelytic period to cause lysis after the hemolysin-calcium-erythrocyte complex has been disrupted. The cell-associated hemolysin was not separated from the cell by autolysis, freezing, sonic treatment, or treatment with trypsin or lysozyme. It appears to be closely associated with the metabolic status of the cell. Organisms that are highly hemolytic under usual conditions of assay immediately lose most of their hemolytic capability in the presence of sodium cyanide, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, and rifampin. PMID:16558036

  4. Close association of verotoxin (Shiga-like toxin) production with enterohemolysin production in strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, L; Montenegro, M A; Orskov, I; Orskov, F; Prada, J; Zimmermann, S; Stephan, R

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-four verotoxin-producing (VT+) Escherichia coli strains were analyzed for VT1- and VT2-specific DNA sequences and for production of hemolysin. Strains of human origin were of the following serotypes: O157:H7 or H-, O111:H8 or H-, O26:H11, O114:H4, and rough:H7. Strains of serotypes O157:H7, O113:H21, O116:H21, and rough:H- were from cattle, while those of serotype O139:K12:H1 were from pigs. All 64 isolates carried either VT1 or VT2 or both genes. Sixty of the strains (93.8%) were hemolytic (Hly+). The three O139:K12:H1 strains examined produced alpha-hemolysin, as shown by their reaction with the alpha-hemolysin-specific monoclonal antibody h2A and by DNA hybridization with an alpha-hly gene probe. The remaining 57 Hly+ strains (95%) produced a different type of hemolysin (enterohemolysin), which is genetically and serologically unrelated to alpha-hemolysin. The two types of hemolysin are further distinguished by the appearance of the lysis zone on blood agar and by the time interval for the detection of hemolysis. In contrast to alpha-hemolysin, enterohemolysin can be detected only on blood plates containing washed erythrocytes. The frequent association of enterohemolysin with verotoxin production (89%) makes it useful as an epidemiological marker for rapid and simple detection of potential VT+ E. coli. Images PMID:2681256

  5. A chemical-induced pH-mediated molecular switch

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardhana, Dilani A.; Sengupta, Mrinal K.; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Gupta, Jyoti; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein α-hemolysin pore has been used to develop ultrasensitive biosensors, study biomolecular folding and unfolding, investigate covalent and non-covalent bonding interactions, and probe enzyme kinetics. Here, we report that by addition of ionic liquid tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride solution to the α-hemolysin pore, the α-hemolysin channel can be controlled open or closed by adjusting the pH of the solution. This approach can be employed to develop a novel molecular switch to regulate molecular transport, and should find potential applications as a ‘smart’ drug delivery method. PMID:21919492

  6. Chemical-induced pH-mediated molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Jayawardhana, Dilani A; Sengupta, Mrinal K; Krishantha, D M Milan; Gupta, Jyoti; Armstrong, Daniel W; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-10-15

    The transmembrane protein α-hemolysin pore has been used to develop ultrasensitive biosensors, study biomolecular folding and unfolding, investigate covalent and noncovalent bonding interactions, and probe enzyme kinetics. Here, we report that, by addition of ionic liquid tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride solution to the α-hemolysin pore, the α-hemolysin channel can be controlled open or closed by adjusting the pH of the solution. This approach can be employed to develop a novel molecular switch to regulate molecular transport and should find potential applications as a "smart" drug delivery method.

  7. Hemolysis induced by psoralen previously photo-oxidized in ethanol or aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyagova, Alla A.; Ismailova, Mekhriban I.; Malakhov, Mikhail V.; Potapenko, Alexander Y.

    2004-08-01

    Hemolytic effects of psoralen previously photooxidized (366 nm) in ethanol and aqueous solutions were investigated on human erythrocytes. Photooxidation of psoralen in ethanol or aqueous solutions gives a mixture of hemolysins, some of which spontaneously degrade during about 0.5 h of storage with a loss of hemolytic activity whilst others retain their activity during several days of storage. On exposure of psoralen to UVA irradiation in ethanol solutions, water-degradable hemolysins along with not degradable by water are produced. Reciprocity law of the fluence rate and time of irradiation is not fulfilled for the hemolysins production; they are more efficiently produced at high fluence rate of ultraviolet.

  8. High frequency of virulence factor genes tdh, trh, and tlh in Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from a pristine estuary.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez West, Casandra K; Klein, Savannah L; Lovell, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Virulence factor genes encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and the thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) are strongly correlated with virulence of the emergent human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The gene encoding the thermolabile hemolysin (tlh) is also considered a signature molecular marker for the species. These genes are typically reported in very low percentages (1 to 2%) of nonclinical strains. V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from various niches within a pristine estuary (North Inlet, SC) and were screened for these genes using both newly designed PCR primers and more commonly used primers. DNA sequences of tdh and trh were recovered from 48% and 8.3%, respectively, of these North Inlet strains. The recovery of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains in such high proportions from an estuarine ecosystem that is virtually free of anthropogenic influences indicates the potential for additional, perhaps environmental roles of the tdh and trh genes.

  9. Occurrence of the tdh and trh genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from waters and raw shellfish collected in two French coastal areas and from seafood imported into France.

    PubMed

    Robert-Pillot, Annick; Guénolé, Alain; Lesne, Jean; Delesmont, Régis; Fournier, Jean-Michel; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2004-03-15

    The occurrence of the hemolysin genes, tdh and trh, in Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from environmental samples collected in two French coastal areas, clinical samples, and seafood products imported into France was studied. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with two sets of primers was used to detect the hemolysin genes. Most of the clinical isolates (91%) and 1.5% of the isolates from seafood possessed the hemolysin genes. Three and fifteen percent, respectively, of the two groups of environmental strains carried the hemolysin genes depending on the geographic site. The tdh and trh genes play important roles in virulence. Thus, our results indicate that pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates are present in French coastal areas and in seafood imported into France. Furthermore, they may also be present in French seafood products.

  10. Ham test

    MedlinePlus

    Acid hemolysin test; Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria - Ham test; PNH - Ham test ... BJ. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  11. FACTORS INFLUENCING IN VITRO KILLING OF BACTERIA BY HEMOCYTES OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains altered in motility or colonial morphology (opaque versus translucent), Listeria monocytogenes mutants lacking catalase, superoxide dismutase, hemolysin, or phospholipase activities, and Vibrio vulnificus strains, possessing and lacking capsules we...

  12. Aeromonas Caviae Strain Induces Th1 Cytokine Response in Mouse Intestinal Tract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small i...

  13. Genetic relatedness among tdh+ and trh+ Vibrio parahaemolyticus cultured from Gulf of Mexico oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and surrounding water and sediment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C N; Flowers, A R; Young, V C; Gonzalez-Escalona, N; DePaola, A; Noriea, N F; Grimes, D J

    2009-04-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) (tdh(+)/trh(+)) represent a small percentage of environmental Vp populations, and very little is known about this subpopulation. Repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR and multilocus sequence analysis revealed heterogeneity among 41 Vp containing thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) that were isolated from Mississippi coastal environments from October 2006 to April 2007. There was no source-specific sequestering in oysters, water, or sediment.

  14. Characterization of Staphylococci Isolated from Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Zemelman, Raúl; Longeri, Luis

    1965-01-01

    To evaluate the pathogenicity of staphylococci from bovine raw milk, the general characteristics of 775 strains isolated from 798 samples of milk were studied. The coagulase test was performed by use of rabbit plasma. Chromogenesis, mannitol fermentation, and gelatin liquefaction were investigated on Chapman's Medium 110, after 48 hr of incubation. Production of β-hemolysin, which has been considered indicative of pathogenic staphylococci of animal origin, was determined by streaking different strains on sheep blood-agar plates in the presence of a strain of Lancefield group B streptococci. Plates were incubated at 37 C for 24 hr, and strong hemolysis was produced in the zone of interaction of β-hemolysin and some substance liberated by streptococcus (CAMP test). Of 404 strains found to be coagulase-positive, 95.8% exhibited a deep-orange pigment, 76.5% produced β-hemolysin, 91.8% fermented mannitol, and 75% liquefield gelatin. Of 371 strains which gave a negative coagulase test, about 16% fermented mannitol and liquefied gelatin; none of these strains produced β-hemolysin. When results are grouped according to pigmentation and coagulase production, β-hemolysin seems to be developed by pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus only. If suitability of these tests for investigation of pathogenicity is compared, production of β-hemolysin appears to be the most useful one, since no “false positive” results were found. The use of the CAMP test as a simple and rapid technique to determine production of β-hemolysin by pathogenic strains of animal staphylococci during routine bacteriological work is suggested. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14325873

  15. Incidence and toxigenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila in seafood.

    PubMed

    Tsai, G J; Chen, T H

    1996-08-01

    Three selective media, Oxoid Aeromonas agar (OA), blood ampicillin agar (BA) and starch ampicillin agar (SA) were used to evaluate the presence of Aeromonas hydrophila in 66 samples of oyster, shrimp, fish and surimi products. Oyster had the highest incidence, with 50% positive, whilst no A. hydrophila was found in the surimi. Of the three selective media, BA displayed the highest recovery rate of A. hydrophila from seafood. Forty-eight isolates from this survey were tested for their capability to produce hemolysin and cytotoxin. Hemolysin was produced by 79.2% of the isolates and cytotoxin was produced by 91.7% of the isolates in brain heart infusion broth. One of the toxin-producing isolates from oyster, strain 8-169, was further tested for growth and toxin production in oyster, shrimp and fish at various temperatures. This particular isolate grew best and had highest toxin production in oyster. Hemolysin and cytotoxin were produced earlier at 28 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, and titers of hemolysin were also higher at 28 degrees C. At 5 degrees C, it was able to grow and produce hemolysin in oyster.

  16. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  17. Streptolysin S of Streptococcus anginosus exhibits broad-range hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Asam, Daniela; Mauerer, Stefanie; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a commensal of mucous membranes and an emerging human pathogen. Some strains, including the type strain, display a prominent β-hemolytic phenotype. A gene cluster (sag), encoding a variant of streptolysin S (SLS) has recently been identified as the genetic background for β-hemolysin production in S. anginosus. In this study, we further characterized the hemolytic and cytolytic activity of the S. anginosus hemolysin in comparison with other streptococcal hemolysins. The results indicate that SLS of S. anginosus is a broad-range hemolysin able to lyse erythrocytes of different species, including horse, bovine, rabbit and even chicken. The hemolytic activity is temperature dependent, and a down-regulation of the hemolysin expression is induced in the presence of high glucose levels. Survival assays indicate that in contrast to other streptococcal species, S. anginosus does not require SLS for survival in the presence of human granulocytes. Cross-complementation studies using the sagB and sagD genes of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis demonstrated functional similarities to the S. anginosus SLS. Nevertheless, distinct differences to other streptolysin S variants were noted and provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms of SLS pathogen host interactions.

  18. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques.

    PubMed

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques.

  19. Probing Peptide and Protein Insertion in a Biomimetic S-Layer Supported Lipid Membrane Platform

    PubMed Central

    Damiati, Samar; Schrems, Angelika; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The most important aspect of synthetic lipid membrane architectures is their ability to study functional membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins in an environment close to nature. Here, we report on the generation and performance of a biomimetic platform, the S-layer supported lipid membrane (SsLM), to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics of the membrane-active peptide gramicidin and the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin in real-time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A shift in membrane resistance is caused by the interaction of α-hemolysin and gramicidin with SsLMs, even if only an attachment onto, or functional channels through the lipid membrane, respectively, are formed. Moreover, the obtained results did not indicate the formation of functional α-hemolysin pores, but evidence for functional incorporation of gramicidin into this biomimetic architecture is provided. PMID:25633104

  20. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques. PMID:25566219

  1. Isolation of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from diarrheic dogs and their antimicrobial resistance profile

    PubMed Central

    de Cleber Jacob Silva Paula; Marin, José Moacir

    2008-01-01

    From January to December 2006, 92 Escherichia coli isolates from 25 diarrheic dogs were analyzed by screening for the presence of adhesin-encoding genes (pap, sfa, afa), hemolysin and aerobactin genes. Virulence gene frequencies detected in those isolates were: 12% pap, 1% sfa, 10% hemolysin and 6.5% aerobactin. Ten isolates were characterized as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains; all showed a multidrug resistance phenotype that may represent a reason for concern due the risk of dissemination of antimicrobial resistant genes to the microbiota of human beings. PMID:24031253

  2. Production of Lysozyme by Staphylococci and Its Correlation with Three Other Extracellular Substances1

    PubMed Central

    Jay, James M.

    1966-01-01

    Jay, James M. (Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.). Production of lysozyme by staphylococci and its correlation with three other extracellular substances. J. Bacteriol. 91:1804–1810. 1966.—Lysozyme production was determined on plates containing 1 mg/ml of Lysozyme Substrate in Heart Infusion Agar with incubation at 37 C for 48 hr. Its production was compared with that of α-hemolysin and sheep hemolysin and egg-yolk precipitation, by use of both coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative strains of staphylococci. Of 126 coagulase-positive strains tested, 120 or 95.2% produced lysozyme, 117 or 92.9% produced α-hemolysin, 108 or 85.7% precipitated egg yolk, and 102 or 81% produced sheep hemolysin. Of the 49 coagulase-negative strains (which included 22 pathogens), only 4 or 8.1% produced lysozyme, 14 or 28.6% produced α-hemolysin, 13 or 26.5% produced sheep hemolysins, and 5 or 10.2% precipitated egg yolk. Only two of the six coagulase-positive strains which failed to produce lysozyme showed any consistent patterns in relation to the four characteristics determined. The four coagulase-negative strains which produced lysozyme were inconsistent for the other characteristics measured. It is suggested that lysozyme production is more a property of coagulase-positive staphylococci, and therefore a better ancillary test of pathogenicity, than either production of α-hemolysin or egg-yolk precipitation, because the incidence of lysozyme producers is higher among this group than among those producing the other substances and because fewer coagulase-negative staphylococci produced lysozyme than hemolysins or egg-yolk precipitation. Of 16 other species of bacteria and yeasts tested, all were found negative except Bacillus subtilis. Lysozyme production by staphylococci in heavily contaminated foods was not inhibited on plates containing sodium azide, whereas media containing 7.5% salt and sorbic acid were unsuitable. The possible relationship of lysozyme production to

  3. Pore-forming proteins with built-in triggers and switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Hagan

    1996-02-01

    Genetic engineering and targeted chemical modification are being used to produce polypeptides with pore-forming activity that can be triggered or switched on-and-off by biochemical, chemical or physical stimuli. The principal target of our studies has been the (alpha) -hemolysin ((alpha) HL) from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The remodeled hemolysins include protease-activated pores, metal-regulated pores, pores that are activated by chemical alkylation and pores that are turned on with light. These polypeptides have several potential applications. For example, they might serve as components of sensors or they might be useful for mediating the controlled release of encapsulated drugs.

  4. Probing single nanometer-scale pores with polymeric molecular rulers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; DiMarzio, Edmund A.; Wang, Qian; Stanford, Vincent M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that individual molecules of single-stranded DNA can be driven electrophoretically through a single Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin ion channel. Polynucleotides thread through the channel as extended chains and the polymer-induced ionic current blockades exhibit stable modes during the interactions. We show here that polynucleotides can be used to probe structural features of the α-hemolysin channel itself. Specifically, both the pore length and channel aperture profile can be estimated. The results are consistent with the channel crystal structure and suggest that polymer-based "molecular rulers" may prove useful in deducing the structures of nanometer-scale pores in general.

  5. Comparative Prevalence of Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Male Infants with and without Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Houdouin, Véronique; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Mahjoub-Messai, Farah; Bingen, Edouard

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates causing urinary tract infection in 83 male infants younger than 90 days with and without bacteremia were compared for phylogenetic groups and the presence of 10 virulence factors. Our result suggest that the absence of both hemolysin and antigen K1 may be used as a negative predictive factor for bacteremia. PMID:16517919

  6. Prevalence and Molecular Typing of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (tdh+) isolated from seafood using PCR-based methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a pathogen most frequently implicated in foodborne outbreaks linked to the consumption of seafood in the coastal cities of China. The pathogenicity of environmental V. parahaemolyticus is mostly correlated with the production of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH). In orde...

  7. Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in the Coastal and Estuarine Waters of Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, and Washington (United States)

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John C.; Griffitt, Kimberly J.; Molina, Vanessa; Clostio, Rachel W.; Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward; Paranjpye, Rohinee N.; Strom, Mark S.; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Huq, Anwar; Noriea, Nicholas F.; Grimes, D. Jay; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, which are native to estuaries globally, are agents of seafood-borne or wound infections, both potentially fatal. Like all vibrios autochthonous to coastal regions, their abundance varies with changes in environmental parameters. Sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), and chlorophyll have been shown to be predictors of zooplankton and thus factors linked to vibrio populations. The contribution of salinity, conductivity, turbidity, and dissolved organic carbon to the incidence and distribution of Vibrio spp. has also been reported. Here, a multicoastal, 21-month study was conducted to determine relationships between environmental parameters and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus populations in water, oysters, and sediment in three coastal areas of the United States. Because ecologically unique sites were included in the study, it was possible to analyze individual parameters over wide ranges. Molecular methods were used to detect genes for thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) as indicators of V. parahaemolyticus and the hemolysin gene vvhA for V. vulnificus. SST and suspended particulate matter were found to be strong predictors of total and potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Other predictors included chlorophyll a, salinity, and dissolved organic carbon. For the ecologically unique sites included in the study, SST was confirmed as an effective predictor of annual variation in vibrio abundance, with other parameters explaining a portion of the variation not attributable to SST. PMID:22865080

  8. Bacteria differentially induce degradation of Bcl-xL, a survival protein, by human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Bjoern F.; Campbell, Robert A.; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Franks, Zechariah G.; Vieira de Abreu, Adriana; Grundler, Katharina; Kile, Benjamin T.; Dhakal, Bijaya K.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Blaylock, Robert C.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria can enter the bloodstream in response to infectious insults. Bacteremia elicits several immune and clinical complications, including thrombocytopenia. A primary cause of thrombocytopenia is shortened survival of platelets. We demonstrate that pathogenic bacteria induce apoptotic events in platelets that include calpain-mediated degradation of Bcl-xL, an essential regulator of platelet survival. Specifically, bloodstream bacterial isolates from patients with sepsis induce lateral condensation of actin, impair mitochondrial membrane potential, and degrade Bcl-xL protein in platelets. Bcl-xL protein degradation is enhanced when platelets are exposed to pathogenic Escherichia coli that produce the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin, a response that is markedly attenuated when the gene is deleted from E coli. We also found that nonpathogenic E coli gain degrading activity when they are forced to express α-hemolysin. Like α-hemolysin, purified α-toxin readily degrades Bcl-xL protein in platelets, as do clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates that produce α-toxin. Inhibition of calpain activity, but not the proteasome, rescues Bcl-xL protein degradation in platelets coincubated with pathogenic E coli including α-hemolysin producing strains. This is the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can trigger activation of the platelet intrinsic apoptosis program and our results suggest a new mechanism by which bacterial pathogens might cause thrombocytopenia in patients with bloodstream infections. PMID:23086749

  9. A Staphylococcus aureus Pore-Forming Toxin Subverts the Activity of ADAM10 to Cause Lethal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Inoshima, Ichiro; Inoshima, Naoko; Wilke, Georgia; Powers, Michael; Frank, Karen; Wang, Yang; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of human disease, responsible for half a million infections and approximately 20,000 deaths per year in the United States alone 1,2. This pathogen secretes α-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin that contributes to the pathogenesis of pneumonia 3–5. α-hemolysin injures epithelial cells by interacting with its receptor, the zinc-dependent metalloprotease ADAM10 6. We show that mice harboring a conditional disruption of the Adam10 gene in lung epithelium are resistant to lethal pneumonia. Investigation of the molecular mechanism of toxin-receptor function revealed that α-hemolysin upregulates ADAM10 metalloprotease activity in alveolar epithelial cells, resulting in cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin. Cleavage is associated with disruption of epithelial barrier function, contributing to the pathogenesis of lethal acute lung injury. A metalloprotease inhibitor of ADAM10 prevents E-cadherin cleavage; similarly, E-cadherin proteolysis and barrier disruption is attenuated in ADAM10 knockout mice. Together, these data attest to the function of ADAM10 as the cellular receptor for α-hemolysin. The observation that Hla can usurp the metalloprotease activity of its receptor reveals a novel mechanism of pore-forming cytotoxin action in which pathologic insults are not solely the result of irreversible membrane injury, and defines ADAM10 inhibition as a strategy for disease modification. PMID:21926978

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Ichthyobacterium seriolicida JBKA-6T, Isolated from Yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) Affected by Bacterial Hemolytic Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoji; Matsuyama, Tomomasa; Sakai, Takamitsu; Shigenobu, Yuya; Sugaya, Takuma; Yasuike, Motoshige; Fujiwara, Atushi; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Nakayasu, Chihaya

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ichthyobacterium seriolicida is a fish bacterial pathogen that causes hemolytic jaundice in farmed yellowtail in Japan. To understand more about the characteristics of this bacterium, we determined its complete genome sequence. Two hemolysin genes which may be important for its pathogenicity were identified in the I. seriolicida genome. PMID:28183761

  11. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  12. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus,. Microarray profiling of...

  13. The type II secretion system is essential for erythrocyte lysis and gut colonization by the leech digestive tract symbiont Aeromonas veronii.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Michele; Graf, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Hemolysin and the type II secretion system (T2SS) have been shown to be important for virulence in many pathogens, but very few studies have shown their importance in beneficial microbes. Here, we investigated the importance of the type II secretion pathway in the beneficial digestive-tract association of Aeromonas veronii and the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana and revealed a critical role for the hemolysis of erythrocytes. A mutant with a miniTn5 insertion in exeM, which is involved in forming the inner membrane platform in the T2SS, was isolated by screening mutants for loss of hemolysis on blood agar plates. A hemolysis assay was used to quantify the mutant's deficiency in lysing sheep erythrocytes and revealed a 99.9% decrease compared to the parent strain. The importance of the T2SS in the colonization of the symbiotic host was assessed. Colonization assays revealed that the T2SS is critical for initial colonization of the leech gut. The defect was tied to the loss of hemolysin production by performing a colonization assay with blood containing lysed erythrocytes. This restored the colonization defect in the mutant. Complementation of the mutant using the promoter region and exeMN revealed that the T2SS is responsible for secreting hemolysin into the extracellular space and that both the T2SS and hemolysin export by the T2SS are critical for initial establishment of A. veronii in the leech gut.

  14. Cloning, expressing, and hemolysis of tdh, trh and tlh genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonggang; Tang, Xiaoqian; Zhan, Wenbin

    2011-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VP) is one of the pathogenic vibrios endangering net-cage cultured Pseudosciaena crocea, Fennerpenaeus chinensis, and shellfish in coastal areas of China. Several types of hemolysins produced by Vp have been characterized as major virulence factors. They are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and thermolabile hemolysin (TLH). In this study, we cloned tdh, trh, and tlh genes from the genome DNA of VP by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We ligated the three genes into prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a (+), and transformed the recombinant plasmids into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The expression of recombinant proteins was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalacto-pyranoside (IPTG). The recombinant proteins were expressed in a form of inclusion bodies and thus purified with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Western blotting results showed that recombinant proteins, TDH, TRH and TLH, could be recognized by rabbit anti-VP serum. The three purified proteins were renatured by gradient dialysis. The renatured proteins exhibited hemolytic activity except for TLH in the presence of phosphatidylcholine. These results not only are helpful for better understanding these genes' functions under a single factor level, but also provide evidence for VP vaccine engineering.

  15. Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in the coastal and estuarine waters of Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, and Washington (United States).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Crystal N; Bowers, John C; Griffitt, Kimberly J; Molina, Vanessa; Clostio, Rachel W; Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward; Paranjpye, Rohinee N; Strom, Mark S; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A; Huq, Anwar; Noriea, Nicholas F; Grimes, D Jay; Colwell, Rita R

    2012-10-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, which are native to estuaries globally, are agents of seafood-borne or wound infections, both potentially fatal. Like all vibrios autochthonous to coastal regions, their abundance varies with changes in environmental parameters. Sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), and chlorophyll have been shown to be predictors of zooplankton and thus factors linked to vibrio populations. The contribution of salinity, conductivity, turbidity, and dissolved organic carbon to the incidence and distribution of Vibrio spp. has also been reported. Here, a multicoastal, 21-month study was conducted to determine relationships between environmental parameters and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus populations in water, oysters, and sediment in three coastal areas of the United States. Because ecologically unique sites were included in the study, it was possible to analyze individual parameters over wide ranges. Molecular methods were used to detect genes for thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) as indicators of V. parahaemolyticus and the hemolysin gene vvhA for V. vulnificus. SST and suspended particulate matter were found to be strong predictors of total and potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Other predictors included chlorophyll a, salinity, and dissolved organic carbon. For the ecologically unique sites included in the study, SST was confirmed as an effective predictor of annual variation in vibrio abundance, with other parameters explaining a portion of the variation not attributable to SST.

  16. Structure based virtual screening of novel inhibitors against multidrug resistant superbugs.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Mahajanakatti, Arpitha Badarinath; Sharma, Narasimha; Karanth, Shraddha; Rao, Shruthi; Rajeswari, Narayanappa

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms are persistently expressing resistance towards present generation antibiotics and are on the verge of joining the superbug family. Recent studies revealed that, notorious pathogens such as Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae and Vibrio cholerae have acquired multiple drug resistance and the treatment became a serious concern. This necessitates an alternative therapeutic solution. Present study investigates the utility of computer aided method to study the mechanism of receptor-ligand interactions and thereby inhibition of virulence factors (shiga toxin of Shigella dysenteriae, cholera toxin of Vibrio cholerae and hemolysin-E of Salmonella typhi) by novel phytoligands. The rational designs of improved therapeutics require the crystal structure for the drug targets. The structures of the virulent toxins were identified as probable drug targets. However, out of the three virulent factors, the structure for hemolysin-E is not yet available in its native form. Thus, we tried to model the structure by homology modeling using Modeller 9v9. After extensive literature survey, we selected 50 phytoligands based on their medicinal significance and drug likenesses. The receptor-ligands interactions between selected leads and toxins were studied by molecular docking using Auto Dock 4.0. We have identified two novel sesquiterpenes, Cadinane [(1S, 4S, 4aS, 6S, 8aS)- 4- Isopropyl- 1, 6- dimethyldecahydronaphthalene] and Cedrol [(8α)-Cedran-8-ol] against Shiga (binding energy -5.56 kcal/mol) and cholera toxins (binding energy -5.33 kcal/mol) respectively which have good inhibitory properties. Similarly, a natural Xanthophyll, Violaxanthin [3S, 3'S, 5R, 5'R, 6S, 6'S)-5, 5', 6, 6'-Tetrahydro-5, 6:5', 6'-diepoxy-β, β-carotene-3, 3'-diol] was identified as novel therapeutic lead for hemolysin-E (binding energy of -5.99 kcal/mol). This data provide an insight for populating the pool of novel inhibitors against various drug targets of superbugs when all

  17. Electric-field-driven polymer entry into asymmetric nanoscale channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, Narges; Fazli, Hossein

    2012-02-01

    The electric-field-driven entry process of flexible charged polymers such as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into asymmetric nanoscale channels such as the α-hemolysin protein channel is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the height of the free-energy barrier on the polymer length, the strength of the applied electric field, and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. It is shown that the squeezing effect of the driving field on the polymer and the lateral confinement of the polymer before its entry to the channel crucially affect the barrier height and its dependence on the system parameters. The attempt frequency of the polymer for passing the channel is also discussed. Our theoretical and simulation results support each other and describe related data sets of polymer translocation experiments through the α-hemolysin protein channel reasonably well.

  18. [Incidence of Kanagawa phenomenon-positive and -negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from traveller's diarrhea and their relation to tdh and trh genes].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Ueda, Y; Furukawa, T; Takegaki, Y; Miyagi, K; Noda, K; Hirose, H; Hashimoto, S; Yano, S; Ishibashi, M; Honda, T

    1997-05-01

    A total of 1,319 strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from traveller's diarrhea were analysed for Kanagawa phenomenon (KP) with the Wagatsuma blood agar test and the results were also compared with those of analyses of tdh and trh genes which encode thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and TDH-related hemolysin (trh). The majority of the strains (1,152 strains) counting 87.3% had positive KP, among which 1,049 and 103 strains were only tdh and both tdh and trh-positive ones, respectively. However, 167 strains counting 12.7%, which is quite high compared to the previous report, were found to have negative KP, among which 94 and 24 strains were only trh and both tdh and trh-positive ones, respectively.

  19. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  20. In situ and in vitro impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Erica L; Molina, Vanessa; Cole, Krystal M; Laws, Edward; Johnson, Crystal N

    2013-10-15

    Most established virulence genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp), e.g., thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), tdh-related hemolysin (trh), and type three secretion system 2 (TTSS2), are on the chromosome 2 pathogenicity island, which also possesses numerous uncharacterized genes. We hypothesized the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DH) oil spill would cause an increase in populations of Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying environmental adaptation genes. Vp isolated pre- and post-spill were analyzed for TTSS2 genes, and impacts of DH oil on Vp were examined in vitro. There was no change in TTSS2 in situ, but tdh and V. vulnificus levels were higher post-spill. In vitro exposure of water samples to DH oil produced no changes in Vp densities. Two years post-spill, total Vp remained low; tdh and trh increased. These results indicate the effects of the DH oil spill on potentially pathogenic Vp subpopulations were complex and difficult to discern from other concurrent anthropogenic and natural events.

  1. THE CONVERSION OF HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI TO NON-HEMOLYTIC FORMS

    PubMed Central

    Todd, E. W.

    1928-01-01

    From one strain of hemolytic streptococcus three forms were isolated, which produced three different degrees of hemolysis on the surface of blood agar in the presence of oxygen. The original form was moderately hemolytic; the glossy variant was more hemolytic than the original form; and the third form, obtained by passing the original culture through mice, was non-hemolytic. Under anaerobic conditions all three forms were hemolytic. The non-hemolytic passage culture, in the presence of an ample supply of oxygen, not only destroyed its own hemolysin, which only appeared under anaerobic conditions, but was also able to destroy the hemolysin of other cultures of hemolytic streptococci. It is possible that these observations may throw some light on experiments reported by a number of workers showing that Streptococcus hæmolyticus can be transmuted to Streptococcus viridans by animal passage. PMID:19869500

  2. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa Hassan; El-Mahdy, Areej Mostafa; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm.

  3. The function of PlcR in Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain A16R.

    PubMed

    Xiaolin, Jia; Dongshu, Wang; Zhiqi, Gao; Erling, Feng; Jiping, Zheng; Hengliang, Wang; Guiying, Guo; Xiankai, Liu

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis, B. thuringiensis and B. cereus are members of the B. cereus group. They share high genetic similarity. Whereas plcR (Phospholipase C regulator) usually encodes a functional pleiotropic activator protein in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates, a characteristic nonsense mutation is found in all B. anthracis strains investigated, making the gene dysfunctional. To study the function of PlcR in B. anthracis, we used the B. cereus CMCC63301 genome as a template and constructed a recombinant expression plasmid pBE2A-plcR, and introduced it into the B. anthracis vaccine strain A16R, and then analyzed the activity of the hemolysin and sphingomyelinase. The results showed that transformation of B. anthracis with plasmid pBE2A-plcR carrying the native B. cereus plcR gene active the expression of sphingomyelinase gene, but did not activate expression of hemolysin genes of B. anthracis A16R.

  4. Enterocyte Purge and Rapid Recovery Is a Resilience Reaction of the Gut Epithelium to Pore-Forming Toxin Attack.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Zin; Lestradet, Matthieu; Socha, Catherine; Schirmeier, Stefanie; Schmitz, Antonin; Spenlé, Caroline; Lefebvre, Olivier; Keime, Céline; Yamba, Wennida M; Bou Aoun, Richard; Liegeois, Samuel; Schwab, Yannick; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Dalle, Frédéric; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2016-12-14

    Besides digesting nutrients, the gut protects the host against invasion by pathogens. Enterocytes may be subjected to damage by both microbial and host defensive responses, causing their death. Here, we report a rapid epithelial response that alleviates infection stress and protects the enterocytes from the action of microbial virulence factors. Intestinal epithelia exposed to hemolysin, a pore-forming toxin secreted by Serratia marcescens, undergo an evolutionarily conserved process of thinning followed by the recovery of their initial thickness within a few hours. In response to hemolysin attack, Drosophila melanogaster enterocytes extrude most of their apical cytoplasm, including damaged organelles such as mitochondria, yet do not lyse. We identify two secreted peptides, the expression of which requires CyclinJ, that mediate the recovery phase in which enterocytes regain their original shape and volume. Epithelial thinning and recovery constitute a fast and efficient response to intestinal infections, with pore-forming toxins acting as alarm signals.

  5. [Investigation of hydrophobicity of Proteus vulgaris strains and ability of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri strains to penetrate bladder membrane HCV T-29 cells ].

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, Beata; Błaszczyk, Aleksandra; Wykrota, Marianna; Kwil, Iwona; Babicka, Dorota; Rózalski, Antoni

    2002-01-01

    Proteus bacilli play a particularly important role in urinary tract infections (UTI). Fimbriae and adherence ability and hemolysins production (HpmA, HlyA) are one of the factors of pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this paper we describe the invasion of HCV T-29 transitional bladder urothelial cells carcinoma strains of P. penneri, as well as P. vulgaris strains belonging to different serogroups. The cytotoxic effect was observed at 8 hour of incubation of the tested cells with P. vulgaris O21 and the same effect (complete lysis) at 6 hours by P. vulgaris O4 (this strain manifests maximal activity in the production of HlyA hemolysin). P. penneri strains, produce different types of fimbriae, expressed similar bacterial invasiveness. The hydrophobic properties of 25 P. vulgaris strains were also tested and only 3 strains occur to have hydrophobic cell surface.

  6. Entérite nécrotique chez le poulet de gril II. Caractères des souches de Clostridium perfringens isolées

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, G.; Filion, R.; Malo, R.; Phaneuf, J.-B.

    1974-01-01

    A Gram positive bacillus, strictly anaerobic, was isolated from the viscera of all diseased birds showing lesions of necrotic enteritis. Its morphology and biochemical reactions, the presence of alpha and thêta hemolysins and the production of a lecithinase-C in vitro, all these characteristics indicated a similarity to those belonging to the group of Clostridium perfringens. The two hemolysins were neutralized in vitro only by the antitoxin A. Broiler chickens injected I.V. with a Viande-Foie (VF) broth culture of Clostridium perfringens together with the antitoxin A survived, whereas those receiving antitoxin C died. These results seem to indicate that this organism belongs to the type A. This bacillus was sensitive to a great variety of antibiotics, except neomycin. PMID:4368193

  7. Identification of two components of the Serratia marcescens metalloprotease transporter: protease SM secretion in Escherichia coli is TolC dependent.

    PubMed

    Létoffé, S; Ghigo, J M; Wandersman, C

    1993-11-01

    The Serratia marcescens metalloprotease (protease SM) belongs to a family of proteins secreted from gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a specific transporter consisting of three proteins: two in the inner membrane and one in the outer membrane. The prtDSM and prtESM genes encoding the two S. marcescens inner membrane components were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Their nucleotide sequence revealed high overall homology with the two analogous inner membrane components of the Erwinia chrysanthemi protease secretion apparatus and lower, but still significant, homology with the two analogous inner membrane components of the E. coli hemolysin transporter. When expressed in E. coli, these two proteins, PrtDSM and PrtESM, allowed the secretion of protease SM only in the presence of TolC protein, the outer membrane component of the hemolysin transporter.

  8. Relationships between Environmental Factors and Pathogenic Vibrios in the Northern Gulf of Mexico ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. N.; Flowers, A. R.; Noriea, N. F.; Zimmerman, A. M.; Bowers, J. C.; DePaola, A.; Grimes, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Although autochthonous vibrio densities are known to be influenced by water temperature and salinity, little is understood about other environmental factors associated with their abundance and distribution. Densities of culturable Vibrio vulnificus containing vvh (V. vulnificus hemolysin gene) and V. parahaemolyticus containing tlh (thermolabile hemolysin gene, ubiquitous in V. parahaemolyticus), tdh (thermostable direct hemolysin gene, V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity factor), and trh (tdh-related hemolysin gene, V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity factor) were measured in coastal waters of Mississippi and Alabama. Over a 19-month sampling period, vibrio densities in water, oysters, and sediment varied significantly with sea surface temperature (SST). On average, tdh-to-tlh ratios were significantly higher than trh-to-tlh ratios in water and oysters but not in sediment. Although tlh densities were lower than vvh densities in water and in oysters, the opposite was true in sediment. Regression analysis indicated that SST had a significant association with vvh and tlh densities in water and oysters, while salinity was significantly related to vibrio densities in the water column. Chlorophyll a levels in the water were correlated significantly with vvh in sediment and oysters and with pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (tdh and trh) in the water column. Furthermore, turbidity was a significant predictor of V. parahaemolyticus density in all sample types (water, oyster, and sediment), and its role in predicting the risk of V. parahaemolyticus illness may be more important than previously realized. This study identified (i) culturable vibrios in winter sediment samples, (ii) niche-based differences in the abundance of vibrios, and (iii) predictive signatures resulting from correlations between environmental parameters and vibrio densities. PMID:20817802

  9. Secretion and expression of the Pasteurella haemolytica Leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Highlander, S K; Engler, M J; Weinstock, G M

    1990-01-01

    The Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin gene cluster (lktCABD) is homologous to the Escherichia coli hemolysin locus (hlyCABD). Since the cloned leukotoxin (LktA) is not secreted from E. coli cells, a heteroplasmid complementation system was developed that permits secretion of the leukotoxin from cells expressing the hemolysin transport proteins HlyB and HlyD. We observed that the secreted leukotoxin protein had weak hemolytic activity when activated by either the HlyC or LktC proteins and that LktC expressed in E. coli could confer weak hemolytic activity upon hemolysin. Thus, it appears that the accessory proteins of the leukotoxin and hemolysin gene clusters are functionally similar, although their expression in E. coli is not equivalent. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin gene cluster revealed a major 3.5-kilobase transcript that includes the lktC and lktA genes. The start site for this transcript mapped to a cytosine residue 30 nucleotides upstream from the putative start of lktC; a similar initiation site was observed in E. coli, although adjacent cytosine and adenine residues were also utilized. The 3.5-kilobase transcript terminated near the rho-independent terminator structure between lktA and lktB, but transcription may continue, via antitermination or de novo transcription initiation, into the downstream lktB and lktD genes. We propose that the lack of LktB and LktD function in E. coli is a result, at least in part, of poor lktBD transcription and suggest that a P. haemolytica-specific regulator is required for optimal expression of the leukotoxin genes. Images PMID:2185213

  10. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Major Virulence Factors Dly, Plasmid-Encoded HlyA, and Chromosome-Encoded HlyA Are Secreted via the Type II Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Vences, Ana; Husmann, Matthias; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae is a marine bacterium that causes septicemia in marine animals and in humans. Previously, we had determined a major role of pPHDD1 plasmid-encoded Dly (damselysin) and HlyA (HlyApl) and the chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch) hemolysins in virulence. However, the mechanisms by which these toxins are secreted remain unknown. In this study, we found that a mini-Tn10 transposon mutant in a plasmidless strain showing an impaired hemolytic phenotype contained an insertion in epsL, a component of a type II secretion system (T2SS). Reconstruction of the mutant by allelic exchange confirmed the specific involvement of epsL in HlyAch secretion. In addition, mutation of epsL in a pPHDD1-harboring strain caused an almost complete abolition of hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, indicating that epsL plays a major role in secretion of the plasmid-encoded HlyApl and Dly. This was further demonstrated by analysis of different combinations of hemolysin gene mutants and by strain-strain complementation assays. We also found that mutation of the putative prepilin peptidase gene pilD severely affected hemolysis, which dropped at levels inferior to those of epsL mutants. Promoter expression analyses suggested that impairment of hemolysin secretion in epsL and pilD mutants might constitute a signal that affects hemolysin and T2SS gene expression at the transcriptional level. In addition, single epsL and pilD mutations caused a drastic decrease in virulence for mice, demonstrating a major role of T2SS and pilD in P. damselae subsp. damselae virulence. PMID:25583529

  11. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  12. Expression and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Diphtheria Toxin Molecule, CRM197, and Its Fragments in Salmonella typhi Vaccine Strain CVD 908-htrA

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nadav; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    Mutant diphtheria toxin molecule CRM197 and fragments thereof were expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA, and the constructs were tested for their ability to induce serum antitoxin. Initially, expressed proteins were insoluble, and the constructs failed to induce neutralizing antitoxin. Soluble CRM197 was expressed at low levels by utilizing the hemolysin A secretion system from Escherichia coli. PMID:10417208

  13. Identification of the Regions of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor Type 1 Responsible for Receptor Binding and Enzymatic Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-05

    produce two toxins , hemolysin and CNF1, as well as other virulence determinants such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and iron acquisition products (not shown...cytoplasmic polypeptide toxin that is composed of a reputed N-terminal binding domain and a C- terminal enzymatic domain. A putative transmembrane...domain, considered to be responsible for translocation of the toxin into eukaryotic cells, is contained within the N- terminal half of the molecule

  14. Identification and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains with an Incomplete Hemolytic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifang; Zheng, Yi; Gao, Huasheng; Xu, Ping; Wang, Min; Li, Aiqing; Miao, Minhui; Xie, Xiaofang; Deng, Yimai; Zhou, Huiqin; Du, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen causing both hospital and community-acquired infections. Hemolysin is one of the important virulence factors for S. aureus and causes the typical β-hemolytic phenotype which is called complete hemolytic phenotype as well. Recently, S. aureus with an incomplete hemolytic phenotype (SIHP) was isolated from clinical samples. To study the microbiologic characteristics of SIHP, the special hemolytic phenotype of SIHP was verified on the sheep blood agar plates supplied by different manufacturers. Expression of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, hlgC, and hld of SIHP was detected by qRT-PCR and it was showed that expression of hlb in SIHP was obviously increased compared to the control S. aureus strains with complete hemolytic phenotype (SCHP), while the expression of hla, hlgC, and hld in SIHP was significantly decreased. In addition, the α-hemolysin encoded by gene hla was decreased obviously in SIHP compared to SCHP by western blot. All 60 SIHP strains were identified to be the methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and moreover these SIHP strains all contains mecA gene. The virulence gene tst were all present in SIHP, and the intracellular survival ability of SIHP was much greater than that of the gene tst negative S. aureus. We also found that IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17A secreted in the supernatant of SIHP infected macrophages increased significantly compared to tst negative control strains infected ones. MLST analysis showed that all of SIHP strains were classified into ST5 clone. To our knowledge, this study firstly showed that SIHP strains are a kind of methicillin resistant strains which express β-hemolysin highly and possess a potential high virulence, and it was suggested that SIHP should be paid more attention in hospital. PMID:27917374

  15. Recognizing a Single Base in an Individual DNA Strand: A Step Toward Nanopore DNA Sequencing**

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenasy, N.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; Ghadiri, M. R.; Bayley, H.

    2007-01-01

    Functional supramolecular chemistry at the single-molecule level. Single strands of DNA can be captured inside α-hemolysin transmembrane pore protein to form single-species α-HL·DNA pseudorotaxanes. This process can be used to identify a single adenine nucleotide at a specific location on a strand of DNA by the characteristic reductions in the α-HL ion conductance. This study suggests that α-HL-mediated single-molecule DNA sequencing might be fundamentally feasible. PMID:15666419

  16. Isolation and characterization of Aeromonas from seafoods in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Yaun, S S; Lin, L P

    1993-05-01

    A total of 124 fresh seafoods and 158 processed seafoods collected from the retail markets and supermarkets in Taipei were tested for the contamination with motile Aeromonas spp. Of the fresh seafoods analyzed, 88% displayed the presence of Aeromonas. The isolation rates of various samples were as follows: 100%, freshwater fish; 95%, seawater fish; 78%, fish fillets; 84%, shrimp and crab of the crustacea group; 83%, bivalve shellfish and 84%, non-bivalve shellfish of the mollusca group, and 100%, seaweed. Of the 158 processed seafoods, 11% were contaminated by Aeromonas. The isolation rates were as follows: 0%, canned, dried, or frozen fresh seafood; 18%, salted seafood; 30%, fish cake; 7% vacuum-packaged fish cakes; 14%, frozen seafood dumplings; 8%, cooked seafoods. One hundred and eighty-three Aeromonas strains isolated in this survey were characterized to species level and tested for their ability to produce beta-hemolysin. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of the A. hydrophila produced beta-hemolysin on 5% blood agar, 94% of the A. sobria and 33% of the A. caviae produced beta-hemolysin. Thus it is likely that fresh seafoods are potentially significant sources of the virulent Aeromonas species and may play an important role in the epidemiology of Aeromonas-associated gastroenteritis.

  17. Phobalysin, a Small β-Pore-Forming Toxin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Amable J; von Hoven, Gisela; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Füser, Sabine; Boller, Klaus; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R; Husmann, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, an important pathogen of marine animals, may also cause septicemia or hyperaggressive necrotizing fasciitis in humans. We previously showed that hemolysin genes are critical for virulence of this organism in mice and fish. In the present study, we characterized the hlyA gene product, a putative small β-pore-forming toxin, and termed it phobalysin P (PhlyP), for "photobacterial lysin encoded on a plasmid." PhlyP formed stable oligomers and small membrane pores, causing efflux of K(+), with no significant leakage of lactate dehydrogenase but entry of vital dyes. The latter feature distinguished PhlyP from the related Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Attack by PhlyP provoked a loss of cellular ATP, attenuated translation, and caused profound morphological changes in epithelial cells. In coculture experiments with epithelial cells, Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae led to rapid hemolysin-dependent membrane permeabilization. Unexpectedly, hemolysins also promoted the association of P. damselae subsp. damselae with epithelial cells. The collective observations of this study suggest that membrane-damaging toxins commonly enhance bacterial adherence.

  18. Phobalysin, a Small β-Pore-Forming Toxin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; von Hoven, Gisela; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Füser, Sabine; Boller, Klaus; Lemos, Manuel L.; Osorio, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, an important pathogen of marine animals, may also cause septicemia or hyperaggressive necrotizing fasciitis in humans. We previously showed that hemolysin genes are critical for virulence of this organism in mice and fish. In the present study, we characterized the hlyA gene product, a putative small β-pore-forming toxin, and termed it phobalysin P (PhlyP), for “photobacterial lysin encoded on a plasmid.” PhlyP formed stable oligomers and small membrane pores, causing efflux of K+, with no significant leakage of lactate dehydrogenase but entry of vital dyes. The latter feature distinguished PhlyP from the related Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Attack by PhlyP provoked a loss of cellular ATP, attenuated translation, and caused profound morphological changes in epithelial cells. In coculture experiments with epithelial cells, Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae led to rapid hemolysin-dependent membrane permeabilization. Unexpectedly, hemolysins also promoted the association of P. damselae subsp. damselae with epithelial cells. The collective observations of this study suggest that membrane-damaging toxins commonly enhance bacterial adherence. PMID:26303391

  19. Coral-Associated Bacteria as a Promising Antibiofilm Agent against Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Duncun Mosioma, Nyagwencha; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2012-01-01

    The current study deals with the evaluation of two coral-associated bacterial (CAB) extracts to inhibit the biofilm synthesis in vitro as well as the virulence production like hemolysin and exopolysaccharide (EPS), and also to assess their ability to modify the adhesion properties, that is cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Out of nine CAB screened, the ethyl acetate extract of CAB-E2 (Bacillus firmus) and CAB-E4 (Vibrio parahemolyticus) have shown excellent antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. CAB-E2 reduced the production of EPS (57–79%) and hemolysin (43–70%), which ultimately resulted in the significant inhibition of biofilms (80–87%) formed by both MRSA and MSSA. Similarly, CAB-E4 was also found to decrease the production of EPS (43–57%), hemolysin (43–57%) and biofilms (80–85%) of test pathogens. CLSM analysis also proved the antibiofilm efficacy of CAB extracts. Furthermore, the CAB extracts strongly decreased the CSH of S. aureus. Additionally, FT-IR analysis of S. aureus treated with CAB extracts evidenced the reduction in cellular components compared to their respective controls. Thus, the present study reports for the first time, B. firmus—a coral-associated bacterium, as a promising source of antibiofilm agent against the recalcitrant biofilms formed by multidrug resistant S. aureus. PMID:22988476

  20. Pathogenicity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Different Food Matrices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rundong; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Deng, Yijia; Liu, Ying; Xu, Defeng; Liu, Huanming; Ye, Riying; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenicity and virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in four food matrices--shrimp, freshwater fish, pork, and egg-fried rice--were compared by measuring the thermostable direct hemolysin activity and total hemolytic titer. Significantly high thermostable direct hemolysin and also hemolytic titers (P < 0.05) were produced by V. parahaemolyticus in egg-fried rice > shrimp > freshwater fish > pork. Filtrates of V. parahaemolyticus in shrimp given intraperitoneally induced marked liver and kidney damage and were highly lethal to adult mice compared with filtrates of V. parahaemolyticus in freshwater fish > egg-fried rice > pork. From in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity tests, it seems the type of food matrix has a significant impact on the virulence of V. parahaemolyticus. These results suggest that hemolysin may not necessarily be the only virulence factor for pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus. This is the first report that shows that virulence factors produced by V. parahaemolyticus in seafood such as shrimp are more toxic in vivo than in nonseafood.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain FORC_008, a foodborne pathogen from a flounder fish in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suyeon; Chung, Han Young; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lim, Jong Gyu; Kim, Se Keun; Ku, Hye-Jin; Kim, You-Tae; Kim, Heebal; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Choi, Sang Ho

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative, motile, nonspore-forming pathogen that causes foodborne illness associated with the consumption of contaminated seafoods. Although many cases of foodborne outbreaks caused by V. parahaemolyticus have been reported, the genomes of only five strains have been completely sequenced and analyzed using bioinformatics. In order to characterize overall virulence factors and pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus associated with foodborne outbreak in South Korea, a new strain FORC_008 was isolated from flounder fish and its genome was completely sequenced. The genomic analysis revealed that the genome of FORC_008 consists of two circular DNA chromosomes of 3266 132 bp (chromosome I) and 1772 036 bp (chromosome II) with a GC content of 45.36% and 45.53%, respectively. The entire genome contains 4494 predicted open reading frames, 129 tRNAs and 31 rRNA genes. While the strain FORC_008 does not have genes encoding thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), its genome encodes many other virulence factors including hemolysins, pathogenesis-associated secretion systems and iron acquisition systems, suggesting that it may be a potential pathogen. This report provides an extended understanding on V. parahaemolyticus in genomic level and would be helpful for rapid detection, epidemiological investigation and prevention of foodborne outbreak in South Korea.

  2. Detection, Identification, and Prevalence of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Fish and Coastal Environment in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alaboudi, Akram R; Ababneh, Mustafa; Osaili, Tareq M; Al Shloul, Khalaf

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is widely distributed in the marine environments and considered the leading cause of human gastroenteritis in Asian countries. A total of 150 marketed fish and 50 water and sediment samples from the Gulf of Aqaba were examined for the prevalence of pathogenic strains of V. parahaemolyticus. A total of 132 typical isolates obtained from the primary selective medium (thiosulfate-citrate bile salt sucrose agar) and showed positive biochemical properties were subjected to confirmation by polymerase chain reaction targeting the gyrB and toxR genes. These genes were confirmed at rates of 82% (108 isolates) and 72% (95 isolates), respectively. The toxR positive isolates were tested for the presence of thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) virulence genes. Accordingly, the prevalence rates of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were 4%, 8%, and 12% in sediment, water, and fish samples, respectively. The 16S rRNA amplification and sequences were conducted for confirmation of the isolates and showing the relatedness among these isolates. The results showed that both 16S rRNA and toxR assays had same sensitivity and tested isolates had high nucleotide similarity irrespective of their sources.

  3. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Narayanavari, Suneel A.; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A.; Matsunaga, James

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity

  4. Construction of a flagellum-negative mutant of Proteus mirabilis: effect on internalization by human renal epithelial cells and virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, H L; Belas, R; Lockatell, V; Chippendale, G; Trifillis, A L; Johnson, D E; Warren, J W

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of flagella in pathogenesis of urinary tract infection caused by Proteus mirabilis, we constructed a nonmotile, nonswarming flagellum mutant of strain WPM111 (an hpmA hemolysin mutant of strain BA6163, chosen because of its lack of in vitro cytotoxicity in renal epithelial cell internalization studies). A nonpolar mutation was introduced into the flaD gene, which encodes the flagellar cap protein. This mutation does not affect the synthesis of flagellin but rather prevents the assembly of an intact flagellar filament. In in vitro assays, the genetically characterized nonmotile mutant was found to be internalized by cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells in numbers less than 1% of those of the flagellated parent strain. Internalization of the nonmotile mutant was increased significantly (14- to 21-fold) by centrifugation onto the monolayer. To assess virulence in vivo, CBA mice were challenged transurethrally with 10(7) CFU of P. mirabilis BA6163 (wild type) (n = 16), WPM111 (hpmA mutant) (n = 46), or BB2401 (hmpA flaD mutant) (n = 46). Differences in quantitative cultures between the parent strain and the hemolysin-negative mutant were not significant. However, the hpmA flaD mutant was recovered in numbers approximately 100-fold lower than those of the hmpA mutant or the wild-type parent strain and thus was clearly attenuated. We conclude that while hemolysin does not significantly influence virulence, flagella contribute significantly to the ability of P. mirabilis to colonize the urinary tract and cause acute pyelonephritis in an experimental model of ascending urinary tract infection. PMID:8945585

  5. The sae locus of Staphylococcus aureus controls exoprotein synthesis at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, A T; Cheung, A L; Nagel, R

    1997-07-01

    Agr and sar are known regulatory loci of Staphylococcus aureus that control the production of several extracellular and cell-wall-associated proteins. A pleiotropic insertional mutation in S. aureus, designated sae, that leads to the production of drastically diminished levels of alpha- and beta-hemolysins and coagulase and slightly reduced levels of protein A has been described. The study of the expression of the genes coding for these exoproteins in the sae::Tn551 mutant (carried out in this work by Northern blot analyses) revealed that the genes for alpha- and beta-hemolysins (hla and hlb) and coagulase (coa) are not transcribed and that the gene for protein A (spa) is transcribed at a somewhat reduced level. These results indicate that the sae locus regulates these exoprotein genes at the transcriptional level. Northern blot analyses also show that the sae mutation does not affect the expression of agr or sar regulatory loci. An sae::Tn551 agr::tetM double mutant has been phenotypically characterized as producing reduced or null levels of alpha-, beta-, and delta-hemolysins, coagulase, and high levels of protein A. Northern blot analyses carried out in this work with the double mutant revealed that hla, hlb, hld, and coa genes are not transcribed, while spa is transcribed at high levels. The fact that coa is not expressed in the sae agr mutant, as in the sae parental strain, while spa is expressed at the high levels characteristic of the agr parental strain, suggests that sae and agr interact in a complex way in the control of the expression of the genes of several exoproteins.

  6. Differences in purinergic amplification of osmotic cell lysis by the pore-forming RTX toxins Bordetella pertussis CyaA and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIA: the role of pore size.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Fiser, Radovan; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Hewlett, Erik L; Benz, Roland; Sebo, Peter

    2013-12-01

    A large subgroup of the repeat in toxin (RTX) family of leukotoxins of Gram-negative pathogens consists of pore-forming hemolysins. These can permeabilize mammalian erythrocytes (RBCs) and provoke their colloid osmotic lysis (hemolytic activity). Recently, ATP leakage through pannexin channels and P2X receptor-mediated opening of cellular calcium and potassium channels were implicated in cell permeabilization by pore-forming toxins. In the study described here, we examined the role played by purinergic signaling in the cytolytic action of two RTX toxins that form pores of different sizes. The cytolytic potency of ApxIA hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, which forms pores about 2.4 nm wide, was clearly reduced in the presence of P2X7 receptor antagonists or an ATP scavenger, such as pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), Brilliant Blue G, ATP oxidized sodium salt, or hexokinase. In contrast, antagonists of purinergic signaling had no impact on the hemolytic potency of the adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis, which forms pores of 0.6 to 0.8 nm in diameter. Moreover, the conductance of pores formed by ApxIA increased with the toxin concentration, while the conductance of the CyaA single pore units was constant at various toxin concentrations. However, the P2X7 receptor antagonist PPADS inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the exacerbated hemolytic activity of a CyaA-ΔN489 construct (lacking 489 N-terminal residues of CyaA), which exhibited a strongly enhanced pore-forming propensity (>20-fold) and also formed severalfold larger conductance units in planar lipid bilayers than intact CyaA. These results point to a pore size threshold of purinergic amplification involvement in cell permeabilization by pore-forming RTX toxins.

  7. Risk of Vibrio transmission linked to the consumption of crustaceans in coastal towns of Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Traoré, S G; Bonfoh, B; Krabi, R; Odermatt, P; Utzinger, J; Rose, K-N; Tanner, M; Frey, J; Quilici, M-L; Koussémon, M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of Vibrio spp. transmission from crustaceans to humans in two coastal towns of Côte d'Ivoire. Bacteriologic analysis was performed on 322 crustacean samples obtained from six markets in Abidjan and one in Dabou. Suspected Vibrio colonies were identified by morphological, cultural, biochemical, and molecular tests and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PCR assays were used to further characterize Vibrio strains. A survey on consumption of crustaceans was conducted among 120 randomly selected households in Abidjan. Overall, Vibrio spp. were isolated from 7.8% of the crustacean samples studied, at levels as high as 6.3 log CFU/g. Of the Vibrio strains identified, 40% were V. alginolyticus, 36% were V. parahaemolyticus, and 24% were nontoxigenic V. cholerae; the latter two species can cause mild to severe forms of seafood-associated gastroenteritis. Among interviewed households, 11.7% reported daily consumption of crustaceans, confirming the high probability of exposure of human population to Vibrio spp., and 7.5% reported symptoms of food poisoning after consumption of crustaceans. The absence of genes encoding major virulence factors in the studied strains, i.e., cholera toxin (ctxA and ctxB) in V. cholerae and thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) in V. parahaemolyticus, does not exclude the possibility of exposure to pathogenic strains. However, human infections are not common because most households (96.7%) boil crustaceans, usually for at least 45 min (85.9% of households) before consumption.

  8. SarA, a global regulator of virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus, binds to a conserved motif essential for sar-dependent gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Y; Manna, A C; Projan, S J; Cheung, A L

    1999-12-24

    The expression of many virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus including alpha-hemolysin-, protein A-, and fibronectin-binding proteins is controlled by global regulatory loci such as sar and agr. In addition to controlling target gene expression via agr (e.g. alpha-hemolysin), the sar locus can also regulate target gene transcription via agr-independent mechanisms. In particular, we have found that SarA, the major regulatory protein encoded within sar, binds to a conserved sequence, homologous to the SarA-binding site on the agr promoter, upstream of the -35 promoter boxes of several target genes including hla (alpha-hemolysin gene), spa (protein A gene), fnb (fibronectin-binding protein genes), and sec (enterotoxin C gene). Deletion of the SarA recognition motif in the promoter regions of agr and hla in shuttle plasmids rendered the transcription of these genes undetectable in agr and hla mutants, respectively. Likewise, the transcription activity of spa (a gene normally repressed by sar), as measured by a XylE reporter fusion assay, became derepressed in a wild type strain containing a shuttle plasmid in which the SarA recognition site had been deleted from the spa promoter region. However, DNase I footprinting assays demonstrated that the SarA-binding region on the spa and hla promoter is more extensive than the predicted consensus sequence, thus raising the possibility that the consensus sequence is an activation site within a larger binding region. Because the sar and agr regulate an assortment of virulence factors in S. aureus, we propose, based on our data, a unifying hypothesis for virulence gene activation in S. aureus whereby SarA is a regulatory protein that binds to its consensus SarA recognition motif to activate (e.g. hla) or repress (e.g. spa) the transcription of sar target genes, thus accounting for both agr-dependent and agr-independent mode of regulation.

  9. Isolation of enterotoxigenic strains of staphylococci from dogs.

    PubMed

    Adesiyun, A A; Usman, B

    1983-10-01

    The ability of 309 staphylococcal isolates from household dogs to produce enterotoxin, coagulase, thermonuclease and hemolysin was investigated. A total of 52 (16.8%) isolates from 45 out of 150 dogs examined were enterotoxigenic when tested for enterotoxin types A, B and C. Based on sites sampled, 33 (20.5%) out of 161 isolates from the anterior nares were enterotoxigenic while from dorsal skins 19 (12.8%) out of 148 isolates were enterotoxigenic. Staphylococcal enterotoxin C(SEC) was predominantly produced as 21 (6.8%) isolates elaborated it and also accounted for 40.4% of all enterotoxins produced by isolates. Staphylococcal enterotoxins A(SEA) and B(SEB) were produced by 10 (3.2%) and 16 (5.2%) strains, respectively. Mixed enterotoxin types AB, AC and BC were produced by 1,3 and 1 strains, respectively. With human plasma, 17.1% of coagulase-positive and 15.0% of coagulase-negative strains were enterotoxigenic. However, using canine plasma, 19.1% and 6.9% of the coagulase-positive and negative isolates, respectively, were enterotoxigenic. The incidence of enterotoxigenicity was 16.9% amongst thermonuclease-positive isolates and 16.3% for thermonuclease-negative strains. Alpha hemolysin was predominantly produced by 180 (60.2%) isolates and 19.9% of these were enterotoxigenic. Beta hemolysin was produced by 36 (11.7%) isolates with 13.9% enterotoxigenic, while 87 (28.2%) exhibited gamma hemolytic pattern amongst which 11.5% were enterotoxigenic. Based on data provided on coagulation of human and canine plasmas and hemolytic patterns, it is concluded that a large proportion of canine isolates from this environment are not of canine biotypes, but are most probably human biotypes.

  10. Genetic diversity of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Paranjpye, Rohinee; Hamel, Owen S; Stojanovski, Asta; Liermann, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Since 1997, cases of Vibrio parahaemolyticus-related gastroenteritis from the consumption of raw oysters harvested in Washington State have been higher than historical levels. These cases have shown little or no correlation with concentrations of potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (positive for the thermostable direct hemolysin gene, tdh) in oysters, although significant concentrations of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from shellfish-growing areas in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). We compared clinical and environmental strains isolated from the PNW to those from other geographic regions within the United States and Asia for the presence of virulence-associated genes, including the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), the thermostable-related hemolysin (trh), urease (ureR), the pandemic group specific markers orf8 and toxRS, and genes encoding both type 3 secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2). The majority of clinical strains from the PNW were positive for tdh, trh, and ureR genes, while a significant proportion of environmental isolates were tdh(+) but trh negative. Hierarchical clustering grouped the majority of these clinical isolates into a cluster distinct from that including the pandemic strain RIMD2210633, clinical isolates from other geographical regions, and tdh(+), trh-negative environmental isolates from the PNW. We detected T3SS2-related genes (T3SS2β) in environmental strains that were tdh and trh negative. The presence of significant concentrations of tdh(+), trh-negative environmental strains in the PNW that have not been responsible for illness and T3SS2β in tdh- and trh-negative strains emphasizes the diversity in this species and the need to identify additional virulence markers for this bacterium to improve risk assessment tools for the detection of this pathogen.

  11. [Effectiveness of expression of tdh gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus depends on two point mutations in promoter region].

    PubMed

    Shalu, O A; Pisanov, R V; Monakhova, E V

    2012-12-01

    A molecular-biological study of the clinical strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain genes of thermostable direct hemolysin Tdh) and Tdh-related hemolysin (Trh). Using Southern blot hybridization, it is shown that genomes of strains that carry determinants of both hemolysins (tdh(+)-trh+) represent a single copy, whereas in tdh2+RH+ strains, there are two copies (tdh1 and tdh2). All of the examined tdh+trh+ and some of the tdh+trh strains either did not express the tdh gene or did not express the tdh gene (Kanagawa negative or KP-) or expressed it weakly and not often (Kanagawa intermediate, KP+), unlike several Kanagawa positive tdh+trh- strains. To establish the reasons for KP -/+ phenotypes, tdh, tdh11, and tdh2 genes of 13 strains isolated in Russia and neighboring foreign countries were sequenced, followed by the biotransformation analysis of the obtained sequences, as well as a comparison with those of a number of strains presented in GenBank. The results revealed that the weak expression of the tdh gene depends, not only on one point mutation in the promoter region (substitution of A for G in the -35 region), as was thought previously, but also on the second substitution (G for A in the -3 position relative to the -10 sequence), which is quite sufficient when the former is absent. Therefore, the reversion of KP -/+ strains that contain one of these substitutions can take place as a result of a single reverse point mutation, and they should be considered potentially dangerous. Strains that contain both substitutions may revert with lesser probability because, in this case, both mutations are necessary.

  12. Glycerol monolaurate inhibits the effects of Gram-positive select agents on eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Marnie L; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2006-02-21

    Many exotoxins of Gram-positive bacteria, such as superantigens [staphylococcal enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins] and anthrax toxin are bioterrorism agents that cause diseases by immunostimulation or cytotoxicity. Glycerol monolaurate (GML), a fatty acid monoester found naturally in humans, has been reported to prevent synthesis of Gram-positive bacterial exotoxins. This study explored the ability of GML to inhibit the effects of exotoxins on mammalian cells and prevent rabbit lethality from TSS. GML (>or=10 microg/mL) inhibited superantigen (5 microg/mL) immunoproliferation, as determined by inhibition of (3)H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) as well as phospholipase Cgamma1, suggesting inhibition of signal transduction. The compound (20 microg/mL) prevented superantigen (100 microg/mL) induced cytokine secretion by human vaginal epithelial cells (HVECs) as measured by ELISA. GML (250 microg) inhibited rabbit lethality as a result of TSST-1 administered vaginally. GML (10 microg/mL) inhibited HVEC and macrophage cytotoxicity by anthrax toxin, prevented erythrocyte lysis by purified hemolysins (staphylococcal alpha and beta) and culture fluids containing streptococcal and Bacillus anthracis hemolysins, and was nontoxic to mammalian cells (up to 100 microg/mL) and rabbits (250 microg). GML stabilized mammalian cell membranes, because erythrocyte lysis was reduced in the presence of hypotonic aqueous solutions (0-0.05 M saline) or staphylococcal alpha- and beta-hemolysins when erythrocytes were pretreated with GML. GML may be useful in the management of Gram-positive exotoxin illnesses; its action appears to be membrane stabilization with inhibition of signal transduction.

  13. The role of genomic islands in Escherichia coli K1 interactions with intestinal and kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Rafiq, Sahar; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    The completion of Escherichia coli K1 genome has identified several genomic islands that are present in meningitis-causing E. coli RS218 but absent in the non-pathogenic E. coli MG1655. In this study, the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) and kidney epithelial cells (MA104) was determined. Using association assays, invasion assays, and intracellular survival assays, the findings revealed that the genomic island deletion mutants of RS218 related to P fimbriae, S fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, non-fimbrial adhesins, Hek and hemagglutinin, protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin; T2SS; T5SS for antigen 43), Iro system and hmu system), invasins (CNF1, IbeA), toxins (α-hemolysin), K1 capsule biosynthesis, metabolism (d-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism), prophage genes, showed reduced interactions with both cell types. Next, we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 resistance to serum. When exposed to the normal human serum, the viability of the genomic island deletion mutants related to adhesins such as S fimbriae, P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, non-fimbrial adhesins, Hek and hemagglutinin, antigen 43 and T5SS for antigen 43, T2SS, and T1SS for hemolysin, Iro system and hmu system, prophage genes, metabolism (sugar metabolism and d-serine catabolism), K1 capsule biosynthesis, and invasins such as CNF1 was affected, suggesting their role in bacteremia. The characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of E. coli K1 pathogenicity that could be of value as therapeutic targets.

  14. Season-Specific Occurrence of Potentially Pathogenic Vibrio spp. on the Southern Coast of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Di, Doris Y W; Lee, Anna; Jang, Jeonghwan; Han, Dukki; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2017-02-01

    Vibrio species are widely distributed in warm estuarine and coastal environments, and they can infect humans through the consumption of raw and mishandled contaminated seafood. In this study, we aimed to isolate and observe the distribution of enteropathogenic Vibrio spp. from environments of the southern coast of South Korea over a season cycle. A total of 10,983 isolates of Vibrio spp. were obtained from tidal water and mud samples over a 1-year period from five sampling sites along the southwest coast of South Korea. We found that Vibrio alginolyticus (n = 6,262) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (n = 1,757) were ubiquitous in both tidal water and mud year round, whereas Vibrio cholerae (n = 24) and Vibrio vulnificus (n = 130) were seasonally specific to summer. While all V. cholerae isolates were nontoxigenic (non-O1 and non-O139), more than 88% of V. vulnificus isolates possessed the virulence factor elastolytic protease (encoded by vvp). Interestingly, V. parahaemolyticus, which was omnipresent in all seasons, contained the virulence factors thermostable direct hemolysin (encoded by tdh) and thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (encoded by trh) in larger amounts in June (29 trh-positive strains) and September (14 tdh-, 36 trh-, and 12 tdh- and trh-positive strains) than in December (4 trh-positive strains) and February (3 tdh-positive strains), and virulence factors were absent from isolates detected in April. To understand why virulence factors were detected only in the warm season and were absent in the cold season although the locations are static, long-term monitoring and particularly seasonal study are necessary.

  15. Contribution of hly homologs to the hemolytic activity of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoko; Fukamachi, Haruka; Arimoto, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a periodontal pathogen that requires iron for its growth. Although this organism has hemolytic activity, the precise nature of its hemolytic substances and their associated hemolytic actions are yet to be fully determined. In the present study, we identified and characterized several putative hly genes in P. intermedia ATCC25611 which appear to encode hemolysins. Six hly genes (hlyA, B, C, D, E, and hlyI) of P. intermedia were identified by comparing their nucleotide sequences to those of known hly genes of Bacteroides fragilis NCTC9343. The hlyA-E, and hlyI genes were overexpressed individually in the non-hemolytic Escherichia coli strain JW5181 and examined its contribution to the hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar plates. E. coli cells expressing the hlyA and hlyI genes exhibited hemolytic activity under anaerobic conditions. On the other hand, only E. coli cells stably expressing the hlyA gene were able to lyse the red blood cells when cultured under aerobic conditions. In addition, expression of the hlyA and hlyI genes was significantly upregulated in the presence of red blood cells. Furthermore, we found that the growth of P. intermedia was similar in an iron-limited medium supplemented with either red blood cells or heme. Taken together, our results indicate that the hlyA and hlyI genes of P. intermedia encode putative hemolysins that appear to be involved in the lysis of red blood cells, and suggest that these hemolysins might play important roles in the iron-dependent growth of this organism.

  16. Two-dimensional analysis of exoproteins of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for possible epidemiological applications.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo; Kawano, Yasushi; Kawagish, Mika; Hasegawa, Tadao; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Oht, Michio

    2002-01-01

    We applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to the total exoproteins secreted from pathogenic MRSA strains and identified major protein spots by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. In approximately 300 to 500 spots visualized on each gel, various exoproteins and cell-associated proteins were identified and their sites on the gels confirmed for construction of a reference map. Major exotoxins such as enterotoxins SEA, SEB, and SEC,, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), and hemolysins were distributed in the region of pI 6.8 to 8.1 and MW 21 to 35 kDa. Although the differences between calculated and observed values of pI and MW were relatively small in each exoprotein, those of several proteins including alpha-hemolysin and SEB were considerably deviated from the positions of the expected values. Some exoproteins were detected as multiple spots. These included beta-hemolysin, enterotoxins SEA, SEB, and SEC3, glutamic acid-specific endopeptidase, glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase and triacylglycerol lipase. The multiple spots of these exoproteins may be generated by the action of own proteases. Certain similarities of 2-DE patterns among strains belonging to the same coagulase types were observed. On the basis of 2-DE image analysis, coagulase type II strains secreted somewhat larger amounts of SEB and SEC3 as well as TSST-1 than the strains belonging to other coagulase types. Taken together, 2-DE analysis of exoproteins is applicable to epidemiological studies for MRSA, as compared with pulsed field gel electrophoresis of restricted chromosomal DNA.

  17. Characterization of the groESL operon in Listeria monocytogenes: utilization of two reporter systems (gfp and hly) for evaluating in vivo expression.

    PubMed

    Gahan, C G; O'Mahony, J; Hill, C

    2001-06-01

    The ability of intracellular pathogens to sense and adapt to the hostile environment of the host is an important factor governing virulence. We have sequenced the operon encoding the major heat shock proteins GroES and GroEL in the gram-positive food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. The operon has a conserved orientation in the order groES groEL. Upstream of groES and in the opposite orientation is a gene encoding a homologue of the Bacillus subtilis protein YdiL, while downstream of groEL is a gene encoding a putative bile hydrolase. We used both reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and transcriptional fusions to the UV-optimized Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP(UV)) to analyze expression of groESL under various environmental stress conditions, including heat shock, ethanol stress, and acid shock, and during infection of J774 mouse macrophage cells. Strains harboring GFP(UV) transcriptional fusions to the promoter region of groESL demonstrated a significant increase in fluorescence following heat shock that was detected by both fluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy. Using both RT-PCR and GFP technology we detected expression of groESL following internalization by J774 cells. Increased intracellular expression of dnaK was also determined using RT-PCR. We have recently described a system which utilizes L. monocytogenes hemolysin as an in vivo reporter of gene expression within the host cell phagosome (C. G. M. Gahan and C. Hill, Mol. Microbiol. 36:498-507, 2000). In this study a strain was constructed in which hemolysin expression was placed under the control of the groESL promoter. In this strain hemolysin expression during infection also confirms transcription from the groESL promoter during J774 and murine infection, albeit at lower levels than the known virulence factor plcA.

  18. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  19. Genetic characterization of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus from the Northeast USA reveals emerging resident and non-indigenous pathogen lineages.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Ilyas, Saba; Hall, Jeffrey A; Jones, Stephen H; Cooper, Vaughn S; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2015-01-01

    Gastric infections caused by the environmentally transmitted pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, have increased over the last two decades, including in many parts of the United States (US). However, until recently, infections linked to shellfish from the cool northeastern US waters were rare. Cases have risen in the Northeast, consistent with changes in local V. parahaemolyticus populations toward greater abundance or a shift in constituent pathogens. We examined 94 clinical isolates from a period of increasing disease in the region and compared them to 200 environmental counterparts to identify resident and non-indigenous lineages and to gain insight into the emergence of pathogenic types. Genotyping and multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of clinical isolates collected from 2010 to 2013 in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine revealed their polyphyletic nature. Although 80% of the clinical isolates harbored the trh hemolysin either alone or with tdh, and were urease positive, 14% harbored neither hemolysin exposing a limitation for these traits in pathogen detection. Resident sequence type (ST) 631 strains caused seven infections, and show a relatively recent history of recombination with other clinical and environmental lineages present in the region. ST34 and ST674 strains were each linked to a single infection and these strain types were also identified from the environment as isolates harboring hemolysin genes. Forty-two ST36 isolates were identified from the clinical collection, consistent with reports that this strain type caused a rise in regional infections starting in 2012. Whole-genome phylogenies that included three ST36 outbreak isolates traced to at least two local sources demonstrated that the US Atlantic coastal population of this strain type was indeed derived from the Pacific population. This study lays the foundation for understanding dynamics within natural populations associated with emergence and invasion of pathogenic strain types in the

  20. Genetic characterization of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus from the Northeast USA reveals emerging resident and non-indigenous pathogen lineages

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Ilyas, Saba; Hall, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Stephen H.; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Whistler, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric infections caused by the environmentally transmitted pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, have increased over the last two decades, including in many parts of the United States (US). However, until recently, infections linked to shellfish from the cool northeastern US waters were rare. Cases have risen in the Northeast, consistent with changes in local V. parahaemolyticus populations toward greater abundance or a shift in constituent pathogens. We examined 94 clinical isolates from a period of increasing disease in the region and compared them to 200 environmental counterparts to identify resident and non-indigenous lineages and to gain insight into the emergence of pathogenic types. Genotyping and multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of clinical isolates collected from 2010 to 2013 in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine revealed their polyphyletic nature. Although 80% of the clinical isolates harbored the trh hemolysin either alone or with tdh, and were urease positive, 14% harbored neither hemolysin exposing a limitation for these traits in pathogen detection. Resident sequence type (ST) 631 strains caused seven infections, and show a relatively recent history of recombination with other clinical and environmental lineages present in the region. ST34 and ST674 strains were each linked to a single infection and these strain types were also identified from the environment as isolates harboring hemolysin genes. Forty-two ST36 isolates were identified from the clinical collection, consistent with reports that this strain type caused a rise in regional infections starting in 2012. Whole-genome phylogenies that included three ST36 outbreak isolates traced to at least two local sources demonstrated that the US Atlantic coastal population of this strain type was indeed derived from the Pacific population. This study lays the foundation for understanding dynamics within natural populations associated with emergence and invasion of pathogenic strain types in the

  1. Synergistic hemolytic reactions between staphylococci and Micrococcus lylae.

    PubMed

    Lämmler, C; Brückler, J

    1989-06-01

    The primary culture of a clinical specimen obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema revealed three different bacterial species which demonstrated synergistic hemolytic activities on sheep blood agar plates. The three cultures were identified as beta-hemolytic Staphylococcus intermedius, as a coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, producing a delta-like hemolysin and as non-hemolytic Micrococcus lylae. The coagulase-negative staphylococcal species as well as M. lylae produced synergistically with beta-hemolytic S. intermedius zones of complete hemolysis. The occurrence of three different synergistically active bacterial species from one clinical specimen might be of clinical significance.

  2. [Avian Escherichia coli virulence factors associated with coli septicemia in broiler chickens].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Santoyo, R M; Moreno Sala, A; Almanza Marquez, Y

    2001-01-01

    In order to detect phenotypic characteristics associated with pathogenicity, 25 strains of Escherichia coli, isolated from clinical cases of colisepticemia in broiler chickens, were examined to determine the following properties: colicinogenicity, colicin V production, type 1 fimbriae, hemolysin expression and motility. Colicinogenicity occurred in 72% of the strains, 56% of all strains produced colicin V, 84% were positive for type 1 fimbriae and 80% were positive for motility. None of the strains had hemolytic activity; however, all of them, expressed at least one of the other characteristics studied. These results suggest that the diversity of phenotypes detected partially explain the multifactorial nature of avian colisepticemia.

  3. Driven DNA Transport into an Asymmetric Nanometer-Scale Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Misakian, Martin; Robertson, Baldwin; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2000-10-01

    To understand the mechanism by which individual DNA molecules enter nanometer-scale pores, we studied the concentration and voltage dependence of polynucleotide-induced ionic-current blockades of a single α-hemolysin ion channel. We find that the blockade frequency is proportional to the polymer concentration, that it increases exponentially with the applied potential, and that DNA enters the pore more readily through the entrance that has the larger vestibule. We also measure the minimum value of the electrical potential that confines a modified polymer inside the pore against random diffusion and repulsive forces.

  4. Evaluation of nonisotopic DNA hybridization methods for detection of the tdh gene of vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, S A; DePaola, A; Kaysner, C A; Hill, W E; Cook, D W

    2000-12-01

    Production of the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) by Vibrio parahaemolyticus is associated with pathogenicity of the organism and is encoded by the tdh gene. The timely resolution of seafood-associated outbreaks requires rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. The specificity of alkaline phosphatase- and digoxigenin-labeled tdh gene probes was evaluated against 61 strains of V. parahaemolyticus (including isolates from recent outbreaks involving oysters from the Pacific Northwest, Texas, and New York), 85 strains of other vibrios, and 7 strains of non-vibrio species from clinical and environmental sources. The probes were specific for detection of the V. parahaemolyticus tdh gene.

  5. Effect of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes of Aeromonas proteolytica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica was selected for studying the effects of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes because it produces an endopeptidase that is capable of degrading proteins and a hemolysin that is active in lysing human erythrocytes. Possible alterations in the rate of enzyme production in response to the test conditions are currently underway and are not available for this preliminary report. Completed viability studies are indicative that little difference exists among the survival curves derived for cells exposed to various components of ultraviolet irradiation in space.

  6. Recent advances in the study of the taxonomy, pathogenicity, and infectious syndromes associated with the genus Aeromonas.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M

    1991-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of Aeromonas species as bona fide human pathogens and their probable role as etiologic agents of bacterial gastroenteritis have resulted in an explosion of scientific interest in the genus. Major accomplishments occurring in this field during that interval include a more refined taxonomy, identification of new cell-associated factors (surface layers, pili), and the molecular analysis of selected extracellular gene products that may play a critical role in pathogenesis (hemolysins, enterotoxins). This review provides an updated overview of recent systematic, clinical, and pathophysiologic advances and defines key areas of medical and scientific interest in which major questions remain unanswered. PMID:1747858

  7. Presence of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in waters and seafood from the Tunisian Sea.

    PubMed

    Khouadja, Sadok; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Spagnoletti, Matteo; Croci, Luciana; Colombo, Mauro M; Amina, Bakhrouf

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of the hemolysin genes, tdh and trh, in Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from environmental samples collected from various exported seafood products comprising of fishes and shellfish (Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas) or seawater, was studied. Eight strains were confirmed as V. parahaemolyticus by toxR -based polymerase chain reaction and only one strain out of these 8 strains was positive for tdh and trh genes. Toxigenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates are present in Tunisian coastal areas and they may also be present in Tunisian exported seafood products.

  8. Effects of streptomycin and novobiocin on Staphylococcus aureus gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, K; Lindberg, M

    1978-01-01

    Streptomycin and novobiocin induced production of protein A and inhibited production of alpha- and beta-hemolysins in mutants of Staphylococcus aureus strains RN450 and RN1 resistant to these antibiotics. Streptomycin, but not novobiocin, also inhibited propagation of bacteriophages of serological group B, whereas phages of group A were unaffected. Streptomycin had to be present at adsorption of the phage, and 10 mM CACL2 reversed the inhibitory effect. Lysogenization and competence induction occurred in the presence of streptomycin, suggesting that some early phage genes were expressed. PMID:627534

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease.

  10. Bacillus cereus and related species.

    PubMed Central

    Drobniewski, F A

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod. It is a cause of food poisoning, which is frequently associated with the consumption of rice-based dishes. The organism produces an emetic or diarrheal syndrome induced by an emetic toxin and enterotoxin, respectively. Other toxins are produced during growth, including phospholipases, proteases, and hemolysins, one of which, cereolysin, is a thiol-activated hemolysin. These toxins may contribute to the pathogenicity of B. cereus in nongastrointestinal disease. B. cereus isolated from clinical material other than feces or vomitus was commonly dismissed as a contaminant, but increasingly it is being recognized as a species with pathogenic potential. It is now recognized as an infrequent cause of serious nongastrointestinal infection, particularly in drug addicts, the immunosuppressed, neonates, and postsurgical patients, especially when prosthetic implants such as ventricular shunts are inserted. Ocular infections are the commonest types of severe infection, including endophthalmitis, panophthalmitis, and keratitis, usually with the characteristic formation of corneal ring abscesses. Even with prompt surgical and antimicrobial agent treatment, enucleation of the eye and blindness are common sequelae. Septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections are other manifestations of severe disease. B. cereus produces beta-lactamases, unlike Bacillus anthracis, and so is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics; it is usually susceptible to treatment with clindamycin, vancomycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. Simultaneous therapy via multiple routes may be required. PMID:8269390

  11. Characterization of staphylococci isolated from mastitic cows in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, M L; Moreno, B; Bergdoll, M S

    1980-01-01

    A total of 57 gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci, considered etiological agents of clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis, were tested for glucose and mannitol fermentation, coagulase and thermonuclease production, sensitivity to lysostaphin, gelatin hydrolysis, lysozyme, phosphatase and egg yolk factor production, hemolytic properties, antibiotic sensitivity, susceptibility to human and bovine phages, and enterotoxin production. All 57 strains were identified as staphylococci. A good correlation was found between 3+ and 4+ coagulase reactions, thermonuclease production, and high sensitivity to lysostaphin. Neither mannitol fermentation nor production of other enzymes appeared to be a specific property of bovine Staphylococcus aureus strains. beta- and delta-hemolysins were more frequently found than alpha-hemolysin. Nearly 40% of the strains were penicillin resistant. Strains were lysed by phage 42E from the human phage set more frequently than by phage 42D, whereas with the bovine set, strains were more sensitive to specific bovine phages. Three strains produced enterotoxin C, and one strain produced enterotoxin D. PMID:7387155

  12. Genetic diversity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from farmed Pacific white shrimp and ambient pond water affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chonsin, Kaknokrat; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Theethakaew, Chonchanok; Kodama, Toshio; Junjhon, Jiraphan; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Suthienkul, Orasa; Iida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is an emerging shrimp disease that causes massive die-offs in farmed shrimps. Recent outbreaks of AHPND in Asia have been causing great losses for shrimp culture and have become a serious socioeconomic problem. The causative agent of AHPND is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is typically known to cause food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. However, there have been few reports of the epidemiology of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND strains, and the genetic relationship among AHPND strains is unclear. Here, we report the genetic characterization of V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from AHPND outbreaks in Thailand. We found eight isolates from AHPND-suspected shrimps and pond water that were positive for AHPND markers AP1 and AP2. PCR analysis confirmed that none of these eight AP-positive AHPND strains possesses the genes for the conventional virulence factors affecting to humans, such as thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and type III secretion system 2. Phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing showed that the AHPND strains are genetically diverse, suggesting that AHPND strains were not derived from a single genetic lineage. Our study represents the first report of molecular epidemiology of AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus strains using multilocus sequence typing, and provides an insight into their evolutionary mechanisms.

  13. Allicin from garlic inhibits the biofilm formation and urease activity of Proteus mirabilis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Omid, Mahsa; Arzanlou, Mohsen; Amani, Mojtaba; Shokri Al-Hashem, Seyyedeh Khadijeh; Amir Mozafari, Nour; Peeri Doghaheh, Hadi

    2015-05-01

    Several virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Proteus mirabilis. This study determined the inhibitory effects of allicin on urease, hemolysin and biofilm of P. mirabilis ATCC 12453 and its antimicrobial activity against 20 clinical isolates of P. mirabilis. Allicin did not inhibit hemolysin, whereas it did inhibit relative urease activity in both pre-lysed (half-maximum inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 4.15 μg) and intact cells (IC50 = 21 μg) in a concentration-dependent manner. Allicin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (2-32 μg mL(-1)) showed no significant effects on the growth of the bacteria (P > 0.05), but it reduced biofilm development in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.001). A higher concentration of allicin was needed to inhibit the established biofilms. Using the microdilution technique, the MIC90 and MBC90 values of allicin against P. mirabilis isolates were determined to be 128 and 512 μg mL(-1), respectively. The results suggest that allicin could have clinical applications in controlling P. mirabilis infections.

  14. Delivery of a viral antigen to the class I processing and presentation pathway by Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that grows in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. We examined the capacity of L. monocytogenes to introduce influenza nucleoprotein (NP) into the class I pathway of antigen presentation both in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant L. monocytogenes secreting a fusion of listeriolysin O and NP (LLO-NP) targeted infected cells for lysis by NP-specific class I- restricted cytotoxic T cells. Antigen presentation occurred in the context of three different class I haplotypes in vitro. A hemolysin- negative L. monocytogenes strain expressing LLO-NP was able to present in a class II-restricted manner. However, it failed to target infected cells for lysis by CD8+ T cells, indicating that hemolysin-dependent bacterial escape from the vacuole is necessary for class I presentation in vitro. Immunization of mice with a recombinant L. monocytogenes strain that stably expressed and secreted LLO-NP induced NP-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These studies have implications for the use of L. monocytogenes to deliver potentially any antigen to the class I pathway in vivo. PMID:7964496

  15. [[Staphylococcus aureus producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in the lower genital tract of the female].

    PubMed

    Puig de Centorbi, O N; Calleri de Milán, M C; Abdón de Cuadrado, A M; Ciácera de Carrizo, S C; Giménez, D F

    1987-01-01

    Staphylococcus sp was investigated in the female lower genital tract of 102 healthy women aged between 18 and 48 years in San Luis, Argentina. Three hundred and six samples were obtained from labia, introitus and vagina (posterior fornix). Samples were plated on sheep blood, mannitol salt and Baird-Parker media. Strains were identified by tube coagulase test; thermonuclease, fibrinolysin, pigment and hemolysin production; glucose and mannitol utilization and novobiocin sensitivity. Antibiotic susceptibility was assayed. Strains were examined for their ability to produce staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). Fourteen women (13.7%) had S. aureus in one or more samples: 10.7% labia, 3.9% introitus and 3.9% vaginal. All strains were sensitive to cephalotin, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamycin and chloramphenicol; 21.0% were intermediate to methicillin; 15.7% were resistant to methicillin, 94.7% to penicillin and 21.0% to tetracycline. Three strains (15.7%) produced SEB, three (15.7%) SED, one (5.7%) SEC and three (15.7%) TSST-1. Only one strain (5.7%) produced both SEB and TSST-1. All strains produced hemolysins. Coagulase negative staphylococci were found in 40.1% of vaginal samples: S. epidermidis (32.2%) and S. saprophyticus (9.8%) were identified.

  16. Increased sensitivity in PCR detection of tdh-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood with purified template DNA.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kudo, Y; Kasuga, Y; Kiuchi, A; Horisaka, T; Kawasumi, T; Kumagai, S

    2003-09-01

    PCR is an important method for the detection of thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh)-positive (pathogenic hemolysin-producing) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood because tdh-negative (nonpathogenic) V. parahaemolyticus strains often contaminate seafood and interfere with the direct isolation of tdh-positive V. parahaemolyticus. In this study, the use of PCR to detect the tdh gene of V. parahaemolyticus in various seafoods artificially contaminated with tdh-positive V. parahaemolyticus was examined. PCR was inhibited by substances in oysters, squid, mackerel, and yellowtail but not by cod, sea bream, scallop, short-necked clam, and shrimp. To improve detection, DNA was purified by either the silica membrane method, the glass fiber method, or the magnetic separation method, and the purified DNA was used as the PCR primer template. For all samples, the use of the silica membrane method and the glass fiber method increased detection sensitivity. The results of this study demonstrate that the use of properly purified template DNA for PCR markedly increases the effectiveness of the method in detecting pathogenic tdh-positive V. parahaemolyticus in contaminated seafood.

  17. Occurrence of toxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains in shrimp in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Ameri, Mehrdad; Doosti, Abbas; Gholampour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a common cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in people, is frequently isolated from a variety of seafood, including shrimp. The virulence of clinical V. parahaemolyticus strains is commonly associated with expression of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), which are encoded by the tdh and trh genes. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of total and toxigenic V. parahaemolyticus in shrimp caught off the south coast of Iran. Three hundred freshly caught shrimp from four different species, Penaeus monodon, Penaeus semisulcatus, Penaeus indicus, and Penaeus merguiensis, were collected in three provinces along Persian Gulf in the south coast of Iran. Shrimp were collected at the end of each month from July 2008 to July 2009. The samples were analyzed for the presence of V. parahaemolyticus and the occurrence of toxigenic strains. Using conventional bacteriological techniques, 29 V. parahaemolyticus isolates were identified in which 28 strains were confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the tlh gene of V. parahaemolyticus. Using polymerase chain reaction assays targeting the tdh and trh genes, five (1.7%) and two (0.7%) isolates were tdh positive and trh positive, respectively. The tdh-positive isolates were commonly detected in summer, whereas no toxigenic strain was isolated in winter. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first report of the presence of toxigenic tdh- and trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strains in the seafood in Iran.

  18. Crataeva nurvala nanoparticles inhibit virulence factors and biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Ghazanfar; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Khan, Haris M; Jalal, Mohammad; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2017-03-01

    Green synthesized nanoparticles have gained great attention due to their non-toxic and non-hazardous nature. In the present study, bark extract of the medicinal plant in Ayurveda Crataeva nurvala (Buch-Ham) (CN) was chosen for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These NPs were characterized by Ultra violet visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra Red, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The average particle size of green synthesized CN-AgNPs was 15.2 ± 1.01 nm. Gas chromatography- mass spectrometry analysis of methanolic bark extract involved in the formation of CN-AgNPs revealed lupeol as a major active component. In this study, CN-AgNPs (15 μg ml(-1) ) efficiently suppressed the production of quorum sensing mediated virulence factors viz. pyocyanin, protease, hemolysin, and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pyocyanin production was strongly inhibited (74.64%) followed by proteolysis (47.3%) and hemolysin production (47.7%). However, the biofilm forming ability was maximally reduced up to 79.70%. Moreover, the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopic Analysis showed that CN-AgNPs inhibit colonization of P. aeruginosa on to the surface. Furthermore, TEM analysis revealed internalization of CN-AgNPs inside the bacterial cell. It is concluded that green synthesized AgNPs have great potential to inhibit virulence factors and biofilm forming ability of drug-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  19. Properties of an Arcanobacterium haemolyticum strain isolated from a donkey.

    PubMed

    Sammra, Osama; Balbutskaya, Anna; Nagib, Samy; Alber, Jörg; Lämmler, Christoph; Abdulmawjood, Amir; Timke, Markus; Kostrzewa, Markus; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to characterize phenotypically and genotypically an Arcanobacterium haemolyticum strain (A. haemolyticum P646) isolated from a purulent nasal discharge of a donkey. A. haemolyticum P646 showed, compared to sheep blood, an enhanced hemolytic reaction on rabbit blood agar, a synergistic CAMP-like reaction with Streptococcus agalactiae and Rhodococcus equi as indicator strains, a reverse CAMP reaction in the zone of Staphylococcus aureus beta-hemolysin and the typical biochemical properties of this species. The species identity could be confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS analysis, by sequencing the 16S rDNA and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene gap and by amplification of A. haemolyticum specific parts of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region and 23S rDNA. A. haemolyticum P646 and the reference strain A. haemolyticum DSM 20595 were further characterized by amplification of the putative virulence genes encoding arcanolysin, phospholipase D, hemolysin A, CAMP factor family protein, a collagen binding protein and two neuraminidases which were present for A. haemolyticum DSM 20595. A. haemolyticum P646 showed a comparable gene spectrum but was negative for the genes encoding collagen binding protein and neuraminidase H. To our knowledge, the present study is the first phenotypic and genotypic characterization of an A. haemolyticum strain isolated from a donkey.

  20. Droplet-based lipid bilayer system integrated with microfluidic channels for solution exchange.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yutaro; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2013-04-21

    This paper proposes a solution exchange of a droplet-based lipid bilayer system, in which the inner solution of a droplet is replaced for the purpose of efficient ion channel analyses. In our previous report, we successfully recorded the channel conductance of alpha-hemolysin in a bilayer lipid membrane using a droplet contact method that can create a spontaneous lipid bilayer at the interface of contacting droplets; this method is widely used as highly efficient method for preparing planar lipid membranes. When only pipetting droplets of the solution, this method is highly efficient for preparing lipid membranes. However, the drawback of droplet-based systems is their inability to exchange the solution within the droplets. To study the effect of inhibitors and promoters of ion channels in drug discovery, it would be beneficial to conduct a solution exchange of droplets to introduce membrane proteins and to apply or wash-out the chemicals. In this study, we propose a droplet contact method that allows for the solution exchange of droplets via microfluidic channels. We experimentally and numerically investigated the bilayer stability with respect to exchanging flow rates, and then demonstrated a binding assay of an alpha-hemolysin using one of its blockers. The solution exchange in this system was conducted in less than 20 s without rupturing the membrane. We believe that the proposed system will enhance the efficiency of ion channel analyses.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of the Nanopore Translocation Dynamics of Simple Structured Polynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Severin; Renner, Stephan; Alim, Karen; Arnaut, Vera; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore translocation experiments are increasingly applied to probe the secondary structures of RNA and DNA molecules. Here, we report two vital steps toward establishing nanopore translocation as a tool for the systematic and quantitative analysis of polynucleotide folding: 1), Using α-hemolysin pores and a diverse set of different DNA hairpins, we demonstrate that backward nanopore force spectroscopy is particularly well suited for quantitative analysis. In contrast to forward translocation from the vestibule side of the pore, backward translocation times do not appear to be significantly affected by pore-DNA interactions. 2), We develop and verify experimentally a versatile mesoscopic theoretical framework for the quantitative analysis of translocation experiments with structured polynucleotides. The underlying model is based on sequence-dependent free energy landscapes constructed using the known thermodynamic parameters for polynucleotide basepairing. This approach limits the adjustable parameters to a small set of sequence-independent parameters. After parameter calibration, the theoretical model predicts the translocation dynamics of new sequences. These predictions can be leveraged to generate a baseline expectation even for more complicated structures where the assumptions underlying the one-dimensional free energy landscape may no longer be satisfied. Taken together, backward translocation through α-hemolysin pores combined with mesoscopic theoretical modeling is a promising approach for label-free single-molecule analysis of DNA and RNA folding. PMID:22225801

  2. Relatedness of Streptococcus suis Isolates of Various Serotypes and Clinical Backgrounds as Evaluated by Macrorestriction Analysis and Expression of Potential Virulence Traits

    PubMed Central

    Allgaier, Achim; Goethe, Ralph; Wisselink, Henk J.; Smith, Hilde E.; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis isolates of different serotypes by macrorestriction analysis and elucidated possible relationships between the genetic background, expression of potential virulence traits, and source of isolation. Virulence traits included expression of serotype-specific polysaccharides, muramidase-released protein (MRP), extracellular protein factor (EF), hemolysin activity, and adherence to epithelial cells. Macrorestriction analysis of streptococcal DNA digested with restriction enzymes SmaI and ApaI allowed differentiation of single isolates that could be assigned to four major clusters, named A1, A2, B1, and B2. Comparison of the genotypic and phenotypic features of the isolates with their source of isolation showed that (i) the S. suis population examined, which originated mainly from German pigs, exhibited a genetic diversity and phenotypic patterns comparable to those found for isolates from other European countries; (ii) certain phenotypic features, such as the presence of capsular antigens of serotypes 2, 1, and 9, expression of MRP and EF, and hemolysin activity (and in particular, combinations of these features), were strongly associated with the clinical background of meningitis and septicemia; and (iii) isolates from pigs with meningitis and septicemia showed a significantly higher degree of genetic homogeneity compared to that for isolates from pigs with pneumonia and healthy pigs. Since the former isolates are considered highly virulent, this supports the theory of a clonal relationship among highly virulent strains. PMID:11158088

  3. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    PubMed Central

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The ‘AC to Hly-linking segment’ thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  4. Virulence patterns and long-range genetic mapping of extraintestinal Escherichia coli K1, K5, and K100 isolates: use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, M; Bender, L; Blum, G; Schmittroth, M; Achtman, M; Tschäpe, H; Hacker, J

    1991-01-01

    A total of 127 extraintestinal Escherichia coli strains of the capsule serotypes K1, K5, and K100 from human and animal sources were analyzed for DNA sequences specific for the genes for various adhesins (P fimbriae [pap] and P-related sequences [prs], S fimbriae [sfa]/F1C fimbriae [foc], and type I fimbriae [fim]), aerobactin (aer), and hemolysin (hly). The expression of corresponding virulence factors was also tested. Twenty-four selected strains were analyzed by long-range DNA mapping to evaluate their genetic relationships. DNA sequences for the adhesins were often found in strains not expressing them, while strains with hemolysin and aerobactin genes usually did express them. Different isolates of the same serotype often expressed different virulence patterns. The use of virulence-associated gene probes for Southern hybridization with genomic DNA fragments separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that a highly heterogeneous restriction fragment length and hybridization pattern existed even within strains of the same serotype. Long-range DNA mapping is therefore useful for the evaluation of genetic relatedness among individual isolates and facilitates the performance of precise molecular epidemiology. Images PMID:1677349

  5. Virulence modulation of Candida albicans biofilms by metal ions commonly released from orthodontic devices.

    PubMed

    Ronsani, Maiara Medeiros; Mores Rymovicz, Alinne Ulbrich; Meira, Thiago Martins; Trindade Grégio, Ana Maria; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Ribeiro Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The installation of metal devices leads to an increase in the salivary concentration of metal ions and in the growth of salivary Candida spp. However, the relationship between released metal ions and Candida virulence has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether metal ions affect fungal virulence. We prepared culture media containing Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Co(2+) or a mixture of these metal ions at concentrations similar to those released in saliva of orthodontic patients. Biofilms of Candida albicans SC5314 were grown for 72 h and their biomasses were determined. The supernatants were analyzed for secretory aspartyl protease (SAP) and hemolysin activities. To verify changes in virulence following treatment with metals, proteolytic and hemolytic activities were converted into specific activities. The results revealed that all ions, except Co(2+), caused increases in biofilm biomass. In addition, Ni(2+) caused an increase in SAP activity and Fe(3+) reduced hemolytic activity. However, the SAP and hemolysin activities in the presence of the mixture of ions did not differ from those of control. These results indicate that metal ions released during the degradation of orthodontic appliances can modulate virulence factors in C. albicans biofilms.

  6. Continuum electrostatic calculations of the pKa of ionizable residues in an ion channel: dynamic vs. static input structure.

    PubMed

    Aguilella-Arzo, M; Aguilella, V M

    2010-04-01

    We have computed the pK(a)'s of the ionizable residues of a protein ion channel, the Staphylococcus aureus toxin alpha-hemolysin, by using two types of input structures, namely the crystal structure of the heptameric alpha-hemolysin and a set of over four hundred snapshots from a 4.38 ns Molecular Dynamics simulation of the protein inserted in a phospholipid planar bilayer. The comparison of the dynamic picture provided by the Molecular Simulation with the static one based on the X-ray crystal structure of the protein embedded in a lipid membrane allows analyzing the influence of the fluctuations in the protein structure on its ionization properties. We find that the use of the dynamic structure provides interesting information about the sensitivity of the computed pK(a) of a given residue to small changes in the local structure. The calculated pK(a) are consistent with previous indirect estimations obtained from single-channel conductance and selectivity measurements.

  7. An improved method for detection of Edwardsiella tarda by loop-mediated isothermal amplification by targeting the EsrB gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guosi; Zhang, Qingli; Han, Nana; Shi, Chengyin; Wang, Xiuhua; Liu, Qinghui; Huang, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a major pathogen in aquatic environments that can cause heavy economic losses. An improved method for quick and accurate detection of E. tarda by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with two additional loop primers was developed by targeting the EsrB gene ( EsrB — LAMP). In this method, the Mg2+ concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time were optimized to 8 mmol/L, 61°C, and 40 min, respectively. The detection limit with the EsrB gene was as low as 10 copies, which is 100 times more sensitive than that of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The EsrB-LAMP assay was shown more sensitive and rapid than previously reported LAMP assays targeting the hemolysin gene ( hemolysin -LAMP) for detection of E. tarda. The EsrB -LAMP was also highly specific to E. tarda and had no cross-reaction with 13 other strains of bacteria. The assay can be carried out in a simple heating device and the EsrB-LAMP products can be visually detected by adding fluorescent dye to the reaction mixture. Taken together, the improved EsrB-LAMP diagnostic protocol has the potential for detection of E. tarda from indoor and outdoor samples.

  8. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  9. Evaluation of Enterococcus mundtii ST4SA and Lactobacillus plantarum 423 as probiotics by using a gastro-intestinal model with infant milk formulations as substrate.

    PubMed

    Botes, Marelize; van Reenen, Carol A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2008-12-10

    Enterococcus mundtii ST4SA and Lactobacillus plantarum 423 produce bacteriocins with activity against a number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Both strains survived intestinal conditions simulated in a gastro-intestinal model (GIM) with infant milk formulations as substrate and prevented the growth of Listeria monocytogenes ScottA. The strains are inhibited by the antibiotics amoxicillin, cefadroxil, roxithromycin and doxycycline, anti-inflammatory medicaments containing meloxicam, ibuprofen and sodium diklofenak, and analgesics containing paracetamol, codeine phosphate and promethazine. Strain 423 is sensitive to vancomycin and does not contain genes encoding gelatinase, cell aggregation substance (AS), adhesion to collagen (Ace), enterococcus surface protein (Esp), Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis antigen (EfaAfs), cytolysin and non-cytolysin (beta-hemolysin III). Genes encoding AS, cytolysin and non-cytolysin (beta-hemolysin III) were amplified from the genome of strain ST4SA. Survival of strains ST4SA and 423 improved when used as combined cultures in the GIM and compared well with the survival of commercially available probiotics subjected to the same conditions.

  10. Bacillus cereus and related species.

    PubMed

    Drobniewski, F A

    1993-10-01

    Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod. It is a cause of food poisoning, which is frequently associated with the consumption of rice-based dishes. The organism produces an emetic or diarrheal syndrome induced by an emetic toxin and enterotoxin, respectively. Other toxins are produced during growth, including phospholipases, proteases, and hemolysins, one of which, cereolysin, is a thiol-activated hemolysin. These toxins may contribute to the pathogenicity of B. cereus in nongastrointestinal disease. B. cereus isolated from clinical material other than feces or vomitus was commonly dismissed as a contaminant, but increasingly it is being recognized as a species with pathogenic potential. It is now recognized as an infrequent cause of serious nongastrointestinal infection, particularly in drug addicts, the immunosuppressed, neonates, and postsurgical patients, especially when prosthetic implants such as ventricular shunts are inserted. Ocular infections are the commonest types of severe infection, including endophthalmitis, panophthalmitis, and keratitis, usually with the characteristic formation of corneal ring abscesses. Even with prompt surgical and antimicrobial agent treatment, enucleation of the eye and blindness are common sequelae. Septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections are other manifestations of severe disease. B. cereus produces beta-lactamases, unlike Bacillus anthracis, and so is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics; it is usually susceptible to treatment with clindamycin, vancomycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. Simultaneous therapy via multiple routes may be required.

  11. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins.

  12. Cellular and Humoral Antibody Responses of Normal Pastel and Sapphire Mink to Goat Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lodmell, D. L.; Bergman, R. K.; Hadlow, W. J.; Munoz, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether normal sapphire and royal pastel mink differ immunologically at the cellular and humoral levels. Two days after primary intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of goat erythrocytes (GE), essentially no 19 or 7S plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 106 cells were detected in spleen or in abdominal and peripheral lymph nodes of either color phase. On the 4th day, more 19S PFC were detected in pastel than in sapphire tissues; pastel tissues also contained 7S PFC, whereas essentially none was present in sapphires until the 6th day. After an ip booster inoculation, the number of PFC was markedly different between the two color phases. These differences were most apparent in spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. In parallel with differences observed in PFC responses between the color phases, total hemolysin and 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant hemolysin titers of pastels exceeded those of sapphires in all but one interval after the primary, and at every interval after the booster, inoculation. These data indicate that sapphire mink are not immunological cripples, nor are they immunologically hyperactive, but that differences do exist between sapphire and royal pastel mink, especially in the response to booster injections of GE. PMID:16557957

  13. Cellular and humoral antibody responses of normal pastel and sapphire mink to goat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L; Bergman, R K; Hadlow, W J; Munoz, J J

    1971-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether normal sapphire and royal pastel mink differ immunologically at the cellular and humoral levels. Two days after primary intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of goat erythrocytes (GE), essentially no 19 or 7S plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 10(6) cells were detected in spleen or in abdominal and peripheral lymph nodes of either color phase. On the 4th day, more 19S PFC were detected in pastel than in sapphire tissues; pastel tissues also contained 7S PFC, whereas essentially none was present in sapphires until the 6th day. After an ip booster inoculation, the number of PFC was markedly different between the two color phases. These differences were most apparent in spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. In parallel with differences observed in PFC responses between the color phases, total hemolysin and 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant hemolysin titers of pastels exceeded those of sapphires in all but one interval after the primary, and at every interval after the booster, inoculation. These data indicate that sapphire mink are not immunological cripples, nor are they immunologically hyperactive, but that differences do exist between sapphire and royal pastel mink, especially in the response to booster injections of GE.

  14. Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species: comparison of biofilm production and metabolic activity in biofilms, and putative virulence properties of isolates from hospital environments and infections.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A V; Prado, C G; Carvalho, R R; Dias, K S T; Dias, A L T

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans and, more recently, non-C. albicans Candida spp. are considered the most frequent fungi in hospitals. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency of different species, that is, C. albicans and non-C. albicans Candida spp., and the origins of isolates, that is, from hospital environments or infections. Yeast virulence factors were evaluated based on biofilm production and metabolic activity. Hemolysin production and the antifungal susceptibility profiles of isolates were also evaluated. Candida spp. were highly prevalent in samples collected from hospital environments, which may provide a reservoir for continuous infections with these yeasts. There were no differences in the biofilm productivity levels and metabolic activities of the environmental and clinical isolates, although the metabolic activities of non-C. albicans Candida spp. biofilms were greater than those of the C. albicans biofilms (p < 0.05). Clinical samples had higher hemolysin production (p < 0.05) and lower susceptibility to fluconazole (p < 0.05). Non-C. albicans Candida spp. predominated in samples collected from hospital environments and infections (p < 0.05). These species had a lower susceptibility to fluconazole and amphotericin B, and their biofilms had higher metabolic activities than those produced by C. albicans, which may explain the increased incidence of fungal infections with these yeasts during recent years.

  15. Isolation of Aeromonas spp. from an unchlorinated domestic water supply.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, V; Robinson, J; Gracey, M; Peterson, D; Meyer, N; Haley, V

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of Aeromonas spp. from the unchlorinated water supply for a Western Australian city of 21,000 people was monitored at several sampling points during a period of 1 year. Membrane filtration techniques were used to count colonies of Aeromonas spp., coliforms, and Escherichia coli in water sampled before entry to service reservoirs, during storage in service reservoirs, and in distribution systems. Aeromonas spp. were identified by subculture on blood agar with ampicillin, oxidase tests, and the use of Kaper medium and then were tested for production of enterotoxins and hemolysins. During the same period, two-thirds of all fecal specimens sent for microbiological examination were cultured on ampicillin-blood agar for Aeromonas spp. Recovery of Aeromonas spp. from water supplies at distribution points correlated with fecal isolations and continued during autumn and winter. Coliforms and E. coli were found most commonly in late summer to autumn. This pattern differs from the summer peak of Aeromonas isolations both from water and from patients with Aeromonas spp.-associated gastroenteritis in Perth, Western Australia, a city with a chlorinated domestic water supply. Of the Aeromonas strains from water, 61% were enterotoxigenic, and 64% produced hemolysins. PMID:6486783

  16. Effect of fermentation conditions on the enterotoxigenicity, cytotoxicity and pesticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jen-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Lun; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Chi-Yea; Tzeng, Ching-Chou; Kao, Suey-Sheng; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2010-03-01

    A total of 75 Bacillus thuringiensis strains, among them 62 of Taiwan's microbiota, were screened for their enterotoxin genes, hemolysin BL activity and cytotoxicity. All the strains harbored enterotoxin genes and were cytotoxic to the cultivated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The hemolysin BL and cytotoxicity titers of the B. thuringiensis culture in casitone yeast sucrose (CYS) broth were lower than those in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth, and when the B. thuringiensis strains were cultivated in CYS broth for 5 days, no cytotoxicity was detected. The spores and crystal toxins collected from 40 isolates showed high levels of insecticidal activity against Plutella xylostella. All strains exhibiting low cytotoxicity also had low pesticidal activity. Our study demonstrated that it is difficult to find B. thuringiensis strains that are both effective against insect targets and do not produce enterotoxins or cytotoxic effects in CHO cells. However, it is possible to avoid or reduce unwanted properties, but not the insecticidal activity, of some B. thuringiensis preparations by alteration of culture media and conditions.

  17. Identification and characterization of Photorhabdus temperata mutants altered in hemolysis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christine; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-08-01

    Photorhabdus temperata is a symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and an insect pathogen. This bacterium produces a wide variety of virulence factors and hemolytic activity. The goal of this study was to identify hemolysin-defective mutants and test their virulence. A genetic approach was used to identify mutants with altered hemolytic activity by screening a library of 10 000 P. temperata transposon mutants. Three classes of mutants were identified: (i) defective (no hemolytic activity), (ii) delayed (delayed initiation of hemolytic activity), and (iii) early (early initiation of hemolytic activity). The transposon insertion sites for these mutants were identified and used to investigate other physiological properties, including insect pathogenesis and motility. The hemolysin-defective mutants, P10A-C11, P10A-H12, and P79-B5, had inserts in genes involved in RNA turnover (RNase II and 5'-pentaphospho-5'-adenosine pyrophosphohydrolase) and showed reduced virulence and production of extracellular factors. These data support the role of RNA turnover in insect pathogenesis and other physiological functions.

  18. Occurrence of Vibrio spp. in fish and shellfish collected from the Swiss market.

    PubMed

    Schärer, K; Savioz, S; Cernela, N; Saegesser, G; Stephan, R

    2011-08-01

    The genus Vibrio includes gram-negative bacteria that inhabit estuarine ecosystems. V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus pose a considerable public health threat as agents of sporadic and epidemic foodborne infections associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked contaminated fish or shellfish. In this study, we analyzed 138 fish and shellfish samples collected from the Swiss market (fish fillets [n = 102], bivalves [n = 34], and squid [n = 2]). Microbiological analysis was done according to International Organization for Standardization method 21872-1/21872-2:2007, using thiosulfate citrate bile sucrose agar and chromID Vibrio agar as selective agar. Presumptive-positive colonies on thiosulfate citrate bile sucrose agar or chromID Vibrio agar were picked and were identified by the API 20E and species-specific PCR systems. V. cholerae isolates were tested further by PCR for the presence of the cholera toxin A subunit gene (ctxA). V. parahaemolyticus isolates were tested by PCR for genes encoding for thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and TDH-related hemolysin (trh). V. cholerae was isolated from three samples and V. parahaemolyticus from eight samples. None of these strains harbored species-specific virulence factors. Further, V. alginolyticus was isolated from 40 samples, and V. fluvialis was isolated from 1 sample. Our study provides, for the first time, data for the assessment of exposure to Vibrio spp. in raw fish and bivalves consumed in Switzerland.

  19. A vesicle bioreactor as a step toward an artificial cell assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noireaux, Vincent; Libchaber, Albert

    2004-12-01

    An Escherichia coli cell-free expression system is encapsulated in a phospholipid vesicle to build a cell-like bioreactor. Large unilamellar vesicles containing extracts are produced in an oil-extract emulsion. To form a bilayer the vesicles are transferred into a feeding solution that contains ribonucleotides and amino acids. Transcription-translation of plasmid genes is isolated in the vesicles. Whereas in bulk solution expression of enhanced GFP stops after 2 h, inside the vesicle permeability of the membrane to the feeding solution prolongs the expression for up to 5 h. To solve the energy and material limitations and increase the capacity of the reactor, the -hemolysin pore protein from Staphylococcus aureus is expressed inside the vesicle to create a selective permeability for nutrients. The reactor can then sustain expression for up to 4 days with a protein production of 30 µM after 4 days. Oxygen diffusion and osmotic pressure are critical parameters to maintain expression and avoid vesicle burst. -hemolysin | cell-free protein expression | membrane-anchoring polypeptide

  20. Evolution in Fast Forward: a Potential Role for Mutators in Accelerating Staphylococcus aureus Pathoadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Gregory S.; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Foley, Matthew H.; Vore, Kelly L.; Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Gill, Ann L.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen evolution and subsequent phenotypic heterogeneity during chronic infection are proposed to enhance Staphylococcus aureus survival during human infection. We tested this theory by genetically and phenotypically characterizing strains with mutations constructed in the mismatch repair (MMR) and oxidized guanine (GO) system, termed mutators, which exhibit increased spontaneous-mutation frequencies. Analysis of these mutators revealed not only strain-dependent increases in the spontaneous-mutation frequency but also shifts in mutational type and hot spots consistent with loss of GO or MMR functions. Although the GO and MMR systems are relied upon in some bacterial species to prevent reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage, no deficit in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity was found when either of these DNA repair pathways was lost in S. aureus. To gain insight into the contribution of increased mutation supply to S. aureus pathoadaptation, we measured the rate of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation during serial passage. Detection of increased rates of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation in GO and MMR mutants suggests that these strains are capable of modifying virulence phenotypes implicated in mediating infection. Accelerated derivation of altered virulence phenotypes, combined with the absence of increased ROS sensitivity, highlights the potential of mutators to drive pathoadaptation in the host and serve as catalysts for persistent infections. PMID:23204459

  1. Rapid detection of tdh and trh mRNAs of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Noriyoshi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Isawa, Yuichi; Horie, Ryuichi; Saitoh, Juichi; Ishiguro, Takahiko; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Toshinori

    2004-01-01

    We developed a novel method named the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method and an instrument that allowed rapid and completely homogeneous real-time monitoring of RNA isothermal sequence amplification without any post-amplification analysis in our previous study [Ishiguro et al., Anal. Biochem., 314, 77-86 (2003)]. In this study, we newly established rapid and sensitive TRC systems for the detection of the mRNAs transcribed from two major virulence genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: the tdh gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and the trh gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin. Examination of the standard RNAs prepared in vitro showed that a positive result, increase in the fluorescence intensity to the cut-off value within 25 min, was obtained for as few as 100 copies of RNA. The TRC method specific to the trh mRNA detected the mRNAs transcribed from the trh1 and trh2 genes, two representative trh variants sharing 84% sequence identity. The detection time gave a linear relationship to the logarithm of starting RNA copies ranging from 10(3) to 10(7) copies, showing that quantitative analysis is possible. The detection time for 10(3) copies of the standard RNAs ranged from 11 to 15 min. Examination of the total RNAs extracted from the standard strains of V. parahaemolyticus demonstrated that the new TRC systems are sufficiently sensitive to detect as few as 100 CFUs of the strains carrying the target genes. Total RNA preparations extracted from 24 strains of V. parahaemolyticus, 52 strains belonging to 31 other species of the genus Vibrio and 11 strains belonging to 8 species of non-Vibrio genera were examined. The results of the detection of tdh- and trh-specific mRNAs by the two TRC systems and those of the respective genes by the DNA colony hybridization method agreed. We conclude that the new TRC systems are rapid, highly sensitive, easy to manipulate, and are suitable for routine examination of

  2. Structural and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin NetB from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu-Xia; Porter, Corrine J; Hardy, Simon P; Steer, David; Smith, A Ian; Quinsey, Noelene S; Hughes, Victoria; Cheung, Jackie K; Keyburn, Anthony L; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Moore, Robert J; Bannam, Trudi L; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I

    2013-02-05

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that causes numerous important human and animal diseases, primarily as a result of its ability to produce many different protein toxins. In chickens, C. perfringens causes necrotic enteritis, a disease of economic importance to the worldwide poultry industry. The secreted pore-forming toxin NetB is a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis and is similar to alpha-hemolysin, a β-barrel pore-forming toxin from Staphylococcus aureus. To address the molecular mechanisms underlying NetB-mediated tissue damage, we determined the crystal structure of the monomeric form of NetB to 1.8 Å. Structural comparisons with other members of the alpha-hemolysin family revealed significant differences in the conformation of the membrane binding domain. These data suggested that NetB may recognize different membrane receptors or use a different mechanism for membrane-protein interactions. Consistent with this idea, electrophysiological experiments with planar lipid bilayers revealed that NetB formed pores with much larger single-channel conductance than alpha-hemolysin. Channel conductance varied with phospholipid net charge. Furthermore, NetB differed in its ion selectivity, preferring cations over anions. Using hemolysis as a screen, we carried out a random-mutagenesis study that identified several residues that are critical for NetB-induced cell lysis. Mapping of these residues onto the crystal structure revealed that they were clustered in regions predicted to be required for oligomerization or membrane binding. Together these data provide an insight into the mechanism of NetB-mediated pore formation and will contribute to our understanding of the mode of action of this important toxin. IMPORTANCE Necrotic enteritis is an economically important disease of the worldwide poultry industry and is mediated by Clostridium perfringens strains that produce NetB, a β-pore-forming toxin. We carried out

  3. Characterization of trh2 Harbouring Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains Isolated in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Bechlars, Silke; Jäckel, Claudia; Diescher, Susanne; Wüstenhagen, Doreen A.; Kubick, Stefan; Dieckmann, Ralf; Strauch, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a recognized human enteropathogen. Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) as well as the type III secretion system 2 (T3SS2) are considered as major virulence factors. As tdh positive strains are not detected in coastal waters of Germany, we focused on the characterization of trh positive strains, which were isolated from mussels, seawater and patients in Germany. Results Ten trh harbouring V. parahaemolyticus strains from Germany were compared to twenty-one trh positive strains from other countries. The complete trh sequences revealed clustering into three different types: trh1 and trh2 genes and a pseudogene Ψtrh. All German isolates possessed alleles of the trh2 gene. MLST analysis indicated a close relationship to Norwegian isolates suggesting that these strains belong to the autochthonous microflora of Northern Europe seawaters. Strains carrying the pseudogene Ψtrh were negative for T3SS2β effector vopC. Transcription of trh and vopC genes was analyzed under different growth conditions. Trh2 gene expression was not altered by bile while trh1 genes were inducible. VopC could be induced by urea in trh2 bearing strains. Most trh1 carrying strains were hemolytic against sheep erythrocytes while all trh2 positive strains did not show any hemolytic activity. TRH variants were synthesized in a prokaryotic cell-free system and their hemolytic activity was analyzed. TRH1 was active against sheep erythrocytes while TRH2 variants were not active at all. Conclusion Our study reveals a high diversity among trh positive V. parahaemolyticus strains. The function of TRH2 hemolysins and the role of the pseudogene Ψtrh as pathogenicity factors are questionable. To assess the pathogenic potential of V. parahaemolyticus strains a differentiation of trh variants and the detection of T3SS2β components like vopC would improve the V. parahaemolyticus diagnostics and could lead to a refinement of the risk

  4. The SaeRS Two-Component System of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Yeo, Won-Sik; Bae, Taeok

    2016-01-01

    In the Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the SaeRS two-component system (TCS) plays a major role in controlling the production of over 20 virulence factors including hemolysins, leukocidins, superantigens, surface proteins, and proteases. The SaeRS TCS is composed of the sensor histidine kinase SaeS, response regulator SaeR, and two auxiliary proteins SaeP and SaeQ. Since its discovery in 1994, the sae locus has been studied extensively, and its contributions to staphylococcal virulence and pathogenesis have been well documented and understood; however, the molecular mechanism by which the SaeRS TCS receives and processes cognate signals is not. In this article, therefore, we review the literature focusing on the signaling mechanism and its interaction with other global regulators. PMID:27706107

  5. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-01-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  6. Genome Sequence of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica EM1, Isolated from a Patient with a Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Soehnlen, Marty; Walker, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    Elizabethkingia meningoseptica EM1 was isolated from a whole-blood sample from a female patient. The draft genome sequence of Em1 contains 4,038,467 bp, with a G+C content of 36.37%. A preliminary genome analysis showed that Em1 contains genes conferring resistance to β-lactams. The bacterium has hemolysin genes and a set of genes involved in heme uptake and heme utilization, showing its potential to cause bloodstream infections. A clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR/Cas) system was identified. Average nucleotide identity (ANI) analysis assigned the bacterium to the species E. meningoseptica (ANI, >95%). The annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its role as a pathogen in humans. PMID:27789634

  7. Placement of oppositely charged aminoacids at a polypeptide termini determines the voltage-controlled braking of polymer transport through nanometer-scale pores.

    PubMed

    Asandei, Alina; Chinappi, Mauro; Lee, Jong-Kook; Ho Seo, Chang; Mereuta, Loredana; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-06-01

    Protein and solid-state nanometer-scale pores are being developed for the detection, analysis, and manipulation of single molecules. In the simplest embodiment, the entry of a molecule into a nanopore causes a reduction in the latter's ionic conductance. The ionic current blockade depth and residence time have been shown to provide detailed information on the size, adsorbed charge, and other properties of molecules. Here we describe the use of the nanopore formed by Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin and polypeptides with oppositely charged segments at the N- and C-termini to increase both the polypeptide capture rate and mean residence time of them in the pore, regardless of the polarity of the applied electrostatic potential. The technique provides the means to improve the signal to noise of single molecule nanopore-based measurements.

  8. Formation of droplet interface bilayers in a Teflon tube

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Edmond; Feuerborn, Alexander; Cook, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Droplet-interface bilayers (DIBs) have applications in disciplines ranging from biology to computing. We present a method for forming them manually using a Teflon tube attached to a syringe pump; this method is simple enough it should be accessible to those without expertise in microfluidics. It exploits the properties of interfaces between three immiscible liquids, and uses fluid flow through the tube to pack together drops coated with lipid monolayers to create bilayers at points of contact. It is used to create functional nanopores in DIBs composed of phosphocholine using the protein α-hemolysin (αHL), to demonstrate osmotically-driven mass transfer of fluid across surfactant-based DIBs, and to create arrays of DIBs. The approach is scalable, and thousands of DIBs can be prepared using a robot in one hour; therefore, it is feasible to use it for high throughput applications. PMID:27681313

  9. Trichomonas gallinae: a possible contact-dependent mechanism in the hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Tasca, Tiana

    2002-07-02

    The in vitro hemolytic activity of Trichomonas gallinae was investigated. The parasite was tested against human erythrocytes of groups A, B, AB, and O, and against erythrocytes of six adult animals of different species (rabbit, rat, chicken, horse, bovine, and sheep). Results showed that T. gallinae lysed all human erythrocytes groups, as well as rabbit, rat, chicken, horse, bovine and sheep erythrocytes. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be identified. Hemolysis did not occur with trichomonad culture supernatants, with sonicated extracts of T. gallinae, or with killed organisms. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the erythrocytes adhered to the parasite surface and were phagocytosed. These observations suggest that the contact between T. gallinae and erythrocytes may be an important mechanism in the injury caused to the erythrocytes. The hemolytic activity of T. gallinae may be an efficient means of obtaining nutrients for the parasite and allow the investigation of the mechanism used by T. gallinae to damage cellular membranes.

  10. Detection of 3′-End RNA Uridylation with a Protein Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Clamer, Massimiliano; Höfler, Lajos; Mikhailova, Ellina; Viero, Gabriella; Bayley, Hagan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of the 3′-ends of RNA molecules have a profound impact on their stability and processing in the cell. Uridylation, the addition of uridines to 3′-ends, has recently been found to be an important regulatory signal to stabilize the tagged molecules or to direct them towards degradation. Simple and cost-effective methods for the detection of this post-transcriptional modification are not yet available. Here, we demonstrate the selective and transient binding of 3′-uridylated ssRNAs inside the β barrel of the staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore, and investigate the molecular basis of uridine recognition by the pore. We show the discrimination of 3′-oligouridine tails on the basis of their lengths and propose the αHL nanopore as a useful sensor for this biologically relevant RNA modification. PMID:24369707

  11. Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans subsp. nov., isolated from the external auditory meatus of dogs with external ear otitis.

    PubMed

    Igimi, S; Takahashi, E; Mitsuoka, T

    1990-10-01

    A new subspecies, Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans, was isolated from the external auditory meatus of dogs suffering from external ear otitis and is described on the basis of studies of 21 strains. Phenotypic studies showed that these strains are more closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius than to other staphylococci, but DNA hybridization studies indicated that they are closely related to Staphylococcus schleiferi N850274T. On the basis of biochemical distinctiveness (positive test tube coagulase test and different carbohydrate reactions) and the etiological importance (frequent isolation from otitis specimens from dogs) of these strains, we propose to classify them as a subspecies of S. schleiferi. The strains of this new subspecies are coagulase tube test, beta-hemolysin, and heat-stable nuclease positive but clumping factor negative. A simple scheme for the differentiation of S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans from the other coagulase-positive staphylococci is presented. The type strain is GA211 (= JCM 7470).

  12. Production of virulence factors in Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis and control individuals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Araújo, Maria Izabel Daniel Santos Alves; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of virulence factors in Candida isolates from the oral cavities of 50 patients with different degrees of denture stomatitis (DS, type I, II and III) and 50 individuals without signs of DS. We evaluated the enzymatic and hemolytic activities, the biofilm formation, and the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) in all isolates. Germ tube (GT) production was also evaluated in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates. In C. albicans and C. dubliniensis the secretion of hemolysin and GT production was significantly different between isolates from patients with DS and individuals without DS. No significant difference was observed in the production of virulence factors by Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates expressed a wide range of virulence factors. However, in the majority of isolates from the type III lesions, the production of the virulence factors was higher than for the other groups.

  13. Helicobacter pylori TlyA agglutinates liposomes and induces fusion and permeabilization of the liposome membranes.

    PubMed

    Lata, Kusum; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-06-10

    Helicobacter pylori TlyA is a pore-forming hemolysin with potent cytotoxic activity. To explore the potential membrane-damaging activity of H. pylori TlyA, we have studied its interaction with the synthetic liposome vesicles. In our study, H. pylori TlyA shows a prominent ability to associate with the liposome vesicles without displaying an obligatory requirement for any protein receptor on the liposome membranes. Interaction of TlyA triggers agglutination of the liposome vesicles. Such agglutinating activity of TlyA could also be observed with erythrocytes before the induction of its pore-forming hemolytic activity. In addition to its agglutinating activity against liposomes, TlyA also induces fusion and disruption of the liposome membranes. Altogether, our study highlights novel membrane-damaging properties of H. pylori TlyA that have not been documented previously with any other TlyA family protein.

  14. Semisynthetic Nanoreactor for Reversible Single-Molecule Covalent Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein engineering has been used to remodel pores for applications in biotechnology. For example, the heptameric α-hemolysin pore (αHL) has been engineered to form a nanoreactor to study covalent chemistry at the single-molecule level. Previous work has been confined largely to the chemistry of cysteine side chains or, in one instance, to an irreversible reaction of an unnatural amino acid side chain bearing a terminal alkyne. Here, we present four different αHL pores obtained by coupling either two or three fragments by native chemical ligation (NCL). The synthetic αHL monomers were folded and incorporated into heptameric pores. The functionality of the pores was validated by hemolysis assays and by single-channel current recording. By using NCL to introduce a ketone amino acid, the nanoreactor approach was extended to an investigation of reversible covalent chemistry on an unnatural side chain at the single-molecule level. PMID:27537396

  15. Nanoscale Bio-engineering Solutions for Space Exploration: The Nanopore Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Cozmuta, Ioana

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of biological systems at the molecular level and extraction of essential information for nano-engineering design to guide the nano-fabrication of solid-state sensors and molecular identification devices is a computational challenge. The alpha hemolysin protein ion channel is used as a model system for structural analysis of nucleic acids like DNA. Applied voltage draws a DNA strand and surrounding ionic solution through the biological nanopore. The subunits in the DNA strand block ion flow by differing amounts. Atomistic scale simulations are employed using NASA supercomputers to study DNA translocation, with the aim to enhance single DNA subunit identification. Compared to protein channels, solid-state nanopores offer a better temporal control of the translocation of DNA and the possibility to easily tune its chemistry to increase the signal resolution. Potential applications for NASA missions, besides real-time genome sequencing include astronaut health, life detection and decoding of various genomes.

  16. Simulation of polymer translocation through protein channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, M.; Kong, C. Y.

    2006-04-01

    A modeling algorithm is presented to compute simultaneously polymer conformations and ionic current, as single polymer molecules undergo translocation through protein channels. The method is based on a combination of Langevin dynamics for coarse-grained models of polymers and the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism for ionic current. For the illustrative example of ssDNA passing through the -hemolysin pore, vivid details of conformational fluctuations of the polymer inside the vestibule and -barrel compartments of the protein pore, and their consequent effects on the translocation time and extent of blocked ionic current are presented. In addition to yielding insights into several experimentally reported puzzles, our simulations offer experimental strategies to sequence polymers more efficiently.

  17. Interaction of DNA and Proteins with Single Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasianowicz, J. J.

    2006-03-01

    The bacterial toxins Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin and Bacillus anthracis protective antigen kill cells in part by forming ion channels in target membranes. We are using electrophysiology, molecular biology/protein biochemistry and computer modeling to study how biopolymers (e.g., single-stranded DNA and proteins) bind to and transport through these nanometer-scale pores. The results provide insight into the mechanism by which these toxins work and are the basis for several potential nanobiotechnology applications including ultra-rapid DNA sequencing, the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes and high throughput screening of therapeutic agents against several anthrax toxins. In collaboration with V.M. Stanford, M. Misakian, B. Nablo, S.E. Henrickson, NIST, EEEL, Gaithersburg, MD; T. Nguyen, R. Gussio, NCI, Ft. Detrick, MD; and K.M. Halverson, S. Bavari, R.G. Panchal, USAMRIID, Ft. Detrick, MD.

  18. Identification of tdh-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus from an outbreak associated with raw oyster consumption in Spain.

    PubMed

    Lozano-León, Antonio; Torres, Julio; Osorio, Carlos R; Martínez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2003-09-26

    Between August and September 1999, a total of 64 cases of illness were identified in three episodes of acute gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of live oysters from a typical outdoor street market in Galicia (northwest Spain). Nine case patients were hospitalized and analysis of their stool samples revealed the presence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The strains isolated from two stool samples were studied for antibiotic susceptibility, biochemical characteristics and presence of virulence factors. Both isolates were Kanagawa phenomenon positive and produced thermostable direct hemolysin, which is related to pathogenicity in humans. These results show the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in mollusks harvested in Europe and reveal the risk of illness associated with their consumption, suggesting the revision of V. parahaemolyticus risk assessment associated with consumption of raw live shellfish.

  19. Development of a rapid detection method to detect tdh gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus using 2-step ultrarapid real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hee; Kim, Il-Wook; Lee, Dong-Woo; Yoo, Mi-Sun; Han, Sang-Hoon; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2011-01-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin encoded by tdh gene has been considered an important virulence factor in pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Two-step ultrarapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (URRT PCR) with a microchip was devised to detect V. parahaemolyticus carrying tdh gene. This novel method has a 6-μL reaction volume and extremely reduces running time since one cycle can be completed in 10 s or less. Consequently, 35 cycles of URRT PCR was successfully able to detect up to 100 fg (18 copies) of genomic DNA from pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus carrying tdh gene in 6 min. These results indicate that this method is at present the most rapid detection method for tdh gene and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus.

  20. Elderly infection in the community due to ST5/SCCmecII methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (the New York/Japan clone) in Japan: Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative necrotizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Olga; Tomita, Yusuke; Hung, Wei-Chun; Takano, Tomomi; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Higuchi, Wataru; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-06-01

    An 89-year-old man suffered from and died of necrotizing pneumonia with rapid progression and cavity formation due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). He was at no risk for hospital-acquired MRSA infection. His MRSA exhibited genotype ST5/spa2(t002)/agr2/SCCmecII/coagulaseII and was negative for Panton-Valentine leukocidin, indicating the New York/Japan clone (the predominant epidemic hospital-acquired MRSA clone in Japan). However, this strain expressed the cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin or δ-hemolysin) genes at high level, similar to USA300 (the most common community-acquired MRSA in the United States), indicating a variant of the New York/Japan clone with an important feature of community-acquired MRSA.

  1. Nanopore detection of copper ions using a polyhistidine probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Liang; Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Guan, Xiyun

    2014-03-15

    We report a stochastic nanopore sensing method for the detection of Cu(2+) ions. By employing a polyhistidine molecule as a chelating agent, and based on the different signatures of the events produced by the translocation of the chelating agent through an α-hemolysin pore in the absence and presence of target analytes, trace amounts of copper ions could be detected with a detection limit of 40 nM. Importantly, although Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+) also interacts with the polyhistidine molecule, since the event residence times and/or blockage amplitudes for these metal chelates are significantly different from those of copper chelates, these metal ions do not interfere with Cu(2+) detection. This chelating reaction approach should find useful application in the development of nanopore sensors for other metal ions.

  2. Identification of DNA lesions using a third base pair for amplification and nanopore sequencing.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Ding, Yun; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-11-06

    Damage to the genome is implicated in the progression of cancer and stress-induced diseases. DNA lesions exist in low levels, and cannot be amplified by standard PCR because they are frequently strong blocks to polymerases. Here, we describe a method for PCR amplification of lesion-containing DNA in which the site and identity could be marked, copied and sequenced. Critical for this method is installation of either the dNaM or d5SICS nucleotides at the lesion site after processing via the base excision repair process. These marker nucleotides constitute an unnatural base pair, allowing large quantities of marked DNA to be made by PCR amplification. Sanger sequencing confirms the potential for this method to locate lesions by marking, amplifying and sequencing a lesion in the KRAS gene. Detection using the α-hemolysin nanopore is also developed to analyse the markers in individual DNA strands with the potential to identify multiple lesions per strand.

  3. Filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic pore closure in erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodey, S V; Nikulina, O F

    2010-11-01

    Filterability of erythrocytes through small (3 μ) pores decreases with decreasing osmolarity of suspension medium because of hypo-osmotic swelling of cells. After appearance of lytic pores, erythrocyte filterability increases for some time, while after recovery of membrane integrity it decreases again. We suggest filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic lytic pores closure. The dynamics of changes in erythrocyte filterability was studied in 2 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and 6 donors (Ht 0.01%, Na phosphate buffer 5 mM, pH 7.4, 35 mOsm, 24°C). The method can be used for studies of erythrocyte membrane characteristics in various diseases and for evaluation of the membranotropic effects of drugs, infusion media, hemolysins, ethanol, etc.

  4. Isolation of Clostridium absonum and its cultural and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Hayase, M; Mitsui, N; Tamai, K; Nakamura, S; Nishida, S

    1974-01-01

    A new procedure for isolation of Clostridium absonum was devised. Sixtyseven strains of C. absonum were isolated from 135 soil samples, but no strain of C. absonum could be found from human fecal samples. The lecithinase, hemolysin, and lethal toxin in the culture filtrates of this species exhibited low avidity for C. perfringens type A antitoxin. The three activities were inseparable by the present method of purification. A reinvestigation of biochemical properties revealed that incomplete suppression of lecithinase reaction by C. perfringens type A antitoxin and no fermentation of raffinose, melibiose, and starch are useful criteria to differentiate C. absonum from C. perfringens, and that positive, although weak, gelatin liquefaction and fermentation of trehalose are useful to differentiate it from C. paraperfringens.

  5. Formation of droplet interface bilayers in a Teflon tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Edmond; Feuerborn, Alexander; Cook, Peter R.

    2016-09-01

    Droplet-interface bilayers (DIBs) have applications in disciplines ranging from biology to computing. We present a method for forming them manually using a Teflon tube attached to a syringe pump; this method is simple enough it should be accessible to those without expertise in microfluidics. It exploits the properties of interfaces between three immiscible liquids, and uses fluid flow through the tube to pack together drops coated with lipid monolayers to create bilayers at points of contact. It is used to create functional nanopores in DIBs composed of phosphocholine using the protein α-hemolysin (αHL), to demonstrate osmotically-driven mass transfer of fluid across surfactant-based DIBs, and to create arrays of DIBs. The approach is scalable, and thousands of DIBs can be prepared using a robot in one hour; therefore, it is feasible to use it for high throughput applications.

  6. Aeromonas proteolyrica bacteria in aerospace environments. [possible genetic alterations and effects on man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    Preflight studies on Aeromonas proteolytica are reported to investigate the possibility of genetic alterations resulting in increased proteolysis in spacecraft environments. This organism may be present on human tissue and could pose medical problems if its endopeptidase and a hemolysin were to be produced in ususually high quantities or altered in such a way as to be more effective in their activities. Considered are: (1) Development of a nutrative holding medium for suspension of organisms; (2) the establishment of baseline information for the standardization of the assay for endopeptidase levels and hemolytic titers; (3) formulation of a method by which intracutaneous hemorrhage could be quantitated in guinea pig tissue; and (4) the responses of these organisms to parameters of spaceflight and experimentation.

  7. Clonal distribution of Streptococcus suis isolated from diseased pigs in the central region of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Bárbara; Ruiz, Álvaro; Lacouture, Sonia; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of 29 Chilean field strains of Streptococcus suis recovered between 2007 and 2011 from pigs with clinical signs at different farms were studied. Serotyping with use of the coagglutination test revealed that all but 1 strain belonged to serotype 6; the remaining strain was serotype 22. All the serotype-6 strains were suilysin (hemolysin)-negative; in addition, they were found to be genotypically homogeneous by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and sensitive to ampicillin, ceftiofur, penicillin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results indicate that, in contrast to what is generally observed in other countries, a single clone of S. suis was isolated from diseased pigs in the central region of Chile. PMID:26424917

  8. Discrimination of Single Base Pair Differences Among Individual DNA Molecules Using a Nanopore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; DeGuzman, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    The protein toxin alpha-hemolysin form nanometer scale channels across lipid membranes. Our lab uses a single channel in an artificial lipid bilayer in a patch clamp device to capture and examine individual DNA molecules. This nanopore detector used with a support vector machine (SVM) can analyze DNA hairpin molecules on the millisecond time scale. We distinguish duplex stem length, base pair mismatches, loop length, and single base pair differences. The residual current fluxes also reveal structural molecular dynamics elements. DNA end-fraying (terminal base pair dissociation) can be observed as near full blockades, or spikes, in current. This technique can be used to investigate other biological processes dependent on DNA end-fraying, such as the processing of HIV DNA by HIV integrase.

  9. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S L; Lye, D J; McKinstry, Craig A.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 hours after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (γ-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) transcripts. A. caviae has always been considered as opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  10. Effect of confinement on DNA, solvent and counterion dynamics in a model biological nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Suren; de Biase, Pablo M.; Czapla, Luke; Samoylova, Olga; Singh, Gurpreet; Cuervo, Javier; Tieleman, D. Peter; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2014-07-01

    The application of recent advances in nanopore technology to high-throughput DNA sequencing requires a more detailed understanding of solvent, ion and DNA interactions occurring within these pores. Here we present a combination of atomistic and coarse-grained modeling studies of the dynamics of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers within the alpha-hemolysin pore, for the two single-stranded homopolymers poly(dA)40 and poly(dC)40. Analysis of atomistic simulations along with the per-residue decomposition of protein-DNA interactions in these simulations gives new insight into the very complex issues that have yet to be fully addressed with detailed MD simulations. We discuss a modification of the solvent properties and ion distribution around DNA within nanopore confinement and put it into the general framework of counterion condensation theory. There is a reasonable agreement in computed properties from our all-atom simulations and the resulting predictions from analytical theories with experimental data, and our equilibrium results here support the conclusions from our previous non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics studies with a recently developed BROMOC protocol that cations are the primary charge carriers through alpha-hemolysin nanopores under an applied voltage in the presence of ssDNA. Clustering analysis led to an identification of distinct conformational states of captured polymer and depth of the current blockade. Therefore, our data suggest that confined polymer may act as a flickering gate, thus contributing to excess noise phenomena. We also discuss the extent of water structuring due to nanopore confinement and the relationship between the conformational dynamics of a captured polymer and the distribution of blocked current.The application of recent advances in nanopore technology to high-throughput DNA sequencing requires a more detailed understanding of solvent, ion and DNA interactions occurring within these pores. Here we present a

  11. A novel δ-hemolysis screening method for detecting heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, V; Bertuccio, T; Spina, D; Purrello, S; Blandino, G; Stefani, Stefania

    2012-05-01

    We assessed a new screening method, based on δ-hemolysin production in the presence of 6 mg/liter vancomycin, to distinguish heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) and vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) from vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA). On 37 clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, hVISA and VISA displayed no δ-hemolysis whereas VSSA displayed strong δ-hemolysis, showing 91.6% sensitivity. These data, supported by real-time reverse transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) highlighting an hld downregulation, i.e., VSSA>hVISA>VISA, define this new assay as a valid screening method.

  12. Formation of droplet interface bilayers in a Teflon tube.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Edmond; Feuerborn, Alexander; Cook, Peter R

    2016-09-29

    Droplet-interface bilayers (DIBs) have applications in disciplines ranging from biology to computing. We present a method for forming them manually using a Teflon tube attached to a syringe pump; this method is simple enough it should be accessible to those without expertise in microfluidics. It exploits the properties of interfaces between three immiscible liquids, and uses fluid flow through the tube to pack together drops coated with lipid monolayers to create bilayers at points of contact. It is used to create functional nanopores in DIBs composed of phosphocholine using the protein α-hemolysin (αHL), to demonstrate osmotically-driven mass transfer of fluid across surfactant-based DIBs, and to create arrays of DIBs. The approach is scalable, and thousands of DIBs can be prepared using a robot in one hour; therefore, it is feasible to use it for high throughput applications.

  13. Highly efficient biocompatible single silicon nanowire electrodes with functional biological pore channels.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Julio A; Misra, Nipun; Wang, Yinmin; Stroeve, Pieter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Noy, Aleksandr

    2009-03-01

    Nanoscale electrodes based on one-dimensional inorganic conductors could possess significant advantages for electrochemical measurements over their macroscopic counterparts in a variety of electrochemical applications. We show that the efficiency of the electrodes constructed of individual highly doped silicon nanowires greatly exceeds the efficiency of flat Si electrodes. Modification of the surfaces of the nanowire electrodes with phospholipid bilayers produces an efficient biocompatible barrier to transport of the solution redox species to the nanoelectrode surface. Incorporating functional alpha-hemolysin protein pores in the lipid bilayer results in a partial recovery of the Faradic current due to the specific transport through the protein pore. These assemblies represent a robust and versatile platform for building a new generation of highly specific biosensors and nano/bioelectronic devices.

  14. A novel input-parasitic compensation technique for a nanopore-based CMOS DNA detection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsuk

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a novel input-parasitic compensation (IPC) technique for a nanopore-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) DNA detection sensor. A resistive-feedback transimpedance amplifier is typically adopted as the headstage of a DNA detection sensor to amplify the minute ionic currents generated from a nanopore and convert them to a readable voltage range for digitization. But, parasitic capacitances arising from the headstage input and the nanopore often cause headstage saturation during nanopore sensing, thereby resulting in significant DNA data loss. To compensate for the unwanted saturation, in this work, we propose an area-efficient and automated IPC technique, customized for a low-noise DNA detection sensor, fabricated using a 0.35- μm CMOS process; we demonstrated this prototype in a benchtop test using an α-hemolysin ( α-HL) protein nanopore.

  15. A Protein Nanopore-Based Approach for Bacteria Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apetrei, Aurelia; Ciuca, Andrei; Lee, Jong-kook; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2016-11-01

    We present herein a first proof of concept demonstrating the potential of a protein nanopore-based technique for real-time detection of selected Gram-negative bacteria ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli) at a concentration of 1.2 × 108 cfu/mL. The anionic charge on the bacterial outer membrane promotes the electrophoretically driven migration of bacteria towards a single α-hemolysin nanopore isolated in a lipid bilayer, clamped at a negative electric potential, and followed by capture at the nanopore's mouth, which we found to be described according to the classical Kramers' theory. By using a specific antimicrobial peptide as a putative molecular biorecognition element for the bacteria used herein, we suggest that the detection system can combine the natural sensitivity of the nanopore-based sensing techniques with selective biological recognition, in aqueous samples, and highlight the feasibility of the nanopore-based platform to provide portable, sensitive analysis and monitoring of bacterial pathogens.

  16. Computational analysis of maltose binding protein translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinappi, Mauro; Cecconi, Fabio; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    We propose a computational model for the study of maltose binding protein translocation across α-hemolysin nanopores. The phenomenological approach simplifies both the pore and the polypeptide chain; however it retains the basic structural protein-like properties of the maltose binding protein by promoting the correct formation of its native key interactions. By considering different observables characterising the channel blockade and molecule transport, we verified that MD simulations reproduce qualitatively the behaviour observed in a recent experiment. Simulations reveal that blockade events consist of a capture stage, to some extent related to the unfolding kinetics, and a single file translocation process in the channel. A threshold mechanics underlies the process activation with a critical force depending on the protein denaturation state. Finally, our results support the simple interpretation of translocation via first-passage statistics of a driven diffusion process of a single reaction coordinate.

  17. Virulence profile and clonal relationship among the Vibrio cholerae isolates from ground and surface water in a cholera endemic area during rainy season.

    PubMed

    Goel, A K; Jain, M; Kumar, P; Kamboj, D V; Singh, L

    2010-01-01

    All the V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 isolates from ground and surface water samples collected during the rainy season (rainfall contributes significantly in the spread of cholera) contained ompW and a regulatory toxR gene, while many others possessed accessory cholera toxin (ace), hemolysin (hlyA) and outer membrane protein (ompU) genes. All the isolates lacked ctxAB, tcp, zot, rfbO1 and rfbO139 genes. The strains could be grouped into two main clusters colligating the isolates from ground water and surface water samples. The results suggest that surface water harbors various virulent V. cholerae strains that contaminate the ground water due to rain or poor hygienic practices, and result in the emergence of new toxigenic strains for cholera.

  18. Sorbitol-fermenting, β-glucuronidase-positive, Shiga toxin-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 in free-ranging red deer in South-Central Spain.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Sandra; Vidal, Dolors; Herrera-León, Silvia; Sánchez, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in free-ranging red deer in south-central Spain, to assess their potential as reservoir hosts of sorbitol-fermenting (SF) E. coli O157:H7 strains, which are emerging causes of hemolytic uremic syndrome in Europe. Fecal samples from 264 hunter-harvested Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus) were collected in 25 different game estates and examined for E. coli O157:H7 by culture and PCR. E. coli O157:H7 was detected and isolated in 4 of the 25 game estates sampled (16%) and the isolates obtained (four in total) were further phenogenotypically characterized. One of them was biochemically typical of E. coli O157:H7, that is, neither fermented sorbitol nor exhibited β-glucuronidase (GUD) activity, and carried genes encoding Shiga toxins (Stx) 1 and 2, the intimin subtype γ1, the enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC)-hemolysin, and the ter gene cluster. The rest of the isolates (three of four) fermented sorbitol, exhibited GUD activity after 18-24 h incubation, and carried genes encoding the intimin subtype γ1 and the EHEC-hemolysin, although no Stx-encoding genes were detected. All these atypical isolates carried the sfp gene cluster, lacked the ter gene cluster, and were unable to grow on cefixime tellurite sorbitol MacConkey agar, which are typical features of SF E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from patients. In total, SF, GUD-positive, Stx-negative E. coli O157:H7 strains were isolated in 3 of the 25 game estates sampled (12%), with an overall sample-level prevalence of 1.1% (3/264). Our findings indicate that free-ranging red deer may be one of the possible reservoir hosts of Stx-negative derivatives of SF E. coli O157:H7.

  19. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from retail shrimps in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Yin, Wai-Fong; Lee, Learn-Han; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine and estuarine bacterium that has been the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks which leads to a significant threat to human health worldwide. Consumption of seafood contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus causes acute gastroenteritis in individuals. The bacterium poses two main virulence factor including the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) which is a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance V. parahaemolyticus strains in shrimps purchased from wetmarkets and supermarkets. The toxR-based PCR assay indicated that a total of 57.8% (185/320) isolates were positive for V. parahaemolyticus. Only 10% (19/185) toxR-positive isolate exhibit the trh gene and none of the isolates were tested positive for tdh. The MAR index was measured for 14 common antimicrobial agents. The results indicated 98% of the isolates were highly susceptible to imipenem, ampicillin sulbactam (96%), chloramphenicol (95%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (93%), gentamicin (85%), levofloxacin (83%), and tetracycline (82%). The chloramphenicol (catA2) and kanamycin (aphA-3) resistance genes were detected in the resistant V. parahaemolyticus isolates. Our results demonstrate that shrimps are contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus, some of which carry the trh-gene thus being potential to cause food borne illness. The occurrence of multidrug resistance strains in the environment could be an indication of excessive usage of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture fields. PMID:25688239

  20. In vitro cytotoxic effect of alpha-hemolytic Escherichia coli on human blood granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gadeberg, O V; Orskov, I

    1984-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of Escherichia coli bacteria on human blood granulocytes was measured by recording numbers of nonlysed cells and percentages of viable cells after in vitro incubation with bacteria in the presence of plasma. A total of 179 strains from various sources of infection were tested. Of 117 alpha-hemolytic strains, 59 were cytotoxic. Five nonhemolytic mutant strains, derived from alpha-hemolytic cytotoxic strains, were nontoxic. None of the 62 nonhemolytic strains were toxic. Four spontaneously occurring alpha-hemolytic, nontoxic mutant strains were isolated from cytotoxic ones. Cytotoxicity of bacteria reached a maximum after log-phase growth at 30 to 37 degrees C for 2.5 h, and the toxic capacity was equal after growth in various media, including human urine and plasma. The cytotoxic effect increased with the length of exposure of granulocytes to bacteria and with increasing numbers of bacteria per granulocyte. Cytotoxic strains showed different degrees of toxicity, highly cytotoxic strains lysing about 90% of the granulocytes and killing about one-half of nonlysed cells in 1 h. Bacteria killed by heat, formaldehyde, or UV light were nontoxic. Alpha-hemolytic strains of O groups 2, 4, 6, 25, and 75 originating from various infections in humans were more frequently cytotoxic than alpha-hemolytic strains of other O groups derived from human infections. Culture supernatants containing free alpha-hemolysin were highly cytotoxic to human blood granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes in vitro, whether supernatants originated from cytotoxic or noncytotoxic bacteria. Cytotoxicity to phagocytes, which is mediated by or closely linked genetically to alpha-hemolysin, may be a mechanism by which alpha-hemolytic strains of E. coli strengthen their ability to establish and maintain infections. PMID:6376357

  1. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  2. The Vibrio cholerae trh Gene Is Coordinately Regulated In Vitro with Type III Secretion System Genes by VttRA/VttRB but Does Not Contribute to Caco2-BBE Cell Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kelly A.; Hamilton, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Numerous virulence factors have been associated with pathogenic non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strains of Vibrio cholerae. Among them are the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), which share amino acid similarities to the TDH and TRH proteins of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, where they have been shown to contribute to pathogenesis. Although TDH and TRH homologs can be encoded on extrachromosomal elements in V. cholerae, type III secretion system (T3SS)-positive strains, such as AM-19226, carry a copy of trh within the T3SS genomic island. Transcriptional fusion analysis showed that in strain AM-19226, trh expression is regulated in a bile-dependent manner by a family of transmembrane transcriptional regulators that includes VttRA, VttRB, and ToxR. Genes encoding T3SS structural components are expressed under similar conditions, suggesting that within the T3SS genomic island, genes encoding proteins unrelated to the T3SS and loci involved in T3SS synthesis are coregulated. Despite similar in vitro expression patterns, however, TRH is not required for AM-19226 to colonize the infant mouse intestine, nor does it contribute to bile-mediated cytotoxicity when strain AM-19226 is cocultured with the mammalian cell line Caco2-BBE. Instead, we found that a functional T3SS is essential for AM-19226 to induce bile-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Collectively, the results are consistent with a more minor role for the V. cholerae TRH in T3SS-positive strains compared to the functions attributed to the V. parahaemolyticus TDH and TRH proteins. PMID:23045478

  3. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    PubMed

    Huyet, Jessica; Naylor, Claire E; Savva, Christos G; Gibert, Maryse; Popoff, Michel R; Basak, Ajit K

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF) revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB) cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  4. Genome anatomy of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus of crustacean origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an important human pathogen, is associated with gastroenteritis and transmitted through partially cooked seafood. It has become a major concern in the production and trade of marine food products. The prevalence of potentially virulent and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in raw seafood is of public health significance. Here we describe the genome sequence of a V. parahaemolyticus isolate of crustacean origin which was cultured from prawns in 2008 in Selangor, Malaysia (isolate PCV08-7). The next generation sequencing and analysis revealed that the genome of isolate PCV08-7 has closest similarity to that of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. However, there are certain unique features of the PCV08-7 genome such as the absence of TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), and the presence of HU-alpha insertion. The genome of isolate PCV08-7 encodes a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), an important virulence factor that classifies PCV08-7 isolate to be a serovariant of O3:K6 strain. Apart from these, we observed that there is certain pattern of genetic rearrangements that makes V. parahaemolyticus PCV08-7 a non-pandemic clone. We present detailed genome statistics and important genetic features of this bacterium and discuss how its survival, adaptation and virulence in marine and terrestrial hosts can be understood through the genomic blueprint and that the availability of genome sequence entailing this important Malaysian isolate would likely enhance our understanding of the epidemiology, evolution and transmission of foodborne Vibrios in Malaysia and elsewhere. PMID:24330647

  5. Incidence of Aeromonas spp. infection in fish and chicken meat and its related public health hazards: A review

    PubMed Central

    Praveen, Praveen Kumar; Debnath, Chanchal; Shekhar, Shashank; Dalai, Nirupama; Ganguly, Subha

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas is recognized to cause a variety of diseases in man. In humans, they are associated with intestinal and extra-intestinal infections. With the growing importance of Aeromonas as an emerging pathogen, it is important to combat this organism. It is indisputable that Aeromonas strains may produce many different putative virulence factors such as enterotoxins, hemolysins or cytotoxins, and antibiotic resistance against different antibiotics. The ability of these bacteria to grow competitively at 5°C may be indicative of their potential as a public health hazard. Comprehensive enteric disease surveillance strategies, prevention and education are essential for meeting the challenges in the years ahead. It is important for us to promote the value of enteric cultures when patients have a gastrointestinal illness or bloody diarrhea or when multiple cases of enteric disease occur after a common exposure. With the growing importance of Aeromonas as an emerging pathogen, it is important to combat this organism. It is indisputable that Aeromonas strains may produce many different putative virulence factors, such as enterotoxins, hemolysins or cytotoxins. It has been established that aerolysin is a virulence factor contributing to the pathogenesis of Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Fish and chicken play an important role in the transmission of this pathogen to humans. In the present study, the high prevalence of toxin-producing strains was found among the Aeromonas isolates. The ability of these bacteria to grow competitively at 5°C may be indicative of their potential as a public health hazard. The present review was constructed with a view to highlight the zoonotic importance of Aeromonas pathogen in fish and chicken meat. PMID:27051177

  6. Incidence and virulence characteristics of Aeromonas spp. in fish

    PubMed Central

    Abd-El-Malek, Ashraf M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the presence of Aeromonas spp. in raw and ready-to-eat (RTE) fish commonly consumed in Assiut city, Egypt, and to determine virulence factors due to they play a key role in their pathogenicity. Materials and Methods: A total of 125 samples of raw and RTE fish samples were taken from different fish markets and fish restaurants in Assiut Governorate and screened for the presence of Aeromonas spp. by enrichment on tryptic soy broth then incubated at 30°C for 24 h. Plating unto the sterile Petri dishes containing Aeromonas agar base to which Aeromonas selective supplement was added. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Presumptive Aeromonas colonies were biochemically confirmed and analyzed for pathogenicity by hemolysin production, protease, and lipase detection. Results: The results indicated that raw fish were contaminated with Aeromonas spp. (40% in wild and 36% in cultured Nile tilapia). Regarding RTE, Aeromonas spp. could be isolated with the percentage of 16%, 28% and 20% in fried Bolti, grilled Bolti and fried Bayad, respectively. Out of 35 isolates obtained, 22 were categorized as Aeromonas hydrophila, 12 were classified as Aeromonas sobria and Aeromonas caviae were found in only one isolate. The virulence factors of Aeromonas spp. were detected and the results showed that all isolates produced of hemolysin (91.4%), protease (77.1%), and lipase enzyme (17.1%). Conclusion: This study indicates that the presence of A. hydrophila with virulence potential in fresh and RTE fish may be a major threat to public health. PMID:28246446

  7. Serogroup, Virulence, and Genetic Traits of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Estuarine Ecosystem of Bangladesh▿

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munirul; Chowdhury, Wasimul B.; Bhuiyan, N. A.; Islam, Atiqul; Hasan, Nur A.; Nair, G. Balakrish; Watanabe, H.; Siddique, A. K.; Huq, Anwar; Sack, R. Bradley; Akhter, M. Z.; Grim, Christopher J.; Kam, K.-M.; Luey, C. K. Y.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Colwell, Rita R.

    2009-01-01

    Forty-two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were isolated from Bay of Bengal estuaries and, with two clinical strains, analyzed for virulence, phenotypic, and molecular traits. Serological analysis indicated O8, O3, O1, and K21 to be the major O and K serogroups, respectively, and O8:K21, O1:KUT, and O3:KUT to be predominant. The K antigen(s) was untypeable, and pandemic serogroup O3:K6 was not detected. The presence of genes toxR and tlh were confirmed by PCR in all but two strains, which also lacked toxR. A total of 18 (41%) strains possessed the virulence gene encoding thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), and one had the TDH-related hemolysin (trh) gene, but not tdh. Ten (23%) strains exhibited Kanagawa phenomenon that surrogates virulence, of which six, including the two clinical strains, possessed tdh. Of the 18 tdh-positive strains, 17 (94%), including the two clinical strains, had the seromarker O8:K21, one was O9:KUT, and the single trh-positive strain was O1:KUT. None had the group-specific or ORF8 pandemic marker gene. DNA fingerprinting employing pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of SfiI-digested DNA and cluster analysis showed divergence among the strains. Dendrograms constructed using PFGE (SfiI) images from a soft database, including those of pandemic and nonpandemic strains of diverse geographic origin, however, showed that local strains formed a cluster, i.e., “clonal cluster,” as did pandemic strains of diverse origin. The demonstrated prevalence of tdh-positive and diarrheagenic serogroup O8:K21 strains in coastal villages of Bangladesh indicates a significant human health risk for inhabitants. PMID:19684167

  8. Rapid and specific detection of tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNA of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by transcription-reverse transcription concerted reaction with an automated system.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Ishizuka, Tetsuya; Ohnaka, Satoru; Hayashi, Toshinori; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Ishiguro, Takahiko; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2004-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains carrying the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) tdh gene, the TDH-related hemolysin (trh) gene, or both genes are considered virulent strains. We previously demonstrated that the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method could be used to quantify the amount of mRNA transcribed from the tdh gene by using an automated detection system. In this study, we devised two TRC-based assays to quantify the mRNAs transcribed from the trh1 and trh2 genes, the two representative trh genes. The TRC-based detection assays for the tdh, trh1, and trh2 transcripts could specifically and quantitatively detect 10(3) to 10(7) copies of the corresponding calibrator RNAs. We examined by the three TRC assays the total RNA preparations extracted from 103 strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying the tdh, trh1, or trh2 gene in various combinations. The tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNAs in the total RNA preparations were specifically quantified, and the time needed for detection ranged from 9 to 19 min, from 14 to 18 min, and from 9 to 12 min, respectively. The results showed that this automated TRC assays could detect the tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNAs specifically, quantitatively, and rapidly. The relative levels of TDH determined by the immunological method and that of tdh mRNA determined by the TRC assays for most tdh-positive strains correlated. Interestingly, the levels of TDH produced from the strains carrying both tdh and trh genes were lower than those carrying only the tdh gene, whereas the levels of mRNA did not significantly differ between the two groups.

  9. Most-probable-number loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based procedure enhanced with K antigen-specific immunomagnetic separation for quantifying tdh(+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus in molluscan Shellfish.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Natsuko; Iwade, Yoshito; Yamazaki, Wataru; Gondaira, Fumio; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2014-07-01

    Although thermostable direct hemolysin-producing (tdh(+)) Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis, the enumeration of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus remains challenging due to its low densities in the environment. In this study, we developed a most-probable-number (MPN)-based procedure designated A-IS(1)-LAMP, in which an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) technique targeting as many as 69 established K antigens and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene were applied in an MPN format. Our IMS employed PickPen, an eight-channel intrasolution magnetic particle separation device, which enabled a straightforward microtiter plate-based IMS procedure (designated as PickPen-IMS). The ability of the procedure to quantify a wide range of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels was evaluated by testing shellfish samples in Japan and southern Thailand, where shellfish products are known to contain relatively low and high levels of total V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. The Japanese and Thai shellfish samples showed, respectively, relatively low (< 3 to 11 MPN/10 g) and considerably higher (930 to 110,000 MPN/10 g) levels of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus, raising concern about the safety of Thai shellfish products sold to domestic consumers at local morning markets. LAMP showed similar or higher performance than conventional PCR in the detection and quantification of a wide range of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels in shellfish products. Whereas a positive effect of PickPen-IMS was not observed in MPN determination, PickPen-IMS was able to concentrate tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus 32-fold on average from the Japanese shellfish samples at an individual tube level, suggesting a possibility of using PickPen-IMS as an optional tool for specific shellfish samples. The A-IS(1)-LAMP procedure can be used by any health authority in the world to measure the tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels in

  10. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for sensitive and rapid detection of the tdh and trh genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Kumeda, Yuko; Misawa, Naoaki; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2010-02-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) are the major virulence determinants of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. TRH is further differentiated into TRH1 and TRH2 on the basis of genetic and phenotypic differences. We developed a novel and highly specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for sensitive and rapid detection of the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes of V. parahaemolyticus. The LAMP assay was designed for both combined and individual detection of the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes and combined detection of the trh1 and trh2 genes. Our results showed that it gave the same results as DNA probes and conventional PCR assays for 125 strains of V. parahaemolyticus, 3 strains of Grimontia hollisae, and 2 strains of Vibrio mimicus carrying the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes in various combinations. No LAMP products were detected for any of the 20 bacterial strains lacking the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes. The sensitivities of the LAMP assay for detection of tdh-, trh1-, and trh2-carrying V. parahaemolyticus strains in spiked shrimp samples were 0.8, 21.3, and 5.0 CFU per LAMP reaction tube, respectively. Starting with DNA extraction from a single colony and from spiked shrimp samples, the LAMP assay required only 27 to 60 min and less than 80 min, respectively. This is the first report of a rapid and specific LAMP assay for detection and differentiation of the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes of V. parahaemolyticus and related Vibrio species.

  11. Effects of Dry Storage and Resubmersion of Oysters on Total Vibrio vulnificus and Total and Pathogenic (tdh+/trh+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus Levels.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Thomas P; Lydon, Keri A; Bowers, John C; Jones, Jessica L

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are the two leading causes of bacterial illnesses associated with raw shellfish consumption. Levels of these pathogens in oysters can increase during routine antifouling aquaculture practices involving dry storage in ambient air conditions. After storage, common practice is to resubmerge these stored oysters to reduce elevated Vv and Vp levels, but evidence proving the effectiveness of this practice is lacking. This study examined the changes in Vv and in total and pathogenic (thermostable direct hemolysin gene and the tdh-related hemolysin gene, tdh+ and trh+) Vp levels in oysters after 5 or 24 h of dry storage (28 to 32°C), followed by resubmersion (27 to 32°C) for 14 days. For each trial, replicate oyster samples were collected at initial harvest, after dry storage, after 7 days, and after 14 days of resubmersion. Oysters not subjected to dry storage were collected and analyzed to determine natural undisturbed vibrio levels (background control). Vibrio levels were measured using a most-probable-number enrichment followed by real-time PCR. After storage, vibrio levels (excluding tdh+ and trh+ Vp during 5-h storage) increased significantly (P < 0.001) from initial levels. After 7 days of resubmersion, Vv and total Vp levels (excluding total Vp in oysters stored for 5 h) were not significantly different (P < 0.1) from levels in background oysters. Vv and total and pathogenic Vp levels were not significantly different (P > 0.1) from levels in background oysters after 14 days of resubmersion, regardless of dry storage time. These data demonstrate that oyster resubmersion after dry storage at elevated ambient temperatures allows vibrio levels to return to those of background control samples. These results can be used to help minimize the risk of Vv and Vp illnesses and to inform the oyster industry on the effectiveness of routine storing and resubmerging of aquaculture oysters.

  12. Density of total and pathogenic (tdh+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Atlantic and Gulf coast molluscan shellfish at harvest.

    PubMed

    Cook, David W; Bowers, John C; DePaola, Angelo

    2002-12-01

    The densities of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in 671 samples of molluscan shellfish harvested in 1999 and 2000 from 14 sites in seven Gulf and Atlantic coast states were determined at 2-week intervals over a period of 12 to 16 months in each state. Changes in V. parahaemolyticus densities in shellfish between harvest and sample analysis were minimized with time and temperature controls. Densities were measured by direct plating techniques, and gene probes were used for identification. Total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus organisms were identified with probes for the thermolabile direct hemolysin (tlh) gene and the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene, respectively. An enrichment procedure involving 25 g of shellfish was also used for the recovery of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. The densities of V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish from all harvest sites were positively correlated with water temperature. Shellfish from the Gulf Coast typically had higher densities of V. parahaemolyticus than did shellfish harvested from the North Atlantic or mid-Atlantic coast. Vibrio parahaemolyticus counts exceeded 1,000 CFU/g for only 5% of all samples. Pathogenic (tdh+) V. parahaemolyticus was detected in approximately 6% of all samples by both procedures, and 61.5% of populations in the positive samples from the direct plating procedure were at the lower limit of detection (10 CFU/g). The frequency of detection of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus was significantly related to water temperature and to the density of total V. parahaemolyticus. The failure to detect pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish more frequently was attributed to the low numbers and uneven distribution of the organism.

  13. Differential gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae in response to various iron sources.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Shah, P; Swiatlo, E

    2009-08-01

    Iron is a critical co-factor for several enzymes and is known to regulate gene expression in many pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) normally colonizes the upper respiratory mucosa, which is an iron-restricted environment. In contrast, during bacteremia available iron from heme and non-heme proteins potentially increases. In iron-depleted medium pneumococcal strain TIGR4 showed reduced growth, however, addition of several physiological iron sources restored growth. Gene expression of selected known and putative pneumococcal virulence factors was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in response to iron sources in vitro and during colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia in a mouse model. Change in mRNA levels relative to transcription in iron-depleted medium was reported. In presence of iron sources, transcription of cps4A, zmpA, pavA, hemolysin and a putative exfoliative toxin was significantly increased, but nanB was suppressed. Hemoglobin at physiological concentration repressed ply and pspA expression. Ferritin, an acute phase protein, increased expression of an iron ABC transporter and repressed expression of a bacterial non-heme iron-containing ferritin. Transcription of cps4A, nanB, hemolysin, and a putative exfoliative toxin were significantly up-regulated during pneumonia and bacteremia, while mRNA of pavA and non-heme ferritin were expressed at higher levels during pneumonia and carriage. An iron ABC transporter was most up-regulated during bacteremia, while pspA and ply were expressed only in pneumonia. Transcription of zmpA was elevated during both pneumonia and bacteremia. These findings suggest that a subset of virulence genes in pneumococci is differentially regulated in response to the quantity and form of iron sources available in a host.

  14. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Tangjuan; Wang, Ke; Hou, Changchun; Cai, Shuangqi; Huang, Yingying; Du, Zhongye; Huang, Hong; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037) for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM) and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR) confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and α-hemolysin (hla) levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  15. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  16. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 isolated from German and Austrian patients.

    PubMed

    Schirmeister, F; Dieckmann, R; Bechlars, S; Bier, N; Faruque, S M; Strauch, E

    2014-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae belonging to the non-O1, non-O139 serogroups are present in the coastal waters of Germany and in some German and Austrian lakes. These bacteria can cause gastroenteritis and extraintestinal infections, and are transmitted through contaminated food and water. However, non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae infections are rare in Germany. We studied 18 strains from German and Austrian patients with diarrhea or local infections for their virulence-associated genotype and phenotype to assess their potential for infectivity in anticipation of possible climatic changes that could enhance the transmission of these pathogens. The strains were examined for the presence of genes encoding cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), as well as other virulence-associated factors or markers, including hemolysins, repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxins, Vibrio seventh pandemic islands VSP-1 and VSP-2, and the type III secretion system (TTSS). Phenotypic assays for hemolysin activity, serum resistance, and biofilm formation were also performed. A dendrogram generated by incorporating the results of these analyses revealed genetic differences of the strains correlating with their clinical origin. Non-O1, non-O139 strains from diarrheal patients possessed the TTSS and/or the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin, which were not found in the strains from ear or wound infections. Routine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of all strains provided reliable identification of the species but failed to differentiate between strains or clusters. The results of this study indicate the need for continued surveillance of V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 in Germany, in view of the predicted increase in the prevalence of Vibrio spp. due to the rise in surface water temperatures.

  17. Ecological fitness and virulence features of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in estuarine environments.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Charles R

    2017-03-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a commonly encountered and highly successful organism in marine ecosystems. It is a fast-growing, extremely versatile copiotroph that is active over a very broad range of conditions. It frequently occurs suspended in the water column (often attached to particles or zooplankton), and is a proficient colonist of submerged surfaces. This organism is an important pathogen of animals ranging from microcrustaceans to humans and is a causative agent of seafood-associated food poisoning. This review examines specific ecological adaptations of V. parahaemolyticus, including its broad tolerances to temperature and salinity, its utilization of a wide variety of organic carbon and energy sources, and its pervasive colonization of suspended and stationary materials that contribute to its success and ubiquity in temperate and tropical estuarine ecosystems. Several virulence-related features are examined, in particular the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), and the type 3 secretion system, and the possible importance of these features in V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity is explored. The impact of new and much more effective PCR primers on V. parahaemolyticus detection and our views of virulent strain abundance are also described. It is clear that strains carrying the canonical virulence genes are far more common than previously thought, which opens questions regarding the role of these genes in pathogenesis. It is also clear that virulence is an evolving feature of V. parahaemolyticus and that novel combinations of virulence factors can lead to emergent virulence in which a strain that is markedly more pathogenic evolves and propagates to produce an outbreak. The effects of global climate change on the frequency of epidemic disease, the geographic distribution of outbreaks, and the human impacts of V. parahaemolyticus are increasing and this review provides information on why this ubiquitous human pathogen has

  18. Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains of Pandemic Serotypes Identified from Clinical and Environmental Samples from Jiangsu, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjiao; Xue, Feng; Yang, Zhenquan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zeng, Dexin; Chao, Guoxiang; Jiang, Yuan; Li, Baoguang

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus has emerged as a major foodborne pathogen in China, Japan, Thailand, and other Asian countries. In this study, 72 strains of V. parahaemolyticus were isolated from clinical and environmental samples between 2006 and 2014 in Jiangsu, China. The serotypes and six virulence genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDR) and TDR-related hemolysin (TRH) genes were assessed among the isolates. Twenty five serotypes were identified and O3:K6 was one of the dominant serotypes. The genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, and 48 sequence types (STs) were found, suggesting this V. parahaemolyticus group is widely dispersed and undergoing rapid evolution. A total of 25 strains of pandemic serotypes such as O3:K6, O5:K17, and O1:KUT were identified. It is worth noting that the pandemic serotypes were not exclusively identified from clinical samples, rather, nine strains were also isolated from environmental samples; and some of these strains harbored several virulence genes, which may render those strains pathogenicity potential. Therefore, the emergence of these “environmental” pandemic V. parahaemolyticus strains may poses a new threat to the public health in China. Furthermore, six novel serotypes and 34 novel STs were identified among the 72 isolates, indicating that V. parahaemolyticus were widely distributed and fast evolving in the environment in Jiangsu, China. The findings of this study provide new insight into the phylogenic relationship between V. parahaemolyticus strains of pandemic serotypes from clinical and environmental sources and enhance the MLST database; and our proposed possible O- and K- antigen evolving paths of V. parahaemolyticus may help understand how the serotypes of this dispersed bacterial population evolve. PMID:27303379

  19. Characterization of toxigenic vibrios isolated from the freshwater environment of Hiroshima, Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, K; Kiiyukia, C; Takaki, M; Nakano, H; Matsuda, H; Kawakami, H; Hashimoto, H

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characterization of toxigenic vibrios in surface water and sediment samples of the fresh water environment of the Ohta River were studied. The membrane filter, pad preenrichment technique, followed by the placement of membranes onto thiosulfate citrate-bile salt-sucrose agar, was used for the enumeration of total vibrios. Qualitative examination of pathogenic vibrios was also attempted. In addition, a survey was conducted to determine the incidence of Clostridium botulinum in sediment samples of the Ohta River and the Hiroshima coast. In the identification of 361 strains, 12 species of Vibrio and two species of Listonella were observed. Non-01 Vibrio cholerae was prevalent among the members of the genus Vibrio. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (serotype 04:K34), isolated in fresh water, is significant and suggests that some still unknown conditions promote the survival of these organisms in fresh water. An estimated 132 strains were hemolytic by a simple agar method, and further characterization revealed that 82% of the hemolytic vibrios (107 strains) produced various toxins. About 71% (93 strains) elaborated cytotoxin, 55% (72 strains) produced hemolysin, and 44% (58 strains) responded for both cytotoxin and hemolysin in the crude toxin extracts. All the non-01 V. cholerae showed cytotoxic activity, and the virulent strains of Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio spp. showed cytotonic responses in RK-13 cells. Of 36 sediment samples tested, 10 harbored C. botulinum spores (28%) and were isolated invariably in all the regions of the Hiroshima coast and in the Ohta River, except the upper region of the Ohta River. PMID:2690736

  20. Acceleration of epithelial cell syndecan-1 shedding by anthrax hemolytic virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Taissia G; Millis, Bryan; Bradburne, Chris; Nazarenko, Svetlana; Bailey, Charles; Chandhoke, Vikas; Popov, Serguei G

    2006-01-01

    Background It has been recently reported that major pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accelerate a normal process of cell surface syndecan-1 (Synd1) ectodomain shedding as a mechanism of host damage due to the production of shedding-inducing virulence factors. We tested if acceleration of Synd1 shedding takes place in vitro upon treatment of epithelial cells with B. anthracis hemolysins, as well as in vivo during anthrax infection in mice. Results The isolated anthrax hemolytic proteins AnlB (sphingomyelinase) and AnlO (cholesterol-binding pore-forming factor), as well as ClnA (B. cereus homolog of B. anthracis phosphatidyl choline-preferring phospholipase C) cause accelerated shedding of Synd1 and E-cadherin from epithelial cells and compromise epithelial barrier integrity within a few hours. In comparison with hemolysins in a similar range of concentrations, anthrax lethal toxin (LT) also accelerates shedding albeit at slower rate. Individual components of LT, lethal factor and protective antigen are inactive with regard to shedding. Inhibition experiments favor a hypothesis that activities of tested bacterial shedding inducers converge on the stimulation of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases of the Syk family, ultimately leading to activation of cellular sheddase. Both LT and AnlO modulate ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways, while JNK pathway seems to be irrelevant to accelerated shedding. Accelerated shedding of Synd1 also takes place in DBA/2 mice challenged with Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) spores. Elevated levels of shed ectodomain are readily detectable in circulation after 24 h. Conclusion The concerted acceleration of shedding by several virulence factors could represent a new pathogenic mechanism contributing to disruption of epithelial or endothelial integrity, hemorrhage, edema and abnormal cell signaling during anthrax infection. PMID:16464252

  1. Cytotoxic Potential of Bacillus cereus Strains ATCC 11778 and 14579 Against Human Lung Epithelial Cells Under Microaerobic Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kilcullen, Kathleen; Teunis, Allison; Popova, Taissia G.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus, a food poisoning bacterium closely related to Bacillus anthracis, secretes a multitude of virulence factors including enterotoxins, hemolysins, and phospholipases. However, the majority of the in vitro experiments evaluating the cytotoxic potential of B. cereus were carried out in the conditions of aeration, and the impact of the oxygen limitation in conditions encountered by the microbe in natural environment such as gastrointestinal tract remains poorly understood. This research reports comparative analysis of ATCC strains 11778 (BC1) and 14579 (BC2) in aerobic and microaerobic (static) cultures with regard to their toxicity for human lung epithelial cells. We showed that BC1 increased its toxicity upon oxygen limitation while BC2 was highly cytotoxic in both growth conditions. The combined effect of the pore-forming, cholesterol-dependent hemolysin, cereolysin O (CLO), and metabolic product(s) such as succinate produced in microaerobic conditions provided substantial contribution to the toxicity of BC1 but not BC2 which relied mainly on other toxins. This mechanism is shared between CB1 and B. anthracis. It involves the permeabilization of the cell membrane which facilitates transport of toxic bacterial metabolites into the cell. The toxicity of BC1 was potentiated in the presence of bovine serum albumin which appeared to serve as reservoir for bacteria-derived nitric oxide participating in the downstream production of reactive oxidizing species with the properties of peroxynitrite. In agreement with this the BC1 cultures demonstrated the increased oxidation of the indicator dye Amplex Red catalyzed by peroxidase as well as the increased toxicity in the presence of externally added ascorbic acid. PMID:26870026

  2. Capsule Expression and Genotypic Differences among Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Chronic or Acute Osteomyelitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Lattar, Santiago M.; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Caccuri, Roberto L.; Centrón, Daniela; Becker, Karsten; Alonso, Claudio A.; Barberis, Claudia; Miranda, Graciela; Buzzola, Fernanda R.; von Eiff, Christof; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) promotes virulence. Loss of capsule expression, however, may lead to S. aureus persistence in a chronically infected host. This study was conducted to determine the relative prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus in patients with chronic and acute osteomyelitis. Only 76/118 (64%) S. aureus isolates from patients with osteomyelitis expressed CP, whereas all 50 isolates from blood cultures of patients with infections other than osteoarticular infections expressed CP (P = 0.0001). A significantly higher prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus was found in patients with chronic osteomyelitis (53%) than in those with acute osteomyelitis (21%) (P = 0.0046). S. aureus isolates obtained from multiple specimens from five of six patients with chronic osteomyelitis exhibited phenotypic (expression of CP, α-hemolysin, β-hemolysin, slime, and the small-colony variant phenotype) and/or genotypic (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing) differences. Nonencapsulated S. aureus was recovered from at least one specimen from each chronic osteomyelitis patient. Fourteen isolates obtained from two patients with acute osteomyelitis were indistinguishable from each other within each group, and all produced CP5. In conclusion, we demonstrated that nonencapsulated S. aureus is more frequently isolated from patients with chronic osteomyelitis than from those with acute osteomyelitis, suggesting that loss of CP expression may be advantageous to S. aureus during chronic infection. Our findings on multiple S. aureus isolates from individual patients allow us to suggest that selection of nonencapsulated S. aureus is likely to have occurred in the patient during long-term bone infection. PMID:19273557

  3. Improvement of the quantitation method for the tdh+ Vibrio parahaemolyticus in molluscan shellfish based on most-probable- number, immunomagnetic separation, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Maldonado, Oscar; Kayali, Ahmad Y.; Yamazaki, Wataru; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine microorganism that can cause seafood-borne gastroenteritis in humans. The infection can be spread and has become a pandemic through the international trade of contaminated seafood. Strains carrying the tdh gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the trh gene encoding the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) are considered to be pathogenic with the former gene being the most frequently found in clinical strains. However, their distribution frequency in environmental isolates is below 1%. Thus, very sensitive methods are required for detection and quantitation of tdh+ strains in seafood. We previously reported a method to detect and quantify tdh+ V. parahaemolyticus in seafood. This method consists of three components: the most-probable-number (MPN), the immunomagnetic separation (IMS) targeting all established K antigens, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeting the tdh gene. However, this method faces regional issues in tropical zones of the world. Technicians have difficulties in securing dependable reagents in high-temperature climates where we found MPN underestimation in samples having tdh+ strains as well as other microorganisms present at high concentrations. In the present study, we solved the underestimation problem associated with the salt polymyxin broth enrichment for the MPN component and with the immunomagnetic bead-target association for the IMS component. We also improved the supply and maintenance of the dependable reagents by introducing a dried reagent system to the LAMP component. The modified method is specific, sensitive, quick and easy and applicable regardless of the concentrations of tdh+ V. parahaemolyticus. Therefore, we conclude this modified method is useful in world tropical, sub-tropical, and temperate zones. PMID:25914681

  4. Improvement of the quantitation method for the tdh (+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus in molluscan shellfish based on most-probable- number, immunomagnetic separation, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Escalante-Maldonado, Oscar; Kayali, Ahmad Y; Yamazaki, Wataru; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine microorganism that can cause seafood-borne gastroenteritis in humans. The infection can be spread and has become a pandemic through the international trade of contaminated seafood. Strains carrying the tdh gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the trh gene encoding the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) are considered to be pathogenic with the former gene being the most frequently found in clinical strains. However, their distribution frequency in environmental isolates is below 1%. Thus, very sensitive methods are required for detection and quantitation of tdh (+) strains in seafood. We previously reported a method to detect and quantify tdh (+) V. parahaemolyticus in seafood. This method consists of three components: the most-probable-number (MPN), the immunomagnetic separation (IMS) targeting all established K antigens, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) targeting the tdh gene. However, this method faces regional issues in tropical zones of the world. Technicians have difficulties in securing dependable reagents in high-temperature climates where we found MPN underestimation in samples having tdh (+) strains as well as other microorganisms present at high concentrations. In the present study, we solved the underestimation problem associated with the salt polymyxin broth enrichment for the MPN component and with the immunomagnetic bead-target association for the IMS component. We also improved the supply and maintenance of the dependable reagents by introducing a dried reagent system to the LAMP component. The modified method is specific, sensitive, quick and easy and applicable regardless of the concentrations of tdh (+) V. parahaemolyticus. Therefore, we conclude this modified method is useful in world tropical, sub-tropical, and temperate zones.

  5. Prevalence, Molecular Characterization, and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from Ready-to-Eat Foods in China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tengfei; Xu, Xiaoke; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Cheng, Jianheng

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks, particularly outbreaks associated with consumption of fish and shellfish, and represents a major threat to human health worldwide. This bacterium harbors two main virulence factors: the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). Additionally, various serotypes have been identified. The extensive use of antibiotics is a contributing factor to the increasing incidence of antimicrobial-resistant V. parahaemolyticus. In the current study, we aimed to determine the incidence and features of V. parahaemolyticus in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods in China. We found 39 V. parahaemolyticus strains on Chinese RTE foods through investigation of 511 RTE foods samples from 24 cities in China. All isolates were analyzed for the presence of tdh and trh gene by PCR, serotyping was performed using multiplex PCR, antibiotic susceptibility analysis was carried out using the disk diffusion method, and molecular typing was performed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The results showed that none of the isolates were positive for tdh and trh. Most of the isolates (33.3%) were serotype O2. Antimicrobial susceptibility results indicated that most strains were resistant to streptomycin (89.7%), cefazolin (51.3%), and ampicillin (51.3%). The isolates were grouped into five clusters by ERIC-PCR and four clusters by MLST. We updated 10 novel loci and 33 sequence types (STs) in the MLST database. Thus, our findings demonstrated the presence of V. parahaemolyticus in Chinese RTE foods, provided insights into the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains, and improved our knowledge of methods of microbiological risk assessment in RTE foods. PMID:27148231

  6. Distribution and dynamics of epidemic and pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; Hasan, Nur A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, autochthonous to estuarine, marine, and coastal environments throughout the world, is the causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis. More than 80 serotypes have been described worldwide, based on antigenic properties of the somatic (O) and capsular (K) antigens. Serovar O3:K6 emerged in India in 1996 and subsequently was isolated worldwide, leading to the conclusion that the first V. parahaemolyticus pandemic had taken place. Most strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from the environment or seafood, in contrast to clinical strains, do not produce a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or a TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs), needle-like apparatuses able to deliver bacterial effectors into host cytoplasm, were identified as triggering cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity. Type 6 secretion systems (T6SS) predicted to be involved in intracellular trafficking and vesicular transport appear to play a role in V. parahaemolyticus virulence. Recent advances in V. parahaemolyticus genomics identified several pathogenicity islands (VpaIs) located on either chromosome in both epidemic and pandemic strains and comprising additional colonization factors, such as restriction-modification complexes, chemotaxis proteins, classical bacterial surface virulence factors, and putative colicins. Furthermore, studies indicate strains lacking toxins and genomic regions associated with pathogenicity may also be pathogenic, suggesting other important virulence factors remain to be identified. The unique repertoire of virulence factors identified to date, their occurrence and distribution in both epidemic and pandemic strains worldwide are described, with the aim of highlighting the complexity of V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity as well as its dynamic genome.

  7. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Canadian Clinical Isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Collected from 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Ashley K.; Nadon, Celine A.; Peterson, Christy-Lynn; Tyler, Kevin; Bakouche, Laurene; Clark, Clifford G.; Hoang, Linda; Gilmour, Matthew W.; Farber, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading bacterial cause of food-borne illness due to the consumption of contaminated seafood. The aim of the present study was to determine the population of its subtypes and establish a better understanding of the various types of V. parahaemolyticus strains that are causing human illness in Canada. The subtypes for 100 human clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus collected between 2000 and 2009 were determined by performing serotyping, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing. Within this panel of strains, there was a high level of diversity (between 22 and 53 subtypes per method), but the presence of predominant clones with congruent subtypes between the various methods was also observed. For example, all 32 isolates belonging to sequence type 36 (ST36) were from serogroup O4, while 31 of them were ribotype EcoVib235-287, and 24 of the 32 were SfiI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern VPSF1.0001. With regard to the presence of known virulence genes, 74 of the 100 isolates were PCR positive for the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh); and 59 of these 74 strains also contained the second virulence marker, the tdh-related hemolysin (trh). The detection of trh was more predominant (81%) among the clinical isolates, and only four (4%) of the clinical isolates tested negative for the presence of both tdh and trh. This database, comprising 100 clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus strains from Canada, forms a baseline understanding of subtype diversity for future source attribution and other epidemiologic studies. PMID:24452166

  8. Host cell interactions of outer membrane vesicle-associated virulence factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: Intracellular delivery, trafficking and mechanisms of cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Greune, Lilo; Jarosch, Kevin-André; Steil, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlan; He, Xiaohua; Lloubes, Roland; Fruth, Angelika; Kim, Kwang Sik; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are important tools in bacterial virulence but their role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157, the leading cause of life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome, is poorly understood. Using proteomics, electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, and bioassays, we investigated OMVs secreted by EHEC O157 clinical isolates for virulence factors cargoes, interactions with pathogenetically relevant human cells, and mechanisms of cell injury. We demonstrate that O157 OMVs carry a cocktail of key virulence factors of EHEC O157 including Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a), cytolethal distending toxin V (CdtV), EHEC hemolysin, and flagellin. The toxins are internalized by cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and differentially separate from vesicles during intracellular trafficking. Stx2a and CdtV-B, the DNase-like CdtV subunit, separate from OMVs in early endosomes. Stx2a is trafficked, in association with its receptor globotriaosylceramide within detergent-resistant membranes, to the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum from where the catalytic Stx2a A1 fragment is translocated to the cytosol. CdtV-B is, after its retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, translocated to the nucleus to reach DNA. CdtV-A and CdtV-C subunits remain OMV-associated and are sorted with OMVs to lysosomes. EHEC hemolysin separates from OMVs in lysosomes and targets mitochondria. The OMV-delivered CdtV-B causes cellular DNA damage, which activates DNA damage responses leading to G2 cell cycle arrest. The arrested cells ultimately die of apoptosis induced by Stx2a and CdtV via caspase-9 activation. By demonstrating that naturally secreted EHEC O157 OMVs carry and deliver into cells a cocktail of biologically active virulence factors, thereby causing cell death, and by performing first comprehensive analysis of intracellular trafficking of OMVs and OMV-delivered virulence factors

  9. Diversity, persistence, and virulence of Aeromonas strains isolated from drinking water distribution systems in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, I; Allestam, G; Huys, G; Janssen, P; Kersters, K; Krovacek, K; Stenström, T A

    1997-01-01

    The Aeromonas populations in 13 Swedish drinking water distribution systems, representing different treatments, were investigated. From each system, water samples were collected four times during the period from May to September 1994 from raw water and water after treatment and at two to five sites within the distribution system. In total, 220 water samples were collected. From samples containing presumptive Aeromonas, up to 32 colonies were analyzed by the PhenePlate Aeromonas (PhP-AE) system, which is a highly discriminating biochemical fingerprinting method. Selected isolates from different phenotypes (PhP types) were further identified by the API 20 NE system and by gas-liquid chromatography analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). Selected isolates were also assayed for their potential to produce hemolysin and cytotoxin and for their ability to adhere to human intestinal cells. In total, 117 water samples (53%) contained presumptive Aeromonas which numbered up to 10(6) CFU/100 ml in raw water and up to 750 CFU/100 ml in tap water. Among the 2,117 isolates that were subjected to typing by the PhP-AE system, more than 300 distinct PhP types were found, of which the majority occurred only sporadically. Raw (surface) water samples usually contained many different PhP types, showing high diversity indices (Di) (median Di = 0.95). The Aeromonas populations in samples collected from within the distribution systems were less diverse (median Di = 0.58) and were often dominated by one major PhP type that was found on several sampling occasions. Seventeen such major PhP types could be found and were represented in 1,037 isolates (49%). Identification by API 20 NE and FAME analysis revealed that most of the major PhP types were Aeromonas hydrophila or belonged to unidentified Aeromonas species. Hemolysin and cytotoxin production was observed in most major PhP types (representing 87 and 54% of the assayed isolates, respectively), and adherence was found in 89% of the

  10. Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis Due to Staphylococcus aureus: A Single-Center Experience over 15 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barretti, Pasqual; Moraes, Taíse M. C.; Camargo, Carlos H.; Caramori, Jacqueline C. T.; Mondelli, Alessandro L.; Montelli, Augusto C.; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Peritonitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), which is associated with poor outcome and high PD failure rates. We reviewed the records of 62 S. aureus peritonitis episodes that occurred between 1996 and 2010 in the dialysis unit of a single university hospital and evaluated the host and bacterial factors influencing peritonitis outcome. Peritonitis incidence was calculated for three subsequent 5-year periods and compared using a Poisson regression model. The production of biofilm, enzymes, and toxins was evaluated. Oxacillin resistance was evaluated based on minimum inhibitory concentration and presence of the mecA gene. Logistic regression was used for the analysis of demographic, clinical, and microbiological factors influencing peritonitis outcome. Resolution and death rates were compared with 117 contemporary coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) episodes. The incidence of S. aureus peritonitis declined significantly over time from 0.13 in 1996–2000 to 0.04 episodes/patient/year in 2006–2010 (p = 0.03). The oxacillin resistance rate was 11.3%. Toxin and enzyme production was expressive, except for enterotoxin D. Biofilm production was positive in 88.7% of strains. The presence of the mecA gene was associated with a higher frequency of fever and abdominal pain. The logistic regression model showed that diabetes mellitus (p = 0.009) and β-hemolysin production (p = 0.006) were independent predictors of non-resolution of infection. The probability of resolution was higher among patients aged 41 to 60 years than among those >60 years (p = 0.02). A trend to higher death rate was observed for S. aureus episodes (9.7%) compared to CoNS episodes (2.5%), (p = 0.08), whereas resolution rates were similar. Despite the decline in incidence, S. aureus peritonitis remains a serious complication of PD that is associated with a high death rate. The outcome of this infection is negatively influenced

  11. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    PubMed

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  12. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, an Emerging Fish Pathogen in the Black Sea: Evidence of a Multiclonal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Terceti, Mateus S.; Ogut, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae is considered to be an emerging pathogen of marine fish of importance in aquaculture, with a notable increase in its geographical distribution during the last several years. In this study, we carried out for the first time to our knowledge a genetic and pathobiological characterization of 14 strains isolated from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) reared in the Southeastern Black Sea, where high mortalities were observed at two aquaculture farms during the summer and autumn of 2011. Heterogeneity was evidenced among strains in phenotypical traits, such as sucrose fermentation, motility, and hemolysis. Although 11 of 14 isolates were hemolytic, we found that all of the isolates lacked the pPHDD1 virulence plasmid that encodes the phospholipase-D damselysin (Dly) and the pore-forming toxin PhlyP, two hemolysins previously reported to constitute major virulence factors for turbot. Subsequent PCR and sequencing analyses demonstrated that the 11 hemolytic isolates harbored a complete hlyAch gene, a chromosome I-borne gene that encodes HlyAch hemolysin, whereas the three nonhemolytic isolates contained hlyAch pseudogenes caused by insertion sequence elements. Virulence challenges with two representative strains revealed that, albeit less virulent than the pPHDD1-harboring strain RM-71, the plasmidless hlyAch-positive and hlyAch-negative Black Sea isolates were pathogenic for sea bass. A phylogenetic analysis based on the toxR gene sequence uncovered a greater diversity in the isolates, indicating that the presence of this pathogen in the Black Sea was not caused by the introduction and spread of a single virulent clone but by the proliferation of different clones. IMPORTANCE The geographical distribution of marine bacterial pathogens is undergoing a worldwide increase. In particular, bacteria of the group vibrios are increasingly being isolated as the causative agents of disease in novel species of cultivated fish in areas

  13. Use of porcine vaginal tissue ex-vivo to model environmental effects on vaginal mucosa to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Catherine C.; Baccam, Mekhine; Mantz, Mary J.; Osborn, Thomas W.; Hill, Donna R.; Squier, Christopher A.

    2014-01-15

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS) is a rare, recognizable, and treatable disease that has been associated with tampon use epidemiologically. It involves a confluence of microbial risk factors (Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce the superantigen—TSST-1), as well as environmental characteristics of the vaginal ecosystem during menstruation and host susceptibility factors. This paper describes a series of experiments using the well-characterized model of porcine vaginal mucosa ex-vivo to assess the effect of these factors associated with tampon use on the permeability of the mucosa. The flux of radiolabeled TSST-1 and tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sub 2}O) through porcine vaginal mucosa was determined at various temperatures, after mechanical disruption of the epithelial surface by tape stripping, after treatment with surfactants or other compounds, and in the presence of microbial virulence factors. Elevated temperatures (42, 47 and 52 °C) did not significantly increase flux of {sup 3}H{sub 2}O. Stripping of the epithelial layers significantly increased the flux of labeled toxin in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of benzalkonium chloride (0.1 and 0.5%) and glycerol (4%) significantly increased the flux of {sup 3}H{sub 2}O but sodium lauryl sulfate at any concentration tested did not. The flux of the labeled toxin was significantly increased in the presence of benzalkonium chloride but not Pluronic® L92 and Tween 20 and significantly increased with addition of α-hemolysin but not endotoxin. These results show that the permeability of porcine vagina ex-vivo to labeled toxin or water can be used to evaluate changes to the vaginal environment and modifications in tampon materials, and thus aid in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Model assessed local effects of tampon use on vaginal mucosa. • Risks were evaluated using two tracers to assess permeability in an ex vivo model. • Mechanical damage to the epithelial surface increased tracer penetration.

  14. Response of Staphylococcus Aureus to a Spaceflight Analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, S. L.; Ott, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The decreased gravity of the spaceflight environment creates quiescent, low fluid shear conditions. This environment can impart considerable effects on the physiology of microorganisms as well as their interactions with potential hosts. Using the rotating wall vessel (RWV), as a spaceflight analogue, the consequence of low fluid shear culture on microbial pathogenesis has provided a better understanding of the risks to the astronaut crew from infectious microorganisms. While the outcome of low fluid shear culture has been investigated for several bacterial pathogens, little has been done to understand how this environmental factor affects Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen which presents a high level of infection risk to the crew, as it has been isolated from both the space shuttle and International Space Station. Given that approximately forty percent of the population are carriers of the bacteria, eradication of this organism from in flight environments is impractical. These reasons have lead to us to assess the response of S. aureus to a reduced fluid shear environment. Culture in the RWV demonstrated that S. aureus grown under the low-shear condition had lower cell concentrations after 10 hours when compared to the control culture. Furthermore, the low-shear cultured bacteria displayed a reduction in carotenoid production, pigments responsible for their yellow/gold coloration. When exposed to various environmental stressors, post low-shear culture, a decrease in the ability to survive oxidative assault was observed compared to control cultures. The low fluid shear environment also resulted in a decrease in hemolysin secretion, a staphylococcal toxin responsible for red blood cell lysis. When challenged by the immune components present in human whole blood, low-shear cultured S. aureus demonstrated significantly reduced survival rates as compared to the control culture. Assays to determine the duration of these alterations

  15. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Olga E; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V; Teplyakova, Olga V; Kamshilova, Vera V; Kotlovsky, Yuri V; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V; Sidorenko, Sergey V; Peryanova, Olga V; Reva, Galina V; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  16. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Olga E.; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Kamshilova, Vera V.; Kotlovsky, Yuri V.; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V.; Sidorenko, Sergey V.; Peryanova, Olga V.; Reva, Galina V.; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  17. Soluble Amyloid β-Oligomers Affect Dielectric Membrane Properties by Bilayer Insertion and Domain Formation: Implications for Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Valincius, Gintaras; Heinrich, Frank; Budvytyte, Rima; Vanderah, David J.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Sokolov, Yuri; Hall, James E.; Lösche, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptides reduce the membrane barrier to ion transport. The prevailing model ascribes the resulting interference with ion homeostasis to the formation of peptide pores across the bilayer. In this work, we examine the interaction of soluble prefibrillar amyloid β (Aβ1–42)-oligomers with bilayer models, observing also dramatic increases in ion current at micromolar peptide concentrations. We demonstrate that the Aβ-induced ion conductances across free-standing membranes and across substrate-supported “tethered” bilayers are quantitatively similar and depend on membrane composition. However, characteristic signatures of the molecular transport mechanism were distinctly different from ion transfer through water-filled pores, as shown by a quantitative comparison of the membrane response to Aβ-oligomers and to the bacterial toxin α-hemolysin. Neutron reflection from tethered membranes showed that Aβ-oligomers insert into the bilayer, affecting both membrane leaflets. By measuring the capacitance of peptide-free membranes, as well as their geometrical thicknesses, the dielectric constants in the aliphatic cores of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers were determined to be ɛ = 2.8 and 2.2, respectively. The magnitude of the Aβ-induced increase in ɛ indicates that Aβ-oligomers affect membranes by inducing lateral heterogeneity in the bilayers, but an increase in the water content of the bilayers was not observed. The activation energy for Aβ-induced ion transport across the membrane is at least three times higher than that measured for membranes reconstituted with α-hemolysin pores, Ea = 36.8 vs. 9.9 kJ/mol, indicating that the molecular mechanisms underlying both transport processes are fundamentally different. The Aβ-induced membrane conductance shows a nonlinear dependence on the peptide concentration in the membrane. Moreover, Ea depends on

  18. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar

    PubMed Central

    Petronella, N.; Chew Leung, C.; Pightling, A. W.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  19. Molecular characterization of the diversity of Clostridium chauvoei isolates collected from two bovine slaughterhouses: analysis of cross-contamination.

    PubMed

    Sathish, S; Swaminathan, K

    2008-06-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiologic agent of blackleg, a high mortality rate disease affecting mainly cattle and sheep. Carcasses of animals affected by the disease are the chief source of soil infection and considered as an ever-present threat to livestock health. A study was undertaken to examine the cross-contamination of C. chauvoei in two different bovine slaughterhouses using restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and protein analysis. Samples from various sites of two different bovine slaughterhouses were screened and 34 isolates were identified by conventional techniques and 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequencing. C. chauvoei were isolated from carcass, soil, and sewage from slaughterhouses examined. The isolates were differentiated using REA and whole-cell and excretory protein pattern analysis combined with numerical analysis and cluster formation. The alpha and beta toxins produced by the strains were characterized. Our preliminary results suggest that REA combined with numerical analysis provides additional criteria and characteristic banding patterns for the study of the cross-contamination and characterization of C. chauvoei. The effects of temperature, oxygen tension, and enzymes on C. chauvoei hemolysin activity were also discussed. These microorganisms may be a potential contaminant of carcasses and widespread in soil of abattoir environments. The information of area-specific distribution of C. chauvoei strains and its toxin characteristics may give an efficient program in protecting cattle and other ruminants.

  20. A simple strategy for extracellular production of CotA laccase in Escherichia coli and decolorization of simulated textile effluent by recombinant laccase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Nyu; Zhao, Min

    2017-01-01

    Laccases are green oxidases with a number of potential industrial applications. In this study, recombinant Bacillus subtilis CotA laccase was secreted by Escherichia coli via both the α-hemolysin secretion system and the YebF secretion system after microaerobic induction. Meanwhile, we discovered a much simpler approach for extracellular production of recombinant CotA laccase from E. coli, involving alternation of induction conditions to release recombinant CotA following intracellular expression. By optimizing the induction parameters, the extracellular yield of recombinant CotA laccase was improved from 157.4 to 2401.3 U/L after 24 h of induction. This strategy could be suitable for large-scale production of CotA laccase for industrial use. Recombinant CotA laccase was purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography in a single step and showed similar biochemical properties to wild-type laccase. Purified as well as crude recombinant CotA laccase efficiently decolorized seven structurally different dyes. The decolorization capability of recombinant CotA laccase under harsh conditions was investigated by incubation of the enzyme with a simulated textile effluent (STE) with pH 11.6, 3.5 % salinity and peak absorbance of 10.42. Recombinant CotA laccase efficiently decolorized 77.0 % of STE after 48 h reaction, demonstrating the potential of this enzyme for industrial dye effluent treatment.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  2. Secretory delivery of recombinant proteins in attenuated Salmonella strains: potential and limitations of Type I protein transporters.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Heinz P; von Specht, Bernd Ulrich

    2003-07-15

    Live attenuated Salmonella strains have been extensively explored as oral delivery systems for recombinant vaccine antigens and effector proteins with immunoadjuvant and immunomodulatory potential. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in human vaccination trials for various antigens. However, immunization efficiencies with live vaccines are generally significantly lower compared to those monitored in parenteral immunizations with the same vaccine antigen. This is, at least partly, due to the lack of secretory expression systems, enabling large-scale extracellular delivery of vaccine and effector proteins by these strains. Because of their low complexity and the terminal location of the secretion signal in the secreted protein, Type I (ATP-binding cassette) secretion systems appear to be particularly suited for development of such recombinant extracellular expression systems. So far, the Escherichia coli hemolysin system is the only Type I secretion system, which has been adapted to recombinant protein secretion in Salmonella. However, this system has a number of disadvantages, including low secretion capacity, complex genetic regulation, and structural restriction to the secreted protein, which eventually hinder high-level in vivo delivery of recombinant vaccines and effector proteins. Thus, the development of more efficient recombinant protein secretion systems, based on Type I exporters can help to improve efficacies of live recombinant Salmonella vaccines. Type I secretion systems, mediating secretion of bacterial surface layer proteins, such as RsaA in Caulobacter crescentus, are discussed as promising candidates for improved secretory delivery systems.

  3. Deoxyribonucleic acid base composition and biochemical properties of certain coagulase-negative enterotoxigenic cocci.

    PubMed

    Lotter, L P; Genigeorgis, C A

    1975-02-01

    Eight coagulase-negative, enterotoxigenic strains of cocci and one weakly coagulase-positive strain isolated from a number of different sources, including cases of food poisoning incidents, were evaluated for their relationship to Staphylococcus aureus on the basis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) buoyant density and physiological studies. One strain of cocci produced enterotoxins A and C, two strains produced types B and C, four strains produced only type C, and one strain only type D. The enterotoxin produced by one strain of cocci was serologically untypable. None of the test organisms produced detectable amounts of enterotoxin in broth cultures. The test strains of cocci exhibited the following profile: all produced catalase; all grew anaerobically and fermented glucse; five were sensitive to lysostaphin; the percentage of guanine plus cytosine content of their DNA varied from 32.7 to 37.6; five produced acid from mannitol both aerobically and anaerobically; two formed delta-hemolysin; five produced phosphatase and acetoin; and all produced heat-stable nuclease. None of the organisms exhibited typical characteristics of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, or S. saprophyticus. On the basis of the present data and data reported elsewhere, these organisms should be considered as variants or mutants of S. aureus.

  4. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  5. Crystal Structure and Self-Interaction of the Type VI Secretion Tail-Tube Protein from Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Douzi, Badreddine; Spinelli, Silvia; Blangy, Stéphanie; Roussel, Alain; Durand, Eric; Brunet, Yannick R.; Cascales, Eric; Cambillau, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread machine used by bacteria to control their environment and kill or disable bacterial species or eukaryotes through toxin injection. The T6SS comprises a central tube formed of stacked hexamers of hemolysin co-regulated proteins (Hcp) and terminated by a trimeric valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) component, the cell puncturing device. A contractile tail sheath, formed by the TssB and TssC proteins, surrounds this tube. This syringe-like machine has been compared to an inverted phage, as both Hcp and VgrG share structural homology with tail components of Caudovirales. Here we solved the crystal structure of a tryptophan-substituted double mutant of Hcp1 from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and compared it to the structures of other Hcps. Interestingly, we observed that the purified Hcp native protein is unable to form tubes in vitro. To better understand the rationale for observation, we measured the affinity of Hcp1 hexamers with themselves by surface plasmon resonance. The intra-hexamer interaction is weak, with a KD value of 7.2 µM. However, by engineering double cysteine mutants at defined positions, tubes of Hcp1 gathering up to 15 stacked hexamers formed in oxidative conditions. These results, together with those available in the literature regarding TssB and TssC, suggest that assembly of the T6SS tube differs significantly from that of Sipho- or Myoviridae. PMID:24551044

  6. The TolC Homologue of Brucella suis Is Involved in Resistance to Antimicrobial Compounds and Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Diana M.; Martín, Fernando A.; Sabio y García, Julia V.; Spera, Juan M.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Baldi, Pablo; Campos, Eleonora; Cravero, Silvio L.; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2007-01-01

    Brucella spp., like other pathogens, must cope with the environment of diverse host niches during the infection process. In doing this, pathogens evolved different type of transport systems to help them survive and disseminate within the host. Members of the TolC family have been shown to be involved in the export of chemically diverse molecules ranging from large protein toxins to small toxic compounds. The role of proteins from the TolC family in Brucella and other α-2-proteobacteria has been explored little. The gene encoding the unique member of the TolC family from Brucella suis (BepC) was cloned and expressed in an Escherichia coli mutant disrupted in the gene encoding TolC, which has the peculiarity of being involved in diverse transport functions. BepC fully complemented the resistance to drugs such as chloramphenicol and acriflavine but was incapable of restoring hemolysin secretion in the tolC mutant of E. coli. An insertional mutation in the bepC gene strongly affected the resistance phenotype of B. suis to bile salts and toxic chemicals such as ethidium bromide and rhodamine and significantly decreased the resistance to antibiotics such as erythromycin, ampicillin, tetracycline, and norfloxacin. Moreover, the B. suis bepC mutant was attenuated in the mouse model of infection. Taken together, these results suggest that BepC-dependent efflux processes of toxic compounds contribute to B. suis survival inside the host. PMID:17088356

  7. Metal-organic complex-functionalized protein nanopore sensor for aromatic amino acids chiral recognition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanli; Niu, Aihua; Jian, Feifei; Wang, Ying; Yao, Fujun; Wei, Yongfeng; Tian, Lei; Kang, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-27

    Chiral recognition at single-molecule level for small active molecules is important, as exhibited by many nanostructures and molecular assemblies in biological systems, but it presents a significant challenge. We report a simple and rapid sensing strategy to discriminate all enantiomers of natural aromatic amino acids (AAA) using a metal-organic complex-functionalized protein nanopore, in which a chiral recognition element and a chiral recognition valve were equipped. A trifunctional molecule, heptakis-(6-deoxy-6-amino)-β-cyclodextrin (am7βCD), was non-covalently lodged within the nanopore of an α-hemolysin (αHL) mutant, (M113R)7-αHL. Copper(ii) ion reversibly bonds to the amino group of am7βCD to form an am7βCD-Cu(II) complex, which allowed chiral recognition for each enantiomer in the mixture of AAA by distinct current signals. The Cu(II) plugging valve plays a crucial rule that holds chiral molecules in the nanocavity for a sufficient registering time. Importantly, six enantiomers of all nature AAA could be simultaneously recognized at one time. Enantiomeric excess (ee) could also be accurately detected by this approach. It should be possible to generalize this approach for sensing of other chiral molecules.

  8. Crystal Structure of Hcp from Acinetobacter baumannii: A Component of the Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Federico M.; Santillana, Elena; Spínola-Amilibia, Mercedes; Torreira, Eva; Culebras, Esther; Romero, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial macromolecular machine widely distributed in Gram-negative bacteria, which transports effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells or other bacteria. Membrane complexes and a central tubular structure, which resembles the tail of contractile bacteriophages, compose the T6SS. One of the proteins forming this tube is the hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), which acts as virulence factor, as transporter of effectors and as a chaperone. In this study, we present the structure of Hcp from Acinetobacter baumannii, together with functional and oligomerization studies. The structure of this protein exhibits a tight β barrel formed by two β sheets and flanked at one side by a short α-helix. Six Hcp molecules associate to form a donut-shaped hexamer, as observed in both the crystal structure and solution. These results emphasize the importance of this oligomerization state in this family of proteins, despite the low similarity of sequence among them. The structure presented in this study is the first one for a protein forming part of a functional T6SS from A. baumannii. These results will help us to understand the mechanism and function of this secretion system in this opportunistic nosocomial pathogen. PMID:26079269

  9. Crystal Structure of Hcp from Acinetobacter baumannii: A Component of the Type VI Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Federico M; Santillana, Elena; Spínola-Amilibia, Mercedes; Torreira, Eva; Culebras, Esther; Romero, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial macromolecular machine widely distributed in Gram-negative bacteria, which transports effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells or other bacteria. Membrane complexes and a central tubular structure, which resembles the tail of contractile bacteriophages, compose the T6SS. One of the proteins forming this tube is the hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), which acts as virulence factor, as transporter of effectors and as a chaperone. In this study, we present the structure of Hcp from Acinetobacter baumannii, together with functional and oligomerization studies. The structure of this protein exhibits a tight β barrel formed by two β sheets and flanked at one side by a short α-helix. Six Hcp molecules associate to form a donut-shaped hexamer, as observed in both the crystal structure and solution. These results emphasize the importance of this oligomerization state in this family of proteins, despite the low similarity of sequence among them. The structure presented in this study is the first one for a protein forming part of a functional T6SS from A. baumannii. These results will help us to understand the mechanism and function of this secretion system in this opportunistic nosocomial pathogen.

  10. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-05-27

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells.

  11. Expression, secretion and bactericidal activity of type VI secretion system in Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Yue, Shu; Li, Gui-Yang; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Ran; Li, Shu-Fang; Mo, Zhao-Lan

    2016-10-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) was recently shown to modulate quorum sensing and the stress response in Vibrio anguillarum serotype O1 strain NB10. It is not known whether there is a functionally active T6SS in other serotypes of V. anguillarum. Here, homologues to T6SS cluster VtsEFGH and hemolysin-coregulated protein (Hcp)-encoding genes were found to be prevalent and conserved in clinical isolates of V. anguillarum from fish, including four O1 and five non-O1 serotype strains. Unexpectedly, only the non-O1 serotype strains expressed VtsEFGH and Hcp under laboratory and marine-like conditions, in contrast to the serotype O1 strains. This suggested that the V. anguillarum non-O1 serotype strains tested have constitutive expression of T6SS. Examination of a representative non-O1 strain, MHK3, showed that Hcp production was growth phase dependent and that maximum Hcp production was observed in the exponential growth phase. Moreover, Hcp production by MHK3 was most active under warm marine-like conditions. Further examination revealed a correlation of the constitutive expression of T6SS with bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and Edwardsiella tarda. The work presented here suggests that the constitutive expression of T6SS provides V. anguillarum with advantage in microbial competition in marine environments.

  12. Role of wild birds as carriers of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and Escherichia vulneris.

    PubMed

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y; Abo-Amer, Aly E

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and distribution of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in environments pose a risk to human and animal health. A total of 82 isolates of Escherichia spp. were recovered from cloacal swabs of migrating and non-migrating wild birds. All bacterial isolates were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. 72% and 50% of isolates recovered from non-migrating and migrating birds, respectively, showed positive congo red dye binding (a virulence factor). Also, hemolysin production (a virulence factor) was showed in 8% of isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and 75% of isolates recovered from migrating birds. All isolates recovered from non-migrating birds were found resistant to Oxacillin while all isolates recovered from migrating birds demonstrated resistance to Oxacillin, Chloramphenicol, Oxytetracycline and Lincomycin. Some bacterial isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and migrating birds exhibited MDR phenotype. The MDR isolates were further characterized by API 20E and 16S rRNA as E. coli and E. vulneris. MDR Escherichia isolates contain ~1-5 plasmids of high-molecular weights. Accordingly, wild birds could create a potential threat to human and animal health by transmitting MDR bacteria to water streams and other environmental sources through their faecal residues, and to remote regions by migration.

  13. The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita J; Suong, Nguyen Thao; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining a better understanding of mechanisms involved in bacterial infections is of paramount importance for the development of novel agents to control disease caused by (antibiotic resistant) pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we investigated the impact of catecholamine stress hormones on growth and virulence factor production of pathogenic vibrios (i.e. two Vibrio campbellii strains and two Vibrio anguillarum strains). Both norepinephrine and dopamine (at 100 μM) significantly induced growth in media containing serum. The compounds also increased swimming motility of the tested strains, whereas they had no effect on caseinase, chitinase, and hemolysin activities. Further, antagonists for eukaryotic catecholamine receptors were able to neutralize some of the effects of the catecholamines. Indeed, the dopaminergic receptor antagonist chlorpromazine neutralized the effect of dopamine, and the α-adrenergic receptor antagonists phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine neutralized the effect of norepinephrine, whereas the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol had limited to no effect. Finally, pretreatment of pathogenic V. campbellii with catecholamines significantly increased its virulence toward giant freshwater prawn larvae. However, the impact of catecholamine receptor antagonists on in vivo virulence was less clear-cut when compared to the in vitro experiments. In summary, our results show that—similar to enteric pathogens—catecholamines also increase the virulence of vibrios that are pathogenic to aquatic organisms by increasing motility and growth in media containing serum.

  14. Imaging of bacterial multicellular behaviour in biofilms in liquid by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Miyakawa, Reina; Sato, Mari; Arita-Morioka, Ken-ichi; Chiba, Akio; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ogura, Teru; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Sato, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microbes that attach to biotic or abiotic surfaces causing chronic infectious diseases. Within a biofilm, microbes are embedded in a self-produced soft extracellular matrix (ECM), which protects them from the host immune system and antibiotics. The nanoscale visualisation of delicate biofilms in liquid is challenging. Here, we develop atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) to visualise Gram-positive and -negative bacterial biofilms immersed in aqueous solution. Biofilms cultured on electron-transparent film were directly imaged from below using the inverted SEM, allowing the formation of the region near the substrate to be studied at high resolution. We visualised intercellular nanostructures and the exocytosis of membrane vesicles, and linked the latter to the trafficking of cargos, including cytoplasmic proteins and the toxins hemolysin and coagulase. A thick dendritic nanotube network was observed between microbes, suggesting multicellular communication in biofilms. A universal immuno-labelling system was developed for biofilms and tested on various examples, including S. aureus biofilms. In the ECM, fine DNA and protein networks were visualised and the precise distribution of protein complexes was determined (e.g., straight curli, flagella, and excreted cytoplasmic molecular chaperones). Our observations provide structural insights into bacteria-substratum interactions, biofilm development and the internal microbe community. PMID:27180609

  15. Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, J M; Peterkin, P I

    1991-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is an ubiquitous, intracellular pathogen which has been implicated within the past decade as the causative organism in several outbreaks of foodborne disease. Listeriosis, with a mortality rate of about 24%, is found mainly among pregnant women, their fetuses, and immunocompromised persons, with symptoms of abortion, neonatal death, septicemia, and meningitis. Epidemiological investigations can make use of strain-typing procedures such as DNA restriction enzyme analysis or electrophoretic enzyme typing. The organism has a multifactorial virulence system, with the thiol-activated hemolysin, listeriolysin O, being identified as playing a crucial role in the organism's ability to multiply within host phagocytic cells and to spread from cell to cell. The organism occurs widely in food, with the highest incidences being found in meat, poultry, and seafood products. Improved methods for detecting and enumerating the organism in foodstuffs are now available, including those based on the use of monoclonal antibodies, DNA probes, or the polymerase chain reaction. As knowledge of the molecular and applied biology of L. monocytogenes increases, progress can be made in the prevention and control of human infection. PMID:1943998

  16. Antibiotic resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from pond-reared Litopenaeus vannamei marketed in natal, brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Ligia Maria Rodrigues; Almeida, Dulce; Hofer, Ernesto; dos Reis, Cristhiane Moura Falavina; Theophilo, Grace Nazareth Diogo; Santos, André Felipe das Mercês; Vieira, Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Ten out of fifty fresh and refrigerated samples of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) collected from retailers in Natal (Rio Grande do Norte, Northeastern Brazil) tested positive for Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The Kanagawa test and multiplex PCR assays were used to detect TDH and TRH hemolysins and the tdh, trh and tlh genes, respectively. All strains were Kanagawa-negative and tlh-positive. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done for seven antibiotics by the agar diffusion technique. Five strains (50%) presented multiple antibiotic resistance to ampicillin (90%) and amikacin (60%), while two strains (20%) displayed intermediate-level resistance to amikacin. All strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. Intermediate-level susceptibility and/or resistance to other antibiotics ranged from 10 to 90%, with emphasis on the observed growing intermediate-level resistance to ciprofloxacin. Half our isolates yielded a multiple antibiotic resistance index above 0.2 (range: 0.14–0.29), indicating a considerable risk of propagation of antibiotic resistance throughout the food chain. PMID:24031779

  17. Aeromonas hydrophila-associated septicemia in captive crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni and Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Roh, Yoon-Seok; Park, Heejin; Cho, Hyun-Ung; Cho, Ara; Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul; Cho, Ho-Seong; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2011-12-01

    Five 25-yr-old crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni and Crocodylus porosus) were diagnosed with Aeromonas hydrophila-associated septicemia accelerated by improper thermoregulation. At necropsy, pulmonary congestion and pleural effusion were the main lesions in the thorax. Necrotizing enteritis, intestinal hemorrhage, fibrinous serositis, hepatitis, and pancreatitis were observed in the abdominal cavities of all five crocodiles. Aeromonas hydrophila was identified in the pleural effusions and abdominal ascites of all necropsied crocodiles by using an API system 20NE. Aeromonas hydrophila infection and evaluation of virulence were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction targeting the 16S rRNA and extracellular hemolysin gene. The crocodiles in the present case were housed in an indoor facility at a private zoo that failed to optimize land and water portions of the enclosure, exposing the animals to impeded thermoregulation, and it is suggested that the pathogenesis was accelerated by the improper thermoregulation-induced stress. This is the first description of A. hydrophila pathogenicity associated with impeded thermoregulation in reptiles.

  18. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-11-10

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections.

  19. Use of Zebrafish to Probe the Divergent Virulence Potentials and Toxin Requirements of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Travis J.; Bower, Jean M.; Redd, Michael J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) cause an array of diseases, including sepsis, neonatal meningitis, and urinary tract infections. Many putative virulence factors that might modulate ExPEC pathogenesis have been identified through sequencing efforts, epidemiology, and gene expression profiling, but few of these genes have been assigned clearly defined functional roles during infection. Using zebrafish embryos as surrogate hosts, we have developed a model system with the ability to resolve diverse virulence phenotypes and niche-specific restrictions among closely related ExPEC isolates during either localized or systemic infections. In side-by-side comparisons of prototypic ExPEC isolates, we observed an unexpectedly high degree of phenotypic diversity that is not readily apparent using more traditional animal hosts. In particular, the capacity of different ExPEC isolates to persist and multiply within the zebrafish host and cause disease was shown to be variably dependent upon two secreted toxins, α-hemolysin and cytotoxic necrotizing factor. Both of these toxins appear to function primarily in the neutralization of phagocytes, which are recruited in high numbers to sites of infection where they act as an essential host defense against ExPEC as well as less virulent E. coli strains. These results establish zebrafish as a valuable tool for the elucidation and functional analysis of both ExPEC virulence factors and host defense mechanisms. PMID:20019794

  20. Virulence Inhibitors from Brazilian Peppertree Block Quorum Sensing and Abate Dermonecrosis in Skin Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Muhs, Amelia; Lyles, James T.; Parlet, Corey P.; Nelson, Kate; Kavanaugh, Jeffery S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Quave, Cassandra L.

    2017-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is on the rise and current therapies are becoming increasingly limited in both scope and efficacy. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a major contributor to this trend. Quorum sensing controlled virulence factors include secreted toxins responsible for extensive damage to host tissues and evasion of the immune system response; they are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. Investigation of botanical folk medicines for wounds and infections led us to study Schinus terebinthifolia (Brazilian Peppertree) as a potential source of virulence inhibitors. Here, we report the inhibitory activity of a flavone rich extract “430D-F5” against all S. aureus accessory gene regulator (agr) alleles in the absence of growth inhibition. Evidence for this activity is supported by its agr-quenching activity (IC50 2–32 μg mL−1) in transcriptional reporters, direct protein outputs (α-hemolysin and δ-toxin), and an in vivo skin challenge model. Importantly, 430D-F5 was well tolerated by human keratinocytes in cell culture and mouse skin in vivo; it also demonstrated significant reduction in dermonecrosis following skin challenge with a virulent strain of MRSA. This study provides an explanation for the anti-infective activity of peppertree remedies and yields insight into the potential utility of non-biocide virulence inhibitors in treating skin infections. PMID:28186134

  1. Insights from the Genome Annotation of Elizabethkingia anophelis from the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dong; Rayl, Melanie; Yu, Wanqin; Steritz, Matthew; Faye, Ingrid; Xu, Jiannong

    2014-01-01

    Elizabethkingia anophelis is a dominant bacterial species in the gut ecosystem of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae. We recently sequenced the genomes of two strains of E. anophelis, R26T and Ag1, isolated from different strains of A. gambiae. The two bacterial strains are identical with a few exceptions. Phylogenetically, Elizabethkingia is closer to Chryseobacterium and Riemerella than to Flavobacterium. In line with other Bacteroidetes known to utilize various polymers in their ecological niches, the E. anophelis genome contains numerous TonB dependent transporters with various substrate specificities. In addition, several genes belonging to the polysaccharide utilization system and the glycoside hydrolase family were identified that could potentially be of benefit for the mosquito carbohydrate metabolism. In agreement with previous reports of broad antibiotic resistance in E. anophelis, a large number of genes encoding efflux pumps and β-lactamases are present in the genome. The component genes of resistance-nodulation-division type efflux pumps were found to be syntenic and conserved in different taxa of Bacteroidetes. The bacterium also displays hemolytic activity and encodes several hemolysins that may participate in the digestion of erythrocytes in the mosquito gut. At the same time, the OxyR regulon and antioxidant genes could provide defense against the oxidative stress that is associated with blood digestion. The genome annotation and comparative genomic analysis revealed functional characteristics associated with the symbiotic relationship with the mosquito host. PMID:24842809

  2. Insights from the genome annotation of Elizabethkingia anophelis from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Kukutla, Phanidhar; Lindberg, Bo G; Pei, Dong; Rayl, Melanie; Yu, Wanqin; Steritz, Matthew; Faye, Ingrid; Xu, Jiannong

    2014-01-01

    Elizabethkingia anophelis is a dominant bacterial species in the gut ecosystem of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae. We recently sequenced the genomes of two strains of E. anophelis, R26T and Ag1, isolated from different strains of A. gambiae. The two bacterial strains are identical with a few exceptions. Phylogenetically, Elizabethkingia is closer to Chryseobacterium and Riemerella than to Flavobacterium. In line with other Bacteroidetes known to utilize various polymers in their ecological niches, the E. anophelis genome contains numerous TonB dependent transporters with various substrate specificities. In addition, several genes belonging to the polysaccharide utilization system and the glycoside hydrolase family were identified that could potentially be of benefit for the mosquito carbohydrate metabolism. In agreement with previous reports of broad antibiotic resistance in E. anophelis, a large number of genes encoding efflux pumps and β-lactamases are present in the genome. The component genes of resistance-nodulation-division type efflux pumps were found to be syntenic and conserved in different taxa of Bacteroidetes. The bacterium also displays hemolytic activity and encodes several hemolysins that may participate in the digestion of erythrocytes in the mosquito gut. At the same time, the OxyR regulon and antioxidant genes could provide defense against the oxidative stress that is associated with blood digestion. The genome annotation and comparative genomic analysis revealed functional characteristics associated with the symbiotic relationship with the mosquito host.

  3. Increasing of temperature induces pathogenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae and the up-regulation of inflammatory related genes in infected Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Kayansamruaj, Pattanapon; Pirarat, Nopadon; Hirono, Ikuo; Rodkhum, Channarong

    2014-08-06

    Temperature strongly affects the health of aquatic poikilotherms. In Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), elevated water temperatures increase the severity of streptococcosis. Here we investigated the effects of temperature on the vulnerability and inflammatory response of Nile tilapia to Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococci; GBS). At 35 and 28 °C, GBS took 4 and 7h, respectively to reach the log-phase and, when incubated with tilapia whole blood, experienced survival rates of 97% and 2%, respectively. The hemolysis activity of GBS grown at 35 °C was five times higher than that of GBS grown at 28 °C. GBS expressed cylE (β-hemolysin/cytolysin), cfb (CAMP factor) and PI-2b (pili-backbone) much more strongly at 35 °C than at 28 °C. Challenging Nile tilapia reared at 35 and 28 °C with GBS resulted in accumulated mortalities of about 85% and 45%, respectively. At 35 °C, infected tilapia exhibited tremendous inflammatory responses due to a dramatic up-regulation (30-40-fold) of inflammatory-related genes (cyclooxygenase-2, IL-1β and TNF-α) between 6 and 96 h-post infection. These results suggest that the increase of GBS pathogenicity to Nile tilapia induced by elevated temperature is associated with massive inflammatory responses, which may lead to acute mortality.

  4. Schisandra polysaccharide evokes immunomodulatory activity through TLR 4-mediated activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Li, Jing; Mao, Riwen; Zou, Ye; Feng, Weiwei; Zheng, Daheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2014-04-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Previous studies have shown that Schisandra polysaccharide (SCPP11) has robust antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, the immunomodulatory activity and mechanisms of action of SCPP11 were investigated further to reveal its mechanism of action against tumors. Results showed that SCPP11 increased the thymus and spleen indices, pinocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, and hemolysin formation in CTX-induced immunosuppressed mice. Moreover, SCPP11 significantly increased immunoglobulin levels, cytokines levels in vivo and induced RAW264.7 cells to secrete cytokines in vitro. RAW264.7 cells pretreated with SCPP11 significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG-2 cells. In addition, SCPP11 promoted both the expression of iNOS protein and of iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. TLR-4 is a possible receptor for SCPP11-mediated macrophage activation. Therefore, the data suggest that SCPP11 exerted its antitumor activity by improving immune system functions through TLR-4-mediated up-regulation of NO and TNF-α.

  5. Effects of Fuzhuan Brick-Tea Water Extract on Mice Infected with E. coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanliang; Xu, Aiqing; Liu, Ping; Li, Zongjun

    2015-01-01

    Fuzhuan brick-tea extract (FBTE) affects the physiology of mice infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7. For 10 consecutive days, 0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 g/mL FBTE was administered intragastrically to three groups of infected Kunming mice, and changes in immunological function, hematology, and histopathology were examined. The results revealed upregulation of platelets, total protein, and albumin along with downregulation of serum triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, and urea nitrogen in FBTE-treated mice. Histological sections of stomach, kidney, duodenum, ileum, and colon suggested that infected mucous membranes could be rehabilitated by low- and high-dose FBTE and that inflammation was alleviated. Similarly, increased thymic function in mice treated with middle- and high-dose FBTE led to elevated serum hemolysin antibody titer and increased CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as indicated by CD4+ and CD8+ expression on intestinal mucosa. Monocyte and macrophage function was improved by three FBTE dosages tested. Colonic microbiota analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed characteristic bands in infected mice treated with middle- and high-dose FBTE and increased species diversity in Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Clostridium cluster IV. These results suggest that FBTE may protect kidney and liver of mice infected with E. coli O157:H7, improve immune function, and regulate the colonic microbiota. PMID:26140539

  6. An emerging mycoplasma associated with trichomoniasis, vaginal infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J Paul; Glascock, Abigail L; Sheth, Nihar U; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as "Mnola." In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name "Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii" for this potential new pathogen.

  7. Distribution of Toxin Genes and Enterotoxins in Bacillus thuringiensis Isolated from Microbial Insecticide Products.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Lee, Yea-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jo; Yoo, Young-Bin; Bak, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-12-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis microbial insecticide products have been applied worldwide. Although a few cases of B. thuringiensis foodborne illness have been reported, little is known about the toxigenic properties of B. thuringiensis isolates. The aims of this study were to estimate the pathogenic potential of B. thuringiensis selected from microbial insecticide products, based on its possession of toxin genes and production of enterotoxins. Fifty-two B. thuringiensis strains selected from four kinds of microbial insecticide products were analyzed. PCR assay for detection of toxin genes and immunoassay for detection of enterotoxins were performed. The hemolysin BL complex as a major enterotoxin was produced by 17 (32.7%), whereas the nonhemolytic enterotoxin complex was detected in 1 (1.9%) of 52 B. thuringiensis strains. However, cytK, entFM, and ces genes were not detected in any of the tested B. thuringiensis strains. The potential risk of food poisoning by B. thuringiensis along with concerns over B. thuringiensis microbial insecticide products has gained attention recently. Thus, microbial insecticide products based on B. thuringiensis should be carefully controlled.

  8. Comparative analysis of quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR and commercial enzyme imunoassays for detection of enterotoxigenic Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Paulina S; Yernazarova, Aliya; Murawska, Emilia; Swiecicki, Jakub; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Bideshi, Dennis K; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2014-08-01

    Entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis is closely related to Bacillus cereus, a human pathogen known to cause emesis and diarrhea. Standard detection methods do not distinguish these bacilli. Hemolysin BL (hbl) and non-hemolytic enterotoxin (nhe) genes that encode, respectively, HBL and NHE enterotoxins, are known to be harbored in both bacterial species, suggesting that differentiation of these bacilli is clinically and epidemiologically relevant. In this study the reliability of quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) in detecting hbl and nhe transcripts and corresponding toxins in environmental B. thuringiensis isolates was assessed. At least one enterotoxin gene was present in each isolate, and nhe or hbl genes were found in 85% and 55% of the strains, respectively. Based on statistical analyses, both BCET-RPLA and Duopath detected HBL at similar levels, and TECRA and Duopath can be used interchangeably for the detection of NHE, although TECRA has significantly lower sensitivity than Duopath. Thus, as potential enterotoxic B. thuringiensis strains occur in the natural environment, and EIA results may not correspond with the presence of enterotoxin genes and their expression, we suggest that reliable interpretation will be significantly enhanced by including qRT-PCR to support inferences based on EIAs.

  9. In the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system sae, the response regulator SaeR binds to a direct repeat sequence and DNA binding requires phosphorylation by the sensor kinase SaeS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length SaeR could be restored by sensor kinase SaeS-induced phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SaeR is more resistant to digestion by trypsin, suggesting conformational changes. DNase I footprinting assays revealed that the SaeR protection region in the P1 promoter contains a direct repeat sequence (GTTAAN(6)GTTAA [where N is any nucleotide]). This sequence is critical to the binding of phosphorylated SaeR. Mutational changes in the repeat sequence greatly reduced both the in vitro binding of SaeR and the in vivo function of the P1 promoter. From these results, we concluded that SaeR recognizes the direct repeat sequence as a binding site and that binding requires phosphorylation by SaeS.

  10. The Hha-TomB Toxin-Antitoxin System Shows Conditional Toxicity and Promotes Persister Cell Formation by Inhibiting Apoptosis-Like Death in S. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Sangeeta; Paul, Prajita; Padhi, Chandrashekhar; Ray, Shilpa; Ryan, Daniel; Dash, Shantoshini; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are two component “addictive” genetic elements found on either plasmid or bacterial chromosome, sometimes on both. TA systems perform a wide range of functions like biofilm formation, persistence, programmed cell death, phage abortive infection etc. Salmonella has been reported to contain several such TA systems. However, the hemolysin expression modulating protein (Hha) and its adjacent uncharacterized hypothetical protein TomB (previously known as YbaJ), have not been listed as a TA module in Salmonella. In this study we established that Hha and TomB form a bonafide TA system where Hha serves as a toxin while TomB functions as an antitoxin. Interestingly, the toxicity of Hha was conditional causing cell death under acid stress. The antitoxin attenuated the toxicity of Hha by forming a TA complex through stable interactions. The Hha-TomB TA system was found to increase persistence and inhibit programmed cell death under antibiotic stress where a phenotypically diverse population expressing differential level of TA components was observed. Therefore we propose that Hha and TomB prevent cells from committing suicide thereby promoting persister cell formation. PMID:27910884

  11. Protective potency of clove oil and its transcriptional down-regulation of Aeromonas sobria virulence genes in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus L.).

    PubMed

    Abd El-Hamid, M I; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Ali, H A

    2016-08-31

    Disease episodes of fish caused by Aeromonas species are moved to the top list of limiting problems worldwide. The present study was planned to verify the in vitro antibacterial activities as well as the in vivo potential values of clove oil and ciprofloxacin against Aeromonas sobria in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The in vitro phenotypic virulence activities and the successful amplification of aerolysin and hemolysin genes in the precisely identified A. sobria strain were predictive for its virulence. In the in vivo assay, virulence of A. sobria strain was fully demonstrated based on constituent mRNA expression profile of tested virulence genes and typical septicemia associated with high mortalities of infected fish. Apparent lower mortality rates were correlated well with both decrescent bacterial burden and significant down-regulated transcripts of representative genes in the treated groups with clove oil, followed by ciprofloxacin as a prophylactic use for 15 days (P < 0.0001); however, the essential oil apart from ciprofloxacin significantly enhanced different hematological parameters (P < 0.05). In addition, administration of antibiotic may be considered as a pronounced stress factor in the fish even when it used in the prophylactic dose. In conclusion, medicinal plants-derived essential oils provide a virtually safer alternative to chemotherapeutics on fish, consumers and ecosystems.

  12. Channel formation by RTX-toxins of pathogenic bacteria: Basis of their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Benz, Roland

    2016-03-01

    The pore-forming cytolysins of the RTX-toxin (Repeats in ToXin) family are a relatively small fraction of a steadily increasing family of proteins that contain several functionally important glycine-rich and aspartate containing nonapeptide repeats. These cytolysins produced by a variety of Gram-negative bacteria form ion-permeable channels in erythrocytes and other eukaryotic cells. Hemolytic and cytolytic RTX-toxins represent pathogenicity factors of the toxin-producing bacteria and are very often important key factors in pathogenesis of the bacteria. Channel formation by RTX-toxins lead to the dissipation of ionic gradients and membrane potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of target cells, which results in cell death. Here we discuss channel formation and channel properties of some of the best known RTX-toxins, such as α-hemolysin (HlyA) of Escherichia coli and the uropathogenic EHEC strains, the adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT, CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis and the RTX-toxins (ApxI, ApxII and ApxIII) produced by different strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The channels formed by these RTX-toxins in lipid bilayers share some common properties such as cation selectivity and voltage-dependence. Furthermore the channels are transient and show frequent switching between different ion-conducting states. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  13. Channel-forming bacterial toxins in biosensing and macromolecule delivery.

    PubMed

    Gurnev, Philip A; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2014-08-21

    To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on "Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins", reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their "second life" in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  14. Clostridial pore-forming toxins: powerful virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-12-01

    Pore formation is a common mechanism of action for many bacterial toxins. More than one third of clostridial toxins are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) belonging to the β-PFT class. They are secreted as soluble monomers rich in β-strands, which recognize a specific receptor on target cells and assemble in oligomers. Then, they undergo a conformational change leading to the formation of a β-barrel, which inserts into the lipid bilayer forming functional pore. According to their structure, clostridial β-PFTs are divided into several families. Clostridial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins form large pores, which disrupt the plasma membrane integrity. They are potent virulence factors mainly involved in myonecrosis. Clostridial heptameric β-PFTs (aerolysin family and staphylococcal α-hemolysin family) induce small pores which trigger signaling cascades leading to different cell responses according to the cell types and toxins. They are mainly responsible for intestinal diseases, like necrotic enteritis, or systemic diseases/toxic shock from intestinal origin. Clostridial intracellularly active toxins exploit pore formation through the endosomal membrane to translocate the enzymatic component or domain into the cytosol. Single chain protein toxins, like botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins, use hydrophobic α-helices to form pores, whereas clostridial binary toxins encompass binding components, which are structurally and functionally related to β-PFTs, but which have acquired the specific activity to internalize their corresponding enzymatic components. Structural analysis suggests that β-PFTs and binding components share a common evolutionary origin.

  15. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. CyaA targets myeloid phagocytes expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, known as αMβ2 integrin CD11b/CD18 or Mac-1) and translocates by a poorly understood mechanism directly across the cytoplasmic membrane into cell cytosol of phagocytes an adenylyl cyclase(AC) enzyme. This binds intracellular calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cytosolic ATP into cAMP. Among other effects, this yields activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, BimEL accumulation and phagocyte apoptosis induction. In parallel, CyaA acts as a cytolysin that forms cation-selective pores in target membranes. Direct penetration of CyaA into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells allows the use of an enzymatically inactive CyaA toxoid as a tool for delivery of passenger antigens into the cytosolic pathway of processing and MHC class I-restricted presentation, which can be exploited for induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses.

  16. Identification and characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus species frequently isolated from laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hitoki; Takagi, Toshikazu; Ohsawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Naoto; Kubo, Noriaki; Takemoto, Takahira; Sasano, Shoko; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Ohsawa, Kazutaka

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of drug resistant bacteria colonizing laboratory mice, we isolated and characterized vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus species (VRE) from commercially available mice. A total of 24 VRE isolates were obtained from 19 of 21 mouse strains supplied by 4 commercial breeding companies. Of these, 19 isolates of E. gallinarum and 5 isolates of E. casseliflavus possessing the vanC1 and vanC2/3 genes intrinsically, exhibited intermediate resistance to vancomycin respectively. In addition, these isolates also exhibited diverse resistant patterns to erythromycin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin, whereas the use of antibiotics had not been undertaken in mouse strains tested in this study. Although 6 virulence-associated genes (ace, asa, cylA, efaA, esp, and gelE) and secretion of gelatinase and hemolysin were not detected in all isolates, 23 of 24 isolates including the isolates of E. casselifalvus secreted ATP into culture supernatants. Since secretion of ATP by bacteria resident in the intestinal tract modulates the local immune responses, the prevalence of ATP-secreting VRE in mice therefore needs to be considered in animal experiments that alter the gut microflora by use of antibiotics.

  17. Genome of Herbaspirillum seropedicae Strain SmR1, a Specialized Diazotrophic Endophyte of Tropical Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Fábio O.; Monteiro, Rose Adele; Wassem, Roseli; Cruz, Leonardo M.; Ayub, Ricardo A.; Colauto, Nelson B.; Fernandez, Maria Aparecida; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Hungria, Mariangela; Madeira, Humberto M. F.; Nodari, Rubens O.; Osaku, Clarice A.; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Terenzi, Hernán; Vieira, Luiz G. E.; Steffens, Maria Berenice R.; Weiss, Vinicius A.; Pereira, Luiz F. P.; Almeida, Marina I. M.; Alves, Lysangela R.; Marin, Anelis; Araujo, Luiza Maria; Balsanelli, Eduardo; Baura, Valter A.; Chubatsu, Leda S.; Faoro, Helisson; Favetti, Augusto; Friedermann, Geraldo; Glienke, Chirlei; Karp, Susan; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Raittz, Roberto T.; Ramos, Humberto J. O.; Ribeiro, Enilze Maria S. F.; Rigo, Liu Un; Rocha, Saul N.; Schwab, Stefan; Silva, Anilda G.; Souza, Eliel M.; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z.; Torres, Rodrigo A.; Dabul, Audrei N. G.; Soares, Maria Albertina M.; Gasques, Luciano S.; Gimenes, Ciela C. T.; Valle, Juliana S.; Ciferri, Ricardo R.; Correa, Luiz C.; Murace, Norma K.; Pamphile, João A.; Patussi, Eliana Valéria; Prioli, Alberto J.; Prioli, Sonia Maria A.; Rocha, Carmem Lúcia M. S. C.; Arantes, Olívia Márcia N.; Furlaneto, Márcia Cristina; Godoy, Leandro P.; Oliveira, Carlos E. C.; Satori, Daniele; Vilas-Boas, Laurival A.; Watanabe, Maria Angélica E.; Dambros, Bibiana Paula; Guerra, Miguel P.; Mathioni, Sandra Marisa; Santos, Karine Louise; Steindel, Mario; Vernal, Javier; Barcellos, Fernando G.; Campo, Rubens J.; Chueire, Ligia Maria O.; Nicolás, Marisa Fabiana; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; da Conceição Silva, José L.; Gioppo, Nereida M. R.; Margarido, Vladimir P.; Menck-Soares, Maria Amélia; Pinto, Fabiana Gisele S.; Simão, Rita de Cássia G.; Takahashi, Elizabete K.; Yates, Marshall G.; Souza, Emanuel M.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of plant recognition, colonization, and nutrient exchange between diazotrophic endophytes and plants are scarcely known. Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic bacterium capable of colonizing intercellular spaces of grasses such as rice and sugar cane. The genome of H. seropedicae strain SmR1 was sequenced and annotated by The Paraná State Genome Programme—GENOPAR. The genome is composed of a circular chromosome of 5,513,887 bp and contains a total of 4,804 genes. The genome sequence revealed that H. seropedicae is a highly versatile microorganism with capacity to metabolize a wide range of carbon and nitrogen sources and with possession of four distinct terminal oxidases. The genome contains a multitude of protein secretion systems, including type I, type II, type III, type V, and type VI secretion systems, and type IV pili, suggesting a high potential to interact with host plants. H. seropedicae is able to synthesize indole acetic acid as reflected by the four IAA biosynthetic pathways present. A gene coding for ACC deaminase, which may be involved in modulating the associated plant ethylene-signaling pathway, is also present. Genes for hemagglutinins/hemolysins/adhesins were found and may play a role in plant cell surface adhesion. These features may endow H. seropedicae with the ability to establish an endophytic life-style in a large number of plant species. PMID:21589895

  18. Tritrichomonas foetus: a scanning electron microscopy study of erythrocyte adhesion associated with hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Tasca, Tiana; Pires Borges, Fernanda

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro hemolytic activity of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. The parasite was tested against human erythrocytes of groups A, B, AB, and O, and against erythrocytes of nine adult animals of different species (the rabbit, rat, chicken, cat, dog, swine, horse, bovine, and sheep). The results showed that T. foetus strains (ATCC KV1, K, PAL, 5022, RJ, 90) did not present any hemolytic activity against any human erythrocyte group nor against rabbit, rat, chicken, cat, dog and swine erythrocytes. T. foetus strains, however, lysed horse, bovine, and sheep erythrocytes. No hemolysin released by the parasites could be identified. Hemolysis did not occur with trichomonad culture supernatants, with sonicated extracts of T. foetus, nor with killed organisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that human erythrocytes did not adhere to the trophozoites, in contrast horse erythrocytes adhered to the surface of the parasites and were phagocytosed for up to 90 min. The parasites are able to exert their cytopathic effects through: (a) physical contact established between the two cell surfaces, (b) toxins released from parasites into the interaction media, or (c) the association of both mechanisms. Further studies are necessary to clarify the importance of the hemolytic activity in the biology of T. foetus.

  19. The Draft Genome Sequence of the Yersinia entomophaga Entomopathogenic Type Strain MH96T

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Mark R. H.; Beattie, Amy; Altermann, Eric; Moraga, Roger M.; Harper, Lincoln A.; Calder, Joanne; Laugraud, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome of Yersinia entomophaga type strain MH96T. The genome shows 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity to that of Yersinia nurmii type strain APN3a-cT, and comprises a single chromosome of approximately 4,275,531 bp. In silico analysis identified that, in addition to the previously documented Y. entomophaga Yen-TC gene cluster, the genome encodes a diverse array of toxins, including two type III secretion systems, and five rhs-associated gene clusters. As well as these multicomponent systems, several orthologs of known insect toxins, such as VIP2 toxin and the binary toxin PirAB, and distant orthologs of some mammalian toxins, including repeats-in-toxin, a cytolethal distending toxin, hemolysin-like genes and an adenylate cyclase were identified. The genome also contains a large number of hypothetical proteins and orthologs of known effector proteins, such as LopT, as well as genes encoding a wide range of proteolytic determinants, including metalloproteases and pathogen fitness determinants, such as genes involved in iron metabolism. The bioinformatic data derived from the current in silico analysis, along with previous information on the pathobiology of Y. entomophaga against its insect hosts, suggests that a number of these virulence systems are required for survival in the hemocoel and incapacitation of the insect host. PMID:27187466

  20. Campylobacter jejuni Increases Flagellar Expression and Adhesion of Noninvasive Escherichia coli: Effects on Enterocytic Toll-Like Receptor 4 and CXCL-8 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Reti, Kristen L.; Tymensen, Lisa D.; Davis, Shevaun P.; Amrein, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterium-induced gastroenteritis, and while typically self-limiting, C. jejuni infections are associated with postinfectious intestinal disorders, including flares in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), via mechanisms that remain obscure. Based on the hypothesis that acute campylobacteriosis may cause pathogenic microbiota dysbiosis, we investigated whether C. jejuni may activate dormant virulence genes in noninvasive Escherichia coli and examined the epithelial pathophysiological consequences of these alterations. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that E. coli adhesin, flagellum, and hemolysin gene expression were increased when E. coli was exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned medium. Increased development of bacterial flagella upon exposure to live C. jejuni or C. jejuni-conditioned medium was observed under transmission electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the forces of bacterial adhesion to colonic T84 enterocytes, and the work required to rupture this adhesion, were significantly increased in E. coli exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned media. Finally, C. jejuni-modified E. coli disrupted TLR4 gene expression and induced proinflammatory CXCL-8 gene expression in colonic enterocytes. Together, these data suggest that exposure to live C. jejuni, and/or to its secretory-excretory products, may activate latent virulence genes in noninvasive E. coli and that these alterations may directly trigger proinflammatory signaling in intestinal epithelia. These observations shed new light on mechanisms that may contribute, at least in part, to postcampylobacteriosis inflammatory disorders. PMID:26371123

  1. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus: Molecular Detection of Cytotoxin and Enterotoxin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Ivo Brito, Carla; de Oliveira, Adilson; Yoshida Faccioli Martins, Patrícia; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Although opportunistic pathogens, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus, have long been regarded as avirulent organisms. The role of toxins in the development of infections caused by CoNS is still controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the presence of enterotoxin and cytotoxin genes in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates obtained from blood cultures. Cytotoxin genes were detected by PCR using novel species-specific primers. Among the 85 S. epidermidis and 84 S. haemolyticus isolates, 95.3% and 79.8%, respectively, carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The most frequent enterotoxin genes were sea (53.3%), seg (64.5%) and sei (67.5%). The seg gene was positively associated with S. epidermidis (p = 0.02), and this species was more toxigenic than S. haemolyticus. The hla/yidD gene was detected in 92.9% of S. epidermidis and the hla gene in 91.7% of S. haemolyticus isolates; hlb was detected in 92.9% of the S. epidermidis isolates and hld in 95.3%. Nosocomial Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates exhibited a high toxigenic potential, mainly containing the non-classical enterotoxin genes seg and sei. The previously unreported detection of hla/yidD and hlb in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus using species-specific primers showed that these hemolysin genes differ between CoNS species and that they are highly frequent in blood culture isolates. PMID:26389954

  2. The outer membrane protein TolC from Sinorhizobium meliloti affects protein secretion, polysaccharide biosynthesis, antimicrobial resistance, and symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ana M; Becker, Anke; Santos, Mário R; Sharypova, Larissa A; Santos, Pedro M; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2008-07-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is capable of establishing a symbiotic nitrogen fixation relationship with Medicago sativa. During this process, it must cope with diverse environments and has evolved different types of transport systems that help its propagation in the plant roots. TolC protein family members are the outer-membrane components of several transport systems involved in the export of diverse molecules, playing an important role in bacterial survival. In this work, we have characterized the protein TolC from S. meliloti 2011. An insertional mutation in the tolC gene strongly affected the resistance phenotype to antimicrobial agents and induced higher susceptibility to osmotic and oxidative stresses. Immunodetection experiments and comparison of the extracellular proteins present in the supernatant of the wild-type versus tolC mutant strains showed that the calcium-binding protein ExpE1, the endoglycanase ExsH, and the product of open reading frame SMc04171, a putative hemolysin-type calcium-binding protein, are secreted by a TolC-dependent secretion system. In the absence of TolC, neither succinoglycan nor galactoglucan were detected in the culture supernatant. Moreover, S. meliloti tolC mutant induced a reduced number of nonfixing nitrogen nodules in M. sativa roots. Taken together, our results confirm the importance of TolC in protein secretion, exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, antimicrobials resistance, and symbiosis.

  3. Hemolytic and proteolytic activities of Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria in broth and salmon extract at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, María-Nieves; Santos, Jesús A; Otero, Andrés; García-López, Maria-Luisa

    2004-02-01

    Expression of hemolytic and proteolytic activities throughout the growth cycle was investigated with two enterotoxic aeromonad strains assigned to the species Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria. Although growth kinetic data were dependent on strain, temperature, and substrate, maximum populations attained were higher than 9 log CFU/ml in aerated tryptone soya broth plus yeast extract (TSBYE) and salmon extract within the range 4 to 28 degrees C. For both strains in TSBYE, variable amounts of hemolytic activity were first detected at any temperature when aeromonad counts were over 9 log CFU/ml. Afterwards, this activity increased up to similar levels (109 to 112 hemolytic units per ml) without a significant increase in populations. Salmon extract supported hemolysin synthesis at 28 but not 4 degrees C. Proteolytic activity of the A. hydrophila strain was only expressed in salmon extract at 28 degrees C, whereas A. veronii biovar sobria did at 28 degrees C in both substrates and at 10 degrees C in TSBYE.

  4. DNA Translocation and Unzipping through a Nanopore: Some Geometrical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Muzard, J.; Martinho, M.; Mathé, J.; Bockelmann, U.; Viasnoff, V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This article explores the role of some geometrical factors on the electrophoretically driven translocations of macromolecules through nanopores. In the case of asymmetric pores, we show how the entry requirements and the direction of translocation can modify the information content of the blocked ionic current as well as the transduction of the electrophoretic drive into a mechanical force. To address these effects we studied the translocation of single-stranded DNA through an asymmetric α-hemolysin pore. Depending on the direction of the translocation, we measure the capacity of the pore to discriminate between both DNA orientations. By unzipping DNA hairpins from both sides of the pores we show that the presence of single strand or double strand in the pore can be discriminated based on ionic current levels. We also show that the transduction of the electrophoretic drive into a denaturing mechanical force depends on the local geometry of the pore entrance. Eventually we discuss the application of this work to the measurement of energy barriers for DNA unzipping as well as for protein binding and unfolding. PMID:20483325

  5. Role of side-edge site of sphingomyelinase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masataka; Takahashi, Masaya; Tsuge, Hideaki; Nagahama, Masahiro; Sakurai, Jun

    2012-05-25

    Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (Bc-SMase) belongs to the Mg(2+)-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) which hydrolyzes sphingomyelin (SM) to produce phosphocholine and ceramide, and acts as an extracellular hemolysin. Bc-SMase has two metal ion-binding sites in a long horizontal cleft across the molecule, with one Mg(2+) in the central region of the cleft and one divalent metal ion at the side-edge of the cleft. The role of the Mg(2+) at the side-edge of the long horizontal cleft in Bc-SMase remains unresolved. The replacement of Asn-57, Glu-99, and Asp-100 located in close proximity to Mg(2+) at the side-edge with alanine resulted in a striking reduction in binding to and hydrolysis of sphingomyelin in membranes of sheep erythrocytes or SM-liposomes but that of Phe-55 did not. However, the replacement of these residues had little effect on the enzymatic activity. N57A, E99A, and D100A contained 2 mol of Mg(2+) per mol of protein, and the wild type and F55A contained 3 mol. A crystal analysis showed that N57A with Mg(2+) had no metal ion at the side-edge. These results indicate that the Mg(2+) at the side-edge of Bc-SMase plays an important role in the binding to membranes.

  6. Detecting and genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-07-05

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFUs ml-1 (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products and the system is amenable to automation.

  7. Prevalence of Virulence Factors and Drug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Enterococci: A Study from North India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Anupurba, Shampa

    2015-01-01

    Along with emergence of multidrug resistance, presence of several virulence factors in enterococci is an emerging concept. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of various virulence factors phenotypically and genotypically in enterococci and study their association with multidrug resistance. A total of 310 enterococcal isolates were studied, comprising 155 E. faecium and 155 E. faecalis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion and agar dilution method. Hemolysin, gelatinase, biofilm production, and haemagglutination were detected phenotypically and presence of virulence genes, namely, asa1, gelE, cylA, esp, and hyl, was detected by multiplex PCR. Of the total, 47.41% isolates were high level gentamicin resistant (HLGRE) and 7.09% were vancomycin resistant (VRE). All the virulence traits studied were found in varying proportions, with majority in E. faecalis (p > 0.05). Strong biofilm producers possessed either asa1 or gelE gene. gelE silent gene was detected in 41.37% (12/29). However, increase in resistance was associated with significant decrease in expression or acquisition of virulence genes. Further, acquisition of vancomycin resistance was the significant factor responsible for the loss of virulence traits. Though it is presumed that increased drug resistance correlates with increased virulence, acquisition of vancomycin resistance might be responsible for reduced expression of virulence traits to meet the “biological cost” relating to VRE. PMID:26366302

  8. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence as a result of phage predation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; van de Ven, Theo G M; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-10-01

    The rapid increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has attracted attention to bacteriophages for treating and preventing bacterial infections. Bacteriophages can drive the diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, giving rise to phage-resistant variants with different phenotypes from their ancestral hosts. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of phage resistance on cytotoxicity of host populations toward cultured mammalian cells. The library of phage-resistant P. aeruginosa PAO1 variants used was developed previously via experimental evolution of an isogenic host population using phages PP7 and E79. Our results presented herein indicate that the phage-resistant variants developed in a heterogeneous phage environment exhibit a greater ability to impede metabolic action of cultured human keratinocytes and have a greater tendency to cause membrane damage even though they cannot invade the cells in large numbers. They also show a heightened resistance to phagocytosis by model murine macrophages. Furthermore, all isolates produced higher levels of at least one of the secreted virulence factors, namely, total proteases, elastase, phospholipase C, and hemolysins. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed upregulation in the transcription of a number of genes associated with virulence of P. aeruginosa for the phage-resistant variants. The results of this study indicate a significant change in the in vitro virulence of P. aeruginosa following phage predation and highlight the need for caution in the selection and design of phages and phage cocktails for therapeutic use.

  9. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. PMID:27297393

  10. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates.

  11. A patch-clamp ASIC for nanopore-based DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsuk; Maitra, Raj; Pedrotti, Kenneth D; Dunbar, William B

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a fully integrated high-sensitivity patch-clamp system is proposed for single-molecule deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis using a nanopore sensor. This system is composed of two main blocks for amplification and compensation. The amplification block is composed of three stages: 1) a headstage, 2) a voltage-gain difference amplifier, and 3) a track-and-hold circuit, that amplify a minute ionic current variation sensed by the nanopore while the compensation block avoids the headstage saturation caused by the input parasitic capacitances during sensing. By employing design techniques novel for this application, such as an instrumentation--amplifier topology and a compensation switch, we minimize the deleterious effects of the input-offset voltage and the input parasitic capacitances while attaining hardware simplicity. This system is fabricated in a 0.35 μm 4M2P CMOS process and is demonstrated using an α-hemolysin protein nanopore for detection of individual molecules of single-stranded DNA that pass through the 1.5 nm-diameter pore. In future work, the refined system will functionalize single and multiple solid-state nanopores formed in integrated microfluidic devices for advanced DNA analysis, in scientific and diagnostic applications.

  12. Nanoscale Bioengineering Solutions for Space Exploration the Nanopore Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioana, Cozmuta; Viktor, Stoic

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of biological systems at the molecular level and extraction of essential information for nano-engineering design to guide the nano-fabrication of solid-state sensors and molecular identification devices is a computational challenge. The alpha hemolysin protein ion channel is used as a model system for structural analysis of nucleic acids like DNA. Applied voltage draws a DNA strand and surrounding ionic solution through the biological nanopore. The subunits in the DNA strand block ion flow by differing amounts. Atomistic scale simulations are employed using NASA supercomputers to study DNA translocation. with the aim to enhance single DNA subunit identification. Compared to protein channels, solid-state nanopores offer a better temporal control of the translocation of DNA and the possibility to easily tune its chemistry to increase the signal resolution. Potential applications for NASA missions, besides real-time genome sequencing include astronaut health, life detection and decoding of various genomes. http://phenomrph.arc.nasa.gov/index.php

  13. Fighting malaria with engineered symbiotic bacteria from vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sibao; Ghosh, Anil K; Bongio, Nicholas; Stebbings, Kevin A; Lampe, David J; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2012-07-31

    The most vulnerable stages of Plasmodium development occur in the lumen of the mosquito midgut, a compartment shared with symbiotic bacteria. Here, we describe a strategy that uses symbiotic bacteria to deliver antimalaria effector molecules to the midgut lumen, thus rendering host mosquitoes refractory to malaria infection. The Escherichia coli hemolysin A secretion system was used to promote the secretion of a variety of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins by Pantoea agglomerans, a common mosquito symbiotic bacterium. These engineered P. agglomerans strains inhibited development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei by up to 98%. Significantly, the proportion of mosquitoes carrying parasites (prevalence) decreased by up to 84% for two of the effector molecules, scorpine, a potent antiplasmodial peptide and (EPIP)(4), four copies of Plasmodium enolase-plasminogen interaction peptide that prevents plasminogen binding to the ookinete surface. We demonstrate the use of an engineered symbiotic bacterium to interfere with the development of P. falciparum in the mosquito. These findings provide the foundation for the use of genetically modified symbiotic bacteria as a powerful tool to combat malaria.

  14. Structure and Stability of Individual DNA or RNA Hairpin Molecules Captured in an Ion Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeson, Mark

    2002-03-01

    Nanoscale pores can be used to analyze individual DNA or RNA molecules. For example, a prototype device based on the alpha-hemolysin protein permits serial examination of hundreds to thousands of molecules per minute. It is routinely used to identify individual polynucleotide homopolymers, and to read segments within single DNA or RNA block copolymers as they thread through a narrow, trans-membrane pore formed by the protein (1.5 nm limiting aperture). In recent reports, we have shown that this device can also be used to examine structural details of individual DNA or RNA hairpins at single base-pair precision. This is achieved by capturing each hairpin in a vestibule of the channel leading to the trans-membrane pore. Under a 120 mV applied voltage, ionic current through the channel is gated by the RNA or DNA hairpin as it is perched in the vestibule, resulting in a dynamic current pattern that is exquisitely sensitive to sequence identity. In this presentation, I will explain the ion channel device and then describe structural details of the hairpin molecules that can be resolved by the instrument. These include: i) Watson-Crick base-pair identity at the hairpin stem terminus; ii) duplex fraying caused by single base pair mismatches internal to the hairpin stem; and iii) A form (RNA) versus B form (DNA) helix conformation. I will then discuss alternative mechanisms that can account for the discrete gating patterns that underlie the analysis.

  15. Novel twin streptolysin S-like peptides encoded in the sag operon homologue of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Atsushi; Nakano, Kota; Ohkura, Kazuto; Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Kikuchi, Ken; Whiley, Robert A; Nagamune, Hideaki

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the anginosus group streptococci, which form part of the normal human oral flora. In contrast to the pyogenic group streptococci, our knowledge of the virulence factors of the anginosus group streptococci, including S. anginosus, is not sufficient to allow a clear understanding of the basis of their pathogenicity. Generally, hemolysins are thought to be important virulence factors in streptococcal infections. In the present study, a sag operon homologue was shown to be responsible for beta-hemolysis in S. anginosus strains by random gene knockout. Interestingly, contrary to pyogenic group streptococci, beta-hemolytic S. anginosus was shown to have two tandem sagA homologues, encoding streptolysin S (SLS)-like peptides, in the sag operon homologue. Gene deletion and complementation experiments revealed that both genes were functional, and these SLS-like peptides were essential for beta-hemolysis in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence of these SLS-like peptides differed from that of the typical SLS of S. pyogenes, especially in their propeptide domain, and an amino acid residue indicated to be important for the cytolytic activity of SLS in S. pyogenes was deleted in both S. anginosus homologues. These data suggest that SLS-like peptides encoded by two sagA homologues in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus may be potential virulence factors with a different structure essential for hemolytic activity and/or the maturation process compared to the typical SLS present in pyogenic group streptococci.

  16. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRULENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILES OF UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL, SOUTHERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Themphachanal, Monchanok; Kongpheng, Suttiporn; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Khianngam, Saowapar; Singkhamanan, Kamonnut; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2015-11-01

    Among uropathogens, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) worldwide, but clinical aspects due to this bacterial species is not fully understood in southern Thailand. Two hundred fifty-four UPEC isolates from patients admitted to Maharaj Nakhon Si Thammarat Hospital, southern Thailand were examined for crucial virulence genes, showing that 33.5% contained at least one of the virulence, genes tested. Genes encoding P fimbria, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and α-hemolysin constituted the majority (15.8%) carried by UPEC isolates. Phylogenetic group classification revealed that 57.5% of UPEC belonged to group D. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that 70.5% and 65.1% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, respectively. Moreover, 50.0% of UPEC were capable of producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases. These findings should be of benefit for more appropriate treatment of UTI patients in this region of Thailand. Keywords: uropathogenic Escherichia coli, antibiotics resistance, cnfl, hlyA, pap, Thailand

  17. Cloning, partial sequence, expression, and antigenic analysis of the filamentous hemagglutinin gene of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Delisse-Gathoye, A M; Locht, C; Jacob, F; Raaschou-Nielsen, M; Heron, I; Ruelle, J L; de Wilde, M; Cabezon, T

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), one of the main factors involved in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to ciliated host cells, was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the 3,500-base-pair nucleotide sequence encoding the amino-terminal region was determined. Molecular cloning, together with the characterization of recombinant FHA-related proteins produced in E. coli, revealed that the primary translation product is a protein of about 370 kilodaltons (kDa). The mature 220-kDa FHA polypeptide secreted by B. pertussis is most probably generated by proteolytic processing that eliminates a carboxy-terminal portion of about 150 kDa. The 1,087 amino-terminal residues of the predicted FHA sequence showed a number of remarkable features. Extensive homology to the Serratia marcescens and Proteus mirabilis hemolysin proteins was found between amino acids 91 and 205 of the FHA sequence, suggesting involvement of this FHA domain in host cell binding or secretion of FHA from B. pertussis. In addition, two regions containing repetitive amino acid sequences were identified. One region, extending from residues 382 to 664, was formed by six repeats, and a second, extending from residues 701 to 912, contained three repeats. The reactivities of several recombinant FHA-derived proteins with a panel of monoclonal antibodies identified at least four epitopes composing an immunoreactive domain present in the carboxy-terminal moiety of the mature FHA. Images PMID:1696934

  18. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: In vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    Gharamah, Abdullah A; Moharram, Ahmed M; Ismail, Mady A; AL-Hussaini, Ashraf K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Results: Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2), sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin). Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusion: In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss. PMID:24008795

  19. The Draft Genome Sequence of the Yersinia entomophaga Entomopathogenic Type Strain MH96T.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Mark R H; Beattie, Amy; Altermann, Eric; Moraga, Roger M; Harper, Lincoln A; Calder, Joanne; Laugraud, Aurelie

    2016-05-11

    Here we report the draft genome of Yersinia entomophaga type strain MH96T. The genome shows 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity to that of Yersinia nurmii type strain APN3a-cT, and comprises a single chromosome of approximately 4,275,531 bp. In silico analysis identified that, in addition to the previously documented Y. entomophaga Yen-TC gene cluster, the genome encodes a diverse array of toxins, including two type III secretion systems, and five rhs-associated gene clusters. As well as these multicomponent systems, several orthologs of known insect toxins, such as VIP2 toxin and the binary toxin PirAB, and distant orthologs of some mammalian toxins, including repeats-in-toxin, a cytolethal distending toxin, hemolysin-like genes and an adenylate cyclase were identified. The genome also contains a large number of hypothetical proteins and orthologs of known effector proteins, such as LopT, as well as genes encoding a wide range of proteolytic determinants, including metalloproteases and pathogen fitness determinants, such as genes involved in iron metabolism. The bioinformatic data derived from the current in silico analysis, along with previous information on the pathobiology of Y. entomophaga against its insect hosts, suggests that a number of these virulence systems are required for survival in the hemocoel and incapacitation of the insect host.

  20. Membrane-on-a-chip: microstructured silicon/silicon-dioxide chips for high-throughput screening of membrane transport and viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Ilja; van Oijen, Antoine M; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-04-22

    Screening of transport processes across biological membranes is hindered by the challenge to establish fragile supported lipid bilayers and the difficulty to determine at which side of the membrane reactants reside. Here, we present a method for the generation of suspended lipid bilayers with physiological relevant lipid compositions on microstructured Si/SiO2 chips that allow for high-throughput screening of both membrane transport and viral membrane fusion. Simultaneous observation of hundreds of single-membrane channels yields statistical information revealing population heterogeneities of the pore assembly and conductance of the bacterial toxin α-hemolysin (αHL). The influence of lipid composition and ionic strength on αHL pore formation was investigated at the single-channel level, resolving features of the pore-assembly pathway. Pore formation is inhibited by a specific antibody, demonstrating the applicability of the platform for drug screening of bacterial toxins and cell-penetrating agents. Furthermore, fusion of H3N2 influenza viruses with suspended lipid bilayers can be observed directly using a specialized chip architecture. The presented micropore arrays are compatible with fluorescence readout from below using an air objective, thus allowing high-throughput screening of membrane transport in multiwell formats in analogy to plate readers.

  1. Interactions of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Polymicrobial Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B.; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections. PMID:23451098

  2. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  3. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa FN; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  4. Antistaphylococcal and biofilm inhibitory activities of gallic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids.

    PubMed

    Luís, Ângelo; Silva, Filomena; Sousa, Sónia; Duarte, Ana Paula; Domingues, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen which is able to form biofilms, exhibiting a more pronounced resistance to antibiotics and disinfectants. The hurdles posed in eradicating biofilms have driven the search for new compounds able to fight these structures. Phenolic compounds constitute one of the most numerous and ubiquitous group of plant secondary metabolites with many biological activities. The aim of the present work was to study the potential antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties of gallic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids against S. aureus as well to elucidate its mechanism of action. It was concluded that the phenolic acids studied in this work have antistaphylococcal properties. For instance, gallic acid is able to influence the adhesion properties of S. aureus. The phenolic acids tested were also able to inhibit the production of α-hemolysin by this microorganism, with the exception of chlorogenic acid. Regarding its mechanism of action, caffeic acid interferes with the stability of the cell membrane and with the metabolic activity of the cells of S. aureus.

  5. Plasmid-Encoded Iron Uptake Systems.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids confer genetic information that benefits the bacterial cells containing them. In pathogenic bacteria, plasmids often harbor virulence determinants that enhance the pathogenicity of the bacterium. The ability to acquire iron in environments where it is limited, for instance the eukaryotic host, is a critical factor for bacterial growth. To acquire iron, bacteria have evolved specific iron uptake mechanisms. These systems are often chromosomally encoded, while those that are plasmid-encoded are rare. Two main plasmid types, ColV and pJM1, have been shown to harbor determinants that increase virulence by providing the cell with essential iron for growth. It is clear that these two plasmid groups evolved independently from each other since they do not share similarities either in the plasmid backbones or in the iron uptake systems they harbor. The siderophores aerobactin and salmochelin that are found on ColV plasmids fall in the hydroxamate and catechol group, respectively, whereas both functional groups are present in the anguibactin siderophore, the only iron uptake system found on pJM1-type plasmids. Besides siderophore-mediated iron uptake, ColV plasmids carry additional genes involved in iron metabolism. These systems include ABC transporters, hemolysins, and a hemoglobin protease. ColV- and pJM1-like plasmids have been shown to confer virulence to their bacterial host, and this trait can be completely ascribed to their encoded iron uptake systems.

  6. Microsecond simulations of DNA and ion transport in nanopores with novel ion-ion and ion-nucleotides effective potentials.

    PubMed

    De Biase, Pablo M; Markosyan, Suren; Noskov, Sergei

    2014-04-05

    We developed a novel scheme based on the grand-canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics simulations and have extended it to studies of ion currents across three nanopores with the potential for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sequencing: solid-state nanopore Si₃N₄, α-hemolysin, and E111N/M113Y/K147N mutant. To describe nucleotide-specific ion dynamics compatible with ssDNA coarse-grained model, we used the inverse Monte Carlo protocol, which maps the relevant ion-nucleotide distribution functions from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined with the previously developed simulation platform for Brownian dynamics simulations of ion transport, it allows for microsecond- and millisecond-long simulations of ssDNA dynamics in the nanopore with a conductance computation accuracy that equals or exceeds that of all-atom MD simulations. In spite of the simplifications, the protocol produces results that agree with the results of previous studies on ion conductance across open channels and provide direct correlations with experimentally measured blockade currents and ion conductances that have been estimated from all-atom MD simulations.

  7. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. PMID:27460800

  8. Multiplexed real-time PCR amplification of tlh, tdh and trh genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and its rapid detection in shellfish and Gulf of Mexico water.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Amy V; Bej, Asim K

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we have developed a SYBR Green I-based real-time multiplexed PCR assay for the detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Gulf of Mexico water (gulf water), artificially seeded and natural oysters targeting three hemolysin genes, tlh, tdh and trh in a single reaction. Post-amplification melt-temperature analysis confirmed the amplification of all three targeted genes with high specificity. The detection sensitivity was 10 cfu (initial inoculum) in 1 ml of gulf water or oyster tissue homogenate, following 5 h enrichment. The results showed 58% of the oysters to be positive for tlh, indicating the presence of V. parahaemolyticus; of which 21% were positive for tdh; and 0.7% for trh, signifying the presence of pathogenic strains. The C(t) values showed that oyster tissue matrix had some level of inhibition, whereas the gulf water had negligible effect on PCR amplification. The assay was rapid (approximately 8 h), specific and sensitive, meeting the ISSC guidelines. Rapid detection using real-time multiplexed PCR will help reduce V. parahaemolyticus-related disease outbreaks, thereby increasing consumer confidence and economic success of the seafood industry.

  9. Genes similar to the Vibrio parahaemolyticus virulence-related genes tdh, tlh, and vscC2 occur in other vibrionaceae species isolated from a pristine estuary.

    PubMed

    Klein, Savannah L; Gutierrez West, Casandra K; Mejia, Diana M; Lovell, Charles R

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus often relies on molecular biological analysis of species-specific virulence factor genes. These genes have been employed in determinations of V. parahaemolyticus population numbers and the prevalence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains. Strains of the Vibrionaceae species Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio diabolicus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio natriegens, as well as strains similar to Vibrio tubiashii, were isolated from a pristine salt marsh estuary. These strains were examined for the V. parahaemolyticus hemolysin genes tdh, trh, and tlh and for the V. parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 2α gene vscC2 using established PCR primers and protocols. Virulence-related genes occurred at high frequencies in non-V. parahaemolyticus Vibrionaceae species. V. diabolicus was of particular interest, as several strains were recovered, and the large majority (>83%) contained virulence-related genes. It is clear that detection of these genes does not ensure correct identification of virulent V. parahaemolyticus. Further, the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus-like virulence factors in other vibrios potentially complicates tracking of outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus infections.

  10. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus: Molecular Detection of Cytotoxin and Enterotoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Brito, Carla Ivo; de Oliveira, Adilson; Martins, Patrícia Yoshida Faccioli; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2015-09-14

    Although opportunistic pathogens, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus, have long been regarded as avirulent organisms. The role of toxins in the development of infections caused by CoNS is still controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the presence of enterotoxin and cytotoxin genes in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates obtained from blood cultures. Cytotoxin genes were detected by PCR using novel species-specific primers. Among the 85 S. epidermidis and 84 S. haemolyticus isolates, 95.3% and 79.8%, respectively, carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The most frequent enterotoxin genes were sea (53.3%), seg (64.5%) and sei (67.5%). The seg gene was positively associated with S. epidermidis (p = 0.02), and this species was more toxigenic than S. haemolyticus. The hla/yidD gene was detected in 92.9% of S. epidermidis and the hla gene in 91.7% of S. haemolyticus isolates; hlb was detected in 92.9% of the S. epidermidis isolates and hld in 95.3%. Nosocomial Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates exhibited a high toxigenic potential, mainly producing the non-classical enterotoxins seg and sei. The previously unreported detection of hla/yidD and hlb in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus using species-specific primers showed that these hemolysin genes differ between CoNS species and that they are highly frequent in blood culture isolates.

  11. Thermostability of heterophile antibodies from human sera infected with Schistosoma mansoni and geo-helminths. An immuno-metric statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chamone, Munir; Atuncar, Gregorio S; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech

    2006-01-01

    Antibody in human sera that induces lysis of sheep erythrocytes in hemolytic assay was investigated. The present study showed that the presence in serum of the thermostable cytolytic anti-sheep red blood cells antibodies is dependent on the Schistosoma mansoni infection, and this is more frequent in adults than in children. The thermostable characteristic of hemolysins in normal sera was not dependent on the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura or hookworm geo-helminths. Further, thermostable complement-activating heterophile antibodies were noticed in children in association with massive number of S. mansoni eggs. The results were obtained by using the z- and the chi-square tests. The z-test allows us to formulate a one-sided alternative, i.e., a tendency of one of the attributes. On the other hand, the chi-square test analyzes the independence between attributes by using a contingency table. Besides the obtained results being interesting in the field of schistosomiasis mansoni, they can provide a new insight into the use of statistics in medical science.

  12. Polymerized planar suspended lipid bilayers for single ion channel recordings: comparison of several dienoyl lipids.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Benjamin A; Xu, Juhua; Jones, Ian W; Keogh, John P; Comi, Troy J; Hall, Henry K; Aspinwall, Craig A; Saavedra, S Scott

    2011-03-01

    The stabilization of suspended planar lipid membranes, or black lipid membranes (BLMs), through polymerization of mono- and bis-functionalized dienoyl lipids was investigated. Electrical properties, including capacitance, conductance, and dielectric breakdown voltage, were determined for BLMs composed of mono-DenPC, bis-DenPC, mono-SorbPC, and bis-SorbPC both prior to and following photopolymerization, with diphytanoyl phosphocholine (DPhPC) serving as a control. Poly(lipid) BLMs exhibited significantly longer lifetimes and increased the stability of air-water transfers. BLM stability followed the order bis-DenPC > mono-DenPC ≈ mono-SorbPC > bis-SorbPC. The conductance of bis-SorbPC BLMs was significantly higher than that of the other lipids, which is attributed to a high density of hydrophilic pores, resulting in relatively unstable membranes. The use of poly(lipid) BLMs as matrices for supporting the activity of an ion channel protein (IC) was explored using α-hemolysin (α-HL), a model IC. Characteristic i-V plots of α-HL were maintained following photopolymerization of bis-DenPC, mono-DenPC, and mono-SorbPC, demonstrating the utility of these materials for preparing more durable BLMs for single-channel recordings of reconstituted ICs.

  13. Identification of an intracellular M17 family leucine aminopeptidase that is required for virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ronan K.; Robison, Tiffany M.; Rivera, Frances E.; Davenport, Jessica E.; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Florczyk, Danuta; Tarkowski, Andrej; Potempa, Jan; Koziel, Joanna; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly virulent bacterial pathogen capable of causing a variety of ailments throughout the human body. It is a major public health concern due to the continued emergence of highly pathogenic methicillin resistant strains (MRSA) both within hospitals and in the community. Virulence in S. aureus is mediated by an array of secreted and cell wall associated virulence factors, including toxins, hemolysins and proteases. In this work we identify a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP, pepZ) that strongly impacts the pathogenic abilities of S. aureus. Disruption of the pepZ gene in either Newman or USA300 resulted in a dramatic attenuation of virulence in both localized and systemic models of infection. LAP is required for survival inside human macrophages and gene expression analysis shows that pepZ expression is highest in the intracellular environment. We examine the cellular location of LAP and demonstrate that it is localized to the bacterial cytosol. These results identify for the first time an intracellular leucine aminopeptidase that influences disease causation in a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:22613209

  14. Host-extract induced changes in the secretome of the plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Mattinen, Laura; Nissinen, Riitta; Riipi, Tero; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Pirhonen, Minna

    2007-10-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacterium that causes rotting in potato stems and tubers. The secreted proteins of this pathogen were analyzed with proteomics from culture supernatant of cells grown in minimal medium supplemented with host extracts. More than 40 proteins were identified, among them known virulence determinants, such as pectic enzymes, metalloprotease, and virulence protein Svx, along with flagella proteins, GroEL and cyclophilin-type chaperones and several hypothetical proteins or proteins with unknown function. Some of the identified proteins may be involved in utilization of nutrients or transport of minerals. Northern and real-time RT-PCR analyses suggested that most of the proteins upregulated by plant extract were transcriptionally regulated. Among the identified proteins were VgrG and four homologs of hemolysin-coregulated proteins (Hcps). A mutant strain lacking one of the hcp genes was not affected in virulence, while a bacterial strain overexpressing the same gene was shown to have increased virulence, which suggests that these proteins may be new virulence determinants of P. atrosepticum. Comparison of the secretomes of wild type cells and hrcC mutant defective in Type III secretion suggested that the production of the identified proteins was independent of functional Type III secretion system.

  15. Proximal Capture Dynamics for a Single Biological Nanopore Sensor.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Emmanuel D; Barbalas, Jonathan; Drown, Bryon S; Culbertson, Michael J; Keranen Burden, Lisa M; Kasianowicz, John J; Burden, Daniel L

    2015-08-20

    Single nanopore sensors enable capture and analysis of molecules that are driven to the pore entry from bulk solution. However, the distance between an analyte and the nanopore opening limits the detection efficiency. A theoretical basis for predicting particle capture rate is important for designing modified nanopore sensors, especially for those with covalently tethered reaction sites. Using the finite element method, we develop a soft-walled electrostatic block (SWEB) model for the alpha-hemolysin channel that produces a vector map of drift-producing forces on particles diffusing near the pore entrance. The maps are then coupled to a single-particle diffusion simulation to probe capture statistics and to track the trajectories of individual particles on the μs to ms time scales. The investigation enables evaluation of the interplay among the electrophoretic, electroosmotic, and thermal driving forces as a function of applied potential. The findings demonstrate how the complex drift-producing forces compete with diffusion over the nanoscale dimensions of the pore. The results also demonstrate the spatial and temporal limitations associated with nanopore detection and offer a basic theoretical framework to guide both the placement and kinetics of reaction sites located on, or near, the nanopore cap.

  16. Identification of a novel insertion sequence element in Streptococcus agalactiae. bspeller@imib.rwth-aachen.de.

    PubMed

    Spellerberg, B; Martin, S; Franken, C; Berner, R; Lütticken, R

    2000-01-04

    Gain and loss of bacterial pathogenicity is often associated with mobile genetic elements. A novel insertion sequence (IS) element designated ISSa4 was identified in Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci). The 963bp IS element is flanked by 25bp perfect inverted repeats and led to the duplication of a 9bp target sequence at the insertion site. ISSa4 contains one open reading frame coding for a putative transposase of 287 aa and exhibits closest similarities to insertion elements of the IS982 family which has previously not been identified in streptococci. Analysis of different S. agalactiae strains showed that the copy number of ISSa4 in S. agalactiae varies significantly between strains. The S. agalactiae strain with the highest copy number of ISSa4 was nonhemolytic and harbored one copy inserted in cylB, which encodes the membrane-spanning domain of the putative hemolysin transporter (Spellerberg et al., 1999. Identification of genetic determinants for the hemolytic activity of Streptococcus agalactiae by ISS1 transposition. J. Bacteriol. 181, 3212-3219). Determination of the distribution of ISSa4 in different S. agalactiae strains revealed that ISSa4 could be detected only in strains isolated after 1996, which might indicate a recent acquisition of this novel insertion element by S. agalactiae.

  17. Controlling polymer translocation and ion transport via charge correlations.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2014-11-04

    We develop a correlation-corrected transport theory in order to predict ionic and polymer transport properties of membrane nanopores under physical conditions where mean-field electrostatics breaks down. The experimentally observed low KCl conductivity of open α-hemolysin pores is quantitatively explained by the presence of surface polarization effects. Upon the penetration of a DNA molecule into the pore, these polarization forces combined with the electroneutrality of DNA sets a lower boundary for the ionic current, explaining the weak salt dependence of blocked pore conductivities at dilute ion concentrations. The addition of multivalent counterions to the solution results in the reversal of the polymer charge and the direction of the electroosmotic flow. With trivalent spermidine or quadrivalent spermine molecules, the charge inversion is strong enough to stop the translocation of the polymer and to reverse its motion. This mechanism can be used efficiently in translocation experiments in order to improve the accuracy of DNA sequencing by minimizing the translocation velocity of the polymer.

  18. A Disease Model of Muscle Necrosis Caused by Aeromonas dhakensis Infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Yi-Wei; Ou, Chun-Chun; Lee, Tzer-Min; Wu, Chi-Jung; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2017-01-01

    A variety of bacterial infections cause muscle necrosis in humans. Caenorhabditis elegans has epidermis and bands of muscle that resemble soft-tissue structures in mammals and humans. Here, we developed a muscle necrosis model caused by Aeromonas dhakensis infection in C. elegans. Our data showed that A. dhakensis infected and killed C. elegans rapidly. Characteristic muscle damage in C. elegans induced by A. dhakensis was demonstrated in vivo. Relative expression levels of host necrosis-associated genes, asp-3, asp-4, and crt-1 increased significantly after A. dhakensis infection. The RNAi sensitive NL2099 rrf-3 (pk1426) worms with knockdown of necrosis genes of crt-1 and asp-4 by RNAi showed prolonged survival after A. dhakensis infection. Specifically knockdown of crt-1 and asp-4 by RNAi in WM118 worms, which restricted RNAi only to the muscle cells, conferred significant resistance to A. dhakensis infection. In contrast, the severity of muscle damage and toxicity produced by the A. dhakensis hemolysin-deletion mutant is attenuated. In another example, shiga-like toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) known to elicit toxicity to C. elegans with concomitant enteropathogenicty, did not cause muscle necrosis as A. dhakensis did. Taken together, these results show that Aeromonas infection induces muscle necrosis and rapid death of infected C. elegans, which are similar to muscle necrosis in humans, and then validate the value of the C. elegans model with A. dhakensis infection in studying Aeromonas pathogenicity. PMID:28101079

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 after exposure to Austrian bathing sites.

    PubMed

    Hirk, Sonja; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Lepuschitz, Sarah; Rehak, Sonja; Weil, Sandra; Gschwandtner, Elisabeth; Hermann, Michael; Neuhold, Stephanie; Zoufaly, Alexander; Indra, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report on two cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the lower leg due to nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae). A 73-year-old woman (case 1) and an 80-year-old man (case 2) were hospitalized with symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis on July 18 and August 15, 2015, respectively. In both cases, symptoms started the day after swimming in local ponds. Swabs gained intraoperatively and a blood culture from the male patient, yielded V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139, negative for cholera toxin gene ctx and positive for hemolysin genes hlyA and hlyB. Water samples taken from pond A on August 17, 2015 (32 days after exposure of case 1) and from pond B on August 20, 2015 (7 days after exposure of case 2) yielded non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in most-probable numbers of > 11,000 per 100 ml each. The occurrence of two cases of necrotizing fasciitis within a 1 month period related to two Austrian non-saline bathing waters, previously not known to harbor V. cholerae, is probably linked to the prevailing extreme weather conditions (heat wave, drought) this summer in Austria. While case 1 was discharged in good clinical condition after 73 days, case 2 died after four months of hospitalization. Public health authorities are challenged to assess the effects of long-term climate change on pathogen growth and survival in continental bodies of fresh water.

  20. Molecular architecture and functional analysis of NetB, a pore-forming toxin from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos G; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Naylor, Claire E; Cole, Ambrose R; Moss, David S; Titball, Richard W; Basak, Ajit K

    2013-02-01

    NetB is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been reported to play a major role in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis, a disease that has emerged due to the removal of antibiotics in animal feedstuffs. Here we present the crystal structure of the pore form of NetB solved to 3.9 Å. The heptameric assembly shares structural homology to the staphylococcal α-hemolysin. However, the rim domain, a region that is thought to interact with the target cell membrane, shows sequence and structural divergence leading to the alteration of a phosphocholine binding pocket found in the staphylococcal toxins. Consistent with the structure we show that NetB does not bind phosphocholine efficiently but instead interacts directly with cholesterol leading to enhanced oligomerization and pore formation. Finally we have identified conserved and non-conserved amino acid positions within the rim loops that significantly affect binding and toxicity of NetB. These findings present new insights into the mode of action of these pore-forming toxins, enabling the design of more effective control measures against necrotic enteritis and providing potential new tools to the field of bionanotechnology.

  1. Immunoproteomic analysis of antibody in lymphocyte supernatant in patients with typhoid fever in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Charles, Richelle C; Liang, Li; Khanam, Farhana; Sayeed, M Abu; Hung, Chris; Leung, Daniel T; Baker, Stephen; Ludwig, Albrecht; Harris, Jason B; Larocque, Regina C; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Felgner, Philip L; Ryan, Edward T

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that an assay based on detection of anti-Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi antibodies in supernatant of lymphocytes harvested from patients presenting with typhoid fever (antibody in lymphocyte supernatant [ALS] assay) can identify 100% of patients with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever in Bangladesh. In order to define immunodominant proteins within the S. Typhi membrane preparation used as antigen in these prior studies and to identify potential biomarkers unique to S. Typhi bacteremic patients, we probed microarrays containing 2,724 S. Typhi proteins with ALS collected at the time of clinical presentation from 10 Bangladeshis with acute typhoid fever. We identified 62 immunoreactive antigens when evaluating both the IgG and IgA responses. Immune responses to 10 of these antigens discriminated between individuals with acute typhoid infection and healthy control individuals from areas where typhoid infection is endemic, as well as Bangladeshi patients presenting with fever who were subsequently confirmed to have a nontyphoid illness. Using an ALS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format and purified antigen, we then confirmed that immune responses against the antigen with the highest immunoreactivity (hemolysin E [HlyE]) correctly identified individuals with acute typhoid or paratyphoid fever in Dhaka, Bangladesh. These observations suggest that purified antigens could be used with ALS and corresponding acute-phase activated B lymphocytes in diagnostic platforms to identify acutely infected patients, even in areas where enteric fever is endemic.

  2. Virulence gene profiling of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1-harboring E. coli (EAST1EC) derived from sporadic diarrheal patients.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takayuki; Yatsuyanagi, Jun; Saito, Shioko

    2012-04-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, a total of 2168 Escherichia coli strains derived from diarrheal patients, defined as putative diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC), were collected from medical institutions in Akita prefecture, Japan. Thirty five of the strains lacked typical pathogenic determinants of DEC other than astA, which encodes enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC) heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1). These E. coli strains are referred to as EAST1EC. Several studies have suggested a role of EAST1 in diarrhea; however, the correlation between diarrhea and the presence of astA remains inconclusive. To investigate whether EAST1EC strains derived from diarrheal patients shared pathogenic factors other than EAST1, virulence gene profiling of 12 virulence genes - iha, lpfA, ldaG, pilS, pic, pet, irp2, daa, aah, aid, cdtB and hlyA - was carried out. PCR analysis revealed that four of the 35 EAST1EC strains harbored only astA, 24 harbored genes associated with adhesins and intestinal colonization, three strains harbored the gene for α-hemolysin, and 24 strains harbored the gene for a siderophore. These results indicated that some EAST1EC strains harbor various virulence genes associated with distinct E. coli pathotypes, primarily enterohemorrhagic E. coli and EAggEC, which may represent additional pathogenic determinants of EAST1EC.

  3. Occurrence of natural Bacillus thuringiensis contaminants and residues of Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides on fresh fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Kristine; Rosenquist, Hanne; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Wilcks, Andrea

    2006-05-01

    A total of 128 Bacillus cereus-like strains isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables for sale in retail shops in Denmark were characterized. Of these strains, 39% (50/128) were classified as Bacillus thuringiensis on the basis of their content of cry genes determined by PCR or crystal proteins visualized by microscopy. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and plasmid profiling indicated that 23 of the 50 B. thuringiensis strains were of the same subtype as B. thuringiensis strains used as commercial bioinsecticides. Fourteen isolates were indistinguishable from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD1 present in the products Dipel, Biobit, and Foray, and nine isolates grouped with B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai present in Turex. The commercial strains were primarily isolated from samples of tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers. A multiplex PCR method was developed to simultaneously detect all three genes in the enterotoxin hemolysin BL (HBL) and the nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE), respectively. This revealed that the frequency of these enterotoxin genes was higher among the strains indistinguishable from the commercial strains than among the other B. thuringiensis and B. cereus-like strains isolated from fruits and vegetables. The same was seen for a third enterotoxin, CytK. In conclusion, the present study strongly indicates that residues of B. thuringiensis-based insecticides can be found on fresh fruits and vegetables and that these are potentially enterotoxigenic.

  4. A Nanosensor for Trans-membrane Capture and Identification of Single Nucleic Acid Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakane, Jonathan; Wiggin, Matthew; Marziali, Andre

    2004-03-01

    We present the construction and operation of a self-assembling nanosensor for sequence-specific detection of nucleotides across a membrane. The probe is constructed of two main components: a single alpha-hemolysin nanopore self-assembled into a lipid bilayer, and a DNA probe tethered to avidin at one end and complementary to the analyte nucleotide at the other end. The sensor is assembled by electrophoretic insertion of the probe into the cis-side of the nanopore (observable as an increase in electrical impedance). Hybridization of the probe to analyte on the trans- side of the pore traps the probe in place, and increases the time constant for probe exit on subsequent voltage reversal. Using this sensor, we can uncover the energy landscape of binding interactions between single DNA molecules on the trans side of the membrane and the probe strand. This allows us to detect and identify single base mutations in short oligonucleotide strands specifically targeted based on the sensor probe sequence. The nanosensor shows promise for applications such as single nucleotide polymorphism detection, and potentially, for in vivo detection of specific RNA sequences.

  5. High Temperature Extends the Range of Size Discrimination of Nonionic Polymers by a Biological Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Piguet, Fabien; Ouldali, Hadjer; Discala, Françoise; Breton, Marie-France; Behrends, Jan C.; Pelta, Juan; Oukhaled, Abdelghani

    2016-01-01

    We explore the effect of temperature on the interaction of polydisperse mixtures of nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymers of different average molar masses with the biological nanopore α-hemolysin. In contrast with what has been previously observed with various nanopores and analytes, we find that, for PEGs larger than a threshold molar mass (2000 g/mol, PEG 2000), increasing temperature increases the duration of the PEG/nanopore interaction. In the case of PEG 3400 the duration increases by up to a factor of 100 when the temperature increases from 5 °C to 45 °C. Importantly, we find that increasing temperature extends the polymer size range of application of nanopore-based single-molecule mass spectrometry (Np-SMMS)-type size discrimination. Indeed, in the case of PEG 3400, discrimination of individual molecular species of different monomer number is impossible at room temperature but is achieved when the temperature is raised to 45 °C. We interpret our observations as the consequence of a decrease of PEG solubility and a collapse of PEG molecules with higher temperatures. In addition to expanding the range of application of Np-SMMS to larger nonionic polymers, our findings highlight the crucial role of the polymer solubility for the nanopore detection. PMID:27924860

  6. Calcium-chelating alizarin and other anthraquinones inhibit biofilm formation and the hemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Yong Ryu, Shi; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal biofilms are problematic and play a critical role in the persistence of chronic infections because of their abilities to tolerate antimicrobial agents. Thus, the inhibitions of biofilm formation and/or toxin production are viewed as alternative means of controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections. Here, the antibiofilm activities of 560 purified phytochemicals were examined. Alizarin at 10 μg/ml was found to efficiently inhibit biofilm formation by three S. aureus strains and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. In addition, two other anthraquinones purpurin and quinalizarin were found to have antibiofilm activity. Binding of Ca2+ by alizarin decreased S. aureus biofilm formation and a calcium-specific chelating agent suppressed the effect of calcium. These three anthraquinones also markedly inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. aureus, and in-line with their antibiofilm activities, increased cell aggregation. A chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that two hydroxyl units at the C-1 and C-2 positions of anthraquinone play important roles in antibiofilm and anti-hemolytic activities. Transcriptional analyses showed that alizarin repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene, biofilm-related genes (psmα, rbf, and spa), and modulated the expressions of cid/lrg genes (the holin/antiholin system). These findings suggest anthraquinones, especially alizarin, are potentially useful for controlling biofilm formation and the virulence of S. aureus. PMID:26763935

  7. The controversial nature of the Weissella genus: technological and functional aspects versus whole genome analysis-based pathogenic potential for their application in food and health

    PubMed Central

    Abriouel, Hikmate; Lerma, Leyre Lavilla; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Montoro, Beatriz Pérez; Kabisch, Jan; Pichner, Rohtraud; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Neve, Horst; Fusco, Vincenzina; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Gálvez, Antonio; Benomar, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of several Weissella (W.) strains for biotechnological and probiotic purposes, certain species of this genus were found to act as opportunistic pathogens, while strains of W. ceti were recognized to be pathogenic for farmed rainbow trout. Herein, we investigated the pathogenic potential of weissellas based on in silico analyses of the 13 whole genome sequences available to date in the NCBI database. Our screening allowed us to find several virulence determinants such as collagen adhesins, aggregation substances, mucus-binding proteins, and hemolysins in some species. Moreover, we detected several antibiotic resistance-encoding genes, whose presence could increase the potential pathogenicity of some strains, but should not be regarded as an excluding trait for beneficial weissellas, as long as these genes are not present on mobile genetic elements. Thus, selection of weissellas intended to be used as starters or for biotechnological or probiotic purposes should be investigated regarding their safety aspects on a strain to strain basis, preferably also by genome sequencing, since nucleotide sequence heterogeneity in virulence and antibiotic resistance genes makes PCR-based screening unreliable for safety assessments. In this sense, the application of W. confusa and W. cibaria strains as starter cultures or as probiotics should be approached with caution, by carefully selecting strains that lack pathogenic potential. PMID:26579103

  8. Novel Twin Streptolysin S-Like Peptides Encoded in the sag Operon Homologue of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Atsushi; Nakano, Kota; Ohkura, Kazuto; Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Kikuchi, Ken; Whiley, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the anginosus group streptococci, which form part of the normal human oral flora. In contrast to the pyogenic group streptococci, our knowledge of the virulence factors of the anginosus group streptococci, including S. anginosus, is not sufficient to allow a clear understanding of the basis of their pathogenicity. Generally, hemolysins are thought to be important virulence factors in streptococcal infections. In the present study, a sag operon homologue was shown to be responsible for beta-hemolysis in S. anginosus strains by random gene knockout. Interestingly, contrary to pyogenic group streptococci, beta-hemolytic S. anginosus was shown to have two tandem sagA homologues, encoding streptolysin S (SLS)-like peptides, in the sag operon homologue. Gene deletion and complementation experiments revealed that both genes were functional, and these SLS-like peptides were essential for beta-hemolysis in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence of these SLS-like peptides differed from that of the typical SLS of S. pyogenes, especially in their propeptide domain, and an amino acid residue indicated to be important for the cytolytic activity of SLS in S. pyogenes was deleted in both S. anginosus homologues. These data suggest that SLS-like peptides encoded by two sagA homologues in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus may be potential virulence factors with a different structure essential for hemolytic activity and/or the maturation process compared to the typical SLS present in pyogenic group streptococci. PMID:23292771

  9. Cell envelope of Bordetella pertussis: immunological and biochemical analyses and characterization of a major outer membrane porin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Surface molecules of Bordetella pertussis which may be important in metabolism, pathogenesis, and immunity to whooping cough were examined using cell fractionation and /sup 125/I cell surface labeling. Antigenic envelope proteins were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting procedures using monoclonal antibodies and convalescent sera. A surface protein with a high M/sub r/, missing in a mutant lacking the filamentous hemagglutinin, was identified in virulent Bordetella pertussis but was absent in virulent B. pertussis strains. At least three envelope proteins were found only in virulent B. pertussis strains and were absent or diminished in avirulent and most phenotypically modulated strains. Transposon-induced mutants unable to produce hemolysin, dermonecrotic toxin, pertussis toxin, and filamentous hemagglutinin also lacked these three envelope proteins, confirming that virulence-associated envelope proteins were genetically regulated with other virulence-associated traits. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed at least five heat modifiable proteins which migrated as higher or lower M/sub r/ moieties if solubilized at 25/sup 0/C instead of 100/sup 0/C.

  10. High Temperature Extends the Range of Size Discrimination of Nonionic Polymers by a Biological Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piguet, Fabien; Ouldali, Hadjer; Discala, Françoise; Breton, Marie-France; Behrends, Jan C.; Pelta, Juan; Oukhaled, Abdelghani

    2016-12-01

    We explore the effect of temperature on the interaction of polydisperse mixtures of nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymers of different average molar masses with the biological nanopore α-hemolysin. In contrast with what has been previously observed with various nanopores and analytes, we find that, for PEGs larger than a threshold molar mass (2000 g/mol, PEG 2000), increasing temperature increases the duration of the PEG/nanopore interaction. In the case of PEG 3400 the duration increases by up to a factor of 100 when the temperature increases from 5 °C to 45 °C. Importantly, we find that increasing temperature extends the polymer size range of application of nanopore-based single-molecule mass spectrometry (Np-SMMS)-type size discrimination. Indeed, in the case of PEG 3400, discrimination of individual molecular species of different monomer number is impossible at room temperature but is achieved when the temperature is raised to 45 °C. We interpret our observations as the consequence of a decrease of PEG solubility and a collapse of PEG molecules with higher temperatures. In addition to expanding the range of application of Np-SMMS to larger nonionic polymers, our findings highlight the crucial role of the polymer solubility for the nanopore detection.

  11. Protective efficacy of PLGA microspheres loaded with divalent DNA vaccine encoding the ompA gene of Aeromonas veronii and the hly gene of Aeromonas hydrophila in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Zhao, Na; Amer, Said; Qian, Mingming; Lv, Mengxi; Zhao, Yuliang; Su, Xin; Cao, Jieying; He, Hongxuan; Zhao, Baohua

    2013-11-19

    In the present study, poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) was used as a carrier for a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding the Aeromonas veronii outer membrane protein A (ompA) and Aeromonas hydrophila hemolysins (hly) protein. The recombinant pET-28a-ompA-hly was constructed by inserting the ompA gene and hly gene into a pET-28a expression vector. Loading of ompA-hly antigen module on PLGA microspheres were accomplished by water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) encapsulation. The molecular weight and specificity of pET-28a-ompA-hly were detected by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blotting. The microspheres showed an average particle size of 100-150 μm and a loading efficiency (LE) of 68.8%. Mice received ompA-hly antigen-loaded PLGA microspheres by intraperitoneal or intragastric administration mounted strong and sustained IgG response, which was significantly higher (p<0.05) than those achieved by pET-28a-ompA-hly antigen alone. OmpA-hly antigen-loaded PLGA microsphere vaccine uniquely conferred a long lasting (30 days) sterile immunity against challenge infection. Results indicated that ompA-hly antigen-loaded PLGA microsphere vaccine is a qualified candidate vector system for sterile protective immunity against A. hydrophila and A. veronii infections.

  12. Crown ether–electrolyte interactions permit nanopore detection of individual DNA abasic sites in single molecules

    PubMed Central

    An, Na; Fleming, Aaron M.; White, Henry S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA abasic (AP) sites are one of the most frequent lesions in the genome and have a high mutagenic potential if unrepaired. After selective attachment of 2-aminomethyl-18-crown-6 (18c6), individual AP lesions are detected during electrophoretic translocation through the bacterial protein ion channel α-hemolysin (α-HL) embedded in a lipid bilayer. Interactions between 18c6 and Na+ produce characteristic pulse-like current amplitude signatures that allow the identification of individual AP sites in single molecules of homopolymeric or heteropolymeric DNA sequences. The bulky 18c6-cation complexes also dramatically slow the DNA motion to more easily recordable levels. Further, the behaviors of the AP-18c6 adduct are different with respect to the directionalities of DNA entering the protein channel, and they can be precisely manipulated by altering the cation (Li+, Na+ or K+) of the electrolyte. This method permits detection of multiple AP lesions per strand, which is unprecedented in other work. Additionally, insights into the thermodynamics and kinetics of 18c6-cation interactions at a single-molecule level are provided by the nanopore measurement. PMID:22711805

  13. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  14. ATP Release from Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Baaske, Romina; Richter, Mandy; Möller, Nils; Ziesemer, Sabine; Eiffler, Ina; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells reduce cytosolic ATP content in response to treatment with S. aureus alpha-toxin (hemolysin A, Hla). This study was undertaken to investigate whether this is due to attenuated ATP generation or to release of ATP from the cytosol and extracellular ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes. Exposure of cells to rHla did result in mitochondrial calcium uptake and a moderate decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that ATP regeneration may have been attenuated. In addition, ATP may have left the cells through transmembrane pores formed by the toxin or through endogenous release channels (e.g., pannexins) activated by cellular stress imposed on the cells by toxin exposure. Exposure of cells to an alpha-toxin mutant (H35L), which attaches to the host cell membrane but does not form transmembrane pores, did not induce ATP release from the cells. The Hla-mediated ATP-release was completely blocked by IB201, a cyclodextrin-inhibitor of the alpha-toxin pore, but was not at all affected by inhibitors of pannexin channels. These results indicate that, while exposure of cells to rHla may somewhat reduce ATP production and cellular ATP content, a portion of the remaining ATP is released to the extracellular space and degraded by ecto-enzymes. The release of ATP from the cells may occur directly through the transmembrane pores formed by alpha-toxin. PMID:27929417

  15. Toxigenic clostridia.

    PubMed Central

    Hatheway, C L

    1990-01-01

    Toxigenic clostridia belonging to 13 recognized species are discussed in this review. Each species or group of organisms is, in general, introduced by presenting the historical aspects of its discovery by early investigators of human and animal diseases. The diseases caused by each species or group are described and usually discussed in relation to the toxins involved in the pathology. Morphological and physiological characteristics of the organisms are described. Finally, the toxins produced by each organism are listed, with a presentation of their biological activities and physical and biochemical characteristics. The complete amino acid sequences for some are known, and some of the genes have been cloned. The term toxin is used loosely to include the various antigenic protein products of these organisms with biological and serological activities which have served as distinguishing characteristics for differentiation and classification. Some of these factors are not truly toxic and have no known role in pathogenicity. Some of the interesting factors common to more than one species or group are the following: neurotoxins, lethal toxins, lecithinases, oxygen-labile hemolysins, binary toxins, and ADP-ribosyltransferases. Problems in bacterial nomenclature and designation of biologically active factors are noted. PMID:2404569

  16. Screening Antibacterial Agent from Crude Extract of Marine-Derived Fungi Associated with Soft Corals against MDR-Staphylococcus haemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabdaningsih, A.; Cristianawati, O.; Sibero, M. T.; Nuryadi, H.; Radjasa, O. K.; Sabdono, A.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus is a Gram-positive bacteria and member of coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) which has the highest level of antimicrobial resistance. This nosocomial pathogen due to skin or soft tissue infections, bacteremia, septicemia, peritonitis, otitis media, meningitis and urinary tract infections. The ability to produce enterotoxins, hemolysins, biofilm, and cytotoxins could be an important characteristic for the successful of infection. Marine-derived fungi have potency as a continuous supply of bioactive compound. The aim of this research was screening antibacterial agent from crude extracts of marine-derived fungi associated with soft corals against MDR-S. haemolyticus. Among 23 isolates of marine-derived fungi isolated from 7 soft corals, there were 4 isolates active against MDR-S. haemolyticus. The screening was conducted by using agar plug diffusion method. Isolate PPSC-27-A4 had the highest antibacterial activity with diameter 23±9,6 mm. The crude extract from this isolate had been confirmed to antibacterial susceptibility test and it had the highest antibacterial activity in 12.2 mm with concentration of 300μg/ml from mycelia extract. PPSC-27-A4 had been characterized in molecular, based on the sequence analysis of 18S rRNA, PPSC-27-A4 isolate was identified as Trichoderma longibrachiatum.

  17. Chemical Composition and Antipathogenic Activity of Artemisia annua Essential Oil from Romania.

    PubMed

    Marinas, Ioana C; Oprea, Eliza; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Badea, Irinel Adriana; Buleandra, Mihaela; Lazar, Veronica

    2015-10-01

    The essential oil extracted by hydrodistillation from Romanian Artemisia annua aerial parts was characterized by GC/MS analysis, which allowed the identification of 94.64% of the total oil composition. The main components were camphor (17.74%), α-pinene (9.66%), germacrene D (7.55%), 1,8-cineole (7.24%), trans-β-caryophyllene (7.02%), and artemisia ketone (6.26%). The antimicrobial activity of this essential oil was evaluated by determining the following parameters: minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC), minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC), and minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC). Moreover, the soluble virulence factors were quantified with different biochemical substrates incorporated in the culture media. The reference and resistant, clinical strains proved to be susceptible to the A. annua oil, with MICs ranging from 0.51 to 16.33 mg/ml. The tested essential oil also showed good antibiofilm activity, inhibiting both the initial stage of the microbial cell adhesion to the inert substratum and the preformed mature biofilm. When used at subinhibitory concentrations, the essential oil proved to inhibit the phenotypic expression of five soluble virulence factors (hemolysins, gelatinase, DNase, lipases, and lecithinases). Briefly, the present results showed that the A. annua essential oil contained antimicrobial compounds with selective activity on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains as well as on yeast strains and which also interfere with the expression of cell-associated and soluble virulence factors.

  18. Virulence properties of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella species in meat samples.

    PubMed

    Gundogan, Neslihan; Citak, Sumru; Yalcin, Emel

    2011-04-01

    The present study was carried out to identify virulence properties (siderophores, serum resistance, and hemolysin) and antibiotic resistance in extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella isolates from 60 calf and chicken meat samples purchased from various supermarkets in Ankara, Turkey. Of the 45 Klebsiella isolates, 24 (53%) were identified as K. oxytoca and 21 (47%) were identified as K. pneumoniae. A high proportion of Klebsiella isolates had virulence factors such as hemolytic activity (67%), siderophore production (44%), and serum resistance (38%). The double-disk synergy test was used to determine ESBL production. ESBL production was detected in 13 (29%) of the 45 Klebsiella isolates. Resistance to 14 antimicrobials was tested in all Klebsiella isolates by the disk diffusion method. All isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. All ESBL-producing Klebsiella isolates were highly resistant to cephalosporins and monobactams. Our findings indicate that meat and its products represent potential hazardous sources of multidrug-resistant and virulent Klebsiella species.

  19. Nitrosylation: an adverse factor in Uremic Hemolytic Syndrome. Antitoxin effect of Ziziphus mistol Griseb.

    PubMed

    Virginia, Aiassa; Claudia, Albrecht; Soledad, Bustos Pamela; Gabriela, Ortega; Jorge, Eraso Alberto; Albesa, Inés

    2013-06-01

    Toxins of Escherichia coli (STEC) causing Uremic Hemolytic Syndrome (UHS) generate oxidative stress in human blood with more production of nitric oxide (NO) than reactive oxygen species (ROS). Shiga toxin (Stx) together with the hemolysin (Hly) increased lipid oxidation, as evaluated by malondialdehyde MDA and oxidation of proteins. The addition of Ziziphus mistol Griseb extracts decreased NO, ROS, MDA and simultaneously caused an increase in the degradation of oxidized proteins to advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) in controls and samples with toxins. Furthermore, the nitrosylated proteins/AOPP ratio was reduced, due to the increase of AOPP. Z. mistol Griseb extracts exhibited a high proportion of polyphenols and flavonoids, with evident correlation with ferrous reduction antioxidant potential (FRAP). The plasma of eight children with UHS showed oxidative stress and NO stimulus, comparable to the effect of toxins during the assays in vitro. UHS children presented high levels of nitrosylated proteins respect to control children of similar age. Although the degradation of oxidized proteins to AOPP rose in UHS children, the nitrosylated proteins/AOPP rate increased as a consequence of the elevated nitrosative stress observed in these patients.

  20. Protection of mice against Staphylococcus aureus infection by a recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Delfani, Somayeh; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Amani, Jafar; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. An effective vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections is urgently required due to the dramatic increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this report, we evaluated a newly recombinant protein composed of selected antigenic regions of clumping factor A (ClfA), iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and gamma hemolysin B (HlgB) of S. aureus and sequence coding for hydrophobic linkers between three domains. The recombinant gene was constructed in pET-28a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. In addition, sequence coding for a His(6)-tag was added followed by a hybrid procedure of nickel chelate protein purification. Immunization of BALB/c mice with the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg evoked antigen-specific antibodies that could opsonize S. aureus cells, enhancing in vitro phagocytosis by macrophages. Vaccination with the recombinant protein also reduced the bacterial load recovered from mice spleen samples and increased survival following the intraperitoneal challenge with pathogenic S. aureus compared to the control mice. Our results showed that the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg is a promising vaccine candidate for the prevention of S. aureus bacteremia infections.