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  1. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  2. Carboxyhemoglobin elevation due to hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Neil B

    2007-07-01

    A critically ill man with drug-induced hemolytic anemia and hepatic failure was hospitalized at a private academic medical center in Seattle, Washington. Intravascular hemolysis with associated endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) production resulted in elevation of the patient's carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level to as high as 9.7%. Serial measurements of the patient's COHb level were obtained and compared with other conventional measures of hemolytic activity. With the availability of new non-invasive measurement technology to detect COHb elevations, emergency clinicians are likely to see COHb elevation as a manifestation of hemolytic anemia.

  3. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  4. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  5. Disseminated intravascular coagulation due to IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bleakly, N Teresa; Fontaine, Magali J; Pate, Lisa L; Sutherland, Scott M; Jeng, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) due to red cell hemolysis has been previously attributed to transfusion-related hemolytic reactions, but not to autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We report a case of DIC in a child with complement-fixing IgM-mediated cold-agglutinin autoimmune hemolysis, which resulted in arterial thrombosis and gangrene of the upper and lower extremities.

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, Toyomi

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia is defined as anemia due to a reduction of the RBC lifespan to less than the normal range of approximately 120 days. Patients with anemia and jaundice are often suspected to have hemolysis. Herein, different causes of hemolysis and the diagnostic algorithm are reviewed. Currently, there is no generic treatment for hemolytic anemia. Appropriate management of a patient with hemolytic anemia requires determination of the underlying cause. Treatments for the different causes of hemolytic anemia are also reviewed.

  7. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  8. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated.

  9. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  10. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  11. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  12. Primary Sjögren syndrome presenting with hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia following delivery due to Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Yohei; Higuchi, Takakazu; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Haji, Youichiro; Okada, Masato; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Okada, Sadamu

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with hemolytic anemia without a reticulocyte response 38 days after delivery. A marked reduction in erythroid cells and an increase in macrophages with active hemophagocytosis were noted in the bone marrow. While conventional Coombs' tests were negative, the level of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) was increased. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) based on her symptoms, positive anti-SS-A antibodies, Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia associated with RBC-bound IgG and hemophagocytosis. The unique presentation was considered to be a consequence of immunological derangement associated with pSS, pregnancy and delivery.

  13. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  14. Hemolytic anemia in dogs and cats due to erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Harvey, John W

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies do not usually shorten life expectancy except for PK deficiency in dogs and the potential for PFK-deficient dogs to die during hemolytic crises. In addition, erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies are uncommon or rare, so they are generally not seriously considered in the differential diagnosis of anemia until common causes of anemia have been excluded. However, unique clinical and/or laboratory findings like sporadic hemoglobinuria in English Springer spaniels (PFK deficiency) may quickly point to the possibility of an inherited erythrocyte enzyme defect. The ability to diagnose deficient or carrier animals allows for the possibility of eliminating these undesirable traits in future breeding. Continued research is needed to document additional enzyme deficiencies that likely occur and to develop additional DNA-based assays that are especially important in the recognition of heterozygous or carrier animals that have no clinical signs.

  15. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  16. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  17. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  18. Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia due to High-grade non Hodgkin's B cell Lymphoma with Weak Response to Rituximab and Chemotherapy Regimens.

    PubMed

    Nazel Khosroshahi, Behzad; Jafari, Mohammad; Vazini, Hossein; Ahmadi, Alireza; Shams, Keivan; Kholoujini, Mahdi

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by shortening of red blood cell (RBC) survival and the presence of autoantibodies directed against autologous RBCs. Approximately 20% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases are associated with cold-reactive antibody. About half of patients with AIHA have no underlying associated disease; these cases are termed primary or idiopathic. Secondary cases are associated with underlying diseases or with certain drugs. We report herein a rare case of cold autoimmiune hemolytic anemia due to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type with weak response to rituximab and chemotherapy regimens. For treatment B cell lymphoma, Due to lack of treatment response, we used chemotherapy regimens including R- CHOP for the first time, and then Hyper CVAD, R- ICE and ESHAP were administered, respectively. For treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, we have used the corticosteroid, rituximab, plasmapheresis and blood transfusion and splenectomy. In spite of all attempts, the patient died of anemia and aggressive lymphoma nine months after diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is a rare report from cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia in combination with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type that is refractory to conventional therapies.

  19. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin.

  20. Anti-M Antibody Induced Prolonged Anemia Following Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Erythropoietic Suppression in 2 Siblings.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsushi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Negishi, Yutaka; Tsuiki, Hideki; Arakawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Uchimura, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Toru; Ohashi, Wataru; Takamoto, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) arising from MNSs incompatibility is rare, with few reports of prolonged anemia and reticulocytopenia following HDN. We report the younger of 2 male siblings, both of whom had anti-M-induced HDN and anemia persisting for over a month. Peripheral reticulocytes remained inappropriately low for the degree of anemia, and they needed multiple red cell transfusions. Viral infections were ruled out. Corticosteroids were given for suspected pure red cell aplasia. Anemia and reticulocytopenia subsequently improved. Colony-forming unit erythroid assay revealed erythropoietic suppression of M antigen-positive erythroid precursor cells cultured with maternal or infant sera containing anti-M. In conclusion, maternal anti-M caused HDN and prolonged anemia by erythropoietic suppression in 2 siblings.

  1. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn with late-onset anemia due to anti-M: a case report and review of the Japanese literature.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ohto, Hitoshi; Nollet, Kenneth E; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Saito, Shunnichi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Negishi, Yutaka; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) attributed to M/N-incompatibility varies from asymptomatic to lethally hydropic. Case reports are rare, and the clinical significance of anti-M is not completely understood. A challenging case of HDFN due to anti-M prompted an investigation of the Japanese literature, in order to characterize the clinical spectrum of M/N-incompatibility pregnancies in Japan and report results to English-language readers. Japanese reports of HDFN attributed to M/N incompatibility were compiled. Abstracted data include maternal antibody titers at delivery, fetal direct antiglobulin test, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, reticulocyte count at birth, and therapeutic interventions. We investigated characteristics of HDFN due to M/N-incompatible pregnancies in Japan after encountering a case of severe HDFN along with late-onset anemia in an infant born to a woman carrying IgG anti-M with a titer of 1. In total, thirty-three babies with HDFN due to anti-M and one due to anti-N have been reported in Japan since 1975. The median maternal antibody titer was 64 at delivery and was 16 or less in 10 of 34 women (29%). Five of 34 babies (15%) were stillborn or died as neonates. Twenty-one of 29 survivors (72%) had severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. The reticulocyte count of neonates with anemia stayed below the reference interval. Sixteen (55%) developed late-onset anemia and 14 (48%) were transfused with M-negative RBCs. Significant positive correlation (P < .05) between the hemoglobin value and the reticulocyte count within 4 days of birth was obtained in 16 babies with anti-M HDFN. In the Japanese population, 21 of 34 cases of M/N-incompatible HDFN (72%) have manifested as severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. Low reticulocyte count in neonates with late-onset anemia is consistent with suppressed erythropoiesis due to anti-M.

  2. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment.

  3. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  4. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  5. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ...

  6. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  7. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  8. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Philippe, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is diagnosed in the presence of anemia, usually macrocytic and of variable intensity, reticulocytosis, and a positive direct and/or indirect antiglobulin test, after ruling out other types of hemolytic anemia. A positive direct antiglobulin test alone is not sufficient to diagnose AIHA and may be positive in many patients without anemia or negative in some patients with AIHA. AIHA may be classified into two major categories according to the optimal temperature of antibody activity: warm-reacting autoantibodies (usually IgG) optimal around 37 degrees C and cold-reacting autoantibodies, optimal at 4 degrees C (usually IgM). This classification guides the selection of tests and treatment. AIHA is widely reported to be associated with a variety of other diseases, although these associations are often fortuitous. A minimal set of useful investigations is appropriate since AIHA may be secondary to viral infections, lymphoid malignancies, or autoimmune disorders such as lupus. Transfusion should remain rare in AHAI, but close contact with the transfusion service is necessary if it is to succeed. As for many autoimmune and/or systemic diseases, numerous types of treatment have been proposed but have not been validated in controlled multicenter studies. These are necessary to improve the management of these rare disorders.

  9. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  10. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with mesenteric teratoma].

    PubMed

    Ntanishyan, K I; Sabirov, K R; Shcherbakova, O V; Vybornykh, D E; Shupletsova, I A; Tsvetaeva, N V

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in a 27-year-old woman whose examination revealed mesenteric teratoma. AIHA was characterized by a hypertensive crisis and a temporary response to corticosteroid therapy that was complicated by the development of somatogenic psychosis and discontinued. A relapse of hemolysis developed 6 months later. The patient underwent laparoscopic splenectomy and removal of mesenteric root teratoma. Immediately after surgery, a hematological response was obtained as relief of hemolysis and restoration of a normal hemoglobin level. There is a sustained remission of AIHA for the next 16 months.

  11. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies.

  12. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  13. Primary biliary cholangitis associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moreno, Emmanuel I; Martinez-Cabriales, Sylvia A; Cruz-Moreno, Miguel A; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar D; Cortez-Hernandez, Carlos A; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco J; Garza, Aldo A; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Jose A; Garcia-Compean, Diego; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2016-02-01

    There are many autoimmune diseases associated with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), known as primary biliary cirrhosis; however, the association between PBC and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) has rarely been reported. It is documented that hemolysis is present in over 50% of the patients with chronic liver disease, regardless of the etiologies. Due to the clear and frequent relationship between PBC and many autoimmune diseases, it is reasonable to suppose that wAIHA may be another autoimmune disorder seen in association with PBC. Here we reported a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with wAIHA associated with PBC.

  14. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Go, Ronald S; Winters, Jeffrey L; Kay, Neil E

    2017-03-30

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon entity that presents diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic dilemmas despite being a well-recognized entity for over 150 years. Because of significant differences in the rates of hemolysis as well as associated diseases and cause there is considerable clinical heterogeneity. In addition there is a lack of clinical trials required to refine and update standardized and evidence-based therapeutic approaches. To aid the clinician in AIHA management we present four vignettes that represent and highlight distinct clinical presentations with separate diagnostic and therapeutic pathways that we utilize in our clinical practice setting. We also review the parameters present in diagnostic testing that allows for prognostic insight and present algorithms for both diagnosis and treatment of the AIHA patient in diverse situations. This is done in the hope that this review may offer guidance in regard to personalized therapy recommendations. A section is included for the diagnosis of suspected AIHA with negative testing, a relatively infrequent but challenging situation in order to assist in the overall evaluation spectrum for these patients.

  15. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses.

  16. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias in adults.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich

    2010-09-16

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a heterogeneous disease with respect to the type of the antibody involved and the absence or presence of an underlying condition. Treatment decisions should be based on careful diagnostic evaluation. Primary warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to steroids, but most patients remain steroid-dependent, and many require second-line treatment. Currently, splenectomy can be regarded as the most effective and best-evaluated second-line therapy, but there are still only limited data on long-term efficacy and adverse effects. The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab is another second-line therapy with documented short-term efficacy, but there is limited information on long-term efficacy and side effects. The efficacy of immunosuppressants is poorly evaluated. Primary cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to rituximab but are resistant to steroids and splenectomy. The most common causes of secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemias are malignancies, immune diseases, or drugs. They may be treated in a way similar to primary autoimmune hemolytic anemias, by immunosuppressants or by treatment of the underlying disease.

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Ya-Ting

    2012-04-01

    Hemolysis is a common feature in patients with β-thalassemia major. As a result, autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicating β-thalassemia is easily overlooked. Here, the authors described the clinical features and management of 7 patients with β-thalassemia major and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. These patients had fever, cough, and tea-colored urine on admission. The laboratory investigations showed a significant drop in hemoglobin and increased serum bilirubin. Coombs' tests revealed that anti-immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-C3 was positive in 7 and 5 cases, respectively, whereas anti-Rh E alloantibody was positive in 3 cases. All the patients received corticosteroids treatments and blood transfusions. Patients with anti-Rh E alloantibodies also received immunoglobulin treatments. Six of the patients responded well to the management, but 1 patient developed recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia that required cyclosporin A treatment. All the patients remained well by following up for more than 6 months.

  18. Adult patent ductus arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination.

  19. Hemolytic anemia caused by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olivares, N; Medina, C; Sánchez-Corona, J; Rivas, F; Rivera, H; Hernández, A; Delgado, J L; Ibarra, B; Cantú, J M; Vaca, G; Martínez, C

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported concerning quantitation of glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity where in one of the members of a family a clinical diagnosis of acute hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency had been established. In the propositus, G6PD levels were found to be less than 10 per cent thus confirming diagnosis; the same enzymatic deficiency was identified in one of the siblings without a history of hematologic pathology and in a maternal cousin with a history of neonatal jaundice as well as two obliged carriers. Electrophoretical enzyme phenotype was similar to A variant in three affected males. Advantages of prevention and medical care possible with early diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are discussed.

  20. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rho immune globulin (WinRho) Ribavirin Snake bites (some snake venom contains hemolytic toxins ) Sulfonamides Sulfones This list is not all-inclusive. Alternative Names ... Review Date 2/12/2016 Updated ...

  1. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  2. [Hemolytic anemia as the first clinical presentation of Wilson disease: a pediatric case].

    PubMed

    Henao C, José A; Valverde Muñoz, Kathia; Ávila A, María L

    2016-12-01

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of the copper's hepatic metabolism; it results in toxicity due to accumulation of the mineral. The hemolytic anemia is present in 17% at some point of the disease, although it is a rare initial clinical presentation.

  3. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  4. Chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: report of two families with novel mutations causing G6PD Bangkok and G6PD Bangkok Noi.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, Voravarn S; Hirono, Akira; Pung-amritt, Parichat; Treesucon, Ajjima; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai

    2011-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common hereditary enzymopathies worldwide. Mostly G6PD deficient cases are asymptomatic though they may have the risk of neonatal jaundice (NNJ) and acute intravascular hemolysis during oxidative stress. Chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) due to G6PD deficiency is rare. In Thailand, one case was reported 40 years ago and by biochemical study this G6PD was reported to be a new variant G6PD Bangkok. We, herein, report two families with CNSHA due to G6PD deficiency. In the first family, we have been following up the clinical course of the patient with G6PD Bangkok. In addition to chronic hemolysis, he had three acute hemolytic episodes requiring blood transfusions during childhood period. Multiple gallstones were detected at the age of 27. His two daughters who inherited G6PD Bangkok from him and G6PD Vanua Lava from his wife are asymptomatic. Both of them had NNJ and persistent evidences of compensated hemolysis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel missense mutation 825 G→C predicting 275 Lys→Asn causing G6PD Bangkok. In the second family, two male siblings are affected. They had NNJ and several hemolytic episodes which required blood transfusions. On follow-up they have been diagnosed with chronic hemolysis as evidenced by reticulocytosis and indirect hyperbilirubinemia. Molecular analysis revealed combined missense mutations in exons 12 and 13. The first mutation was 1376 G→T predicting 459 Arg→Leu (known as G6PD Canton) and the second one was 1502 T→G predicting 501 Phe→Cys. We designated the resulting novel G6PD variant, G6PD Bangkok Noi.

  5. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  6. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  7. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome.

  8. Transient Hemolytic Anemia after Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Stent Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rebollo, Sagrario; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco; Diaz-Romero, Francisco; Rodriguez-Moreno, Fermin; Martinez-Riera, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    Management of variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension constitutes a challenging issue, particularly in child's C cirrhotic patients. Recently, transjugular placement of self-expanding metallic stents in the liver (TIPS), creating a shunt between the portal and hepatic branches has provided a safe and promising therapeutic approach in this clinical situation. We report here the case of a 66-year-old male cirrhotic patient who developed a moderately severe clinical picture of a Coombsnegative hemolytic anemia (serum hemoglobin, 93 g/l, serum bilirubin 160.74 umol/L (9.4 mg/dl), indirect 6.3 mg/dl (107.73 umol/L); serum LDH 1220 u/l, reticulocytes, 5.1%. serum ferritin, 1221 ug/1, schistocytes in peripheral blood smear) the week after undergoing a TIPS, suggesting the development ofa microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia secondary to red blood cell disruption by passing through the metallic network of the stent. PMID:8809588

  9. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, W; Fattizzo, B

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20-40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans' syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions.

  10. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Amruth R.; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789–1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089–1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5–12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202–204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373–378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab. PMID:27920704

  11. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  12. Study of serum hepcidin in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    El Beshlawy, Amal; Alaraby, Ibrahim; Abdel Kader, Mohamed S E M; Ahmed, Dina H; Abdelrahman, Hossam E M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the level of hepcidin in hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias and to correlate the serum hepcidin levels to the need for blood transfusions (frequency of blood transfusions and the serum ferritin level). Seventy pediatric patients with hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias, attending to hematology clinics of Cairo University and Misr University for Science and Technology (MUST) hospitals were the subjects of this study [53 patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM), 10 patients with β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), four patients with congenital spherocytosis and three patients with sickle cell disease) (38 males and 32 females)]; their ages ranged from 1-14 years. Seventy normal children, age- and sex-matched, served as the control group. The results of this study revealed decreased hepcidin levels in patients (all types of congenital chronic hemolytic anemias) [mean ± SD (standard deviation) = 22.9 ± 6.0] compared to controls (mean ± SD = 132.4 ± 16.7) with highly significant statistical difference in between. Hepcidin levels were higher in β-TM patients (mean ± SD = 23.7 ± 6.2) than in β-TI patients (mean ± SD = 21.8 ± 4.0), the hepcidin to ferritin ratio was significantly less than one. In β-TM patients, the mean ± SD was 0.03 ± 0.004, and in β-TI patients the mean ± SD = 0.025 ± 0.002, with highly significant statistical difference with hepcidin-to-ferritin ratios in controls being mean ± SD = 2.3 ± 0.7. Hepcidin and hepcidin/ferritin ratios can be used as good markers of hemolytic anemia and iron overload as they have very high sensitivity (99.0 and 99.0%, respectively) and very high specificity (98.0 and 97.0%, respectively). Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of hepcidin measurement as a diagnostic tool. The use of hepcidin as an adjuvant therapy with iron chelators is important as it has a vital role in combating hemosidrosis.

  13. Pleural solitary fibrous tumor complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Harada-Shirado, Kayo; Furukawa, Miki; Sukegawa, Masumi; Shichishima-Nakamura, Akiko; Noji, Hideyoshi; Wakamatsu, Saho; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Kazuei; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a 74-year-old woman who presented with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) associated with pleural solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Her AIHA was initially treated with 1 mg/kg daily of oral prednisolone (PSL) for 2 months, which had a limited effect. However, after surgical tumor resection, the patient showed remarkable improvement of AIHA with normalizations of serum lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin levels, and we were able to rapidly reduce the PSL dosage. This is the first description of a case of AIHA caused by SFT.

  14. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia during adalimumab treatment for plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Midori; Kodaira, Mutsuki; Kono, Tsunesuke

    2015-01-01

    Adalimumab is commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases with few reported hematological adverse reactions. We herein describe the case of an 85-year-old Japanese man with plaque psoriasis who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) after 3 years of adalimumab treatment. The patient suddenly developed hematuria and dyspnea on exertion while receiving adalimumab treatment. Laboratory data showed low hemoglobin levels and slightly increased reticulocyte counts, while direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were positive. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA which resolved after replacing the adalimumab treatment with prednisolone therapy. The findings from this case indicate that AIHA may be caused by long-term adalimumab treatment.

  15. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM.

  16. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs) of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias registered in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients and methods All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion. Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. Results We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all, hemolysis was confirmed in 359 patients, yielding an overall PPV of 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.5%–90.2%). A diagnosis could be established in 392 patients of whom 355 patients had a hemolytic diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed in 197 of the 249 patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, yielding a PPV of 79.1% (95% CI: 73.5%–84.0%). Diagnosis of acquired hemolytic anemia could be confirmed in 136 of the 163 patients, resulting in a PPV of 83.4% (95% CI: 76.8%–88.8%). For hemoglobinopathy PPV was 84.1% (95% CI: 77.4%–89.4%), for hereditary spherocytosis PPV was 80.6% (95% CI: 69.5%–88.9%), and for autoimmune hemolytic anemia PPV was 78.4% (95% CI: 70.4%–85.0%). Conclusion The PPV of hemolytic anemias was moderately high. The PPVs were comparable in the three main categories of overall hemolysis, and congenital and acquired hemolytic anemia. PMID:27445504

  17. Two cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to brucellosis: a review of hemolytic disorders in patients with brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Kaya, Safak; Dal, Tuba; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease associated with hemolytic complications, including thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and hemolytic anemia. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare clinical presentation of this disease. In this report, we describe the cases of two patients with brucellosis who presented with Coombs-positive AIHA. We also include a review of the literature on the hemolytic complications of brucellosis. Both patients were successfully treated with a combination of doxycycline and rifampicin in addition to steroids. In the medical literature, there are several cases of TMA associated with brucellosis, although only a few cases of Coombs test-positive AIHA have been reported. Antibiotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment, and the selection of antibiotics and duration of treatment do not differ between brucellosis patients with and without hemolysis. Although rare, the potential for brucellosis should always be kept in mind in patients who present with hemolysis, especially those living in areas where brucellosis is endemic.

  18. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of cold agglutinin mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2012-05-01

    Exact diagnosis of the subtype has essential therapeutic consequences in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Cold-antibody types include primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) and rare cases of cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to cancer or acute infection. Primary CAD is a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Not all patients require pharmacological therapy, but treatment seems indicated more often than previously thought. Corticosteroids should not be used to treat primary CAD. Half of the patients respond to rituximab monotherapy; median response duration is 11 months. The most efficient treatment to date is fludarabine and rituximab in combination, resulting in responses in 75%, complete responses in 20% and median response duration of more than 66 months. Toxicity may be a concern, and an individualized approach is discussed. Erythrocyte transfusions can be given provided specific precautions are undertaken. No evidence-based therapy exists in secondary CAS, but optimal treatment of the underlying disorder is essential when feasible.

  20. Efficacy and safety of splenectomy in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Valentina; Rosamilio, Rosa; Ferrara, Idalucia; Seneca, Elisa; Serio, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare hematologic disease, primarily affecting adults or children with immunodeficiency disease. First-line therapy consists of long course of steroids administration, with an early complete response rate (CRr) of 75-80%, but up to 20-30% of patients requires a second-line therapy. Rituximab is the first choice in refractory old AIHA patients, because of its safety and efficacy (early CRr at 80-90% and at 68% at 2-3 years). For this reason, splenectomy is even less chosen as second-line therapy in elderly, even though laparoscopic technique decreased complication and mortality rates. However, splenectomy can be still considered a good therapeutic option with a CRr of 81% at 35.6 months in patients older than 60 year-old, when rituximab administration cannot be performed. PMID:28352823

  1. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemias: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, Boris; Einav, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include several diseases, most prominently are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). TMAs are characterized by profound thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ ischemia. In most cases TTP results from deficiency of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease leading to increase of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers. Congenital TTP is due to mutations in the gene of ADAMTS13 whereas acquired TTP is due to production of autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. In both cases severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 exists. However, the presence of ADAMTS13 activity does not rule out TTP. Diagnostic criteria of TTP are based on clinical features of neurologic and renal disfunction along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, low ADAMTS13 activity, and the presence of ULVWF. The standard treatment of TTP includes plasma exchange, protein A immunoabsobtion, immunosuppressive drugs, CD20 antibodies against B cells, and splenectomy. HUS is commonly caused by infection with Shiga-toxin produced by Escherichia coli. HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, anemia, renal impairment and diarrhea. Rarely, atypical HUS appears as a consequence of mutations related to the alternative pathway for the compliment system. Plasmapheresis in HUS is not efficient. Alternatively, plasma therapy and in some cases dialysis are used. TMA diseases may be associated with other infections, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, systemic vasculitis, and certain drugs.

  2. [Hemolytic anemia caused by graft-versus-host reaction in ABO-nonidentical renal transplants from blood group O donors].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Díaz Corte, C; Navascués, R A

    2001-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia is one of the side effects associated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus therapy, and three mechanisms have been described to account for hemolytic anemia in patients receiving these drugs: drug induced hemolysis, autoimmune hemolysis and alloimmune hemolysis resulting from donor lymphocytes derived from the allograft (passenger lymphocyte syndrome). We report four cases of renal transplant recipients who developed alloimmune hemolytic anemia due to minor ABO incompatibility while under treatment with cyclosporin (two) and tacrolimus (two). The anti-erythrocyte antibodies responsible for hemolysis were of the IgG isotype and showed anti-A or anti-B specificity. These findings suggest that the hemolysis could be related to alloantibodies derived from the clonal development of donor B lymphocytes in the recipients (microchimerism). In summary, hemolytic anemia due to ABO-minor incompatibility occurs infrequently after renal transplantation. Risks are higher for patients A, B or AB blood group receiving an O blood group graft under treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. Follow-up of these patients is warranted for the early detection and optimal management may be achieved by reduction of immunosuppression and change to mycophenolate mofetil.

  3. Auto immune hemolytic anemia in a child precipitated by chicken pox.

    PubMed

    Billoo, Samina Shamim; Jamalvi, Syed Waseem

    2008-05-01

    Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) is a rare entity in children. We report a case of an adolescent girl with AIHA, which was precipitated by chicken pox. Clinical course over 3 years, till remission is described.

  4. Penicillin-induced hemolytic anemia and acute hepatic failure following treatment of tetanus in a horse.

    PubMed

    Step, D L; Blue, J T; Dill, S G

    1991-01-01

    Acute, severe hemolytic anemia occurred in a horse being treated for tetanus with intravenous penicillin and tetanus antitoxin. During treatment, the horse developed a positive direct antiglobulin test and a high titer (maximum 1:1024) of IgG anti-penicillin antibody. The horse recovered from the tetanus and penicillin induced hemolytic anemia, but later developed acute hepatic failure, probably resulting from the administration of equine origin tetanus antitoxin.

  5. When pure is not so pure: chloramine-related hemolytic anemia in home hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Junglee, Naushad A; Rahman, Saeed U; Wild, Mike; Wilms, Anke; Hirst, Sarah; Jibani, Mahdi; Seale, Jim R C

    2010-07-01

    Worldwide, chloramines are used as the preferred disinfectant for city water supplies. Although they have distinct advantages compared with chlorine and are deemed harmless to the general population, hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk from chloramine-induced hemolytic anemia. In recent years, this has been highlighted in regional dialysis units but not as frequently in the home HD group. We report on 2 home HD patients who succumbed to severe oxidative hemolysis due to high mains water chloramine concentrations. Both patients were extensively investigated for other cause of anemia before a definitive diagnosis was reached. Delays in diagnosing this uncommon condition can be costly in terms of significant morbidity and excessive usage of recombinant erythropoietin and blood transfusion. Prevention primarily involves enforcing strict water quality control and establishing regular communication with water supply boards and home HD patients. Double (inline) carbon filters should be installed in patient's homes as an effective means for removing high incoming chloramine concentrations.

  6. Expansion of CD8+ cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, S Ju; Sidorova, Ju V; Tsvetaeva, N V; Nikulina, O F; Biderman, B V; Nikulina, E E; Kulikov, S M; Sudarikov, A B

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare blood disease associated with the production of auto-antibodies and autoimmune hemolysis. A critical role of B-cells in the development of AIHA has been demonstrated before. Here, we present the analysis of the clonal T-cell populations in patients with AIHA. Thirty-three patients with AIHA were included in this study. Thirteen patients with other anemias, 14 patients with other autoimmune conditions (SLE - 6, RA - 8) and 20 healthy donors were included in the study as a control group. The clonality of T-cell was evaluated by the assessment of the T-cell receptor gamma and beta chain gene rearrangements (TCRG and TCRB). The incidence of T-cell monoclonality detected in patients with AIHA was significantly higher compared to the control group. The persistence of T-cell clones did not correlate with the level of hemoglobin and other signs of remission or relapse and did not disappear after the therapy and clinical improvement (observation period was between 1 and 10 years). There was no correlation between the T-cell clonality and the gender, age, splenectomy, duration or severity of the disease. Fractionation of T-lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD4+25+) revealed that the monoclonal T-cells belonged to the CD8+ sub-population. We assume that besides a possible causative role of the T-cell clones in AIHA to autoimmune process, these clones do not directly participate in the development and maintenance of hemolysis. Most of the AIHA patients (48.5%) demonstrated a T-cell monoclonality, which requires monitoring and should be distinguished from T-cell tumors.

  7. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, <300/μL) and persistent HPV B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

  8. Alloimmunization in autoimmune hemolytic anemia patient: The differential adsorption approach

    PubMed Central

    Dara, Ravi C.; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Arora, Dinesh; Mitra, Subhasis; Acharya, Devi Prasad; Aggarwal, Geet; Sharma, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Patients of β-thalassemia major are dependent on regular blood transfusions for their entire lifetime. Development of antibodies against red blood cell (RBC) antigen which may be alloantibody or autoantibody, several times as a result of frequent red cell component transfusions, further complicates the subsequent transfusion therapy. Among the autoantibodies, warm-reactive autoantibodies are commoner and interfere in the pretransfusion testing. These RBC autoantibodies present in patient's serum potentially react with all the cells of antibody identification panel giving “pan-reactive” picture and making alloantibody identification complex. In this report, we present our approach in a thalassemia patient who presented with warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia, low hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl, and three significant alloantibodies (anti-D, anti-S, and anti-Jkb) which were masked by pan-reactive warm autoantibody(s). Differential adsorption was used to unmask underlying alloantibodies. We suggest that differential adsorption procedure is an effective and efficient method for autoantibody adsorption, detection, and identification of masked alloantibody(s), especially in patients with low hemoglobin and history of recent blood transfusion. PMID:28316442

  9. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-RBC autoantibodies with or without complement activation. RBC destruction may occur both by a direct lysis through the sequential activation of the final components of the complement cascade (membrane attack complex), or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The pathogenic role of autoantibodies depends on their class (the most frequent are IgG and IgM), subclass, thermal amplitude (warm and cold forms),as well as affinity and efficiency in activating complement. Several cytokines and cytotoxic mechanisms (CD8+ T and natural killer cells) are further involved in RBC destruction. Moreover, activated macrophages carrying Fc receptors may recognize and phagocyte erythrocytes opsonized by autoantibodies and complement. Direct complement-mediated lysis takes place mainly in the circulations and liver, whereas ADCC, cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis occur preferentially in the spleen and lymphoid organs. The degree of intravascular hemolysis is 10-fold greater than extravascular one. Finally, the efficacy of the erythroblastic compensatory response can greatly influence the clinical picture of AIHA. The interplay and relative burden of all these pathogenic mechanisms give reason for the great clinical heterogeneity of AIHAs, from fully compensated to rapidly evolving fatal cases. PMID:26696796

  10. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  11. Hemolytic anemia in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Yasunobu; Tamura, Shinjiro; Okawa, Makoto; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori L

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and treatment of normocytic and normochromic anemia with hemoglobin level of 8.6 g/dL. A peripheral blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes. The patient was then referred to the department of cardiology because of systolic murmur, ECG abnormality, and red cell fragmentation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with particularly increased interventricular septal thickness of 24 mm and a hyperkinetic wall motion, resulting in marked obstruction to left ventricular outflow tract (pressure gradient of 200 mmHg). Mitral regurgitation due to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflets was also seen. The cause of anemia was thought to be mechanical intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and mitral regurgitation. She was treated with atenolol and the class Ia antiarrhythmic drug cibenzoline to relieve the outflow tract obstruction, and the pressure gradient was reduced to 70 mmHg. After 3 months of treatment, her hemoglobin level had increased to 11.4 g/dL without additional treatment for anemia.

  12. The Lbw2 locus promotes autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scatizzi, John C; Haraldsson, Maria K; Pollard, K Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Kono, Dwight H

    2012-04-01

    The lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4; however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. In this study, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of New Zealand White (NZW) on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate its role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants.

  13. Unusual manifestations of acute Q fever: autoimmune hemolytic anemia and tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Serdal; Elaldi, Nazif; Kayatas, Mansur; Sencan, Mehmet; Yildiz, Esin

    2012-05-18

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection that caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strict intracellular bacterium. It may be manifested by some of the autoimmune events and is classified into acute and chronic forms. The most frequent clinical manifestation of acute form is a self-limited febrile illness which is associated with severe headache, muscle ache, arthralgia and cough. Meningoencephalitis, thyroiditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and nephritis are rare manifestations. Here we present a case of acute Q fever together with Coombs' positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and tubulointerstitial nephritis treated with chlarithromycin, steroids and hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of such rare manifestations of the disease.

  14. Antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF: drug-induced life-threatening hemolytic anemia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alma; Mian, Amir; Scurlock, Amy M; Blackall, Douglas; Com, Gulnur

    2010-12-01

    Adverse reactions to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are a growing concern. We report the case of a pediatric patient with CF with multiple comorbidities and a history of drug reactions, who developed life-threatening piperacillin-induced immune hemolytic anemia. We review drug-induced hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) in particular, and antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF in general, including the frequency, pathogenesis, and risk factors. Finally, we discuss the treatment options and propose an algorithm for the management of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with CF.

  15. Case of cytomegalovirus-associated direct anti-globulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Saeko; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Goro; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Oishi, Tsutomu; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    A 1-year-old boy developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia after a negative direct anti-globulin test. The concentration of erythrocyte membrane-associated immunoglobulin G, determined using an immunoradiometric assay, correlated with disease activity. He was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) both serologically and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, indicating that his autoimmune hemolytic anemia was directly caused by CMV infection. Since anti-CMV immunoglobulin G was not absorbed by the patient's erythrocytes, cross-reaction between erythrocyte antigens and CMV was not likely a causative factor for hemolysis.

  16. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and hemolytic anemia in a patient with hemoglobin SC disease.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M; Barrera, E; Martin, R R

    1980-08-01

    A patient with hemoglobin SC disease and cholelithiasis was found to have Bacillus cereus bacteremia. Hemolytic anemia developed, for which common causes of hemolysis were excluded, suggesting a relationship with the bacteremia. Following in vitro incubation, type O erythrocytes were hemolyzed by the culture, but not by a bacteria-free filtrate. This case confirms the association between sickle cell disorders and cholelithiasis with B cereus infections. In addition, it provides evidence for in vivo hemolysis with B cereus bacteremia, an organism not previously associated with hemolytic anemia.

  17. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send ... develop during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid (folate) and changes in the ...

  18. Coexistence of immunoglobulin M nephropathy and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: 2 rare entities.

    PubMed

    Bayrakci, Nergiz; Ozkayar, Nihal; Ersozen, Muge Erek; Colak, Aysel; Oguz, Ebru Gok; Dede, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin M (IgM) nephropathy is described as mesengial proliferative glomerulonephritis with diffuse mesengial IgM deposition. We report a patient diagnosed with IgM nephropathy and concomitant autoimmune hemolytic anemia syndrome associated with cold-reacting autoantibodies. Complete remission was achieved with systemic corticosteroid and plasmapheresesis.

  19. The role of rituximab in adults with warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, Daan; Kentos, Alain; Delannoy, André

    2015-05-21

    Warm antibody hemolytic anemia is the most common form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. When therapy is needed, corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of initial treatment but are able to cure only a minority of patients (<20%). Splenectomy is usually proposed when a second-line therapy is needed. This classical approach is now challenged by the use of rituximab both as second-line and as first-line therapy. Second-line treatment with rituximab leads to response rates similar to splenectomy (∼70%), but rituximab-induced responses seem less sustained. However, additional courses of rituximab are most often followed by responses, at the price of reasonable toxicity. In some major European centers, rituximab is now the preferred second-line therapy of warm antibody hemolytic anemia in adults, although no prospective study convincingly supports this attitude. A recent randomized study strongly suggests that in first-line treatment, rituximab combined with steroids is superior to monotherapy with steroids. If this finding is confirmed, rituximab will emerge as a major component of the management of warm antibody hemolytic anemia not only after relapse but as soon as treatment is needed.

  20. EPO-dependent induction of erythroferrone drives hepcidin suppression and systematic iron absorption under phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingkang; Gao, Ming; Chen, Yue; Liu, Jing; Qi, Shiyong; Ma, Juan; Zhang, Zhihong; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a common form of anemia due to hemolysis, resulting in disordered iron homeostasis. In this study, a dose of 40mg/kg phenylhydrazine (PHZ) was injected into mice to successfully establish a pronounced anemia animal model, which resulted in stress erythropoiesis and iron absorption. We found that serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentration was dramatically elevated by nearly 5000-fold for the first 2days, and then drop to the basal level on day 6 after PHZ injection. Mirrored with serum EPO concentration, the mRNA expression of erythroferrone (ERFE) was rapidly increased in the bone marrow and spleen 3days after injection of PHZ, and then gradually decreased but was still higher than baseline on day 6. In addition, we also found that the hepcidin mRNA levels were gradually reduced almost up to 8-fold on day 5, and then was ameliorated compared to the untreated control. Mechanistic investigation manifested that the increase of serum EPO essentially determined the induction of ERFE expression particular at the first 3days after PHZ treatment. Lentiviral mediated ERFE knockdown significantly restrained hepcidin suppression under PHZ treatment. Thus, our data unearthed EPO-dependent ERFE expression acts as an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron metabolism under PHZ-induced hemolytic anemia.

  1. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with IgM warm auto-antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koichiro; Taki, Hirofumi; Hounoki, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Reina; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder involving mainly salivary and lachrymal glands. However, many extraglandular symptoms have also been reported. Although leucocytopenia and lymphocytopenia are frequently observed in hematological disorders, autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rarely reported. We experienced a case of primary Sjögren's syndrome developing severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The patient's red blood cells showed spontaneous agglutination in saline at room temperature, and immunoglobulin M (IgM) was detected on the surface of red blood cells by flow cytometry, indicating that autoimmune hemolytic anemia was caused by warm reactive IgM antibodies. Immediate corticosteroid therapy resulted in a dramatic recovery. We report a first case of severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by warm reactive IgM antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

  2. Downeast anemia (dea), a new mouse model of severe nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia caused by hexokinase (HK(1)) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Peters, L L; Lane, P W; Andersen, S G; Gwynn, B; Barker, J E; Beutler, E

    2001-01-01

    A new spontaneous mutation in the A/J inbred mouse strain, downeast anemia (dea), causes severe hemolytic anemia with extensive tissue iron deposition and marked reticulocytosis. The anemia is present at birth and persists throughout life. The defect is inherited as an autosomal recessive and is transferable through bone marrow stem cells. The red cell morphology is consistent with a nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, suggestive of a red cell enzymopathy. In linkage analysis, dea is nonrecombinant with the hexokinase-1 gene (Hk1) on mouse Chromosome 10. Expression of Hk1 is markedly decreased in dea erythroid tissues, and the transcript produced is larger than normal. Hexokinase enzyme activity is significantly decreased in dea tissues, including red cells, spleen, and kidney. Southern blot analyses revealed approximately 5.5 kb of additional sequence in the 5' portion of the dea Hk1 gene, which was identified by direct sequencing as an early transposon (ETn) insertion in intron 4. ETn insertions disrupt genes in several mouse models by a variety of mechanisms, including aberrant splicing of ETn sequences into the mRNA. We conclude that the primary gene defect in the dea mutation is in Hk1 and that dea is a model of generalized hexokinase deficiency, the first such model identified to date.

  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia as a risk factor of poor outcome in patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Aniko; Molnar, Miklos Zsolt; Krenacs, Laszlo; Bagdi, Eniko; Csomor, Judit; Matolcsy, Andras; Demeter, Judit

    2009-12-01

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a rare disease, accounting for 1% of all lymphomas. We reviewed our single center experience of 13 patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL). Based on the prognostic model developed by Intergruppo Italiano Linfomi, 31% (4/13) of our patients had good, 38% (5/13) had intermediate and 31% (4/13) had a poor prognosis. The presence of two out of three prognostic factors (anemia, elevated LDH, low serum albumin) assignes the patient into the high risk category. In patients with anemia and an elevated LDH due to hemolysis, the outcome seems to be especially poor. Three out of 13 (23%) cases were complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia. All patients with autoimmune hemolytic anaemia (AIHA) died 7-28 months after the diagnosis. The mean follow-up time of those nine patients who are still alive is longer than 5 years (36-100 months). Patients with AIHA had significantly (p < 0.001) worse survival than those without AIHA. The main finding of our study is that the presence of AIHA is an adverse prognostic factor in SMZL.

  4. Pure red-cell aplasia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with acute hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyo Jeong; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Cho, Sung Gyun; Oh, Tae Hoon; Jeon, Tae Joo; Shin, Won Chang; Choi, Won Choong

    2014-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) have rarely been reported as an extrahepatic manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA). We report herein a case of AHA complicated by both PRCA and AIHA. A 49-year-old female with a diagnosis of AHA presented with severe anemia (hemoglobin level, 6.9 g/dL) during her clinical course. A diagnostic workup revealed AIHA and PRCA as the cause of the anemia. The patient was treated with an initial transfusion and corticosteroid therapy. Her anemia and liver function test were completely recovered by 9 months after the initial presentation. We review the clinical features and therapeutic strategies for this rare case of extrahepatic manifestation of AHA.

  5. [Successful treatment with rituximab for autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuko; Ito, Yoshikazu; Yoshizawa, Sei-ichiro; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Gotoh, Moritaka; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Kimura, Yukihiko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-02-01

    A 68-year-old man was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) 3 years ago. His course was progressive, and he was complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). After the lack of efficacy of prednisone and cyclo-phosphamide, rituximab (375mg/m(2)) was administered based on the presence of CD20 positive leukemic cells by flow cytometric analysis of bone marrow. During 4 courses of rituximab administration, both anemia and hemolysis improved dramatically. Furthermore, the percentage of CLL cells in his peripheral blood was reduced. Rituximab may be one of the effective treatments for CLL associated AIHA in Japan as well as in foreign countries.

  6. Postoperative Recurrence of Invasive Thymoma with Cold Agglutinin Disease and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Taro; Koba, Hayato; Tanimura, Kota; Ogawa, Naohiko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hara, Johsuke; Abo, Miki; Sone, Takashi; Kimura, Hideharu; Kasahara, Kazuo

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital in 1995. Invasive thymoma was diagnosed and extended thymectomy and left upper lobe partial resection were performed. In 2013, he complained of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma. Several chemotherapies were administered. Severe anemia and an increase in the total bilirubin level were observed with chemotherapies. In additional, an examination showed that the direct Coombs test was positive. Cold agglutinin was also high. We herein experienced a rare case of postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma with cold agglutinin disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  7. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  8. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  9. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Togashi, Masaru; Sawada, Ken-Ichi; Wakui, Hideki

    2013-06-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted because of proteinuria. A renal biopsy showed mesangial/endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with IgG2-κ deposits. Electron microscopy showed immune complex-type deposits. She also had Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia, anticardiolipin antibodies, and antinuclear antibodies. Middle-dose steroid therapy led to improvement of proteinuria and hemolytic anemia. Six years later, she developed crescentic glomerulonephritis with IgG2-κ deposits during pregnancy. Middle-dose steroid therapy improved renal dysfunction. This is an exceptional case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID), a recently described rare dysproteinemia-related glomerulonephritis, associated with autoimmune disease. This case also suggests that crescentic glomerulonephritis can be superimposed on PGNMID.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Benjamin Y; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo S

    2016-04-01

    We report the occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient receiving the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab, for metastatic melanoma in the presence of known red cell alloantibodies, despite having received prior ipilimumab without evidence of hemolysis. The patient had a history of multiple red cell alloantibodies and a positive direct antiglobulin test, identified at the time of a prior transfusion, which occurred before treatment with ipilimumab. The patient developed symptomatic warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after four cycles of treatment with nivolumab. Clinical improvement was noted following cessation of the drug and treatment with corticosteroids. Given that there was no prior history of hemolysis, even during treatment with ipilimumab, we hypothesize that anti-PD-1 therapy disrupted peripheral tolerance, unmasking an underlying autoimmune predisposition.

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and giant cell hepatitis: Report of three infants.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Şule; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Balamtekin, Necati; Baysoy, Gökhan; Aytaç Elmas, Selin; Orhan, Diclehan; Kale, Gülsev; Yüce, Aysel; Gürakan, Figen; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla

    2010-12-05

    Giant cell hepatitis associated with direct Coombs' test-positive hemolytic anemia is a rare condition of childhood and the pathogenesis remains unclear. An autoimmune activation and loss of self-tolerance in these patients may be the underlying pathology related to the response of some of the patients to immunosuppressive treatment. Herein, we report the clinical presentation and course of three consecutive patients with this rare condition. We conclude that serum ferritin at diagnosis may be used for prediction of the outcome.

  12. Clinicopathologic features of young and old sphha/sphha mice. Mutants with congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Price, L.; Russell, R.; Wolf, N. S.; Alpers, C. E.; Engel, D.

    1988-01-01

    A colony of mice with congenital hemolytic anemia, sphha/sphha, were evaluated over a 3-year period. Prominent findings included decreased survivability, reticulocytosis, increased peripheral blood leukocytes, extramedullary hematopoiesis in liver and spleen, lymphoid hyperplasia and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Older (12 to 21 months) anemic animals had elevated serum levels of IgG1 and IgA. There was deposition of C3, IgG, IgM, and IgA in renal glomeruli of both control and anemic mice, but deposition of IgM and IgA was more prominent and widely distributed in anemic animals and correlated with mesangial expansion and the presence of electron dense deposits in the mesangium and in glomerular capillary walls. Prominent renal tubular hemosiderosis was noted in young and old anemic mice. The relation between the hemolytic anemia and glomerular disease is unclear but these mice may be an animal model useful for exploration of changes attendant with chronic hemolysis and evaluation of renal disease that accompanies hemolytic anemia. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3414779

  13. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    PubMed

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3 years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3 months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level.

  14. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Triggered by Infection with Human Parvovirus B19 after Total Abdominal Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Satoh, Shuji; Nakagaki, Suguru; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for an adhesive ileus 14 years after total abdominal colectomy for ulcerative colitis (UC). The ileus decreased with conservative treatment, however, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed due to worsening anemia, a positive direct Coombs test, low haptoglobin, high lactase dehydrogenase, reticulocytosis, and an increase in the erythroblastic series in a bone-marrow examination. Human parvovirus B19 (PV-B19) IgM and PV-B19 DNA were present, indicating the development of AIHA triggered by an infection with PV-B19. The patient is currently being monitored after spontaneous remission. This is the first report of UC after total abdominal colectomy complicated by AIHA triggered by PV-B19 infection.

  15. Iron-rich drinking water and ascorbic acid supplementation improved hemolytic anemia in experimental Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Banerjee, Saumen; Bhattacharjee, Chira R; Raul, Prasanta; Borah, Kusum; Singh, Lokendra; Veer, Vijay

    2014-11-01

    Anemia is a frequent problem in both the primary and secondary health care programs. In contrast, most areas of northeast India are vulnerable to iron toxicity. In the present study, we documented the effect of administration of iron rich water on hemolytic anemia in a Wistar rats' animal model. Hemolytic anemia was induced by phenyl hydrazine through intraperitoneal route and diagnosed by the lowering of blood hemoglobin. After inducing the hemolytic anemia, 24 Wistar rats (n = 6 in four groups) were randomly assigned to 1 mg/l, 5 mg/l, and 10 mg/l ferric oxide iron along with 1 mg/ml ascorbic acid administered through drinking water; a control group was treated with iron-free water. The hematological and biochemical parameters, iron levels in liver, spleen, and kidney were estimated after 30 d of treatment. In the group treated with 5 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, a significant increase of serum iron and ferritin, and a decrease of TIBC (total iron binding capacity) were observed without changes in other biochemical parameters and histopathological findings. However, in the group treated with 10 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, hematological changes with significantly higher values for white blood cell count, serum glutamic phospho transaminase, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, splenic, and liver iron content, indicate potential toxicity at this supplementation level. Data suggest that the optimum concentration of iron (5 mg/l) and ascorbic acid solution may improve anemic conditions and may be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia without any negative impact, while 10 mg/l in drinking water seems to be the threshold for the initiation of toxicity.

  16. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge.

  17. Systemic neosporosis in a dog treated for immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Magaña, Angie; Sánchez, Félix; Villa, Karina; Rivera, Liliana; Morales, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    A 4-year-old male Toy Poodle was presented to the Small Animal Veterinary Hospital of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the Autonomous University of Mexico (FMVZ, UNAM) because of depression, lethargy, and hemorrhages involving several areas of the skin and around the eyes. Hematology data and a bone marrow analysis suggested hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The dog was treated with prednisone, and after one month the hematology variables improved. However, the dog's clinical condition inexplicably worsened and it was euthanized. On necropsy, there were no relevant findings. However, in histology, multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis and necrosis, and a protozoan cyst in the cerebellum were identified. In addition, moderate multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and necrotizing pancreatitis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic enteritis were observed. Immunohistochemistry of the cerebellum, liver, pancreas, and intestine with a specific antibody against Neospora caninum confirmed the diagnosis of systemic neosporosis. The systemic neosporosis in this dog was most likely caused by reactivation of latent parasites due to prednisone administration during the one month of treatment. It should be kept in mind that in dogs being treated with immunosuppressants for immune-mediated conditions, opportunistic parasites, such as Toxoplasma gondii and N caninum, can be reactivated from a latent state, as it probably happened in the present case.

  18. [Metallosis: A Rare Cause of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Joana; Correia, Lurdes; Simão, Adélia; Figueiredo, António; Carvalho, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A anemia hemolítica pode estar associada a múltiplas etiologias, nomeadamente a tóxicos, como os metais, sendo esta uma causa rara.Caso Clínico: Homem de 55 anos de idade, sujeito a artroplastia total da anca direita (prótese não cimentada com articulação cerâmica-cerâmica, cujo componente acetabular era constituído por uma cúpula metálica composta por uma liga de titânio, vanádio e alumínio na qual encaixava um insert cerâmico). Cerca de quatro anos após esta intervenção cirúrgica referia ruídos na prótese com os movimentos. Foi sujeito a revisão cirúrgica tendo-se constatado a presença de líquido espesso intracapsular de cor escura, fractura do insert acetabular cerâmico e sinais de desgaste da cúpula metálica acetabular. Procedeu-se a lavagem abundante e substituição do insert cerâmico fracturado por um insert de polietileno. Dois meses depois recorreu ao Serviço de Urgência por degradação do estado geral, flutuação na anca direita e icterícia muco-cutânea. Analiticamente evidenciava valores compatíveis com anemia hemolítica autoimune. Foi feita punção articular com saída de abundante líquido metalótico. A tomografia computorizada revelou extensa colecção heterogénea quística intrapélvica com múltiplos fragmentos de prótese no seu interior, sugestivos de metalose. A anemia hemolítica foi interpretada como consequência da toxicidade das partículas e iões metálicos oriundos do desgaste da prótese. Iniciou corticoterapia em altas doses e posteriormente quando houve condições procedeu-se à substituição de todos os componentes da prótese e drenagem do material acumulado intra-pélvico.Discussão: Após a fractura do insert cerâmico a cabeça cerâmica passou a articular directamente com o componente acetabular metálico, originando os ruídos e desgaste com libertação de partículas e iões. Este material formou uma coleção quística intrapélvica, que passou despercebida na

  19. Sirolimus as maintenance treatment in an infant with life-threatening multiresistant pure red cell anemia/autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Miano, Maurizio; Poggi, Vincenzo; Banov, Laura; Fioredda, Francesca; Micalizzi, Concetta; Svahn, Johanna; Montobbio, Giovanni; Gallicola, Federica; Molinari, Angelo C; Parasole, Rosanna; Petruzziello, Fara; Fischer, Alain; Calvillo, Michaela; Dufour, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    A 9-month-old boy with life-threatening multiresistant pure red cell anemia/autoimmune hemolytic anemia within the frame of a possible, undiagnosed immune-mediated disease was initially treated with prednisone. Further-line therapies of the following 7 relapses included immunoglobulins, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and alentuzumab followed by other maintenance treatments as cyclosporine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate. After all the administered therapies failed, the patient was successfully treated by splenectomy followed by fludarabine and then sirolimus as maintenance treatment. Relapses might have been caused by the lack of a complete debulking of triggering cells and/or ineffective maintenance therapy. Splenectomy and sirolimus may have played a complementary role in the management of both situations.

  20. Rare hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies associated with hemolytic anemia - pathophysiology, clinical aspects, and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koralkova, P; van Solinge, W W; van Wijk, R

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies are genetic disorders affecting genes encoding red blood cell enzymes. They cause a specific type of anemia designated hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). Enzymopathies affect cellular metabolism, which, in the red cell, mainly consists of anaerobic glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, glutathione metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. Enzymopathies are commonly associated with normocytic normochromic hemolytic anemia. In contrast to other hereditary red cell disorders such as membrane disorders or hemoglobinopathies, the morphology of the red blood cell shows no specific abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on detection of reduced specific enzyme activity and molecular characterization of the defect on the DNA level. The most common enzyme disorders are deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and pyruvate kinase (PK). However, there are a number of other enzyme disorders, often much less known, causing HNSHA. These disorders are rare and often underdiagnosed, and the purpose of this review. In this brief review, we provide an overview of clinically relevant enzymes, their function in red cell metabolism, and key aspects of laboratory diagnosis.

  1. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: experience from a single referral center in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Anguiano-Alvarez Victor; Amir, Carmona Gonzalez Carlos; Sergio, Rodriguez-Rodriguez; Allan, Pomerantz; Xavier, Lopez-Karpovitch; Juventina, Tuna-Aguilar Elena

    2017-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by an autoimmune-mediated destruction of red blood cells. Warm AIHA (wAIHA) represents 60% of AIHA cases and is associated with the positive detection of IgG and C3d in the direct antiglobulin test (DAT). This study aimed to assess the clinical and laboratorial differences between primary and secondary wAIHA patients from a referral center in Mexico City. Methods All patients diagnosed with wAIHA in our institution from January 1992 to December 2015 were included and received corticosteroids as the first-line treatment. We analyzed the response to the first-line treatment, relapse-free survival, and time to splenectomy. Results Eighty-nine patients were included. Secondary wAIHA represented 55.1% of the cases. At diagnosis, secondary wAIHA patients showed a DAT mixed pattern more frequently than primary wAIHA patients (36.7 vs. 17.5%, P<0.001). In the survival analysis, patients with secondary wAIHA had a lower time to response (18 vs. 37 days, P=0.05), median disease-free survival (28.51 vs. 50.95 weeks, P=0.018), and time to splenectomy (43.5 vs. 61 wks, P=0.029) than those with primary wAIHA. Due to economic constraints, rituximab was considered as the third-line treatment in only two patients. Conclusion Secondary wAIHA may benefit from a longer low-dose steroid maintenance period mainly due to its shorter time to relapse and time to splenectomy than primary wAIHA.

  2. Pseudo-hypoproteinemia in a hyperbilirubinemic dog with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bridget C; Priest, Heather; Smith, Jo

    2014-06-01

    A 10-year-old spayed female Miniature Poodle was presented to the University of Georgia veterinary teaching hospital for evaluation of lethargy, vomiting and anorexia of 4 days' duration. Physical examination, history and a minimum database led to a diagnosis of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia accompanied by marked hyperbilirubinemia. Refractometric protein determination was within the reference interval, whereas the biuret method indicated hypoproteinemia. This discrepancy was attributed to interference of bilirubin and biliverdin with the spectrophotometric read-out of the biuret total protein assay. The albumin concentration, determined by bromcresol green, and refractometric total protein were less affected by this interference.

  3. [Successful treatment with rituximab in a patient with refractory mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Ono, Kaoru; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Hashimoto, Akari; Kamihara, Yusuke; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Shohei; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyanishi, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2013-11-01

    The evidence that rituximab is effective therapy for refractory warm or cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) has been accumulating; however, the efficacy of rituximab for mixed-type AIHA is not evident. Herein, we report a case of mixed-type AIHA refractory to corticosteroids and splenectomy, but successfully treated with rituximab (375 mg/m(2)/day, once weekly, four times). She achieved a complete response, which has been maintained for 16 months, to date, despite steroid tapering. Our case suggests that rituximab therapy should be considered for refractory AIHA even of mixed-type.

  4. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to corticosteroids and high dosage immunoglobulin therapy].

    PubMed

    Hasanbegović, Edo

    2008-01-01

    We report about very rare case of autoimune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) with "warm" antibodies in eight months old boy. Diagnosis was set up according blood picture results, distinct anaemia in blood picture, positive Coombs test (IgG) for "warm" antibodies. Therapy with high doses of corticosteroids, with immunoglobulins, with two exchange transfusions and with frequent transfusions of deplasmatic erythrocytes (DPE) was without good result. Introducing of Rituximab (Mathera) therapy in dose of 375 mg/m2, four times had good effect. For last six months boy has still been in complete clinical and hematologic remission. His his blood picture is normal and his Coombs test is within normal range.

  5. Complete remission of multiple myeloma after autoimmune hemolytic anemia: possible association with interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Zelig, Orly; Shapira, Michael Y; Ackerstein, Aliza; Avgil, Meytal; Or, Reuven

    2007-06-01

    A patient with multiple myeloma (MM) was being maintained on human recombinant interferon-alpha (INF-alpha) after VAD and autologous bone marrow transplantation (pretreated with melphalan). An episode of immune thrombocytopenia and (Coombs positive) autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was noted while on maintenance INF-alpha, which remitted when it was withdrawn. Following this event, he achieved a state of stable disease that persists (more than 3 years) with no specific myeloma treatment. This sequence of events suggests a relationship between an immunological reaction induced by INF-alpha and the prolonged phase of stable disease.

  6. Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder Associated With Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Greenberg, Benjamin M

    2015-08-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder characterized by monophasic or recurrent attacks of optic neuritis (ON) and transverse myelitis. NMO spectrum disorders include patients who are seropositive for NMO-IgG antibody and have experienced at least 1 demyelinating attack. NMO has been associated with other autoimmune conditions. We describe a patient diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and marginal zone lymphoma, who later developed NMO-IgG seropositive ON. The coexistence of multiple immunologic abnormalities in this patient points to a generalized dysfunction of the humoral immune system. History of autoimmunity should alert the clinician to the possibility of NMO spectrum disorder in a patient presenting with isolated ON.

  7. G-6-PD Guadalajara. A new mutant associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Vaca, G; Ibarra, B; Romero, F; Olivares, N; Cantú, J M; Beutler, E

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a new G-6-PD variant designated Guadalajara, which was found in a Mexican boy suffering from chronic hemolytic anemia. The red cell enzyme activity of the subject is about 14%. The mutant enzyme showed rapid electrophoretic mobility, slightly increased affinity for glucose-6-phosphate, slightly decreased affinity for NADP+, moderately elevated utilization of substrate analogues, and normal heat stability, pH curve, and inhibition by NADPH. G-6-PD Guadalajara differs from all previously reported variants and is the first variant associated with chronic hemolysis found in Mexico.

  8. Genetic heterogeneity of thalassemias in Mexican mestizo patients with hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, B; Vaca, G; de la Mora, E; Romero, F; Aguilar-Luna, C; Mejía, A; Esparza, M A; Pérez, G; Ornelas, M L; Cantú, J M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-eight Hb abnormalities (16 thalassemias, 10 Hb variants and 2 hereditary persistences of fetal hemoglobin) were detected in an etiopathogenic search in 131 patients with hemolytic anemia. The observed thalassemic genotypes [6 beta(0)/beta, 2 (delta beta) (0)/beta(0), 2 beta(0)/beta(+), 2 beta(0)/beta(s), 2 beta(+)/beta(+), 1 beta(+)/beta(s) and 1 (delta beta)(0)/beta] showed heterogeneity in the population studied. A native origin of some of these mutations is considered.

  9. Severe hemolytic anemia after repair of primum septal defect and cleft mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Alehan, D; Doğan, R; Ozkutlu, S; Elshershari, H; Gümrük, F

    2001-01-01

    Two cases are described in which severe mechanical hemolytic anemia developed after surgical repair of primum atrial septal defect (ASD) and cleft mitral valve. In both cases there was residual mitral regurgitation after repair. Moderate mitral regurgitation and collision of the regurgitant jet with the teflon patch used for repair of the primum ASD were detected by color-Doppler echocardiography imaging. Laboratory tests showed normochromic normocytic anemia, increased indirect serum bilirubin, decreased plasma haptoglobin and hemoglobinuria. The peripheral blood smear contained numerous fragmented red cells. Following another surgical correction of the mitral valve (repair or mitral valve replacement), there was no more hemolysis. The two presented cases show that foreign materials in association with localized intracardiac turbulence may cause severe hemolysis.

  10. First case of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Hironori; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2014-07-14

    To our knowledge, patients with immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) have not been reported previously. Many patients with IgG4-SC have autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and respond to steroid treatment. However, isolated cases of IgG4-SC are difficult to diagnose. We describe our experience with a patient who had IgG4-SC without AIP in whom the presence of AIHA led to diagnosis. The patient was a 73-year-old man who was being treated for dementia. Liver dysfunction was diagnosed on blood tests at another hospital. Imaging studies suggested the presence of carcinoma of the hepatic hilus and primary sclerosing cholangitis, but a rapidly progressing anemia developed simultaneously. After the diagnosis of AIHA, steroid treatment was begun, and the biliary stricture improved. IgG4-SC without AIP was thus diagnosed.

  11. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  12. Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D Deficiencies: An Unusual Cause of Fever, Severe Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas A.; Harbada, Rishit; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The array of diagnostic workup for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) generally revolves in searching for infections, inflammatory/autoimmune, and endocrine etiologies. A differential diagnosis of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia can have etiologies varying from infections like malaria, dengue, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein barr virus, Parvovirus, infective endocarditis, to autoimmune disorder (systemic lupus erythromatosis), vasculitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia/Evan's syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuri (PNH), or drugs. Nutritional deficiencies (especially vitamin B12 deficiency) as a cause of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia are very rare and therefore rarely thought of. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fever and if accompanied by concurrent hyper-homocysteinemia and hypophosphatemia can sometimes lead to severe hemolysis mimicking the above-mentioned conditions. We present a case that highlights vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiency as an easily treatable cause of PUO, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, which should be actively looked for and treated before proceeding with more complicated and expensive investigation or starting empiric treatments. PMID:25811010

  13. Risk factor analysis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wen, Yu-Chuan; Huang, I-Anne; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Tsay, Pei-Kwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a clinically relevant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Currently, there is no established consensus regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Whether AIHA contributes to increased mortality is still somewhat controversial. We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of post-transplant AIHA in 265 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 17-year period. Onset of AIHA was calculated from the first documented detection of AIHA by either clinical symptoms or positive direct agglutinin test. Resolution of AIHA was defined as normalization of hemoglobin and biochemical markers of hemolysis with sustained transfusion independence. We identified 15 cases of AIHA after allo-HSCT (incidence rate, 6%). Ten (67%) of these patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test. Data were obtained for 9 boys and 6 girls after a median follow-up of 53 months (range 4–102). The median age was 5.1 years (range 0.5–15.4) at the time of HSCT and the median time to emergence was 149 days (range 42–273). No significant risk factor for post-transplant AIHA has emerged from our data to date. In the majority (14 of 15; 93%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with 12 of 15 (80%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. No splenectomy was performed in any of our patients. For various reasons, post-transplantation AIHA poses an extraordinary challenge to transplant physicians. Despite the advancements in diagnostic tools, therapeutic challenges remain due to the myriad interacting pathways in AIHA. PMID:27861376

  14. Risk factor analysis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wen, Yu-Chuan; Huang, I-Anne; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Tsay, Pei-Kwei

    2016-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a clinically relevant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Currently, there is no established consensus regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Whether AIHA contributes to increased mortality is still somewhat controversial.We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of post-transplant AIHA in 265 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 17-year period. Onset of AIHA was calculated from the first documented detection of AIHA by either clinical symptoms or positive direct agglutinin test. Resolution of AIHA was defined as normalization of hemoglobin and biochemical markers of hemolysis with sustained transfusion independence.We identified 15 cases of AIHA after allo-HSCT (incidence rate, 6%). Ten (67%) of these patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test. Data were obtained for 9 boys and 6 girls after a median follow-up of 53 months (range 4-102). The median age was 5.1 years (range 0.5-15.4) at the time of HSCT and the median time to emergence was 149 days (range 42-273). No significant risk factor for post-transplant AIHA has emerged from our data to date. In the majority (14 of 15; 93%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with 12 of 15 (80%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. No splenectomy was performed in any of our patients.For various reasons, post-transplantation AIHA poses an extraordinary challenge to transplant physicians. Despite the advancements in diagnostic tools, therapeutic challenges remain due to the myriad interacting pathways in AIHA.

  15. An infant with acute brucellosis presenting with Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia: is breastfeeding guilty for transmission?

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Keskin, Sükran; Gülfidan, Gamze; Yaman, Yöntem; Devrim, Ilker

    2013-07-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that can be transmitted to humans through infected milk and dairy products. There are limited cases with Brucella infection acquired via breastfeeding in infants in the literature. Also, Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia as a result of the disease is comparatively rare when considering the other frequent hematologic complications. We report a mother who acquired the infection as a result of consuming infected milk and dairy products after delivery and of her 5-month-old baby, who had acquired the disease via breastfeeding and presented with Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  16. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to Plasmodium ovale infection: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam S; Delisca, Gadini; Booth, Garrett S

    2013-12-01

    A three year old male from the Democratic Republic of the Congo was admitted to Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt with a 10-day history of fever, emesis, and diarrhea. Examination demonstrated scleral icterus, splenomegaly, and anemia. By peripheral blood smear, the patient was diagnosed with Plasmodium ovale. Immunohematology demonstrated a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) for IgG and C3d with pan-agglutination on eluate. These findings, in combination with hemolytic labs, signified presence of an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We believe this to be the first reported case of P. ovale infection-mediated AIHA.

  17. Diaminodiphenyl Sulfone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia and Alopecia in a Case of Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Eijiro; Kayo, Sato-Jin; Nakano, Hajime; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sawamura, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease characterized by subepidermal blistering induced by IgA autoantibodies against several autoantigens in the basal membranous zone of the skin and mucosal tissue. Although diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), also known as dapsone, is generally recognized as the first-line therapy for LABD, DDS can induce several severe side effects. We present a Japanese case of LABD with DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and alopecia. In the present case, the DDS-induced hemolytic anemia and hair loss made the DDS monotherapy difficult. When DDS is used in LABD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), hemolytic anemia is concealed by IDA. It is thus necessary to carefully and frequently examine the laboratory data to find the signs of DDS-induced hemolytic anemia. Even though there is no literature on DDS-induced alopecia, alopecia was reported as one of the side effects of DDS in an FDA report, and, in our case, hair loss was improved after reducing its dosage. We have to recognize that alopecia is one of the side effects of DDS and that careful management is needed in order not to overlook the adverse side effects of DDS when treating LABD patients.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Splenectomy in Children: Report of the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Henry E; Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Smithers, Charles; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St. Peter, Shawn; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of children with congenital hemolytic anemia (CHA) undergoing total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) remain unclear. In this study, we collected data from 100 children with CHA who underwent TS or PS from 2005–2013 at 16 sites in the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium using a patient registry. We analyzed demographics and baseline clinical status, operative details, and outcomes at 4, 24, and 52 weeks after surgery. Results were summarized as hematologic outcomes, short-term adverse events (AEs) (≤ 30 days after surgery), and long-term AEs (31–365 days after surgery). For children with hereditary spherocytosis, after surgery there was an increase in hemoglobin (baseline 10.1 ± 1.8 gm/dl, 52 week 12.8 ± 1.6 gm/dl; mean ± SD), decrease in reticulocyte and bilirubin as well as control of symptoms. Children with sickle cell disease had control of clinical symptoms after surgery, but had no change in hematologic parameters. There was an 11% rate of short-term AEs and 11% rate of long-term AEs. As we accumulate more subjects and longer follow-up, use of a patient registry should enhance our capacity for clinical trials and engage all stakeholders in the decision-making process. PMID:25382665

  19. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma type II complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kato, Aiko; Takiuchi, Yoko; Aoki, Kazunari; Ono, Yuichiro; Arima, Hiroshi; Nagano, Seiji; Tabata, Sumie; Yanagita, Soshi; Matsushita, Akiko; Maruoka, Hayato; Wada, Masaya; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old man was admitted to hospital because of persistent fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. CT scanning showed extensive wall thickening of the colon. He was transferred to our hospital because he further developed ascites and paraaortic lymph node swelling. On presentation, he was extremely emaciated with superficial lymph node swelling, ascitic signs, and leg edema. Histological image of a biopsied mesenteric lymph node demonstrated diffuse infiltration of large abnormal T cells. Surface antigen analysis of abnormal cells in the ascites revealed positivity for CD3, CD8, CD56, and weak positivity for CD103. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed monoclonal rearrangement of the T cell receptor (TCR) gene. The subtype of TCR was αβ. A diagnosis of enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL) type II was made. The lymphoma involved the bone marrow. The patient also had severe hemolytic anemia with a positive Coomb's test result. An additional diagnosis for autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was made, which was resistant to methylprednisolone therapy. We first treated him with only vincristine in addition to the steroid to avoid acute tumor lysis syndrome ; however, he died of septic shock that occurred soon after vincristine administration. To the best of our knowledge, this may be the first reported case of EATL complicated by AIHA.

  20. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  1. Direct antiglobulin ("Coombs") test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a review.

    PubMed

    Segel, George B; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2014-04-01

    We have reviewed the literature to identify and characterize reports of warm-antibody type, autoimmune hemolytic anemia in which the standard direct antiglobulin reaction was negative but a confirmatory test indicated that the red cells were opsonized with antibody. Three principal reasons account for the absence of a positive direct antiglobulin test in these cases: a) IgG sensitization below the threshold of detection by the commercial antiglobulin reagent, b) low affinity IgG, removed by preparatory washes not conducted at 4°C or at low ionic strength, and c) red cell sensitization by IgA alone, or rarely (monomeric) IgM alone, but not accompanied by complement fixation, and thus not detectable by a commercial antiglobulin reagent that contains anti-IgG and anti-C3. In cases in which the phenotype is compatible with warm-antibody type, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the direct antiglobulin test is negative, an alternative method to detect low levels of IgG sensitization, use of 4°C, low ionic strength washes to prepare the cells for the direct antiglobulin test reaction to permit retention and identification of low affinity IgG antibodies, and, if the latter are uninformative, testing for sensitization with an anti-IgA, and, if necessary, an anti-IgM reagent identifies cases of warm-antibody type, immune hemolysis not verified by a commercial reagent.

  2. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia as a life-threatening complication of antibiotic treatment of 'chronic Lyme disease'.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Maarten; Speeckaert, Marijn; Callens, Rutger; Van Biesen, Wim

    2017-04-01

    'Chronic Lyme disease' is a controversial condition. As any hard evidence is lacking that unresolved systemic symptoms, following an appropriately diagnosed and treated Lyme disease, are related to a chronic infection with the tick-borne spirochaetes of the Borrelia genus, the term 'chronic Lyme disease' should be avoided and replaced by the term 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.' The improper prescription of prolonged antibiotic treatments for these patients can have an impact on the community antimicrobial resistance and on the consumption of health care resources. Moreover, these treatments can be accompanied by severe complications. In this case report, we describe a life-threatening ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia with an acute kidney injury (RIFLE-stadium F) due to a pigment-induced nephropathy in a 76-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with a so-called 'chronic Lyme disease.'

  3. Heinz-body hemolytic anemia from the ingestion of crude oil: a primary toxic effect in marine birds.

    PubMed

    Leighton, F A; Peakall, D B; Butler, R G

    1983-05-20

    Hemolytic anemia developed in young herring gulls and Atlantic puffins given daily oral doses of a Prudhoe Bay crude oil. Anemia developed 4 to 5 days after the initiation of oil ingestion and was accompanied by Heinz-body formation and a strong regenerative response. The data evince a toxic effect on circulating red blood cells involving an oxidative biochemical mechanism and the first clear evidence of a primary mechanism of toxicity from the ingestion of crude oil by birds.

  4. Heinz-body hemolytic anemia from the ingestion of crude oil: a primary toxic effect in marine birds

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, F.A.; Peakall, D.B.; Butler, R.G.

    1983-05-20

    Hemolytic anemia developed in young herring gulls and Atlantic puffins given daily oral doses of a Prudhoe Bay crude oil. Anemia developed 4 to 5 days after the initiation of oil ingestion and was accompainied by Heinz-body formation and a strong regenerative response. The data evince a toxic effect on circulating red blood cells involving an oxidative biochemical mechanism and the first clear evidence of a primary mechanism of toxicity from the ingestion of crude oil by birds.

  5. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  6. Characterization of direct antiglobulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a study of 154 cases.

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, Toyomi; Toyotsuji, Tomonori; Kajii, Eiji

    2013-02-01

    Direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-negative (DAT-)autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is empirically thought to show the same clinical conditions as DAT-positive (DAT+)AIHA, with the exception of an adequate amount of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin (Ig)G. We investigated the clinical characteristics of DAT-AIHA in comparison with DAT+AIHA. Of the 582 patients referred to our laboratory with undiagnosed hemolytic anemia, AIHA was clinically diagnosed in 216 patients (DAT-AIHA, n = 154; DAT+AIHA, n = 62). The percentage of reticulocytes, mean corpuscular volume, RBC-IgG levels, white blood cell count, and total protein (TP) levels were significantly higher in patients with DAT+AIHA than patients with DAT-AIHA. The hemoglobin level was significantly lower in patients with DAT+AIHA. No significant differences between patients with DAT-AIHA and DAT+AIHA existed with respect to age, gender, idiopathic/secondary nature, complications such as Evans syndrome, effectiveness of steroid treatment, or survival rate at 1 year following diagnosis. Patients with DAT-AIHA required significantly lower doses of steroids for maintenance therapy. Based on multivariate analysis of idiopathic DAT-AIHA (n = 110), TP and Evans syndrome were associated with the effectiveness of steroids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.36/[0.1 g/dl]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.84) and survival at the 1-year follow-up (aOR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.01-0.88). Our results indicate that patients with DAT-AIHA generally suffer milder anemia and hemolysis than patients with DAT+AIHA, respond equally well to steroids, and have comparable survival at 1-year.

  7. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after nivolumab treatment in Hodgkin lymphoma responsive to immunosuppressive treatment. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Magalie P; Gastaud, Lauris; Boscagli, Annick; Peyrade, Frederic; Gallamini, Andrea; Thyss, Antoine

    2016-08-19

    The patients with refractory Hodgkin lymphoma have a poor prognosis. The nivolumab, an IgG4 monoclonal antibody inhibiting the program death 1 pathway has recently demonstrated its efficacy and its safety in patients with heavily pretreated refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. The side effects of this immunotherapy include autoimmune-like syndromes. A 75-year-old woman with no significant comorbidities was treated by nivolumab (3 mg/kg every 2 wk) as a third-line treatment for refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. A clinical response was observed with the first injection of nivolumab, with a reduction in superficial lymph nodes. After the second injection, the patient presented an authentic autoimmune hemolytic anemia with a profound anemia at 64 g/L and biologic characteristics of hemolysis (elevated unconjugated bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, and reticulocytes). The direct antiglobulin test was strongly positive for IgG antibodies, and the indirect antiglobulin test became positive with a very high level of autoantibodies. After 2 injections of nivolumab, the patient underwent a fluodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography-computed tomography, showing a partial response according to modified Cheson criteria. A treatment with prednisone (2 mg/kg), initiated after transfusion of 2 units of red blood cells, permitted the complete resolution of this autoimmune reaction after 3 months of corticotherapy. The fluodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography-computed tomography performed at the end of the corticotherapy showed a clear disease progression. Considering the very good response achieved after only 2 injections of nivolumab, the limited therapeutic resources for this old woman, and the complete resolution of the autoimmune hemolytic anemia, nivolumab was reintroduced at the same dose, with close clinical and biological monitoring. She received 6 more injections of nivolumab without recurrence of hemolysis.

  8. Sirolimus for Refractory Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Treatment of Post-Transplant Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong A; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Kwon, Hyun-Seop; Baik, Chung-Ryul; Song, Sae-Am; Lee, Jung Nye

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) may occur after any type of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT), even ABO-matched transplantation. It tends to be refractory to standard corticosteroid treatment and requires multiple transfusions. Though, there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment for post-transplant severe AIHA. We present a pediatric patient with refractory AIHA after umbilical cord blood transplantation. She developed severe AIHA at 3months after transplantation and was unresponsive to multiple treatment modalities, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and rituximab, resulting in persistent transfusion dependency. Sirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, was started on day 67 after the onset of AIHA, and this patient was successfully rescued without any complications. Sirolimus induces apoptosis in autoreactive lymphocytes, increases regulatory T cells and has been reported to have a positive effect on AIHA following solid organ transplantation (SOT). We reviewed the literature regarding post-transplant AIHA in the PubMed database and evaluated the treatment outcome of sirolimus in AIHA after SOT.

  9. Portable microsystem integrates multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations and a surface stress biosensor to detect red blood cells for hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shengbo; Feng, Qiliang; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Huiming; Ji, Jianlong; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Tao

    2016-09-20

    Hemolytic anemia intensity has been suggested as a vital factor for the growth of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease. However, there is no effective and rapid diagnostic method. As a powerful platform for bio-particles testing, biosensors integrated with microfluidics offer great potential for a new generation of portable point of care systems. In this paper, we describe a novel portable microsystem consisting of a multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations (MDM) device and a surface stress biosensor to separate and detect red blood cells (RBCs) for diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The peripheral circuit to power the interdigitated electrode array of the MDM device and the surface stress biosensor test platform were integrated into a portable signal system. The MDM includes a preparing region, a focusing region, and a sorting region. Simulation and experimental results show the RBCs trajectories when they are subjected to the positive DEP force, allowing the successful sorting of living/dead RBCs. Separated RBCs are then transported to the biosensor and the capacitance values resulting from the variation of surface stress were measured. The diagnosis of hemolytic anemia can be realized by detecting RBCs and the portable microsystem provides the assessment to the hemolytic anemia patient.

  10. Portable microsystem integrates multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations and a surface stress biosensor to detect red blood cells for hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Shengbo; Feng, Qiliang; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Huiming; Ji, Jianlong; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia intensity has been suggested as a vital factor for the growth of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease. However, there is no effective and rapid diagnostic method. As a powerful platform for bio-particles testing, biosensors integrated with microfluidics offer great potential for a new generation of portable point of care systems. In this paper, we describe a novel portable microsystem consisting of a multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations (MDM) device and a surface stress biosensor to separate and detect red blood cells (RBCs) for diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The peripheral circuit to power the interdigitated electrode array of the MDM device and the surface stress biosensor test platform were integrated into a portable signal system. The MDM includes a preparing region, a focusing region, and a sorting region. Simulation and experimental results show the RBCs trajectories when they are subjected to the positive DEP force, allowing the successful sorting of living/dead RBCs. Separated RBCs are then transported to the biosensor and the capacitance values resulting from the variation of surface stress were measured. The diagnosis of hemolytic anemia can be realized by detecting RBCs and the portable microsystem provides the assessment to the hemolytic anemia patient. PMID:27647457

  11. [Successful rituximab treatment for acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura complicated with Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akari; Fujimi, Akihito; Kanisawa, Yuji; Matsuno, Teppei; Okuda, Toshinori; Minami, Shinya; Doi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Kazuma; Uemura, Naoki; Tomaru, Utano

    2013-06-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura (AATP) is a rare disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia associated with total absence or a selective decrease in bone marrow megakaryocytes. A 67-year-old male presented with a 2-month bleeding tendency. He was referred to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy showed complete absence of megakaryocytes without dysplasia in cells of the myeloid and erythroid lineages. AATP was diagnosed. In addition, mild normocytic normochromic anemia and reticulocytosis were also observed and haptoglobin was below the detectable level. Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed based on the high titer of RBC-bound IgG and negative direct and indirect coombs test results. He was first treated with cyclosporine 200 mg per day and subsequently with prednisolone but only slight temporary improvement was achieved. Administration of eight doses of rituximab 375 mg/m(2) per week ameliorated both thrombocytopenia and anemia. AATP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of thrombocytopenia, and immunosuppressive therapy is a potential first-line treatment. This is the first case report of AATP accompanied by AIHA successfully treated with rituximab.

  12. [Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed after formation of post-operative pseudoaneurysm for femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Masao; Hua, Jian; Inoue, Morihiro; Michikawa, Naohiko

    2011-03-01

    An 85-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with severe anemia after nail-plate fixation of the left femoral neck fracture. The patient was diagnosed with Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia based on the measurement of red blood cell (RBC)-bound IgG molecules per cell. Pseudoaneurysm of the left profunda femoris artery was detected on magnetic resonance imaging and successfully removed by surgical repair of the artery. Anemia promptly improved, and the number of RBC-bound IgG normalized after the surgery. The destruction of RBCs was thought to have been responsible for temporary induction of anti-RBC autoimmune antibodies.

  13. Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Direct Antiglobulin Testing With a False-Negative Result in a 53-Year-Old Man: The DAT Will Set You Free.

    PubMed

    Losos, Michael; Hamad, Diane; Joshi, Sarita; Scrape, Scott; Chen, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA), the most common of the relatively uncommon autoimmune-mediated hemolytic anemias (AIHAs), is mediated by polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies in most cases. Herein, we present a case of WAIHA involving a direct antiglobulin test (DAT) with an initially negative result. Using a modified DAT protocol, repeat testing of the same specimen material from a previously healthy 53-year-old man yielded positive results. This case demonstrates that investigation of an apparently negative DAT result plays a critical role in the differential diagnosis of patients with rapidly progressing hemolytic anemia and the reversal of that decline.

  14. CNS intravascular large cell lymphoma in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Orengo, James P; Toossi, Shahed; Perry, Arie; Treseler, Patrick; Hess, Christopher; Margeta, Marta

    2015-04-01

    Intravascular large cell lymphoma (IVLCL) is a rare disease characterized by proliferation of malignant lymphocytes within the small blood vessel lumens. The association of IVLCL with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) has been described in a single case report, but the true prevalence of this co-occurrence is not known because of declining autopsy rates. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old woman who carried a diagnosis of AIHA for 2 years, with repeated hemolytic episodes that were initially well controlled with immunomodulatory treatment. At her last presentation, the patient developed rapidly progressive neurologic symptoms and leukoencephalopathy on MRI; she died 4 weeks later with a clinical impression of thrombotic microangiopathy, a known complication of AIHA. At autopsy, the brain showed widespread platelet thrombi and intraparenchymal hemorrhages characteristic of this disorder. In addition, there was evidence of a clinically unsuspected IVLCL, most likely of B-cell lineage. This case illustrates a potential association between IVLCL and AIHA, highlights the need for broad differential diagnosis in cases with atypical disease presentation or progression, and underlines the importance of autopsy in establishing the full cause of morbidity and mortality.

  15. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  16. Marrow transplantation in the treatment of a murine heritable hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.E.; McFarland-Starr, E.C.

    1989-05-15

    Mice with hemolytic anemia, sphha/sphha, have extremely fragile RBCs with a lifespan of approximately one day. Neither splenectomy nor simple transplantation of normal marrow after lethal irradiation cures the anemia but instead causes rapid deterioration and death of the mutant unless additional prophylactic procedures are used. In this report, we show that normal marrow transplantation preceded by sublethal irradiation increases but does not normalize RBC count. The mutant RBCs but not all the WBCs are replaced by donor cells. Splenectomy of the improved recipient causes a dramatic decrease in RBC count, indicating that the mutant spleen is a site of donor-origin erythropoiesis as well as of RBC destruction. Injections of iron dextran did not improve RBC counts. Transplantation of primary recipient marrow cells into a secondary host with a heritable stem cell deficiency (W/Wv) corrects the defect caused by residence of the normal cells in the sphha/sphha host. The original +/+ donor cells replace the RBCs of the secondary host, and the RBC count is normalized. Results indicate that the environment in the sphha/sphha host is detrimental to normal (as well as mutant) erythroid cells but the restriction is not transmitted.

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a teenager: a wolf in sheep's clothing.

    PubMed

    Halbrich, Michelle; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; McCusker, Christine

    2013-09-01

    This case report describes a 14-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with symptoms of severe anemia. He was diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and on further investigation, it was noted that he had no functioning T cells. Despite no antecedent history of severe infection, he was worked up for a severe combined immunodeficiency, and was found to have a compound hypomorphic mutation in an enzyme responsible for recombination of the B- and T-cell receptors. He was subsequently diagnosed with severe combined immunodeficiency, presenting with autoimmunity, and received a bone marrow transplant. As our knowledge of the immune system continues to expand, we are learning that dysregulation can occur in any one of the complex immune pathways, and may have a variety of clinical presentations. A high index of suspicion for immune defects should be maintained in cases of atypical or severe infections, autoimmunity or malignancy, particularly by the general practitioner, who is often the first to encounter these challenging patients.

  18. Immune-mediated Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in the Dog: A retrospective study of 55 cases diagnosed from 1979 through 1983 at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Marion L.; Kruth, Stephen A.

    1985-01-01

    All recognized cases (n = 55) of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in dogs presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine from 1969 through 1983 were reviewed. Specific areas of concern were: association with other conditions, therapeutic response, prognosis, relapse rate and final outcome. Of these 55 cases, 19 were immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, 26 were immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and 10 were both immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Females were slightly over-represented and the mean age was 6.4 years. Therapy consisted of various combinations of immuno-suppressive drugs and in some cases, whole blood transfusion and splenectomy. No firm conclusions could be made regarding therapeutic efficacy, as a result of variation in treatment protocol and the occasional unavailability of follow-up data. Well over half of all cases were diagnosed as idiopathic. Precipitating factors or diseases most frequently implicated in secondary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia or hemolytic anemia were: recent vaccination, drug therapy, obstetrical complications, stress, recent viral infection and neoplasia. Twice as many cases of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia were seen in the cooler months (October to March), although this could not be related to antibody class or thermal reactivity. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia both as a single disease and combined with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia had no seasonal incidence. History, clinical findings and hematological and clinical chemistry findings were consistent with data previously reported, with the exception of icterus, which appeared to be of higher incidence than most reports, being present in almost 50% of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia cases. Just over half of all dogs survived, although the survival rate was highest for immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, followed closely by immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and lowest for the combined disease. Immune

  19. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge3: combined antibody-dependent hemolysis and erythroid precursor cell growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Douglas P; Pesek, Gina D; Montgomery, Matthew M; Oza, Krishna K; Arndt, Patricia A; Garratty, George; Shahcheraghi, Ali; Denomme, Gregory A

    2008-10-01

    The Gerbich (Ge) antigens are a collection of high-incidence antigens carried on the red blood cell membrane glycoproteins, glycophorins C and D. Antibodies against these antigens are uncommon, and there have been only rare case reports of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge. In this case report, we present a neonate with severe anemia and hyperbilirubinemia due to anti-Ge3. Routine and special laboratory studies undertaken in this case suggested two mechanisms for the patient's hemolysis and persistent anemia. Antibody-dependent hemolysis was associated with early-onset hyperbilirubinemia, anemia, and a mild reticulocytosis, and inhibition of erythroid progenitor cell growth was associated with late anemia and normal bilirubin and reticulocyte values. Though rare, anti-Ge3 can be a dangerous antibody in pregnancy. Affected neonates may require intensive initial therapy and close follow-up for at least several weeks after delivery.

  20. The simultaneous incidence of acute pancreatitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a rare duo in a patient with SLE.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A young female presented with acute abdominal pain of two days duration consistent with acute pancreatitis. During her stay in the hospital she had a sudden drop in hemoglobin to 6 g/dl without any overt blood loss. On evaluation, it was evident that she had acute pancreatitis, in addition to displaying features of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She had been a known case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and had discontinued her treatment. She was managed with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Her clinical condition improved, and she has been regularly attending our clinic for the last 2 years. According to a literature search in Medline, it would appear that this is the first report of a case in which SLE with autoimmune hemolytic anemia has been associated with acute pancreatitis in a single case.

  1. Complement deposition in autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a footprint for difficult-to-detect IgM autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M; de Haas, Masja; Brouwer, Conny; Folman, Claudia; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Wouters, Diana

    2015-11-01

    In autoimmune hemolytic anemia autoantibodies against erythrocytes lead to increased clearance of the erythrocytes, which in turn results in a potentially fatal hemolytic anemia. Depending on whether IgG or IgM antibodies are involved, response to therapy is different. Proper identification of the isotype of the anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies is, therefore, crucial. However, detection of IgM autoantibodies can be challenging. We, therefore, set out to improve the detection of anti-erythrocyte IgM. Direct detection using a flow cytometry-based approach did not yield satisfactory improvements. Next, we analyzed whether the presence of complement C3 on a patient's erythrocytes could be used for indirect detection of anti-erythrocyte IgM. To this end, we fractionated patients' sera by size exclusion chromatography and tested which fractions yielded complement deposition on erythrocytes. Strikingly, we found that all patients with C3 on their erythrocytes according to standard diagnostic tests had an IgM anti-erythrocyte component that could activate complement, even if no such autoantibody had been detected with any other test. This also included all tested patients with only IgG and C3 on their erythrocytes, who would previously have been classified as having an IgG-only mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Depleting patients' sera of either IgG or IgM and testing the remaining complement activation confirmed this result. In conclusion, complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia is mostly IgM-mediated and the presence of covalent C3 on patients' erythrocytes can be taken as a footprint of the presence of anti-erythrocyte IgM. Based on this finding, we propose a diagnostic workflow that will aid in choosing the optimal treatment strategy.

  2. [Serological characteristics and transfusion efficacy evaluation in 61 cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Chun-Ya; Guan, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Lin-Fen; Wang, Ke; Luo, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yi; Li, Ming-Wei; Feng, Yan-Nan; Tong, Shan; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Lu; Wu, Yue-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan; Pan, Ji-Chun; Fen, Qian; Zhang, Ting; Wang, De-Qing

    2013-10-01

    This study was aimed to analyze the serological characteristics, efficacy and safety of incompatible RBC transfusion in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The patients with idiopathic or secondary AIHA were analyzed retrospectively, then the serological characteristics and the incidence of adverse transfusion reactions were investigated, and the efficacy and safety of incompatible RBC transfusion were evaluated according to the different autoantibody type and infused different RBC components. The results showed that out of 61 cases of AIHA, 21 cases were idiopathic, and 40 cases were secondary. 8 cases (13.1%) had IgM cold autoantibody, 50 cases (82.0%) had IgG warm autoantibody, and 3 cases (4.9%) had IgM and IgG autoantibodies simultaneously. There were 18 cases (29.5%) combined with alloantibodies. After the exclusion of alloantibodies interference, 113 incompatible RBC transfusions were performed for 36 patients with AIHA, total efficiency rate, total partial efficiency rate and total inefficiency rate were 56.6%, 15.1% and 28.3%, respectively. Incompatible RBC transfusions were divided into non-washed RBC group and washed RBC group. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in non-washed RBC group were 57.6%, 13.0% and 29.4%, respectively. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in washed RBC group were 53.6%, 21.4% and 25.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference of transfusion efficacy (P > 0.05) in two groups. Incompatible RBC transfusions were also divided into IgM cold autoantibody group and IgG warm autoantibody group. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in IgM cold autoantibody group were 46.2%, 30.8% and 29.4%, respectively. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in IgG warm autoantibody group were 56.7%, 13.4% and 29.9%, respectively. There was no significant difference of transfusion efficacy (P > 0.05 ) in two

  3. [A Case of Mitral Valvular Re-repair in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia after Mitral Valvular Repair].

    PubMed

    Tomino, Mikiko; Miyata, Kazuto; Takeshita, Yuji; Kaneko, Koki; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted for mitral valvular repair. After folding plasty to A3, a 30 mm Cosgrove-Edwards ring was placed. There was no mitral regurgitation jet observed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during the operation. However, high blood pressure was monitored and treated in the intensive care unit, hemolytic anemia developed, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated. Two weeks after the operation, serum lactate dehydrogenase was again elevated. TEE showed mild mitral regurgitation and the regurgitation jet colliding with the annuloplasty ring. Multiple transfusions of red blood cells were required. Repeat surgery was therefore undertaken. Lam and associates previously studying patients on hemolysis after mitral valvular repair noted high grade mitral regurgitation jets fragmented or accelerated. In the present case, mitral regurgitation was mild, but the high velocity and manner of regurgitation (collision with the annuloplasty ring) could cause hemolytic anemia. In the present case, high blood pressure might have caused chordae rupture. Furthermore, a flexible ring, such as the Cosgrove-Edwards ring, is likely to cause hemolytic anemia. As contributing factors to hemolysis after mitral valvular repair, perioperative blood pressure management and type of ring are significant.

  4. Cisplatin and Short-Term 5-Fluorouracil Infusion for Paraneoplastic Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia in Gastric Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sanatani, M. S.; Lazo-Langner, A.; Al-Rasheedy, I. M.

    2013-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome accompanying adenocarcinoma of the stomach. We report on a patient presenting with anemia due to a combination of severe hemolysis and tumour bleeding, where the combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in a short course infusional regimen led to a complete response of the hematologic abnormalities in the first line setting. Relapse was successfully treated with second line docetaxel; however the response was relatively short-lived. Overall survival was 16 months from diagnosis, which compares favourably to the survival of other reported cases. The chemotherapy regimens used in previously reported similar cases are reviewed. We suggest that a regimen based on bolus 5-fluorouracil, possibly with a platinum, should be investigated as a possible regimen of choice. PMID:24490094

  5. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Childhood Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Retrospective Analysis of 68 Cases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junjie; He, Hailong; Zhao, Wenli; Wang, Yi; Lu, Jun; Li, Jie; Li, Jianqin; Xiao, Peifang; Lu, Ye; Chai, Yihuan; Hu, Shaoyan

    2016-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease in children, and its clinical severity varies. To better understand disease manifestation and treatment outcome, we analyzed 68 children diagnosed as AIHA for clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, and treatment outcomes. Data show that primary AIHA accounted for 39.7% of all patients, whereas secondary AIHA accounted for 60.3%. Among them, Evans syndrome (ES) accounted for 20 cases (29.4%). Average hemoglobin was lower in the 1-year or below age group than in the above 1-year age group, combined-antibody group than single-antibody group, and IgM-contained group than non-IgM-contained group (P<0.05 for all). The duration of therapy in the ES group was longer than that in the AIHA-only group (P<0.05). During the follow-up period, 29 cases (29/45, 64.4%) remained in continuous remission. In total, 35.6% of patients relapsed after first complete remission and 56.3% of them still showed good response to glucocorticoid after relapse. There was no difference in the duration of therapy or relapse rate between the intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-treatment group and the non-IVIG-treatment group. In conclusion, the severity of anemia correlates with age and serologic types of direct antiglobulin test. Glucocorticoid is efficacious for AIHA regardless of whether it is a first attack or relapse in this cohort of young patients. ES needs longer treatment duration. IVIG does not improve the outcome of AIHA.

  6. Association of adenylyl cyclase 6 rs3730070 polymorphism and hemolytic level in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Cita, Kizzy-Clara; Ferdinand, Séverine; Connes, Philippe; Brudey, Laura; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Lemonne, Nathalie; Tarer, Vanessa; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2016-05-01

    A recent study suggested that adenosine signaling pathway could promote hemolysis in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA). This signaling pathway involves several gene coding enzymes for which variants have been described. In this study, we analyzed the genotype-phenotype relationships between functional polymorphisms or polymorphisms associated with altered expression of adenosine pathway genes, namely adenosine deaminase (ada; rs73598374), adenosine A2b receptor (adora2b; rs7208480), adenylyl cyclase6 (adcy6; rs3730071, rs3730070, rs7300155), and hemolytic rate in SCA patients. One hundred and fifty SCA patients were genotyped for adcy6, ada, and adora2b variants as well as alpha-globin gene, a genetic factor known to modulate hemolytic rate. Hematological and biochemical data were obtained at steady-state. Lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, reticulocytes and total bilirubin were used to calculate a hemolytic index. Genotype-phenotype relationships were investigated using parametric tests and multivariate analysis. SCA patients carrying at least one allele of adcy6 rs3730070-G exhibited lower hemolytic rate than non-carriers in univariate analysis (p=0.006). The presence of adcy6 rs3730070-G variant was associated with a decreased hemolytic rate in adjusted model for age and alpha-thalassemia (p=0.032). Our results support a protective effect of adcy6 rs3730070-G variant on hemolysis in SCA patients.

  7. Severe hemolytic disease of the premature newborn due to RH1 incompatibility: a case report

    PubMed Central

    UWINGABIYE, JEAN; ZAHID, HAFID; LABRINI, FAYÇAL; EL KHAZRAJI, ABDELHAK; YAHYAOUI, ANASS; HADEF, RACHID; MESSAOUDI, NEZHA

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of dramatic outcome of severe hemolytic disease in a newborn due to RH1 incompatibility. A newborn with A RH1 blood group was admitted in the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital for the problem of hydrops fetalis associated with RH1 incompatibility. The blood group of his mother, aged 31, was AB RH1-negative and that of his 37 year old father was A RH1. The mother had a history of 4 term deliveries, 3 abortions, and 1 living child. There was no prevention by anti-D immunoglobulin postpartum. The mother’s irregular agglutinin test was positive and the pregnancy was poorly monitored. The laboratory tests of the newborn showed a high total serum bilirubin level (30 mg/L) and macrocytic regenerative anemia (Hemoglobin=4 g/dL, mean corpuscular volume = 183 fL, reticulocytes count =176600/m3). The blood smear showed 1256 erythroblasts per 100 leukocytes, Howell–Jolly bodies and many macrocytes. The direct antiglobulin test was positive. He was transfused with red blood cell concentrates and treated with conventional phototherapy. The evolution was unfavourable; he died three days after the death of his mother. The monitoring of these high-risk pregnancies requires specialized centers and a close collaboration between the gynaecologist and the blood transfusion specialist to strengthen the prevention, as well as clinico-biological monitoring in patients with a history of RH1 fetomaternal alloimunization. PMID:27857529

  8. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  9. Ovarian dermoid cyst-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report with emphasis on pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cobo, F; Pereira, A; Nomdedeu, B; Gallart, T; Ordi, J; Torne, A; Monserrat, E; Rozman, C

    1996-05-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) as a manifestation of ovarian dermoid cyst (ODC) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome of unknown pathogenesis. Among mechanisms postulated to explain this association, cross-reactivity between cyst and red blood cell (RBC) antigens, and local production of RBC autoantibodies by intracyst B lymphocytes are the most likely. Studies to test these hypothesis were done in a patient diagnosed of AIHA associated with a nonpalpable ODC, in whom the AIHA subsided after tumor excision. The RBC-bound autoantibody was an IgG directed against the Rh complex. The cyst's fluid content lacked detectable RBC autoantibodies or immunoglobulins, the latter being measured by a high-sensitivity assay. It also failed to inhibit the ability of the purified autoantibody to agglutinate RBCs. Ovarian dermoid cyst histology disclosed that (1) the biotin-labelled RBC autoantibody did not bind to ODC structures; (2) scanty amounts of small mature lymphocytes (50% CD45RO+; 50% CD20+) were present only in a few tissue sections; (3) plasma cells producing IgM or IgG were extremely scarce; and (4) deposits of immunoglobulins were not detected into the ODC. These data fail to support any of the aforementioned hypotheses on the pathogenesis of this paraneoplastic syndrome. Other possible mechanisms are discussed, and a wider use of imaging diagnosis to search for ODC in women with AIHA is emphasized.

  10. Life-Threatening Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Idhiopatic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. Successful Selective Splenic Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Matteo; Massaro, Fulvio; Annechini, Giorgia; Baldacci, Erminia; D’Elia, Gianna Maria; Rosati, Riccardo; Trisolini, Silvia Maria; Volpicelli, Paola; Foà, Robin; Capria, Saveria

    2016-01-01

    Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE) is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy. PMID:27158433

  11. Serum BAFF and APRIL levels in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zi-Zhen; Zhao, Bing-Bing; Xiong, Hong; Wei, Bei-Wen; Wang, Ye-Fei

    2015-10-01

    B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) play crucial roles in B cell development, survival, and antibody production. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an acquired autoimmune disease that occurs when antibodies target autologous red blood cells. Here, we analyzed the serum levels of BAFF and APRIL and their respective clinical associations in patients with AIHA. Serum BAFF and APRIL levels in patients with AIHA were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in healthy individuals. Serum BAFF and APRIL levels were significantly augmented in patients with lower hemoglobin levels (hemoglobin was <8 g/dL) and higher LDH activity (LDH > 480 IU/mL). Glucocorticoid treatment dramatically reduced serum levels of BAFF and APRIL. Thus, serum BAFF and APRIL levels may reflect the clinical activity of this disease. Our results indicate that analysis of serum concentrations of BAFF and APRIL potentially represents a useful tool for the assessment of AIHA disease activity and progression.

  12. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia at diagnosis and during follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dimou, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Georgiou, Georgios; Kalpadakis, Christina; Pappi, Vassiliki; Tsopra, Olga; Koutsoukos, Konstantinos; Zografos, Eleftherios; Boutsikas, George; Moschogianni, Maria; Vardounioti, Ioanna; Petevi, Kyriaki; Karali, Vassiliki; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros; Ntalageorgos, Themis; Yiakoumis, Xanthis; Bartzis, Vasiliki; Bitsani, Aikaterini; Pessach, Elias; Efthimiou, Anna; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Rassidakis, George; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Patsouris, Efstratios; Meletis, John; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P

    2012-08-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia (AIHA/AITP) frequently complicate the course of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, especially low-grade, but they are very rarely observed in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Consequently the frequency and the profile of patients with HL-associated AIHA/AITP have not been well defined. Among 1029 patients with HL diagnosed between 1990 and 2010, two cases of AIHA (0.19%) and three of AITP (0.29%) were identified at the presentation of disease. These patients were significantly older, and more frequently had features of advanced disease and non-nodular sclerosing histology, compared to the majority of patients, who did not have autoimmune cytopenias at diagnosis. ABVD combination chemotherapy (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) provided effective control of HL and the autoimmune condition as well. During approximately 6600 person-years of follow-up for the remaining 1024 patients, seven (0.7%) patients developed autoimmune cytopenias (three AITP, three AIHA, one autoimmune pancytopenia) for a 10- and 15-year actuarial incidence of 0.95% and 1.40%, respectively. Their features did not differ compared to the general population of adult HL. In this large series of consecutive, unselected patients, those who presented with autoimmune cytopenias had a particular demographic and disease-related profile. In contrast, patients developing autoimmune cytopenias during follow-up did not appear to differ significantly from those who did not.

  13. Reactive oxygen species exacerbate autoimmune hemolytic anemia in New Zealand Black mice.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tasuku; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kibe, Noriko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi

    2013-12-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage occur in the red blood cells (RBCs) of SOD1-deficient C57BL/6 mice. This leads to autoimmune responses against RBCs in aged mice that are similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We examined whether a SOD1 deficiency and/or the human SOD1 transgene (hSOD1) would affect phenotypes of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice by establishing three congenic strains: those lacking SOD1, those expressing hSOD1 under a GATA-1 promoter, and those lacking mouse SOD1 but expressing hSOD1. Levels of intracellular ROS and oxidative stress markers increased, and the severity of the AIHA phenotype was aggravated by a SOD1 deficiency. In contrast, the transgenic expression of hSOD1 in an erythroid cell-specific manner averted most of the AIHA phenotype evident in the SOD1-deficient mice and also ameliorated the AIHA phenotype in the mice possessing intrinsic SOD1. These data suggest that oxidative stress in RBCs may be an underlying mechanism for autoimmune responses in NZB mice. These results were consistent with the hypothetical role of reactive oxygen species in triggering the autoimmune reaction in RBCs and may provide a novel approach to mitigating the progression of AIHA by reducing oxidative stress.

  14. GLUT1 mutations are a cause of paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesias and induce hemolytic anemia by a cation leak

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Yvonne G.; Storch, Alexander; Wuttke, Thomas V.; Brockmann, Knut; Kempfle, Judith; Maljevic, Snezana; Margari, Lucia; Kamm, Christoph; Schneider, Susanne A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Pekrun, Arnulf; Roebling, Robert; Seebohm, Guiscard; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Camelia; Kraft, Eduard; Blazevic, Dragica; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Fauler, Michael; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Münchau, Alexander; Edwards, Mark J.; Presicci, Anna; Margari, Francesco; Gasser, Thomas; Lang, Florian; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Lerche, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders that can be inherited or are sporadic in nature. The pathophysiology underlying these disorders remains largely unknown but may involve disrupted ion homeostasis due to defects in cell-surface channels or nutrient transporters. In this study, we describe a family with paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia (PED) over 3 generations. Their PED was accompanied by epilepsy, mild developmental delay, reduced CSF glucose levels, hemolytic anemia with echinocytosis, and altered erythrocyte ion concentrations. Using a candidate gene approach, we identified a causative deletion of 4 highly conserved amino acids (Q282_S285del) in the pore region of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes and human erythrocytes revealed that this mutation decreased glucose transport and caused a cation leak that alters intracellular concentrations of sodium, potassium, and calcium. We screened 4 additional families, in which PED is combined with epilepsy, developmental delay, or migraine, but not with hemolysis or echinocytosis, and identified 2 additional GLUT1 mutations (A275T, G314S) that decreased glucose transport but did not affect cation permeability. Combining these data with brain imaging studies, we propose that the dyskinesias result from an exertion-induced energy deficit that may cause episodic dysfunction of the basal ganglia, and that the hemolysis with echinocytosis may result from alterations in intracellular electrolytes caused by a cation leak through mutant GLUT1. PMID:18451999

  15. Severe viral hepatitis in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), treated with steroids.

    PubMed

    Orvain, Corentin; Ducancelle, Alexandra; Eymerit-Morin, Caroline; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Oberti, Frederic; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Tanguy-Schmidt, Aline

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) due to impaired immunity secondary to the disease itself and to the immunosuppressive therapies administered to these patients. We report a 78-year-old woman with CLL who was treated with steroids for autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). A few weeks later, she was admitted for severe acute hepatitis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Despite the symptomatic treatment of DIC, standard reanimation and probabilistic antibiotics, the patient died within 24h with severe hepatic failure. Autopsy was in favor of a disseminated viral infection with esophageal, hepatic and pulmonary cytopathologic lesions with acidophilic intranuclear inclusions suggestive of herpes virus, even though HSV 1 and 2, CMV and HHV6 PCRs were negative. This case of severe viral hepatitis with esophagitis occurring three weeks after the introduction of high-dose steroid treatment for AIHA in a CLL patient calls for anti-herpetic prophylaxis in such patients, immunodepressed by their diseases and the treatment they receive.

  16. Oral cyclophosphamide was effective for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CD16+CD56- chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Nishina, Sayaka; Kawakami, Toru; Sakai, Hitoshi; Senoo, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Ito, Toshiro; Saito, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-12-27

    An 84-year-old woman was referred to our hospital presenting anemia. Her hemoglobin level was 5.8 g/dL, and white blood cell count was 9400/μL, consisting of 82% lymphocytes. Given the lymphocyte phenotype (CD2+, CD3-, CD16+, and CD56-) and negative whole blood EBV viral load, we made a diagnosis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). We suspected hemolytic anemia because of the high levels of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood and the low haptoglobin value. Although the direct Coombs test was negative and there was no cold agglutination, we examined her red-blood-cell-bound IgG (RBC-IgG), which was elevated. She was diagnosed as having as Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report the effectiveness of oral cyclophosphamide for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CLPD-NK.

  17. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be iron deficient due to poor absorption. Vitamin-deficiency anemia may result from low levels of vitamin ... foods can help you avoid both iron-and vitamin-deficiency anemia. Foods to include in your diet include ...

  18. Congenital 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia in a Spanish family.

    PubMed

    Vives Corrons, J L; Colomer, D; Pujades, A; Rovira, A; Aymerich, M; Merino, A; Aguilar i Bascompte, J L

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and metabolic studies were performed in four members of a Spanish family with partial (50%) 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency. In all cases the activities of 6 phosphogluconolactone (6PGL) and glutathione reductase (GR) were normal, and the molecular characterization performed in the partially purified 6PGD from the propositus showed normal kinetic and electrophoretic patterns. Two females (the propositus and her sister) suffered from a well-compensated chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) and exhibited decreased RBC glutathione (GSH) stability with increased oxidative susceptibility, defined by enhanced malonyldialdehyde (MDA) generation "in vitro." The other two members of the family (the propositus's mother and brother) were clinically asymptomatic. In the propositus and her sister, RBC metabolism exhibited a markedly abnormal concentration of glycolytic intermediates, mainly characterized by striking increases in fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (50-fold), dihydroxiacetone-phosphate (20-fold) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (tenfold). Although the precise mechanism of the hemolysis in the two patients is unknown, the enhanced oxidative threat observed in their RBCs may interfere in some way with the glycolytic pathway function, leading to a marked increase in certain metabolic intermediates located before the glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) step. Since it seems that GA3PD half-life is modulated by fluctuations of the cytosolic redox status, an "in situ" approach was simulated by using permeabilized RBCs. In these conditions, GA3PD activity was significantly lower in the propositus and her sister than in the asymptomatic members of the family and the simultaneous normal control.

  19. Metabolic compensation for profound erythrocyte adenylate kinase deficiency. A hereditary enzyme defect without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E; Carson, D; Dannawi, H; Forman, L; Kuhl, W; West, C; Westwood, B

    1983-01-01

    A child with hemolytic anemia was found to have severe erythrocyte adenylate kinase (AK) deficiency, but an equally enzyme-deficient sibling had no evidence of hemolysis. No residual enzyme activity was found in erythrocytes by spectrophotometric methods that could easily have detected 0.1% of normal activity. However, concentrated hemolysates were shown to have the capacity to generate small amounts of ATP and AMP from ADP after prolonged incubation. Hemolysates could also catalyze the transfer of labeled gamma-phosphate from ATP to ADP. Intact erythrocytes were able to transfer phosphate from the gamma-position of ATP to the beta-position, albeit at a rate substantially slower than normal. They could also incorporate 14C-labeled adenine into ADP and ATP. Thus, a small amount of residual AK-like activity representing about 1/2,000 of the activity normally present could be documented in the deficient erythrocytes. The residual activity was not inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, which completely abolishes the activity of the normal AK1 isozyme of erythrocytes. The minute amount of residual activity in erythrocytes could represent a small amount of the AK2 isozyme, which has not been thought to be present in erythrocytes, or the activity of erythrocyte guanylate kinase with AMP substituting as substrate for GMP. Peripheral blood leukocytes, cultured skin fibroblasts, and transformed lymphoblasts from the deficient subject manifested about 17, 24, and 74%, respectively, of the activity of the concurrent controls. This residual activity is consistent with the existence of genetically independent AK isozyme, AK2, which is known to exist in these tissues. The cause of hemolysis in the proband was not identified. Possibilities include an unrelated enzyme deficiency or other erythrocyte enzyme defect and intraction of another unidentified defect with AK deficiency. PMID:6308059

  20. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01) and CLL patients (P < 0.01). CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was higher than that on CD5(-)B lymphocytes in untreated patients (P > 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P < 0.05). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of untreated patients was higher than that of remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than that of NC, remission (P < 0.05), and untreated patients (P > 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes.

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome concomitant with immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans syndrome).

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Huseyin; Bugdaci, Mehmet Sait; Temel, Tuncer; Dagli, Mehmet; Karabagli, Pinar

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) associated with Evans syndrome; combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 53-year-old patient who presented with weakness, myalgia, arthralgia, shortness of breath and purpura. Initial laboratory investigations revealed liver dysfunction, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Anti-nuclear (ANA) and antimitochondrial M2 (AMA M2) antibodies were positive. Diagnose of PBC-AIH overlap was made by clinical, serological and histological investigations. AIHA and ITP was identified with clinical-laboratory findings and bone marrow puncture. She was treated with IVIG followed by prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid. Hemoglobin-thrombocytes increased rapidly and transaminases improved at day 8. We have reported the first case in the literature with AIH-PBC overlap syndrome concurrent by ITP and AIHA which suggest the presence of shared genetic susceptibility factors in multiple autoimmune conditions including AIH, PBC, ITP and AIHA.

  2. Cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia and lymphoproliferative disorders: a retrospective study of 20 patients including clinical, hematological, and molecular findings.

    PubMed

    Arthold, Cathrin; Skrabs, Cathrin; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, Gerlinde; Thalhammer, Renate; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Panzer, Simon; Valent, Peter; Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich; Sillaber, Christian

    2014-06-01

    A total of 20 patients with cold antibody hemolytic anemia were evaluated in a retrospective study of them, 15 had a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS): 14 with MGUS of immunoglobulin M (IgM) subtype and 1 with immunoglobulin G subtype. One patient had smoldering Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, but four patients had no monoclonal protein and no evidence of lymphoma. However, in three of these patients, we were able to demonstrate a (mono-)clonal rearrangement of their immunoglobulin heavy and/or light chains. Of the 20 patients, 5 had IgHV34 nucleotide sequence indicating that the antibody was directed against the "I" antigen. Two patients exhibited a progressive increase of IgM over time, however without increasing hemolytic activity. Moreover, in two patients with long-term follow-up, we were able to correlate recurrent hemolytic activity with low environmental temperatures. Among four patients treated with rituximab, all four responded to treatment. However, treatment effect was only transient in all of them.

  3. Low-dose rituximab in adult patients with idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia: clinical efficacy and biologic studies.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma; Zaja, Francesco; Zaninoni, Anna; Imperiali, Francesca Guia; Battista, Marta Lisa; Di Bona, Eros; Fattizzo, Bruno; Consonni, Dario; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Fanin, Renato; Zanella, Alberto

    2012-04-19

    This prospective study investigated the efficacy, safety, and response duration of low-dose rituximab (100 mg fixed dose for 4 weekly infusions) together with a short course of steroids as first- or second-line therapy in 23 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The overall response was 82.6% at month +2, and subsequently stabilized to ∼ 90% at months +6 and +12; the response was better in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA; overall response, 100% at all time points) than in cold hemagglutinin disease (CHD; average, 60%); the relapse-free survival was 100% for WAIHA at +6 and +12 months versus 89% and 59% in CHD, respectively, and the estimated relapse-free survival at 2 years was 81% and 40% for the warm and cold forms, respectively. The risk of relapse was higher in CHD and in patients with a longer interval between diagnosis and enrollment. Steroid administration was reduced both as cumulative dose (∼ 50%) and duration compared with the patient's past history. Treatment was well tolerated and no adverse events or infections were recorded; retreatment was also effective. The clinical response was correlated with amelioration biologic markers such as cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-17), suggesting that low-dose rituximab exerts an immunomodulating activity. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01345708.

  4. Alterations in Bone and Erythropoiesis in Hemolytic Anemia: Comparative Study in Bled, Phenylhydrazine-Treated and Plasmodium-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Robert; Tshikudi Malu, Diane; Dumais, Mathieu; Dalko, Esther; Gaudreault, Véronique; Roméro, Hugo; Martineau, Corine; Kevorkova, Olha; Dardon, Jaime Sanchez; Dodd, Erin Lynn; Bohle, David Scott; Scorza, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Sustained erythropoiesis and concurrent bone marrow hyperplasia are proposed to be responsible for low bone mass density (BMD) in chronic hemolytic pathologies. As impaired erythropoiesis is also frequent in these conditions, we hypothesized that free heme may alter marrow and bone physiology in these disorders. Bone status and bone marrow erythropoiesis were studied in mice with hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by phenylhydrazine (PHZ) or Plasmodium infection and in bled mice. All treatments resulted in lower hemoglobin concentrations, enhanced erythropoiesis in the spleen and reticulocytosis. The anemia was severe in mice with acute hemolysis, which also had elevated levels of free heme and ROS. No major changes in cellularity and erythroid cell numbers occurred in the bone marrow of bled mice, which generated higher numbers of erythroid blast forming units (BFU-E) in response to erythropoietin. In contrast, low numbers of bone marrow erythroid precursors and BFU-E and low concentrations of bone remodelling markers were measured in mice with HA, which also had blunted osteoclastogenesis, in opposition to its enhancement in bled mice. The alterations in bone metabolism were accompanied by reduced trabecular bone volume, enhanced trabecular spacing and lower trabecular numbers in mice with HA. Taken together our data suggests that hemolysis exerts distinct effects to bleeding in the marrow and bone and may contribute to osteoporosis through a mechanism independent of the erythropoietic stress. PMID:23029401

  5. Galactosylation of IgG1 modulates FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition of murine autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori; Ito, Kiyoaki; Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakata, Junichiro; Alvarez, Montserrat; Verbeek, J Sjef; Shinohara, Yasuro; Izui, Shozo

    2013-12-01

    Murine immune effector cells express three different stimulatory FcγRs (FcγRI, FcγRIII and FcγRIV) and one inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIB. Competitive engagement of stimulatory and inhibitory FcγRs has been shown to be critical for the development of immune complex-mediated inflammatory disorders. Because of the previous demonstration that FcγRIIB was unable to inhibit FcγRIII-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by 105-2H IgG1 anti-RBC mAb, we reevaluated the regulatory role of FcγRIIB on the development of anemia using two additional IgG1 anti-RBC mAbs (34-3C and 3H5G1) and different 34-3C IgG subclass-switch variants. We were able to induce a more severe anemia in FcγRIIB-deficient mice than in FcγRIIB-sufficient mice after injection of 34-3C and 3H5G1 IgG1, but not 105-2H IgG1. Structural analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides attached to the CH2 domain revealed that 105-2H was poorly galactosylated as compared with the other mAbs, while the extent of sialylation was comparable between all mAbs. In addition, we observed that a more galactosylated 105-2H variant provoked more severe anemia in FcγRIIB-deficient mice than FcγRIIB-sufficient mice. In contrast, the development of anemia induced by three non-IgG1 subclass variants of the 34-3C mAb was not down-regulated by FcγRIIB, although they were more galactosylated than its IgG1 variant. These data indicate that FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition of autoimmune hemolytic anemia is restricted to the IgG1 subclass and that galactosylation, but not sialylation, of IgG1 (but not other IgG subclasses) is critical for the interaction with FcγR, thereby determining the pathogenic potential of IgG1 autoantibodies.

  6. Delayed-onset hemolytic anemia in patients with travel-associated severe malaria treated with artesunate, France, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Thellier, Marc; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ader, Flavie; Roussel, Camille; Sonneville, Romain; Mayaux, Julien; Matheron, Sophie; Angoulvant, Adela; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Rapp, Christophe; Pistone, Thierry; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Kendjo, Eric; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bricaire, François; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre; Caumes, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Artesunate is the most effective treatment for severe malaria. However, delayed-onset hemolytic anemia has been observed in ≈20% of travelers who receive artesunate, ≈60% of whom require transfusion. This finding could discourage physicians from using artesunate. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 123 patients in France who had severe imported malaria that was treated with artesunate; our evaluation focused on outcome, adverse events, and postartesunate delayed-onset hemolysis (PADH). Of the 123 patients, 6 (5%) died. Overall, 97 adverse events occurred. Among the 78 patients who received follow-up for >8 days after treatment initiation, 76 (97%) had anemia, and 21 (27%) of the 78 cases were recorded as PADH. The median drop in hemoglobin levels was 1.3 g/dL; 15% of patients with PADH had hemoglobin levels of <7 g/dL, and 1 required transfusion. Despite the high incidence of PADH, the resulting anemia remained mild in 85% of cases. This reassuring result confirms the safety and therapeutic benefit of artesunate.

  7. Coombs-negative Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Followed by Anti-erythropoetin Receptor Antibody-associated Pure Red Cell Aplasia: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Mayumi; Kadowaki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Yuji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolysis. Although a direct Coombs test was negative, a high titer of RBC-bound IgG was detected, and a diagnosis of Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia was made. She was successfully treated with prednisolone. One year and five months later, she again presented anemia and was diagnosed with pure red cell aplasia. Anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody was detected in the serum. She was treated with cyclosporine and obtained prompt recovery. We herein report this rare case and review the pertinent literature.

  8. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia with mimicking anti-e specificity causing intravascular hemolysis in a chronic ITP patient.

    PubMed

    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Reddy, Mahua; Basu, Sabita

    2015-10-01

    A 12-year-old male child presented to the emergency room with three days history of cola-colored urine, mild icterus, dyspnea, palpitation and fatigue. He had a history of chronic ITP two years ago and had since been on steroid for maintenance of platelet count. He was subsequently diagnosed as a case of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Laboratory investigations were suggestive of intravascular hemolysis, and on immuno-hematological evaluation it was diagnosed that the patient had autoantibody with mimicking anti-e specificity. The specificity of autoantibody was further confirmed by adsorption study. The patient was successfully managed by transfusion of Rh(e)-negative red cells,steroid and rituximab therapy. So an autoantibody with mimicking anti-e specificity was identified in this case, which was significant in clinical point of view.

  9. Acute kidney injury in a patient with hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Michael; Lalama, Miguel; Rivard, Gabrielle; Kashiwagi, Deanne; Cornell, Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is clinically difficult to distinguish from HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Atypical HUS results from dysregulation of complement activation causing thrombotic microangiopathy affecting multiple organ systems. Atypical HUS is associated with high morbidity and mortality, making early recognition and appropriate therapy necessary to improve patient outcomes.

  10. Myeloid glycosylation defects lead to a spontaneous common variable immunodeficiency-like condition with associated hemolytic anemia and antilymphocyte autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sean O; Abbott, Derek W; Cobb, Brian A

    2014-06-15

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the most frequent symptomatic primary immune deficiency in humans, is a heterogeneous group of immunologic disorders estimated to affect 1:10,000-1:50,000. Although a clear disease etiology remains elusive, a common characteristic of CVID is deficient IgG Ab production in response to infection or vaccination. Patients often also exhibit autoimmune cytopenias with symptoms of abnormal T cell function, including reductions in naive T cells, which correlate with clinical severity. In this study, we discovered that targeted alterations in the glycome of the myeloid lineage lead to spontaneous immunodeficiency characteristic of both humoral and T cell dysfunction regularly found in human CVID. Mice carrying a myeloid-specific knockout of the Mgat2 gene encoding UDP-GlcNAc:α-6-d-mannoside β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II enzyme exhibit deficiencies in IgG responses to both protein and polysaccharide conjugate vaccines. Interestingly, the immunodeficiency is associated with decreased T cell activity because of a persistent autoimmune-mediated depletion of naive T cells, which is induced by changes in erythrocyte surface glycosylation. The N-glycosylation dependent autoepitopes that emerge on erythrocytes lead to autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and the causative auto-IgM cross-reacts with naive T cells despite the lack of glycan change on T cells. These findings demonstrate that alterations in erythrocyte glycosylation trigger the development of autoantibodies directed at both erythrocytes and naive T cells, revealing a possible mechanistic link between the induction of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the reduction in naive T cells, and poor Ab responses to vaccine in severe CVID patients.

  11. Clinical heterogeneity and predictors of outcome in primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a GIMEMA study of 308 patients.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma; Fattizzo, Bruno; Zaninoni, Anna; Radice, Tommaso; Nichele, Ilaria; Di Bona, Eros; Lunghi, Monia; Tassinari, Cristina; Alfinito, Fiorella; Ferrari, Antonella; Leporace, Anna Paola; Niscola, Pasquale; Carpenedo, Monica; Boschetti, Carla; Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Consonni, Dario; Scaramucci, Laura; De Fabritiis, Paolo; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Zanella, Alberto

    2014-11-06

    The clinical outcome, response to treatment, and occurrence of acute complications were retrospectively investigated in 308 primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) cases and correlated with serological characteristics and severity of anemia at onset. Patients had been followed up for a median of 33 months (range 12-372); 60% were warm AIHA, 27% cold hemagglutinin disease, 8% mixed, and 5% atypical (mostly direct antiglobulin test negative). The latter 2 categories more frequently showed a severe onset (hemoglobin [Hb] levels ≤6 g/dL) along with reticulocytopenia. The majority of warm AIHA patients received first-line steroid therapy only, whereas patients with mixed and atypical forms were more frequently treated with 2 or more therapy lines, including splenectomy, immunosuppressants, and rituximab. The cumulative incidence of relapse was increased in more severe cases (hazard ratio 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-6.57 for Hb ≤6 g/dL; P < .001). Thrombotic events were associated with Hb levels ≤6 g/dL at onset, intravascular hemolysis, and previous splenectomy. Predictors of a fatal outcome were severe infections, particularly in splenectomized cases, acute renal failure, Evans syndrome, and multitreatment (4 or more lines). The identification of severe and potentially fatal AIHA in a largely heterogeneous disease requires particular experienced attention by clinicians.

  12. Unusual Anemias.

    PubMed

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed.

  13. Concurrent Infections with Vector-Borne Pathogens Associated with Fatal Hemolytic Anemia in a Cattle Herd in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Meli, Marina L.; Dreher, Ute M.; Gönczi, Enikö; Deplazes, Peter; Braun, Ueli; Engels, Monika; Schüpbach, Jörg; Jörger, Kaspar; Thoma, Rudolf; Griot, Christian; Stärk, Katharina D. C.; Willi, Barbara; Schmidt, Joseph; Kocan, Katherine M.; Lutz, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a vector-borne disease that results in substantial economic losses in other parts of the world but so far not in northern Europe. In August 2002, a fatal disease outbreak was reported in a large dairy herd in the Swiss canton of Grisons. Diseased animals experienced fever, anorexia, agalactia, and depression. Anemia, ectoparasite infestation, and, occasionally, hemoglobinuria were observed. To determine the roles of vector-borne pathogens and to characterize the disease, blood samples were collected from all 286 animals: 50% of the cows were anemic. Upon microscopic examination of red blood cells, Anaplasma marginale inclusion bodies were found in 47% of the cows. The infection was confirmed serologically and by molecular methods. Interestingly, we also found evidence of infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, large Babesia and Theileria spp., and Mycoplasma wenyonii. The last two species had not previously been described in Switzerland. Anemia was significantly associated with the presence of the infectious agents detected, with the exception of A. phagocytophilum. Remarkably, concurrent infections with up to five infectious vector-borne agents were detected in 90% of the ill animals tested by PCR. We concluded that A. marginale was the major cause of the hemolytic anemia, while coinfections with other agents exacerbated the disease. This was the first severe disease outbreak associated with concurrent infections with vector-borne pathogens in alpine Switzerland; it was presumably curtailed by culling of the entire herd. It remains to be seen whether similar disease outbreaks will have to be anticipated in northern Europe in the future. PMID:15297529

  14. AMPD3-deficient mice exhibit increased erythrocyte ATP levels but anemia not improved due to PK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jidong; Morisaki, Hiroko; Toyama, Keiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Morisaki, Takayuki

    2012-11-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD) catalyzes AMP to IMP and plays an important role in energy charge and nucleotide metabolism. Human AMPD3 deficiency is a type of erythrocyte-specific enzyme deficiency found in individuals without clinical symptoms, although an increased level of ATP in erythrocytes has been reported. To better understand the physiological and pathological roles of AMPD3 deficiency, we established a line of AMPD3-deficient [A3(-/-)] mice. No AMPD activity and a high level of ATP were observed in erythrocytes of these mice, similar to human RBC-AMPD3 deficiency, while other characteristics were unremarkable. Next, we created AMPD3 and pyruvate kinase (PK) double-deficient [PKA(-/-,-/-)] mice by mating A3(-/-) mice with CBA-Pk-1slc/Pk-1slc mice [PK(-/-)], a spontaneous PK-deficient strain showing hemolytic anemia. In PKA(-/-,-/-) mice, the level of ATP in red blood cells was increased 1.5 times as compared to PK(-/-) mice, although hemolytic anemia in those animals was not improved. In addition, we observed osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in A3(-/-) mice under fasting conditions. In contrast, the ATP level in erythrocytes was elevated in A3(-/-) mice as compared to the control. In conclusion, AMPD3 deficiency increases the level of ATP in erythrocytes, but does not improve anemia due to PK deficiency and leads to erythrocyte dysfunction.

  15. Late onset of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using in vivo alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Oshima, Kumi; Nishimoto, Nahoko; Sato, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takuro; Hosoya, Noriko; Motokura, Toru; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Kamijo, Aki; Takahashi, Koki; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-03-01

    Hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have been reported to be mainly related to ABO-incompatibility between donor and recipient. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) without ABO-incompatibility has been also reported after allogeneic HSCT, especially with T-cell depletion. However, optimal management of AIHA or PRCA remains unclear. A 54-year-old male with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) underwent haploidentical human leukocyte antigen-mismatched HSCT using in vivo alemtuzumab and developed AIHA and PRCA simultaneously 15 months after transplantation, following the administration of cidofovir and probenecid for persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia and retinitis. AIHA was successfully treated with rituximab, and subsequently PRCA with cyclosporine without relapse of MDS or recurrence of CMV infection. The clinical course suggested that AIHA was mainly caused by humoral immune response, while PRCA was mainly caused by cell-mediated immune response in this patient, although these immune responses might be related to each other.

  16. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations. PMID:26740874

  17. Anemia for the Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    Powell, Darryl J; Achebe, Maureen Okam

    2016-12-01

    Anemia denotes a reduced red blood cell (RBC) mass from any cause. The causes of anemia are numerous and due to decreased (or abnormal) erythropoesis, shortened RBC life span, or blood loss. The most common etiology of anemia is iron deficiency. A judicious work up of anemia includes evaluating the reticulocyte count and peripheral smear. The severity of illness of a patient with anemia is determined by the degree of anemia and the seriousness of the underlying disorder. Management of patients with hereditary and hemolytic anemias should involve a hematologist.

  18. ATP11C is a major flippase in human erythrocytes and its defect causes congenital hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arashiki, Nobuto; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Mohandas, Narla; Hale, John; Yoshida, Kenichi; Ogura, Hiromi; Utsugisawa, Taiju; Ohga, Shouichi; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji; Kanno, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine is localized exclusively to the inner leaflet of the membrane lipid bilayer of most cells, including erythrocytes. This asymmetric distribution is critical for the survival of erythrocytes in circulation since externalized phosphatidylserine is a phagocytic signal for splenic macrophages. Flippases are P-IV ATPase family proteins that actively transport phosphatidylserine from the outer to inner leaflet. It has not yet been determined which of the 14 members of this family of proteins is the flippase in human erythrocytes. Herein, we report that ATP11C encodes a major flippase in human erythrocytes, and a genetic mutation identified in a male patient caused congenital hemolytic anemia inherited as an X-linked recessive trait. Phosphatidylserine internalization in erythrocytes with the mutant ATP11C was decreased 10-fold compared to that of the control, functionally establishing that ATP11C is a major flippase in human erythrocytes. Contrary to our expectations phosphatidylserine was retained in the inner leaflet of the majority of mature erythrocytes from both controls and the patient, suggesting that phosphatidylserine cannot be externalized as long as scramblase is inactive. Phosphatidylserine-exposing cells were found only in the densest senescent cells (0.1% of total) in which scramblase was activated by increased Ca2+ concentration: the percentage of these phosphatidylserine-exposing cells was increased in the patient’s senescent cells accounting for his mild anemia. Furthermore, the finding of similar extents of phosphatidylserine exposure by exogenous Ca2+-activated scrambling in both control erythrocytes and the patient’s erythrocytes implies that suppressed scramblase activity rather than flippase activity contributes to the maintenance of phosphatidylserine in the inner leaflet of human erythrocytes. PMID:26944472

  19. A teenager presents with fulminant hepatic failure and acute hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bose, Somnath; Sonny, Abraham; Rahman, Nadeem

    2015-03-01

    A teenager was admitted to an outside hospital ED following an episode of melena. He had been complaining of intermittent abdominal pain, nausea, malaise, and easy fatigability for 2 months, with significant worsening of symptoms 2 weeks prior to this episode. He had no significant medical, surgical, or family history. On presentation at the outside ED, he was found to be profoundly icteric and encephalopathic. Initial laboratories suggested anemia, acute kidney injury, and acute liver failure, leading to a presumptive diagnosis of acute fulminant liver failure necessitating transfer to our institution.

  20. Red Blood Cell Destruction in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Role of Complement and Potential New Targets for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a collective term for several diseases characterized by autoantibody-initiated destruction of red blood cells (RBCs). Exact subclassification is essential. We provide a review of the respective types of AIHA with emphasis on mechanisms of RBC destruction, focusing in particular on complement involvement. Complement activation plays a definitive but limited role in warm-antibody AIHA (w-AIHA), whereas primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD), secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS), and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) are entirely complement-dependent disorders. The details of complement involvement differ among these subtypes. The theoretical background for therapeutic complement inhibition in selected patients is very strong in CAD, CAS, and PCH but more limited in w-AIHA. The optimal target complement component for inhibition is assumed to be important and highly dependent on the type of AIHA. Complement modulation is currently not an evidence-based therapy modality in any AIHA, but a number of experimental and preclinical studies are in progress and a few clinical observations have been reported. Clinical studies of new complement inhibitors are probably not far ahead. PMID:25705656

  1. Red blood cell destruction in autoimmune hemolytic anemia: role of complement and potential new targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Sundic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a collective term for several diseases characterized by autoantibody-initiated destruction of red blood cells (RBCs). Exact subclassification is essential. We provide a review of the respective types of AIHA with emphasis on mechanisms of RBC destruction, focusing in particular on complement involvement. Complement activation plays a definitive but limited role in warm-antibody AIHA (w-AIHA), whereas primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD), secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS), and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) are entirely complement-dependent disorders. The details of complement involvement differ among these subtypes. The theoretical background for therapeutic complement inhibition in selected patients is very strong in CAD, CAS, and PCH but more limited in w-AIHA. The optimal target complement component for inhibition is assumed to be important and highly dependent on the type of AIHA. Complement modulation is currently not an evidence-based therapy modality in any AIHA, but a number of experimental and preclinical studies are in progress and a few clinical observations have been reported. Clinical studies of new complement inhibitors are probably not far ahead.

  2. A Deep Intronic Mutation in the Ankyrin-1 Gene Causes Diminished Protein Expression Resulting in Hemolytic Anemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Zhao, PengXiang; Arimatsu, Kei; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa; Krieg, Lara; Fu, Emily; Zhang, Tian; Du, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Linkage between transmembrane proteins and the spectrin-based cytoskeleton is necessary for membrane elasticity of red blood cells. Mutations of the proteins that mediate this linkage result in various types of hemolytic anemia. Here we report a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea−induced mutation of ankyrin-1, named hema6, which causes hereditary spherocytosis in mice through a mild reduction of protein expression. The causal mutation was traced to a single nucleotide transition located deep into intron 13 of gene Ank1. In vitro minigene splicing assay revealed two abnormally spliced transcripts containing cryptic exons from fragments of Ank1 intron 13. The inclusion of cryptic exons introduced a premature termination codon, which leads to nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant transcripts in vivo. Hence, in homozygous mice, only wild-type ankyrin-1 is expressed, albeit at 70% of the level in wild-type mice. Heterozygotes display a similar hereditary spherocytosis phenotype stemming from intermediate protein expression level, indicating the haploinsufficiency of the mutation. Weakened linkage between integral transmembrane protein, band 3, and underlying cytoskeleton was observed in mutant mice as the result of reduced high-affinity binding sites provided by ankyrin-1. Hema6 is the only known mouse mutant of Ank1 allelic series that expresses full-length canonical ankyrin-1 at a reduced level, a fact that makes it particularly useful to study the functional impact of ankyrin-1 quantitative deficiency. PMID:23934996

  3. Hemolytic anemia repressed hepcidin level without hepatocyte iron overload: lesson from Günther disease model

    PubMed Central

    Millot, Sarah; Delaby, Constance; Moulouel, Boualem; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Pilard, Nathalie; Ducrot, Nicolas; Ged, Cécile; Lettéron, Philippe; de Franceschi, Lucia; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaumont, Carole; Gouya, Laurent; De Verneuil, Hubert; Lyoumi, Saïd; Puy, Hervé; Karim, Zoubida

    2017-01-01

    Hemolysis occurring in hematologic diseases is often associated with an iron loading anemia. This iron overload is the result of a massive outflow of hemoglobin into the bloodstream, but the mechanism of hemoglobin handling has not been fully elucidated. Here, in a congenital erythropoietic porphyria mouse model, we evaluate the impact of hemolysis and regenerative anemia on hepcidin synthesis and iron metabolism. Hemolysis was confirmed by a complete drop in haptoglobin, hemopexin and increased plasma lactate dehydrogenase, an increased red blood cell distribution width and osmotic fragility, a reduced half-life of red blood cells, and increased expression of heme oxygenase 1. The erythropoiesis-induced Fam132b was increased, hepcidin mRNA repressed, and transepithelial iron transport in isolated duodenal loops increased. Iron was mostly accumulated in liver and spleen macrophages but transferrin saturation remained within the normal range. The expression levels of hemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor CD163 and hemopexin receptor CD91 were drastically reduced in both liver and spleen, resulting in heme- and hemoglobin-derived iron elimination in urine. In the kidney, the megalin/cubilin endocytic complex, heme oxygenase 1 and the iron exporter ferroportin were induced, which is reminiscent of significant renal handling of hemoglobin-derived iron. Our results highlight ironbound hemoglobin urinary clearance mechanism and strongly suggest that, in addition to the sequestration of iron in macrophages, kidney may play a major role in protecting hepatocytes from iron overload in chronic hemolysis. PMID:28143953

  4. Hemolytic anemia repressed hepcidin level without hepatocyte iron overload: lesson from Günther disease model.

    PubMed

    Millot, Sarah; Delaby, Constance; Moulouel, Boualem; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Pilard, Nathalie; Ducrot, Nicolas; Ged, Cécile; Lettéron, Philippe; de Franceschi, Lucia; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaumont, Carole; Gouya, Laurent; De Verneuil, Hubert; Lyoumi, Saïd; Puy, Hervé; Karim, Zoubida

    2017-02-01

    Hemolysis occurring in hematologic diseases is often associated with an iron loading anemia. This iron overload is the result of a massive outflow of hemoglobin into the bloodstream, but the mechanism of hemoglobin handling has not been fully elucidated. Here, in a congenital erythropoietic porphyria mouse model, we evaluate the impact of hemolysis and regenerative anemia on hepcidin synthesis and iron metabolism. Hemolysis was confirmed by a complete drop in haptoglobin, hemopexin and increased plasma lactate dehydrogenase, an increased red blood cell distribution width and osmotic fragility, a reduced half-life of red blood cells, and increased expression of heme oxygenase 1. The erythropoiesis-induced Fam132b was increased, hepcidin mRNA repressed, and transepithelial iron transport in isolated duodenal loops increased. Iron was mostly accumulated in liver and spleen macrophages but transferrin saturation remained within the normal range. The expression levels of hemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor CD163 and hemopexin receptor CD91 were drastically reduced in both liver and spleen, resulting in heme- and hemoglobin-derived iron elimination in urine. In the kidney, the megalin/cubilin endocytic complex, heme oxygenase 1 and the iron exporter ferroportin were induced, which is reminiscent of significant renal handling of hemoglobin-derived iron. Our results highlight ironbound hemoglobin urinary clearance mechanism and strongly suggest that, in addition to the sequestration of iron in macrophages, kidney may play a major role in protecting hepatocytes from iron overload in chronic hemolysis.

  5. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  6. Primary sinusoidal lymphoma of the liver revealed by autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Gris, J C; Pignodel, C; Joujoux, J M; Schved, J F; Balmes, J L

    1997-01-01

    Primary liver lymphomas usually present with the clinical picture of a liver tumor, and are characterized by a predominantly portal invasion by lymphoid cells of the B-cell phenotype. We report a case of primary sinusoidal lymphoma of the liver, in a 36 year-old male patient, revealed by homogeneous hepatosplenomegaly and infiltration of liver sinusoids by morphologically normal lymphocytes, without destruction of the parenchyma. Immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue sections was positive for the pan T-cell marker MTI, weakly positive for UCHLI, and negative for CD3, and B-cell markers were negative; these findings were consistent with the diagnosis of T-cell lymphoma. The clinical, histological and immunological presentation of this lymphoma was similar to that of hepatosplenic gamma delta T-cell lymphoma. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia preceded the lymphoma. Despite chemotherapy, the patient died 24 months after the initial presentation in the leukemic phase. A better understanding of this exceptional but characteristic entity is required for an accurate and early diagnosis.

  7. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength

    PubMed Central

    Cita, Kizzy-Clara; Brureau, Laurent; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Connes, Philippe; Ferdinand, Séverine; Tressières, Benoit; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Blanchet, Pascal; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters. Materials and Methods Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years) were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group) and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group). Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC) deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry) and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time). Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), total bilirubin (BIL) levels and reticulocyte (RET) percentage) to calculate a hemolytic index. Results Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01), LDH (p = 0.03), RET (p = 0.03) levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02). Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01) and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005) were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01) and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03) were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01) than controls. Conclusion Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability. PMID:27145183

  8. Development of mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia and Evans' syndrome following chicken pox infection in a case of low-titer cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yumi; Masuya, Masahiro; Katayama, Naoyuki; Miyata, Eri; Sugimoto, Yuka; Shibasaki, Tetsunori; Yamamura, Kentaro; Ohishi, Kohshi; Minami, Nobuyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Nobori, Tsutomu

    2006-10-01

    We describe a patient with low-titer cold agglutinin disease (CAD) who developed mixed-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and idiopathic thrombocytopenia following chicken pox infection. At least 1 year before admission to hospital, the patient had mild hemolytic anemia associated with low-titer cold agglutinins. A severe hemolytic crisis and thrombocytopenia (Evans' syndrome) occurred several days after infection with chicken pox, and the patient was referred to our hospital. Serological findings revealed the presence of both cold agglutinins and warm-reactive autoantibodies against erythrocytes, and the diagnosis was mixed-type AIHA. Following steroid therapy, the hemoglobin (Hb) level and platelet count improved. The patient was closely followed over a 10-year period with recurrent documented hemolysis after viral or bacterial infections. Warm-reactive autoantibodies have not been detected in the last 2 years, and only the immunoglobulin M anti-I cold agglutinins with a low titer and wide thermal amplitude have remained unchanged. Therefore, the patient has received at least 10 mg prednisolone daily to maintain a Hb level of 10 g/dL. To the best of our knowledge, no adult case of low-titer CAD that has evolved into mixed-type AIHA and Evans' syndrome after chicken pox infection has been previously reported in the literature.

  9. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, iron supplementation, kidney disease, low blood iron, low iron, normocytic anemia, nutrition, pregnancy, Procrit, red blood cell deficiency, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroiditis ...

  10. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vulliamy, T J; D'Urso, M; Battistuzzi, G; Estrada, M; Foulkes, N S; Martini, G; Calabro, V; Poggi, V; Giordano, R; Town, M

    1988-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; EC 1.1.1.49) deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. We have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A we have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. In one of the commonest, G6PD Mediterranean, which is associated with favism among other clinical manifestations, a single amino acid replacement was found (serine----phenylalanine): it must be responsible for the decreased stability and the reduced catalytic efficiency of this enzyme. Single point mutations were also found in G6PD Metaponto (Southern Italy) and in G6PD Ilesha (Nigeria), which are asymptomatic, and in G6PD Chatham, which was observed in an Indian boy with neonatal jaundice. In G6PD "Matera," which is now known to be the same as G6PD A-, two separate point mutations were found, one of which is the same as in G6PD A. In G6PD Santiago, a de novo mutation (glycine----arginine) is associated with severe chronic hemolytic anemia. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C----T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency. Images PMID:3393536

  11. Coinfection of hepatitis A virus genotype IA and IIIA complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, prolonged cholestasis, and false-positive immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis E virus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Sup; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Jang, Je Hyuck; Myung, Hyung Joon; Kim, Jin Wook; Bang, Soo Mee; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Haeryoung; Yun, Hae Sun

    2011-12-01

    A 37-year-old male presented with fever and jaundice was diagnosed as hepatitis A complicated with progressive cholestasis and severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia. He was treated with high-dose prednisolone (1.5 mg/kg), and eventually recovered. His initial serum contained genotype IA hepatitis A virus (HAV), which was subsequently replaced by genotype IIIA HAV. Moreover, at the time of development of hemolytic anemia, he became positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV). We detected HAV antigens in the liver biopsy specimen, while we detected neither HEV antigen in the liver nor HEV RNA in his serum. This is the first report of hepatitis A coinfected with two different genotypes manifesting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, prolonged cholestasis, and false-positive IgM anti-HEV.

  12. A 2-month-old boy with hemolytic anemia and reticulocytopenia following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for Kawasaki disease: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Yeon; Kim, Joon Hwan; Park, Jin Suk; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cho, Yeon Kyung; Cha, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ki Eun; Kang, Myung Suh; Lim, Kyung Ah

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a rare case of hemolytic anemia with reticulocytopenia following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in a young infant treated for Kawasaki disease. A 2-month-old boy presented with fever lasting 3 days, conjunctival injection, strawberry tongue, erythematous edema of the hands, and macular rash, symptoms and signs suggestive of incomplete Kawasaki disease. His fever resolved 8 days after treatment with aspirin and high dose infusion of intravenous immunoglobulin. The hemoglobin and hematocrit decreased from 9.7 g/dL and 27.1% to 7.4 g/dL and 21.3%, respectively. The patient had normocytic hypochromic anemia with anisocytosis, poikilocytosis, immature neutrophils, and nucleated red blood cells. The direct antiglobulin test result was positive, and the reticulocyte count was 1.39%. The patient had an uneventful recovery. However, reticulocytopenia persisted 1 month after discharge. PMID:28018448

  13. Inheritance of the Bantu/Benin haplotype causes less severe hemolytic and oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxycarbamide.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Jéssika V; Silva, Danilo G H; Torres, Lidiane S; Belini-Junior, Edis; Barberino, Willian M; Oliveira, Renan G; Carrocini, Gisele C S; Gelaleti, Gabriela B; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-07-01

    Beta S-globin gene cluster haplotypes (β(S)-haplotypes) can modulate the response to hydroxycarbamide (HC) treatment in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. In Brazil, the most common haplotypes are Bantu and Benin, and both confer a poor prognosis for patients when untreated with HC. We evaluated oxidative and hemolytic biomarkers in 48 SCA patients undergoing HC treatment separated in three subgroups: Bantu/Bantu, Bantu/Benin and Benin/Benin haplotype. On the basis of reduced haptoglobin (HP) levels, patients with Bantu/Bantu haplotypes had 3.0% higher hemolysis degree when compared with those with Bantu/Benin haplotypes (P=0.01). The Benin/Benin patients had 53.6% greater lipid peroxidation index than the Bantu/Bantu patients (P=0.01) because of evaluated thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels. The Bantu/Benin subgroup had intermediate levels of hemolytic and oxidative stress markers compared with the homozygous subgroups. Through strict inclusion criteria adopted, as well as consolidated and well-described hemolytic and the oxidative parameters evaluated, we suggest a haplotype-interaction response to HC treatment mediated by a 'balance' between the genetic factors of each haplotype studied.

  14. Nimesulide-induced severe hemolytic anemia and acute liver failure leading to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, L; de Francisco, R; Pérez-Pariente, J M; Cadahia, V; Tojo, R; Rodriguez, M; Lucena, Ma I; Andrade, R J

    2002-11-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman who had undergone 7 months of treatment with Nimesulide (100 mg/b.i.d.) for symptomatic osteoarthritis. The patient was admitted to our unit with a clinical picture of progressive jaundice over 3 weeks. Clinical and analytical studies revealed acute liver failure, this being confirmed by liver biopsy, which showed submassive necrosis. Serological tests for different viral agents causing hepatitis were all negative. In addition, she presented a picture of severe haemolytic anaemia resistant to several treatments and needed multiple transfusions. Twenty-three days after admission, the patient presented hepatic encephalopathy and received an orthotopic liver transplant on day 25. The evolution after transplantation was good and the patient continues in good health with no evidence of haemolysis almost 2 years later. Liver toxicity due to Nimesulide is well known, but to our knowledge the occurrence of haemolytic anaemia has not been related to this drug previously. For these reasons, Nimesulide has been restricted or removed from the market in several countries in recent months.

  15. Comparison of cytokine responses between dogs with sepsis and dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Valerie; Burgess, Brandy; Morley, Paul; Bragg, Ryan; Avery, Anne; Dow, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Cytokine abnormalities have been described previously in dogs with varied immune mediated and inflammatory conditions such as IMHA and sepsis. The purpose of this study was to establish references ranges for cytokine levels in dogs and to compare cytokine levels in normal dogs and dogs with two common inflammatory diseases (sepsis and IMHA). We hypothesized that cytokine response profiles in dogs with sepsis would be significantly different from those in dogs with IMHA due to the very different etiologies of the two diseases. Concentrations of 14 different cytokines in serum were measured and values grouped according to cytokine function. Serum from clinically normal dogs was used to establish cytokine concentration reference ranges. Rank values for each of the 4 cytokine groups were then compared statistically between healthy control, septic and IMHA dogs. This analysis revealed differences in cytokine groups between dogs with sepsis and IMHA when compared to healthy control dogs but no difference between dogs with either of these conditions. In conclustion, dogs in the early stage of sepsis and IMHA have similar circulating cytokines despite different etiologies suggesting activation of common immunologic pathways. This may have implications for immunotherapy of immune mediated diseases in dogs of varying etiology.

  16. Immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Absolute reticulocyte count Direct or indirect Coombs test Hemoglobin in the urine LDH (level of this enzyme ... of tissue damage) Red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin, and hematocrit Serum bilirubin level Serum free hemoglobin ...

  17. Anemias.

    PubMed

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia.

  18. Cut-off value of red-blood-cell-bound IgG for the diagnosis of Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, Toyomi; Oyamada, Takashi; Omine, Mitsuhiro; Ozawa, Keiya; Kajii, Eiji

    2009-02-01

    Direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (Coombs-negative AIHA) is characterized by laboratory evidence of in vivo hemolysis, together with a negative DAT performed by conventional tube technique (CTT) in clinically suspected AIHA patients. The immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for red-blood-cell-bound immunoglobulin G (RBC-IgG) can be used to diagnose patients in whom CTT does not detect low levels of red cell autoantibodies. We investigated the diagnostic cutoff value of the IRMA for RBC-IgG in Coombs-negative AIHA and calculated its sensitivity and specificity. Of the 140 patients with negative DAT by CTT referred to our laboratory with undiagnosed hemolytic anemia, AIHA was clinically diagnosed in 64 patients (Coombs-negative AIHA). The numbers of Coombs-negative AIHA and non-AIHA patients changed with age and gender. The cutoff values were determined from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve according to age and gender. The IRMA for RBC-IgG proved to be sensitive (71.4%) and specific (87.8%) when using these cutoffs. Using these cutoffs for 41 patients with negative DAT referred to our laboratory in 2006, all the pseudonegative cases were treated with steroids before the test. The 31 untreated cases could be grouped using one cutoff value of 78.5 and showed 100% sensitivity and 94% specificity, independent of gender and age. Results indicate that RBC-IgG could become a standard approach for the diagnosis of Coombs-negative AIHA, when measured before treatment.

  19. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Kara B.; Scrape, Scott R.; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse. PMID:26989567

  20. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... returns to normal. Possible Complications Complications may include: Gallstones Much lower red blood cell production (aplastic crisis) ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 14. Read More Anemia Gallstones Hemolytic anemia Review Date 2/1/2016 Updated ...

  1. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-03-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and beta thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias.

  2. ABO Antibody Titers are not Predictive of Hemolytic Reactions Due to Plasma Incompatible Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Karafin, Matthew S.; Blagg, Lorraine; Tobian, Aaron A. R.; King, Karen E.; Ness, Paul M.; Savage, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The overall risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions from plasma (minor) incompatible platelet transfusions and the role of a critical anti-A or anti-B titer in predicting/preventing these reactions has not been clearly established. Methods We evaluated all apheresis platelet (AP) transfusions for three months. Using the gel titer method, we determined the anti-A and/or the anti-B IgG titer for all incompatible APs. Reported febrile transfusion reactions and hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) were recorded; transfusions were not prospectively evaluated by the study team. A post-transfusion DAT and eluate were performed after a reported febrile or hemolytic reaction for patients who received plasma incompatible APs. Results 647of 4,288 AP transfusions (15.1%) were plasma incompatible. Group O APs (N = 278) had significantly higher anti-A and anti-B titers than group A or B APs (p<0.0001). No group A or B APs had a titer >128 (0/342). For group O APs, 73 had titers ≥256 (26.3%), and 27 had titers ≥512 (9.7%). No HTRs were reported to any plasma incompatible AP transfusion during the study period. Two plasma incompatible AP transfusions were associated with fever/chills and positive DATs, of which one had a positive eluate. The incidence of a DAT and eluate positive febrile transfusion reaction in the plasma incompatible AP population is 0.15% (95% CI 0.0–0.86%). Conclusion A critical anti-A or B titer is not sufficient to predict the risk of hemolysis in patients receiving plasma incompatible APs, although underreporting of reactions to the blood bank may limit the generalizability of this study. PMID:22339320

  3. Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

  4. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems) Long-term (chronic) diseases such as chronic kidney disease, cancer, ulcerative colitis, or rheumatoid arthritis Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone marrow such as lymphoma, leukemia, ...

  5. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  6. [Fulminant visceral disseminated varicella-zoster virus infection without skin involvement in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia on prednisolone therapy].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Megumi; Yoshifuji, Kota; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tohda, Shuji; Miki, Tohru; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    An 80-year-old man with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) received immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone (1 mg/kg). One month later, his hemoglobin level had normalized, and the prednisolone dose was tapered. The next day, he complained of acute and progressive back pain. He was admitted to our hospital for further examination approximately 24 h after the pain had started. Computed tomography revealed only localized pneumonia. However, he showed signs of severe disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), liver dysfunction, and respiratory failure. Empiric broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy was started with a presumptive diagnosis of severe bacterial infection. However, his condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 17 h after admission. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was detected by quantitative PCR in the peripheral blood sample and by immunohistochemistry in all organs except for the brain at autopsy. Visceral VZV infection is a severe disease with a high mortality rate. Although appropriate diagnosis and treatment is crucial, in cases without the characteristic skin rash the diagnosis is difficult. The possibility of visceral VZV infection should be taken into consideration when administering prednisolone to patients with AIHA.

  7. Refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with DiGeorge syndrome treated successfully with plasma exchange: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Damlaj, Moussab; Séguin, Chantal

    2014-11-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) results from targeted antibodies towards the red blood cells (RBCs) and can be either idiopathic or secondary to certain diseases, such as autoimmune disorders or malignancy, drugs, or infection. Patients with DiGeorge syndrome are particularly vulnerable to autoimmune conditions secondary to thymic hypoplasia and dysfunction of the immune system. First-line therapy for AIHA consists of corticosteroids, with most patients showing signs of response. Relapses are not uncommon and are treated with splenectomy or rituximab. There is a paucity of reports in the literature regarding treatment options beyond this stage. Herein, we describe an unusual case of a 20-year-old female affected by DiGeorge syndrome with a history of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), who presented with life-threatening AIHA. Standard first- and second-line therapeutic modalities were ineffective in controlling her disease and she ultimately underwent plasma exchange therapy with successful resolution of hemolysis. At her last follow-up, one year after her initial presentation, she remains clinically well without signs of hemolysis. We conclude that in refractory cases of warm AIHA, plasma exchange therapy can be a valuable tool in the therapeutic armamentarium.

  8. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA.

  9. Characteristics and outcome of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia in adults: New insights based on a single-center experience with 60 patients.

    PubMed

    Roumier, Mathilde; Loustau, Valentine; Guillaud, Constance; Languille, Laetitia; Mahevas, Matthieu; Khellaf, Mehdi; Limal, Nicolas; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Godeau, Bertrand; Michel, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is a rare autoimmune disease with poorly known natural history and management remaining mainly empirical. To better describe the characteristics and outcome of wAIHA in adults, we performed a single-center cohort study of patients diagnosed with wAIIHA from 2001 to 2012 in our center. Sixty patients (50% women) were included, the mean age at the time of wAIHA onset was 54 ± 23 years. wAIHA was considered "primary" for 21 patients (35%) and was associated with an underlying disorder in 39 (65%), including mainly lymphoproliferative disorders and systemic lupus. All patients but two needed treatment and received corticosteroids, with an overall initial response rate of 87%. However, 63% of the patients were corticosteroid-dependent and 56% required at least one second-line treatment including mainly rituximab (n = 19). At the time of analysis, after a mean follow-up of 46 months, 28 patients (47%) were in remission and off treatment and 5 (8%) had died. The presence of an underlying lymphoproliferative disorder was associated with reduced response to corticosteroids and increased need for second-line therapy. In conclusion, in the last decade and compared to a previous series from our center, the rate of secondary wAIHA has increased and the use of rituximab has emerged as the preferred second-line treatment and corticosteroid-sparing strategy; the overall mortality has significantly decreased (8 vs. 18%).

  10. Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreoshi; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-01-01

    Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in C57BL/6 mice after 5-6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline). Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA.

  11. Hemopoietic effect of extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hyojun; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Kil, Ki-Jung; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2014-01-01

    Samul-tang (Si-Wu-Tang, SMT), a kind of herbal medicines, has been used for the hemato-deficient disease for hundreds of years. In this work, investigate the anti-anemia activity of the H2O extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang in an anemia model induced by intravenous infection of phenylhydrazine-HCL (PHZ) at 10 mg/kg for 4 days. After PHZ injection, female Sparague-Dawley rats were administrated extracts from constituent herbal medicines of SMT (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) daily for 1 week. Results showed that sever hemolysis was induced by PHZ. For Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) H2O extract treated groups, the concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cells number increased much more significantly than PHZ-treated group. Moreover, Angelica gigas (AG), Angelica. acutiloba (AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) extract administration significantly improved serum erythropoietin concentration. The activity of aminolevulinic acid dehydrates (ALDL) in liver homegenate was increased in Angelica gigas(AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) treated group.

  12. Hemolytic disease of newborn due to anti-Jk b in a woman with high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Beenu; Malhotra, Sheetal; Saluja, Karan; Kumar, Praveen; Marwaha, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    This case illustrates the importance of blood group antibodies in antenatal serology other than Rh system as a cause of hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In India, antenatal antibody screening is done at majority of transfusion centers in only Rh (D) negative mothers. In this multigravida woman with high risk obstetrical history, an antenatal antibody screening by indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was not performed as she was Rh (D) positive. Postnatal work up for the pathological jaundice in the neonate revealed that red cell alloimmunization had occurred due to anti-Jk(b). We conclude that antenatal antibody screening should be done in all pregnant women irrespective of the D antigen status to detect and manage red cell alloimmunization to any other clinically significant blood group antigens.

  13. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anemia Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  14. The expression and concentration of CD40 ligand in normal pregnancy, preeclampsia, and hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Hanan A G; Abousamra, Nashwa K; Goda, Hossam; El-Shouky, Reda; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia has been associated with increased platelet activation detected before disease onset. Inappropriate activation of platelets may be involved in pathogenesis in preeclampsia by promoting coagulation and thrombosis and also as a mediator of inflammation. The exaggerated platelet activation and inflammation leading to endothelial damage in preeclampsia can be explained by the CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) system. Expression of CD40L on platelets was determined by whole-blood flow cytometry, and serum levels of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 11 women with mild preeclampsia, 11 women with severe preeclampsia, and six women with hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome compared with 13 normotensive pregnant women as a control group. The platelet surface expression of CD40L was significantly higher in women with mild and severe preeclampsia and HELLP compared with normal pregnancy group (P = 0.001; P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.003, respectively), with no significant difference being found between women with mild preeclampsia compared with HELLP and severe preeclampsia compared with HELLP (P = 0.2; P = 0.8, respectively). The serum concentration of sCD40L was significantly higher in women with mild and severe preeclampsia and HELLP compared with the normal pregnancy group (P = 0.001; P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.022, respectively), with no significant difference being found between women with mild compared with severe preeclampsia or HELLP and severe preeclampsia compared with HELLP (P = 0.7; P = 0.6; P = 0.6, respectively). In conclusion, the higher expression and concentration of CD40L in women with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome compared with normal pregnant women may indicate an exaggerated activation of platelets and endothelial cells in the disorder.

  15. Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sreoshi; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in C57BL/6 mice after 5–6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline). Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA. PMID:27870894

  16. Emergence of long-lived autoreactive plasma cells in the spleen of primary warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia patients treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Vingert, Benoit; Moroch, Julien; Boutboul, David; Audia, Sylvain; Cagnard, Nicolas; Ripa, Julie; Menard, Cédric; Tarte, Karin; Mégret, Jérôme; Le Gallou, Simon; Patin, Pauline; Thai, Lan; Galicier, Lionel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Godeau, Bertrand; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-08-01

    Primary warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is a rare autoimmune disease in which red blood cells are eliminated by IgG autoantibodies. We analyzed the antibody-secreting cells in the spleen and the peripheral blood of wAIHA patients in various contexts of treatment. Plasmablasts were observed in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed wAIHA patients and, accordingly, active germinal center reactions were present in the spleen of patients receiving short-term corticosteroid therapy. Long-term corticosteroid regimens markedly reduced this response while splenic plasma cells were able to persist, a fraction of them secreting anti-red blood cell IgG in vitro. In wAIHA patients treated by rituximab and who underwent splenectomy because of treatment failure, plasma cells were still present in the spleen, some of them being autoreactive. By using a set of diagnostic genes that allowed us to assess the plasma cell maturation stage, we observed that these cells displayed a long-lived program, differing from the one of plasma cells from healthy donors or from wAIHA patients with various immunosuppressant treatments, and more similar to the one of normal long-lived bone-marrow plasma cells. Interestingly, an increased level of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) was observed in the supernatant of spleen cell cultures from such rituximab-treated wAIHA patients. These results suggest, in line with our previous report on primary immune thrombocytopenia, that the B-cell depletion induced by rituximab promoted a suitable environment for the maturation and survival of auto-immune long-lived plasma cells in the spleen.

  17. Bendamustine and rituximab combination in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a multicentric retrospective study of the French CLL intergroup (GCFLLC/MW and GOELAMS).

    PubMed

    Quinquenel, Anne; Willekens, Christophe; Dupuis, Jehan; Royer, Bruno; Ysebaert, Loic; De Guibert, S; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Feugier, Pierre; Guieze, Romain; Levy, Vincent; Delmer, Alain

    2015-03-01

    We report our experience on bendamustine and rituximab (BR) combination in 26 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). At the time of BR initiation, 88% of the patients had already been treated for AIHA and CLL was progressive regardless of AIHA in all patients but one. Overall response rates were 81% for AIHA and 77% for CLL. Median time to next treatment was 28.3 months and 26.2 months for AIHA and CLL, respectively. BR therapy may represent a good and safe therapeutic option in this setting where adequate control of CLL seems important for long-term AIHA response.

  18. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  19. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  20. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... essential compounds. It also helps regulate your body temperature, fights infection, and gets rid of waste products. ... Some AIHA antibodies become active only in warm temperatures; others only in cold temperatures. – Alloimmune hemolytic anemia. ...

  1. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jump to navigation U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Contact Us Get Email Alerts ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  2. Surface localization of high-mobility group nucleosome-binding protein 2 on leukemic B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is related to secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Morande, Pablo E; Borge, Mercedes; Abreu, Cecilia; Galletti, Jeremías; Zanetti, Samanta R; Nannini, Paula; Bezares, Raimundo F; Pantano, Sergio; Dighiero, Guillermo; Oppezzo, Pablo; Gamberale, Romina; Giordano, Mirta

    2015-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the main cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA). However, the cellular basis underlying this strong association remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that leukemic B cells from patients with CLL recognize the erythrocyte protein Band 3, a prevalent autoantigen in AHA. Here we show that the major binding site of Band 3 on leukemic cells is an extrinsic protein identified as high-mobility group nucleosome binding protein 2 (HMGN2), a nucleosome-interacting factor which has not been previously reported at the cell surface. T lymphocytes do not express HMGN2 or bind Band 3. Removal of HMGN2 from the cell membrane abrogated the capacity of Band 3-pulsed CLL cells to induce CD4 + T cell proliferation. We conclude that surface HMGN2 in leukemic B cells is involved in Band 3 binding, uptake and presentation to CD4 + T lymphocytes, and as such may favor the initiation of AHA secondary to CLL.

  3. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-S antibody in patient with anti-Jk(a) autoantibody and multiple alloantibodies.

    PubMed

    Guastafierro, S; Sessa, F; Cuomo, C; Tirelli, A

    2004-05-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman with a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR). She had a history of an ulcerative colitis, blood transfusion because of rectal bleeding, and surgical removal of descendent and sigmoid colon. At admission, laboratory data showed Hb 6.3 g/dL, reticulocytes 120 x 10(9)/L, serum total bilirubin 1.2 mg/dL (direct bilirubin: 0.2 mg/dL). Pretransfusion antibody screening procedures were positive. A monospecific autoanti-Jk(a) and three alloantibodies (anti-c, -E, -K) were identified by immunohematologic studies. The patient received two units of crossmatch compatible concentrated red blood cells. Six days later biochemical serum values showed Hb 6.2 g/dL, LDH 975 I.U./L and total bilirubin 2.95 mg/dL (direct 0.35 mg/dL). Crossmatches with red cell suspension of transfused blood units and a post-transfusion serum were repeatedly positive. Laboratory tests showed the presence of anti-S alloantobody in the serum and eluate. Moreover, pre-transfusion serum of the patient was retrospectively retested: anti-S was not detected. These data suggested a DHTR. The present case is unusual and interesting because of the association of a rare autoanti-Jk(a), non responsible for anemia, and four alloantibodies of which anti-S involved in a DHTR.

  4. Anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody-associated pure red cell aplasia accompanied by Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with T cell/histiocyte-rich large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fujimi, Akihito; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kanisawa, Yuji; Hashimoto, Akari; Nakajima, Chisa; Hayasaka, Naotaka; Uemura, Naoki; Okuda, Toshinori; Minami, Shinya; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Koichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Kato, Junji

    2014-11-01

    A 79-year-old female diagnosed with T cell/histiocyte-rich large B cell lymphoma in complete remission after six cycles of rituximab-combined chemotherapy developed severe anemia, reticulocytopenia, and bone marrow erythroid hypoplasia. She was diagnosed with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) accompanied by Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia evidenced by a lack of glycophorin-A-positive cells in the bone marrow, haptoglobin under the detection level, and a high titer of RBC-bound IgG. Anti-erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) antibody was detected in the serum, and oligoclonal α/β and γ/δ T cells were also detected in her peripheral blood by Southern blotting analysis. Parvovirus B19 DNA was not detected by PCR. Although the treatment with rituximab had limited efficacy (specifically, only for hemolysis), subsequent cyclosporine therapy led to prompt recovery of erythropoiesis with the disappearance of anti-EPOR antibody and oligoclonal T cells. This is the first case report of anti-EPOR antibody-associated PRCA in a patient with malignant lymphoma treated successfully with cyclosporine.

  5. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  6. Anemia and iron overload due to compound heterozygosity for novel ceruloplasmin mutations.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Sandra; De Gobbi, Marco; Roetto, Antonella; Zecchina, Gabriella; Leonardo, Eugenio; Rizzetto, Mario; Lucetti, Claudio; Petrozzi, Lucia; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Camaschella, Clara

    2002-09-15

    Aceruloplasminemia is a recessive disorder characterized by anemia, iron overload, and neurodegeneration, caused by the absence of ceruloplasmin (Cp), a multicopper oxidase important for iron export. Few patients homozygous for loss of function mutations of the Cp gene have been reported. We describe a 62-year-old white woman with heavy liver iron overload, diabetes, anemia, and neurologic symptoms. She was compound heterozygote for 2 novel mutations that result in the absence of hepatocyte Cp: an adenine insertion at nucleotide 2917 causing a truncated protein and a C-G transversion causing a glutamine-->glutamic acid substitution at position 146. Although rare in whites, aceruloplasminemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained anemia associated with iron overload, because these features anticipate progressive neurologic symptoms. We propose that anemia, secondary to the impaired macrophage iron release, plays a major role in hepatic iron overload through increased absorption mediated by the erythroid regulator.

  7. A rare case of concurrent signet-ring carcinoma of breast and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia†

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Kelly; Bae, Esther; Park, Hanna; Hussain, Farabi

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) can be an uncommon presentation of an underlying malignancy, most often due to signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC). Additionally, pure SRCC in a breast primary-tumor comprises <2% of all breast cancers (Shin SY, Park H, Chae SW, Woo HY. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia as the first manifestation of metastatic signet-ring cell carcinoma of unknown origin: a case report and review of literature. Kor J Lab Med 2011;31:157–61). To the best of our knowledge, the combination of these two entities, pure breast primary SRCC along with MAHA, has not been reported. Here, we present such a rare case. We also evaluate the current literature regarding this and similar disease processes, of which evidence is scarce and further research is needed. PMID:27587305

  8. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, K.S.; Heine, A.; Weimann, T.; Kristiansen, G.; Brossart, P.

    2016-01-01

    Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, we assumed that nivolumab could also be effective in our patients with refractory metastatic squamous cell cancer of the skin. So far, there have been no clinical data on the therapeutic efficacy of nivolumab in squamous cell skin cancer. We here present a case of a patient with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer refractory to previous therapies, who showed a good response to nivolumab over a period of 5 months, but developed a serious hemolytic crisis under nivolumab treatment after eight applications. PMID:27462240

  9. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Limelette, Anne; Le Magrex-Debar, Elisabeth; Wynckel, Alain; Gouali, Malika; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Guyot-Colosio, Charlotte; de Champs, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection.

  10. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  11. Anemia in older persons.

    PubMed

    Bross, Michael H; Soch, Kathleen; Smith-Knuppel, Teresa

    2010-09-01

    Anemia in older persons is commonly overlooked despite mounting evidence that low hemoglobin levels are a significant marker of physiologic decline. Using the World Health Organization definition of anemia (hemoglobin level less than 13 g per dL [130 g per L] in men and less than 12 g per dL [120 g per L] in women), more than 10 percent of persons older than 65 years are anemic. The prevalence increases with age, approaching 50 percent in chronically ill patients living in nursing homes. There is increasing evidence that even mild anemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anemia warrants evaluation in all older persons, except those at the end of life or who decline interventions. About one third of persons have anemia secondary to a nutritional deficiency, one third have anemia caused by chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease, and one third have unexplained anemia. Nutritional anemia is effectively treated with vitamin or iron replacement. Iron deficiency anemia often is caused by gastrointestinal bleeding and requires further investigation in most patients. Anemia of chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease may respond to treatment of the underlying disease and selective use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The treatment of unexplained anemia is difficult, and there is little evidence that treatment decreases morbidity and mortality, or improves quality of life. Occasionally, anemia may be caused by less common but potentially treatable conditions, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, malignancy, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

  12. Evaluation of stem cell reserve using serial bone marrow transplantation and competitive repopulation in a murine model of chronic hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Maggio-Price, L.; Wolf, N.S.; Priestley, G.V.; Pietrzyk, M.E.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1988-09-01

    Serial transplantation and competitive repopulation were used to evaluate any loss of self-replicative capacity of bone marrow stem cells in a mouse model with increased and persistent hemopoietic demands. Congenic marrows from old control and from young and old mice with hereditary spherocytic anemia (sphha/sphha) were serially transplanted at 35-day intervals into normal irradiated recipients. Old anemic marrow failed or reverted to recipient karyotype at a mean of 3.5 transplants, and young anemic marrow reverted at a mean of 4.0 transplants, whereas controls did so at a mean of 5.0 transplants. In a competitive assay in which a mixture of anemic and control marrow was transplanted, the anemic marrow persisted to 10 months following transplantation; anemic marrow repopulation was greater if anemic marrow sex matched with the host. It is possible that lifelong stress of severe anemia decreases stem cell reserve in the anemic sphha/sphha mouse marrow. However, marginal differences in serial transplantation number and the maintenance of anemic marrow in a competition assay would suggest that marrow stem cells, under prolonged stress, are capable of exhibiting good repopulating and self-replicating abilities.

  13. Use of recombinant erythropoietin for the management of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn of a K0 phenotype mother.

    PubMed

    Manoura, Antonia; Korakaki, Eftychia; Hatzidaki, Eleftheria; Saitakis, Emmanuel; Maraka, Sofia; Papamastoraki, Isabella; Matalliotakis, Emmanuel; Foundouli, Kaliopi; Giannakopoulou, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Very few people do not express any Kell antigens on their red blood cells (K0 phenotype). They can be immunized by transfusion or pregnancy and develop antibodies against Kell system antigens. These maternal antibodies can cause severe hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn, as a result of the suppression of erythropoiesis and hemolysis. Multiple intrauterine transfusions in the management of severe hemolytic disease have been shown to cause erythropoietic suppression as well. Recombinant erythropoietin has been successfully used in the management of late anemia of infants with Rh hemolytic disease and in 1 case of KEL1 (Kell)-associated hemolytic disease. The authors present the case of severe hemolytic disease of a newborn due to KEL5 (Ku) isoimmunization of his K0 phenotype mother. Regular intrauterine transfusions were performed to manage the severe fetal anemia (Hb 3 g/dL). A male infant was born at the 36th week of gestation having normal hemoglobin (15.8 g/dL) and developed only mild hyperbilirubinemia. On the 15th day of life, the infant's hematocrit had fallen to 27.3%, with low reticulocyte count and low erythropoietin level. The infant was managed successfully with recombinant erythropoietin.

  14. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied.

  15. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  16. Hyperhemolytic Syndrome Complicating a Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reaction due to anti-P1 Alloimmunization, in a Pregnant Woman with HbO-Arab/β-Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Bezirgiannidou, Zoe; Christoforidou, Anna; Kontekaki, Eftychia; Anastasiadis, Athanasios G; Papamichos, Spyros I.; Menexidou, Helen; Margaritis, Dimitrios; Martinis, Georges; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperhemolytic Syndrome or Hyperhemolytic Transfusion Reaction (HHTR), a life-threatening subset of Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reaction (DHTR) is characterized by destruction of both transfused and autologous erythrocytes evidenced by a fall in post transfusion hemoglobin below the pre-transfusion level. Case report We describe a case of DHTR due to anti-P1 alloimmunization manifesting with hyperhemolysis in a 30-year-old Greek Pomak woman with thalassemia intermedia (HbO-Arab/β-thalassemia), during the11th week of her first gestation. She was successfully managed with avoidance of further transfusions and administration of IVIG and corticosteroids. Conclusion A high index of suspicion for HHTR is of vital importance among clinicians especially since optimal methods for its prevention and treatment remain yet to be defined. Early recognition of HHTR leading to prompt cessation of additional transfusions and initiation of immunosuppressive treatment can be life-saving, especially in clinical settings where limited therapeutic options are available, such as in pregnancy. PMID:27872733

  17. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kollipara, Venkateswara K.; Brine, Patrick L.; Gemmel, David; Ingnam, Sisham

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case. PMID:27609735

  18. Critical Diamond-Blackfan anemia due to ribosomal protein S19 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozono, Shuichi; Mitsuo, Miho; Noguchi, Maiko; Nakagawa, Shin-Ichiro; Ueda, Koichiro; Inada, Hiroko; Ohga, Shouichi; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by pure erythrocyte aplasia, and approximately 70% of patients carry mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RP). Here, we report the case of a male infant with DBA who presented with anemic crisis (hemoglobin [Hb] concentration 1.5 g/dL) at 58 days after birth. On admission, the infant was pale and had tachypnea, but recovered with intensive care, including red blood cell transfusions, and prednisolone. Based on the clinical diagnosis of DBA, the father of the infant had cyclosporine-A-dependent anemia. On analysis of RP genes when the infant was 6 months old, both the infant and the father, but not the mother, were found to harbor a mutation of RPS19 (c.167G > C, p. R56P). Therefore, genetic background search and early neonatal health check-ups are recommended for families with a history of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

  19. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schmidt, Paul J.; Campagna, Dean R.; Rahimov, Fedik; Schilke, Brenda A.; Cuijpers, Marloes; Rieneck, Klaus; Lausen, Birgitte; Linenberger, Michael L.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Guo, Chaoshe; Hofmann, Inga; Newburger, Peter E.; Matthews, Dana; Shimamura, Akiko; Snijders, Pieter J. L. M.; Towne, Meghan C.; Niemeyer, Charlotte M.; Watson, Henry G.; Dziegiel, Morten H.; Heeney, Matthew M.; May, Alison; Bottomley, Sylvia S.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Markianos, Kyriacos; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q deletion syndrome 5q33 critical deletion interval and involved in mitochondrial Fe-S biogenesis, result in CSA inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In a fraction of patients with just 1 severe loss-of-function allele, expression of the clinical phenotype is associated with a common coding single nucleotide polymorphism in trans that correlates with reduced messenger RNA expression and results in a pseudodominant pattern of inheritance. PMID:26491070

  20. Optimal management of iron deficiency anemia due to poor dietary intake

    PubMed Central

    Aspuru, Kattalin; Villa, Carlos; Bermejo, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar; López, Santiago García

    2011-01-01

    Iron is necessary for the normal development of multiple vital processes. Iron deficiency (ID) may be caused by several diseases, even by physiological situations that increase requirements for this mineral. One of its possible causes is a poor dietary iron intake, which is infrequent in developed countries, but quite common in developing areas. In these countries, dietary ID is highly prevalent and comprises a real public health problem and a challenge for health authorities. ID, with or without anemia, can cause important symptoms that are not only physical, but can also include a decreased intellectual performance. All this, together with a high prevalence, can even have negative implications for a community’s economic and social development. Treatment consists of iron supplements. Prevention of ID obviously lies in increasing the dietary intake of iron, which can be difficult in developing countries. In these regions, foods with greater iron content are scarce, and attempts are made to compensate this by fortifying staple foods with iron. The effectiveness of this strategy is endorsed by multiple studies. On the other hand, in developed countries, ID with or without anemia is nearly always associated with diseases that trigger a negative balance between iron absorption and loss. Its management will be based on the treatment of underlying diseases, as well as on oral iron supplements, although these latter are limited by their tolerance and low potency, which on occasions may compel a change to intravenous administration. Iron deficiency has a series of peculiarities in pediatric patients, in the elderly, in pregnant women, and in patients with dietary restrictions, such as celiac disease. PMID:22114518

  1. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  2. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  3. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism or heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Donker, Albertine E; Raymakers, Reinier A P; Vlasveld, L Thom; van Barneveld, Teus; Terink, Rieneke; Dors, Natasja; Brons, Paul P T; Knoers, Nine V A M; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2014-06-19

    During recent years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited microcytic anemias has gained from the identification of several genes and proteins involved in systemic and cellular iron metabolism and heme syntheses. Numerous case reports illustrate that the implementation of these novel molecular discoveries in clinical practice has increased our understanding of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases. Integration of these insights into daily clinical practice will reduce delays in establishing a proper diagnosis, invasive and/or costly diagnostic tests, and unnecessary or even detrimental treatments. To assist the clinician, we developed evidence-based multidisciplinary guidelines on the management of rare microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism and heme synthesis. These genetic disorders may present at all ages, and therefore these guidelines are relevant for pediatricians as well as clinicians who treat adults. This article summarizes these clinical practice guidelines and includes background on pathogenesis, conclusions, and recommendations and a diagnostic flowchart to facilitate using these guidelines in the clinical setting.

  4. [Treating severe acute anemia due to vaginal bleeding in the Jehovah's Witness: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gredilla, E; Pérez-Ferrer, A; Canser, E; Alonso, E; Martínez Serrano, B; Gilsanz, F

    2009-12-01

    For reasons of religious belief, Jehova's Witnesses do not accept blood transfusions or the infusion of blood products. In situations in which severe, life-threatening anemia develops, patient refusal to receive a transfusion can create serious ethical and legal problems. The principle of patient autonomy, which implies the freedom to accept or reject treatment, comes into conflict with the physician's obligation to safeguard the patient's life using all means possible. We report 2 cases of severe anemia in Jehova's Witnesses. One was due to menorrhagia and the other to postpartum bleeding. The physician should be aware of alternatives to infusion of blood products and know how to cope with an unexpected critical event in these patients. The measures we took were effective in our patients. In the case of menorrhagia, hormone treatment is effective when the woman wishes to preserve the ability to conceive and avoid surgery (endometrial ablation and hysterectomy). In postpartum bleeding refractory to conservative treatment, selective embolization of bleeding vessels may make it unnecessary to resort to more aggressive treatment, such as obstetric hysterectomy.

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare syndrome characterized by micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. The major pathogenesis of aHUS involves dysregulation of the complement system. Eculizumab, which blocks complement C5 activation, has recently been proven as an effective agent. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of aHUS can cause death or end-stage renal disease. Therefore, a diagnosis that differentiates aHUS from other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy is very important for appropriate management. These guidelines aim to offer recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aHUS in Korea. The guidelines have largely been adopted from the current guidelines due to the lack of evidence concerning the Korean population. PMID:27550478

  6. [Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2008-03-01

    Anemia can result from deficient erythropoiesis [aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease (ACD), thalassemia, megaloblastic anemia, chronic renal failure, hematological malignancies, etc.], excessive RBC destruction [hereditary spherocytosis, inherited enzyme deficiency, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), etc.], and blood loss. Based on the measured red cell size(MCV), anemia is classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron parameters (serum iron, serum ferritin, etc.), reticulocyte count, bone marrow examination, Coombs test, serum vitamin B12 level, and Ham test are also useful in the differential diagnosis of anemia. Novel treatment of anemia includes lenalidomide for 5q(-)MDS, azacitidine for high-risk MDS, and eculizumab for PNH. Oral iron chelator(deferasirox) developed for the treatment of transfusional iron overload is also very useful for the management of patients with bone marrow failure syndromes.

  7. Irregular antibodies in no hemolytic autoimmune diseases are able to induce erythrophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    López-Díaz, Paola Ester; Ruiz-Olivera, María Del Rocío; Hernández-Osorio, Luis Alberto; Vargas-Arzola, Jaime; Valle-Jiménez, Xareni; Aguilar-Ruiz, Sergio Roberto; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio

    2016-08-25

    Irregular antibodies are produced by alloimmunization because of pregnancies or blood transfusions. They are called "irregular" due to target erythrocyte antigens from "rare blood systems," those different from the ABO system. Irregular antibodies have been widely investigated in immunohematology since their presence in blood donors may lead to difficulties in blood typing and in blood cross-matching, or to induce hemolytic transfusion reactions. Nevertheless, their incidence and participation in the physiopathology of autoimmune diseases have not been thoroughly studied. In this work, we analyzed the presence and pro-hemolytic capabilities of irregular antibodies in patients with different autoimmune diseases lacking signs of hemolytic anemia, in comparison with healthy multiparous women. Five of 141 autoimmune patients (3.5 %) and two of 77 multiparous women (2.6 %) were positive. Although frequency was relatively low and similar in both populations, the targeted antigens were Kell (k, Kp(b), Js(b)) and Luth (Lu(b)) in multiparous women, and the same plus Duffy (Fy(a)), Kidd (Jk(a)) and MNS (M, s) in autoimmune patients. Irregular antibodies from autoimmune patients did not induce complement-mediated hemolysis (intravascular), but they were able to induce macrophages-mediated phagocytosis (extravascular hemolysis) in vitro. It is the first approach exploring the presence of irregular antibodies associated with the loss of immune tolerance and demonstrating their hemolytic potential in autoimmune patients without hemolytic manifestations. The presence of irregular antibodies targeted to Duffy (Fya), Kidd (Jka) and MNS (M, s) antigens only in autoimmune patients suggests a loss of immune tolerance to these erythrocyte antigens.

  8. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with paraquat intoxication.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ha Nee; Bae, Eun Jin; Hwang, Kyungo; Kang, Yeojin; Yun, Seongeun; Cho, Hyun Seop; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old patient with paraquat intoxication resulting in the requirement for hemoperfusion, hemodialysis, and plasma exchange. His initial serum paraquat level was 0.24 µg/mL (0.0-0.1 µg/mL). Activated charcoal (50 g) was administered orally, and high-dose N-acetylcysteine (150 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. In addition, immediate 4 h hemoperfusion was also performed for three consecutive days after admission. Hemodialysis was started on the 4th day after admission because of uremia. On the 9th day after admission, laboratory findings demonstrated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS): microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), thrombocytopenia, elevated reticulocyte count, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Plasma exchange was performed three times consecutively. Anemia and thrombocytopenia were improved, and LDH was normalized after plasma exchange. Urine output increased to 2240 mL/day on the 18th day after admission, and hemodialysis was discontinued. He is currently being observed at our follow-up clinic without renal impairment or pulmonary dysfunction for 1.5 years since discharge. We should suspect paraquat-associated HUS when thrombocytopenia and anemia are maintained for a long time after paraquat intoxication.

  10. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giannini, S; Martes, C

    2006-09-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A systematic review of the literature shows that the overall prevalence of anemia ranges from 8.8% to 73.7% but differs whether in a setting of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. A disabling complication of IBD, anemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. Different factors, including vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency, bone marrow suppression secondary to drug therapy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the coexistence of myelodysplastic syndromes are involved in the pathogenesis of anemia in IBD. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia accompanying chronic diseases. Correct diagnostic definition of anemia is a fundamental step in guiding the choice of therapeutic options, since the co-presence of different pathogenetic factors may sometimes require a more complex treatment plan. A review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on evidence from recent studies is the focus of this article.

  11. An Elevated Fetal IL-6 Concentration Can Be Observed In Fetuses with Anemia Due To Rh Alloimmunization: Implications for the Understanding of the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Gomez, Ricardo; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) has been described in the context of preterm labor and preterm PROM and is often associated with intra-amniotic infection/inflammation. This syndrome is characterized by systemic fetal inflammation and operationally-defined by an elevated fetal plasma interleukin (IL)-6. The objective of this study was to determine if FIRS can be found in fetuses with activation of their immune system, such as the one observed in Rh alloimmune-mediated fetal anemia. Methods Fetal blood sampling was performed in sensitized Rh-D negative women with suspected fetal anemia (n=16). Fetal anemia was diagnosed according to reference range nomograms established for the assessment of fetal hematologic parameters. An elevated fetal plasma IL-6 concentration was defined using a cutoff of >11 pg/mL. Concentrations of IL-6 were determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) The prevalence of an elevated fetal plasma IL-6 was 25% (4/16); 2) there was an inverse relationship between the fetal hematocrit and IL-6 concentration - the lower the hematocrit, the higher the fetal IL-6 (r= −0.68, p=0.004); 3) fetuses with anemia had a significantly higher plasma IL-6 concentration than those without anemia (3.74 pg/ml, interquartile range (IQR) 1.18–2.63 vs. 1.46 pg/ml, IQR 1.76–14.7; p=0.02); 4) interestingly, all fetuses with an elevated plasma IL-6 concentration had anemia (prevalence 40%, 4/10), while in the group without anemia, none had an elevated fetal plasma IL-6. Conclusions An elevation in fetal plasma IL-6 can be observed in a subset of fetuses with anemia due to Rh alloimmunization. This observation suggests that the hallmark of FIRS can be caused by non-infection-related insults. Further studies are required to determine whether the prognosis of FIRS caused by intra-amniotic infection/inflammation is different from that induced by alloimmunization. PMID:20701435

  12. Aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Kensuke

    Treatments of aplastic anemia are comprised of supportive therapy and aplastic anemia-specific therapy aimed at restoring hematopoiesis. Supportive therapies include transfusion, G-CSF, and the administration of iron chelation agents, as well as dealing specifically with individual symptoms. Aplastic anemia-specific treatments given with the aim of achieving hematopoietic recovery include immunosuppressive therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and anabolic hormone therapy. Although transplantation provides complete recovery of hematopoiesis (cure), there is a risk of death due to transplant-related complications. The most effective immunosuppressive therapy is a combination of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. This treatment is also effective against the secondary, drug-induced and hepatitis-associated forms of aplastic anemia. In the management of aplastic anemia, a treatment is selected from among these options depending on the disease severity and the age of the individual case. The thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag appears to be effective and to provide tri-lineage recovery of hematopoiesis in some cases. Indications for its use are expected to expand in Japan.

  13. A Case of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Successfully Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Thajudeen, B.; Sussman, A.; Bracamonte, E.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) characterized by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Eculizumab, a monoclonal complement C5 antibody which prevents the induction of the terminal complement cascade, has recently emerged as a therapeutic option for aHUS. We report a case of aHUS successfully treated with eculizumab. A 51-year-old male was admitted to the hospital following a mechanical fall. His past medical history was significant for rheumatic valve disease and mitral valve replacement; he was on warfarin for anticoagulation. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed a right-sided subdural hematoma due to coagulopathy resulting from a supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR). Following treatment with prothrombin complex concentrate to reverse the INR, urine output dropped and his serum creatinine subsequently increased to 247.52 μmol/l from the admission value of 70.72 μmol/l. Laboratory evaluation was remarkable for hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), low haptoglobin, and low complement C3. A renal biopsy was consistent with TMA, favoring a diagnosis of aHUS. Treatment with eculizumab was initiated which resulted in the stabilization of his hemoglobin, platelets, and LDH. Hemodialysis was terminated after 2.5 months due to improvement in urine output and solute clearance. The interaction between thrombin and complement pathway might be responsible for the pathogenesis of aHUS in this case. Eculizumab is an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of aHUS. Early targeting of the complement system may modify disease progression and thus treat aHUS more effectively. PMID:24570684

  14. Investigation of the Etiology of Anemia in Thromboangiitis Obliterans.

    PubMed

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Ravari, Hassan; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Valizadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Bahare

    2016-09-01

    During a review of patients admitted with thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), there was evidence of normochromic normocytic anemia and abrupt changes in hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in patients with several hospital admissions. Therefore, the evidence of hemolytic anemia was evaluated based on 37 banked plasma samples taken from Caucasian male TAO patients during disease exacerbation between 2012 and 2014. The patients' hospital records, including clinical manifestations and complete blood count, were evaluated. The following tests were performed on all samples: indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), haptoglobin, indirect bilirubin, d-aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and d-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The mean age of the patients was 40 ± 7 years. Two patients underwent below-knee amputation. The mean hospital-documented Hgb of the patients was 12.9 ± 2.6 g/dL. CRP and IAT were positive in 75.6 and 70.2% of the samples, respectively. The tests and corresponding results were as follows: hsCRP, 14.07 ± 2.37 µg/mL; LDH, 2,552 ± 315 u/L; haptoglobin, 2.27 ± 1.1 g/L; indirect bilirubin, 0.09 ± 0.04 mg/dL; AST, 67 ± 7 u/L; and ALT, 26 ± 3 u/L. There was a significant inverse correlation between hsCRP and hospital-documented Hgb level (p = 0.03). Anemia with the positive IAT in most of the samples, high LDH and AST, and normal ALT are suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Normal indirect bilirubin is consistent with intravascular hemolysis. The positive CRP and elevated haptoglobin levels could be due to systemic inflammation in TAO. However, it is not known if an autoantigen or an infectious antigen is responsible for TAO systemic inflammation and induction hemolytic anemia. As such, the underlying mechanism of anemia in TAO could be part of the footprint of its main etiology.

  15. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Cristina; Goldstein, Jorge; Silberstein, Claudia; Zotta, Elsa; Belardo, Marcela; Repetto, Horacio A

    2008-10-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, plaquetopenia and kidney damage. It is the leading cause of acute renal failure in pediatric age and the second for chronic renal failure. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the first etiologic agent of HUS being its main reservoir cattle and transmitted via contaminated food. At present, there is no specific treatment to reduce the progression of HUS. The study of the mechanisms by which STEC infects and Shiga toxin induces HUS can help to find new strategies to prevent this disease.

  16. Gestational anemia.

    PubMed

    Wahed, F; Latif, S A; Nessa, A; Bhuiyan, M R; Hossain, M B; Akther, A; Mahmud, M M

    2010-07-01

    Gestational anemia is a common public health problem in our country. Most anemia during pregnancy results from an increased need for iron as her body is making more blood. Often dietary supplementation does not provide enough iron to meet the extra needs. Also the growing baby takes all the iron it needs from mother, regardless of how much iron is stored in mother's blood. Gestational Anemia contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, IUGR, preterm delivery and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high proportion of women in both industrialized and developing countries become anemic during pregnancy. The most important cause of gestational anemia due to iron deficiency, because high iron requirements during pregnancy are not easily fulfilled by dietary intake. Adequate iron stores can help a pregnant women replace lost red blood cells. So, iron supplementation is strongly recommended for all pregnant women in developing countries. Oral iron intake is the treatment of choice and almost all pregnant women can be treated effectively with oral iron preparation during their pregnancy period.

  17. THE CONVERSION OF HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI TO NON-HEMOLYTIC FORMS

    PubMed Central

    Todd, E. W.

    1928-01-01

    From one strain of hemolytic streptococcus three forms were isolated, which produced three different degrees of hemolysis on the surface of blood agar in the presence of oxygen. The original form was moderately hemolytic; the glossy variant was more hemolytic than the original form; and the third form, obtained by passing the original culture through mice, was non-hemolytic. Under anaerobic conditions all three forms were hemolytic. The non-hemolytic passage culture, in the presence of an ample supply of oxygen, not only destroyed its own hemolysin, which only appeared under anaerobic conditions, but was also able to destroy the hemolysin of other cultures of hemolytic streptococci. It is possible that these observations may throw some light on experiments reported by a number of workers showing that Streptococcus hæmolyticus can be transmuted to Streptococcus viridans by animal passage. PMID:19869500

  18. Anemia, fatigue and aging.

    PubMed

    Balducci, L

    2010-12-01

    Aging is associated with increased incidence and prevalence of both cancer and anemia. Cancer and aging may conspire in making anemia more frequent and more severe. This article reviews the causes and the consequences of anemia in the older individual. The most common causes include chronic inflammation that is a typical manifestation of aging, iron deficiency that may be due to chronic hemorrhage, malabsorption and Helicobacter pylori infection, cobalamin deficiency from malabsorption and renal insufficiency. Other causes of anemia whose prevalence is not well established include myelodysplasia, copper deficiency, hypothyroidism, and sarcopenia. Anemia is associated with increased risk of mortality, functional dependence, dementia, falls, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. When correcting the anemia of older cancer patients one should remember that the erythropoietic stimulating agents (ESA) may stimulate cancer growth and cause thrombosis. These products may be safe when given exclusively to patients receiving chemotherapy and when the hemoglobin levels are maintained below 12 g/dL.

  19. Multiple spleen and liver abscesses due to Yersinia enterocolitica septicemia in a child with congenital sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Grigull, Lorenz; Linderkamp, Christin; Sander, Annette; Schmid, Hansjoerg; Mutschler, Ulrich; Welte, Karl; Beilken, Andreas

    2005-11-01

    In patients with iron overload, opportunistic infections are an underestimated risk. Yersinia enterocolitica is a rare organism to be isolated in this setting. The authors report a case of disseminated Y. enterocolitica sepsis in a 5-year-old boy with sideroblastic anemia. Ultrasound examination revealed massive ascites, a pseudo-appendicitis, and hypoechogenic lesions corresponding to abscess formations in the liver and spleen. The initial antibiotic therapy consisted of cefotaxime, gentamicin, and metronidazole, but only treatment with ciprofloxacin and meropenem led to defervescence and clinical stabilization. The risk of developing uncommon infections in patients with iron overload should be acknowledged by all physicians, and the relevance of ultrasound examination is emphasized. In this case, only a detailed history revealed that several days before the onset of diarrhea, the child was feeding a deer; this is how infection was probably acquired.

  20. Warning: an anemia outbreak due to chloramine exposure in a clean hemodialysis unit--an issue to be revisited.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rubens Marona; de los Santos, Carlos Abaeté; Antonello, Ivan; d'Avila, Domingos

    2009-01-01

    In July 2004, an anemia outbreak was identified in our hemodialysis (HD) unit. The dialysate chloramine levels had risen from <0.1 mg/mL in May to 0.27 mg/mL in August 2004. Other parameters of water quality were within accepted standards. Hematocrit (Ht) and hemoglobin (Hb) returned to basal values after one month without changing recombinant human erythropoetin (rHuEpo) doses and with exchange of activated charcoal column. Chloramines (chlorine and ammonia) are used routinely to disinfect and sterilize potable water. High blood levels of chloramines are associated with hemolysis and rarely methemoglobinemia. Uremic patients have a decreased ability to withstand oxidative stress. It is postulated that their antioxidant capacity is reduced, yet the mechanism remains unclear. Patients on maintenance hemodialysis are vulnerable to chloramine toxicity if chloramines are inadequately removed from water.

  1. Normocytic normochromic anemia due to automatic neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients without severe nephropathy: a possible role of microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Morimoto, Aya; Tajima, Naoko

    2005-12-01

    We describe here four male patients with long-term and poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. They shared many common characteristic complications, such as severe autonomic neuropathy, proliferative retinopathy and normocytic normochromic anemia without progressive renal failure and macroangiopathy. They also showed normal levels of erythropoietin and reticulocyte, which was considered relatively low. The coefficient of variation of R-R, a useful method to estimate autonomic failure, showed markedly advanced autonomic neuropathy in all four patients. Coronary angiography did not reveal stenosis, anomaly or collateral vessels, but left ventriclography showed diffuse or partial hypokinesis. Massive proteinuria, high urinary levels of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamidase (NAG) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2M) were detected, though creatinine clearance (Ccr) was not so deteriorated. Treatment with recombinant erythropoietin increased their hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. These common points have a possibility to be brought about by tubulointerstitial damage and microangiopathy may be involved in it.

  2. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Bone marrow examination (only needed if diagnosis is unclear) ... Alternative Names Macrocytic achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile ... Review Date 2/1/2016 ...

  3. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  4. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Secondary to Lupus Nephritis, Responsive to Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Raufi, Alexander G.; Scott, Shruti; Darwish, Omar; Harley, Kevin; Kahlon, Kanwarpal; Desai, Sheetal; Lu, Yuxin; Tran, Minh-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Among the spectrum of disease manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, lupus nephritis is particularly concerning due to the potential for renal failure. This autoimmune attack may not, however, be limited to the kidney and is increasingly being recognized as a trigger for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS). Atypical HUS falls under the spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) – a group of disorders characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and end organ damage. Although plasma exchange is considered first-line therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura – a TMA classically associated with autoimmune depletion of ADAMTS-13 – aHUS demonstrates less reliable responsiveness to this modality. Instead, use of the late complement inhibitor Eculizumab has emerged as an effective modality for the management of such patients. Diagnosis of aHUS, however, is largely clinically based, relying heavily upon a multidisciplinary approach. Herein we present the case of a patient with atypical HUS successfully treated with Eculizumab in the setting of Class IV-G (A) lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia. PMID:27781079

  5. Comparison of two recombinant erythropoietin formulations in patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: A parallel, randomized, double blind study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Oliva, Jorge F; Casanova-González, Martha; García-García, Idrian; Porrero-Martín, Pedro J; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen M; Hernández-Montero, Tairí; Lagarde-Ampudia, Marcia; Casanova-Kutsareva, Yuri; Ávila-Albuerne, Yisel; Vargas-Batista, Alicia; Bobillo-López, Hailen; Herrera-Valdés, Raúl; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Background Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) is used for the treatment of last stage renal anemia. A new EPO preparation was obtained in Cuba in order to make this treatment fully nationally available. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety properties of two recombinant EPO formulations in patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Methods A parallel, randomized, double blind study was performed. A single 100 IU/Kg EPO dose was administered subcutaneously. Heberitro (Heber Biotec, Havana, formulation A), a newly developed product and Eprex (CILAG AG, Switzerland, formulation B), as reference treatment were compared. Thirty-four patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis were included. Patients had not received EPO previously. Serum EPO level was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) during 120 hours after administration. Clinical and laboratory variables were determined as pharmacodynamic and safety criteria until 216 hours. Results Both groups of patients were similar regarding all demographic and baseline characteristics. EPO kinetics profiles were similar for both formulations; the pharmacokinetic parameters were very close (i.e., AUC: 4667 vs. 4918 mIU.h/mL; Cmax: 119.1 vs. 119.7 mIU/mL; Tmax: 13.9 vs. 18.1 h; half-life, 20.0 vs. 22.5 h for formulations A and B, respectively). The 90% confidence intervals for the ratio between both products regarding these metrics were close to the 0.8 – 1.25 range, considered necessary for bioequivalence. Differences did not reach 20% in any case and were not determined by a formulation effect, but probably by a patients' variability effect. Concerning pharmacodynamic features, a high similitude in reticulocyte counts increments until 216 hours and the percentage decrease in serum iron until 120 hours was observed. There were no differences between formulations regarding the adverse events and their intensity. The more

  6. How to approach chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Koury, Mark J; Rhodes, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    We present herein an approach to diagnosing the cause of chronic anemia based on a patient's history and complete blood cell count (CBC). Four patterns that are encountered frequently in CBCs associated with chronic anemias are considered: (1) anemia with abnormal platelet and/or leukocyte counts, (2) anemia with increased reticulocyte counts, (3) life-long history of chronic anemia, and (4) anemia with inappropriately low reticulocytes. The pathophysiologic bases for some chronic anemias with low reticulocyte production are reviewed in terms of the bone marrow (BM) events that reduce normal rates of erythropoiesis. These events include: apoptosis of erythroid progenitor and precursor cells by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, development of macrocytosis when erythroblast DNA replication is impaired, and development of microcytosis due to heme-regulated eIF2α kinase inhibition of protein synthesis in iron-deficient or thalassemic erythroblasts.

  7. A neonate with Coombs-negative hemolytic jaundice with spherocytes but normal erythrocyte indices: a rare case of autosomal-recessive hereditary spherocytosis due to alpha-spectrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yaish, H M; Christensen, R D; Agarwal, A

    2013-05-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) in a newborn infant is generally made on the basis of a positive family history, spherocytes on blood film and Coombs-negative hemolytic jaundice of variable severity with an elevated mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and a low mean corpuscular volume (MCV). In general, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) quantification of erythrocyte membrane proteins is not needed to make the clinical diagnosis of HS. However, we observed that a neonate with no family history of HS, but with abundant spherocytosis on repeated blood films, Coombs-negative hemolytic jaundice and normal MCHC and MCV measurements, where SDS-PAGE revealed alpha-spectrin deficiency, a rare autosomal-recessive variety of HS that generally has a severe clinical phenotype.

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  9. Study of chronic hemolytic anaemia patients in Rio de Janeiro: prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies and the development aplastic crises.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Anadayr L M; Garcia, Rita de Cássia N Cubel; Marzoche, Mônica; da Rocha, Heloisa Helena A Gallo; Paula, Maria Tereza M; Lobo, Clarisse C; Nascimento, Jussara P

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies was determined in sera from 165 chronic hemolytic anemia patients, receiving medical care at Instituto Estadual de Hematologia (IEHE), Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1994. This sample represents around 10% of the chronic hemolytic anemia patients attending at IEHE. Most of these patients (140) have sickle cell disease. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 32.1% of patients. No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) was seen between IgG antibody prevalence in male (27.8%) and female (35.5%) patients. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were more frequent in older (37.6%) than younger (28.2%) than 20 years old patients, although this difference had no statistical significance (p > 0.05). Anti-B19 IgG antibody prevalence showed that 67.9% of patients enrolled in the study were susceptible to B19 acute infection. With the aim to detect acute B19 infection, patients follow up continued until February 1996. During this period four patients presented transient aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 as confirmed by the detection of specific IgM antibodies. All four patients were younger than 20 years old, and 3 were younger than 10 years old. Three of them were sickle cell disease patients. Three of the four acute B19 infection occurred during 1994 springtime.

  10. Rheumatoid anemia.

    PubMed

    Masson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid anemia is a typical example of anemia of chronic disease. It differs from other forms of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia or iatrogenic anemia. Rheumatoid anemia is normochromic, normocytic or, less often, microcytic, aregenerative, and accompanied with thrombocytosis. Serum transferrin levels are normal or low, transferrin saturation is decreased, serum ferritin levels are normal or high, the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is not increased (a distinguishing feature with iron deficiency anemia), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio is lower than 1. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of rheumatoid anemia based on a review of the literature. Iron metabolism, absorption, diffusion, storage, and use by the bone marrow are described using published data on transferrin, ferritin, and hepcidin. Hepcidin is now recognized as a key factor in rheumatoid anemia, in conjunction with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Hepcidin is a hormone that lowers serum iron levels and regulates iron transport across membranes, preventing iron from exiting the enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes. In addition, hepcidin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes. The action of hepcidin is mediated by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin expression in the liver is dependent on the protein hemojuvelin. Inflammation leads to increased hepcidin production via IL-6, whereas iron deficiency and factors associated with increased erythropoiesis (hypoxia, bleeding, hemolysis, dyserythropoiesis) suppress the production of hepcidin. Data from oncology studies and the effects of recombinant human IL-6 support a causal link between IL-6 production and the development of anemia in patients with chronic disease. IL-6 diminishes the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow and lowers the serum iron level, and these abnormalities can be corrected by administering an IL-6 antagonist. IL-6 stimulates

  11. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  12. Beta-hemolytic streptococcal erythroderma syndrome: a clinical and pathogenic analysis.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Harmony L; Schlievert, Patrick M; Baddour, Larry M

    2011-10-01

    The syndrome of erythroderma due to beta-hemolytic streptococci is rarely seen and should be distinguished from cellulitis and toxic shock-like syndrome. The authors describe a novel syndrome of nongroup A, beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection truncal erythroderma. The characteristics of this syndrome suggest that local factors were likely operative in the cutaneous manifestations of an exotoxin-associated erythroderma.

  13. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laužikienė, D.; Ramašauskaitė, D.; Lūža, T.; Lenkutienė, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied. PMID:26719601

  14. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Laužikienė, D; Ramašauskaitė, D; Lūža, T; Lenkutienė, R

    2015-11-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied.

  15. Detection of Occult Acute Kidney Injury in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hakeem, Gehan Lotfy; Abdel Naeem, Emad Allam; Swelam, Salwa Hussein; El Morsi Aboul Fotoh, Laila; El Mazary, Abdel Azeem Mohamed; Abdel Fadil, Ashraf Mohamed; Abdel Hafez, Asmaa Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency anemia is associated with intravascular hemolysis. The freely filtered hemoglobin can damage the kidney. We aimed to assess any subclinical renal injury in G6PD children. Methods Sixty children were included. Thirty G6PD deficiency anemia children were enrolled during the acute hemolytic crisis and after the hemolytic episode had elapsed. Another thirty healthy children were included as controls. Serum cystatin C, creatinine levels, and urinary albumin/creatinine (A/C) ratio were measured, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated. Results Significantly higher urinary A/C ratio (p=0.001,0.002 respectively) and lower GFR (p=0.001 for both) were found during hemolysis and after the hemolytic episode compared to the controls. Also, significant higher serum cystatin C (p=0.001), creatinine (p=0.05) and A/C (p= 0.001) ratio and insignificant lower GFR (p=0.3) during acute hemolytic crisis compared to the same children after the hemolytic episode subsided. Conclusions G6PD deficiency anemia is associated with a variable degree of acute renal injury during acute hemolytic episodes which may persist after elapsing of the hemolytic crises. PMID:27648201

  16. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  17. [Severe chronic anemia and endocrine disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Michael; Theintz, Gérald

    2007-04-18

    Hemolytic anemias can induce various anomalies of the endocrine glands which can already be observed in children. Endocrine dysfunction is also found in the course of therapy for aplastic anemias, usually as undesirable side effects. In Europe, 2-9% of the population belongs to ethnic minorities at risk for developing hemolytic anemia. Pituitary affinity to iron deposition explains the high incidence of hypogonadism, puberty delay and growth retardation although other factors have to be considered. Growth hormone deficiency has to be ruled out as it can occur in a minority of subjects with thalassemia and sickle-cell disease (drepanocytosis). Diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism may also develop. Follow-up includes close monitoring of growth and pubertal development in order to guide therapeutic interventions.

  18. Infections in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jessica M; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S; Walsh, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of death in patients with aplastic anemia (AA). There are differences between the immunocompromised state of a patient with AA and the patient who is neutropenic due to chemotherapy and this leads to a difference in the infections that they incur. Prolonged neutropenia is one of the largest risk factors for the development of infections with the invasive mycoses and bacteria. Recovery from neutropenia is directly related to survival, and supportive care plays a large role in protection while the patient is in a neutropenic state. The most common invasive mycoses include the Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Candida spp., and Fusarium spp. Bacterial infections that are seen in patients with AA include gram-positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus, Staphylococus aureus, Clostridium spp., Micrococcus, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, and Bacillus cereus. Gram-negative infections including gram-negative bacilli, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Bacteroides fragilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumonia, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio vulnificus. Viral infections are much less common but include those that belong to the Herpesviridae family, community-acquired respiratory viral infection, and the viral hepatitides A, B, and C. Evidence of the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis has also been documented. This review discusses the major invasive fungal infections, bacterial pathogens, parasites, and viral infections that are found in patients with AA who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy. The specific immune impairment and current treatment parameters for each of these classes of infection will also be discussed.

  19. [Acute renal failure secondary to hemolytic uremic syndrome in a pregnant woman with pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    García-Miguel, F J; Mirón Rodríguez, M F; Alsina Aser, M J

    2009-02-01

    Acute renal failure is a serious complication of pregnancy associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality; the incidence is currently 1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The most common causes are gestational hypertension, bleeding, sepsis, and intrinsic renal disease. Other less common pregnancy-related syndromes, such as HELLP syndrome or thrombotic microangiopathy, may also lead to kidney failure. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura are forms of thrombotic microangiopathy and although neither is specific to pregnancy, the incidence of these entities rises during gestation. The classic symptoms are fever, hemolytic microangiopathic anemia, thrombopenia, neurologic dysfunction, and kidney abnormalities. When renal involvement is the predominant manifestation, the diagnosis is usually hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  20. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically.

  1. Cerebral infarct with recurrence of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in a child following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mochon, M; Kaiser, B A; deChadarevian, J P; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1992-11-01

    A white girl with a history of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and persistent microangiopathic anemia, and thrombocytopenia for 2 months after the initial presentation at age 7 months, received her first cadaveric renal transplant at age 3 years. During the first 2.5 days post transplant, she developed progressive thrombocytopenia and anemia followed by tonic-clonic seizures and loss of consciousness, secondary to a diffuse cerebral infarction of the left hemisphere. Renal histology showed evidence of glomerular microthrombi and microangiopathy. A large cerebral infarct, previously described in patients during their initial presentation with HUS, presented in our patient as part of the recurrence of the disease post renal transplantation.

  2. Anemia Causes Hypoglycemia in Intensive Care Unit Patients Due to Error in Single-Channel Glucometers: Methods of Reducing Patient Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hematocrit, low oxygen tension, acetaminophen, uric acid, ascorbic acid, maltose , galactose, xy- lose, lactose, operator inexperience, age of strips, heat...Biomedical, Waltham, MA) that corrects for the effects of anemia, low oxygen tension, acetaminophen, uric acid, ascorbic acid, maltose , galactose, xylose, and... maltose , galactose, xylose, lactose) and low oxygen tension were eliminated as signifi- cant contributors to error by comparison of glucometer results

  3. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients.

  4. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  5. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anemia KidsHealth > For Teens > Anemia Print A A A ... Getting Enough Iron en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  6. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  9. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  10. Chickens treated with a nitric oxide inhibitor became more resistant to Plasmodium gallinaceum infection due to reduced anemia, thrombocytopenia and inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Macchi, Barbarella Matos; Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; de Souza, Fernanda Silva; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiroz; Albernaz, Antônio Peixoto; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2013-02-11

    Malaria is a serious infectious disease caused by parasites of the Plasmodium genus that affect different vertebrate hosts. Severe malaria leads to host death and involves different pathophysiological phenomena such as anemia, thrombocytopenia and inflammation. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important effector molecule in this disease, but little is known about its role in avian malaria models. Plasmodium gallinaceum-infected chickens were treated with aminoguanidine (AG), an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase, to observe the role of NO in the pathogenesis of this avian model. AG increased the survival of chickens, but also induced higher parasitemia. Treated chickens demonstrated reduced anemia and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, erythrocytes at different stages of maturation, heterophils, monocytes and thrombocytes were infected by Plasmodium gallinaceum and animals presented a generalized leucopenia. Activated leukocytes and thrombocytes with elongated double nuclei were observed in chickens with higher parasitemia; however, eosinophils were not involved in the infection. AG reduced levels of hemozoin in the spleen and liver, indicating lower inflammation. Taken together, the results suggest that AG reduced anemia, thrombocytopenia and inflammation, explaining the greater survival rate of the treated chickens.

  11. Hematinic effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill. on phenylhydrazine-induced anemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, Navin R.; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill. are known as prickly pear and folkloric use as hematinic, anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic action. Previously, the fruit juice of prickly pear was evaluated in reversed anemia induced by HgCl2 in a dose dependant manner and present study revealed about its effect in acute hemolytic anemia. Aim: To evaluate the hematinic activity of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill. Materials and Methods: The hematinic activity of an orally administered fruit juice was studied on phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced anemic rats. The hematological parameters such as hemoglobin (Hb) content, red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), and reticulocyte count were analyzed as indices of anemia. Results: PHZ altered the hematological parameters by hemolysis characterized by a decrease in Hb content, total RBC counts and PCV (P < 0.001) on day 3. The Hb content (g%) was significantly increased (P < 0.05) at day 7 in 10 and 15 ml/kg fruit juice treated rats, which was a good improvement compared to the standard. Conclusion: The speedy and progressive recovery of anemic rats responding to treatment of the O. elatior Mill. fruits may be due to increased erythropoiesis and/or antioxidant property of betacyanin. PMID:27011725

  12. [Antibiotic therapy against acute tonsillopharyngitis in children due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococci: comparison of clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, and effects on oral flora between cefditoren pivoxil for 5 days and amoxicillin for 10 days].

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Naoki; Nagai, Kensuke; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Otsu, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yuhei; Ikezawa, Shigeru; Honma, Shinichi; Shindo, Shizuo; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2011-06-01

    We compared the clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, effect on the oral microbial flora, and adverse reactions between cefditoren pivoxil (CDTR-PI) for 5 days and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days in children with acute group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis, and simultaneously examined the emm genotype and drug susceptibility of the isolated GAS. The results showed that the clinical efficacy was 100% for CDTR-PI and 97.9% for AMPC, with no difference between the two groups, and the bacterial elimination rate was 100% in both groups. No serious adverse event was noted in either group. On the other hand, concerning changes in the oral microbial flora between before and after treatment, the amount of bacteria showed no change in the CDTR-PI group (p = 0.5761) but clearly decreased in the AMPC group (p = 0.0049). This indicates that CDTR-PI does not disturb the oral microbial flora compared with AMPC. Also, the emm types determined in the 112 GAS strains isolated in this study were similar to those that have recently been isolated frequently in Japan. Concerning the drug resistance, none of the isolates showed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, but 45% of them were resistant to macrolides. The advantages of short-term treatment are considered to include a lower cost, improvement in drug compliance, decrease in the frequency of the occurrence of adverse reactions, decrease in the frequency of the appearance of drug-resistant strains, and alleviation of the psychological burden of patients and their parents. For these reasons, we conclude that CDTR-PI for 5 days is a useful option for the treatment of acute GAS tonsillopharyngitis in children.

  13. Embolic Stroke due to a Common Carotid Artery Thrombus in a Young Patient with Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia without Thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 41-year-old previously healthy male who presented with stuttering transient ischemic symptoms and radiographic evidence of a left common carotid artery thrombus as well as acute and subacute ischemic infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery territory. An exhaustive stroke work-up did not provide a plausible etiology for his symptoms. His complete blood count and iron studies, however, revealed evidence of severe iron-deficiency anemia without reactive thrombocytosis. His stool guaiac test was positive. He was discharged home on oral antithrombotic agents and aggressive iron replacement therapy with a plan for repeat vascular imaging in 3 months and a colonoscopy. This case report suggests that severe iron-deficiency anemia with or without reactive thrombocytosis should be viewed as a possible hematologic condition associated with thrombotic tendencies and a risk factor for ischemic stroke, especially in young adults. Aggressive iron supplementation and short-term antithrombotic therapy with follow-up vascular imaging are a reasonable treatment for these patients. PMID:27752375

  14. [Sideroblastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Matthes, T

    2006-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by the presence of sideroblasts in the bone marrow aspirate. Current classification schemes distinguish between diseases of the heme synthesis pathway and diseases of other mitochondrial pathways which can either be of primary origin (defects in mitochondrial DNA) or of secondary origin (defects in nuclear DNA). Although several distinct hereditary forms exist, sideroblastic anemias are most frequently acquired diseases and belong to the group of myelodysplastic syndromes with the propensity to develop into overt leukemia. Treatment is mainly supportive (vitamins, blood transfusions, cytokines) and only rarely are bone marrow transplantations performed. The molecular defects of a few hereditary forms have already been elucidated, but the genes involved in the acquired forms are still largely unknown.

  15. Recessive mutations in DGKE cause atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Schaefer, Franz; Choi, Murim; Tang, Wai Ho; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Taque, Sophie; Nobili, François; Martinez, Frank; Ji, Weizhen; Overton, John D.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Morin, Denis; Deschenes, Georges; Baudouin, Véronique; Llanas, Brigitte; Collard, Laure; Majid, Mohammed A.; Simkova, Eva; Nürnberg, Peter; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Gubler, Marie Claire; Hwa, John; Loirat, Chantal; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Pathologic thrombosis is a major cause of mortality. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) features episodes of small vessel thrombosis resulting in microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure1. Atypical HUS (aHUS) can result from genetic or autoimmune factors2 that lead to pathologic complement cascade activation3. By exome sequencing we identify recessive mutations in DGKE (diacylglycerol kinase epsilon) that co-segregate with aHUS in 9 unrelated kindreds, defining a distinctive Mendelian disease. Affected patients present with aHUS before age 1, have persistent hypertension, hematuria and proteinuria (sometimes nephrotic range), and develop chronic kidney disease with age. DGKE is found in endothelium, platelets, and podocytes. Arachidonic acid-containing diacylglycerols (DAG) activate protein kinase C, which promotes thrombosis. DGKE normally inactivates DAG signaling. We infer that loss of DGKE function results in a pro-thrombotic state. These findings identify a new mechanism of pathologic thrombosis and kidney failure and have immediate implications for treatment of aHUS patients. PMID:23542698

  16. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin deficiency anemia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vitamin deficiency anemia is a lack of healthy red blood ... normal amounts of certain vitamins. Vitamins linked to vitamin deficiency anemia include folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin ...

  17. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  18. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  19. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... role in their lives. Welcome to the Cooley's Anemia Foundation Website The Cooley's Anemia Foundation is dedicated to serving people afflicted with ... major form of this genetic blood disease, Cooley's anemia/thalassemia major. Our mission is advancing the treatment ...

  20. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  1. Anemia and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  2. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  3. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a drug or toxin. Anemia From Destruction of Red Blood Cells When the body destroys red blood cells (a ... but can affect all races. continue Anemia From Red Blood Cell Loss Blood loss can cause anemia — whether from ...

  4. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  5. Severe neonatal hemolysis due to a maternal antibody to the low-frequency Rh antigen C(w).

    PubMed

    May-Wewers, Julie; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Moore, Ellen Kay; Blackall, Douglas P

    2006-05-01

    C(w) is a low-frequency antigen in the Rh blood group system with a prevalence of approximately 2% in whites. Although anti-C(w) is not an uncommon antibody in pregnancy (0.1% incidence), clinically significant hemolytic disease of the newborn is highly unusual. We report the case of an infant with severe hyperbilirubinemia and persistent anemia due to a high-titer maternal C(w) antibody. The medical literature relating to maternal C(w) alloimmunization and neonatal outcome is also reviewed. In addition, recommendations are made regarding the management of pregnancies and newborns complicated by antibodies to C(w).

  6. Anemia and transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal anemia is a frequent occurrence in neonatal intensive care units. Red blood cell transfusion criteria in case of blood loss are clearly defined but optimal hemoglobin or hematocrit thresholds of transfusion for anemia due to decreased production or increased destruction are less evident. This review focuses on the causes of anemia in the newborn period and the most recent evidence-based treatment options, including transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

  7. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  8. Pathophysiology of hemolytic transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Robertson D

    2005-07-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are systemic reactions provoked by immunologic red blood cell (RBC) incompatibility. Clinical and experimental observations of such reactions indicate that they proceed through phases of humoral immune reaction, activation of phagocytes, productions of cytokine mediators, and wide-ranging cellular responses. HTR have many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in HTR suggest that newer biological agents that target complement intermediates or proinflammatory cytokines may be effective agents in the treatment of severe HTRs.

  9. [Anemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  10. [Refractory anemias].

    PubMed

    Efira, A; Azerad, M-A

    2013-09-01

    Refractory anemia, also known as myelodysplastic syndromes, forms a group of clonal diseases characterized by cytopenias with mostly rich bone marrow. Preferentially reaching an older population, the prognosis depends on both comorbidities and characteristics of the disease, which have been grouped into a score established in 1997 ("IPSS = International Prognostic Scoring System") and revised in 2012 ("R-IPSS = Revised IPSS"). Overall survival and risk of transformation into acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia can now be estimated fairly accurately. Based on these characteristics, the treatment will be mainly supportive or will use several new molecules: growth factors, lenalidomide, 5-azacitidine, etc. A minority of patients may also benefit from allogeneic BMT or sometimes immunosuppressive therapy.

  11. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  12. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  13. Dihydrofolate Reductase Deficiency Due to a Homozygous DHFR Mutation Causes Megaloblastic Anemia and Cerebral Folate Deficiency Leading to Severe Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cario, Holger; Smith, Desirée E.C.; Blom, Henk; Blau, Nenad; Bode, Harald; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Pannicke, Ulrich; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Rump, Eva-Maria; Ayric, Zuleya; Kohne, Elisabeth; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Smulders, Yvo; Schwarz, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The importance of intracellular folate metabolism is illustrated by the severity of symptoms and complications caused by inborn disorders of folate metabolism or by folate deficiency. We examined three children of healthy, distantly related parents presenting with megaloblastic anemia and cerebral folate deficiency causing neurologic disease with atypical childhood absence epilepsy. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping revealed a candidate region on chromosome 5 including the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus. DHFR sequencing revealed a homozygous DHFR mutation, c.458A>T (p.Asp153Val), in all siblings. The patients' folate profile in red blood cells (RBC), plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, was compatible with DHFR deficiency. DHFR activity and fluorescein-labeled methotrexate (FMTX) binding were severely reduced in EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cells of all patients. Heterozygous cells displayed intermediate DHFR activity and FMTX binding. RT-PCR of DHFR mRNA revealed no differences between wild-type and DHFR mutation-carrying cells, whereas protein expression was reduced in cells with the DHFR mutation. Treatment with folinic acid resulted in the resolution of hematological abnormalities, normalization of CSF folate levels, and improvement of neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the homozygous DHFR mutation p.Asp153Val causes DHFR deficiency and leads to a complex hematological and neurological disease that can be successfully treated with folinic acid. DHFR is necessary for maintaining sufficient CSF and RBC folate levels, even in the presence of adequate nutritional folate supply and normal plasma folate. PMID:21310277

  14. Dihydrofolate reductase deficiency due to a homozygous DHFR mutation causes megaloblastic anemia and cerebral folate deficiency leading to severe neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Cario, Holger; Smith, Desirée E C; Blom, Henk; Blau, Nenad; Bode, Harald; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Pannicke, Ulrich; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Rump, Eva-Maria; Ayric, Zuleya; Kohne, Elisabeth; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Smulders, Yvo; Schwarz, Klaus

    2011-02-11

    The importance of intracellular folate metabolism is illustrated by the severity of symptoms and complications caused by inborn disorders of folate metabolism or by folate deficiency. We examined three children of healthy, distantly related parents presenting with megaloblastic anemia and cerebral folate deficiency causing neurologic disease with atypical childhood absence epilepsy. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping revealed a candidate region on chromosome 5 including the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus. DHFR sequencing revealed a homozygous DHFR mutation, c.458A>T (p.Asp153Val), in all siblings. The patients' folate profile in red blood cells (RBC), plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, was compatible with DHFR deficiency. DHFR activity and fluorescein-labeled methotrexate (FMTX) binding were severely reduced in EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cells of all patients. Heterozygous cells displayed intermediate DHFR activity and FMTX binding. RT-PCR of DHFR mRNA revealed no differences between wild-type and DHFR mutation-carrying cells, whereas protein expression was reduced in cells with the DHFR mutation. Treatment with folinic acid resulted in the resolution of hematological abnormalities, normalization of CSF folate levels, and improvement of neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the homozygous DHFR mutation p.Asp153Val causes DHFR deficiency and leads to a complex hematological and neurological disease that can be successfully treated with folinic acid. DHFR is necessary for maintaining sufficient CSF and RBC folate levels, even in the presence of adequate nutritional folate supply and normal plasma folate.

  15. [Differential diagnosis of anemias].

    PubMed

    Szerafin, László; Jakó, János

    2005-02-13

    The authors describe the factors influencing of normal hemoglobin level, pathogenetic and morphological classification of anemias and the possibilities to distinguish their different types. They highlight features of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. They summarise in tables the basis of laboratory diagnosis and possibility of identification of different types of anemias.

  16. Hemolytic uremic syndrome revisited: Shiga toxin, factor H, and fibrin generation.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Douglas P; Marques, Marisa B

    2004-06-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. These features reflect the underlying histopathologic lesion: fibrin-rich thrombi that predominate in the renal microvasculature. HUS most commonly affects children younger than 5 years and is associated with Shiga toxin-producing enteric bacteria, the most important of which is Escherichia coli O157:H7. In this setting, HUS is epidemic and also might affect adults, particularly elderly people. Sporadic cases of HUS more commonly occur in adults and are associated with a wide variety of inciting agents and conditions. Although the disease manifestations might be similar and endothelial activation or injury likely represents a common etiologic event, differing responses to therapy suggest different pathogenic mechanisms. As more is understood about the underlying pathogenesis of the diseases that we now lump together as HUS, more efficacious and rational treatment and prevention strategies are likely to follow.

  17. Nutritional anemias.

    PubMed

    Hoffbrand, A V; Herbert, V

    1999-10-01

    Folate, vitamin B12, and iron are the subjects of active biochemical and molecular research so that further understanding of their metabolism in health and in a wide variety of Inherited and acquired diseases can be achieved. The roles of folate and vitamin B12 in cardiovascular and neurologic diseases and in neural tube defects (NTDs) will be further explored in the next decade. The effects of prophylactic therapy and of food fortification with the vitamins on these diseases remain to be established. Iron deficiency is a public health problem in all countries and prevention or treatment, particularly in children in developing countries, are major goals. The increased recent understanding of iron metabolism and absorption may clarify the etiology of diseases of iron metabolism and of dietary iron overload. Improved iron chelation therapy for transfusion-dependent patients with refractory anemias will continue to be actively researched over the next decades.

  18. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Plasmodium vivax malaria successfully treated with plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Keskar, V S; Jamale, T E; Hase, N K

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in an adult patient with Plasmodium vivax malaria. The patient presented with worsening anemia, persistent thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. HUS was diagnosed based on the high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated reticulocyte count and presence of schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Kidney biopsy showed features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Complete hematological remission was achieved after five sessions of therapeutic plasma exchange. Renal function partially recovered and stabilized at discharge. Vivax malaria, generally considered benign, may be rarely associated with HUS.

  20. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Zafirovska-Ivanovska, Beti; Gruev, Todor; Markic, Josko; Aluloska, Natasa; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Piperkovska, Katica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal jaundice that occurs in ABO or Rhesus issoimunisation has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for development of severe hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin neurotoxicity. AIM: Aim of our study was to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters associated with hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility and compare results with the group of unspecific jaundice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred sixty seven (167) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia cases were included in the study, 24.6% of which presented with ABO/Rhesus type hemolytic jaundice, and the rest with unspecific jaundice. Evaluation included: blood count, reticulocites, serum bilirubin, aminotransferases, blood grouping, and Coombs test, also the day of bilirubin peak, duration of the hyperbilirubinemia, and additional bilirubin measurements. RESULTS: We showed significantly lower mean values of hemoglobin, erythrocytes and hematocrit and significantly higher values of reticulocytes in the group of ABO/Rh incompatibility compared to the group of jaundice of unspecific etiology; also an earlier presentation and a higher-grade jaundice in this group. CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:27275310

  1. Anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Kari M; Ingardia, Charles J; Borgida, Adam F

    2013-06-01

    Hemodynamic changes occur in pregnancy to prepare for expected blood loss at delivery. Physiologic anemia occurs in pregnancy because plasma volume increases more quickly than red cell mass. Anemia is most commonly classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron deficiency anemia accounts for 75% of all anemias in pregnancy. Oral iron supplementation is the recommended treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Parenteral iron and erythropoietin can also be used in severe or refractory cases. Outcomes and treatments for other forms of inherited and acquired anemias in pregnancy vary by disease, and include nutritional supplementation, corticosteroids, supportive transfusions, and splenectomy.

  2. Optimal management of pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Emmanuel; Serraj, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer’s disease) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis, predominantly of the fundus, and is responsible for a deficiency in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) due to its malabsorption. Its prevalence is 0.1% in the general population and 1.9% in subjects over the age of 60 years. Pernicious anemia represents 20%–50% of the causes of vitamin B12 deficiency in adults. Given its polymorphism and broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, pernicious anemia is a great pretender. Its diagnosis must therefore be evoked and considered in the presence of neurological and hematological manifestations of undetermined origin. Biologically, it is characterized by the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Treatment is based on the administration of parenteral vitamin B12, although other routes of administration (eg, oral) are currently under study. In the present update, these various aspects are discussed with special emphasis on data of interest to the clinician. PMID:23028239

  3. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  4. Anemias excluding cobalamin and folate deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Dublis, Stephanie; Shah, Shefali; Nand, Sucha; Anderes, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Anemias are one of the commonest maladies affecting humans. They result from either a failure of production by the bone marrow (hypoproliferative), or from premature destruction or loss (hyperproliferative) of red cells. Hypoproliferative anemias typically result from deficiencies of essential nutrients, stem cell abnormalities or deficiency, and infiltrative processes of the bone marrow. In the hyperproliferative forms, the bone marrow function is normal and anemia results from bleeding or shortened erythrocyte lifespan due to hemoglobinopathies, red cell enzyme disorders, membrane defects, or external factors such as antibodies, trauma, or heat injury. The etiology of anemia is frequently obvious, but when obscure, a systematic diagnostic approach frequently yields the answer. It is important to realize that anemias are usually a consequence of another disease process, which must be identified. Without correction of the underlying disease process, the treatment is likely to fail.

  5. How Is Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This ... iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning. Procedures If your anemia is severe, your doctor ...

  6. What Is Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for the Public » Health Topics » Anemia Explore Anemia What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related ...

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like ... normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also get stuck in blood ...

  8. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  9. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  10. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Caregivers Help Themselves Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD, ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  11. Myeloma and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Perillie, P E

    1978-01-01

    Four cases of pernicious anemia developing in association with multiple myeloma are described. The description now of 14 cases demonstrating the association of these two disorders suggest a causative relationship. These observations, in addition to the previously well-documented increased coincidence of pernicious anemia and benign monoclonal gammopathy and pernicious anemia and hypoglobulinemia, suggest that screening for vitamine B12 deficiency in patients with gammopathies and for protein abnormalities in patients with pernicious anemia is indicated.

  12. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia.

  13. Bone healing under experimental anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Giglio, M J; Gorustovich, A; Guglielmotti, M B

    2000-01-01

    The effects of anemia on different physiological parameters have been the object of permanent study. There are no studies in the literature on the effects of this disorder on the process on bone healing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, histologically and histomorphometrically, the process of osteogenesis in the post-extraction alvcolus of the lower molar, and in the peri-implant environment of rats. Twenty male Wistar rats (body weight (b.w.): 60 +/- 7 g) were grouped into two experimental sets. The control group (n:10) was given 0.5 mL saline solution i.p. The anemic group (n:10) was injected with 6 mg/100 g of b.w. or 3 mg/100 g b.w. phenylhidrazine, a well known hemolytic agent. Under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia the rats were submitted to extraction of the first lower molars, and to implantation in the tibia in keeping with the "laminar test" procedure. Other parameters, i.e. body weight (b.w.), food intake (FI), hematocrit (Htc), and hemoglobinemia (Hb) were monitored every 48 hs. The results showed a reduction in b.w., FI, Htc and Hb in the experimental group. The histological and histomorphometrical data show that the condition of anemia affects osteogenesis quali-quantitatively in the post-extraction alveolus and peri-implant microenvironment. Both bone reparative situations showed that ostegenesis is "sensitive" to anemia and/or the associated conditions, causing a delay in bone healing.

  14. Postpartum anemia I: definition, prevalence, causes, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils

    2011-11-01

    This review provides a status on the definition, prevalence, causes, and consequences of anemia in women who have given childbirth, i.e., postpartum anemia. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia relies on a full blood count including hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum soluble transferrin receptor, which appear to be reliable indicators of anemia and iron status 1 week postpartum while serum transferrin saturation is an unreliable indicator several weeks after delivery. It is recommended that postpartum anemia should be defined by hemoglobin <110 g/L at 1 week postpartum and <120 g/L at 8 weeks postpartum. The major causes of postpartum anemia are prepartum anemia combined with acute bleeding anemia due blood losses at delivery. Normal peripartum blood losses are approximately 300 ml, but hemorrhage >500 ml occur in 5-6% of the women. In healthy women after normal delivery, the prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin <110 g/L) 1 week postpartum is 14% in iron-supplemented women and 24% in non-supplemented women. In consecutive series of European women, the prevalence of anemia 48 h after delivery is approximately 50%. In developing countries, the prevalence of postpartum anemia is in the range of 50-80%. Postpartum anemia is associated with an impaired quality of life, reduced cognitive abilities, emotional instability, and depression and constitutes a significant health problem in women of reproductive age.

  15. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and acute chest syndrome revealing sickle cell anemia in a 32 years female patient.

    PubMed

    Igala, Marielle; Nsame, Daniela; Ova, Jennie Dorothée Guelongo Okouango; Cherkaoui, Siham; Oukkach, Bouchra; Quessar, Asmae

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from a single amino acid substitution in the gene encoding the β-globin subunit. Polymerization of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin leads to decreased deformability of red blood cells. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common thyroid disease now recognized as an auto-immune thyroid disorder, it is usually thought to be haemolytic autoimmune anemia. We report the case of a 32 years old women admitted for chest pain and haemolysis anemia in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis and sickle cell anemia were found. In our observation the patient is a young woman whose examination did not show signs of goitre but the analysis of thyroid function tests performed before an auto-immune hemolytic anemia (confirmed by a high level of unconjugated bilirubin and a Coombs test positive for IgG) has found thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and positive thyroid antibody at rates in excess of 4.5 times their normal value. In the same period, as the hemolytic anemia, and before the atypical chest pain and anguish they generated in the patient, the search for hemoglobinopathies was made despite the absence of a family history of haematological disease or painful attacks in childhood. Patient electrophoresis's led to research similar cases in the family. The mother was the first to be analyzed with ultimately diagnosed with sickle cell trait have previously been ignored. This case would be a form with few symptoms because the patient does not describe painful crises in childhood or adolescence.

  16. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans.

  17. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  18. Investigation of nonpoikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ward, P C

    1979-03-01

    When the mean corpuscular volume is normal in an anemic patient, examination of a blood smear becomes of paramount importance. When the RBCs are normochronic, normocytic, and nonpoikilocytic, the reticulocyte count determines the line of investigation. When the count is increased, either hemorrhage or hemolysis is present. When the count is not increased (ie, normal or low), the differential diagnosis includes anemias due to iron deficiency, chronic disease, renal disease, hemodilution, marrow infiltration, and marrow failure (aplastic anemia). Some morphologic clues to cause other than those pertaining to RBC morphology are discussed and illustrated. A working approach to the investigation of nonpoikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia is suggested.

  19. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  20. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia.

  1. [Sideropenic anemia in infants and toddlers].

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, G; Votava-Raić, A; Tjesić-Drinković, D; Rajić, L; Femenić-Kes, R; Konja, J; Goluza, I; Bilić, E; Leskovar, V

    2001-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common anemia in infants. In the routine pediatric care this problem is encountered every day. Numerous factors in infancy (low birth weight, rapid growth, insufficient nutrition) are involved in the development of iron-deficiency anemia, and they must be considered when establishing diagnosis, counselling parents, and prescribing oral iron preparations. Data on 119 patients aged up to two years treated in the Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Pediatric Department, University Hospital Centre Zagreb Salata between 1994 and 1999, were analyzed. We were prompted to do so because of great frequency of iron-deficiency anemia as one of associated diagnoses, and unfortunately often the only diagnosis requiring hospitalization. Out of 119 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, nine (7.7%) patients (four premature newborns and three from twin pregnancy) had to receive transfusion of erythrocyte concentrate due to very bad general condition and low red blood count, accompanied by clinical signs of anemic hypoxia. We also analyzed prenatal and perinatal history, socioeconomic living conditions of these children, i.e. their nutrition, and if they had previously received oral iron preparations. Some of the results, such as inadequate alimentation with flour, as well as insufficient prophylaxis of iron deficiency, which were found in most cases of severe anemia, point to the need of paying greater attention to this problem, better parents education, and more adequate screening for iron deficiency anemia.

  2. Plasmodium vivax induced hemolytic uremic syndrome: An uncommon manifestation that leads to a grave complication and treated successfully with renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jhorawat, Rajesh; Beniwal, Pankaj; Malhotra, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a rare manifestation of Plasmodium vivax malaria. A young driver was admitted with acute febrile illness, decreased urine output, anemia, thrombocytopenia, jaundice, and increased serum lactate dehydrogenase. He showed a partial response to antimalarial drugs. However, he was readmitted with worsening renal parameters. His kidney biopsy revealed chronic thrombotic microangiopathy. He remained dialysis dependent and later underwent renal transplantation successfully, with excellent graft function at 1-year.

  3. [Massive hydrothorax in a ease of hemolytic uremic syndrome: conservative treatment without interruption of peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Marin, Gustavo R

    2016-12-01

    The hydrothorax is a known but rare complication of acute and chronic peritoneal dialysis. Patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome seem to be more prone to this complication. Usually discontinuation of treatment is necessary due to the lack of resolution or recurrence of hydrothorax and transfer to hemodialysis, but some patients can continue dialysis with modification of technique and with resolution of hydrothorax.

  4. Cyclosporine therapy during pregnancy in a patient with β-thalassemia major and autoimmune haemolytic anemia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Agapidou, A; Vlachaki, E; Theodoridis, T; Economou, M; Perifanis, V

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of hemoglobinopathies offer an improved potential for safe pregnancy with favourable outcome in patients with β-thalassemia major. Autoimmune diseases that are common in women at reproductive age might be fulminant and hardly manageable in pregnant women with thalassemia. Thus immunosuppressant drugs like cyclosporine A could be necessary in order to maintain good maternal and foetal health. We present a case report of a 35-year-old woman with β-thalassemia major, splenectomy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and insulin treated diabetes mellitus who was treated with cyclosporine A during her pregnancy, and delivered a healthy male infant. First line therapy with steroids was ineffective, due to deregulation of diabetes mellitus. PMID:23935353

  5. [Fatigue and anemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Zeller, A

    2009-12-02

    We herein report on an 80-year old male patient with a history of muscle weakness, fatigue and weight loss since several months. Because of a pathologic synacthen test in combination with decreased levels of ACTH, we diagnosed a secondary chronic adrenal insufficiency. Because of a normochromic, normocytic, and hypo-proliferative anemia, bone marrow puncture was performed, showing an anemia of chronic disease. We initiated hydrocortisone and anemia and patients' symptoms were fully reconstituted.

  6. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  7. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated? Treatments for aplastic anemia include blood transfusions , blood and marrow stem cell ... a transplant. Removing a known cause of aplastic anemia, such as exposure to a toxin, also may ...

  8. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  9. Penicillin-induced immunohemolytic anemia associated with circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Funicella, T; Weinger, R S; Moake, J L; Spruell, M; Rossen, R D

    1977-01-01

    Eleven days after administration of multiple penicillin analogs, a 55-year-old female developed a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. The patient's erythrocytes were coated with IgG, complement components (C4/C3) and her serum contained elevated 125I-Clq binding activity (a measure of the presence of immune complexes). Her serum, in the presence of fresh complement and penicillin, induced complement sensitization of normal erythrocytes. Immune complex-mediated complement activation and the haptene type of erythrocyte sensitization accounted for accelerated red blood cell destruction in this patient.

  10. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-08-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI, also called anemia of chronic disease) is a common, typically normocytic, normochromic anemia that is caused by an underlying inflammatory disease. It is diagnosed when serum iron concentrations are low despite adequate iron stores, as evidenced by serum ferritin that is not low. In the setting of inflammation, it may be difficult to differentiate AI from iron deficiency anemia, and the 2 conditions may coexist. Treatment should focus on the underlying disease. Recent advances in molecular understanding of AI are stimulating the development of new pathophysiologically targeted experimental therapies.

  11. Fanconi anemia: current management.

    PubMed

    Kook, Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosomal instability disorder, characterized by congenital anomalies, defective hematopoiesis and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia and certain solid tumors. All racial and ethnic groups are at risk, and at least 11 complementation groups have been identified and the genes defective in eight of these have been identified (FANCA, C, D2, E, F, G, L and BRCA2). FA-A is the most common complementation group, accounting for approximately 65% of all affected individuals. The gold-standard screening test for FA is based on the characteristic hypersensitivity of FA cells to the crosslinking agents, such as mitomicin C or diepoxybutane. Recent progress has been made in identifying the genes bearing pathogenetically relevant mutations, but slower progress has been made in defining the precise functions of the proteins in normal cells, in part because that the proteins are multifunctional. Molecular studies have established that a common pathway exist, both between the FA proteins and other proteins involved in DNA repair such as NBS1, ATM, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only option for establishing normal hematopoiesis. To reduce undue toxicities due to inherent hypersensitivity, nonmyeloablative conditioning for transplants has been advocated. This review summarizes the general clinical and hematologic features and the current management of FA. Fanconi anemia (FA) is the commonest type of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with the birth incidence of around three per million. The inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive with the estimated heterozygote frequency being one in 300 in Europe and the US.

  12. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  13. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  14. [Vitrectomy for retinal proliferation in childhood following hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wirths, G; Alnawaiseh, M; Eter, N

    2016-07-01

    The formation of retinal membranes can occur due to a variety of reasons but they are most commonly idiopathic due to the aging process. In addition, epiretinal and subretinal membranes can be formed after severe infections. The present case description shows the appearance of a retinal membrane after hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Shiga toxin positive E. coli. The question arose whether the patient would benefit from vitrectomy with membrane peeling because of the presence of both epiretinal and subretinal gliotic changes. After the operation on the more severely affected right eye a morphological improvement could be achieved so that an operation on the left eye was also recommended. Judging by the course of this case vitrectomy with membrane peeling seems to be a useful instrument even for the simultaneous presence of subretinal and epiretinal membranes.

  15. Mitochondrial iron metabolism and sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sheftel, Alex D; Richardson, Des R; Prchal, Josef; Ponka, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by mitochondrial iron overload in developing red blood cells. The unifying characteristic of all sideroblastic anemias is the ring sideroblast, which is a pathological erythroid precursor containing excessive deposits of non-heme iron in mitochondria with perinuclear distribution creating a ring appearance. Sideroblastic anemias may be hereditary or acquired. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias are caused by defects in genes present on the X chromosome (mutations in the ALAS2, ABCB7, or GRLX5 gene), genes on autosomal chromosomes, or mitochondrial genes. Acquired sideroblastic anemias are either primary (refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, RARS, representing one subtype of the myelodysplastic syndrome) or secondary due to some drugs, toxins, copper deficiency, or chronic neoplastic disease. The pathogenesis of mitochondrial iron loading in developing erythroblasts is diverse. Ring sideroblasts can develop as a result of a heme synthesis defect in erythroblasts (ALAS2 mutations), a defect in iron-sulfur cluster assembly, iron-sulfur protein precursor release from mitochondria (ABCB7 mutations), or by a defect in intracellular iron metabolism in erythroid cells (e.g. RARS).

  16. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy.

  17. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history.

  18. Synergistic hemolytic reactions between staphylococci and Micrococcus lylae.

    PubMed

    Lämmler, C; Brückler, J

    1989-06-01

    The primary culture of a clinical specimen obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema revealed three different bacterial species which demonstrated synergistic hemolytic activities on sheep blood agar plates. The three cultures were identified as beta-hemolytic Staphylococcus intermedius, as a coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, producing a delta-like hemolysin and as non-hemolytic Micrococcus lylae. The coagulase-negative staphylococcal species as well as M. lylae produced synergistically with beta-hemolytic S. intermedius zones of complete hemolysis. The occurrence of three different synergistically active bacterial species from one clinical specimen might be of clinical significance.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  20. Familial atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: a review of its genetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fengxiao; Borsa, Nicolo; Gianluigi, Ardissino; Smith, Richard J H

    2012-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA) characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases) and familial (20% of cases) forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

  1. Early gestational hemolytic uremic syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F M; Rocha, E; Maccariello, E; Caldas, M L; Gomes, M V; Lugon, J R

    1997-05-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare condition which most frequently follows gastrointestinal or respiratory infection episodes in young children, but it can also occur in other settings such as the postpartum period and during use of drugs such as oral contraconceptives, immunosuppressors, and antineoplastics. In early pregnancy, however, its frequency is thought to be very low. The authors report a case of a 30-year-old woman who developed HUS early in her first pregnancy. She had persistent aqueous diarrhea from the beginning of the pregnancy. At the 21st week she developed hypertension which in 2 weeks was followed by seizures, oliguria, and acute pulmonary edema despite intensive medical efforts to control her blood pressure. Surgical intervention for fetal delivery was performed. The patient was initially kept on continuous hemodialysis (CVVHD) followed by an alternate-day conventional hemodialysis schedule. A peripheral blood analysis showed a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia; blood coagulation tests were completely normal. A brain CT scan and an abdominal MRI showed no major abnormalities. HUS was confirmed by a percutaneal kidney biopsy, performed at the 21st day of anuria. Techniques for identification of verotoxin-producing E. coli were not available. Renal function did not recover and the patient has been undergoing regular maintenance hemodialysis for a year.

  2. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Griffiths, Heidi; Miyashita, Yosuke; Bhatt, Riha; Jaffe, Ronald; Moritz, Michael; Hofer, Johannes; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic microangiopathy of the kidney and usually results from Shiga-toxin induced activation of the alternative complement pathway. Gastroenteritis is a common feature of the Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli HUS, referred to as STEC-HUS. An inherited or acquired complement dysregulation may lead to HUS referred to as non-STEC or atypical (a)HUS. Although gastroenteritis is not a common presentation of aHUS, some patients develop ischemic colitis and may be misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis or acute ulcerative colitis (UC). Case Diagnosis –Treatment We present a patient with low circulating complement (C) 3 levels who developed aHUS in the course of chronic active UC. Resolution of renal and gastrointestinal manifestations in response to treatment with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against terminal C5 protein suggests the role of alternative complement in the pathogenesis of both, aHUS and UC. Conclusion This case illustrates that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway may manifest in other organs besides the kidney and that the circulating C3 levels do not correlate with the disease activity or the clinical response to eculizumab. PMID:27135055

  3. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2009-10-01

    Inherited sideroblastic anemia comprises several rare anemias due to heterogeneous genetic lesions, all characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow. This morphological aspect reflects abnormal mitochondrial iron utilization by the erythroid precursors. The most common X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA), due to mutations of the first enzyme of the heme synthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), has linked heme deficiency to mitochondrial iron accumulation. The identification of other genes, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette B7 (ABCB7) and glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), has strengthened the role of iron sulfur cluster biogenesis in sideroblast formation and revealed a complex interplay between pathways of mitochondrial iron utilization and cytosolic iron sensing by the iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs). As recently occurred with the discovery of the SLC25A38-related sideroblastic anemia, the identification of the genes responsible for as yet uncharacterized forms will provide further insights into mitochondrial iron metabolism of erythroid cells and the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia.

  4. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants ... November 1, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  5. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood and bone marrow diseases, such as aplastic anemia. // Non Object? Updated: August 22, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  6. Anemia and heart failure.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Eileen; Murphy, Clare; McMurray, John J V

    2004-12-01

    Over the past few years, anemia has emerged as a powerful independent predictor of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). It affects up to 50% of patients with CHF, depending on the definition of anemia used and on the population studied. Even small reductions in hemoglobin are associated with worse outcome. However, the causes of anemia in CHF remain unclear, although impairment of renal function and inflammatory cytokines are proposed mechanisms. Both may act through impairment of the synthesis or action of erythropoietin. Preliminary studies have demonstrated improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance, quality of life, and reductions in hospitalizations when patients with severe CHF were treated with erythropoietin. The benefits and the potential risks of such therapies will be further addressed in upcoming larger randomized trials. The recent interest in anemia reflects a new perspective in heart failure therapy, focusing on non-cardiovascular comorbidities.

  7. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  8. The relationship between the severity of hemolysis, clinical manifestations and risk of death in 415 patients with sickle cell anemia in the US and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Lee, Janet S; Zhang, Yingze; Kanias, Tamir; Zhao, Xuejun; Xiong, Zeyu; Oriss, Timothy B; Zeng, Qilu; Kato, Gregory J; Gibbs, J Simon R; Hildesheim, Mariana E; Sachdev, Vandana; Barst, Robyn J; Machado, Roberto F; Hassell, Kathryn L; Little, Jane A; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Novelli, Enrico; Girgis, Reda E; Morris, Claudia R; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Badesch, David B; Lanzkron, Sophie; Castro, Oswaldo L; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Gordeuk, Victor R; Gladwin, Mark T

    2013-03-01

    The intensity of hemolytic anemia has been proposed as an independent risk factor for the development of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease, such as pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia and cutaneous leg ulceration. A composite variable derived from several individual markers of hemolysis could facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of hemolysis. In this study, we assessed the association of hemolysis with outcomes in sickle cell anemia. A hemolytic component was calculated by principal component analysis from reticulocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin concentrations in 415 hemoglobin SS patients. Association of this component with direct markers of hemolysis and clinical outcomes was assessed. As primary validation, both plasma red blood cell microparticles and cell-free hemoglobin concentration were higher in the highest hemolytic component quartile compared to the lowest quartile (P≤0.0001 for both analyses). The hemolytic component was lower with hydroxyurea therapy, higher hemoglobin F, and alpha-thalassemia (P≤0.0005); it was higher with higher systemic pulse pressure, lower oxygen saturation, and greater values for tricuspid regurgitation velocity, left ventricular diastolic dimension and left ventricular mass (all P<0.0001). Two-year follow-up analysis showed that a high hemolytic component was associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, HR 3.44; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2-9.5; P=0.02). The hemolytic component reflects direct markers of intravascular hemolysis in patients with sickle cell disease and allows for adjusted analysis of associations between hemolytic severity and clinical outcomes. These results confirm associations between hemolytic rate and pulse pressure, oxygen saturation, increases in Doppler-estimated pulmonary systolic pressures and mortality (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00492531).

  9. The relationship between the severity of hemolysis, clinical manifestations and risk of death in 415 patients with sickle cell anemia in the US and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Lee, Janet S.; Zhang, Yingze; Kanias, Tamir; Zhao, Xuejun; Xiong, Zeyu; Oriss, Timothy B.; Zeng, Qilu; Kato, Gregory J.; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Hildesheim, Mariana E.; Sachdev, Vandana; Barst, Robyn J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Little, Jane A.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Novelli, Enrico; Girgis, Reda E.; Morris, Claudia R.; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Badesch, David B.; Lanzkron, Sophie; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of hemolytic anemia has been proposed as an independent risk factor for the development of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease, such as pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia and cutaneous leg ulceration. A composite variable derived from several individual markers of hemolysis could facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of hemolysis. In this study, we assessed the association of hemolysis with outcomes in sickle cell anemia. A hemolytic component was calculated by principal component analysis from reticulocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin concentrations in 415 hemoglobin SS patients. Association of this component with direct markers of hemolysis and clinical outcomes was assessed. As primary validation, both plasma red blood cell microparticles and cell-free hemoglobin concentration were higher in the highest hemolytic component quartile compared to the lowest quartile (P≤0.0001 for both analyses). The hemolytic component was lower with hydroxyurea therapy, higher hemoglobin F, and alpha-thalassemia (P≤0.0005); it was higher with higher systemic pulse pressure, lower oxygen saturation, and greater values for tricuspid regurgitation velocity, left ventricular diastolic dimension and left ventricular mass (all P<0.0001). Two-year follow-up analysis showed that a high hemolytic component was associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, HR 3.44; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2–9.5; P=0.02). The hemolytic component reflects direct markers of intravascular hemolysis in patients with sickle cell disease and allows for adjusted analysis of associations between hemolytic severity and clinical outcomes. These results confirm associations between hemolytic rate and pulse pressure, oxygen saturation, increases in Doppler-estimated pulmonary systolic pressures and mortality (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00492531). PMID:22983573

  10. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia with Ferro-Folgamma.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Mihaela Maria

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a hypochromic anemia in which hemoglobin poor synthesis is due to a decrease in the amount of iron in the body. The decrease of iron quantity has many causes: insufficient intake of aliments rich in iron (meat, viscera, green vegetables), increased necessities during growth period, pregnancy, erythrocytes hyperregeneration, high-performance sportsmen, increased loss by digestive way, genito-urinary way, respiratory, hemorrhagic syndromes. Clinically, symptoms and signs specific to all types of anemia and those specific to lack of iron occur besides the symptoms and signs of the underlying disease: atrophic glositis, angular stomatitis, sideropenic dysphagia, pica, skin and nails changes. Laboratory investigations useful for diagnosis are: microcytic, hypochromic anemia, decreased serum iron level, total capacity of iron binding increased, medullar iron store absent, good response to iron therapy. Ferro-Folgamma is one of the most indicated medicines in iron deficiency anemia. Due to its components this medicine has many indications: insufficient alimentary intake concerning iron, folic acid, B12 vitamin, vegetarian alimentation, increased needs during growth period, iron deficiency anaemia secondary to chronic hemorrhages, malnutrition, anemias associated with chronic alcohol intake, preventive treatment of iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia during pregnancy and lactation.

  11. Physicochemical properties and inhibition effect on iron deficiency anemia of a novel polysaccharide-iron complex (LPPC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Han, Zhi-Ping; Yin, Li; Zhao, Ming-Xing; Yu, Shu-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Porphyran (P) was extracted from red algae Porphyra by boiling water. A novel polysaccharide-iron complex (LPPC) was prepared under the alkaline condition by adding a ferric chloride solution to the low molecular weight porphyran (LP) solution. Physicochemical properties and inhibition effect on iron deficiency anemia of this complex were studied. The content of iron(III) in the complex is 21.57% determined with iodometry. The results indicate that LPPC was product required. The complex can increase red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), Serum iron (SI), spleen index, spleen mass and mass of mice with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Although the structure and deeper mechanisms on hemolytic anemia of LPPC should be further studied, LPPC is hoped to be developed as a late-model iron supplement which has a synergism on anemia.

  12. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  13. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease National Hematologic Diseases Information Service What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person has ... also cause low blood iron levels. People with anemia may feel tired because their blood does not ...

  14. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

  15. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Hemoglobin A1c Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nitin; Mishra, T.K.; Singh, Tejinder

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in India. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used in diabetic patients as an index of glycemic control reflecting glucose levels of the previous 3 months. Like blood sugar levels, HbA1c levels are also affected by the presence of variant hemoglobins, hemolytic anemias, nutritional anemias, uremia, pregnancy, and acute blood loss. However, reports on the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels are inconsistent. We conducted a study to analyze the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels and to assess whether treatment of iron deficiency anemia affects HbA1c levels. Methods Fifty patients confirmed to have iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in this study. HbA1c and absolute HbA1c levels were measured both at baseline and at 2 months after treatment, and these values were compared with those in the control population. Results The mean baseline HbA1c level in anemic patients (4.6%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (5.5%, p<0.05). A significant increase was observed in the patients' absolute HbA1c levels at 2 months after treatment (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.73 g/dL, p<0.01). There was a significant difference between the baseline values of patients and controls (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.74 g/dL, p<0.01). Conclusions In contrast to the observations of previous studies, ours showed that HbA1c levels and absolute HbA1c levels increased with treatment of iron deficiency anemia. This could be attributable to nutritional deficiency and/or certain unknown variables. Further studies are warranted. PMID:22259774

  16. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis.

  17. [Anemia of chronic disorder - pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment].

    PubMed

    Demarmels Biasiutti, Franziska

    2010-05-01

    After iron deficiency anemia the anemia of chronic disorder is the second most frequent anemia, and in hospitalized patients and/or patients suffering from chronic disease, especially infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders it is even the most frequent anemia. Morphologically it belongs to the normochromic, normocytic, hyporegeneratoric anemias. Pathogenetically it is induced by the upregulation of hepcidin, a recently detected acute phase protein with most important regulatory function in the iron-household. As a consequence of elevated hepcidin at the same time iron absorption in the bowel as well as iron release from macrophages are reduced, resulting in sequestration of iron in the RES and therefore functional iron deficiency. The other reason is a blunted release of erythropoetin (EPO) with at the same time reduced effectiveness due to down-regulation of EPO-receptors on erythroid cells. Treatment consists first of all in the therapy of the underlying disease and possibly in the combined application of EPO and iron.

  18. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen ... HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of ...

  19. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate I'm Like You. "The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation is helping patients like ... cope with bone marrow failure disease." Diseases Aplastic Anemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) Related ...

  20. Diagnosing anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: beyond the established markers.

    PubMed

    Oustamanolakis, Pantelis; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    The main types of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of inflammatory etiology, or anemia of chronic disease (ACD). In the management of IBD patients with anemia it is essential for the physician to diagnose the type of anemia in order to decide in an evidence-based manner for the appropriate treatment. However, the assessment of iron status in IBD in many cases is rather difficult due to coexistent inflammation. For this assessment several indices and markers have been suggested. Ferritin, seems to play a central role in the definition and diagnosis of anemia in IBD and transferrin, transferrin saturation (Tsat), and soluble transferrin receptors are also valuable markers. All these biochemical markers have several limitations because they are not consistently reliable indices, since they are influenced by factors other than changes in iron balance. In this review, in addition to them, we discuss the newer alternative markers for iron status that may be useful when serum ferritin and Tsat are not sufficient. The iron metabolism regulators, hepcidin and prohepcidin, are still under investigation in IBD. Erythrocytes parameters like the red cell distribution width (RDW) and the percentage of hypochromic red cells as well as reticulocyte parameters such as hemoglobin concentration of reticulocytes, red blood cell size factor and reticulocyte distribution width could be useful markers for the evaluation of anemia in IBD.

  1. Mechanisms of anemia in CKD.

    PubMed

    Babitt, Jodie L; Lin, Herbert Y

    2012-10-01

    Anemia is a common feature of CKD associated with poor outcomes. The current management of patients with anemia in CKD is controversial, with recent clinical trials demonstrating increased morbidity and mortality related to erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Here, we examine recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying anemia of CKD. These insights hold promise for the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that directly target the pathophysiologic processes underlying this form of anemia.

  2. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is a low red blood cell count ... anemia often do well with treatment. Long-term vitamin B12 deficiency can cause nerve damage. This may be permanent ...

  4. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  5. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  6. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  7. Clinical grand rounds: atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hodgkins, Kavita S; Bobrowski, Amy E; Lane, Jerome C; Langman, Craig B

    2012-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, lifethreatening, chronic, genetic disease of uncontrolled alternative pathway complement activation. The understanding of the pathophysiology and genetics of this disease has expanded over recent decades and promising new developments in the management of aHUS have emerged. Regardless of the cause of aHUS, with or without a demonstrated mutation or autoantibody, blockade of terminal complement activation through C5 is of high interest as a mechanism to ameliorate the disease. Eculizumab, an existing monoclonal antibody directed against C5 with high affinity, prevents the perpetuation of the downstream activation of the complement cascade and the damage caused by generation of the anaphylotoxin C5a and the membrane attack complex C5b-9, by blocking C5 cleavage. We report the successful use of eculizumab in a patient after kidney transplantation and discuss the disease aHUS.

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Acinetobacter hemolyticus.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio Lucas; Lipinski, Rubens Wolfe

    2014-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae have been associated with bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. However, there have been only a couple of reports describing bloody diarrhea associated with Acinetobacter spp. and there are no reports of these bacteria causing HUS in children. Here, we report the case of a nine-month-old boy with bloody diarrhea who developed non-oliguric renal failure. The clinical and laboratory findings supported the diagnosis of Acinetobacter hemolyticus infection associated with HUS. The patient responded favorably to antibiotic therapy plus conservative treatment. In conclusion, Acinetobacter infection should be considered as a plausible cause of HUS in cases where E. coli infection is not involved. The rapid transformation ability of Acinetobacter is a matter of concern.

  9. A 21 Nucleotide Duplication on the α1- and α2-Globin Genes Involves a Variety of Hypochromic Microcytic Anemias, From Mild to Hb H Disease.

    PubMed

    Farashi, Samaneh; Faramarzi Garous, Negin; Zeinali, Fatemeh; Vakili, Shadi; Ashki, Mehri; Imanian, Hashem; Najmabadi, Hossein; Azarkeivan, Azita; Tamaddoni, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) is a common genetic disorder in Iran and many parts of the world. Genetic defects in the α-globin gene cluster can result in α-thal that may develop into a clinical phenotype varying from almost asymptomatic to a lethal hemolytic anemia. Loss of one functional α gene, indicated as heterozygous α(+)-thal, shows minor hematological abnormalities. Homozygosity for α(+)- or heterozygosity for α(0)-thal have more severe hematological abnormalities due to a markedly reduced α chain output. At the molecular level, the absence of three α-globin genes resulting from the compound heterozygous state for α(0)- and α(+)-thal, lead to Hb H disease. Here we present a 21 nucleotide (nt) duplication consisting of six amino acids and 3 bp of intronic sequence at the exon-intron boundary, in both the α-globin genes, detected by direct DNA sequencing. This duplication was identified in three patients originating from two different Iranian ethnic groups and one Arab during more than 12 years. The clinical presentation of these individuals varies widely from a mild asymptomatic anemia (heterozygote in α1-globin gene) to a severely anemic state, diagnosed as an Hb H individual requiring blood transfusion (duplication on the α2-globin gene in combination with the - -(MED) double α-globin gene deletion). The third individual, who was homozygous for this nt duplication on the α1-globin gene, showed severe hypochromic microcytic anemia and splenomegaly. In the last decade, numerous α-globin mutations have demonstrated the necessity of prenatal diagnosis (PND) for α-thal, and this study has contributed another mutation as important enough that needs to be considered.

  10. Inborn anemias in mice. Comprehensive progress report, 1 August 1979-1 June 1982, to accompany twenty-seventh renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.; Barker, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been investigated including four macrocytic anemias, three hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules controlling a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse and by extension to man from an understanding of mammalian mechanisms utilized in the control of erythropoiesis. Each of the different anemias is studied through: (a) biochemical and biophysical characterization of peripheral blood cells; (b) determinations of cellular and organismic radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme biosynthesis; (d) morphological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli and inhibitors; and (g) physiological complementation analysis via transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  11. Rapid capping in alpha-spectrin-deficient MEL cells from mice afflicted with hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A spectrin-based membrane skeleton is important for the stability and organization of the erythrocyte. To study the role of spectrin in cells that possess complex cytoskeletons, we have generated alpha-spectrin- deficient erythroleukemia cell lines from sph/sph mice. These cells contain beta-spectrin, but lack alpha-spectrin as determined by immunoblot and Northern blot analyses. The effects of alpha-spectrin deficiency are apparent in the cells' irregular shape and fragility in culture. Capping of membrane glycoproteins by fluorescent lectin or antibodies occurs more rapidly in sph/sph than in wild-type erythroleukemia cells, and the caps appear more concentrated. The data support the idea that spectrin plays an important role in organizing membrane structure and limiting the lateral mobility of integral membrane glycoproteins in cells other than mature erythrocytes. PMID:8195289

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  13. Anemia: Evaluation and Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Michael J; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Anemia is among the most common medical problems and clinical and laboratory evaluation need to be approached logically. The complete blood count with red cell indices offers clues to diagnosis. Many anemias have characteristic red cell morphology. The reticulocyte count serves as a useful screen for hemolysis or blood loss. Testing for specific causes of the anemia is performed. Occasionally, examination of the bone marrow is required for diagnosis. Molecular testing is increasingly being use to aid the diagnostic process. This article reviews diagnostic tests for anemia and suggests a rational approach to determining the etiology of a patient's anemia.

  14. Hypocholesterolemia in chronic anemias with increased erythropoietic activity.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Knobler, Hilla; Tamary, Hannah

    2007-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemia of unknown etiology has been previously described in various chronic anemias. Few small studies also suggested that those patients have a lower incidence of atherosclerotic events. The aim of our study was to determine the extent of hypocholesterolemia in various types of anemias. We studied 59 patients with chronic anemias associated with high-erythropoietic activity (thalassemia intermedia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, congenital spherocytosis), 8 patients with low-erythropoietic activity anemias (acquired aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia), and 20 healthy controls. Mean serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (STR), and serum erythropoietin levels were determined in each patient. All patients with chronic anemia and increased erythropoietic activity had hypocholesterolemia, whereas none of those with low erythropoietic activity was hypocholesterolemic. Mean serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels were found to be significantly lower in the high-erythropoietic activity group (80+/-19 mg/dl; 31+/-10 mg/dl; 35+/-14 mg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.001, respectively) and the low-erythropoietic activity group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.01, respectively). Significant inverse correlation (R2=0.507) was observed between serum cholesterol and STR levels, which in the absence of iron deficiency reflect bone marrow activity. Taken together, our results imply that hypocholesterolemia accompanies anemias with high-erythropoietic activity. We suggest that the high-erythropoitic activity-associated hypocholesterolemia is due to increased cholesterol requirements by the proliferating erythoid cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and the possible clinical consequences of this phenomenon.

  15. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cindy N

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation arising from various etiologies, including infection, autoimmune disorders, chronic diseases, and aging, can promote anemia. The anemia of inflammation (AI) is most often normocytic and normochromic and is usually mild. Characteristic changes in systemic iron handling, erythrocyte production, and erythrocyte life span all contribute to AI. The preferred treatment is directed at the underlying disease. However, when the inflammatory insult is intractable, or the cause has not been diagnosed, there are limited options for treatment of AI. Because anemia is a comorbid condition that is associated with poor outcomes in various chronic disease states, understanding its pathogenesis and developing new tools for its treatment should remain a priority. Hepcidin antimicrobial peptide has taken center stage in recent years as a potent modulator of iron availability. As the technology for quantitative hepcidin analysis improves, hepcidin's role in various disease states is also being revealed. Recent insights concerning the regulatory pathways that modify hepcidin expression have identified novel targets for drug development. As the field advances with such therapeutics, the analysis of the impact of normalized hemoglobin on disease outcomes will confirm whether anemia is a reversible independent contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with inflammatory diseases.

  16. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  17. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  18. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  19. Propionibacterium acnes Susceptibility and Correlation with Hemolytic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Travis E.; Boyle, K. Keely; Duquin, Thomas R.; Crane, John K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many studies have noted an increase in the number of recognized cases of invasive infections due to Propionibacterium acnes, especially after shoulder replacement surgery. The increase in the number of recognized cases of P. acnes, a nonspore-forming, anaerobic, Gram-positive organism, appears due to both an increase in the number of shoulder operations being performed and more specimens being sent for anaerobic cultures. Nevertheless, the optimal surgical and antibiotic management of P. acnes remains controversial. METHODS We tested the susceptibility of 106 P. acnes strains from sterile body sites collected at the Erie County Medical Center between 2012 and 2015, using Etest gradient antibiotic strips. RESULTS P. acnes is very susceptible to the penicillins and the first-generation cephalosporins. We noted an association between hemolytic phenotype on Brucella Blood Agar and clindamycin resistance. CONCLUSIONS Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of P. acnes should no longer just be confined to the research laboratory but expanded and incorporated into routine microbiological evaluation of P. acnes. This would improve patient care as well as help clarify the relationship between hemolysis and clindamycin resistance. PMID:27773990

  20. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  2. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  3. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo... span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo... span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  5. Reticulocyte count

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - reticulocyte ... A higher than normal reticulocytes count may indicate: Anemia due to red blood cells being destroyed earlier than normal ( hemolytic anemia ) Bleeding Blood disorder in a fetus or newborn ( ...

  6. Roles of the valine clusters in domain 3 of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III in its oligomerization and hemolytic abilities.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Keigo; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2009-01-01

    The hemolytic lectin CEL-III and its site-directed mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Replacement of the valine clusters in domain 3 with alanine residues led to increased self-oligomerization in solution and higher hemolytic activity. The results suggest the involvement of these valine clusters in CEL-III oligomerization and hemolytic activity.

  7. Iron Deficiency Anemia Coexists with Cancer Related Anemia and Adversely Impacts Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Sawhney, Ritica; Varghese, Jeeva; Britto, Madonna; Shet, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related anemia (CRA) adversely affects patient Quality of Life (QoL) and overall survival. We prospectively studied the prevalence, etiology and the impact of anemia on QoL in 218 Indian cancer patients attending a tertiary referral hospital. The study used the sTfR/log Ferritin index to detect iron deficiency anemia and assessed patient QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) tool, standardized for language. Mean patient age was 51±13 years and 60% were female. The prevalence of cancer related anemia in this setting was 64% (n = 139). As expected, plasma ferritin did not differ significantly between anemic (n = 121) and non-anemic cancer patients (n = 73). In contrast, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in anemic cancer patients compared to non-anemic cancer patients (31 nmol/L vs. 24 nmol/L, p = 0.002). Among anemic cancer patients, using the sTfR/log Ferritin index, we found that 60% (n = 83) had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Interestingly, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in cancer patients with CRA+IDA (n = 83) compared with patients having CRA (n = 38) alone (39 nmol/L vs. 20 nmol/L, p<0.001). There was a significant linear correlation between Hb and QoL (Spearman ρ = 0.21; p = 0.001) and multivariate regression analysis revealed that every gram rise in Hb was accompanied by a 3.1 unit increase in the QoL score (95% CI = 0.19–5.33; p = 0.003). The high prevalence of anemia in cancer patients, a major portion of which is due to iron deficiency anemia, the availability of sensitive and specific biomarkers of iron status to detect IDA superimposed on anemia of inflammation, suggests an urgent need to diagnose and treat such patients. Despite the potential negative consequences of increasing metabolically available plasma iron in cancer, our clinical data suggest that detecting and treating IDA in anemic cancer patients will have important consequences to their QoL and overall survival. Clinical

  8. The AMPKγ1 subunit plays an essential role in erythrocyte membrane elasticity, and its genetic inactivation induces splenomegaly and anemia.

    PubMed

    Foretz, Marc; Hébrard, Sophie; Guihard, Soizic; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Do Cruzeiro, Marcio; Hamard, Ghislaine; Niedergang, Florence; Gaudry, Muriel; Viollet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an αβγ heterotrimer conserved throughout evolution and important for energy sensing in all eukaryote cells. AMPK controls metabolism and various cellular events in response to both hormones and changes in cellular energy status. The γ subunit senses intracellular energy status through the competitive binding of AMP and ATP. We show here that targeted disruption of the mouse AMPKγ1 gene (Prkag1) causes regenerative hemolytic anemia by increasing the sequestration of abnormal erythrocytes. Prkag1(-/-) mice displayed splenomegaly and iron accumulation due to compensatory splenic erythropoiesis and erythrophagocytosis. Moreover, AMPKγ1-deficient erythrocytes were highly resistant to osmotic hemolysis and poorly deformable in response to increasing shear stress, consistent with greater membrane rigidity. No change in cytoskeletal protein composition was observed; however, the phosphorylation level of adducin, a protein promoting the binding of spectrin to actin, was higher in AMPKγ1-deficient erythrocytes. Together, these results demonstrate that AMPKγ1 subunit is required for the maintenance of erythrocyte membrane elasticity.

  9. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed.

  10. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  11. Causes of macrocytic anemia among 628 patients: mean corpuscular volumes of 114 and 130 fL as critical markers for categorization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Natsuko; Kameoka, Junichi; Takahashi, Naoto; Tamai, Yoshiko; Murai, Kazunori; Honma, Riko; Noji, Hideyoshi; Yokoyama, Hisayuki; Tomiya, Yasuo; Kato, Yuichi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji; Sawada, Kenichi; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    There have been no studies on the distribution of causes of macrocytic anemia with respect to mean corpuscular volume (MCV) cutoff values. We retrospectively investigated the causes of macrocytic anemia (MCV ≥100 fL) among 628 patients who visited the outpatient hematology clinic in Tohoku University Hospital. To ensure data validity, we also analyzed data from 307 patients in eight other hospitals in the Tohoku district. The leading causes of macrocytic anemia (number of patients, %) were myelodysplastic syndromes (121, 19.3 %), suspected bone marrow failure syndromes (BMF; 74, 11.8 %), aplastic anemia (51, 8.1 %), plasma cell dyscrasia (45, 7.2 %), and vitamin B12 deficiency (40, 6.4 %) in Tohoku University Hospital. We made three primary findings as follows. First, the most common cause of macrocytic anemia is BMF. Second, lymphoid and solid malignancies are also common causes of macrocytosis. Third, macrocytic anemia may be classified into three groups: Group 1 (megaloblastic anemia and medications), which can exceed MCV 130 fL; Group 2 (alcoholism/liver disease, BMF, myeloid malignancy, and hemolytic anemia), which can exceed MCV 114 fL; and Group 3 (lymphoid malignancy, chronic renal failure, hypothyroidism, and solid tumors), which does not exceed MCV 114 fL. These conclusions were supported by the results from eight other hospitals.

  12. Added value of hepcidin quantification for the diagnosis and follow-up of anemia-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Thibaud; Lasocki, Sigismond; Fénéant-Thibault, Martine; Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Cunat, Séverine; Ropert-Bouchet, Madeleine; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia; Lehmann, Sylvain; Delaby, Constance

    2017-02-01

    Iron homeostasis is based on a strict control of both intestinal iron absorption and iron recycling through reticulo-endothelial system. Hepcidin controls the iron fluxes in order to maintain sufficient iron levels for erythropoietic activities, hemoproteins synthesis or enzymes function, but also to limit its toxic accumulation throughout the body. Hepcidin expression is regulated by various stimuli: inflammation and iron stimulate the production of the peptide, while anemia, erythropoiesis and hypoxia repress its production. Regulation of hepcidin expression is not so simple in complex pathological situations such as hemolytic anemia, cancer or chronic inflammation. Serum hepcidin quantification in association with the diagnostic tests currently available is quite promising for the diagnosis or the follow-up of anemia in those conditions. This study is part of the working group « Clinical interests of hepcidin quantification » of the Société française de biologie clinique.

  13. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Breastfeeding FAQs: How Much and How Often Vegan Food Guide Vegetarianism Anemia Word! Anemia Vitamins About ... Vegetarian Blood Coping With Common Period Problems Anemia Vegan Food Guide Vitamins and Minerals Contact Us Print ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  17. Fatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-HLA alloimmunization in a twin pregnancy: A very infrequent complication of assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Meler, Eva; Porta, Roser; Canals, Carme; Serra, Bernat; Lozano, Miguel

    2016-11-02

    The most frequently involved antigen in severe fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the human platelet antigen 1a. Platelets express the HLA-A and B antigens on their membrane and some studies report that maternal anti-HLA class I antibody can also cause FNAIT. We report here a very unusual case of a first twin pregnancy produced in vitro by oocyte and semen donation where the mother developed markedly elevated HLA antibodies, in the absence of anti-platelet or anti-neutrophil antibodies, that provoked in one of the twins a profound thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage and a mild thrombocytopenia and neutropenia in the second twin lasting until the fourth month of life. In addition, anti-D alloimmunization provoked hemolytic disease of the newborn with intrauterus anemia detected in the first twin and post-natal anemia in the second twin that required red blood cell transfusion and phototherapy. We hypothesize that the complete HLA-incompatible twin pregnancy due to the oocyte donation might have contributed to the severity of the clinical manifestations.

  18. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  19. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.

  20. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  1. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders.

  2. Failure of Clindamycin To Eradicate Infection with Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Inducibly Resistant to Clindamycin in an Animal Model and in Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James S.; Lepak, Alex J.; Thompson, George R.; Craig, William A.; Andes, David R.; Sabol-Dzintars, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci remains an underrecognized phenomenon of unknown clinical significance. We performed an evaluation of inducible clindamycin resistance using an animal model as well as retrospectively reviewing the charts of patients treated with clindamycin monotherapy who were infected with beta-hemolytic streptococci inducibly resistant to clindamycin. The neutropenic mouse thigh model of infection was used to evaluate the in vivo activity of clindamycin against beta-hemolytic streptococci, including isolates susceptible, inducibly resistant, or constitutively resistant to clindamycin. The clinical microbiology laboratory information system and pharmacy databases were cross-referenced to identify patients with infections due to inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who were treated with clindamycin monotherapy. Medical records of these patients were reviewed to evaluate microbiologic and clinical outcomes. Inducible clindamycin resistance resulted in impaired killing of beta-hemolytic streptococci in the animal model. Though suppressed initially, compared to those with constitutive resistance (P = 0.0429), by 48 h, colony counts of inducibly clindamycin-resistant organisms were similar to those of constitutively resistant isolates (P = 0.1142). In addition, we identified 8 patients infected with inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who experienced clinical and microbiologic failure when treated with clindamycin monotherapy. These patients either improved initially and subsequently failed or never responded to clindamycin therapy. We have demonstrated in a murine model of infection and from human cases that inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci is clinically significant. Routine testing and reporting by clinical laboratories should be encouraged and alternative antimicrobial agents considered when these organisms are encountered in clinical care

  3. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out.

  4. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  5. The Senegal DNA haplotype is associated with the amelioration of anemia in African-American sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Nagel, R L; Erlingsson, S; Fabry, M E; Croizat, H; Susuka, S M; Lachman, H; Sutton, M; Driscoll, C; Bouhassira, E; Billett, H H

    1991-03-15

    We have previously determined that in African sickle cell anemia (SS) patients three different beta-like globin gene cluster haplotypes are associated with different percent G gamma (one of the two types of non-alpha chains comprising hemoglobin F [HbF]), mean percent HbF, and percent dense cells. We report now that in adult New York SS patients, the presence of at least one chromosome with the Senegal haplotype is associated with higher Hb levels (1.2 g/dL higher) than is found for any other non-Senegal haplotype (P less than .004). The percent reticulocytes and the serum bilirubin levels were lower in these patients. When the effect of alpha-gene number was analyzed by examining a sample of SS patients with concomitant alpha-thalassemia, the same results were obtained. Because the HbF level is significantly higher among the Senegal haplotype carriers in this sample, the inhibitory effect on sickling of this Hb variant may be one of the reasons for the haplotype effect. We conclude that the Senegal beta-like globin gene cluster haplotype is associated with an amelioration of the hemolytic anemia that characterizes sickle cell disease.

  6. Hemolytic Activities of the Candida Species in Liquid Medium

    PubMed Central

    Malcok, Hilal Kuzucu; Aktas, Esin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet; Yigit, Nimet; Yazgi, Halil

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemolytic activities of 107 Candida strains isolated from different clinical samples in liquid medium, and to examine the impact of glucose on this activity. Materials and Methods A total of 107 Candida isolates representing seven species (C. albicans, n=28; C. glabrata, n=23; C. tropicalis, n=17; C. parapsilosis, n=16; C. kefyr, n=14; C. krusei, n=5; C. guilliermondii, n=4) were included in the study. The hemolytic activities of the strains were tested on two different Sabouraud dextrose liquid media (SDB) containing 7% defibrinated human blood, one of which is supplemented with 3% glucose and the other without glucose. Cultures were evaluated at the end of a 48-hour incubation. The hemolysis in the media was detected spectrophotometrically by measuring the amount of released hemoglobin and compared with a standard hemolysate which was prepared prior to testing. The degree of hemolysis (percentage value) by an individual strain was calculated according to the following formula below: (Absorbance of supernatant media at 540 nm / Absorbance of standard hemolysate at 540 nm X 100). Results In the liquid medium without glucose, strains generally produced hemolysis at low levels. The degree of hemolysis produced by all species increased noticeably in the liquid medium with glucose. Strains of C. albicans and C.kefyr had demonstrated significant hemolytic activity, whereas others had lower activity. C. parapsilosis exerted very little hemolytic activity in the medium with glucose and showed no activity in the medium without glucose. Conclusion The hemolytic activities of most Candida species was found to be higher in the human blood-enriched SDB medium containing 3% additive glucose than in the one free from additives. This result indicates that increased blood glucose concentration may contribute to increased hemolytic activity in Candida species, and it suggests a parallel with possible pathogenesis of

  7. Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Due to Cryptococcal Osteomyelitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Liang, Jinqian; Shen, Jianxiong; Qiu, Guixing; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients, with vertebral osteomyelitis being a very rare involvement.This study is to present a case of thoracolumbar scoliosis occurring in the setting of cryptococcal osteomyelitis.Pharmacological intervention with anticryptococcal medicine and medical management of immune hemolytic anemia were administered. After initial acute stabilization, she underwent spinal debridement and fusion on October 29, 2008. She eventually recovered fully from this episode with no subsequent mechanical instability or neurological deficits on subsequent clinic follow-ups.To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports describing the onset of spinal cryptococcal osteomyelitis along with immune hemolytic anemia. We suggest a comprehensive algorithm for the diagnosis of vertebral cryptococcal osteomyelitis.

  8. p,p'-DDT induces microcytic anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Mariko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Fukumori, Junko; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Kojima, Sayuri; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Takeuchi-Kashimoto, Yukiko; Kuwahara, Maki; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Ohtsuka, Ryoichi; Takeda, Makio; Kosaka, Tadashi; Harada, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that chronic exposure to DDT and its derivatives is associated with a variety of human disorders such as anemia. The present study demonstrated that p,p'-DDT caused microcystic anemia in a dose-dependent manner (0, 5, 50, and 500 ppm) in the long-term study up to 2 years. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which p,p'-DDT induces anemia, certain hematological parameters were assessed in rats fed specific doses of p,p'-DDT for 2 weeks, and the effect of lipopolysaccharide on anemia of inflammation was also examined in p,p'-DDT-treated rats. The parameters included the content of hemoglobin per reticulocyte, mean corpuscular volume of reticulocytes and mature erythrocytes, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration mean of mature erythrocytes, and saturation levels of transferrin and iron. During the 2-week treatment period, hypochromic microcytic reticulocytes and hypochromic normocytic mature erythrocytes were observed in p,p'-DDT-treated rats, with no evidence of alteration in plasma iron levels. p,p'-DDT enhanced microcytosis of reticulocytes, as well as mature erythrocytes, which occurred due to severe hypoferremia resulting from anemia of inflammation; however, plasma iron levels were attenuated probably through the inhibition of interleukin-6. Our data suggests that long-term treatment with p,p'-DDT induces microcytic anemia, possibly because of the impairment of iron utility in erythrocytes.

  9. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  10. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palma, Lilian M Pereira; Langman, Craig B

    2016-01-01

    The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach.

  11. A fatal case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn associated with anti-Jk(b).

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Duck; Lee, Young Hwan

    2006-02-01

    The Kidd blood group is clinically significant since the Jk antibodies can cause acute and delayed transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In general, HDN due to anti-Jk(b) incompatibility is rare and it usually displays mild clinical symptoms with a favorable prognosis. Yet, we apparently experienced the second case of HDN due to anti-Jk(b) with severe clinical symptoms and a fatal outcome. A female patient having the AB, Rh(D)-positive blood type was admitted for jaundice on the fourth day after birth. At the time of admission, the patient was lethargic and exhibited high pitched crying. The laboratory data indicated a hemoglobin value of 11.4 mg/dL, a reticulocyte count of 14.9% and a total bilirubin of 46.1 mg/dL, a direct bilirubin of 1.1 mg/dL and a strong positive result (+++) on the direct Coomb's test. As a result of the identification of irregular antibody from the maternal serum, anti-Jk(b) was detected, which was also found in the eluate made from infant's blood. Despite the aggressive treatment with exchange transfusion and intensive phototherapy, the patient died of intractable seizure and acute renal failure on the fourth day of admission. Therefore, pediatricians should be aware of the clinical courses of hemolytic jaundice due to anti-Jk(b), and they should be ready to treat this disease with active therapeutic interventions.

  12. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shanti; Dunlap, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF), and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether anemia is merely a marker of poor prognosis or whether anemia itself confers risk. The pathogenesis of anemia in HF is multifactorial. Iron deficiency also confers risk in HF, either with or without associated anemia, and treatment of iron deficiency improves the functional status of patients with HF. An ongoing large clinical trial studying the use of darbepoetin-alfa in patients with anemia and systolic HF is expected to provide information that should improve our understanding of anemia in HF.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormalities lead to kidney damage and, in many cases, kidney failure and ESRD. Although gene mutations increase the risk of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome , studies suggest that they are often not sufficient to cause the disease. In people with certain genetic changes, the signs ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk of developing a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow called acute myeloid ... PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Kitao H, Takata M. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in ...

  15. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn associated with severe congenital anemia of various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Danielle; Kapelushnik, Josef; Harush, Miri B; Marks, Kyla; Shalev, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many associated features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN), severe congenital anemia has been described only occasionally and is not included in the list of conditions that may cause PPHN in the neonate. We describe the clinical course of a group of 12 full-term neonates with PPHN and congenital anemia due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (7/12), α thalasemia (1/12), Diamond-Blackfan (1/12), and epsilon gamma delta beta thalassemia (3/12). The association of congenital anemia and PPHN is more common than previously thought; it can exist with various etiologies and severity of anemia. Congenital anemia has not been described until now as a cause or risk factor for PPHN; it should be considered as such alone or in combination with other known causes to be recognized early and treated appropriately to improve outcome. In families with known cases of congenital anemia due to the above-mentioned diagnosis, closer prenatal follow-up should be offered to anticipate possible fetal distress and/or fetal anemia and PPHN after birth.

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  18. Association of Ehrlichia canis, Hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. and Anaplasma platys and severe anemia in dogs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Lukkana, Nicha; Yangtara, Sarawut; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; Thengchaisri, Naris; Sirinarumitr, Theerapol; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2017-03-01

    Canine tick-borne bacteria; Ehrlichia canis, hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. and Anaplasma spp., are organisms transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks. However, only a few clinical studies evaluating dogs infected with these organisms and anemia condition have been published. In this study, the potential tick-borne bacteria linked to anemia were investigated in eighty-one blood samples selected from anemic dogs using a broad range nested-PCR of the 16S rRNA gene. Positive results were shown in 12/81 blood specimens (14.81%). Nucleotide sequences from the PCR products were analyzed using BLAST and resulted in identification of Ehrlichia canis (8), Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum (1) and Anaplasma platys (3). Two other PCR assays were used to detect and identify the positive results of these pathogens including a specific PCR for Ehrlichia canis (gp36) and a specific nested-PCR for hemoplasma species (16S rRNA) and the phylogenetic analyses of E. canis and canine hemoplasmas were performed using these two loci. These specific PCRs revealed co-infection of E. canis and Mycoplasma haemocanis in two cases. These two male dogs had presented with jaundice, severe hemolytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, mild azotemia and hepatitis. Ehrlichia canis was detected in a significantly greater number of severe anemia cases (PCV<15%) than moderate or mild anemia cases (PCV 16-29%) (P<0.05) and these severe anemia cases were 7-fold more at risk of having E. canis infections (odds ratio: 7.11, p=0.020). However, no statistical differences were detected between E. canis detection and degrees of thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. From the results of this study, we conclude that the severity of anemia is associated with E. canis infections rather than the severity of thrombocytopenia.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cells). Glutathione measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of certain drug-induced hemolytic (erythrocyte destroying) anemias due to an inherited enzyme deficiency. (b) Classification....

  20. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  1. Trisomy 1q in a patient with severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Prodromos; Kojouri, Kiarash; Lee, Jiyun; Kern, William; Mulvihill, John J; Li, Shibo

    2006-08-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare, serious disease characterized by hypocellular bone marrow and pancytopenia in the peripheral blood. Most cases are acquired, idiopathic, and without gross cytogenetic abnormalities. A few chromosome abnormalities have recurred among a small subset of patients, most commonly trisomy 8 and monosomy 7. Some of these chromosome abnormalities have prognostic and therapeutic significance, although for most the clinical relevance is not known. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with idiopathic severe aplastic anemia in bone marrow cells with trisomy of the whole long arm of chromosome 1 due to an unbalanced translocation between chromosomes 1 and 15 at breakpoints of q10 and 15q10. This clonal abnormality (which, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported in a patient with aplastic anemia) suggests that genes on 1q may be involved in marrow aplasia.

  2. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  3. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  4. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  5. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-08

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., "FKK", "LKL", "KKLL", "KWK", "VLK", "CYCR", "CRR", "RFC", "RRR", "LKKL") are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  6. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Lilian M Pereira; Langman, Craig B

    2016-01-01

    The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach. PMID:27110144

  7. Overcoming technical challenges when treating atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with therapeutic plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Zimbudzi, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a very rare, life-threatening, progressive disease that frequently has a genetic component and in most cases is triggered by an uncontrolled activation of the complement system. Successful treatment of aHUS with plasma infusions and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is well reported. TPE has been the treatment of choice in most adult patients with aHUS. However, due to severe hemolysis, which is common among aHUS patients, there are some technical challenges that can affect TPE treatment such as the continuous activation of the blood leak alarm due to hemolysis. Our experience shows that such patients can be managed better on a centrifuge based TPE machine compared to a membrane based TPE machine.

  8. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia.

  9. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  10. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported.

  11. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  12. The systemic vascular resistance response: a cardiovascular response modulating blood viscosity with implications for primary hypertension and certain anemias.

    PubMed

    Sloop, Gregory D; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, John A

    2015-12-01

    Without an active regulatory feedback loop, increased blood viscosity could lead to a vicious cycle of ischemia, increased erythropoiesis, further increases of blood viscosity, decreased tissue perfusion with worsened ischemia, further increases in red cell mass, etc. We suggest that an increase in blood viscosity is detected by mechanoreceptors in the left ventricle which upregulate expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides and soluble erythropoietin receptor. This response normalizes systemic vascular resistance and blood viscosity at the cost of producing 'anemia of chronic disease or inflammation' or 'hemolytic anemia' both of which are better described as states of compensated hyperviscosity. Besides its role in disease, this response is also active in the physiologic adaptation to chronic exercise. Malfunction of this response may cause primary hypertension.

  13. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  14. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  15. Hemolytic venoms from marine cnidarian jellyfish – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Cnidarian jellyfish are viewed as an emergent problem in several coastal zones throughout the world. Recurrent outbreaks pose a serious threat to tourists and bathers, as well as to sea-workers, involving health and economical aspects. As a rule, cnidarian stinging as a consequence of nematocyst firing induces merely local symptoms but cardiovascular or neurological complications can also occur. Hemolysis is a frequent effect of cnidarian stinging; this dangerous condition is known to be caused by several venoms and can sometimes be lethal. At present, the bulk of data concerning hemolytic cnidarian venoms comes from the study of benthic species, such as sea anemones and soft corals, but hemolytic factors were found in venoms of several siphonophore, cubozoan and scyphozoan jellyfish, which are mainly involved in the envenomation of bathers and sea-workers. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the scientific literature concerning the hemolytic venoms from cnidarian jellyfish taking into consideration their importance in human pathology as well as health implications and possible therapeutic measures. PMID:25386336

  16. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... aplastic anemia and are pregnant or want to get pregnant, find an aplastic anemia specialist and an obstetrician (OB) who specializes in high-risk births. Every person and every pregnancy is different. Make sure you ...

  17. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning . Symptoms Mild anemia may have no symptoms. As ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 455. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: Todd ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  19. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 146,000 ...

  20. Correlation between hepcidin level and renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, L-N; Zhang, P; Tang, F; Wang, G; Li, F-E

    2014-09-12

    Anemia in patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is related to the chronic inflammatory state, low iron absorption rate, and low utilization rate. As a key protein for iron metabolism, hepcidin plays an important role in CRI anemia. The study aimed to determine the correlation between hepcidin level and renal anemia. Ninety CRI anemia patients treated in our hospital from February 2012 to December 2012 were enrolled in the study to compare with a healthy control group of 40 cases by measuring the hepcidin level and analyzing the correlation between hepcidin level and CRI anemia. The hepcidin level was significantly higher in the CRI anemia group than the control group; there was a positive correlation between hepcidin level and serum ferritin as well as IL-6 level. Hepcidin level was significantly related to degree of anemia, indicating that an increase in hepcidin level will result in anemia.

  1. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: a neglected issue with relevant effects.

    PubMed

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-04-07

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients.

  2. Pernicious Anemia Associated Cobalamin Deficiency and Thrombotic Microangiopathy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spinowitz, Bruce; Charytan, Chaim; Galler, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    A 43-year-old Hispanic male without significant previous medical history was brought to emergency department for syncope following a blood draw to investigate a 40 lbs weight loss during the past 6 months associated with decreased appetite and progressive fatigue. The patient also reported a 1-month history of jaundice. On examination, he was hemodynamically stable and afebrile with pallor and diffuse jaundice but without skin rash or palpable purpura. Normal sensations and power in all extremities were evident on neurological exam. Presence of hemolytic anemia, schistocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was suggestive of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, presence of leukopenia, macrocytes, and an inadequate reticulocyte response to the degree of anemia served as initial clues to an alternative diagnosis. Two and one units of packed red blood cells were transfused on day 1 and day 3, respectively. In addition, one unit of platelets was transfused on day 2. Daily therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was initiated and continued until ADAMTS-13 result ruled out TTP. A low cobalamin (vitamin B12) level was evident at initial laboratory work-up and subsequent testing revealed positive intrinsic factor-blocking antibodies supporting a diagnosis of pernicious anemia with severe cobalamin deficiency. Hematological improvement was observed following vitamin B12 supplementation. The patient was discharged and markedly improved on day 9 with outpatient follow-up for cobalamin supplementation. PMID:28265287

  3. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    SciTech Connect

    Muta, K.; Nishimura, J.; Ideguchi, H.; Umemura, T.; Ibayashi, H.

    1987-06-01

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of /sup 125/I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of /sup 125/I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast.

  4. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

  6. Hematological parameters and prevalence of anemia among free-living elderly in south Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sgnaolin, Vanessa; Engroff, Paula; Ely, Luísa Scheer; Schneider, Rodolfo Herberto; Schwanke, Carla Helena Augustin; Gomes, Irenio; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; de Carli, Geraldo Attilio

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to analyze the hematological parameters, the prevalence of anemia and the association between anemia and socioeconomic conditions in an elderly community-based population. Methods A population-based study was performed as part of the Multidimensional Study of the Elderly in Porto Alegre, Brazil (EMIPOA). An initial total of 1058 community residents aged 60 years and older were interviewed. Of these, 392 agreed to have a physical evaluation and a blood sample was taken from each. The hematological parameters analyzed in the blood samples included the hemoglobin concentration, mean cell volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and red cell distribution width (RDW). The association between the variables and the diagnosis of anemia was assessed using the chi-squared test and a multiple logistic regression model. Results The overall prevalence of anemia was 12.8%. Anemia was present in 13.7% of women and in 10.4% of men. Normocytic normochromic anemia without anisocytosis was the most common type of anemia (46%). The assessment of erythrocyte morphology showed significant differences between anemic and non-anemic individuals (microcytosis = 12% vs. 1.5%, hypochromia = 40% vs. 8.8%, and anisocytosis = 26% vs. 7%). In the analysis of socioeconomic conditions, significant differences were found in respect to age and race. Conclusion The prevalence of anemia increases with age and is associated with race, microcytosis, hypochromia and anisocytosis. Anemia is not a condition that should be associated only with the aging process, as it may be due to pathological conditions that occur most frequently in this age group. As a result, a diagnosis of anemia warrants adequate clinical attention. PMID:23741189

  7. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes.

  8. Association of mild anemia with hospitalization and mortality in the elderly: the Health and Anemia population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Mosconi, Paola; Apolone, Giovanni; Gandini, Francesca; Nobili, Alessandro; Tallone, Maria Vittoria; Detoma, Paolo; Giacomin, Adriano; Clerico, Mario; Tempia, Patrizia; Guala, Adriano; Fasolo, Gilberto; Lucca, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild anemia is a frequent laboratory finding in the elderly usually disregarded in everyday practice as an innocent bystander. The aim of the present population-based study was to prospectively investigate the association of mild grade anemia with hospitalization and mortality. Design and Methods A prospective population-based study of all 65 to 84 year old residents in Biella, Italy was performed between 2003 and 2007. Data from a total of 7,536 elderly with blood tests were available to estimate mortality; full health information available to evaluate health-related outcomes was available for 4,501 of these elderly subjects. Mild grade anemia was defined as a hemoglobin concentration between 10.0 and 11.9 g/dL in women and between 10.0 and 12.9 g/dL in men. Results The risk of hospitalization in the 3 years following recruitment was higher among the mildly anemic elderly subjects than among subjects who were not anemic (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.32; 95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.60). Mortality risk in the following 3.5 years was also higher among the mildly anemic elderly (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.86; 95% confidence interval: 1.34–2.53). Similar results were found when slightly elevating the lower limit of normal hemoglobin concentration to 12.2 g/dL in women and to 13.2 g/dL in men. The risk of mortality was significantly increased in mild anemia of chronic disease but not in that due to β-thalassemia minor. Conclusions After controlling for many potential confounders, mild grade anemia was found to be prospectively associated with clinically relevant outcomes such as increased risk of hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Whether raising hemoglobin concentrations can reduce the risks associated with mild anemia should be tested in controlled clinical trials. PMID:19001283

  9. Erythema nodosum and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Milman, Perry J; Goldenberg, Steven P; Scheinfeld, Noah; Pereira, Frederick A

    2013-07-14

    Erythema nodosum (EN) often presents as a sudden onset of tender, erythematous, subcutaneous nodules on the legs and ankles. Although rare, pernicious anemia may be related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Discussion of this association in the context of a particular patient is presented.

  10. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  11. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  12. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  13. Erythremia with special reference to sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Taki, T; Wakabayashi, T; Kishimoto, H

    1980-07-01

    An autopsy case of erythremia with sideroblastic tumor cell proliferation is described. A 60-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to general fatigue and anorexia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed abnormalities in erythropoiesis (megaloblasts, 4%; sideroblasts, 84%; ring-formed, 39%, and PAS-positive, 5%). Therapy was directed to pulmonary tuberculosis. Anemia was not improved despite repeated whole blood and platelet transfusions. Serum iron and percentage saturation of the total iron-binding capacity rose during the course. Administration of vitamin B12, B6 or folic acid was inefffective. INAH was replaced by its derivative, IHMS, during the course, but the population of sideroblasts especially of ring-sideroblasts was invariably large (78%-100% and 39%-65% for total sideroblasts and ring-sideroblasts, respectively). He died with increasing abdominal pain and jaundice after three months' hospitalization. Main autopsy findings were: diffuse proliferation of atypical erythroblasts in the bone marrow, systemic lymph nodes, liver, spleen and kidneys. Most of the cells positively stained with iron. Tuberculosis of lungs with cavity formation. Discussion is focussed on the relationship between erythremia and sideroblastic anemia.

  14. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate.

  15. [Iron-deficiency anemia in children. A old problem not yet resolved].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mayans, Jaime A; Ortiz-López, Carolina; García-Campos, Margarita; Cervantes-Bustamante, Roberto; Mata-Rivera, Norberto; Zárate-Mondragón, Flora; Mason-Cordero, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is still a health problem worldwide. Iron supplementation of some foods such as milk formulas and cereals apparently has not been the solution due to bioavailability of iron. In Mexico, there is high prevalence of anemia in children to date, mainly those under 2 years of age and predominantly in the Southern part of the country. Probably the main causes are iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women, recurrent infections, such as gastroenteritis and parasites, and the most important one undoubtedly, deficient iron intake.

  16. Decreased hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio and increased lactate dehydrogenase level in patients with sickle cell anemia and recurrent leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Mougenel, Danièle; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Romana, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC-) and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+)--with no leg ulcers at the time of the study--were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers) and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties). The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR), which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels) was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio) may play a role.

  17. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  18. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  19. Incidence and risk factors of aplastic anemia in Latin American countries: the LATIN case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Maluf, Eliane; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Júnior, Álvaro Avezum; Eluf-Neto, José; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Lorand-Metze, Irene G.; Goldenberg, Daniel; Santana, Cézar Leite; de Oliveira Werneck Rodrigues, Daniela; da Motta Passos, Leny Nascimento; Rosenfeld, Luis Gastão Mange; Pitta, Marimilia; Loggetto, Sandra; Feitosa Ribeiro, Andreza A.; Velloso, Elvira Deolinda; Kondo, Andrea Tiemi; de Miranda Coelho, Erika Oliveira; Pintão, Maria Carolina Tostes; de Souza, Hélio Moraes; Borbolla, José Rafael; Pasquini, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Background Associations between aplastic anemia and numerous drugs, pesticides and chemicals have been reported. However, at least 50% of the etiology of aplastic anemia remains unexplained. Design and Methods This was a case-control, multicenter, multinational study, designed to identify risk factors for agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. The cases were patients with diagnosis of aplastic anemia confirmed through biopsy or bone marrow aspiration, selected through an active search of clinical laboratories, hematology clinics and medical records. The controls did not have either aplastic anemia or chronic diseases. A total of 224 patients with aplastic anemia were included in the study, each case was paired with four controls, according to sex, age group, and hospital where the case was first seen. Information was collected on demographic data, medical history, laboratory tests, medications, and other potential risk factors prior to diagnosis. Results The incidence of aplastic anemia was 1.6 cases per million per year. Higher rates of benzene exposure (≥30 exposures per year) were associated with a greater risk of aplastic anemia (odds ratio, OR: 4.2; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.82–9.82). Individuals exposed to chloramphenicol in the previous year had an adjusted OR for aplastic anemia of 8.7 (CI: 0.87–87.93) and those exposed to azithromycin had an adjusted OR of 11.02 (CI 1.14–108.02). Conclusions The incidence of aplastic anemia in Latin America countries is low. Although the research study centers had a high coverage of health services, the underreporting of cases of aplastic anemia in selected regions can be discussed. Frequent exposure to benzene-based products increases the risk for aplastic anemia. Few associations with specific drugs were found, and it is likely that some of these were due to chance alone. PMID:19734415

  20. Multiparameter FLAER-based flow cytometry for screening of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria enhances detection rates in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Varma, Neelam; Chandra, Dinesh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash

    2015-05-01

    Flow cytometry is the gold standard methodology for screening of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. In the last few years, proaerolysin conjugated with fluorescein (FLAER) has become an important component of antibody panel used for the detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) clone. This study aimed to compare PNH clone detection by flow cytometry in the pre-FLAER era versus the FLAER era. This was a retrospective analysis of 4 years and included 1004 individuals screened for PNH clone, either presenting as hemolytic anemia or as aplastic anemia. In the pre-FLAER time period, the RBCs and neutrophils were screened with antibodies against CD55 and CD59. With the introduction of FLAER, neutrophils were screened with FLAER/CD24/CD15 and monocytes with FLAER/CD14/CD33 combination. A comparative analysis was done for detection of PNH clone in aplastic anemia patients versus non-aplastic anemia patients, as well as between pre-FLAER and FLAER era. Out of a total of 1004 individuals, 59 (5.8%) were detected to have PNH clone positivity. The frequency of PNH clone detected in aplastic anemia and non-aplastic anemia groups was 12.02 and 3.36%, respectively. The detection rate of PNH clone increased from 4.5% (32/711) in the pre-FLAER era to 9.2% (27/293) with the introduction of FLAER. However, this increase could be attributed to increased detection of PNH clone in the aplastic anemia group, which showed a significant increase from 8.3 to 18.2% after use of FLAER. In the non-aplastic group, PNH clone was detected with similar frequencies before and after use of FLAER (3.2 versus 3.8%, respectively). Mean PNH clone size was lower in the aplastic anemia group when compared with the non-aplastic group. RBCs always showed a lower clone size than neutrophils. PNH clone on neutrophils and monocytes was however similar. Inclusion of FLAER increases the sensitivity of the test which is especially useful in picking up small PNH clones in patients of aplastic anemia.

  1. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Schmitt, Peter; Dohrmann, Torsten; Schroeder, Maria; Magnus, Tim; Kluge, Stefan; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Bi, Xiaoming; Fiehler, Jens; Sedlacik, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and aimed to identify a plausible cause. Materials and Methods Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years) were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved) magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA) assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP), as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2. Results SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4). Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35) was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4); hematocrit (n = 33) was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2). Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83%) (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2). SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015), hematocrit (r = 0.65, P < 0.001), and TTP (r = 0.35, P = 0.036). No correlation of SWI with blood pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, creatinine, and urea level was observed. Findings suggest that the loss of venous contrast is related to an increase in CBF secondary to severe anemia related to HUS. SWI contrast of patients with pathological conventional MRI findings was significantly lower

  2. Sickle cell anemia, the first molecular disease: overview of molecular etiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H

    2008-12-25

    The root cause of sickle cell disease is a single beta-globin gene mutation coding for the sickle beta-hemoglobin chain. Sickle hemoglobin tetramers polymerize when deoxygenated, damaging the sickle erythrocyte. A multifaceted pathophysiology, triggered by erythrocyte injury induced by the sickle hemoglobin polymer, and encompassing more general cellular and tissue damage caused by hypoxia, oxidant damage, inflammation, abnormal intracellular interactions, and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, sets off the events recognized clinically as sickle cell disease. This disease is a group of related disorders where sickle hemoglobin is the principal hemoglobin species. All have varying degrees of chronic hemolytic anemia, vasculopathy, vasoocclusive disease, acute and chronic organ damage, and shortened life span. Its complex pathophysiology, of which we have a reasonable understanding, provides multiple loci for potential therapeutic intervention.

  3. Acute Renal Failure, Microangiopathic Haemolytic Anemia, and Secondary Oxalosis in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Karolina M.; Prinsloo, Peter; Hitch, Tony; McCulloch, Thomas A.; Sims, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year old female presented with a one-week history of vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and headache. On admission, she had acute renal failure requiring dialysis. Tests revealed a hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia. An initial diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic microangiopathy was made and plasma exchange was instigated. However, renal biopsy did not show thrombotic microangiopathy but instead revealed acute kidney injury with mild tubulointerstitial nephritis and numerous oxalate crystals, predominantly in the distal tubules. The patient had been taking large doses (>1100 mg daily) of vitamin C for many months. She also gave a history of sclerotherapy using injections of an ethylene glycol derivative for superficial leg veins. The patient completed five sessions of plasma exchange and was able to discontinue dialysis. She eventually achieved full renal recovery. She has now discontinued sclerotherapy and vitamin supplementation. PMID:21785726

  4. Individualized treatment for iron deficiency anemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting mankind, and iron deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age due to pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition or gut malabsorption. Iron deficiency anemia remains quite prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed upon consideration of patient specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based upon the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least one month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  5. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  6. Epidemiology of anemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kushang V

    2008-10-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48% to 63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B(12) deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs.

  7. Hemolytic activity of venom from crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci spines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a venomous species from Taiwan whose venom provokes strong hemolytic activity. To understand the hemolytic properties of A. planci venom, samples were collected from A. planci spines in the Penghu Islands, dialyzed with distilled water, and lyophilized into A. planci spine venom (ASV) powder. Results Both crude venom and ASV cause 50% hemolysis at a concentration of 20 μg/mL. The highest hemolytic activity of ASV was measured at pH 7.0-7.4; ASV-dependent hemolysis was sharply reduced when the pH was lower than 3 or greater than 8. There was almost no hemolytic activity when the Cu2+ concentration was increased to 10 mM. Furthermore, incubation at 100°C for 30 to 60 minutes sharply decreased the hemolytic activity of ASV. After treatment with the protease α-chymotrypsin, the glycoside hydrolase cellulase, and the membrane component cholesterin, the hemolytic activity of ASV was significantly inhibited. Conclusions The results of this study provide fundamental information about A. planci spine venom. The hemolytic activity was affected by pH, temperature, metal ions, EDTA, cholesterin, proteases, and glycoside hydrolases. ASV hemolysis was inhibited by Cu2+, cholesterin, α-chymotrypsin, and cellulose, factors that might prevent the hemolytic activity of venom and provide the medical treatment for sting. PMID:24063308

  8. Anti-Ge3 causes late-onset hemolytic disease of the newborn: the fourth case in three Hispanic families

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Lisa Lee; Myers, Jessica C.; Palma, Jonathan P.; Viele, Maurene; Galel, Susan A.; Ferrer, Zenaida; Gonzalez, Christopher L.; Benitz, William E.; Garratty, George; Fontaine, Magali J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Gerbich (Ge) blood group system consists of 11 antigens carried on red blood cell (RBC) membrane glycophorins C and D; of these, Ge:3 antigen is of high prevalence, and the anti-Ge3 is found to be clinically significant. CASE REPORT A 34-week neonate born to a Hispanic mother with anti-Ge3 developed late-onset hemolysis with hyperbilirubinemia and was successfully treated with transfusions from her mother. Relevant clinical findings and laboratory results for this case are summarized and compared to three other previously reported cases; all babies were born from a mother of Hispanic ethnicity. CONCLUSION Hemolytic disease of the fetus and new born associated with anti-Ge3 is rare but should be considered when working up a broadly reactive RBC antibody screen in women of Hispanic ethnicity. Early identification of pregnant women with anti-Ge3 is recommended for prenatal transfusion planning and close monitoring of the newborn infant for evidence of late-onset anemia. PMID:23241141

  9. Efficacy of rituximab and plasmapharesis in an adult patient with antifactor H autoantibody-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Deville, Clemence; Garrouste, Cyril; Coppo, Paul; Evrard, Bertrand; Lautrette, Alexandre; Heng, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antifactor H antibody (anti-CFHAb) is found in 6% to 25% cases of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in children, but has been only exceptionally reported in adults. There is no consensus about the best treatment for this type of aHUS. We report the case of an adult patient treated successfully with plasma exchange (PE), steroids, and rituximab. A 27-year-old Caucasian male presented to hospital with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. One week earlier, he had digestive problems with diarrhea. The diagnosis of anti-CFHAb-associated aHUS (82,000 AU/mL) without CFHR gene mutations was established. He received Rituximab 375 mg/m2 (4 pulses) with PE and steroids. This treatment achieved renal and hematological remission at day (D) 31 and negative anti-CFHAb at D45 (<100 AU/mL). At D76, a fifth rituximab pulse was performed while CD19 was higher than 10/mm3. Steroids were stopped at month (M) 9. The patient has not relapsed during long-term follow-up (M39). Rituximab therapy can be considered for anti-CFHAb-associated aHUS. Monitoring of anti-CFHAb titer may help to guide maintenance therapeutic strategies including Rituximab infusion. PMID:27684863

  10. [Anemia in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lausević, Mirjana; Nesić, Vidosava; Jovanović, Natasa; Stojimirović, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    A normocytic normochromic anemia is one of the first signs of renal failure. Since anemia increases morbidity and mortality, its elimination is one of the essential objectives of the treatment. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has changed the therapeutical approach to anemia. The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy of anemia correction in peritoneal dialysis patients depending on treatment and dialysis modality. The study is the retrospective analysis of 64 patients who presented to our Clinic in 2003. Eighteen (28.13%) patients were treated with rHuEPO, 14 (28%) underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 2 (100%)--automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and 2 (33.3%)--intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD). Mean hemoglobin level was 98.6 +/- 17.82 g/l in patients treated with rHuEPO versus 98.81 +/- 15.14 g/l in patients without rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin requirements were 3392.85 +/- 1211.77 IU/week All patients received iron supplementation during rHuEPO therapy. Mean serum ferritin levels were 463.41 +/- 360 ug/l. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) was 0.35 +/- 0.16%. No difference of serum iron and TSAT levels was found between CAPD and IPD patients. The degree of anemia significantly differed between CAPD and IPD patients. A total of 17.11% of PD patients were given blood transfusions, most frequently during the first three months after the onset of dialysis. Our conclusion is that the number of patients receiving rHuEPO should be increased, as 50% of our patients should be substituted, while only 28% are being treated. As 50% of patients receiving rHuEPO failed to reach target Hgb levels, higher EPO doses should be considered. Iron stores should be continuously monitored, particularly in patients receiving rHuEPO, since iron deficiency is an important problem for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, especially during erythropoietin therapy. Oral iron supplementation is satisfactory in the majority of patients, and iron

  11. Perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia: a prospective study from India.

    PubMed

    Daigavane, Mayoor M; Jena, Rabindra K; Kar, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, the homozygous genotype of sickle cell disease is one of the most common heritable diseases in the world. The Arab-Asian haplotype present in India is one of the least severe of all haplotypes. Many sickle cell anemia patients are now leading a symptom-free productive life due to hydroxyurea (HU) and better supportive care. Although pregnancy in sickle cell anemia patients is considered a high-risk category, it perinatal outcome is least studied, particularly among carriers of the Arab-Asian haplotype. Thus, the present prospective, randomized study was performed to assess the perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia. Neonatal outcome such as low birth weight, perinatal mortality rate, special care newborn unit (SCNU) admission, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and pre term births were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers. Maternal outcome such as severe anemia, preeclampsia, vasoocclusive crisis (VOC), pulmonary complications, jaundice and blood transfusion requirements were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers, which were successfully managed. Cesarian section rate was not significantly different from normal controls. Successful pregnancies were achieved in 84.44% of cases. However, we strongly recommend that pregnancies in these patients should be managed in an institutional setup.

  12. Meta-analysis of Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Jiang, Ting; Hao, Cao; Gao, Zongshuai; Sun, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia therapy remains difficult, due to lack of effective treatment regimens. In recent years, Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia has been reported in many clinical trials. Considering that Huangqi injection may be a novel approach to aplastic anemia treatment, we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical controlled trials to assess the clinical value of Huangqi injection in the treatment of aplastic anemia. We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Full-text Database (VIP), Wanfang Database, PubMed and EMBASE database to collect the data about the trials of Huangqi injection combined with androgens for treating aplastic anemia. A total of ten studies involving 720 patients with aplastic anemia were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed significant increases in the pool effectiveness rate, white blood cells (WBC), haematoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), and reticulocytes (Ret) between the experimental group versus the control group. No severe side effects were found in this study. However, the lower Jadad scores and asymmetric funnel plot degrades the validity of the meta-analysis as the clinical evidence. Therefore, Huangqi injection may significantly enhance the efficacy of androgens for aplastic anemia, suggesting that the novel approach of Chinese traditional medicine combined with Western medicine is promising. The exact outcome required confirmation with rigorously well-designed multi-center trials.

  13. Low serum selenium is associated with anemia among older adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Semba, RD; Ricks, MO; Ferrucci, L; Xue, Q-L; Guralnik, JM; Fried, LP

    2009-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that low serum selenium was associated with anemia in humans. Subjects A total of 2092 adults aged 65 and older, in the third National Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 2 (1991–1994) (NHANES III). Methods Examination of the relationship between serum selenium and hematological indices in NHANES III. Results Anemia, defined by World Health Organization criteria, was present in 12.9%. Mean serum selenium among non-anemic and anemic adults was 1.60 and 1.51 μmol l−1 (P=0.0003). The prevalence of anemia among adults in the lowest to highest quartiles of serum selenium was 18.3, 9.5, 9.7 and 6.9%, respectively (P=0.0005). The proportion of adults in the lowest quartile of selenium among those who were non-anemic or who had anemia due to nutritional causes, chronic inflammation, renal disease or unexplained anemia was 9.9, 27.5, 17.5, 24.0 and 15.4%, respectively. An increase in loge selenium was associated with a reduced risk of anemia (odds ratio per one standard deviation increase 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.58–0.97, P=0.03), adjusting for age, race, education, body mass index and chronic diseases. Conclusion Low serum selenium is independently associated with anemia among older men and women in the United States. PMID:17805227

  14. Properties of the Hemolytic Activities of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Short, Everett C.; Kurtz, Harold J.

    1971-01-01

    Some properties of the cell-free and cell-associated hemolysins of Escherichia coli were studied. Several strains of E. coli that were isolated from intestines of pigs with edema disease produce large quantities of cell-free hemolysin when grown in the presence of an extract of meat. The component of meat that stimulates production of cell-free hemolysin is not extracted by lipid solvents and is not dialyzable. The cell-free hemolysin is an acidic substance that occurs in two forms. It is inactivated by trypsin but not by lecithinase, lysozyme, ribonuclease, or deoxyribonuclease, shows optimum activity between pH 7 and 8, and requires calcium ion for activity. It does not appear to be an enzyme. The kinetics of the lytic reaction are most consistent with the hypothesis that one molecule of cell-free hemolysin is sufficient to lyse one erythrocyte and that it is inactivated in the lytic reaction. The cell-free hemolysin does not sufficiently damage the cell during the prelytic period to cause lysis after the hemolysin-calcium-erythrocyte complex has been disrupted. The cell-associated hemolysin was not separated from the cell by autolysis, freezing, sonic treatment, or treatment with trypsin or lysozyme. It appears to be closely associated with the metabolic status of the cell. Organisms that are highly hemolytic under usual conditions of assay immediately lose most of their hemolytic capability in the presence of sodium cyanide, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, and rifampin. PMID:16558036

  15. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Kashmira P.; Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  16. Cold-agglutinin hemolytic diseases, a rheo-optical study.

    PubMed

    Plá, Laura Verónica; Stoltz, Jean François; Valverde, Juana R; Riquelme, Bibiana D

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the strength of red blood cells agglutination, induced by autoantibodies in patients with Cold-Agglutinin Hemolytic Disease (CAHD), and the hemorheological profile (deformability and osmotic fragility) by the utilization of rheo-optical techniques. The strength of the antigen-antibody reaction was approached by the work required to dissociate mechanically red blood cells agglutinates. It is focused on the evaluation of the qualitative adhesiveness of cell approached by the dissociation kinetics carried out in a Couette flow (erythroaggregameter). The analysis was performed by recording the increase of the reflectivity signal as the agglutinates are dissociated by shear into smaller ones. A total of eight patients aged <54 years with recent diagnostic of CAHD detected by positive Direct Anti-globulin Test (DAT) and very low RBC counts at 20 degrees C, were studied. Two parametric values were interesting: the dimensionless energy parameter and the characteristic dissociation time, which showed good correlation with hematological parameters. In conclusion, the dissociation method provides a powerful tool for estimating the qualitative adhesiveness of red blood cells agglutinated by autoantibodies in patients suffering of cold-agglutinin hemolytic disease and it would be very interesting to evaluate the severity of the disease.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes and hemolytic Listeria innocua in poultry.

    PubMed

    Milillo, S R; Stout, J C; Hanning, I B; Clement, A; Fortes, E D; den Bakker, H C; Wiedmann, M; Ricke, S C

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, saprophytic, Gram-positive bacterium and occasional food-borne pathogen, often associated with ready-to-eat meat products. Because of the increased consumer interest in organic, all natural, and free range poultry products, it is important to understand L. monocytogenes in the context of such systems. Pasture-reared poultry were surveyed over the course of two 8-wk rearing periods. Cecal, soil, and grass samples were collected for Listeria isolation and characterization. Seven of 399 cecal samples (or 1.75%) were Listeria-positive. All positive cecal samples were obtained from broilers sampled at 2 wk of age. Grass and soil samples were collected from the pasture both before and after introduction of the poultry. Environmental samples collected after introduction of poultry were significantly more likely to contain Listeria (P < 0.001). The results of analytical profile index Listeria, sigB allelic typing, and hlyA PCR tests found that both L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, including hemolytic L. innocua, were recovered from the cecal and environmental (grass/soil) samples. The sigB allelic typing also revealed that (1) positive samples could be composed of 2 or more allelic types; (2) allelic types found in cecal samples could also be found in the environment; and (3) allelic types could persist through the 2 rearing periods. Our data indicate that both pasture-reared poultry and their environment can be contaminated with L. monocytogenes and hemolytic L. innocua.

  18. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ishnava, Kalpesh B; Shah, Pankit P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria. Materials and Methods: The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract. Results: The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36μg/ml and 182.19μg/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50) value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein. Conclusion: Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria. PMID:25628685

  19. [Genetic aspects of sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Labie, D

    1992-10-01

    The genetics of sickle cell anemia may be considered as a model. Its mendelian transmission was hypothesized even before the molecular era. Once the mutation identified, it could be studied at the protein and DNA level; a consistent pathophysiological mechanism was proposed; the various genetic forms of the disease could be identified; the way by which a balanced polymorphism with Plasmodium falciparum malaria is obtained was analyzed. More recently, investigations were run in order to understand how modulating, or epistatic factors could modify the pathophysiological mechanism and contribute to the high clinical diversity of the disease. Several factors have been identified, among which a concomitant alpha-thalassemia, an overproduction of fetal hemoglobin, due either to an activation of the gamma genes or to an increase of the F-cell number, and finally a quantitative control of the beta s chains themselves. Such a high number of genetic active factors questions the concept itself of a monogenic disease.

  20. Coexistence of megaloblastic anemia and iron deficiency anemia in a young woman with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Chia-Sui; Yang, Chao-Ping; Lo, Fu-Sung; Hsu, Hsun-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Pernicious anemia is a megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and is the end-stage of autoimmune gastritis that typically affects persons older than 60 years. It is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia can also be diagnosed concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. We report the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia in a 22-year-old woman with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis for 10.5 years. Recently, she presented with microcytic anemia, and iron deficiency anemia was diagnosed initially. After administration of ferrous sulfate, macrocytic anemia was revealed and vitamin B12 deficiency was detected. Pernicious anemia was highly suspected because of the endoscopic finding of atrophic gastritis, and high titer of antigastric parietal cell antibody, as well as elevated serum gastrin level. After intramuscular injections of hydroxycobalamine 100 microg daily for 10 days, and monthly later, her blood counts returned to normal.