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Sample records for hemophilia cohort hgds-3

  1. Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Hemophilia A; Classic hemophilia; Factor VIII deficiency; Hemophilia B; Christmas disease; Factor IX deficiency ... M, Moorehead P, Lillicrap D. Hemophilia A and B. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ...

  2. [Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián; Vargas-Ruiz, Angel Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease in which the clinical manifestation is mainly the presence of hemorrhage. There are two known types of hemophilia: hemophilia A and B, which have a deficiency of factor VIII or IX clotting, respectively. The intensity of bleeding in hemophilia depends on the plasma levels of factor VIII or IX and has traditionally been classified as mild (> 5 % activity), moderate (1-5 % activity) and severe (< 1 % activity). In laboratory tests, isolated prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) can be found, but it is necessary to determine the plasma levels of factor VIII or IX to establish the diagnosis of hemophilia A or B. The treating of this disease involves replacing exogenous factor VIII or IX concentrates. Gene therapy could be an option in the future to achieve the cure of the disease. Complications of hemophilia are the risk of transfusion-associated infections, pseudotumor hemophilic, hemophilic arthropathy and the presence of serum inhibitors.

  3. Men with severe hemophilia in the United States: birth cohort analysis of a large national database

    PubMed Central

    Mazepa, Marshall A.; Baker, Judith R.; Riske, Brenda K.; Soucie, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The availability of longitudinal data collected prospectively from 1998 to 2011 at federally funded US hemophilia treatment centers provided an opportunity to construct a descriptive analysis of how outcomes of men with severe hemophilia have been altered by the incremental advances and setbacks in hemophilia care in the last 50 years in the United States. This surveillance collaboration with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assembled the largest uniformly examined population with severe hemophilia (n = 4899 men with severe factor VIII and IX deficiency). To address the heterogeneity of this population, 4 successive birth cohorts, differentially affected by eras of hemophilia care, were examined separately in regard to demographics, complications of hemophilia and its treatment, and mortality. Severely affected men in each birth cohort were compared also with the corresponding mild hemophilia birth cohorts (n = 2587 men total) to control for outcomes that might be attributable to aging and environment independent of severely defective hemostasis. The analysis demonstrates improving access to standard of care therapy, correlating the proportion of men on prophylactic factor replacement and reduced bleeding frequency for the youngest men. Frequent bleeding persisted in one third to one half of men across all ages, however, and the disability gap between severe and mild hemophilia did not narrow. The greatest cause of death was liver failure, but attempted anti–hepatitis C virus therapy and cure were low. The study suggests a continued need for national surveillance to monitor and inform hemophilia interventions and outcomes. PMID:26983851

  4. Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clotting factor is a protein needed for normal blood clotting. Without it, you may bleed for a long ... of hemophilia are excessive bleeding and easy bruising. Blood tests can tell if you have it. The main treatment is injecting the missing clotting factor into the bloodstream. You may need it ...

  5. The polygenic nature of inhibitors in hemophilia A: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort.

    PubMed

    Astermark, Jan; Donfield, Sharyne M; Gomperts, Edward D; Schwarz, John; Menius, Erika D; Pavlova, Anna; Oldenburg, Johannes; Kessing, Bailey; DiMichele, Donna M; Shapiro, Amy D; Winkler, Cheryl A; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-02-21

    Studies of determinants of development of inhibitory Abs to factor VIII in people with hemophilia A indicate a complex process involving multiple factors. The Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort was formed to extend our understanding of the genetic background of risk. The study group contains 833 subjects from 3 independent cohorts: brother pairs and singletons with and without a history of inhibitors, as well as 104 brother pairs discordant for inhibitor status. Using an Illumina iSelect platform, 13 331 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from 1081 genes, primarily immune response and immune modifier genes, were typed. Each cohort was analyzed separately with results combined using a meta-analytic technique. After adjustment for potential confounders, 53 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be significant predictors of inhibitor status using the criteria of odds ratios in the same direction in all cohorts or allowing for a 20% interval around an odds ratio = 1 in 1 of the 3 and significant in at least 2. Of the 53 markers, 13 had meta P < .001. Eight of the 53 were significant predictors among the discordant pairs. Results support the complexity of the immune response and encourage further research with the goal of understanding the pathways involved.

  6. The polygenic nature of inhibitors in hemophilia A: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Schwarz, John; Menius, Erika D.; Pavlova, Anna; Oldenburg, Johannes; Kessing, Bailey; DiMichele, Donna M.; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Studies of determinants of development of inhibitory Abs to factor VIII in people with hemophilia A indicate a complex process involving multiple factors. The Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort was formed to extend our understanding of the genetic background of risk. The study group contains 833 subjects from 3 independent cohorts: brother pairs and singletons with and without a history of inhibitors, as well as 104 brother pairs discordant for inhibitor status. Using an Illumina iSelect platform, 13 331 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from 1081 genes, primarily immune response and immune modifier genes, were typed. Each cohort was analyzed separately with results combined using a meta-analytic technique. After adjustment for potential confounders, 53 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be significant predictors of inhibitor status using the criteria of odds ratios in the same direction in all cohorts or allowing for a 20% interval around an odds ratio = 1 in 1 of the 3 and significant in at least 2. Of the 53 markers, 13 had meta P < .001. Eight of the 53 were significant predictors among the discordant pairs. Results support the complexity of the immune response and encourage further research with the goal of understanding the pathways involved. PMID:23223434

  7. A Cohort Pilot Study on HIV-Associated Neuropsychological Impairments in Hemophilia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Silvia; Cutica, Ilaria; Krampe, Caspar; Reinecke, Laura F.; Russell-Edu, William; Santoro, Cristina; Rocino, Angiola; Santagostino, Elena; Rusconi, Vega; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the management of HIV infection with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, it is well known that HIV can directly infect the central nervous system and, as a result of such infection, neuropsychological impairments can be manifested. In this study, we tried to determine whether seropositivity was associated with a poor neuropsychological performance in patients with hemophilia and HIV. Such a cohort of patients is very often underrepresented and understudied in the HIV literature. To amend such a gap, we carried out an extensive neuropsychological evaluation on these patients, and compared their performance with that of a group of seronegative hemophilia patients. The results revealed that HIV infection in HIV-seropositive (HIV+) hemophilia patients was associated with deficits in attention, short-term memory, abstraction, and visual recognition. Such results are still preliminary and explorative due to the small cohort of patients enrolled. However, the results do seem to have some important implications for day-to-day functioning, as the level of impairment detected may cause difficulties in completing common everyday tasks such as maintaining adherence to complex medication regimens or maintaining social life activities. Continued research into the mechanisms related to HIV and neurocognitive dysfunction may provide targets for interventions that could have meaningful consequences in the real world for HIV hemophilia patients. PMID:26082706

  8. Hemophilia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hemophilia and the severity. Families With a History of Hemophilia Any family history of bleeding, such ... inheritance pattern for hemophilia . Families With No Previous History of Hemophilia About one-third of babies who ...

  9. Hemophilia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hemophilia ... The following organizations provide further information on hemophilia : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemophilia/index.html National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ ...

  10. F8 haplotype and inhibitor risk: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, John; Astermark, Jan; Menius, Erika D.; Carrington, Mary; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Nelson, George W.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral background, specifically African descent, confers higher risk for development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A. It has been suggested that differences in the distribution of factor VIII gene (F8) haplotypes, and mismatch between endogenous F8 haplotypes and those comprising products used for treatment could contribute to risk. Design and Methods Data from the HIGS Combined Cohort were used to determine the association between F8 haplotype 3 (H3) vs. haplotypes 1 and 2 (H1+H2) and inhibitor risk among individuals of genetically-determined African descent. Other variables known to affect inhibitor risk including type of F8 mutation and HLA were included in the analysis. A second research question regarding risk related to mismatch in endogenous F8 haplotype and recombinant FVIII products used for treatment was addressed. Results H3 was associated with higher inhibitor risk among those genetically-identified (N=49) as of African ancestry, but the association did not remain significant after adjustment for F8 mutation type and the HLA variables. Among subjects of all racial ancestries enrolled in HIGS who reported early use of recombinant products (N=223), mismatch in endogenous haplotype and the FVIII proteins constituting the products used did not confer greater risk for inhibitor development. Conclusion H3 was not an independent predictor of inhibitor risk. Further, our findings did not support a higher risk of inhibitors in the presence of a haplotype mismatch between the FVIII molecule infused and that of the individual. PMID:22958194

  11. Correlation between phenotype and genotype in a large unselected cohort of children with severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Carcao, Manuel D; van den Berg, H Marijke; Ljung, Rolf; Mancuso, Maria Elisa

    2013-05-09

    Phenotypic variability is well recognized in severe hemophilia A. A few studies, mainly in adults treated lifelong on demand, suggest that bleeding phenotype correlates with factor VIII gene (F8) mutation type. Because treatment regimens influence outcomes to a large extent, examining bleeding phenotype during the first years of life may be the most suitable way to define this variability. We set out to analyze the very early phenotypic expression of severe hemophilia A in 621 consecutively enrolled, well-characterized previously untreated patients and to correlate this with patients' F8 mutation. Detailed information was collected on bleeds and treatment of the first 75 exposure days or until inhibitor development. F8 mutation type was known for 531 patients; 402 had null mutations and 129 had non-null mutations. Considering only patients who had not started prophylaxis or developed an inhibitor before select bleeding events, we found that patients with null mutations experienced their first bleed and first joint bleed at younger median ages than patients with non-null mutations (9.7 vs 10.9 months and 13.8 vs 16.1 months, respectively). We conclude that F8 mutation type accounts for only a small component of the significant phenotypic variability found among patients with severe hemophilia A.

  12. Hemophilia A

    MedlinePlus

    Factor VIII deficiency; Classic hemophilia; Bleeding disorder - hemophilia A ... When you bleed, a series of reactions take place in the body that helps blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation ...

  13. Hemophilia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hemophilia KidsHealth > For Teens > Hemophilia Print A A A ... bruises can be a big deal. What Is Hemophilia? Hemophilia is a disease that prevents blood from ...

  14. The Hypertension of Hemophilia Is Not Explained by the Usual Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Results of a Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Thomas J.; Sait, Afrah S.; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Quon, Doris V. K.; von Drygalski, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background. The etiology of the high prevalence of hypertension among patients with hemophilia (PWH) remains unknown. Methods. We compared 469 PWH in the United States with males from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to determine whether differences in cardiovascular risk factors can account for the hypertension in hemophilia. Results. Median systolic and diastolic BP were higher in PWH than NHANES (P < 0.001) for subjects not taking antihypertensives. Those taking antihypertensives showed similar differences. Differences in both systolic and diastolic BP were especially marked among adults <30 years old. Differences between PWH and NHANES persisted after adjusting for age and risk factors (body mass index, renal function, cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, Hepatitis C, and race). Conclusions. Systolic and diastolic BP are higher in PWH than in the general male population and especially among PWH < 30 years old. The usual cardiovascular risk factors do not account for the etiology of the higher prevalence of hypertension in hemophilia. New investigations into the missing link between hemophilia and hypertension should include age of onset of hypertension and hemophilia-specific morbidities such as the role of inflammatory joint disease. PMID:27965893

  15. [Hemophilia camps.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits.

  16. How to Deal with Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray How to Deal With Hemophilia KidsHealth > For Kids > How to Deal With Hemophilia ... mild case of hemophilia. Why Do Kids Get Hemophilia? Hemophilia almost always affects boys. Why? Because the ...

  17. What Causes Hemophilia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... examples of how the hemophilia gene is inherited. Inheritance Pattern for Hemophilia—Example 1 The image shows one ... hemophilia gene from his mother and having hemophilia. Inheritance Pattern for Hemophilia—Example 2 The image shows one ...

  18. Risk factors for high-titer inhibitor development in children with hemophilia A: results of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Halimeh, Susan; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Heller, Christine; Gutsche, Sven; Holzhauer, Susanne; Kenet, Gili; Kurnik, Karin; Manner, Daniela; Iorio, Alfonso; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Among the discussed risk factors for high-titre inhibitor (HRI) development in patients with hemophilia A (HA) are high dose FVIII replacement therapy and use of recombinant FVIII concentrates (rFVIII). The aim of this study was to evaluate the aforementioned risk factors for HRI development in children with hemophilia A ≤2%. About 288 ascertained PUPs (Israel and Germany) were followed after initial HA diagnosis over 200 exposure days. Inhibitor-free survival, hazard ratios (HR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Adjustment was performed for factor VIII concentrates, median single dose over the first three months of treatment, first FVIII administration before the age of three months, presence of risk HA gene mutations, "intensive treatment moments" and "year of birth" (proxy for different treatment periods). HRI occurred in 71/288 children (24.7%). In multivariate analysis adjusted for "year of birth", underlying risk gene mutations (HR/CI: 2.37/1.40-3.99), FVIII dose, measured per one IU increase per kgbw (HR/CI: 1.05/1.04-1.07), and first FVIII administration before the age of three months showed a significant impact on HR development. The risk of HRI development was similar for recombinant or plasmatic FVIII products. Children at risk should be treated with carefully calculated lower dose regimens, adapted to individual bleeding situations.

  19. Genetic restriction of HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS by a deletion allele of the CKR5 structural gene. Hemophilia Growth and Development Study, Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, Multicenter Hemophilia Cohort Study, San Francisco City Cohort, ALIVE Study.

    PubMed

    Dean, M; Carrington, M; Winkler, C; Huttley, G A; Smith, M W; Allikmets, R; Goedert, J J; Buchbinder, S P; Vittinghoff, E; Gomperts, E; Donfield, S; Vlahov, D; Kaslow, R; Saah, A; Rinaldo, C; Detels, R; O'Brien, S J

    1996-09-27

    The chemokine receptor 5 (CKR5) protein serves as a secondary receptor on CD4(+) T lymphocytes for certain strains of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1). The CKR5 structural gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21, and a 32-base pair deletion allele (CKR5Delta32) was identified that is present at a frequency of approximately0.10 in the Caucasian population of the United States. An examination of 1955 patients included among six well-characterized acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cohort studies revealed that 17 deletion homozygotes occurred exclusively among 612 exposed HIV-1 antibody-negative individuals (2.8 percent) and not at all in 1343 HIV-1-infected individuals. The frequency of CKR5 deletion heterozygotes was significantly elevated in groups of individuals that had survived HIV-1 infection for more than 10 years, and, in some risk groups, twice as frequent as their occurrence in rapid progressors to AIDS. Survival analysis clearly shows that disease progression is slower in CKR5 deletion heterozygotes than in individuals homozygous for the normal CKR5 gene. The CKR5Delta32 deletion may act as a recessive restriction gene against HIV-1 infection and may exert a dominant phenotype of delaying progression to AIDS among infected individuals.

  20. Frequently Asked Questions: Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be consulted. Should people with hemophilia avoid aspirin and other similar non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? People with hemophilia should not take aspirin (ASA or acetylsalicyclic acid), or anything containing aspirin, ...

  1. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  2. What is Hemophilia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fragments that form in the bone marrow—a sponge-like tissue in the bones. Platelets play a ... can prevent the clotting factors from working. This article focuses on inherited hemophilia. Outlook Hemophilia can be ...

  3. Costs and utilization of hemophilia A and B patients with and without inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Edward P; Malone, Daniel C; Krishnan, Sangeeta; Wessler, Maj Jacob

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the health system costs among patients with hemophilia A and B with and without inhibitors over 5 years. This was a retrospective, observational study utilizing medical and pharmacy electronic medical records and administrative encounters/claims data tracking US patients between 2006-2011. Patients with diagnosis codes for hemophilia A and B were identified. Patients with inhibitors were characterized by utilization of bypassing agents activated prothrombin complex concentrate or factor VIIa on two or more distinct dates. Severity was classified as mild, moderate, or severe based on laboratory tests of clotting factor. There were 160 hemophilia A patients and 54 hemophilia B patients identified. From this group, seven were designated as patients with inhibitors (five with hemophilia A and two with hemophilia B). Hemophilia A patients without inhibitors reported 65 (41.9%) as being severe, 19 (12.3%) as moderate, and 71 (45.8%) as mild. Hemophilia B patients without inhibitors reported nine (17.3%) had severe, 13 (25.0%) had moderate, and 30 (57.7%) had mild hemophilia. All patients with inhibitors had been hospitalized in the previous 5 years compared to 64 (41.3%) with hemophilia A without inhibitors and 22 (42.3%) with hemophilia B without inhibitors. The median aggregate cost per year (including factor and health resource use) was $325,780 for patients with inhibitors compared to $98,334 for hemophilia A patients without inhibitors and $23,265 for hemophilia B patients without inhibitors. The results suggest that, while the frequency of inhibitors within the hemophilia cohort was low, there was a higher frequency of hospitalizations, and the associated median aggregate costs per year were 3-fold higher than those patients without inhibitors. In contrast, hemophilia B patients experience less severe disease and account for lower aggregate yearly costs compared to either patients with hemophilia A or patients with inhibitors.

  4. Gene Therapy for Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Arthur W; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Adeno-associated viral vectors have been developed for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. Derivation of vector particles is achieved after multiplasmid transfection of cells that package the vector genome to yield vector particles. To date, three clinical trials have been performed for hemophilia B. The results of these trials are described. The trial that we conducted with our collaborators has yielded evidence of clinical efficacy for hemophilia B. A vector for treating hemophilia A has been developed and a clinical trial is planned.

  5. Hemophilia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on something called gene therapy for people with hemophilia. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to provide ... with the genetic information it doesn't have. Hemophilia is considered a good test for gene therapy because it is caused by only one defective ...

  6. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors.

  7. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  8. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia.

  9. Animal Models of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Denise E.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Merricks, Elizabeth; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Herzog, Roland W.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia is caused by mutations in coagulation factor VIII (hemophilia A) or factor IX (hemophilia B). Unless prophylactic treatment is provided, patients with severe disease (less than 1% clotting activity) typically experience frequent spontaneous bleeds. Current treatment is largely based on intravenous infusion of recombinant or plasma-derived coagulation factor concentrate. More effective factor products are being developed. Moreover, gene therapies for sustained correction of hemophilia are showing much promise in pre-clinical studies and in clinical trials. These advances in molecular medicine heavily depend on availability of well-characterized small and large animal models of hemophilia, primarily hemophilia mice and dogs. Experiments in these animals represent important early and intermediate steps of translational research aimed at development of better and safer treatments for hemophilia, such a protein and gene therapies or immune tolerance protocols. While murine models are excellent for studies of large groups of animals using genetically defined strains, canine models are important for testing scale-up and for longer-term follow-up as well as for studies that require larger blood volumes. PMID:22137432

  10. Hemophilia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaliuniene, Ruta; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Brukiene, Vilma; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to overview the oral health aspects in hemophilia patients. An electronic search of Medline (Pub Med), Cochrane, SSCI (Social Citation Index), SCI (Science Citation Index) databases from 1982 to the present, using the following search words: hemophilia, oral health, dental caries, dental caries prevalence, gingivitis, periodontitis, primary dentition, permanent dentition, dental treatment and review, was performed. The search yielded 196 titles and abstracts on chosen words. All articles were full-text reviewed and 40 of publications were included. Nowadays coagulation factor abnormalities are the most common of inherited bleeding disorders, but occur much less frequently approximating 10000-50000 male births than acquired coagulation defects. Von Willebrand disease, Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B account for 95-97% of all coagulation deficiencies. Hemophilias A and B are subdivided according to the factor's activity levels in the blood: mild, moderate or severe. The two main oral diseases affecting patients with hemophilia are the same as for the rest of population, i.e. dental caries and gingivitis/periodontitis. Only a few studies concerning oral health aspects in hemophilia patients were carried out. Some controversy exists concerning caries prevalence in both primary and permanent dentitions in children with hemophilia. People with congenital hemorrhagic diatheses constitute a very small proportion of the total population. Due to that fact treatment of such patients becomes a challenge to the most of dentists due to the fact that most of them have no experience in dealing with dental problems in such patients. There is a lack of epidemiological studies in oral health status of hemophilia patient.

  11. Hemophilia Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemophilia Women Healthcare Providers Partners Media Policy Makers Data & Statistics Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... at a very young age. Based on CDC data, the median age at diagnosis is 36 months ...

  12. Hemophilia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe hemophilia prevent "bleeds" with regular clotting factor infusions (usually two or three times per week). Some ... the laboratory has virtually eliminated the danger of infusion-related infection with HIV or hepatitis viruses from ...

  13. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2006-09-01

    This review will highlight the progress achieved in the past 2 years on using gene therapy to treat hemophilia in animals and humans. There has been substantial progress in using gene therapy to treat animals with hemophilia. Novel approaches for hemophilia A in mice include expression of Factor VIII in blood cells or platelets derived from ex-vivo transduced hematopoietic stem cells, or in-vivo transfer of transposons expressing Factor VIII into endothelial cells or hepatocytes. Advances in large-animal models include the demonstration that neonatal administration of a retroviral vector expressing canine Factor VIII completely corrected hemophilia A in dogs, and that double-stranded adeno-associated virus vectors resulted in expression of Factor IX that is 28-fold that obtained using single-stranded adeno-associated virus vectors. In humans, one hemophilia B patient achieved 10% of normal activity after liver-directed gene therapy with a single-stranded adeno-associated virus vector expressing human Factor IX. Expression fell at 1 month, however, which was likely due to an immune response to the modified cells. Gene therapy has been successful in a patient with hemophilia B, but expression was unstable due to an immune response. Abrogating immune responses is the next major hurdle for achieving long-lasting gene therapy.

  14. Understanding Hemophilia. Implications for the Physical Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes hemophilia and ways to provide appropriate physical education experiences to children with hemophilia. The article focuses on what hemophilia is, how to treat hemophilia, benefits of physical activity, how to teach children with hemophilia, choosing and modifying sports and activities, and safety and emergency situations. (SM)

  15. Understanding Hemophilia. Implications for the Physical Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes hemophilia and ways to provide appropriate physical education experiences to children with hemophilia. The article focuses on what hemophilia is, how to treat hemophilia, benefits of physical activity, how to teach children with hemophilia, choosing and modifying sports and activities, and safety and emergency situations. (SM)

  16. Hemophilia during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ran D.; Blanchette, Victor; Koren, Gideon

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: A patient in my clinic, who is 10 weeks into her first pregnancy and is a known carrier of hemophilia B, is considering the advantages and disadvantages of antenatal tests and is especially worried about a vaginal delivery thatmight cause bleeding. How should I manage her pregnancy? ANSWER: Many female carriers of hemophilia were found to have lower-than-expected levels of plasma factors, which are thought to be due to X chromosome inactivation. Chorionic villous sampling is the preferred test to determine the sex of the fetus and whether a male infant is affected with hemophilia. Vaginal delivery is not contraindicated and has been proven during the last two decades to be as safe as cesarean section. Vacuum extraction should be avoided to minimize risk of intracranial hemolysis and severe cephalhematoma. PMID:14708924

  17. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  18. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Hortelano, G; Chang, P L

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked genetic disorders caused by deficiency of the coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively. Because of the health hazards and costs of current product replacement therapy, much effort is devoted to the development of gene therapy for these disorders. Approaches to gene therapy for the hemophilias include: ex vivo gene therapy in which cells from the intended recipients are explanted, genetically modified to secrete Factor VIII or IX, and reimplanted into the donor; in vivo gene therapy in which Factor VIII or IX encoding vectors are directly injected into the recipient; and non-autologous gene therapy in which universal cell lines engineered to secrete Factor VIII or IX are enclosed in immuno-protective devices before implantation into recipients. Research into these approaches is aided by the many murine and canine models available. While problems of achieving high and sustained levels of factor delivery, and issues related to efficacy, safety and cost are still to be resolved, progress in gene therapy for the hemophilias has been encouraging and is likely to reach human clinical trial in the foreseeable future.

  19. How to Deal with Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... working to develop gene therapy for people with hemophilia. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to provide ... with the genetic information it doesn't have. Hemophilia is considered a good test for gene therapy because it is caused by only one defective ...

  20. Inhibitor development and mortality in non-severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, C L; Loomans, J I; van Velzen, A S; Peters, M; Mauser-Bunschoten, E P; Schwaab, R; Mazzucconi, M G; Tagliaferri, A; Siegmund, B; Reitter-Pfoertner, S E; van der Bom, J G; Fijnvandraat, K

    2015-07-01

    The life expectancy of non-severe hemophilia A (HA) patients equals the life expectancy of the non-hemophilic population. However, data on the effect of inhibitor development on mortality and on hemophilia-related causes of death are scarce. The development of neutralizing factor VIII antibodies in non-severe HA patients may dramatically change their clinical outcome due to severe bleeding complications. We assessed the association between the occurrence of inhibitors and mortality in patients with non-severe HA. In this retrospective cohort study, clinical data and vital status were collected for 2709 non-severe HA patients (107 with inhibitors) who were treated between 1980 and 2011 in 34 European and Australian centers. Mortality rates for patients with and without inhibitors were compared. During 64,200 patient-years of follow-up, 148 patients died (mortality rate, 2.30 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.96-2.70) at a median age of 64 years (interquartile range [IQR], 49-76). In 62 patients (42%) the cause of death was hemophilia related. Sixteen inhibitor patients died at a median age of 71 years (IQR, 60-81). In ten patients the inhibitor was present at time of death; seven of them died of severe bleeding complications. The all-cause mortality rate in inhibitor patients was > 5 times increased compared with that for those without inhibitors (age-adjusted mortality rate ratio, 5.6). Inhibitor development in non-severe hemophilia is associated with increased mortality. High rates of hemophilia-related mortality in this study indicate that non-severe hemophilia is not mild at all and stress the importance of close follow-up for these patients. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. New therapies for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Pipe, Steven W

    2016-12-02

    Individuals with severe hemophilia have benefitted from 5 decades of advances that have led to widespread availability of safe and efficacious factors VIII and IX, a multidisciplinary integrated care model through a network of specialized hemophilia treatment centers, and aggressive introduction of prophylactic replacement therapy to prevent bleeding and preserve joint health. Yet, there are remaining challenges and treatment gaps which have prevented complete abrogation of all joint bleeding, and progressive joint deterioration may continue in some affected individuals over the course of a lifetime. Some of these challenges can now be addressed with recombinant clotting factors with extended half-life that may improve adherence to prophylaxis regimens through more convenient infusion schedules, maintain higher plasma levels for longer when clinically necessary, and allow for better adaptation to individual phenotypic and pharmacokinetic variability. Real-world case studies will be presented that illustrate practical application of these newly approved therapies in clinical practice and the clinical trial data that have demonstrated the potential for improved clinical outcomes by implementing these strategies. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  2. A patient's perspective on hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sulser, Ellis

    2006-04-01

    People with hemophilia play a central role in partnering with their physicians to achieve the best possible clinical and economic outcomes. To make informed choices regarding a hemophilia therapy, patients and their caregivers must assess four basic areas: safety, purity, cost, and convenience--where safety is the number one concern. Access to information, including informed consent on issues affecting choice of therapy, treater, regimen, and point of service, ancillary, and comprehensive care services, is of fundamental importance when choosing a therapy. Hemophilia treaters are often the primary source for information and also play a large part in therapy decisions based on possible inhibitor formation, patients' lifetime insurance caps, and therapy availability. In order to help optimize a patient's outcomes, hemophilia treaters must also periodically re-evaluate and modify disease management techniques. Given the devastation of the hemophilia community during the worst years of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, physicians, government agencies, and industry must complement policy decisions with medical ethics, psychosocial, and quality-of-life considerations--and patients must remain vigilant about the safety of their therapy. It is imperative that standards of care ensure access to the safest therapies available and enable those with hemophilia to live a life only minimally disrupted by their disease.

  3. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Hypertension in Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    von Drygalski, Annette; Kolaitis, Nicholas A; Bettencourt, Ricki; Bergstrom, Jaclyn; Kruse-Jarres, R; Quon, Doris VK; Wassel, Christina; Li, Ming C; Waalen, Jill; Elias, Darlene J; Mosnier, Laurent O; Allison, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for intracranial hemorrhage. We therefore investigated the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension in adult patients with hemophilia (PWH). PWH ≥18 years (n=458) from 3 geographically different cohorts in the United States were evaluated retrospectively for hypertension and risk factors. Results were compared to the nationally representative sample provided by the contemporary National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). PWH had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to NHANES. Overall, the prevalence of hypertension was 49.1% in PWH compared to 31.7 % in NHANES. At ages 18–44, 45–64, 65–74, and ≥ 75 the prevalence of hypertension for PWH was 31.8%, 72.6%, 89.7%, and 100.0% compared to 12.5%, 41.2%, 64.1%, and 71.7% in NHANES, respectively. Of treated hypertensive PWH, only 27.1% were controlled, compared to 47.7% in NHANES (all p-values <0.05). Age, body mass index, diabetes and renal function were independently associated with hypertension. Among patients with moderate or severe hemophilia there was a trend (~ 1.5-fold) for higher odds of having hypertension compared to patients with mild hemophilia. Based on these results, new care models for adult PWH and further studies for the etiology of hypertension in hemophilia are recommended. PMID:23630949

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    von Drygalski, Annette; Kolaitis, Nicholas A; Bettencourt, Ricki; Bergstrom, Jaclyn; Kruse-Jarres, R; Quon, Doris V; Wassel, Christina; Li, Ming C; Waalen, Jill; Elias, Darlene J; Mosnier, Laurent O; Allison, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for intracranial hemorrhage. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence, treatment, and control of HTN in adult patients with hemophilia (PWH). PWH≥18 years (n=458) from 3 geographically different cohorts in the United States were evaluated retrospectively for HTN and risk factors. Results were compared with the nationally representative sample provided by the contemporary National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). PWH had a significantly higher prevalence of HTN compared with NHANES. Overall, the prevalence of HTN was 49.1% in PWH compared with 31.7% in NHANES. At ages 18 to 44, 45 to 64, 65 to 74, and ≥75 years, the prevalence of HTN for PWH was 31.8%, 72.6%, 89.7%, and 100.0% compared with 12.5%, 41.2%, 64.1%, and 71.7% in NHANES, respectively. Of treated hypertensive PWH, only 27.1% were controlled, compared with 47.7% in NHANES (all P<0.05). Age, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, and renal function were independently associated with HTN. Among patients with moderate or severe hemophilia there was a trend (≈1.5-fold) for higher odds of having HTN compared with patients with mild hemophilia. On the basis of these results, new care models for adult PWH and further studies for the causes of HTN in hemophilia are recommended.

  5. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  6. Myositis ossificans in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Vas, W.; Cockshott, W.P.; Martin, R.F.; Pai, M.K.; Walker, I.

    1981-10-01

    A review of the radiographs of 60 hemophilia patients showed nine (15%) with ectopic new bone formation. Three of these patients had multiple sites of involvement. The high frequency discovered in this series contrasts with the paucity of descriptions to be found in the literature. This process of myositis ossificans affects the lower half of the body and probably represents dysplastic metaplasia developing at the site of an intramuscular hematoma when remote from bone, as well as ossification of hemorrhagic lesions related to the periosteum. In conventional radiographs anatomic localization of bone foci is difficult, but use of computed tomography permits precise identification of the affected muscle. There is negligible disability associated with this condition.

  7. Hemophilia in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dorgalaleh, Akbar; Dadashizadeh, Ghazaleh; Bamedi, Taregh

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) and B (HB) are common bleeding disorders, Iran having the ninth largest such population in the world. A considerable number of studies have been performed on different aspects of their disorder. The aim of the study was to gather all obtainable data about Iranian patients with HA and HB, including molecular studies, clinical presentations and treatment, and development and management of patients with inhibitor, to help better understand the disease and its management in other parts of the world. For this review study, we searched MEDLINE and Scientific Information Database for English and Persian sources until 2015. There are 5369 patients with HA and HB in Iran among which 4438 patients have HA. About one-fifth of HA patients' genes were analyzed and their underlying defects detected. Hemarthrosis, epistaxis, ecchymosis, and post-dental extraction bleeding are the most common clinical presentations. Bleeding was mainly managed by on-demand replacement therapy with factor VIII/factor IX (FVIII/FIX) concentrates or cryoprecipitate in HA, and fresh frozen plasma in HB in the absence of factor concentrate. Mean per capita for FVIII in HA patients is 1.56 IU, which is higher than the global per capita mean. However, mean per capita for FIX (0.24 IU) is lower than the global mean but highest among eastern Mediterranean countries. Replacement with plasma-derived components has led to infection in a large number of patients as well as inhibitor development against exogenous infusion of coagulation factors. According to a World Federation of Hemophilia survey, 223 HA and 6 HB patients in Iran have developed inhibitor and have been mainly managed by recombinant FVII (rFVIIa) and activated prothrombin-complex concentrate. Although this study was performed in Iranian patients, the large number thereof gives confidence that the results can be used more widely for other countries, especially in the developing world.

  8. Current challenges in the management of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kenneth A

    2015-03-01

    Hemophilia is characterized by genetic mutations resulting in the deficiency of factors critical to the normal process of coagulation, sometimes resulting in spontaneous bleeding into soft tissue, joints, and internal organs. The 2 most common subtypes are hemophilia A, or factor VIII deficiency, and hemophilia B, or factor IX deficiency. Hemophilia affects an estimated 20,000 individuals in the United States. The diagnosis and management of patients with severe hemophilia is complex, and requires preventive treatment (prophylaxis) to avoid bleeding episodes and related complications and the use of replacement therapy with coagulation factors during acute bleeding episodes. To achieve optimal long-term results, the treatment of patients with hemophilia requires a comprehensive approach coordinated by a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Hemophilia imposes a substantial burden from economic, societal, and patient perspectives.

  9. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  10. [Peripartum period and hemophilia carriers].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, A; Chevalier, Y; Wallon, G; Huissoud, C; Aubrun, F

    2013-11-01

    Women who are carriers for hemophilia are usually considered as safe carriers. However, they can present hemorragic symptoms associated with low factor VIII or IX levels. During pregancy, factor VIII increases whereas factor IX does not. The peripartum period is at risk of increased bleeding in these women. Here are presented reports of clinical data concerning two hemophilia carriers with low factor VIII or IX (30-40%) during the peripartum period. They received remifentanil and ketamine for labor pain management because of contraindication of epidural and spinal analgesia. Delivery occured quickly but they presented immediate moderate postpartum haemorrage. They did not necessitate blood transfusion. The one with hemophilia A received desmopressin just after delivery and the other one received factor IX when she arrived in delivery room. Blood factor VIII or IX has to be assessed in these women with familial history of hemophilia and bleeding. During pregnancy, factor VIII increases and can be assessed many times during pregnancy expecting a level over 50%. Factor IX does not really increase during pregancy and hemorrage can occur. Epidural and spinal anesthesia seem to be contraindicated as far as recommandations are concerned. Coagulation factor substitution is a mean of increasing factor level before these anaesthesias and can be discussed for each case. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Hemophilia A in the third millennium.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-07-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked hereditary bleeding disorder due to the deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). According to the degree of FVIII deficiency, mild, moderate or severe forms are recognized. Although patients with mild hemophilia A usually bleed excessively only after trauma or surgery, those with severe hemophilia experience frequent episodes of spontaneous or excessive bleeding after minor trauma, particularly into joints and muscles. The modern management of hemophilia began in the 1970s and is actually based upon several plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII products. In addition, the synthetic drug desmopressin can be used to prevent or treat bleeding episodes in patients with mild hemophilia A. Long-term and continuous substitution therapy (prophylaxis), the recommended treatment in severe hemophilia, prevents bleeding and the resultant joint damage. In the last twenty years the high standard of hemophilia care has greatly improved the quality of life of patients and their life expectancy has reached that of the non-hemophilic male population, at least in high-income countries. The most serious and challenging complication of treatment of hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors, which renders FVIII concentrate infusion ineffective and exposes patients to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the actual knowledge on the clinical features and management of patients with hemophilia A is summarized.

  12. Both Hemophilia Health Care Providers and Hemophilia A Carriers Report that Carriers have Excessive Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paroskie, Allison; Oso, Olatunde; DeBaun, Michael R.; Sidonio, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A, the result of reduced factor VIII (FVIII) activity, is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder. Previous reports of Hemophilia A carriers suggest an increased bleeding tendency. Our objective was to determine the attitudes and understanding of the Hemophilia A carrier bleeding phenotype, and opinions regarding timing of carrier testing from the perspective of both medical providers and affected patients. Data from this survey was used as preliminary data for an ongoing prospective study. Material and Methods An electronic survey was distributed to physicians and nurses employed at Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC), and Hemophilia A carriers who were members of Hemophilia Federation of America. Questions focused on the clinical understanding of bleeding symptoms and management of Hemophilia A carriers, and the timing and intensity of carrier testing. Results Our survey indicates that 51% (36/51) of providers compared to 78% (36/46) of carriers believe that Hemophilia A carriers with normal FVIII activity have an increased bleeding tendency (p<0.001); 72% (33/36) of Hemophilia A carriers report a high frequency of bleeding symptoms. Regarding carrier testing, 72% (50/69) of medical providers recommend testing after 14 years of age, conversely 65% (29/45) of Hemophilia A carriers prefer testing to be done prior to this age (p<0.001). Discussion Hemophilia A carriers self-report a higher frequency of bleeding than previously acknowledged, and have a preference for earlier testing to confirm carrier status. PMID:24309601

  13. Clinical, instrumental, serological and histological findings suggest that hemophilia B may be less severe than hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Linari, Silvia; Manetti, Mirko; Romano, Eloisa; Sofi, Francesco; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patients with severe hemophilia B may have a less severe disease compared to severe hemophilia A. To investigate clinical, radiological, laboratory and histological differences in the arthropathy of severe hemophilia A and hemophilia B, 70 patients with hemophilia A and 35 with hemophilia B with at least one joint bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Joint bleedings (<10, 10–50, >50), regimen of treatment (prophylaxis/on demand), World Federation of Hemophilia, Pettersson and ultrasound scores, serum soluble RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin were assessed in all patients. RANK, RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin expression was evaluated in synovial tissue from 18 hemophilia A and 4 hemophilia B patients. The percentage of patients with either 10–50 or more than 50 hemarthrosis was greater in hemophilia A than in hemophilia B (P<0.001 and P=0.03, respectively), while that with less than 10 hemarthrosis was higher in hemophilia B (P<0.0001). World Federation of Hemophilia (36.6 vs. 20.2; P<0.0001) and ultrasound (10.9 vs. 4.3; P<0.0001) score mean values were significantly higher in hemophilia A patients. Serum osteoprotegerin and soluble RANK ligand were decreased in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B (P<0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively). Osteoprotegerin expression was markedly reduced in synovial tissue from hemophilia A patients. In conclusion, the reduced number of hemarthrosis, the lower World Federation of Hemophilia and ultrasound scores, and higher osteoprotegerin expression in serum and synovial tissue in hemophilia B suggest that hemophilia B is a less severe disease than hemophilia A. Osteoprotegerin reduction seems to play a pivotal role in the progression of arthropathy in hemophilia A. PMID:26494839

  14. Clinical, instrumental, serological and histological findings suggest that hemophilia B may be less severe than hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Linari, Silvia; Manetti, Mirko; Romano, Eloisa; Sofi, Francesco; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patients with severe hemophilia B may have a less severe disease compared to severe hemophilia A. To investigate clinical, radiological, laboratory and histological differences in the arthropathy of severe hemophilia A and hemophilia B, 70 patients with hemophilia A and 35 with hemophilia B with at least one joint bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Joint bleedings (<10, 10-50, >50), regimen of treatment (prophylaxis/on demand), World Federation of Hemophilia, Pettersson and ultrasound scores, serum soluble RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin were assessed in all patients. RANK, RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin expression was evaluated in synovial tissue from 18 hemophilia A and 4 hemophilia B patients. The percentage of patients with either 10-50 or more than 50 hemarthrosis was greater in hemophilia A than in hemophilia B (P<0.001 and P=0.03, respectively), while that with less than 10 hemarthrosis was higher in hemophilia B (P<0.0001). World Federation of Hemophilia (36.6 vs. 20.2; P<0.0001) and ultrasound (10.9 vs. 4.3; P<0.0001) score mean values were significantly higher in hemophilia A patients. Serum osteoprotegerin and soluble RANK ligand were decreased in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B (P<0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively). Osteoprotegerin expression was markedly reduced in synovial tissue from hemophilia A patients. In conclusion, the reduced number of hemarthrosis, the lower World Federation of Hemophilia and ultrasound scores, and higher osteoprotegerin expression in serum and synovial tissue in hemophilia B suggest that hemophilia B is a less severe disease than hemophilia A. Osteoprotegerin reduction seems to play a pivotal role in the progression of arthropathy in hemophilia A.

  15. Consideration in hemophilia therapy selection.

    PubMed

    Pipe, Steven

    2006-04-01

    The risk of pathogen transmission via clotting factor therapies has been reduced over the last two decades through the development of effective and progressively more sensitive pathogen screening and inactivation methods and the introduction of recombinant clotting factors for hemophilia, beginning with recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) in 1992. However, new understanding about the potential for transmission of an emerging infectious agent through blood and blood products has renewed concerns about vulnerabilities that remain in plasma-derived and some recombinant clotting therapies that still use plasma components during some stages of the manufacturing process. In the 1980s, patients with hemophilia became "canaries in the coal mine" for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the blood supply. Moving forward, healthcare providers must continue to take a proactive role in educating themselves about new information regarding emerging pathogens and develop approaches to discussing this risk with their patients as part of their therapy selection process.

  16. Hemophilia home treatment. Economic analysis and implications for health policy.

    PubMed

    Ross-Degnan, D; Soumerai, S B; Avorn, J; Bohn, R L; Bright, R; Aledort, L M

    1995-01-01

    This analysis describes the development of technology for home self-infusion of factor VII in the treatment of hemophilia and its clinical, economic, and social consequences, and uses the case study of such home care treatment to illustrate the potentials and pitfalls of formal economic analyses of programs to treat chronically ill children. A comprehensive review of all original data on hemophilia programs, their related costs, and outcomes, conducted from 1966 through 1993, examined the economic outcomes for two hypothetical cohorts, one aged 0-4 years and the other aged 30-34 years. Including the measurement of treatment effects on the productivity of parental caregivers substantially increases the benefit-cost relationship of an intervention directed at chronically ill children. Increased economic productivity and societal return resulting from such a program for young adults exceeds those for a cohort of children, primarily due to assumptions related to discounting. However, estimation of quality-adjusted life years favors the younger age cohort, since children survive for a longer period of time and with each year survived comes a higher quality of life. Unlike simpler instances in which economic benefits can be shown to outweigh resource costs, policy decisions concerning services for chronically ill children raise an additional set of complex analytic issues. Inclusion of the benefits in productivity experienced by family caregivers provides an important added dimension to such analyses. The development of cost-benefit or cost-effectiveness analyses of these programs illustrates the importance of careful measurement of outcomes and explicit statements of underlying assumptions. Such an analysis of home care for children with hemophilia therefore demonstrates both the strengths and the limitations of this approach.

  17. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell-directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV.

  18. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV. PMID:26909355

  19. Engineering Factor Viii for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sean A.; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni A.; Moore, Andrea R.; Sang, Nianli; Xiao, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A by intravenous infusion of factor VIII (fVIII) concentrates is very costly and has a potential adverse effect of developing inhibitors. Gene therapy, on the other hand, can potentially overcome these limitations associated with fVIII replacement therapy. Although hemophilia B gene therapy has achieved promising outcomes in human clinical trials, hemophilia A gene therapy lags far behind. Compared to factor IX, fVIII is a large protein which is difficult to express at sustaining therapeutic levels when delivered by either viral or non-viral vectors. To improve fVIII gene delivery, numerous strategies have been exploited to engineer the fVIII molecule and overcome the hurdles preventing long term and high level expression. Here we reviewed these strategies, and discussed their pros and cons in human gene therapy of hemophilia A. PMID:23565342

  20. The next generation of hemophilia treatment specialists.

    PubMed

    Berntorp, Erik; Gomperts, Edward; Hoots, Keith; Wong, Wing-Yen

    2006-06-01

    We currently are witnessing a serious attrition of physicians specializing in hemophilia treatment in Europe and the United States while most physicians who complete training in hematology-oncology choose oncology practice as their career. Nevertheless, recent therapeutic developments, including advances in prophylaxis and inhibitor management, have renewed the demand for experts in hemophilia and related disorders. To meet this demand, several specialty training programs have been developed in the United States and Europe, specifically the International Course in Hemophilia in Malmö, Sweden, the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles International Pediatric Hemostasis and Thrombosis Program, and the Baxter/National Hemophilia Foundation Fellowship Programs. The purpose of these programs is to enhance the clinical expertise and further the professional development of individuals dedicated to treating patients with coagulation disorders.

  1. Recent progress in gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Marinee K; Nair, Nisha; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders caused by deficiencies in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively. Current treatment for hemophilia involves intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. However, this does not constitute a cure, and the development of gene-based therapies for hemophilia to achieve prolonged high level expression of clotting factors to correct the bleeding diathesis are warranted. Different types of viral and nonviral gene delivery systems and a wide range of different target cells, including hepatocytes, skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and endothelial cells, have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based and lentiviral vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. Stable correction of the bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia A and B was achieved in murine and canine models, and these promising preclinical studies prompted clinical trials in patients suffering from severe hemophilia. These studies recently resulted in the first demonstration that long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels could be achieved in patients undergoing gene therapy. Despite this progress, there are still a number of hurdles that need to be overcome. In particular, the FIX levels obtained were insufficient to prevent bleeding induced by trauma or injury. Moreover, the gene-modified cells in these patients can become potential targets for immune destruction by effector T cells, specific for the AAV vector antigens. Consequently, more efficacious approaches are needed to achieve full hemostatic correction and to ultimately establish a cure for hemophilia A and B.

  2. ED visits by males with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Rachelle; Hoffman, Richard; Hammond, Lucinda

    2002-03-01

    Hemophilia is a rare disorder affecting 1 in 5,000 males. Because hemophilia-associated hemorrhage may occur at anytime, affected males frequently seek care in the ED. We studied the epidemiology of ED visits by males with hemophilia. The medical records of all identified Coloradan males with hemophilia who sought care in Colorado EDs in 1998 were reviewed. Fifty-one males with hemophilia had a total of 125 ED visits; hemorrhage accounted for 64.8% of visits (95% CI=55.6, 73.1). On 13.0% (95% CI=6.4, 22.6) of visits for hemorrhage, treatment was warranted, but not given. On 12.3% (95% CI=5.5, 22.8) of visits when treatment was given, there were errors in product choice or dose. Documentation of factor concentrate brand and lot number was present for just 13.9% (95% CI=6.5, 24.7) and 24.6% (95% CI=14.8, 36.9) of visits, respectively. There is substantial room for improvement in the prescribing practices and documentation related to hemophilia care in the ED. Available resources should be utilized by ED physicians. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.)

  3. Treatment of hemophilia in the near future.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, Flora; Garagiola, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Advancements and debacles have characterized hemophilia treatment over the past 50 years. The 1970s saw the availability of plasma-derived concentrates making prophylaxis and home therapy possible. This optimistic perception changed extremely in the early 1980s, when most people with hemophilia were infected with HIV and hepatitis viruses. Then, also in the 1980s, the rapid progress in molecular biology led to the development of recombinant therapeutic products. This important advancement was a huge technological leap fresh off from the earlier 1980s disaster. Now in the 21st century, the newer bioengineering drugs open a new hopeful phase for the management of hemophilia. The current efforts are concentrated on producing novel coagulation factors with prolonged bioavailability, increased potency, and resistance to inactivation and potentially reduced immunogenicity; this phase of evolution is improving very quickly. 2014 is the year of marketing approval by the Food and Drug Administration of the first bioengineered FVIII and FIX long-acting drugs, using Fc-fusion strategy. This represents the first significant advance in the hemophilia therapy that dramatically transforms patient management by substantially reducing the frequency of injections, improving compliance, and simplifying prophylaxis and, in turn, refining the quality of life of hemophilia patients, offering them a nearly normal life expectancy, particularly to newborns with hemophilia B.

  4. New approaches to gene and cell therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, T; Mizukami, H; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y; Nishimura, S

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia is considered suitable for gene therapy because it is caused by a single gene abnormality, and therapeutic coagulation factor levels may vary across a broad range. Recent success of hemophilia B gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in a clinical trial showed the real prospect that, through gene therapy, a cure for hemophilia may become a reality. However, AAV-mediated gene therapy is not applicable to patients with hemophilia A at present, and neutralizing antibodies against AAV reduce the efficacy of AAV-mediated strategies. Because patients that benefit from AAV treatment (hemophilia B without neutralizing antibodies) are estimated to represent only 15% of total patients with hemophilia, the development of basic technologies for hemophilia A and those that result in higher therapeutic effects are critical. In this review, we present an outline of gene therapy methods for hemophilia, including the transition of technical developments thus far and our novel techniques.

  5. Defining the impact of hemophilia: the Academic Achievement in Children with Hemophilia Study.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, A D; Donfield, S M; Lynn, H S; Cool, V A; Stehbens, J A; Hunsberger, S L; Tonetta, S; Gomperts, E D

    2001-12-01

    We characterized a population-based cohort of school-aged children with severe hemophilia with respect to type of treatment, on-demand versus prophylaxis, and frequency of bleeding episodes in the year before enrollment. We also investigated the association between hemophilia-related morbidity, measured by number of bleeding episodes in the year before enrollment, and academic performance after adjustment for other factors known to have an effect on achievement. Finally, we explored the mechanisms for the association between bleeding episodes and academic achievement. This study was a multicenter investigation of boys 6 to 12 years old with severe factor VIII deficiency (clotting factor level <2%) receiving care in US hemophilia treatment centers. Children with a history of inhibitor, severe developmental disorder, significant psychiatric disorder, or insufficient fluency in English were excluded from the study. On-demand treatment was defined as administration of clotting factor on the occurrence of a bleeding episode. Prophylactic therapy was defined as a course of regular infusions for >2 months with a goal of preventing bleeding episodes. Academic achievement was measured by the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test. Quality of life was measured by the Child Health Questionnaire. Of particular interest was the Physical Summary (PhS) measure of the Child Health Questionnaire. The type of information captured by the PhS includes limitations in physical activity, limitations in the kind or amount of schoolwork or social activities the child engaged in, and presence of pain or discomfort. One hundred thirty-one children were enrolled, a median center recruitment rate of 77%. The mean age of the participants was 9.6 years, and approximately half of the participants had completed less than the fourth grade at the time of enrollment. Sixty-two percent of the children were on prophylaxis at enrollment, and 9% had previously been on prophylaxis but were currently on on

  6. The Experience of Children with Hemophilia and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Children with hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are not a transmission risk to other children, and they can help enact best practices for school attendance by other such children. The article examines the National Hemophilia Foundation's work to promote appropriate inclusion of students with hemophilia and HIV in all…

  7. The Hemophilia Games: An Experiment in Health Education Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The Hemophilia Health Education Planning Project was designed to (1) create a set of tools useful in hemophilia planning and education, and (2) create a planning model for other diseases with similar factors. The project used the game-simulations technique which was felt to be particularly applicable to hemophilia health problems, since as a…

  8. The Experience of Children with Hemophilia and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Children with hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are not a transmission risk to other children, and they can help enact best practices for school attendance by other such children. The article examines the National Hemophilia Foundation's work to promote appropriate inclusion of students with hemophilia and HIV in all…

  9. Coronary surgery in an old patient with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Babapoursaatlou, Behzad

    2015-02-01

    Patients with hemophilia because of limited lifespan rarely undergo cardiac surgery. Due to improved healthcare and management in these patients, the life expectancy is increasing. Nevertheless, surgical intervention is a new challenge in patients with hemophilia, particularly very old patients. We describe an old patient with hemophilia A, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting.

  10. Alternative Strategies for Gene Therapy of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Robert R.; Shi, Qizhen

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are monogenic disorders that were felt to be ideal targets for initiation of gene therapy. Although the first hemophilia gene therapy trial has been over 10 years ago, few trials are currently actively recruiting. Although preclinical studies in animals were promising, levels achieved in humans did not achieve long-term expression at adequate levels to achieve cures. Transplantation as a source of cellular replacement therapy for both hemophilia A and B have been successful following liver transplantation in which the recipient produces normal levels of either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX). Most of these transplants have been conducted for the treatment of liver failure rather than for “curing” hemophilia. There are a variety of new strategies for delivering the missing clotting factor through ectopic expression of the deficient protein. One approach uses hematopoietic stem cells using either a nonspecific promoter or using a lineage-specific promoter. An alternative strategy includes enhanced expression in endothelial cells or blood-outgrowth endothelial cells. An additional approach includes the expression of FVIII or FIX intraarticularly to mitigate the intraarticular bleeding that causes much of the disability for hemophilia patients. Because activated factor VII (FVIIa) can be used to treat patients with inhibitory antibodies to replacement clotting factors, preclinical gene therapy has been performed using platelet- or liver-targeted FVIIa expression. All of these newer approaches are just beginning to be explored in large animal models. Whereas improved recombinant replacement products continue to be the hallmark of hemophilia therapy, the frequency of replacement therapy is beginning to be addressed through longer-acting replacement products. A safe cure of hemophilia is still the desired goal, but many barriers must still be overcome. PMID:21239794

  11. Clinical and laboratory approaches to hemophilia a.

    PubMed

    Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Hemophilia A is a worldwide disorder of coagulation system. It is a male disorder, yet females with hemophilia are rarely seen in communities with high rate of consanguineous marriages. The abnormalities in factor VIII gene transfer as an X-linked pattern in the family, affects as many as one-third of patients who had no family history of abnormality and thus the occurrence of a sporadic mutation could be documented. Hemorrhagic symptoms usually correlate with the plasma level of factor VIII and comprise a wide range of hemorrhagic pictures, including from fatal spontaneous bleeding in the brain to ecchymosis of the skin. The coagulation study needs to differentiate between the two types of hemophilia A and B as well as the categorization of the disease severity. In the developing countries, due to limitations in diagnostic hemostasis facilities and a scant number of experts in the field, it is estimated that noticeable numbers of undiagnosed patients with hemophilia A exist. Occasionally, we encounter undiagnosed cases by general physicians while having hemorrhagic symptoms. The purpose of this review is to recap clinical and diagnostic parameters, pitfalls, and interpretation of coagulation assay in hemophilia A. A literature review was done in PubMed and Scopus medical search engines using the keywords "Hemophilia" and "Haemophilia". A time limitation for the publication beyond 1995 and publication in the English language were considered. A total of 94 original articles and chapters of books was selected for the current review. Additionally, a comprehensive and up-to-date information on the clinical and laboratory features for the diagnosis of hemophilia is also presented.

  12. Alternative strategies for gene therapy of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert R; Shi, Qizhen

    2010-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are monogenic disorders that were felt to be ideal targets for initiation of gene therapy. Although the first hemophilia gene therapy trial has been over 10 years ago, few trials are currently actively recruiting. Although preclinical studies in animals were promising, levels achieved in humans did not achieve long-term expression at adequate levels to achieve cures. Transplantation as a source of cellular replacement therapy for both hemophilia A and B have been successful following liver transplantation in which the recipient produces normal levels of either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX). Most of these transplants have been conducted for the treatment of liver failure rather than for "curing" hemophilia. There are a variety of new strategies for delivering the missing clotting factor through ectopic expression of the deficient protein. One approach uses hematopoietic stem cells using either a nonspecific promoter or using a lineage-specific promoter. An alternative strategy includes enhanced expression in endothelial cells or blood-outgrowth endothelial cells. An additional approach includes the expression of FVIII or FIX intraarticularly to mitigate the intraarticular bleeding that causes much of the disability for hemophilia patients. Because activated factor VII (FVIIa) can be used to treat patients with inhibitory antibodies to replacement clotting factors, preclinical gene therapy has been performed using platelet- or liver-targeted FVIIa expression. All of these newer approaches are just beginning to be explored in large animal models. Whereas improved recombinant replacement products continue to be the hallmark of hemophilia therapy, the frequency of replacement therapy is beginning to be addressed through longer-acting replacement products. A safe cure of hemophilia is still the desired goal, but many barriers must still be overcome.

  13. Hemophilia A: Dental considerations and management

    PubMed Central

    Shastry, Shilpa Padar; Kaul, Rachna; Baroudi, Kusai; Umar, Dilshad

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To review hemophilia A with emphasis on its oral manifestations, investigations, and dental management. Materials and Methods: Search was conducted using internet-based search engines, scholarly bibliographic databases, PubMed, and Medline with key words such as “Hemophilia A,” “factor VIII,” “bleeding and clotting disorders,” and “dental management.” Results: Hemophilia comprises a group of hereditary disorders caused due to the deficiency of one or more clotting factors leading to prolonged clotting time and excessive bleeding tendencies. It is broadly divided into hemophilia A, B, and C, which occur due to deficiency of factor VIII, IX, and XI, respectively. Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive hereditary disorder and is the most common of the three, accounting for 80–85% of the cases. Conclusion: Understanding this complex entity is very important for a dentist to provide appropriate dental treatment and avoid undesirable consequences. PMID:25625071

  14. Targeting activated protein C to treat hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Polderdijk, Stéphanie G.I.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Huntington, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Hemophilia is a debilitating disease, marked by frequent, painful bleeding events, joint deterioration and early death. All current treatments consist of i.v. infusions of replacement factor or other procoagulant factors, and are incompletely effective, due in part to the short half-lives of the proteins. An alternative approach is to rebalance hemostasis by inhibiting natural anticoagulant mechanisms. In this article, we explain why activated protein C (APC) is an appropriate and safe target for the treatment of hemophilia. Recent findings A serpin (serine protease inhibitor) was engineered to specifically inhibit APC and was found to rescue hemostasis in a hemophilia mouse model, even after a severe tail clip injury. However, APC is also anti-inflammatory and has cytoprotective activities, raising safety concerns over the use of an APC inhibitor to treat hemophilia. We summarize the molecular basis of the anticoagulant and signaling activities of APC to assess the potential impact of targeting APC. Summary We conclude that the signaling and anticoagulant functions of APC are in spatially and kinetically distinct compartments, and that it is possible to specifically inhibit the anticoagulant activity of APC. Targeting APC with a serpin is remarkably effective and may be safe for long-term prophylactic use in the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:28632502

  15. Nonneutralizing antibodies against factor VIII and risk of inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Antonino; Valsecchi, Carla; Garagiola, Isabella; Palla, Roberta; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Rosendaal, Frits R; Peyvandi, Flora

    2017-03-09

    The development of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) is the major complication in hemophilia A. Nonneutralizing antibodies (NNAs) have been detected in hemophilia patients and also in unaffected individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of NNAs and to evaluate whether their presence is associated with the development of inhibitors in a cohort of previously untreated or minimally treated patients with hemophilia A; plasma samples of 237 patients with severe hemophilia A enrolled in the SIPPET trial were collected before any exposure to FVIII concentrates and analyzed for the presence of anti-FVIII NNAs. Patients were observed for the development of neutralizing antibodies. NNAs were found in 18 (7.6%) of 237 patients at screening, and there was a clear age gradient. Of those with NNAs, 7 patients subsequently developed an inhibitor for a cumulative incidence of 45.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.5% to 71.3%); among the 219 patients without NNAs, 64 (29%) developed an inhibitor (cumulative incidence, 34.0%; 95% CI, 27.1%-40.9%). In Cox regression analyses, patients with NNAs at screening had an 83% higher incidence of inhibitor development than patients without NNAs (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 0.84-3.99). For high-titer inhibitors, the incidence rate had an almost threefold increase (HR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.23-6.12). These associations did not materially change after adjustment. The presence of anti-FVIII NNAs in patients with severe hemophilia A who were not previously exposed to FVIII concentrates is associated with an increased incidence of inhibitors. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. AAV-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2003-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia has been contemplated since the coagulation Factor genes responsible for the disease were cloned 20 years ago. Multiple approaches towards the delivery of Factors VIII or IX, the defective genes in the most common forms of hemophilia, have resulted in positive results in animals, and largely equivocal results in human clinical testing. Use of vectors based on adeno-associated virus has led to robust and sustained cures in hemophilic mice and dogs, and intriguing preliminary results in small or ongoing clinical trials. As more clinical experience is gained, solving delivery issues will be of paramount importance and will lead to more clinical success. This success will permit hemophilia to be cured following a single injection of the normal gene.

  17. Clinical and Laboratory Approaches to Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a worldwide disorder of coagulation system. It is a male disorder, yet females with hemophilia are rarely seen in communities with high rate of consanguineous marriages. The abnormalities in factor VIII gene transfer as an X-linked pattern in the family, affects as many as one-third of patients who had no family history of abnormality and thus the occurrence of a sporadic mutation could be documented. Hemorrhagic symptoms usually correlate with the plasma level of factor VIII and comprise a wide range of hemorrhagic pictures, including from fatal spontaneous bleeding in the brain to ecchymosis of the skin. The coagulation study needs to differentiate between the two types of hemophilia A and B as well as the categorization of the disease severity. In the developing countries, due to limitations in diagnostic hemostasis facilities and a scant number of experts in the field, it is estimated that noticeable numbers of undiagnosed patients with hemophilia A exist. Occasionally, we encounter undiagnosed cases by general physicians while having hemorrhagic symptoms. The purpose of this review is to recap clinical and diagnostic parameters, pitfalls, and interpretation of coagulation assay in hemophilia A. A literature review was done in PubMed and Scopus medical search engines using the keywords “Hemophilia” and “Haemophilia”. A time limitation for the publication beyond 1995 and publication in the English language were considered. A total of 94 original articles and chapters of books was selected for the current review. Additionally, a comprehensive and up-to-date information on the clinical and laboratory features for the diagnosis of hemophilia is also presented. PMID:25999618

  18. AIDS and hemophilia: experience in the La Paz Hemophilia Center.

    PubMed

    Magallón Martínez, M; Ortega, F; Pinilla, J

    1992-01-01

    435 hemophiliacs are usually being attended in the La Paz hemophilia Center (Madrid, Spain). 257 (59%) of these patients have been infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) because of human plasma derivate substitution therapy. The infection has been more frequent among the severely affected patients and among the most treated patients. 82% of the infected patients are between 14 and 40 years old. By December 1991, 95 (37%) of 257 seropositive patients have developed full-blown AIDS. The most frequent opportunistic infection they had suffered was esophageal candidiasis. Looking for an evolution marker, we can point that the patients older than 35 years with CD4 levels below 200/mm3 had the worst prognosis. There was no difference in the evolution among the patients aged below 17 and those aged between 17 and 35 years. The amount of concentrate used between 1980 and 1984 did not hold any relation to the evolution. 49 patients (51%) of the 95 suffering from AIDS had died by December 1991. The evolution to the death was unrelated to the patient age, CD4 lymphocyte levels, and amount of substitution therapy. In our opinion, the most valuable marker could be the kind of opportunistic infection or tumor the patient suffers from. Finally, Retrovir has demonstrated to be useful in increasing the survival rate of the patients, but after 36 months of treatment, only 33% of those AIDS patients who began taking it remained alive. Retrovir was also used in asymptomatic patients, and during an average period of time of 15 months, a lesser bone marrow toxicity and a stabilization in CD4 lymphocyte levels could be observed, but this was unable to modify the disease progression in those patients who presented circulating p24 antigen.

  19. Impact of mild to severe hemophilia on education and work by US men, women, and caregivers of children with hemophilia B: The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Susan; Molter, Don; Dunn, Spencer; Hunter, Susan; Peltier, Skye; Haugstad, Kimberly; Frick, Neil; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2017-04-01

    The psychosocial impact of hemophilia on work was recently investigated in the Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) study. The findings revealed that hemophilia had an impact for adults with moderate/severe hemophilia and caregivers of children with hemophilia. HERO did not specifically evaluate impact on education in adults/children with mild/moderate hemophilia or the impact on employment of spouses/partners of caregivers of affected children. The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study evaluated the impact of hemophilia on the lives of adult men/women with mild-severe hemophilia B and caregivers of boys/girls with hemophilia B and their spouses/partners. Many adults with hemophilia B (94%) reported that hemophilia had a negative effect on their ability to complete a formal education, often attributed to the inability to attend or concentrate in school as a result of hemophilia-related bleeding or pain. Most adults with hemophilia B (95%) and caregivers/partners (89%/84%) indicated that hemophilia had a negative impact on employment. Most adults with hemophilia were employed (81%), with construction/manufacturing (35%) as the most frequently reported industry; many worked in jobs requiring manual labor (39%). Of those unemployed, 62% never worked, and those who stopped working reported that they left the workforce due to financial issues (59%), including insurance coverage/co-pays, or hemophilia-related issues (55%). Nearly one-third of caregivers voluntarily left the workforce to care for children with hemophilia. These results suggest a need to focus more effort on career counseling for adults with hemophilia B and caregivers of affected children, especially around mild/moderate hemophilia, as this population may not be as well informed regarding potential impact in school and the workplace.

  20. Hemophilia: The Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damiano, Mary Lou; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Care of the school student with hemophilia requires a cooperative effort by the health care team. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for the team, whose members include a hematologist, orthopedist, oral surgeon, geneticist, physical therapist, social worker, and school nurse. (JD)

  1. Bruising and Hemophilia: Accident or Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles F.; Coury, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Two case histories illustrate the difficulty in evaluating abuse/neglect in children with bleeding problems such as hemophilia. Discussed are guidelines for diagnosis and prevention of abuse, including: screening techniques, the need for protection from environmental trauma, parental stress, evaluation of parents' disciplinary methods, and the…

  2. A natural choice for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-03-05

    In this issue of Blood, Crudele et al describe a novel study of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy that induced immune tolerance to factor IX (FIX) in a hemophilia B (HB) dog with previously formed anti-FIX inhibitor antibodies (IAs).

  3. Hemophilia: The Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damiano, Mary Lou; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Care of the school student with hemophilia requires a cooperative effort by the health care team. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for the team, whose members include a hematologist, orthopedist, oral surgeon, geneticist, physical therapist, social worker, and school nurse. (JD)

  4. Bruising and Hemophilia: Accident or Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles F.; Coury, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Two case histories illustrate the difficulty in evaluating abuse/neglect in children with bleeding problems such as hemophilia. Discussed are guidelines for diagnosis and prevention of abuse, including: screening techniques, the need for protection from environmental trauma, parental stress, evaluation of parents' disciplinary methods, and the…

  5. Replacing bad (F)actors: hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B; Spencer, H Trent

    2014-12-05

    Hemophilia A and B are bleeding disorders that result from functional deficiencies in specific circulating blood clotting factors termed factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively, and collectively display an incidence of 1 in 4000 male births. Stem cell transplantation therapies hold the promise of providing a cure for hemophilia, but currently available transplantable stem cell products do not confer endogenous FIX or FVIII biosynthesis. For this reason, stem cell-based approaches for hemophilia have focused primarily on genetic engineering of pluripotent or multipotent stem cells. While pluripotent stem cells have been branded with high expectation and promise, they remain poorly characterized in terms of clinical utility and safety. In contrast, adult-lineage-restricted stem cells are established agents in the clinical armamentarium. Of the clinically established stem cell types, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most utilized and represent the standard of care for several genetic and acquired diseases. Furthermore, HSCs are ideal cellular vehicles for gene therapy applications because they self-renew, repopulate the entire blood lineage while concurrently amplifying the transgene copy number >10(6) fold, and also have direct access to the bloodstream. Current research on HSC transplantation gene therapy approaches for hemophilia A and B is focused on the following: (1) identification of safe and efficient methods of nucleic acid transfer, (2) optimization of transgene product expression, (3) minimization of conditioning-regimen-related toxicity while maintaining HSC engraftment, and (4) overcoming preexisting immunity. Based on the existing data and current rate of progress, clinical trials of HSC transplantation gene therapy for hemophilia are predicted to begin in the coming years. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  6. Animal Models of Hemophilia and Related Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lozier, Jay N.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of hemophilia and related diseases are important for development of novel treatments and to understand the pathophysiology of bleeding disorders in humans. Testing in animals with the equivalent human disorder provides informed estimates of doses and measures of efficacy, which aids in design of human trials. Many models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease have been developed from animals with spontaneous mutations (hemophilia A dogs, rats, sheep; hemophilia B dogs; and von Willebrand disease pigs and dogs), or by targeted gene disruption in mice to create hemophilia A, B, or VWD models. Animal models have been used to generate new insights into the pathophysiology of each bleeding disorder and also to perform pre-clinical assessments of standard protein replacement therapies as well as novel gene transfer technology. Both the differences between species and differences in underlying causative mutations must be considered in choosing the best animal for a specific scientific study PMID:23956467

  7. Hemophilia: What the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie Ann

    2016-11-01

    Hemophilia will be encountered in the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's office. A thorough understanding of hemophilia is necessary to safely care for these patients. One must understand the severity of the patient's hemophilia as well as whether or not inhibitors are present. The patient's surgical management will be influenced by these two factors. In addition to the possible need to transfuse factors or desmopressin, special care must be taken perioperatively to avoid bleeding complications. This article reviews the overall management of hemophilia A and B as well as the specific perioperative management of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonviral gene therapy approaches to hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vargas, Andrew; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2004-04-01

    The goal of hemophilia gene therapy is to obtain long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) without stimulating an immune response against the transgene product or the vector. The success of gene therapy is largely dependent on the development of appropriate gene delivery vectors. Both viral vectors and nonviral vectors have been considered for the development of hemophilia gene therapy. In general, viral vectors are far more efficient than nonviral gene delivery approaches and resulted in long-term therapeutic levels of FVIII or FIX in preclinical animal models. However, there are several reasons why a nonviral treatment would still be desirable, particularly because some viral vectors are associated with inflammatory reactions, that render transgene expression transient, or with an increased risk of insertional oncogenesis when random integrating vectors are used. Nonviral vectors may obviate some of these concerns. Since nonviral vectors are typically assembled in cell-free systems from well-defined components, they have significant manufacturing advantages over viral vectors. The continued development of improved nonviral gene delivery approaches offers new perspectives for gene therapy of chronic diseases including hemophilia.

  9. Impact of mild to severe hemophilia on engagement in recreational activities by US men, women, and children with hemophilia B: The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Kimberly; Hernandez, Grace; Witkop, Michelle; Peltier, Skye; Dunn, Spencer; Cutter, Susan; Frick, Neil; Haugstad, Kimberly; Guelcher, Christine; Frey, Mary Jane; Rotellini, Dawn; Clark, David B; Iyer, Neeraj N; Cooper, David L

    2017-04-01

    The psychosocial impact of hemophilia on activities was recently investigated in the Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) study (675 people with hemophilia and 561 caregivers of children with hemophilia in 10 countries). The impact of hemophilia B may not be accurately reflected in the HERO results, as ~75% of respondents described issues affecting males with hemophilia A. To address the needs of this population, the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities Into Solutions (B-HERO-S) was developed as a pilot study in the United States in collaboration with the hemophilia community. The analysis reported here assessed engagement in recreational activities and changes to treatment regimens around activities as reported by 299 adults with hemophilia B and 150 caregivers of children with hemophilia B. Nearly all adults with hemophilia B (98%) experienced a negative impact on their participation in recreational activities due to hemophilia-related issues, and most caregivers (90%) reported that hemophilia B had a negative impact on their child's engagement in recreational activities. One of the main reasons identified for discontinuing past activities was the risk of bruising or bleeding (adults/children with hemophilia B, 49%/41%). In particular, adults with hemophilia B reported a history of activity-related bleeding, and most adults decreased their participation in high-risk activities as they aged. Substantial percentages of adults and children with hemophilia B (including mild/moderate severity) altered their treatment regimens to accommodate planned activities. These findings may help inform guidelines for individualizing treatment regimens around participation in recreational activities based on hemophilia severity, baseline factor level, and activity risk and intensity.

  10. Current animal models of hemophilia: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ching-Tzu; Fan, Meng-Ni; Yang, Yung-Li; Chou, Sheng-Chieh; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is the most well-known hereditary bleeding disorder, with an incidence of one in every 5000 to 30,000 males worldwide. The disease is treated by infusion of protein products on demand and as prophylaxis. Although these therapies have been very successful, some challenging and unresolved tasks remain, such as reducing bleeding rates, presence of target joints and/or established joint damage, eliminating the development of inhibitors, and increasing the success rate of immune-tolerance induction (ITI). Many preclinical trials are carried out on animal models for hemophilia generated by the hemophilia research community, which in turn enable prospective clinical trials aiming to tackle these challenges. Suitable animal models are needed for greater advances in treating hemophilia, such as the development of better models for evaluation of the efficacy and safety of long-acting products, more powerful gene therapy vectors than are currently available, and successful ITI strategies. Mice, dogs, and pigs are the most commonly used animal models for hemophilia. With the advent of the nuclease method for genome editing, namely the CRISPR/Cas9 system, it is now possible to create animal models for hemophilia other than mice in a short period of time. This review presents currently available animal models for hemophilia, and discusses the importance of animal models for the development of better treatment options for hemophilia.

  11. Hemophilia and Sports: Guidelines for Participation. Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLain, Larry G.; Heldrich, Fred T.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a case report of a 15-year-old boy with severe hemophilia who played soccer 1 school year but was denied continued participation following another screening examination. Before deciding about participation, physicians must assess the type and severity of hemophilia and risk factors for injury. Appropriate sports for hemophiliacs are…

  12. The Impact of HIV Infection on the Hemophilia Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    The hemophilia community has been deeply affected by the catastrophe of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The use of blood products that had first restored the potential for normal survival now bring the threat of AIDS infection and fear and discrimination from others. Strong leadership has come from the National Hemophilia Foundation.…

  13. Treatment of hemophilia: A qualitative study of mothers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim

    2017-01-01

    In Norway, boys with hemophilia usually begin treatment after their first bleeding episode. Boys with severe hemophilia usually start prophylactic treatment around 18-24 months. Health professionals administer factor concentrate initially, but when boys are around 4 years old most parents start treating their children at home. There is a lack of research on how parents, and especially how carrier mothers, experience the medical treatment for their sons' hemophilia. Our aim was to investigate how carrier mothers experience this treatment in the hospital setting and at home. In this qualitative study, we interviewed 16 mothers of boys or men with hemophilia A or B. Data were collected via semistructured interviews and analyzed using an inductive thematic analytical approach. Mothers experienced both practical and emotional challenges in relation to their sons' treatment, and repeated venipuncture was especially difficult emotionally. Parents preferred home treatment to hospital treatment because it was less time-consuming, less disruptive to family life, and provided a greater sense of control. Encountering healthcare professionals who were unfamiliar with hemophilia was a second major stress factor, especially when parents felt that health professionals lacked competence and were unwilling to seek advice. While home treatment for hemophilia enables freedom, flexibility, and autonomy for the boys as well as for the family, mothers may experience treatment of hemophilia as a burden. Health professionals should provide tailored practical and emotional support to parents by probing into their experiences with treating their sons' hemophilia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Hemophilia and Sports: Guidelines for Participation. Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLain, Larry G.; Heldrich, Fred T.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a case report of a 15-year-old boy with severe hemophilia who played soccer 1 school year but was denied continued participation following another screening examination. Before deciding about participation, physicians must assess the type and severity of hemophilia and risk factors for injury. Appropriate sports for hemophiliacs are…

  15. The Impact of HIV Infection on the Hemophilia Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    The hemophilia community has been deeply affected by the catastrophe of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The use of blood products that had first restored the potential for normal survival now bring the threat of AIDS infection and fear and discrimination from others. Strong leadership has come from the National Hemophilia Foundation.…

  16. Molecular approaches for improved clotting factors for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jerry S.

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is caused by a functional deficiency of one of the coagulation proteins. Therapy for no other group of genetic diseases has seen the progress that has been made for hemophilia over the past 40 years, from a life expectancy in 1970 of ∼20 years for a boy born with severe hemophilia to essentially a normal life expectancy in 2013 with current prophylaxis therapy. However, these therapies are expensive and require IV infusions 3 to 4 times each week. These are exciting times for hemophilia because several new technologies that promise extended half-lives for factor products, with potential for improvements in quality of life for persons with hemophilia, are in late-phase clinical development. PMID:24065241

  17. Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Marie; Comio, Emilie; Gay, Valerie; Baroudi, Noureddine; Meyer, Pascal; Chuniaud-Louche, Christine; Hacini, Maya; Pica, Gian Matteo

    2016-05-07

    Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A is a rare association. To the best of our knowledge only one case of myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A has been previously described. A 66-year-old Caucasian man diagnosed with myelofibrosis evolving in acute myeloid leukemia was referred to us for postoperative bleeding. Hemostatic studies showed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, decreased factor VIII coagulation, and a high factor VIII inhibitor titer; these findings led to a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A for which he was treated with methylprednisolone and recombinant activated factor VII on admission. Due to a lack of response he was subsequently treated with rituximab combined with activated prothrombin complex concentrates. Furthermore, he received azacytidine to treat the underlying hematological malignancies. Immunosuppressive rituximab therapy resolved acquired hemophilia A with marked efficacy. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, effective hemostatic therapy, and timely treatment for underlying disease are important in the management of acquired hemophilia A secondary to hematological malignancy.

  18. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B: focus on arthropathy and variables affecting bleeding severity and prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M; Sallah, S

    2013-08-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) and hemophilia B (HB) are X-linked, recessive disorders. Although their clinical manifestations are essentially indistinguishable, it has been suggested that bleeding episodes in patients with HA are generally more severe and occur at higher frequency than in patients with HB. Nevertheless, considerable debate remains regarding the relative severity of HA and HB. Based on the relative risk of undergoing joint arthroplasty, it appears that patients with HA have more severe joint deterioration compared with patients with HB. Although it is difficult to speculate on the factors that might modify bleeding severity in patients with hemophilia, recent observations indicate that other coagulation proteins, such as tissue factor pathway inhibitor or polymorphisms in coagulation factor genes and genetic defects associated with hypercoagulability may account for the variability in clinical phenotype among patients with hemophilia. Numerous studies have provided evidence supporting the clinical and social benefits of administration of clotting factor in prophylaxis. However, it is still unclear why this approach is more commonly utilized in patients with HA than in those with HB.

  19. Advances in hemophilia care: report of two symposia at the Hemophilia 2010 World Congress.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Gerry; Cruz, Jussara Almeida; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Kessler, Craig; Haaning, Jesper; Lemm, Georg; Altisent, Carmen; Guerrero, Caesar; Hermans, Cedric; Riske, Brenda; Bolton-Maggs, Paula

    2012-04-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) 2010 World Congress held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in July 2010, attracted more than 4,300 participants from 106 countries. This report summarizes two symposia held during the congress. The first, titled "Emerging Co-Morbidities in the Aging Hemophilia Population: Healthcare Challenges and Treatment Opportunities," chaired by Gerry Dolan, MD, and Jussara Almeida Cruz, MD, examined the co-morbidities experienced by the aging hemophilic patient population, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, hypertension, and obesity. In addition, Bayer's products in preclinical and clinical development were reviewed, including a novel factor VIIa variant and a long-acting factor VIII molecule, i.e., one that has undergone site-specific PEGylation (attachment of polyethylene glycol [PEG] polymer chains to another molecule). The other symposium, titled "Practical Steps to Making Better Care for Hemophilia Patients a Reality," chaired by Carmen Altisent, MD, and Cesar Guerrero, RN, reviewed the steps that hemophilia caregivers can take to improve the care of their patients. Issues such as the treatment of hemarthroses, the role of the research nurse, and the management of pediatric patients transitioning to adulthood were discussed.

  20. Factor VIII-Mimetic Function of Humanized Bispecific Antibody in Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Shima, Midori; Hanabusa, Hideji; Taki, Masashi; Matsushita, Tadashi; Sato, Tetsuji; Fukutake, Katsuyuki; Fukazawa, Naoki; Yoneyama, Koichiro; Yoshida, Hiroki; Nogami, Keiji

    2016-05-26

    In patients with severe hemophilia A, standard treatment is regular prophylactic and episodic intravenous infusions of factor VIII. However, these treatments are burdensome, especially for children, and may lead to the formation of anti-factor VIII alloantibodies (factor VIII inhibitors). Emicizumab (ACE910), a humanized bispecific antibody mimicking the cofactor function of factor VIII, was developed to abate these problems. We enrolled 18 Japanese patients with severe hemophilia A (with or without factor VIII inhibitors) in an open-label, nonrandomized, interindividual dose-escalation study of emicizumab. The patients received subcutaneous emicizumab weekly for 12 weeks at a dose of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg per kilogram of body weight (cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively). The end points were safety and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. An additional, exploratory end point was the annualized bleeding rate, calculated as 365.25 times the number of bleeding episodes, divided by the number of days in the treatment period as compared with the 6 months before enrollment. Emicizumab was associated with neither serious adverse events nor clinically relevant coagulation abnormalities. Plasma concentrations of emicizumab increased in a dose-dependent manner. Activated partial-thromboplastin times remained short throughout the study. The median annualized bleeding rates in cohorts 1, 2, and 3 decreased from 32.5 to 4.4, 18.3 to 0.0, and 15.2 to 0.0, respectively. There was no bleeding in 8 of 11 patients with factor VIII inhibitors (73%) and in 5 of 7 patients without factor VIII inhibitors (71%). Episodic use of clotting factors to control bleeding was reduced. Antibodies to emicizumab did not develop. Once-weekly subcutaneous administration of emicizumab markedly decreased the bleeding rate in patients who had hemophilia A with or without factor VIII inhibitors. (Funded by Chugai Pharmaceutical; JapicCTI number, 121934.).

  1. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals.

  2. Gene therapy for hemophilia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Fogarty, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    After numerous preclinical studies demonstrated consistent success in large and small animal models, gene therapy has finally seen initial signs of clinically meaningful success. In a landmark study, Nathwani and colleagues reported sustained factor (F)IX expression in individuals with severe hemophilia B following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated in vivo FIX gene transfer. As the next possible treatment-changing paradigm in hemophilia care, gene therapy may provide patients with sufficient hemostatic improvement to achieve the World Federation of Hemophilia's aspirational goal of "integration of opportunities in all aspects of life… equivalent to someone without a bleeding disorder." Although promising momentum supports the potential of gene therapy to replace protein-based therapeutics for hemophilia, several obstacles remain. The largest challenges appear to be overcoming the cellular immune responses to the AAV capsid; preexisting AAV neutralizing antibodies, which immediately exclude approximately 50% of the target population; and the ability to scale-up vector manufacturing for widespread applicability. Additional obstacles specific to hemophilia A (HA) include designing a vector cassette to accommodate a larger cDNA; avoiding development of inhibitory antibodies; and, perhaps the greatest difficulty to overcome, ensuring adequate expression efficiency. This review discusses the relevance of gene therapy to the hemophilia disease state, previous research progress, the current landscape of clinical trials, and considerations for promoting the future availability of gene therapy for hemophilia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Emicizumab Prophylaxis in Hemophilia A with Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Johannes; Mahlangu, Johnny N; Kim, Benjamin; Schmitt, Christophe; Callaghan, Michael U; Young, Guy; Santagostino, Elena; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Negrier, Claude; Kessler, Craig; Valente, Nancy; Asikanius, Elina; Levy, Gallia G; Windyga, Jerzy; Shima, Midori

    2017-08-31

    Emicizumab (ACE910) bridges activated factor IX and factor X to restore the function of activated factor VIII, which is deficient in persons with hemophilia A. This phase 3, multicenter trial assessed once-weekly subcutaneous emicizumab prophylaxis in persons with hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors. We enrolled participants who were 12 years of age or older. Those who had previously received episodic treatment with bypassing agents were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to emicizumab prophylaxis (group A) or no prophylaxis (group B). The primary end point was the difference in bleeding rates between group A and group B. Participants who had previously received prophylactic treatment with bypassing agents received emicizumab prophylaxis in group C. A total of 109 male participants with hemophilia A with inhibitors were enrolled. The annualized bleeding rate was 2.9 events (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 5.0) among participants who were randomly assigned to emicizumab prophylaxis (group A, 35 participants) versus 23.3 events (95% CI, 12.3 to 43.9) among those assigned to no prophylaxis (group B, 18 participants), representing a significant difference of 87% in favor of emicizumab prophylaxis (P<0.001). A total of 22 participants in group A (63%) had zero bleeding events, as compared with 1 participant (6%) in group B. Among 24 participants in group C who had participated in a noninterventional study, emicizumab prophylaxis resulted in a bleeding rate that was significantly lower by 79% than the rate with previous bypassing-agent prophylaxis (P<0.001). Overall, 198 adverse events were reported in 103 participants receiving emicizumab prophylaxis; the most frequent events were injection-site reactions (in 15% of participants). Thrombotic microangiopathy and thrombosis were reported in 2 participants each (in the primary analysis) who had received multiple infusions of activated prothrombin complex concentrate for breakthrough bleeding. No antidrug antibodies

  4. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Monahan, P E

    2015-06-01

    Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A), and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently, the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV, are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A) and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population. PMID:26149016

  6. Sporting Activities and Quality of Life in Children With Hemophilia: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Ruben; Torres-Ortuño, Ana; Pérez-Alenda, Sofía; José Carrasco, Juan; Querol, Felipe; Nieto-Munuera, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Sports activities are part of multidisciplinary treatments in people with hemophilia. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of sports activities in the quality of life as perceived by children with hemophilia. A total of 53 children with hemophilia aged 7 to 13 years and 51 children without hemophilia were evaluated. The perception of quality of life, clinical variables, and the frequency of sports activities were registered. The joint condition of patients with hemophilia was measured with the Spanish version of the Haemophilia Joint Health Score. There were no significant differences in the perception of quality of life between children with hemophilia and children without hemophilia. Sports activities in people with hemophilia promoted a greater health satisfaction. Sports activity in children with hemophilia is associated with an improved quality of life and joint health. It is also associated with improved psychosocial wellness.

  7. Factor VIII therapy for hemophilia A: current and future issues.

    PubMed

    Aledort, Louis; Ljung, Rolf; Mann, Kenneth; Pipe, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a congenital, recessive, X-linked bleeding disorder that is managed with infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant factor (F) VIII. The primary considerations in FVIII replacement therapy today are the: 1) immunogenicity of FVIII concentrates, 2) role of longer-acting FVIII products, 3) prophylactic use of FVIII in children and adults with severe hemophilia A, and 4) affordability and availability of FVIII products. Improving patient outcomes by increasing the use of FVIII prophylaxis, preventing or eliminating FVIII inhibitors, and expanding access to FVIII concentrates in developing countries are the major challenges confronting clinicians who care for patients with hemophilia A.

  8. "Camping up" self-esteem in children with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Gaslin, T C

    2001-01-01

    Children with hemophilia have often been viewed at greater risk for altered self-esteem than their healthy counterparts. Our article shares the positive effects of the camp experience on children with hemophilia and subsequent enhancement of self-esteem. Interaction and support in the camp environment provide an opportunity for these children to gain independence and "prove" their self-worth and ability. Previous literature has provided a variety of findings on the relationship between chronic illness, such as hemophilia, and self-esteem alterations. We identify many opportunities for future education and research to provide quality nursing support to this unique population.

  9. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemophilia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... body) Bleeding in the Joints Bleeding in the knees, elbows, or other joints is another common form of internal bleeding in people who have hemophilia. This bleeding can occur without obvious injury. At first, the bleeding causes tightness in the ...

  10. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Gasparović, Hrvoje; Zupancic-Salek, Silva; Brida, Vojtjeh; Dulić, Grgur; Jelić, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by factor VIII deficiency. The basis for insufficient hemostasis lies within inadequate amplification of factor Xa production with the undersupplied factor VIII. We report on a young patient with critical aortic stenosis bearing all the clinical stigmata of severe hemophilia, in whom aortic valve replacement was performed with a tissue valve in order to avoid the need for long term anticoagulation.

  11. Evaluation of Heart Function in Patients With Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Fath, Maedeh; Jooya, Parisa; Karimi, Mehran

    2015-11-04

    There are conflicting reports about the protective effect of hemophilia on the occurrence of ischemic heart disease. This study focuses on evaluation of heart function in patients with hemophilia. Cross-sectional, case-control study was done on all patients with hemophilia A or B who came to hemophilia center, and data were compared to controls. The data were collected from their charts, and heart function was evaluated by 2-dimensional, Doppler and pulse tissue Doppler. The serum troponin I level was measured in all patients as a marker of myocardial damage. Fifty patients with hemophilia took part in this study. All of them were male with mean age 29.1 years. Systolic blood pressure (mean = 121.52 ± 11 vs 115.61 ± 9.81, P = .038) and diastolic (mean = 81.94 ± 4.51 vs 75.21 ± 3.95, P = .042) blood pressure were higher in the patients. Five (10%) patients had systolic hypertension and 7 (14%) patients had diastolic hypertension. The M-mode echocardiography results showed that interventricular septum in diastole in patients with hemophilia (mean 1.143 ± 0.29) was significantly thicker than the control group (mean 0.828 ± 0.22, P < .001). Tissue Doppler echocardiography showed that late diastolic velocity of septum (Aa; P = .030), systolic velocity (S) of lateral mitral valve (P = .006), late diastolic velocity of lateral mitral (Aa) annulus (P = .038), and late velocity of (Aa) tricuspid (P = .004) had significant difference compared with the control group (P < .05). Troponin enzyme level was < 0.1 in all patients. Patients with hemophilia had higher blood pressure and more hypertension. Echocardiographic study of patients with hemophilia showed some increase in septal thickness and changes in diastolic dysfunction.

  12. Virologic and clinical features of primary infection with human parvovirus 4 in subjects with hemophilia: frequent transmission by virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Colin P; Lail, Alice; Donfield, Sharyne; Gomperts, Edward D; Simmonds, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a newly discovered parvovirus prevalent in injecting drug users and other groups with histories of parenteral exposure including persons with hemophilia exposed to non-virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates. To investigate its potential ongoing transmission to persons with hemophilia treated with plasma-derived, virally inactivated clotting factors, we screened a large cohort of persons with hemophilia for antibody seroconversion to PARV4 over a 5-year observation period. Samples from 195 persons with hemophilia enrolled in the Hemophilia Growth and Development Study cohort were screened for PARV4 antibodies at the start and end of a 5-year period of treatment with exclusively virally inactivated clotting factor concentrates. Samples collected at intermediate time points from subjects seroconverting over the study period were screened to narrow down the seroconversion time and investigate immunoglobulin (Ig)M responses, duration of acute viremia, and clinical presentations. PARV4 seroprevalence at the outset of the study was 44%. Over the observation period, nine subjects (seven human immunodeficiency virus positive) seroconverted for anti-PARV4 (incidence, 1.7%/year). Infected subjects showed relatively prolonged durations of viremia (mean, 7 months) and weak, transient IgM responses during acute infections. Clotting factors inactivated by solvent/detergent or by wet or dry heat were infectious. The most common clinical presentations were rashes and exacerbation of hepatitis. This study identifies PARV4 as a transfusion-transmissible agent that is resistant to viral inactivation. Of concern, infections may still regularly occur in those exposed to plasma-derived blood products. Urgent evaluation of the incidence of PARV4 in treated individuals and disease associations of PARV4 infections is required. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. THROMBIN GENERATION AND BLEEDING IN HEMOPHILIA A

    PubMed Central

    Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Whelihan, Matthew F.; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth G.; Rivard, Georges E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A displays phenotypic heterogeneity with respect to clinical severity. Aim To determine if tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation profiles in whole blood in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) are predictive of bleeding risk in hemophilia A. Methods We studied factor(F) VIII deficient individuals (11 mild, 4 moderate and 12 severe) with a well-characterized five-year bleeding history that included hemarthrosis, soft tissue hematoma and annual FVIII concentrate usage. This clinical information was used to generate a bleeding score. The bleeding scores (range 0–32) were separated into three groups (bleeding score groupings: 0, 0 and ≤9.6, >9.6), with the higher bleeding tendency having a higher score. Whole blood collected by phlebotomy and contact pathway suppressed by 100μg/mL CTI was stimulated to react by the addition of 5pM TF. Reactions were quenched at 20min by inhibitors. Thrombin generation, determined by ELISA for thrombin – antithrombin was evaluated in terms of clot time (CT), maximum level (MaxL) and maximum rate (MaxR) and compared to the bleeding score. Results Data are shown as the mean±SD. MaxL was significantly different (p<0.001) between the groups: 504±114nM, 315±117nM, and 194±91nM; with higher thrombin concentrations in the groups with lower bleeding scores. MaxR was higher in the groups with a lower bleeding score; 97±51nM/min, 86±60nM/min and 39±16nM/min (p=0.09). No significant difference was detected in CT among the groups, 5.6±1.3min, 4.7±0.7min, 5.6±1.3min. Conclusions Our empirical study in CTI-inhibited whole blood shows that the MaxL of thrombin generation appears to correlate with the bleeding phenotype of hemophilia A. PMID:19563500

  14. Hemophilia B in a crossbred Maltese dog.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Makoto; Sakai, Manabu; Sakai, Takeo

    2006-11-01

    A crossbred Maltese dog, 6-year-old, male, was presented to us for examination due to coagulopathy. On examination of blood coagulation screening tests, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was markedly prolonged (63.6 sec). Therefore, a defect in the intrinsic pathway of coagulation was suspected. An additional serum test was also examined and APTT was returned to within the normal range. Furthermore, factor IX coagulation activity was markedly low (2.3%). On the basis of these results, the dog was diagnosed with hemophilia B. The dog has since been presented to us because of hemorrhage problems again after 5, 10, and 16 months, but blood transfusions have maintained good control of its coagulopathy for more than two years.

  15. Phase I study of BAY 94-9027, a PEGylated B-domain-deleted recombinant factor VIII with an extended half-life, in subjects with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, T E; Reding, M T; Lin, J C; Michaels, L A; Shah, A; Powell, J

    2014-01-01

    Background BAY 94-9027 is a B-domain-deleted recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) with site-specific attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) that has shown an extended half-life in animal models of hemophilia. Objectives To assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of BAY 94-9027 after single and repeated administration in subjects with severe hemophilia A. Patients/Methods This 8-week, prospective, multicenter, open-label, phase I trial was conducted in 14 subjects aged 21–58 years with FVIII of < 1%, ≥ 150 days of exposure to FVIII, and no history of FVIII inhibitors. After a ≥ 3-day washout, subjects received a single dose of sucrose-formulated rFVIII (rFVIII-FS) (cohort 1 [n = 7], 25 IU kg−1; cohort 2 [n = 7], 50 IU kg−1) for a 48-h pharmacokinetic (PK) study. After another ≥ 3-day washout, cohort 1 received twice-weekly BAY 94-9027 at 25 IU kg−1 (16 doses), and cohort 2 received once-weekly BAY 94-9027 at 60 IU kg−1 (nine doses). A 168-h PK study was performed after the first and last BAY 94-9027 doses. Results BAY 94-9027 showed equivalent recovery and an improved PK profile vs. rFVIII-FS, with a half-life of ∼ 19 h (vs. ∼ 13.0 h for rFVIII-FS). BAY 94-9027 was well tolerated, and no immunogenicity was observed. Conclusions This phase I study demonstrates that BAY 94-9027 has an extended half-life in subjects with hemophilia A and, after multiple dosing, was well tolerated with no immunogenicity during the 8-week trial. A phase III study in a larger number of subjects is underway to fully characterize how this prolonged half-life will permit less frequent prophylaxis dosing for patients with hemophilia. PMID:24843882

  16. [Characteristics and perioperative management of hemophilia patients with fractures].

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Wang, T B; Zhang, P; Dang, Y; Chen, J H; Xue, F; Zhang, P X; Yang, M; Xu, H L; Fu, Z G; Jiang, B G

    2015-04-18

    To investigate the characteristics and perioperative management of hemophilia patients with fracture. Retrospectively, we analyzed 8 patients with hemophilia combined with fracture, who were admittted to our department from 2005 to 2013. Six patients were with hemophilia A and two with hemophilia B; Based on the severity of hemophilia, 2 cases were light, 3 moderate and 3 severe; Based on the location of fracture, 4 cases were femoral neck fractures, 1 femoral intertrochanteric fracture, 1 bilateral distal femur fractures, 1 tibiofibula fracture, and 1 humerus intercondylar fracture. Blood coagulation factor replacement therapy was conducted preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively, All the patients underwent closed or open reduction and internal fixation or joint replacement. Also, we analyzed the perioperative complications and observed whether the fracture healed. The average age was 33.5 years (14 to 47 years); In 6 cases, fractures occurred at femur, accounting for 75% of all the fractures; Femoral neck fracture was treated by closed reduction and hollow screws fixation; Femoral intertrochanteric fracture, distal femur fracture, and tibiofibula fracture were treated by open reduction and internal fixation with plate; Humerus intercondylar fracture was treated by elbow joint replacement. Intraoperative bleeding was from 50 to 600 mL, an average of 262 mL; Perioperatively, the average use of FVIII/activated prothrombin complex concentrates (APCC) was 358 U/kg (125 to 554 U/kg). Postoperatively, poor wound healing was observed in 2 patients, and the condition improved after symptomatic treatment; In patients with internal fixation, all the fractures united, and the average healing time was 14 weeks. No complications such as fixation loosening or rupture occurred after internal fixation. Hemophilia combined with fracture mainly occurred in the young, and the site of fracture was given priority to femur. With perfect preoperative preparation, on the

  17. Joint Health Status of Hemophilia Patients in Jodhpur Region.

    PubMed

    Payal, Vikas; Sharma, Pramod; Chhangani, N P; Janu, Yojana; Singh, Yudhavir; Sharma, Akash

    2015-09-01

    Hemophilia refers to a group of bleeding disorders in which there is a deficiency of one of the factors necessary for coagulation of the blood. Susceptibility to joint hemorrhage in persons with Hemophilia suggests that the routine assessment of joint health is an important aspect of clinical management and outcome studies assessing the efficacy of treatment. This prospective study was conducted to study joint health status in Hemophilia patients and draw their joint disability score by using Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS). Out of total 56 cases 51 (91.07 %) cases were diagnosed as hemophilia A while 5 cases (8.92 %) were diagnosed as hemophilia B. According to their factor level 44 % cases had severe 36 % had moderate and 20 % had mild disease. Knee joint was the predominant joint affected by hemarthrosis in 67.85 % cases followed by ankle joint (51.7 %) elbow joint (35.7 %), hip joint (12.5 %), shoulder joint (5.3 %) and proximal metacarpophalangeal joint (1.78 %).Out of total 37.5 % patients of hemophilia had developed target joint. Knee joint was the predominant target joint in 28.57 % cases and ankle joint was the target joint in 8.92 % cases. Maximum number of patients (40.47 %) had HJHS score of zero. The mean HJHS score was 6.78 ± 9.04. HJHS score showing significant positive correlation with age of patient (p < 0.0001). Most risky period and most aggravating development of hemophilic joint damage starts from 7 years of age. Therefore, treatment decisions, such as starting prophylaxis, should be tailored according to bleeding pattern and age of patients rather than based on the clotting factor activity levels.

  18. Acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom: a 2-year national surveillance study by the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter W; Hirsch, Sybil; Baglin, Trevor P; Dolan, Gerard; Hanley, John; Makris, Michael; Keeling, David M; Liesner, Ri; Brown, Simon A; Hay, Charles R M

    2007-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a severe bleeding disorder caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Previous reports have focused on referral center patients and it is unclear whether these findings are generally applicable. To improve understanding of the disease, a 2-year observational study was established to identify and characterize the presenting features and outcome of all patients with acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom. This allowed a consecutive cohort of patients, unbiased by referral or reporting practice, to be studied. A total of 172 patients with a median age of 78 years were identified, an incidence of 1.48/million/y. The cohort was significantly older than previously reported series, but bleeding manifestations and underlying diseases were similar. Bleeding was the cause of death in 9% of the cohort and remained a risk until the inhibitor had been eradicated. There was no difference in inhibitor eradication or mortality between patients treated with steroids alone and a combination of steroids and cytotoxic agents. Relapse of the inhibitor was observed in 20% of the patients who had attained first complete remission. The data provide the most complete description of acquired hemophilia A available and are applicable to patients presenting to all centers.

  19. Treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impact of hemophilia on young adults (aged 18-30 years) with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Witkop, Michelle; Guelcher, Christine; Forsyth, Angela; Hawk, Sarah; Curtis, Randall; Kelley, Laureen; Frick, Neil; Rice, Michelle; Rosu, Gabriela; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    The Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) initiative assessed psychosocial issues reported by people with moderate to severe hemophilia and was led by a multidisciplinary international advisory board. This analysis reports data from young adult respondents (aged 18-30 years), including both US and overall global (including US respondents) results, and investigates treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impacts of hemophilia on relationships. More young adults in HERO received prophylaxis than on-demand treatment, although a majority reported not using factor products exactly as prescribed, and 50% of global respondents and 26% of US respondents reported issues with access to factor replacement therapy in the previous 5 years. Many young adults with hemophilia reported comorbidities, including bone/skeletal arthritis, chronic pain, and viral infections, and nearly half of young adults reported anxiety/depression. Most reported pain interference with daily activities in the past 4 weeks, although a majority reported participating in lower-risk activities and approximately half in intermediate-risk activities. Most young adults were very or quite satisfied with the support of partners/spouses, family, and friends, although roughly one-third reported that hemophilia affected their ability to develop close relationships with a partner. A majority of young adults reported that hemophilia has had a negative impact on employment, and 62% of global respondents and 78% of US respondents were employed at least part-time. Together these data highlight the psychosocial issues experienced by young adults with hemophilia and suggest that increased focus on these issues may improve comprehensive care during the transition to adulthood.

  20. Practice of Iranian Adolescents with Hemophilia in Prevention of Complications of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Hosseini, Fahimeh Alsadat; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Heidarnezhad, Fatemeh; Jasemi, Madineh; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prerequisite for management of a chronic disease involves knowledge about its complications and their prevention. Hemophilia in adolescents influences all the aspects of their lives and thier performance. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the performance of Iranian hemophilic adolescents in prevention of disease complications. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 108 adolescents with hemophilia were selected through convenience sampling. Their performance in preventing the complications of hemophilia was evaluated by sending a semi-structured questionnaire to their addresses throughout Iran. Then, the data was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software (v. 13) and descriptive and interferential statistics were used. Results: Overall, 32.1% of the participants controlled bleeding during the 1st hour. Inaccessibility of coagulation products was mainly responsible for inhibiting timely and proper bleeding control. In order to relieve bleeding associated pain, only 39.0% of the adolescents used analgesics. On the other hand, 19.8% of the subjects used nonpharmacological methods to relieve pain. The majority of the adolescents did not participate in sport activities (65.4%) others allocated less than 5 hours a week to physical activities (70.5%). In addition, the participants did not have favorable dietary patterns, exercise habits, and dental care. The results showed a significant relationship between the adolescents’ preventive practice with coagulation disorders and utilization of pharmacological pain relief methods. Also, significant relationships were found between severity of the disease; participating in physical activities, number of hours of physical activities; and disease complications. Conclusions: Iranian adolescents did not exhibit favorable practices towards complication prevention. PMID:26600702

  1. Identifying Information Needs Among Children and Teens Living With Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Gretchen M.; Frick, Neil; Wang, Angelina; Miller, Mary Ellen; Fragueiro, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transitioning from one life stage to the next can be difficult, but for those living with a chronic condition, it can be even more challenging. Children and adolescents with hemophilia need help to manage transitions while dealing with the complications of their disorder. The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) headquartered in New York has an extensive information center on bleeding disorders, but it was unclear how much material existed on the topic of transition. Aim The objectives of this project were to (1) assess the availability of literature about transition for children and adolescents living with hemophilia, (2) determine which transition issues were the most relevant, and (3) develop and test information products that would address those transition issues. Methods An inventory of NHF’s resources and an environmental scan over the Internet was performed. Focus groups were conducted to determine messaging. Video prototypes containing messages were created, tested by focus groups, and revised. Results The literature search yielded limited information available on transition for children and adolescents with hemophilia. Results of the formative research indicated that adolescents wanted more information on sports participation and disclosure of their condition (e.g., to peers, teachers, coaches, health care providers). Video was found to be the preferred delivery format. Conclusion Children and adolescents living with hemophilia need information to help them transition through life. As a result of this study, two educational products were produced, but several more are recommended to guide these individuals in making healthy transitions into adulthood. PMID:23809876

  2. [Economic impact of hemophilia type A and B in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Carlos-Rivera, Fernando; Gasca-Pineda, Ricardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; García-Chávez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of hemophilia generates a disproportionally large economic impact relative to its prevalence. To determine the economic impact of hemophilia A and B in Mexico in 2011 from the perspective of public health institutions. Hemophilia was epidemiologically characterized in Mexico during the year of interest, direct costs (diagnosis, monitoring or follow-up, care of bleeding events, and consumption of hemostatic factors), as well as absenteeism associated with illness (indirect costs) were estimated. Records, surveys and official data were supplemented by expert opinion to assess costs. The investment in hemostatic factors is the primary source of cost: 68.6 and 74.3% of total investment in hemophilia A and B, respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that the most decisive variable is the cost of acquisition of hemostatic factors, including bypass agents. The second most important source of cost is the attention to bleeding events, being significantly higher in patients receiving on-demand treatment compared with those receiving prophylaxis. In Mexico, hemophilia is a condition whose treatment requires a large amount of financial resources associated with the cost of hemostatic factors and care of hemorrhage, the latter being lower in patients on prophylaxis relative to on-demand.

  3. Past, present and future of hemophilia: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2012-05-02

    Over the past forty years the availability of coagulation factor replacement therapy has greatly contributed to the improved care of people with hemophilia. Following the blood-borne viral infections in the late 1970s and early 1980, caused by coagulation factor concentrates manufactured using non-virally inactivated pooled plasma, the need for safer treatment became crucial to the hemophilia community. The introduction of virus inactivated plasma-derived coagulation factors and then of recombinant products has revolutionized the care of these people. These therapeutic weapons have improved their quality of life and that of their families and permitted home treatment, i.e., factor replacement therapy at regular intervals in order to prevent both bleeding and the resultant joint damage (i.e. primary prophylaxis). Accordingly, a near normal lifestyle and life-expectancy have been achieved. The main current problem in hemophilia is the onset of alloantibodies inactivating the infused coagulation factor, even though immune tolerance regimens based on long-term daily injections of large dosages of coagulation factors are able to eradicate inhibitors in approximately two-thirds of affected patients. In addition availability of products that bypass the intrinsic coagulation defects have dramatically improved the management of this complication. The major challenges of current treatment regimens, such the short half life of hemophilia therapeutics with need for frequent intravenous injections, encourage the current efforts to produce coagulation factors with more prolonged bioavailability. Finally, intensive research is devoted to gene transfer therapy, the only way to ultimately obtain cure in hemophilia.

  4. Visuoperceptual sequelae in children with hemophilia and intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Esmeralda; O’Callaghan, Erin T.; Murray, Joan; Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine the impact of focal brain injuries on the outcomes of visual perception and visuospatial abilities in Mexican children with hemophilia who have experienced intracranial hemorrhages. Methods We assessed ten boys who had hemophilia with intracranial hemorrhage (HIC), six boys who had hemophilia without intracranial hemorrhage (HH), and ten boys without hemophilia (CTL). The Verbal (VIQ), Performance IQs (PIQ), and Full Scale IQs (FSIQ) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children—Mexican Revision, Visual Perception, and Visuospatial Abilities domains, which are from a neuropsychological assessment battery for Spanish-speaking children (ENI), were employed for our analysis. Results The results showed that the HIC group performed in the low-average range on the PIQ and FSIQ, which was lower than the HH group. The HIC group showed low performance on visual perception tests, such as line orientation, fragmented objects, and overlapping figures, compared with their matched controls. Conclusions The results suggest that it is not the ability to recognize objects that is impaired in the HIC group, but the ability to identify objects under less favorable conditions. Our findings may have therapeutic and rehabilitative implications for the management of children with hemophilia and early focal brain lesions. PMID:26835360

  5. Evaluating the psychosocial impact of hemophilia B: The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    PubMed

    Sidonio, Robert; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2017-04-01

    The needs of individuals living with hemophilia B, especially those with mild or moderate hemophilia and affected females, are not well understood. The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) initiative was developed in an effort to obtain greater insights into the unique issues and challenges faced by those with hemophilia B. This study explored the impact of hemophilia B on education, employment, engagement in physical activities and other psychosocial aspects of the lives of affected individuals and their families. The B-HERO-S findings reveal a number of unmet needs in the hemophilia B population, and these results may be leveraged to inform patient outreach and education initiatives.

  6. Repeated Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Hajime; Terada, Jiro; Hoshi, Hiromasa; Urushibara, Takashi; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Rintaro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening complication that occurs in association with various diseases including coagulation disorders. In rare cases, it is caused by hemophilia. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for a third time due to DAH. Although the cause of DAH could not be identified by bronchoscopy or laboratory tests, a good response to corticosteroids suggested idiopathic DAH with pulmonary capillaritis. The patient was diagnosed with hemophilia B based on the results of a detailed inquiry, a mildly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, and low factor IX activity. Hemophilia may be an underlying factor that exacerbates the bleeding of patients with DAH, even when they show a good response to corticosteroids. PMID:28202865

  7. Repeated Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Hajime; Terada, Jiro; Hoshi, Hiromasa; Urushibara, Takashi; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Rintaro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening complication that occurs in association with various diseases including coagulation disorders. In rare cases, it is caused by hemophilia. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for a third time due to DAH. Although the cause of DAH could not be identified by bronchoscopy or laboratory tests, a good response to corticosteroids suggested idiopathic DAH with pulmonary capillaritis. The patient was diagnosed with hemophilia B based on the results of a detailed inquiry, a mildly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, and low factor IX activity. Hemophilia may be an underlying factor that exacerbates the bleeding of patients with DAH, even when they show a good response to corticosteroids.

  8. Improvement of surveillance of hemophilia treatment through ICTs.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonor; Saavedra, Vasco; Ferreira, Carlos; Santos, Beatriz Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia, in addition of being a chronic disease, is also a rare disease, and as such, quite expensive for the National Health Service (NHS) due to the cost associated with the drugs used in treatments (Clotting Factor Concentrate - CFC). On the other hand, due to the specific characteristics of this type of disorder, it is necessary to ensure that data generated during the treatments are quickly communicated to the clinicians responsible for monitoring those patients. As such, an effective management of this disease, with maximum safety for patients, involves not only an efficient information management process, but also the coordination and management of all the associated resources. This article aims to present one specific component of a technological solution that can help in coordinate actions of patients, physicians and nurses, as well as improve the surveillance of hemophilia treatment, within a specific Comprehensive Hemophilia Diagnostic and Treatment Center (HTC).

  9. Evaluation of Thrombin Generation Assay in Patients With Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Bazrafshan, Asghar; Silavizadeh, Samir; Dehghani, Javad; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the correlation between thrombin generation (TG) parameters with bleeding symptoms and disease severity in patients with hemophilia. In this cross-sectional study, 59 patients with hemophilia without inhibitors and regardless of their severity were randomly selected from southern Iran and TG assays were conducted. Bleeding score (BS) was calculated by performing a clinical evaluation using Tosetto questionnaire. Only lag time showed a statistically significant correlation with BS (rs = .316,P= .016). All TG parameters except peak showed association with disease severity (P< .05). Endogenous thrombin potential showed a significant correlation with factor activity level (rs = .459,P< .001). Both lag time and start tail showed significant negative correlations with factor activity level (rs = -0.488,P< .001 andrs = - .289,P< .026, respectively). Although most of the TG parameters evaluated were not significantly correlated with the BS of patients with hemophilia, the majority of TG parameters were significantly associated with factor activity level and disease severity.

  10. Hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease: 2. Management. Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present current strategies for the treatment of hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease. OPTIONS: Prophylactic and corrective therapy with hemostatic and adjunctive agents: DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin [desmopressin acetate]), recombinant coagulation products (human Factor VIII and human Factor VIIa) or virally inactivated plasma-derived products (high- or ultra-high-purity human Factor VIII or human Factor VIII concentrate containing von Willebrand factor activity, porcine Factor VIII, high-purity human Factor IX, human prothrombin-complex concentrate, human activated prothrombin-complex concentrate), adjunctive antifibrinolytic agents, topical thrombin and fibrin sealant. The induction of immune tolerance in patients in whom inhibitors develop should also be considered. OUTCOMES: Morbidity and quality of life associated with bleeding and treatment. EVIDENCE: Relevant clinical studies and reports published from 1974 to 1994 were examined. A search was conducted of our reprint files, MEDLINE, citations in the articles reviewed and references provided by colleagues. In the MEDLINE search the following terms were used singly or in combination: "hemophilia," "von Willebrand's disease," "Factor VIII," "Factor IX," "von Willebrand factor," "diagnosis," "management," "home care," "comprehensive care," "inhibitor," "AIDS," "hepatitis," "life expectancy," "complications," "practice guidelines," "consensus statement" and "controlled trial." The in-depth review included only articles written in English from North America and Europe that were relevant to human disease and pertinent to a predetermined outline. The availability of treatment products in Canada was also considered. VALUES: Minimizing morbidity and maximizing functional status and quality of life were given a high value. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Proper prophylactic or early treatment with appropriate hemostatic agents minimizes morbidity and functional disability and improves quality

  11. Burden of illness: direct and indirect costs among persons with hemophilia A in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Koerper, Marion A; Johnson, Kathleen A; Riske, Brenda; Baker, Judith R; Ullman, Megan; Curtis, Randall G; Poon, Jiat-Ling; Lou, Mimi; Nichol, Michael B

    2015-06-01

    To examine the direct and indirect costs of hemophilia care among persons with hemophilia A in the US. Observational data were obtained from HUGS-Va, a multi-center study from six federally supported hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs). Eligible individuals completed a standardized initial questionnaire and were followed regularly for 2 years to obtain information on work or school absenteeism, time spent arranging hemophilia care, and unpaid hemophilia-related support from caregivers. Data from 1-year healthcare utilization records and 2-year clotting factor dispensing records measured direct medical costs. Indirect costs were imputed using the human capital approach, which uses wages as a proxy measure of work time output. A total of 222 patients with complete data were included in the analysis. Two-thirds had severe hemophilia and the mean age was 21.1 years. The use of prophylaxis in severe hemophilia patients is associated with statistically significant reduction in the numbers of emergency department (ED) visits and bleeding episodes compared with those who were treated episodically. From the societal perspective, mild hemophilia costs $59,101 (median: $7519) annually per person, $84,363 (median: $61,837) for moderate hemophilia, $201,471 (median: $143,431) for severe hemophilia using episodic treatment, and $301,392 (median: $286,198) for severe hemophilia receiving prophylaxis. Clotting factor contributed from 54% of total costs in mild hemophilia to a maximum of 94% for patients with severe hemophilia receiving prophylaxis. Hemophilia is a costly disorder not only because of its high medical expenses, but also due to the high indirect costs incurred.

  12. Austrian Hemophilia Registry: design, development and set of variables.

    PubMed

    Reitter, Sylvia; Streif, Werner; Schabetsberger, Thomas; Wozak, Florian; Hartl, Hubert; Male, Christoph; Muntean, Wolfgang; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Patient registries are databases essential for identifying and tracking individuals with a particular disease and for collecting epidemiological information. The data obtained are necessary for quality control and quality assurance in treatment and for studying the impact of new developments on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The Austrian Hemophilia Registry is a joint initiative between Austrian hemophilia treaters, represented by the Austrian Hemophilia Society's scientific advisory board, and the Austrian Hemophilia Society (OHG). The registry's main objective is to record information on patients with hemophilia, such as severity of disease, types of treatment and general health status. The registry also aims to improve the planning of supply of factor concentrates and to provide an instrument for early detection of side effects, such as an increase in inhibitor development or certain infections. The registry consists of three parts: the first contains basic information on quality control, the second contains extended data for quality control collected annually, and the third, "study part", covers scientific data and is also updated annually. For the latter, written informed consent of each patient is a prerequisite. Data are stored centrally on a server of an independent, public institution (University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology: UMIT). The server is situated in a data-processing center with sophisticated security measures including physical control of access. Participating institutions comprise the main hemophilia care centers in Austria. Statistical analysis is carried out on anonymized data only. The project was financed by a public-private partnership with financial resources provided by the Austrian Ministry of Health (BMGFJ) and the pharmaceutical industry. The entire project, which is planned to be long term, will be monitored, evaluated and adjusted by the scientific advisory board accordingly.

  13. Pain Experience in Hemophilia Patients: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rambod, Masoume; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Khair, Kate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pain, as a crucial subsequence of joint hemorrhages in hemophilia patients, is chronic, debilitating, and distracting. This study aimed to describe and interpret pain experiences of hemophilia patients in their lives. Methods: This qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach was conducted on fourteen hemophilia patients who had been referred to a hemophilia center affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The study question was “what is the meaning of pain in hemophilia patients’ lives? The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and field notes through purposeful sampling. Then, thematic analysis with van Manen’s six-step methodological framework was used. MAX.QDA qualitative software package, 2010, was used to analyze the data. Results: The three main themes that emerged in this study were “alteration in physical health”, “engagement in psychological problems”, and “impairment in social relationships”. Alteration in physical health consisted of three subthemes, namely “impairment of physical function”, “change in body physics”, and “disturbance in sleep quality”. In addition, two subthemes including “nostalgia of pain in adults with hemophilia” and “psychological distress” emerged from engagement in psychological problems. Finally, “loss of social activity” and “change in relationships” were related to impairment in social relationships. Conclusion: The present study highlighted alteration in physical health, engagement in psychological problems, and impairment in social relationship as a result of pain in hemophilia patients. Thus, healthcare providers and family members have to pay special attention to these problems. Besides, providing complementary therapy interventions is suggested for reducing these issues. PMID:27713894

  14. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future.

  15. Prevention of the Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited disorder of clotting factor deficiencies resulting in musculoskeletal bleeding, including hemarthroses, leading to musculoskeletal complications. The articular problems of hemophiliac patients begin in infancy. These include: recurrent hemarthroses, chronic synovitis, flexion deformities, hypertrophy of the growth epiphyses, damage to the articular cartilage, and hemophilic arthropathy. The most commonly affected joints are the ankle, the knee, and the elbow. Hematologic prophylactic treatment from ages 2 to 18 years could avoid the development of hemophilic arthropathy if the concentration of the patient's deficient factor is prevented from falling below 1% of normal. Hemarthroses can be prevented by the administration of clotting factor concentrates (prophylaxis). However, high costs and the need for venous access devices in younger children continue to complicate recommendations for universal prophylaxis. Prevention of joint arthropathy needs to focus on prevention of hemarthroses through prophylaxis, identifying early joint disease through the optimal use of cost-effective imaging modalities and the validation of serological markers of joint arthropathy. Screening for effects on bone health and optimal management of pain to improve quality of life are, likewise, important issues. Major hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilic synovitis should be treated aggressively to prevent hemophilic arthropathy. PMID:22778972

  16. Acquired hemophilia A in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Tsukamoto, N; Suto, M; Uchiumi, H; Mitsuhashi, H; Yokohama, A; Maesawa, A; Nojima, Y; Naruse, T

    2001-06-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed acquired hemophilia A. The patient, a 24-year-old Japanese woman, was referred to our hospital because of uncontrollable bleeding following a tooth extraction. Laboratory examination revealed prolonged APTT (116 seconds), reduced factor VIII activity (2.8 %) and the presence of factor VIII inhibitor at a titer of 46.5 Bethesda units/ml. Transfusion of prothrombin complex concentrate and activated prothrombin complex concentrate followed by administration of prednisolone and cyclophosphamide successfully arrested bleeding and reduced the factor VIII inhibitor level. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis and introduction of adequate therapies are critical.

  17. The hope and reality of long-acting hemophilia products.

    PubMed

    Pipe, Steven W

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering are creating hope that we can address ongoing challenges in hemophilia care such as reducing the costs of therapy, increasing the availability to the developing world, and improving the functional properties of these proteins. Technological advances to improve the half-life of recombinant clotting factors have brought long-acting clotting factors for hemophilia replacement therapy closer to reality. Preclinical and clinical trial results are reviewed as well as the potential benefits and risks of these novel therapies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  19. HLA Class I and KIR Genes Do Not Protect Against HIV Type 1 Infection in Highly Exposed Uninfected Individuals With Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Vince, Nicolas; Bashirova, Arman A.; Lied, Alexandra; Gao, Xiaojiang; Dorrell, Lucy; McLaren, Paul J.; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving patients with hemophilia A who were exposed to but uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) did not reveal genetic variants associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection, beyond homozygosity for CCR5-Δ32. Since variation in HLA class I and KIR genes is not well interrogated by standard GWAS techniques, we tested whether these 2 loci were involved in protection from HIV-1 infection in the same hemophilia cohort, using controls from the general population. Our data indicate that HLA class I alleles, presence or absence of KIR genes, and functionally relevant combinations of the HLA/KIR genotypes are not involved in resistance to parenterally transmitted HIV-1 infection. PMID:24719475

  20. Review of antihemophilic factor injection for the routine prophylaxis of bleeding episodes and risk of joint damage in severe hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Rossbach, Hans-Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with severe factor VIII deficiency experience recurrent hemorrhages and develop progressive joint damage. Large retrospective, nonrandomized studies of patient cohorts followed over decades show that factor prophylaxis initiated at an early age before the onset of recurrent bleeding reduces the incidence of hemophilic arthropathy. Two recent prospective, multicenter, randomized trials conducted in Europe (the ESPRIT study) and the USA (the Joint Outcome Study) confirm the efficacy of prophylaxis in the prevention of hemarthroses and arthropathy. Regular prophylaxis initiated in early childhood enhances the quality of life for patients with severe hemophilia and reduces the risk of inhibitor development. The substantial costs of such preventative therapy may be offset by the reduced expenditures that the care of degenerative joint disease in adult hemophilia patients would otherwise require. PMID:20234780

  1. Labor and delivery in a patient with hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Przkora, R; Euliano, T Y; Roussos-Ross, K; Zumberg, M; Robicsek, S A

    2011-07-01

    Hemophilia B is a rare X-linked disorder that may cause dramatic bleeding. Women account for only 3.2% of those clinically affected. The X-linked inheritance frequently delays the diagnosis in women and may expose the patient to an increased risk of adverse events. There is limited experience with these patients during labor and delivery. A 28-year-old primiparous woman with hemophilia B (bleeding phenotype) delivered a male infant by an unplanned cesarean delivery under general anesthesia following treatment with factor IX and normalization of her coagulation parameters, guided by thromboelastography. Postpartum vaginal bleeding required transfusion of two units of packed red blood cells. Factor IX supplementation continued for one week. Once diagnosed with hemophilia B, a multidisciplinary approach and advanced antenatal planning can increase the likelihood of a safe delivery. Neuraxial approaches and cesarean delivery are recommended only after normalization of the coagulation profile. The male fetus of a hemophilia A or B patient requires special attention. Operative vaginal delivery and invasive fetal monitoring should be avoided. Thromboelastography is an excellent technique to assess parturients with bleeding disorders or peripartum hemorrhage and may be underused. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Problems of Hemophilia and the Role of the Rehabilitation Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrai, Edward B.; Handford, H. Allen

    1983-01-01

    Because of the multiple problems associated with hemophilia, optimal treatment is usually provided in a comprehensive care setting by a team of medical and nonmedical professionals. The rehabilitation counselor contributes expertise to that of other team members in development and implementation of an individual rehabilitation plan for…

  3. Adeno-associated viral vectors for the treatment of hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    High, Katherine A.; Anguela, Xavier M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer studies for the treatment of hemophilia began more than two decades ago. A large body of pre-clinical work evaluated a variety of vectors and target tissues, but by the start of the new millennium it became evident that adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene transfer to the liver held great promise as a therapeutic tool. The transition to the clinical arena uncovered a number of unforeseen challenges, mainly in the form of a human-specific immune response against the vector that poses a significant limitation in the application of this technology. While the full nature of this response has not been elucidated, long-term expression of therapeutic levels of factor IX is already a reality for a small number of patients. Extending this success to a greater number of hemophilia B patients remains a major goal of the field, as well as translating this strategy to clinical therapy for hemophilia A. This review summarizes the progress of AAV-mediated gene therapy for the hemophilias, along with its upcoming prospects and challenges. PMID:26614390

  4. Gene therapy for hemophilia: advancing beyond the first clinical success.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Paul E; Gui, Tong

    2013-09-01

    Consistently measurable and persistent expression of circulating clotting factor activity, associated with decreased clinical bleeding, has been achieved for the first time in a hemophilia gene therapy trial. This review examines the successes and limitations of this clinical trial for hemophilia B and approaches to advance beyond this milestone. Although a self-complementary serotype 8 adeno-associated virus (scAAV8) vector approach directed factor IX expression of up to 6% in a human trial, the apparent need to suppress vector dose-dependent immune-mediated liver inflammation in some patients at the highest dose highlighted the next steps to optimize the risk-benefit of hemophilia gene therapy. The approaches being pursued include manufacturing modifications to eliminate contaminating empty vector capsids, the utilization of factor IX and factor VIII modified transgenes to improve secretion or function of the transgene product, and adjunctive pharmacologic and molecular approaches to overcome limitations imposed by naturally occurring antibodies against vectors and by the large size of the factor VIII gene. Preclinical data suggest strategies in development may build upon the first gene therapy success and achieve factor IX correction sufficient to prevent bleeding without toxicity and translate success to hemophilia A gene therapy.

  5. Emerging drugs for the treatment of hemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Morfini, Massimo; Zanon, Ezio

    2016-09-01

    Replacement therapy with clotting factor concentrates is the most appropriate and effective way to treat bleedings of Hemophilia A&B to prevent chronic arthropathy. Unfortunately, the short half-life (HL) of FVIII/IX concentrates obliges the patients to receive frequent infusions, a big concern for children. The development of inhibitors in about 30-45% of hemophilia A and in 3-5% of hemophilia B patient is the major adverse event of replacement therapy. In the last few years, new rFIX have been developed with HL. New rFVIII concentrates are displaying small increase of PK characteristics. The new bio-engineering methods allowed the production of molecules fused with Fc fragment of IgG or Albumin or linked to PEG. A new approach to improve hemostasis is represented by Mab against TFPI and small RNA interfering with Antithrombin synthesis. Another innovative drug seems to be the new bi-specific antibody which mimics FVIII function in linking FXa and FX to tenase production. The emerging drugs for hemophilia treatment seem to be very promising. The extended half-life will improve the adherence of patients to therapy. Accurate post-marketing surveillance studies will be necessary to check the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of these new molecules.

  6. Problems of Hemophilia and the Role of the Rehabilitation Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrai, Edward B.; Handford, H. Allen

    1983-01-01

    Because of the multiple problems associated with hemophilia, optimal treatment is usually provided in a comprehensive care setting by a team of medical and nonmedical professionals. The rehabilitation counselor contributes expertise to that of other team members in development and implementation of an individual rehabilitation plan for…

  7. Management of US men, women, and children with hemophilia and methods and demographics of the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Tyler W; Witkop, Michelle; Guelcher, Christine; Frey, Mary Jane; Hunter, Susan; Peltier, Skye; Recht, Michael; Walsh, Christopher; Kessler, Craig M; Owens, Wendy; Clark, David B; Frick, Neil; Rice, Michelle; Iyer, Neeraj N; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L; Sidonio, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities Into Solutions (B-HERO-S) initiative was launched in an effort to address specific gaps in the understanding of the psychosocial impact of mild-moderate-severe hemophilia B. The original Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) qualitative study evaluated the needs of people with hemophilia A or B in multiple countries; however, a majority of participants had the more common moderate-severe hemophilia A. The B-HERO-S study was designed in collaboration with the hemophilia community to evaluate the needs of adults with hemophilia B and caregivers of children with hemophilia B, including affected women and caregivers of girls with hemophilia. The report presented here describes participant demographics and comorbidities, as well as treatment regimens and access to treatment. Bleeding symptoms were reported by 27% of mothers of children with hemophilia B who participated. Women were more likely than men to self-report arthritis and depression/anxiety as comorbidities associated with hemophilia B. More adults and children with hemophilia B were on routine treatment than on on-demand treatment, and a high percentage of adults with moderate hemophilia B received routine treatment (86%). Many adults with hemophilia B (78%) and caregivers (69%) expressed concern about access to factor in the next 5 years, and of adults with hemophilia B, women more commonly experienced issues with access to factor in the past than did men (72% vs 44%). The findings of the B-HERO-S study reveal potential unmet needs of some patients with mild-moderate hemophilia B, and the results may be leveraged to inform patient outreach by hemophilia treatment centers and education initiatives.

  8. Posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in children with von Willebrand disease or hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gordon H; Auger, Katherine A; Aliu, Oluseyi; Patrick, Stephen W; DeMonner, Sonya; Davis, Matthew M

    2013-03-01

    It is uncertain whether children with bleeding disorders are at higher risk of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage compared with the general pediatric population. To estimate the national rate of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in children previously diagnosed with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or hemophilia, and to analyze potential risk factors for postoperative bleeding in these children. A cross-sectional analysis of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. Academic and community-based nonrehabilitation hospitals from 44 states participating in the KID project. An estimated 508 children with either VWD or hemophilia. Tonsillectomy with and without adenoidectomy, and subsequent hospitalization. Treatment for posttonsillectomy hemorrhage. We extracted all cases of tonsillectomy, adenotonsillectomy, and posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in patients with VWD or hemophilia using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic and procedure codes and applied national weights to estimate rates of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage. Using data regarding patient demographic characteristics, surgical indication, blood transfusion, hospital length of stay, and mortality, we conducted bivariate analyses to identify associations between possible risk factors and posttonsillectomy hemorrhage. Mean age was 7 years, and most patients were male, white, urbanites who had private insurance and underwent tonsillectomy for airway obstruction. The hemorrhage rate within 1 day of tonsillectomy (immediate) was 1.6% while the hemorrhage rate at least 2 days after tonsillectomy (delayed) was estimated at 15%. Delayed hemorrhage was associated with older age (P < .001) and was as high as 35% in children at least 16 years old. The rate of blood transfusion was 2.4%. There were no fatalities. The frequency of immediate posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in children with VWD or

  9. The maintenance of tolerance after successful immune tolerance induction in hemophilia A and B: the North American Registry. Factor VIII/IX Subcommittee of the International Society for Thrombosis and Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    DiMichele, D; Kroner, B

    2000-10-01

    The North American Immune Tolerance Registry (NAITR) was initiated with the goal of determining, by questionnaire, immune tolerance (ITT) practices in hemophilia treatment centers in Canada and the United States. Sixty-eight centers (40%) responded. Of the 130 registry subjects with hemophilia A who completed ITT, 93 (72%) achieved tolerance. Of the 11 completed ITT courses in patients with hemophilia B, 4 (36%) were successful. Maintenance therapy was defined as any dotting factor regimen administered subsequent to the patient achieving the treating physician's criteria for successful immune tolerance. Seventy-five (81%) of 93 individuals in the hemophilia A cohort who successfully achieved tolerance were maintained on a regular (prophylactic factor VIII (FVIII) regimen for a variable time period post-ITT. The median dose used was 150 units/kg/week (range: 17-700). Forty-eight (64%) subjects remained tolerant while receiving regular doses of FVIII for a median observation period of 13 months (range 0-129 months). Of 27 patients whose maintenance therapy had been stopped, 17 (68%) remained tolerant over a median period of 19 months (range 1-54 months) and 9 relapsed. Among the relapses, 3 occurred after maintenance therapy was stopped; 6 were noted on prophylactic FVIII at a median time of 11 months (range 2-61 months). The definition of tolerance was reviewed for the 9 subjects who relapsed and was defined by a normal recovery and survival in only 1/9 patients. Among the 11 hemophilia B subjects in the cohort who completed tolerance, 4 had a successful outcome. Four individuals were placed on maintenance regimens of 25-100 units FIX/kg/day and all remained tolerant.

  10. Emerging therapies for hemophilia: a new era of care and the role of the interdisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Witkop, Michelle; Cutter, Susan; Deutsche, Joann; Santaella, Maria; Chapman, Robin; Lafranco, Jennifer; Lambing, Angela

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of new hemophilia management therapies, targeting extended half-lives through bioengineering, ushers in an era of potential promise and increasing complexity, more so for those with hemophilia B than hemophilia A. Questions arise for patients, caregivers, and hemophilia treatment center (HTC) staff about how to assess and incorporate novel therapies and how to determine whether new therapies offer a distinct advantage over established treatment routines. Nurses and other interdisciplinary HTC staff are well positioned to assess, educate, and support patients and families in navigating this rapidly changing landscape. To support these challenging efforts, this review offers a perspective on issues affecting therapeutic transitions and provides tools to foster ongoing adherence.

  11. Anesthetic management of patient with hemophilia a undergoing emergency ventriculoperitoneal shunting: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Hussain, Altaf; Khan, Mueen Ullah; Hajnour, Muhammad; Qureshi, Sadia; Aqil, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a hemorrhagic trend almost exclusively affecting males (X-related recessive disease). In 85% of cases, it is caused by factor VIII deficiency, called hemophilia A or classic hemophilia. Successful anesthetic management depends on the special care and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals informed about the disease, including qualified hematologist, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. PMID:27833501

  12. Anesthetic management of patient with hemophilia a undergoing emergency ventriculoperitoneal shunting: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Hussain, Altaf; Khan, Mueen Ullah; Hajnour, Muhammad; Qureshi, Sadia; Aqil, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a hemorrhagic trend almost exclusively affecting males (X-related recessive disease). In 85% of cases, it is caused by factor VIII deficiency, called hemophilia A or classic hemophilia. Successful anesthetic management depends on the special care and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals informed about the disease, including qualified hematologist, surgeon, and anesthesiologist.

  13. Intensity of factor VIII treatment and inhibitor development in children with severe hemophilia A: the RODIN study.

    PubMed

    Gouw, Samantha C; van den Berg, H Marijke; Fischer, Kathelijn; Auerswald, Günter; Carcao, Manuel; Chalmers, Elizabeth; Chambost, Hervé; Kurnik, Karin; Liesner, Ri; Petrini, Pia; Platokouki, Helen; Altisent, Carmen; Oldenburg, Johannes; Nolan, Beatrice; Garrido, Rosario Pérez; Mancuso, M Elisa; Rafowicz, Anne; Williams, Mike; Clausen, Niels; Middelburg, Rutger A; Ljung, Rolf; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-05-16

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of the intensity of treatment, ranging from high-dose intensive factor VIII (FVIII) treatment to prophylactic treatment, with the inhibitor incidence among previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A. This cohort study aimed to include consecutive patients with a FVIII activity < 0.01 IU/mL, born between 2000 and 2010, and observed during their first 75 FVIII exposure days. Intensive FVIII treatment of hemorrhages or surgery at the start of treatment was associated with an increased inhibitor risk (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-3.0). High-dose FVIII treatment was associated with a higher inhibitor risk than low-dose FVIII treatment (aHR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.0-4.8). Prophylaxis was only associated with a decreased overall inhibitor incidence after 20 exposure days of FVIII. The association with prophylaxis was more pronounced in patients with low-risk F8 genotypes than in patients with high-risk F8 genotypes (aHR, 0.61, 95% CI, 0.19-2.0 and aHR, 0.85, 95% CI, 0.51-1.4, respectively). In conclusion, our findings suggest that in previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A, high-dosed intensive FVIII treatment increases inhibitor risk and prophylactic FVIII treatment decreases inhibitor risk, especially in patients with low-risk F8 mutations.

  14. Demographic and clinical data in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    PubMed

    Knoebl, P; Marco, P; Baudo, F; Collins, P; Huth-Kühne, A; Nemes, L; Pellegrini, F; Tengborn, L; Lévesque, H

    2012-04-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII and characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage in patients with no previous family or personal history of bleeding. Although data on several AHA cohorts have been collected, limited information is available on the optimal management of AHA. The European Acquired Hemophilia Registry (EACH2) was established to generate a prospective, large-scale, pan-European database on demographics, diagnosis, underlying disorders, bleeding characteristics, treatment and outcome of AHA patients. Five hundred and one (266 male, 235 female) patients from 117 centers and 13 European countries were included in the registry between 2003 and 2008. In 467 cases, hemostasis investigations and AHA diagnosis were triggered by a bleeding event. At diagnosis, patients were a median of 73.9 years. AHA was idiopathic in 51.9%; malignancy or autoimmune diseases were associated with 11.8% and 11.6% of cases. Fifty-seven per cent of the non-pregnancy-related cases were male. Four hundred and seventy-four bleeding episodes were reported at presentation, and hemostatic therapy initiated in 70.5% of patients. Delayed diagnosis significantly impacted treatment initiation in 33.5%. Four hundred and seventy-seven patients underwent immunosuppression, and 72.6% achieved complete remission. Representing the largest collection of consecutive AHA cases to date, EACH2 facilitates the analysis of a variety of open questions in AHA. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Using genetic diagnostics in hemophilia and von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Swystun, Laura L; James, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Most bleeding disorders encountered in clinical practice will be diagnosed, at least initially, by phenotypic assays. However, since the characterization of the genes that encode coagulation factors in the 1980s, significant progress has been made in translating this knowledge for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For hemophilia A and B, molecular genetic testing to determine carrier status, prenatal diagnosis, and likelihood of inhibitor development or anaphylaxis to infused coagulation factor concentrates is an established component of comprehensive clinical management. In contrast, although significant recent advances in our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) have allowed for the development of rational approaches to genetic diagnostics, questions remain about this complex genetic disorder and how to incorporate emerging knowledge into diagnostic strategies. This article will review the state-of-the-art for molecular diagnostics for both hemophilia and VWD.

  16. Factoring nonviral gene therapy into a cure for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gabrovsky, Vanessa; Calos, Michele P

    2008-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia A has fallen short of success despite several clinical trials conducted over the past decade. Challenges to its success include vector immunogenicity, insufficient transgene expression levels of Factor VIII, and inhibitor antibody formation. Gene therapy has been dominated by the use of viral vectors, as well as the immunogenic and oncogenic concerns that accompany these strategies. Because of the complexity of viral vectors, the development of nonviral DNA delivery methods may provide an efficient and safe alternative for the treatment of hemophilia A. New types of nonviral strategies, such as DNA integrating vectors, and the success of several nonviral animal studies, suggest that nonviral gene therapy has curative potential and justifies its clinical development.

  17. Product selection issues in the management of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Jorge

    2004-06-01

    Issues that may influence selection of a factor concentrate for treatment of patients with hemophilia B, including whether the product is derived from plasma or is of recombinant origin, costs, pharmacokinetic issues, and safety considerations, are discussed in this paper. Data in the published literature, advice from the medical team, and patient and family preferences, will also impact product choice. Plasma-derived and recombinant products have similar efficacy; however, recombinant concentrates are more expensive and have demonstrated lower post-infusion recovery, and plasma-derived concentrates may be perceived as less safe. Improvements in donor selection and testing, viral inactivation, and product purification have greatly reduced potential risks of plasma-derived products. It is expected that both recombinant and plasma-derived products will continue to be used worldwide in the treatment of hemophilia B.

  18. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression. PMID:23237078

  19. Hemophilia A in Brazil – epidemiology and treatment developments

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adriana Aparecida; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa; Guerra, Maximiliano Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited disorder characterized by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII, which predisposes patients to bleeding events. Treatment is based on replacement of the deficient factor, in a therapeutic or prophylactic manner. Brazil is the country with the third largest population of people with hemophilia, for which the public health system provides free comprehensive care. Maintaining an updated registry of patients, documenting the prevalence of complications, and assessing the effectiveness of resource use are indispensable elements in the design of a well-coordinated national program. According to sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data collected by the computerized Brazilian system on coagulopathies, in June 2013, there were 9,122 registered patients with hemophilia A in Brazil, of which 36.1% had a severe form of the disease. Clotting factor inhibitors were present in 7.5%, but 25.7% of records did not provide this type of data. Around 70% of the patients belonged to the economically active population, being between 15 and 59 years old. Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus was present in 23.4% of the patients tested and infection by hepatitis C virus antibodies in 59.3%. Infection by the hepatitis B virus and human T-lymphotropic virus was also reported. The high percentage of incomplete records regarding serological data shows the fragility of the information system to date. There was also no information available on the prevalence of permanent or disabling joint damage. Although few hemophiliacs receive adequate care in developing countries, and despite Brazil exhibiting great social inequalities, the Ministry of Health has made significant advances in the treatment of hemophilia A. The gradual increase in importation of factor VIII concentrate enabled the implementation of primary and secondary modalities of prophylaxis, in addition to the induction of immune tolerance. There are also plans to set up a factory in the

  20. The influence of prophylactic factor VIII in severe hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Gissel, Matthew; Whelihan, Matthew F; Ferris, Lauren A; Mann, Kenneth G; Rivard, Georges E; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A individuals displaying a similar genetic defect have heterogeneous clinical phenotypes. Aim To evaluate the underlying effect of exogenous factor (f)VIII on tissue factor (Tf)-initiated blood coagulation in severe hemophilia utilizing both empirical and computational models. Methods We investigated twenty-five clinically severe hemophilia A patients. All individuals were on fVIII prophylaxis and had not received fVIII from 0.25 to 4 days prior to phlebotomy. Coagulation was initiated by the addition of Tf to contact-pathway inhibited whole blood ± an anti-fVIII antibody. Aliquots were quenched over 20 min and analyzed for thrombin generation and fibrin formation. Coagulation factor levels were obtained and used to computationally predict thrombin generation with fVIII set to either zero or its value at the time of the draw. Results Due to prophylactic fVIII, at the time of the blood draw, the individuals had fVIII levels that ranged from <1% to 22%. Thrombin generation (maximum level and rate) in both empirical and computational systems increased as the level of fVIII increased. FXIII activation rates also increased as the fVIII level increased. Upon suppression of fVIII, thrombin generation became comparable in both systems. Plasma composition analysis showed a negative correlation between bleeding history and computational thrombin generation in the absence of fVIII. Conclusion Residual prophylactic fVIII directly causes an increase in thrombin generation and fibrin cross-linking in individuals with clinically severe hemophilia A. The combination of each individual's coagulation factors (outside of fVIII) determine each individual's baseline thrombin potential and may affect bleeding risk. PMID:21899664

  1. Clinical profile of hemophilia patients in Jodhpur Region

    PubMed Central

    Payal, Vikas; Sharma, Pramod; Goyal, Vishnu; Jora, Rakesh; Parakh, Manish; Payal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemophilia is widely distributed all over the world, but little is known about its clinical profile in resource-limited regions. An insight into its clinical spectrum will help in the formulation of policies to improve the situation in these areas. Aims: To study the clinical profile of hemophiliacs (age <18 years) in Jodhpur region and screen them for transfusion-transmitted infections. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Umaid Hospital, Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur, over a period of 12 months. Result: Out of a total of 56 cases enrolled, 51 (91%) cases were diagnosed as hemophilia A while 5 (9%) were diagnosed as hemophilia B. Positive family history was found in 26 (46%) cases. According to their factor levels, 25 (44%) cases had severe disease, 20 (36%) had moderate disease, and 11 (20%) had mild disease. The mean age of onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 1.73 ± 1.43 and 3.87 ± 3.84 years, respectively. First clinical presentation was posttraumatic bleed in 20 (36%), gum bleeds in 17 (30%), epistaxis in 4 (7%), joint bleeds in 4 (7%), skin bleeds in 4 (7%), and circumcision bleed in 3 (5%) cases. Knee joint was the predominant joint affected by hemarthrosis in 38 (68%), followed by ankle in 29 (52%), elbow in 20 (36%), and hip joint in 7 (13%) cases. All patients had a negative screening test for transfusion-transmitted infections. Conclusion: Occurrence of posttraumatic bleeds and gum bleeds in an otherwise normal child should warn the clinician for evaluation of hemophilia. PMID:27011682

  2. An extra X does not prevent acquired hemophilia - Pregnancy-associated acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Barg, Assaf A; Livnat, Tami; Kenet, Gili

    2017-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a severe bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against clotting factor VIII (FVIII). With an estimated annual incidence of 1.3 to 1.5 per million, AHA is a rare disease. An extremely rare form of AHA has been described among women in the peripartum period, and may present with peripartum hemorrhage. Notably, although hemorrhagic symptoms commonly present 1-4 months around delivery, they may occur up to 1 year after parturition. When caring for a mother with AHA it is important to note that Factor VIII inhibitor may be transferred via the placenta from the mother to the fetus. Hence the newborn may also be affected. It is important to increase the awareness of Gynecologists for clinical symptoms and laboratory signs of AHA in order to avoid delayed diagnosis. Treatment may involve use of bypass agents to control hemorrhage, despite the risk of thrombosis, while immunomodulation (with increasing role for Rituximab) may be required to eradicate the inhibiting antibodies. Our review will evaluate the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of peripartum AHA, focusing upon mother and infant care. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Importance of immune response genes in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Josiane Bazzo; Macedo, Luciana Conci; de Barros, Morgana Ferreira; Rodrigues, Camila; Cadide, Renata Campos; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a disease caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII resulting from genetic inheritance linked to chromosome X. One treatment option is the administration of plasma or recombinant FVIII. However, some patients develop inhibitors or antibodies against this factor. Inhibitors are alloantibodies that bind to the epitope of factor VIII causing it to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign peptide. This is the most serious complication in hemophilia patients in respect to replacement therapy. Some studies have suggested that genetic factors influence the development of factor VIII inhibitors such as ethnicity, family history, mutations in the factor VIII gene and in genes of the immune system. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to assess the influence of genetic factors of immune response genes, especially genes of the major histocompatibility complex and cytokines, which may be related to the development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A patients. Understanding these risk factors will help to determine future differential treatment in the control and prevention of the development of inhibitors. PMID:24106448

  4. Importance of pharmacokinetics in the management of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A and hemophilia B are caused by congenital deficiency of factor VIII and factor IX, respectively, and may lead to recurrent, spontaneous bleeding into the muscles and joints resulting in disabling arthropathy. Effective management is available in the form of prophylactic infusions of clotting factor concentrates which have been demonstrated to prevent bleeding episodes and greatly improve the quality of life of these patients. Prophylaxis is, however, expensive. Usual dosing regimens rely on weight based calculations but dosing with an understanding of an individual's pharmacokinetic response has been demonstrated to be more effective in predicting clotting factor levels that protect against bleeding episodes. Standard pharmacokinetic studies require a prohibitive number of time sampling points but recent population or Bayesian pharmacokinetics can be used to provide an accurate estimation of an individual's pharmacokinetic response using a limited number of sampling time points. The use of population pharmacokinetics has the potential to greatly increase the use of pharmacokinetic dosing regimens and optimize the use of clotting factor concentrates in patients with hemophilia.

  5. The gene therapy journey for hemophilia: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Since the isolation and characterization of the genes for FVIII and FIX some 30 years ago, a longstanding goal of the field has been development of successful gene therapy for the hemophilias. In a landmark study published in 2011, Nathwani et al demonstrated successful conversion of severe hemophilia B to mild or moderate disease in 6 adult males who underwent intravenous infusion of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing factor IX. These 6 subjects have now exhibited expression of FIX at levels ranging from 1% to 6% of normal for periods of > 2 years. This review discusses obstacles that were overcome to reach this goal and the next steps in clinical investigation. Safety issues that will need to be addressed before more widespread use of this approach are discussed. Efforts to extend AAV-mediated gene therapy to hemophilia A, and alternate approaches that may be useful for persons with severe liver disease, who may not be candidates for gene transfer to liver, are also discussed. PMID:22829631

  6. Prevalence of HTLV-III antibody among New Mexico residents with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Waskin, H; Smith, K J; Simon, T L; Gribble, T J; Mertz, G J

    1986-10-01

    Persons with hemophilia who have received therapy since 1978 are at risk for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Plasma and serum specimens collected from 1980 to 1985 from 73 New Mexico residents with hemophilia were tested by enzyme immunoassay for antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), and positive results were confirmed by Western blot. Antibody to HTLV-III was first detected in New Mexico residents with hemophilia in 1981. Among 49 persons tested in 1984-1985, seropositivity was found in 35%. Of these, 17 of 32 (53%) commercial concentrate versus 0 of 17 cryoprecipitate users were seropositive (P = .002). Of the 7 with hemophilia B, 3 (43%) were seropositive versus 14 of 42 (33%) with hemophilia A. Of 17 Albuquerque residents with hemophilia, 2(12%) were seropositive as compared with 15 of 32 (47%) persons with hemophilia who resided outside the city (P = .02). Compared with patients with hemophilia outside of Albuquerque, those living in Albuquerque tended to have milder disease and to use cryoprecipitate rather than commercial concentrate. Less frequent treatment (mild disease) and use of cryoprecipitate were associated with a decreased risk of HTLV-III infection.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of congenital hemophilia with inhibitors a Latin American perspective.

    PubMed

    Pérez Bianco, Raúl; Ozelo, Margareth Castro; Villaça, Paula Ribeiro; Solano, Maria Helena; Jimenez Cruze, Guillermo; Martinez Murillo, Carlos; Garcia Chavez, Jaime; Mendoza, Saul; Rodriguez Grecco, Ismael; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2008-01-01

    The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups (CLOTTING) is composed of a number of hemophilia specialists from Latin America. The group aims to encourage the adoption of a good standard of care for Latin American patients with hemophilia. The occurrence of inhibitors in patients with hemophilia poses clinical challenges, and it is estimated that between 1000 and 3000 patients in Latin America are affected by hemophilia with inhibitors. There is an urgent need to establish a regional consensus and clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. We present an extensive review based on best current clinical practice and published literature, as seen from a Latin American perspective, taking into account the variable nature of hemophilia care available in the various countries in this Region.

  8. Immunologic studies in asymptomatic hemophilia patients. Relationship to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Landay, A; Poon, M C; Abo, T; Stagno, S; Lurie, A; Cooper, M D

    1983-05-01

    Asymptomatic hemophilia patients receiving Factor VIII concentrate were found to have normal natural killer (NK) cells and B cells, and an inverted T helper/suppressor ratio due to an increase in cells of T suppressor phenotype. In contrast, a hemophilia patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) exhibited nonfunctional NK cells, low B cells, and an inverted T helper/suppressor ratio due to very low numbers of T helper cells. Hemophilia patients on cryoprecipitate therapy exhibited normal immune parameters. A high percentage of hemophilia patients on both treatments had antibody to hepatitis B virus. The isolated finding of elevated levels of T suppressor cells in hemophilia patients receiving Factor VIII concentrate has not been recognized as an early indicator of impending AIDS, and longitudinal studies will be required to determine its clinical significance.

  9. Hemodialysis in a patient with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Usha, Thiruvengadam; Thopalan, Balasubramaniyan; Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Thirumalvalavan, Kaliaperumal; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan

    2016-10-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), occurring in 1 out of 10,000 persons. Life expectancy and quality of life have dramatically improved recently in patients with hemophilia. Chronic kidney disease and need for renal replacement therapy in these patients are rare. The development of inhibitors to FVIII is the most serious complication of hemophilia and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. We describe here a 28-year-old male patient with severe hemophilia A with presence of factor VIII inhibitor, who had end stage renal disease. Central venous access device was inserted along with infusion of factor eight inhibitor bypass activity before and after the procedure. He is currently on thrice weekly hemodialysis and doing well for 6 months without bleeding episodes. To our knowledge, hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitor managed with hemodialysis has not been reported so far. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  10. Shortened Lifespan and Lethal Hemorrhage in a Hemophilia A Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Staber, Janice M; Pollpeter, Molly J

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A animal models have helped advance our understanding of factor VIII deficiency. Previously, factor VIII deficient mouse models were reported to have a normal life span without spontaneous bleeds. However, the bleeding frequency and survival in these animals has not been thoroughly evaluated. To investigate the survival and lethal bleeding frequency in two strains of E-16 hemophilia A mice. We prospectively studied factor VIII deficient hemizygous affected males (n = 83) and homozygous affected females (n = 55) for survival and bleeding frequency. Animals were evaluated for presence and location of bleeds as potential cause of death. Hemophilia A mice had a median survival of 254 days, which is significantly shortened compared to wild type controls (p < 0.0001). In addition, the hemophilia A mice experienced hemorrhage in several tissues. This previously-underappreciated shortened survival in the hemophilia A murine model provides new outcomes for investigation of therapeutics and also reflects the shortened lifespan of patients if left untreated.

  11. Pattern of factor VIII inhibitors in patients with hemophilia A in the north east of Iran.

    PubMed

    Modaresi, A R; Torghabeh, H Mansouri; Pourfathollah, A A; Shooshtari, M Mahmoodian; Yazdi, Z Rezaie

    2006-06-01

    This survey was conducted to evaluate coagulation factor VIII:C inhibitors among 102 hemophilia A patients from different cities of Khorasan province in north east of Iran in order to identify and characterize the pattern of inhibitor formation in these patients population. For this purpose, we randomly obtained plasma samples of 102 hemophilia A patients (44 patients with severe, 28 patients with intermediate and 30 patients with mild hemophilia A) and studied them using two tests: the APTT mix and Bethesda test were performed. In the whole group 20 patients (19.6%) factor VIII inhibitors were detected. These were in 11 patients with severe, five patients with intermediate and four patients with mild hemophilia A. None of patients with hemophilia A had previously been studied for the presence of an inhibitor, so there was no existing history of inhibitor evaluation.

  12. Role of bone marrow transplantation for correcting hemophilia A in mice

    PubMed Central

    Follenzi, Antonia; Raut, Sanj; Merlin, Simone; Sarkar, Rita

    2012-01-01

    To better understand cellular basis of hemophilia, cell types capable of producing FVIII need to be identified. We determined whether bone marrow (BM)–derived cells would produce cells capable of synthesizing and releasing FVIII by transplanting healthy mouse BM into hemophilia A mice. To track donor-derived cells, we used genetic reporters. Use of multiple coagulation assays demonstrated whether FVIII produced by discrete cell populations would correct hemophilia A. We found that animals receiving healthy BM cells survived bleeding challenge with correction of hemophilia, although donor BM-derived hepatocytes or endothelial cells were extremely rare, and these cells did not account for therapeutic benefits. By contrast, donor BM-derived mononuclear and mesenchymal stromal cells were more abundant and expressed FVIII mRNA as well as FVIII protein. Moreover, injection of healthy mouse Kupffer cells (liver macrophage/mononuclear cells), which predominantly originate from BM, or of healthy BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, protected hemophilia A mice from bleeding challenge with appearance of FVIII in blood. Therefore, BM transplantation corrected hemophilia A through donor-derived mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cells. These insights into FVIII synthesis and production in alternative cell types will advance studies of pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic development in hemophilia A. PMID:22368271

  13. Health-related quality of life in hemophilia: results of the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life Index (Haem-a-Qol) at a Brazilian blood center

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adriana Aparecida; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa; Corrêa, Camila Soares Lima; da Cruz, Danielle Teles; Rodrigues, Daniela de Oliveira Werneck; Ferreira, Monica Calil Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on health-related quality of life are based on the increasingly evident need for medical care not to be limited to preventing death, but to focus instead on the value of health. Objective This study aimed to measure the health-related quality of life in hemophilia, using the Hemophilia- Specific Quality of Life (Haem-A-QoL) questionnaire and describe the socioeconomic characteristics and health conditions of these patients. Methods The Brazilian version of the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire was administered to hemophiliac adults, treated in an on-demand regime at the Juiz de Fora Regional Blood Center - HEMOMINAS Foundation. The patients were interviewed about demographic and socioeconomic data and their understanding of the questionnaire. Clinical data were collected from medical records. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set for p-values < 0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, version 15.0). Results Thirty-nine patients were evaluated. The mean age was 36.8 years. 84.6% had hemophilia A; 20.5% of the patients had hemophilia classified as mild, 41% as moderate and 38.5% as severe. The records of 10.5% of the patients registered seropositivity for anti-HIV and 57.9% for anti-HCV. Target joints were detected in 69.2%. The mean total Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life score was 35.55. 'Sports and leisure'and 'Physical health'were the most impaired dimensions and the dimension 'Relationship and partners'was the least impaired. The Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life scores showed good discriminant validity for hemophilia severity (p-value = 0.001), HIV-infection (p-value = 0.02), HCV-infection (p-value = 0.01) and the presence of target joints (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Health-related quality of life in hemophilia, measured by the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire, was influenced by the

  14. Deep intronic variations may cause mild hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Castaman, G; Giacomelli, S H; Mancuso, M E; D'Andrea, G; Santacroce, R; Sanna, S; Santagostino, E; Mannucci, P M; Goodeve, A; Rodeghiero, F

    2011-08-01

    In about 10% of patients with mild hemophilia A, no candidate gene mutations are apparent after complete gene sequencing. To analyze factor VIII gene (F8) mRNA for mutations in five families with mild hemophilia A with no apparent genomic mutation and a reduced response to desmopressin. In four cases, mRNA studies revealed the presence of an abnormal mRNA transcript in addition to normal F8 mRNA. Sequencing of the abnormal transcripts revealed complex abnormalities, which allowed the identification of three different intronic variations (c.2113+1152delA, c.5587-93C>T and c.5999-277G>A) at the DNA level, absent from 387 normal alleles. By in silico analysis, c.2113+1152delA and c.5587-93C>T were strongly predicted to result in the generation of new splice sites with the introduction of premature termination codons, while c.5999-277G>A was predicted to generate a new protein with 30 additional amino acids. However, these predictions were not homogeneous across the different mutations and programs used. The detrimental effect of two mutations was also confirmed by in vitro expression studies. These changes were also identified in related female carriers and in other mild HA patients not included in the original study. No mRNA abnormality was identified in the remaining patient. Although rare, deep intronic variations may be responsible for mild hemophilia A where no other F8 mutations have been identified and may be associated with a reduced biologic response to desmopressin. F8 mRNA analysis is a useful tool for the identification of deep intronic variation not detectable by standard DNA sequencing. © 2011 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. In vitro and In vivo Model Systems for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong; Kapranov, Philipp; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-01-17

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary disorder caused by various mutations in factor VIII gene resulting in either a severe deficit or total lack of the corresponding activity. Recent success in gene therapy of a related disease, hemophilia B, gives new hope that similar success can be achieved for hemophilia A as well. To develop a gene therapy strategy for the latter, a variety of model systems are needed to evaluate molecular engineering of the factor VIII gene, vector delivery efficacy and safety-related issues. Typically, a tissue culture cell line is the most convenient way to get a preliminary glimpse of the potential of a vector delivery strategy. It is then followed by extensive testing in hemophilia A mouse and dog models. Newly developed hemophilia A sheep may provide yet another tool for evaluation of factor VIII gene delivery vectors. Hemophilia models based on other species may also be developed since hemophiliac animals have been identified or generated in rat, pig, cattle and horse. Although a genetic nonhuman primate hemophilia A model has yet to be developed, the non-genetic hemophilia A model can also be used for special purposes when specific questions need to be addressed that cannot not be answered in other model systems. Hemophilia A is caused by a functional deficiency in the factor VIII gene. This X-linked, recessive bleeding disorder affects approximately 1 in 5000 males [1-3]. Clinically, it is characterized by frequent and spontaneous joint hemorrhages, easy bruising and prolonged bleeding time. The coagulation activity of FVIII dictates severity of the clinical symptoms. Approximately 50% of all cases are classified as severe with less than 1% of normal levels of factor VIII detected [4]. This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding. In contrast, patients with 5-30% of normal factor VIII activity exhibit mild clinical manifestations.

  16. In vitro and In vivo Model Systems for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong; Kapranov, Philipp; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary disorder caused by various mutations in factor VIII gene resulting in either a severe deficit or total lack of the corresponding activity. Recent success in gene therapy of a related disease, hemophilia B, gives new hope that similar success can be achieved for hemophilia A as well. To develop a gene therapy strategy for the latter, a variety of model systems are needed to evaluate molecular engineering of the factor VIII gene, vector delivery efficacy and safety-related issues. Typically, a tissue culture cell line is the most convenient way to get a preliminary glimpse of the potential of a vector delivery strategy. It is then followed by extensive testing in hemophilia A mouse and dog models. Newly developed hemophilia A sheep may provide yet another tool for evaluation of factor VIII gene delivery vectors. Hemophilia models based on other species may also be developed since hemophiliac animals have been identified or generated in rat, pig, cattle and horse. Although a genetic nonhuman primate hemophilia A model has yet to be developed, the non-genetic hemophilia A model can also be used for special purposes when specific questions need to be addressed that cannot not be answered in other model systems. Hemophilia A is caused by a functional deficiency in the factor VIII gene. This X-linked, recessive bleeding disorder affects approximately 1 in 5000 males [1–3]. Clinically, it is characterized by frequent and spontaneous joint hemorrhages, easy bruising and prolonged bleeding time. The coagulation activity of FVIII dictates severity of the clinical symptoms. Approximately 50% of all cases are classified as severe with less than 1% of normal levels of factor VIII detected [4]. This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding. In contrast, patients with 5–30% of normal factor VIII activity exhibit mild clinical manifestations. PMID:25401041

  17. Prevalent Inhibitors in Hemophilia B Subjects Enrolled in the Universal Data Collection Database

    PubMed Central

    Puetz, John; Soucie, J. Michael; Kempton, Christine L.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Several risk factors for inhibitors have recently been described for hemophilia A. It has been assumed that similar risk factors are also relevant for hemophilia B, but there is limited data to confirm this notion. Objectives To determine the prevalence of and risk factors associated with inhibitors in hemophilia B Methods The database of the Universal Data Collection (UDC) project of the Centers for Disease Control for the years 1998 – 2011 was queried to determine the prevalence of inhibitors in hemophilia B subjects. In addition, disease severity, race/ethnicity, age, factor exposure, and prophylaxis usage were evaluated to determine their impact on inhibitor prevalence. Results Of the 3800 male subjects with hemophilia B enrolled in the UDC database, 75 (2%) were determined to have an inhibitor at some point during the study period. Severe disease (OR 13.1, 95% CI 6.2-27.7), black race (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1), and age less than 11 (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.0) were found to be significantly associated with having an inhibitor. There was insufficient data to determine if type of factor used and prophylaxis were associated with inhibitors. Conclusions Inhibitors in hemophilia B are much less prevalent than hemophilia A, especially in patients with mild disease. Similar factors associated with inhibitors in hemophilia A also seem to be present for hemophilia B. The information collected by this large surveillance project did not permit evaluation of potential risk factors related to treatment approaches and exposures, and additional studies will be required. PMID:23855900

  18. Bayesian approach to the assessment of the population-specific risk of inhibitors in hemophilia A patients: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ji; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Romanov, Vadim; Pullenayegum, Eleanor M; Marshall, John K; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Developing inhibitors is a rare event during the treatment of hemophilia A. The multifacets and uncertainty surrounding the development of inhibitors further complicate the process of estimating inhibitor rate from the limited data. Bayesian statistical modeling provides a useful tool in generating, enhancing, and exploring the evidence through incorporating all the available information. We built our Bayesian analysis using three study cases to estimate the inhibitor rates of patients with hemophilia A in three different scenarios: Case 1, a single cohort of previously treated patients (PTPs) or previously untreated patients; Case 2, a meta-analysis of PTP cohorts; and Case 3, a previously unexplored patient population - patients with baseline low-titer inhibitor or history of inhibitor development. The data used in this study were extracted from three published ADVATE (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] is a product of Baxter for treating hemophilia A) post-authorization surveillance studies. Noninformative and informative priors were applied to Bayesian standard (Case 1) or random-effects (Case 2 and Case 3) logistic models. Bayesian probabilities of satisfying three meaningful thresholds of the risk of developing a clinical significant inhibitor (10/100, 5/100 [high rates], and 1/86 [the Food and Drug Administration mandated cutoff rate in PTPs]) were calculated. The effect of discounting prior information or scaling up the study data was evaluated. Results based on noninformative priors were similar to the classical approach. Using priors from PTPs lowered the point estimate and narrowed the 95% credible intervals (Case 1: from 1.3 [0.5, 2.7] to 0.8 [0.5, 1.1]; Case 2: from 1.9 [0.6, 6.0] to 0.8 [0.5, 1.1]; Case 3: 2.3 [0.5, 6.8] to 0.7 [0.5, 1.1]). All probabilities of satisfying a threshold of 1/86 were above 0.65. Increasing the number of patients by two and ten times substantially narrowed the credible intervals for the single cohort study (1.4 [0.7, 2

  19. Bayesian approach to the assessment of the population-specific risk of inhibitors in hemophilia A patients: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ji; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Romanov, Vadim; Pullenayegum, Eleanor M; Marshall, John K; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing inhibitors is a rare event during the treatment of hemophilia A. The multifacets and uncertainty surrounding the development of inhibitors further complicate the process of estimating inhibitor rate from the limited data. Bayesian statistical modeling provides a useful tool in generating, enhancing, and exploring the evidence through incorporating all the available information. Methods We built our Bayesian analysis using three study cases to estimate the inhibitor rates of patients with hemophilia A in three different scenarios: Case 1, a single cohort of previously treated patients (PTPs) or previously untreated patients; Case 2, a meta-analysis of PTP cohorts; and Case 3, a previously unexplored patient population – patients with baseline low-titer inhibitor or history of inhibitor development. The data used in this study were extracted from three published ADVATE (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] is a product of Baxter for treating hemophilia A) post-authorization surveillance studies. Noninformative and informative priors were applied to Bayesian standard (Case 1) or random-effects (Case 2 and Case 3) logistic models. Bayesian probabilities of satisfying three meaningful thresholds of the risk of developing a clinical significant inhibitor (10/100, 5/100 [high rates], and 1/86 [the Food and Drug Administration mandated cutoff rate in PTPs]) were calculated. The effect of discounting prior information or scaling up the study data was evaluated. Results Results based on noninformative priors were similar to the classical approach. Using priors from PTPs lowered the point estimate and narrowed the 95% credible intervals (Case 1: from 1.3 [0.5, 2.7] to 0.8 [0.5, 1.1]; Case 2: from 1.9 [0.6, 6.0] to 0.8 [0.5, 1.1]; Case 3: 2.3 [0.5, 6.8] to 0.7 [0.5, 1.1]). All probabilities of satisfying a threshold of 1/86 were above 0.65. Increasing the number of patients by two and ten times substantially narrowed the credible intervals for the single

  20. Perioperative Considerations in a Patient with Hemophilia A: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Tuhin; Dogra, Neelam; Chauhan, Kanchan; Shahani, Jigyasa

    2017-01-01

    Classic hemophilia or hemophilia A is a congenital bleeding diathesis in which the affected individual may present with spontaneous hemorrhage or persistent bleeding even after minor trauma. Knowledge about the disease process, multidisciplinary team approach, and timely management can lead to favorable outcome in these patients. We report management of a child with hemophilia A for suturing of lacerated upper lip mucosa following trauma. A review of literature with recommendations for perioperative management, especially in the setting of emergency surgery, is also provided. PMID:28298793

  1. Management of Pregnancy in a Patient with Severe Hemophilia Type A

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vipra; Khalid, Aysha; Cohen, Alice J.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia type A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder with a diversity of clinical manifestations ranging from persistent bleeding after minor trauma, spontaneous deep muscle or joint hemorrhage, to intracranial hemorrhage. As an X-linked disorder, hemophilia is rare in females and therefore there is little experience with pregnancy and no standardized guidelines to prevent bleeding antepartum, at delivery, and postpartum. We report the clinical course and management of a woman with severe hemophilia A who on two occasions had uncomplicated pregnancies and vaginal deliveries at term utilizing bolus recombinant factor VIII concentrate. PMID:23943706

  2. Effects of coagulation factor concentrate prophylaxis in moderate and severe hemophilia A patients at a single hemophilia center in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byung Suk; Choi, Jun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate prophylactic treatment effects in Korean patients with severe hemophilia A. Methods A prospective study of 32 severe hemophilia A patients was conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Board at the Eulji University Hospital. Two patients received primary prophylaxis; whereas, the other 30 patients were divided into 2 groups-secondary prophylaxis (n=15) and on-demand (n=15)-on the basis of their consent for secondary prophylaxis. A 20-25 IU/kg dose of factor VIII concentrate was administered to the primary and secondary prophylaxis group patients every 3 days for 1 year. The prophylactic effect was evaluated by observing changes in the Pettersson scores, annual number of total and joint bleeds, and factor VIII consumption for 1 year. Results No moderate or severe bleeding was observed, and the Pettersson scores remained unchanged during the prophylaxis period in the patients who received primary prophylactic treatment. After the treatment was changed from on-demand to secondary prophylaxis, the annual number of total and joint bleeds in the secondary prophylaxis group decreased by 64.4%±13.0% and 70.0%±15.2%, respectively. The average increase in Pettersson scores within 1 year was 0.5±0.8 and 1.3±1.1 in the secondary prophylaxis and on-demand groups, respectively. Prophylactic effects were also observed in patients >17 years who had nearly the same initial Pettersson scores. Conclusion Intermediate-dose prophylactic treatment may delay hemarthropathy progression and prevent its occurrence in Korean severe hemophilia A patients. PMID:23908669

  3. Barriers and perceived limitations to early treatment of hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    Early treatment of bleeds in hemophilia patients, both with and without inhibitors, has been shown to be of immense benefit in the overall clinical outcome. Despite the advantages of treating the bleeding episodes early, significant barriers and limitations remain. The aim of this review is to highlight the various barriers and perceived limitations to early therapy of bleeding episodes, especially in patients who have developed inhibitors to factor VIII. The peer-reviewed literature was searched for articles on hemophilia patients, with and without inhibitors, and early treatment, to identify the barriers to early treatment and potential impact on patient outcomes. The most important barrier is the educational barrier, which involves lack of awareness among patients regarding the signs of a bleed, as well as importance of early therapy. It is also common for parents or caregivers of school-age children to exhibit inconvenience and scheduling barriers. Distance to the treatment center can also play a role here. Some patients experience financial barriers related to cost of clotting factor products, insurance coverage, or insurance caps and out-of-pocket costs. Rarely, there can also be problems related to venous access or home infusion. Lastly, multiple psychosocial barriers can prevent adherence to treatment regimens. Identification and addressing these individual barriers will result in improved compliance rates, prevent joint damage, be more cost-effective, and lead to better overall health of these patients. PMID:23700376

  4. Acquired Hemophilia A: A Frequently Overlooked Autoimmune Hemorrhagic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare hemorrhagic disease in which autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII- (FVIII-) neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) impair the intrinsic coagulation system. As the inhibitors developed in AHA are autoantibodies, the disease may have an autoimmune cause and is often associated with autoimmune disease. Although acute hemorrhage associated with AHA may be fatal and is costly to treat, AHA is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed. AHA should thus be considered in the differential diagnosis particularly in postpartum women and the elderly with bleeding tendency or prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Cross-mixing tests and measurement of FVIII-binding antibodies are useful to confirm AHA diagnosis. For treatment of acute hemorrhage, hemostatic therapy with bypassing agents should be provided. Unlike in congenital hemophilia A with inhibitors, in which immune tolerance induction therapy using repetitive infusions of high-dose FVIII concentrates is effective for inhibitor eradication, immune tolerance induction therapy has shown poor efficacy in treating AHA. Immunosuppressive treatment should thus be initiated to eradicate inhibitors as soon as the diagnosis of AHA is confirmed. PMID:24741588

  5. Predictors of retention among HIV/hemophilia health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Brown, Larry K; Schultz, Janet R; Forsberg, Ann D; King, Gary; Kocik, Susan M; Butler, Regina B

    2002-01-01

    Health care professionals working with individuals with chronic medical illness, especially those infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), may be at risk for burnout and departure due to various job stresses such as the death of patients and social stigma. Factors that prevent burnout and employee attrition are seldom studied. Two hundred thirteen staff (doctors, nurses and mental health workers) at a representative sample of Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC) completed instruments to measure Burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), and perceived job stresses and satisfaction (job tasks, interactions with colleagues and patient care). The staff were surveyed again after two years and their job status determined after 4 years. After 4 years, 35% of the staff had left the field of Hemophilia/HIV care. Univariate tests found that retention was significantly associated with initial job satisfaction, being married and low levels of stress with colleagues. Burnout, as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory, at baseline, was unrelated to job retention over 4 years. An adjusted multiple logistic regression of all significant variables found that colleague support was most related to retention (OR=2.8, CI=1.49,5.1). We conclude that attrition of highly trained staff is a significant issue for patients and HTCs. These data suggest the important role that a well-functioning team can have in buffering the inevitable stresses associated with HIV care. Mental Health professionals have considerable expertise in addressing these issues.

  6. Hemophilia treatment in developing countries: products and protocols.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Alok; You, Steve K; Ayob, Yasmin; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; de Bosch, Norma; Perez Bianco, Raul; Ala, Fereydoun

    2005-11-01

    The most important aspect of management of hemophilia is to provide adequate replacement of safe clotting factor concentrates to prevent or treat bleeding episodes. There has been considerable progress in many countries in the developing world with regard to this aspect of care. However, very little data are available in the literature on the types of products being used for factor replacement and the doses being administered for control or treatment of bleeding in different countries. These data are important to document because only then can data from different centers be compared. This article provides data from seven countries: Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Venezuela, Argentina, Iran, and India. It shows that there is wide variability not only in the types of products used (plasma to recombinant factor concentrates) but also in the doses administered (minimal to very high) for similar indications. Prospective documentation of data on musculoskeletal outcome at these centers and correlation with dose of factor replacement could help identify different models of care. Comparing such data and collating the experience in different countries could be useful for optimizing care and establishing cost-effective models. The combined experience in the developing world in providing hemophilia services should be used to define standards of care that are practical and to set achievable goals.

  7. Acquired hemophilia A: a frequently overlooked autoimmune hemorrhagic disorder.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare hemorrhagic disease in which autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII- (FVIII-) neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) impair the intrinsic coagulation system. As the inhibitors developed in AHA are autoantibodies, the disease may have an autoimmune cause and is often associated with autoimmune disease. Although acute hemorrhage associated with AHA may be fatal and is costly to treat, AHA is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed. AHA should thus be considered in the differential diagnosis particularly in postpartum women and the elderly with bleeding tendency or prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Cross-mixing tests and measurement of FVIII-binding antibodies are useful to confirm AHA diagnosis. For treatment of acute hemorrhage, hemostatic therapy with bypassing agents should be provided. Unlike in congenital hemophilia A with inhibitors, in which immune tolerance induction therapy using repetitive infusions of high-dose FVIII concentrates is effective for inhibitor eradication, immune tolerance induction therapy has shown poor efficacy in treating AHA. Immunosuppressive treatment should thus be initiated to eradicate inhibitors as soon as the diagnosis of AHA is confirmed.

  8. Idiopathic Acquired Hemophilia A with Undetectable Factor VIII Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Nicholas B.; Streiff, Michael B.; Gocke, Christian B.; Kickler, Thomas S.; Lanzkron, Sophie M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We present the case of a 73-year-old female, with no family or personal history of a bleeding disorder, who had a classic presentation for acquired hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was low but detectable and a factor VIII inhibitor was undetectable. Methods. The patient's plasma was comprehensively studied to determine the cause of the acquired coagulopathy. Using the Nijmegen modification of the Bethesda assay, no factor VIII autoantibody was measureable despite varying the incubation time from 1 to 3 hours. Results. The aPTT was prolonged at 46.8 seconds, which did not correct in the 4 : 1 mix but did with 1 : 1 mix. Using a one stage factor VIII activity assay, the FVIII activity was 16% and chromogenic FVIII activity was also 16%. The patient was treated with recombinant FVII and transfusion, significantly reducing bleeding. Long-term therapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone with normalization of FVIII activity. Conclusions. Physicians can be presented with the challenging clinical picture of an acquired factor VIII inhibitor without a detectable inhibitor by the Bethesda assay. Standard therapy for an acquired hemophilia A should be considered. PMID:24955264

  9. Treatment of hepatitis C in patients with haemophilia - the Israeli National Hemophilia Center experience.

    PubMed

    Maor, Y; Schapiro, J M; Bashari, D; Lurie, Y; Safadi, R; Segol, O; Paritsky, M; Rachlis, Z; Avidan, B; Bar-Meir, S; Martinowitz, U

    2008-03-01

    Treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin, now the standard of care, has been shown to achieve sustained viral response (SVR) in up to 60% of patients with hepatitis C (HCV). Studies of response to this combination in HCV-infected haemophilia patients are scarce. The aim of the study was to report the results and safety of interferon/ribavirin treatment in HCV and HCV-/HIV-infected patients at the Israeli National Hemophilia Center. A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted on haemophilia patients infected with HCV or HCV/HIV. Patients received combination of Peg-IFN and ribavirin. Few were still treated with standard interferon. The primary end-point was sustained viral response (SVR). The secondary end-point was safety, with emphasis on increased bleeding episodes. Some 18/43 (42%) HCV mono-infected haemophilia patients achieved SVR. Relapse occurred in 14 (33%), while 11 patients (25%) were non-responders. SVR was achieved among 17/37 (46%) naïve patients receiving Peg-IFN and ribavirin. Among patients with genotype-1, SVR was achieved in 12/36 (33%) and 11/30 (37%) in the whole group and Peg-IFN treated naïve patients, respectively. In HCV/HIV co-infected patients only 1 patient achieved SVR. Severe anaemia occurred in 14/50 (28%) patients, four received erythropoietin. None maintained stable haemoglobin levels. Two patients had significant bleeding episodes. In our cohort of haemophilia patients, SVR was achieved in a lower than expected rates. A relatively high relapse rate in the HCV mono-infected patients and a very high non-response rate in the HCV/HIV co-infected patients were observed as anticipated. Anaemia was a major side effect and the use of growth factors seemed unrevealing.

  10. Case of linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis associated with acquired hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Osao; Yamamoto, Yu-ichi; Awazawa, Ryoko; Nonaka, Kimiko; Taira, Kiyohito; Asato, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Keisuke; Oyama, Bungo; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Uezato, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Linear immunoglobulin (Ig)A bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune subepidermal bullous dermatosis caused by circulating IgA autoantibodies directed against the antigens at the basement membrane zone. Most linear IgA bullous dermatosis cases are idiopathic, but some are associated with the use of certain drugs, infections, lymphoproliferative disorders, internal malignancies, autoimmune disorders, collagen diseases or, very rarely, other skin diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases. Acquired hemophilia is also rare; it is a coagulation disease caused by anti-factor VIII IgG antibodies. Acquired hemophilia has been reported to be associated with malignant tumors, pregnancy or postpartum, drug reactions, collagen diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders, and skin diseases such as psoriasis and pemphigus. We report a case of hemophilia acquired during the course of linear IgA bullous dermatosis and review reported cases of autoimmune bullous dermatoses associated with acquired hemophilia.

  11. Prevention of inhibitor development in hemophilia A in 2016. A glimpse into the future?

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Thanks to considerable progresses made over the last 30years, hemophilia benefits from the most efficacious and safe treatment among the many monogenic inherited disorders. The most challenging complication of replacement therapy in hemophilia A is the occurrence of alloantibodies against infused factor VIII (FVIII), thus predisposing the patients to increased morbidity and disability. Extensive research in this field has definitively unraveled that development of inhibitors in hemophilia A is a complex and multifactorial process, in which inherited and environmental factors dynamically interact. This narrative review, after providing a concise overview about the main genetic and non-genetic risk factors, is aimed to focus on prediction risk models and preventive strategies for minimizing the risk of developing inhibitors in hemophilia A patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improving the management of chronic diseases using web-based technologies: an application in hemophilia care.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonor; Saavedra, Vasco; Ferreira, Carlos; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Modern methods of information and communication that use web technologies provide an opportunity to facilitate closer communication between patients and healthcare providers, allowing a joint management of chronic diseases. This paper describes a web-based technological solution to support the management of inherited bleeding disorders integrating, diffusing and archiving large sets of data relating to the clinical practice of hemophilia care, more specifically the clinical practice at the Hematology Service of Coimbra Hospital Center (a Hemophilia Treatment Center located in Portugal).

  13. Nasal hemophilic pseudotumor in a patient with mild hemophilia A and allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiyasu; Monji, Mikio; Kai, Keita; Matsuo, Muneaki

    2017-02-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication, even in patients with severe hemophilia. Herein we report on a case of hemophilic pseudotumor in a patient with mild hemophilia A and allergic rhinitis, initially suspected to be a nasal tumor. The pseudotumor was cured by supplementation with recombinant factor VIII concentrates, and medication for allergic rhinitis. Pseudotumor should always be considered in hemophiliac patients, even in those with only mild deficiency of coagulation factors.

  14. Changing Paradigm of Hemophilia Management: Extended Half-Life Factor Concentrates and Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Riten; Dunn, Amy; Carcao, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Management of hemophilia has evolved significantly in the last century-from recognition of the causative mechanism in the 1950s to commercially available clotting factor concentrates in the 1960s. Availability of lyophilized concentrates in the 1970s set the stage for home-based therapy, followed by introduction of virally attenuated plasma-derived, and then recombinant factor concentrates in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. The subsequent years saw a paradigm shift in treatment goals from on-demand therapy to prophylactic factor replacement starting at an early age, to prevent hemarthrosis becoming the standard of care for patients with severe hemophilia. In the developed world, the increasing use of home-based prophylactic regimens has significantly improved the quality of life, and life expectancy of patients with severe hemophilia. Seminal developments in the past 5 years, including the commercial availability of extended half-life factor concentrates and the publication of successful results of gene therapy for patients with hemophilia B, promise to further revolutionize hemophilia care over the next few decades. In this review, we summarize the evolution of management for hemophilia, with a focus on extended half-life factor concentrates and gene therapy.

  15. Unmet needs in the transition to adulthood: 18- to 30-year-old people with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Quon, Doris; Reding, Mark; Guelcher, Chris; Peltier, Skye; Witkop, Michelle; Cutter, Susan; Buranahirun, Cathy; Molter, Don; Frey, Mary Jane; Forsyth, Angela; Tran, Duc Bobby; Curtis, Randall; Hiura, Grant; Levesque, Justin; de la Riva, Debbie; Compton, Matthew; Iyer, Neeraj N; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    Young adults with hemophilia face unique challenges during the transition to adulthood, including issues associated with switching from pediatric to adult hematology care, building mature interpersonal relationships, and establishing an independent career with an assurance of medical insurance coverage. A greater understanding of these challenges is essential for developing effective strategies to address the specific needs of this population. These challenges may be differentiated from those of older adults with hemophilia in large part because of more extensive childhood prophylaxis and safer factor products, resulting in fewer joint problems and lower rates of HIV and HCV infections. This analysis of the changing nature and unmet needs of today's young adults entering into adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as potential strategies for optimally addressing these needs, was developed following roundtable discussions between patients, caregivers, hematologists, and other health care professionals participating in comprehensive care. Challenges identified among young adults with hemophilia include psychosocial issues related to maturity, personal responsibility, and increased independence, as well as concerns regarding when and with whom to share information about one's hemophilia, limited awareness of educational and financial resources, and a low perceived value of regular hematology care. The initiatives proposed herein highlight important opportunities for health care professionals at pediatric and adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as national organizations, community groups, and career counselors, to address key unmet needs of this patient population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biodistribution of Liver-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Peripheral Injection in a Hemophilia A Patient.

    PubMed

    Sokal, Etienne M; Lombard, Catherine Anne; Roelants, Véronique; Najimi, Mustapha; Varma, Sharat; Sargiacomo, Camillo; Ravau, Joachim; Mazza, Giuseppe; Jamar, François; Versavau, Julia; Jacobs, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Marc; Eeckhoudt, Stéphane; Lambert, Catherine; Stéphenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Hermans, Cédric

    2017-08-01

    With the exception of liver transplantation, there is no cure for hemophilia, which is currently managed by preemptive replacement therapy. Liver-derived stem cells are in clinical development for inborn and acquired liver diseases and could represent a curative treatment for hemophilia A. The liver is a major factor VIII (FVIII) synthesis site, and mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to control joint bleeding in animal models of hemophilia. Adult-derived human liver stem cells (ADHLSCs) have mesenchymal characteristics and have been shown able to engraft in and repopulate both animal and human livers. Thus, the objectives were to evaluate the potency of ADHLSCs to control bleeding in a hemophilia A patient and assess the biodistribution of the cells after intravenous injection. A patient suffering from hemophilia A was injected with repeated doses of ADHLSCs via a peripheral vein (35 million In-oxine-labeled cells, followed by 125 million cells the next day, and 3 infusions of 250 million cells every 2 weeks thereafter; total infusion period, 50 days). After cell therapy, we found a temporary (15 weeks) decrease in the patient's FVIII requirements and severe bleeding complications, despite a lack of increase in circulating FVIII. The cells were safely administered to the patient via a peripheral vein. Biodistribution analysis revealed an initial temporary entrapment of the cells in the lungs, followed by homing to the liver and to a joint afflicted with hemarthrosis. These results suggest the potential use of ADHLSCs in the treatment of hemophilia A.

  17. Heavy hematuria requiring cystectomy in a patient with hemophilia A: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Washino, Satoshi; Hirai, Masaru; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Saito, Kimitoshi; Miyagawa, Tomoaki

    2015-08-13

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in factor VIII. Hemophilia A affects 1 in 5,000-10,000 males. Hematuria is frequent in hemophilia. Hematuria in hemophilia is generally considered benign and manageable with conservative therapy; however, severe hematuria requiring surgical therapy has rarely been reported. A 60-year-old male with hemophilia A presented with persistent gross hematuria of unknown cause. He was treated with recombinant factor VIII products, followed by several conservative therapies as follows: clot evacuation by vesicoclysis, continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline, and intravesical instillation of aluminum hydroxide/magnesium hydroxide (Maalox); however, these failed to resolve the hemorrhaging. The patient was offered and consented to cystectomy with an ileal conduit. Intraoperative clotting was normal with the infusion of adequate recombinant factor VIII products and transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma, and the procedure was performed safely. After surgery, the patient had blood in his stool several times. No bleeding site was demonstrated in the colon by colonoscopy and (99m)Technetium-human serum albumin-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid scintigraphy demonstrated that the extravasation of radioactive isotope was detected at the anal side of terminal ileum but not at the oral side. These findings were suspected to be bleeding from the ileoileal anastomosis. However, the bleeding was managed with recombinant factor VIII products. Cystectomy in hemophilia may be safe, if monitored appropriately. Urinary diversion using the intestine may be avoided because anastomotic hemorrhage may become a problem.

  18. The Fourth Annual Meeting of the International Network for Pediatric Hemophilia: Current Challenges and Recommendations in the Clinical Care of Children with Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, Marijke; Valentino, Leonard A.; Manco-Johnson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Summary The International Network for Pediatric Hemophilia (INPH) comprises a group of physicians committed to the unique care of and challenges facing pediatric hemophilia patients. By collaborating on an international level, extensive experience can be shared on current practice, new trends can be discussed and scientifically valid studies can be developed and performed. The three overall objectives of the group (scientific progress, education and networking) are achieved at each annual meeting starting with a round table on the members’ current research and clinical activities, project reports of INPH study initiatives, followed by invited educational presentations and interactive discussions. The meetings close with proposals of new projects, future directions of the group and concluding remarks. The Fourth Annual INPH meeting, held in 2009 in Boston, MA, USA, focused on inhibitor development and hemophilic arthropathy in the clinical care of children with hemophilia. PMID:20823999

  19. Joint pain in people with hemophilia depends on joint status.

    PubMed

    Hilberg, Thomas; Czepa, Doerte; Freialdenhoven, David; Boettger, Michael Karl

    2011-09-01

    Recurrent joint bleedings in people with hemophilia (PWH) often progress into the full clinical picture of hemophilic arthropathy, accompanied by chronic pain. Although chronic pain is commonly present in PWH, investigations assessing pain thresholds have not been performed yet. Thus, the aim of this study was to obtain objective and subjective measures of joint pain in PWH and to relate these to the severity of joint pathology. Thirty-six patients (aged 43±11 years) with hemophilia A and B (31 severe A, 1 B; 3 moderate A, 1 B) and 40 healthy control subjects (aged 42±14 years) participated in this study. Mechanical pain thresholds were obtained as objective parameters using an algometer, while subjective pain intensity and quality were assessed using numeric analogue scales. Quality of life was estimated using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Overall, we found reduced mechanical pain thresholds as obtained from the knee (PWH--left 38.1 [28.7/57.7], right 29.5 [20.9/49.3]; control--left 67.4 [56.8/112.6], right 60.9 [42.6/97.2]), and elbow (PWH--left 23.4 [15.3/33.4], right 23.5 [20.1/35.1]; control--left 56.7 [32.6/86.6], right 53.0 [30.7/87.7] in N; median [25th/75th percentile]) joints in PWH. Interestingly, this increased pain sensitivity was related to the severity of clinical joint pathology. In addition, PWH reported their pain in a more descriptive and not affective manner and scored similar to controls in the mental domain of the SF-36, thereby indicating good coping strategies despite the chronic nature of their complaints. In conclusion, pain sensitivity at the site of the affected joints is increased and closely related to joint pathology in people with hemophilia. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors among Saudi patients with hemophilia: Results from the Saudi national hemophilia screening program.

    PubMed

    Owaidah, Tarek; Momen, Abdulkareem Al; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Almusa, Abdulrahman; Alkasim, Fawaz; Tarawah, Ahmed; Nouno, Randa Al; Batniji, Fatima Al; Alothman, Fahad; Alomari, Ali; Abu-Herbish, Saud; Abu-Riash, Mahmoud; Siddiqui, Khawar; Ahmed, Mansor; Mohamed, S Y; Saleh, Mahasen

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked diseases that predominantly affect male patients. Patients can develop coagulation factor inhibitors, which exponentially increases the treatment cost. However, the prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors in Saudi Arabia is unclear.This study aimed to determine the Saudi prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors.This 4-year, 7-center, cross-sectional study evaluated the Saudi prevalences of hemophilia A and B. We collected the patients' clinical data, evaluated their disease, and tested for factor inhibitors.We included 202 patients with hemophilia (median age at diagnosis: 0.13 years, range: birth-34.8 years). The patients included 198 male patients (98%), 148 patients with hemophilia A (73.3%), and 54 patients with hemophilia B (26.7%). The patients exhibited severe factor VIII activity (<1%; 121 patients; 5.2%), moderate activity (1-5%; 7 patients; 4.9%), and mild activity (14 patients; 9.9%). Among the patients with care-related data, most patients were treated for episodic bleeding (76.8%) or received prophylaxis (22.6%); 1 patient received both treatments. Among the patients with source-related data, the factor replacements were derived from plasma (48.4%), recombinant concentrates (22.9%), both sources (14.6%), or fresh frozen plasma (14.1%). Factor VIII inhibitors were observed in 43 (29.3%) of the 147 patients, and only 1 of the 54 patients developed factor IX inhibitors. Most patients who developed inhibitors had severe hemophilia (40/44; 90.9%), and inhibitors were also common among patients who received recombinant products (14/43; 32.6%).The Saudi prevalence of factor inhibitors was similar to those among other ethnic populations.

  1. Current and future prospects for hemophilia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Peter; Walsh, Christopher E

    2016-07-01

    Here we review the recent literature on Hemophilia gene transfer/therapy. Gene therapy is one of several new technologies being developed as a treatment for bleeding disorders. We will discuss current and pending clinical efforts and attempt to relate how the field is trending. In doing so, we will focus on the use of recombinant Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer since all currently active trials are using this vector. Recent exciting results embody nearly 20 years of preclinical and translational research. After several early clinical attempts, therapeutic factor levels that can now be achieved reflect several modifications of the original vectors. Patterns of results are slowly starting to emerge as different AAV vectors are being tested. As with any new technology, there are drawbacks, and the potential for immune/inflammatory and oncogenic risks have emerged and will be discussed.

  2. Acquired hemophilia A: Updated review of evidence and treatment guidance.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Kempton, Christine L; Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter W; Knoebl, Paul; Leissinger, Cindy A; Tiede, Andreas; Kessler, Craig M

    2017-07-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare disease resulting from autoantibodies (inhibitors) against endogenous factor VIII (FVIII) that leads to bleeding, which is often spontaneous and severe. AHA tends to occur in elderly patients with comorbidities and is associated with high mortality risk from underlying comorbidities, bleeding, or treatment complications. Treatment, which consists of hemostatic management and eradication of the inhibitors, can be challenging to manage. Few data are available to guide the management of AHA-related bleeding and eradication of the disease-causing antibodies. Endorsed by the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society of North America, an international panel of experts in AHA analyzed key questions, reviewed the literature, weighed the evidence and formed a consensus to update existing guidelines. AHA is likely underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed in real-world clinical practice. Recommendations for the management of AHA are summarized here based on the available data, integrated with the clinical experience of panel participants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-09-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume.

  4. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    PubMed

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  5. A recurrent F8 mutation (c.6046C>T) causing hemophilia A in 8% of northern Italian patients: evidence for a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Garagiola, Isabella; Seregni, Sabrina; Mortarino, Mimosa; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Peyvandi, Flora

    2016-03-01

    Hemophilia A is a heterogeneous hemorrhagic disorder caused by a large number of mutations. Recurrent mutations are rare, except intron 22 and intron 1 inversions. The substitution of a cytosine to a thymine at nucleotide 6046 in F8 gene was identified in a group of Italian patients affected by hemophilia A from a specific region of Northern Italy with a prevalence of 7.6%. This F8 variant was the second most frequent mutation in our cohort, after the intron 22 inversion. The identification of the same mutation in a restricted population gets to suppose the existence of a founder effect. Intragenic and extragenic polymorphic markers were tested to assess this assumption. A peculiar haplotype in linkage disequilibrium with this recurrent mutation (c.6046C>T) was identified in 71% of patients, supporting a founder effect. This distinctive haplotype was not identified in a control group (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001), coming from the same geographic region. These data strongly suggested the presence of a founder effect, supporting the existence of a single mutation event. Using DMLE+2.3 software and the mathematical approach described by Bengtsson and Thomson, the inferred age of this mutation is supposed to be about 2325 years (95% CI: 904-5081) ago.

  6. Cardiovascular disease risk factors: prevalence and management in adult hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming Y; Pruthi, Rajiv K

    2011-07-01

    With increasing longevity, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in hemophilia patients is expected to increase; however, evidence-based guidelines on management are lacking. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and management of CVD risk factors in hemophilia patients. A retrospective study of 58 adult hemophilia patients (≥35 years) attending Mayo Comprehensive Hemophilia Center between 1 January 2006 and 15 October 2009 were reviewed. The prevalence of CVD risk factors was hypertension 65.5%, diabetes 10.3%, smoking 12.5% and obesity 19.6%. A total of 31% did not have a lipid profile on record. Management of risk factors included antihypertensive medications in 84.2% and lipid-lowering agents in 12.1%. During their medical evaluation, four of seven active smokers received smoking cessation counseling and four of 11 obese patients received lifestyle modification advice. Eight patients (13.8%) experienced a CVD event: myocardial infarction (MI) (n=3), coronary artery disease (n=2), both MI and ischemic stroke (n=1) and hemorrhagic strokes (n=2). Only five of eight patients were on low-dose aspirin, of which aspirin was discontinued in one patient after he was diagnosed with hemophilia following a bleeding work-up. Another patient on dual antiplatelet therapy post stent placement developed epistaxis resulting in clopidogrel cessation. Hemophilia patients are at risk for CVD, similar to the general age-matched male population. Screening for CVD risk factors, with preventive dietary and pharmacologic interventions, play a key role in the prevention and long-term management of CVD. Collaborative efforts between primary care providers, cardiologists and hemophilia center specialists remain essential in managing these complex patients.

  7. Issues of disclosure and condom use in adolescents with hemophilia and HIV. Hemophilia Behavioral Evaluative Intervention Project Staff.

    PubMed

    Geary, M K; King, G; Forsberg, A D; Delaronde, S R; Parsons, J

    1996-12-01

    To examine the patterns, facilitators, and barriers to disclosure of HIV seropositivity in an adolescent population and to determine the relationship between disclosure and condom use. In recent years, public health efforts have focused on methods to prevent the transmission of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). These efforts have included safer sex education, skill building and self-efficacy training, behavioral change techniques, and encouragement of serostatus disclosure to sexual partners. In 1990, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded 10 hemophilia treatment centers to develop and implement a theory-based behavioral intervention to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. A baseline survey, focusing on barriers to safer sex, the influence of parents, peers, and sexual partners, alcohol and drug use, and communication and disclosure patterns, was administered to 321 young males (ages 12 to 25) with hemophilia and HIV. Fifty-eight percent of the sexually experienced adolescents did not disclose their HIV status to their most recent sexual partners (i.e., nondisclosers) compared to 42 percent who reported that either they informed their partners or their partners already knew their HIV status (i.e., disclosers). There was no correlation between disclosure and condom use. The most significant predictor of disclosure was the perception that peers would disclose their HIV status. The results suggest that disclosure does not necessarily facilitate condom use in this population. This conclusion may have implications for future public health efforts in HIV prevention. Rather than focusing primarily on the promotion of serostatus disclosure, behavioral interventions should emphasize the practice of safer sex, utilizing peer educators and support networks.

  8. The literature on inhibitors: articles that influence my management of patients with hemophilia A and high-titer inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, Cindy A

    2012-05-01

    High-titer inhibitors represent the greatest management challenge faced by clinicians who treat patients with hemophilia A, as bleeding episodes no longer respond to standard factor VIII replacement therapy. Over the last seven decades, major strides have been made in inhibitor treatment. This article focuses on the seminal clinical observations and studies that provided the foundation for these advances in hemophilia care.

  9. Shortened Lifespan and Lethal Hemorrhage in a Hemophilia A Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pollpeter, Molly J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilia A animal models have helped advance our understanding of factor VIII deficiency. Previously, factor VIII deficient mouse models were reported to have a normal life span without spontaneous bleeds. However, the bleeding frequency and survival in these animals has not been thoroughly evaluated. Objective To investigate the survival and lethal bleeding frequency in two strains of E-16 hemophilia A mice. Methods We prospectively studied factor VIII deficient hemizygous affected males (n = 83) and homozygous affected females (n = 55) for survival and bleeding frequency. Animals were evaluated for presence and location of bleeds as potential cause of death. Results and Conclusions Hemophilia A mice had a median survival of 254 days, which is significantly shortened compared to wild type controls (p < 0.0001). In addition, the hemophilia A mice experienced hemorrhage in several tissues. This previously-underappreciated shortened survival in the hemophilia A murine model provides new outcomes for investigation of therapeutics and also reflects the shortened lifespan of patients if left untreated. PMID:27144769

  10. Progress and challenges in the development of a cell-based therapy for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fomin, M E; Togarrati, P P; Muench, M O

    2014-12-01

    Hemophilia A results from an insufficiency of factor VIII (FVIII). Although replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII is a life-saving therapy for hemophilia A patients, such therapy is a life-long treatment rather than a cure for the disease. In this review, we discuss the possibilities, progress, and challenges that remain in the development of a cell-based cure for hemophilia A. The success of cell therapy depends on the type and availability of donor cells, the age of the host and method of transplantation, and the levels of engraftment and production of FVIII by the graft. Early therapy, possibly even prenatal transplantation, may yield the highest levels of engraftment by avoiding immunological rejection of the graft. Potential cell sources of FVIII include a specialized subset of endothelial cells known as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) present in the adult and fetal liver, or patient-specific endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells that have undergone gene editing to produce FVIII. Achieving sufficient engraftment of transplanted LSECs is one of the obstacles to successful cell therapy for hemophilia A. We discuss recent results from transplants performed in animals that show production of functional and clinically relevant levels of FVIII obtained from donor LSECs. Hence, the possibility of treating hemophilia A can be envisioned through persistent production of FVIII from transplanted donor cells derived from a number of potential cell sources or through creation of donor endothelial cells from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

  11. Consensus Review of the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease in People With Hemophilia A and B

    PubMed Central

    Boral, Leonard I.; Cohen, Alice J.; Smyth, Susan S.; White, Gilbert C.

    2015-01-01

    With advances in care, increasing numbers of people with hemophilia (PWH) achieve near-normal life expectancies and present with typical age-related cardiovascular conditions. Evidence-based guidelines for medical or surgical management of cardiovascular conditions in individuals with hemophilia are limited. Published recommendations exist for the management of some common cardiovascular conditions (eg, ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation), but identifying optimal strategies for anticoagulant or antithrombotic therapy constitutes the primary challenge of managing nonoperative cardiovascular disease (CVD) in PWH. In general, as long as factor concentrates or other hemostatic therapies maintain adequate hemostasis, the recommended medical and surgical management of CVD in PWH parallels that in individuals without hemophilia. The presence of factor inhibitors complicates hemophilia management. Published outcomes of CVD treatment in PWH are similar to those in the general population. Specific knowledge about factor replacement, factor inhibitors, and disease-specific treatment distinguishes the cardiovascular care of PWH from similar care of individuals without this rare bleeding disorder. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary approach incorporating a hematologist with an onsite coagulation laboratory, ideally associated with a hemophilia treatment center, is integral to the management of CVD in PWH. PMID:25436468

  12. Profile of efraloctocog alfa and its potential in the treatment of hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    George, Lindsey A; Camire, Rodney M

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia care has improved dramatically over the past 50 years, evolving from plasma concentrates, to purified plasma proteins, to recombinant clotting factors. These collective developments allowed for home delivery of on-demand and prophylactic treatment, resulting in the reduction of hemophilia morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life. Although efficacious in treating bleeding, conventional factor products’ half-lives require frequent venipuncture, which remains a significant burden to patients. Despite the remarkable advances in hemophilia care, no improvements have, until now, been made to the pharmacokinetic properties of factor products. Multiple strategies have more recently been employed to generate novel bioengineered products that, with great hope, represent the next wave of progress in hemophilia care. The use of these products will undoubtedly raise important discussion about choosing conventional factor over new long-acting factor products. Incorporation of these therapies into clinical care is accompanied by unanswered safety questions that will likely be evaluated only in postmarketing surveillance analysis. Further, these products may change current treatment paradigms with unclear cost repercussions and feasibility. This paper will review efraloctocog alfa (FVIII-Fc) and its role in the treatment of hemophilia A. PMID:25977610

  13. Understanding cardiovascular risk in hemophilia: A step towards prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Sousos, Nikolaos; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Garipidou, Vasileia

    2016-04-01

    Advances in hemophilia care have led to increased life expectancy and new challenges in the management of the aging hemophilia population, including cardiovascular risk. Despite the deep knowledge into cardiovascular disease in terms of pathophysiology, risk prediction, prevention, early detection and management gained over the last decades, studies in hemophiliacs are scarce and mainly descriptive. As a growing amount of evidence points towards a similar or increased prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in hemophilia compared to the general population, the role of non-traditional, disease-related and treatment-related cardiovascular risk factors remains under investigation. Better understanding of cardiovascular risk in hemophilia is mandatory for proper cardiovascular risk prevention and management. Therefore, this review aims to summarize current knowledge on cardiovascular risk in hemophilia patients focusing on a) cardiovascular risk factors (traditional, non-traditional, disease-related and treatment-related), b) cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and c) cardiovascular prevention and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of treatment practice patterns for severe hemophilia A: a global nurse perspective.

    PubMed

    Khair, Kate; Lawrence, Kingsley; Butler, Regina; O'Shea, Eadaoin; Christie, Beverly A

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a global survey of practice patterns for severe hemophilia A. Nurses from 105 hemophilia treatment centers in the US, the UK, Canada and Sweden responded to a questionnaire and provided data for more than 10,100 children and adults. Forty-eight percent of the US patients and 38 and 37% of the British and Swedish patients, respectively, were reported to have severe hemophilia A. The survey found that 28% of US patients and 38% of UK patients with severe hemophilia A were on primary prophylaxis in 2005. These rates were significantly higher than those reported in a 2003 survey. Sweden continues to lead the world in prophylaxis utilization, with virtually 100% of patients aged 3-18 on primary prophylactic regimens. Bleeding history and target joint development were major reasons for initiating prophylaxis; poor adherence, inadequate family commitment and venous access problems were cited as the top causes for discontinuing treatment. Nurses in all 4 reporting countries agreed that prophylaxis is the optimal therapy for patients with severe hemophilia A because it prevents joint and muscle damage and improves quality of life. They cited patient/family education as the most appropriate strategy for overcoming the barriers to prophylaxis. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Retroviral modification of mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising target for the delivery of secreted proteins due to their ease of isolation, expansion, and genetic modification. The bleeding disorder hemophilia A results from the deficiency of a secreted blood clotting factor termed factor VIII (fVIII). Hemophilia A could be cured by gene-transfer-based procedures targeting virtually any cell type, including MSCs. Here, we describe methods for retroviral modification of MSCs incorporating a high-expression porcine (HEP)-fVIII transgene and a murine model of hemophilia A. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of hemophilia A mice, expanded, and transduced ex vivo. Genetically modified MSCs secreted high levels of HEP-fVIII into the conditioned medium. HEP-fVIII was purified from the conditioned medium and demonstrated to have a specific activity, relative electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic activation pattern similar to HEP-fVIII produced by other commercial cell lines. Collectively, these data support the concept that MSCs can be utilized as a cellular vehicle for successful gene-transfer-based therapy of hemophilia A and other disorders resulting from the deficiency of a secreted protein.

  16. In vivo induction of regulatory T cells for immune tolerance in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Terhorst, Cox; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-03-01

    Current therapy for the X-linked coagulation disorder hemophilia is based on intravenous infusion of the specifically deficient coagulation factor. However, 20-30% of hemophilia A patients (factor VIII, FVIII, deficiency) generate inhibitory antibodies against FVIII. While formation of inhibitors directed against factor IX, FIX, resulting from hemophilia B treatment is comparatively rare, a serious complication that is often associated with additional immunotoxicities, e.g. anaphylaxis, occurs. Current immune tolerance protocols to eradiate inhibitors are lengthy, expensive, not effective in all patients, and there are no prophylactic tolerance regimens to prevent inhibitor formation. The outcomes of recent experiments in animal models of hemophilia demonstrate that regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg) are of paramount importance in controlling B cell responses to FVIII and FIX. This article reviews several novel strategies designed to in vivo induce coagulation factor-specific Treg cells and discusses the subsets of Treg that may promote immune tolerance in hemophilia. Among others, drug- and gene transfer-based protocols, lymphocyte transplant, and oral tolerance are reviewed.

  17. Consensus review of the treatment of cardiovascular disease in people with hemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Boral, Leonard I; Cohen, Alice J; Smyth, Susan S; White, Gilbert C

    2015-01-01

    With advances in care, increasing numbers of people with hemophilia (PWH) achieve near-normal life expectancies and present with typical age-related cardiovascular conditions. Evidence-based guidelines for medical or surgical management of cardiovascular conditions in individuals with hemophilia are limited. Published recommendations exist for the management of some common cardiovascular conditions (eg, ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation), but identifying optimal strategies for anticoagulant or antithrombotic therapy constitutes the primary challenge of managing nonoperative cardiovascular disease (CVD) in PWH. In general, as long as factor concentrates or other hemostatic therapies maintain adequate hemostasis, the recommended medical and surgical management of CVD in PWH parallels that in individuals without hemophilia. The presence of factor inhibitors complicates hemophilia management. Published outcomes of CVD treatment in PWH are similar to those in the general population. Specific knowledge about factor replacement, factor inhibitors, and disease-specific treatment distinguishes the cardiovascular care of PWH from similar care of individuals without this rare bleeding disorder. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary approach incorporating a hematologist with an onsite coagulation laboratory, ideally associated with a hemophilia treatment center, is integral to the management of CVD in PWH.

  18. Protein replacement therapy and gene transfer in canine models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von willebrand disease, and factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Timothy C; Dillow, Aaron M; Franck, Helen W G; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Dogs with hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von Willebrand disease (VWD), and factor VII deficiency faithfully recapitulate the severe bleeding phenotype that occurs in humans with these disorders. The first rational approach to diagnosing these bleeding disorders became possible with the development of reliable assays in the 1940s through research that used these dogs. For the next 60 years, treatment consisted of replacement of the associated missing or dysfunctional protein, first with plasma-derived products and subsequently with recombinant products. Research has consistently shown that replacement products that are safe and efficacious in these dogs prove to be safe and efficacious in humans. But these highly effective products require repeated administration and are limited in supply and expensive; in addition, plasma-derived products have transmitted bloodborne pathogens. Recombinant proteins have all but eliminated inadvertent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, but the other limitations persist. Thus, gene therapy is an attractive alternative strategy in these monogenic disorders and has been actively pursued since the early 1990s. To date, several modalities of gene transfer in canine hemophilia have proven to be safe, produced easily detectable levels of transgene products in plasma that have persisted for years in association with reduced bleeding, and correctly predicted the vector dose required in a human hemophilia B liver-based trial. Very recently, however, researchers have identified an immune response to adeno-associated viral gene transfer vector capsid proteins in a human liver-based trial that was not present in preclinical testing in rodents, dogs, or nonhuman primates. This article provides a review of the strengths and limitations of canine hemophilia, VWD, and factor VII deficiency models and of their historical and current role in the development of improved therapy for humans with these inherited bleeding disorders.

  19. Estimates of utility weights in hemophilia: implications for cost-utility analysis of clotting factor prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Scott D; Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of preference-weighted health outcomes or health state utilities are needed to assess improvements in health in terms of quality-adjusted life-years. Gains in quality-adjusted life-years are used to assess the cost–effectiveness of prophylactic use of clotting factor compared with on-demand treatment among people with hemophilia, a congenital bleeding disorder. Published estimates of health utilities for people with hemophilia vary, contributing to uncertainty in the estimates of cost–effectiveness of prophylaxis. Challenges in estimating utility weights for the purpose of evaluating hemophilia treatment include selection bias in observational data, difficulty in adjusting for predictors of health-related quality of life and lack of preference-based data comparing adults with lifetime or primary prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis living within the same country and healthcare system. PMID:25585817

  20. Management of antithrombotic therapy for acute coronary syndromes and atrial fibrillation in patients with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2012-03-01

    Patients with hemophilia now have a life expectancy very close to that of the unaffected male population and, hence, are at risk of developing the classic age-related morbidities, i.e., cardiovascular diseases. The peculiarity of the management of these diseases in hemophilia is that antithrombotic drugs impinge on the already compromised hemostasis of these lifelong bleeders. This opinion article outlines the strategies we have developed, based on our clinical experience, for the antithrombotic treatment of two common cardiovascular diseases - acute coronary syndromes and chronic atrial fibrillation - in patients with hemophilia A and B. In the absence of specific evidence-based guidelines for patients with coagulation defects, antithrombotic treatment is currently based on expertise and adaptation of the guidelines developed for non-hemophilic patients. Replacement therapy should be tailored with the deficient coagulation factor so as to control the increased risk of bleeding inherent in the use of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs.

  1. The treatment of hemophilia A: from protein replacement to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Youjin, Shen; Jun, Yin

    2009-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential component in blood coagulation, a deficiency of which causes the serious bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Recently, with the development of purification level and recombinant techniques, protein replacement treatment to hemophiliacs is relatively safe and can prolong their life expectancy. However, because of the possibility of unknown contaminants in plasma-derived FVIII and recombinant FVIII, and high cost for hemophiliacs to use these products, gene therapy for hemophilia A is an attractive alternative to protein replacement therapy. Thus far, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy. Further improvement of the virus for clinical application depends on better understanding of the molecular structure and fate of the vector genome. It is likely that hemophilia will be the first genetic disease to be cured by somatic cell gene therapy.

  2. Portal vein delivery of viral vectors for gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Alexandra; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cooper, Mario; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Herzog, Roland W; Nichols, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a very complex organ with a large variety of functions, making it an attractive organ for gene replacement therapy. Many genetic disorders can be corrected by delivering gene products directly into the liver using viral vectors. In this chapter, we will describe gene delivery via portal vein administration in mice and dogs to correct the blood coagulation disorder hemophilia B. Although there are multiple delivery routes for both viral and non-viral vectors in animals, portal vein administration delivers vectors directly and efficiently into the liver. Complete correction of murine hemophilia B and multi-year near-correction of canine hemophilia B have been achieved following portal vein delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing factor IX from hepatocyte-specific promoters. Peripheral vein injection can lead to increased vector dissemination to off-target organ such as the lung and spleen. Below, we will describe portal vein injection delivery route via laparotomy.

  3. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  4. New developments in the management of moderate-to-severe hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Nazeef, Moniba; Sheehan, John P

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic deficiency of coagulation factor IX (FIX) activity associated with recurrent deep tissue and joint bleeding that may lead to long-term disability. FIX replacement therapy using plasma-derived protein or recombinant protein has significantly reduced bleeding and disability from hemophilia B, particularly when used in a prophylactic fashion. Although modern factor replacement has excellent efficacy and safety, barriers to the broader use of prophylaxis remain, including the need for intravenous (IV) access, frequent dosing, variability in individual pharmacokinetics, and cost. To overcome the requirement for frequent factor dosing, novel forms of recombinant FIX have been developed that possess extended terminal half-lives. Two of these products (FIXFc and rIX-FP) represent fusion proteins with the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) Fc domain and albumin, respectively, resulting in proteins that are recycled in vivo by the neonatal Fc receptor. The third product has undergone site-specific PEGylation on the activation peptide of FIX, similarly resulting in a long-lived FIX form. Clinical trials in previously treated hemophilia B patients have demonstrated excellent efficacy and confirmed less-frequent dosing requirements for the extended half-life forms. However, gaps in knowledge remain with regard to the risk of inhibitor formation and allergic reactions in previously untreated patient populations, safety in elderly patients with hemophilia, effects on in vivo FIX distribution, and cost-effectiveness. Additional strategies designed to rebalance hemostasis in hemophilia patients include monoclonal-antibody-mediated inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity and siRNA-mediated reduction in antithrombin expression by the liver. Both of these approaches are long acting and potentially involve subcutaneous administration of the drug. In this review, we will discuss the biology of FIX, the evolution of FIX replacement therapy, the

  5. Specific and global coagulation assays in the diagnosis of discrepant mild hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, Annette E.; Van Veen, Joost J.; Goodeve, Anne C.; Kitchen, Steve; Makris, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The activity of the factor VIII coagulation protein can be measured by three methods: a one or two-stage clotting assay and a chromogenic assay. The factor VIII activity of most individuals with mild hemophilia A is the same regardless of which method is employed. However, approximately 30% of patients show marked discrepancies in factor VIII activity measured with the different methods. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of assay discrepancy in our center, assess the impact of alternative reagents on factor VIII activity assays and determine the usefulness of global assays of hemostasis in mild hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was measured in 84 individuals with mild hemophilia A using different reagents. Assay discrepancy was defined as a two-fold or greater difference between the results of the one-stage and two-stage clotting assays. Rotational thromboelastometry and calibrated automated thrombography were performed. Assay discrepancy was observed in 31% of individuals; 12% with lower activity in the two-stage assay and 19% with lower activity in the one-stage assay. The phenotype could not always be predicted from the individual’s genotype. Chromogenic assays were shown to be a suitable alternative to the two-stage clotting assay. Thromboelastometry was found to have poor sensitivity in hemophilia. Calibrated automated thrombography supported the results obtained by the two-stage and chromogenic assays. The current international guidelines do not define the type of assay to be used in the diagnosis of mild hemophilia A and some patients could be misclassified as normal. In our study, 4% of patients would not have been diagnosed on the basis of the one-stage factor VIII assay. Laboratories should use both one stage and chromogenic (or two-stage) assays in the diagnosis of patients with possible hemophilia A. PMID:23812942

  6. Phenotypic correction of murine hemophilia A using an iPS cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Alipio, Zaida; Fink, Louis M; Adcock, Dorothy M; Yang, Jianchang; Ward, David C; Ma, Yupo

    2009-01-20

    Hemophilia A is caused by mutations within the Factor VIII (FVIII) gene that lead to depleted protein production and inefficient blood clotting. Several attempts at gene therapy have failed for various reasons-including immune rejection. The recent generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from somatic cells by the ectopic expression of 3 transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, provides a means of circumventing the immune rejection barrier. To date, iPS cells appear to be indistinguishable from ES cells and thus provide tremendous therapeutic potential. Here we prepared murine iPS cells from tail-tip fibroblasts and differentiated them to both endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells by using the embryoid body differentiation method. These iPS cells express major ES cell markers such as Oct4, Nanog, SSEA-1, alkaline phosphatase, and SALL4. Endothelial/endothelial progenitor cells derived from iPS cells expressed cell-specific markers such as CD31, CD34, and Flk1 and secreted FVIII protein. These iPS-derived cells were injected directly into the liver of irradiated hemophilia A mice. At various times after transplantation (7-90 days) hemophilia A mice and their control mice counterparts were challenged by a tail-clip bleeding assay. Nontransplanted hemophilia A mice died within a few hours, whereas transplanted mice survived for more than 3 months. Plasma FVIII levels increased in transplanted hemophilia A mice during this period to 8% to 12% of wild type and corrected the hemophilia A phenotype. Our studies provide additional evidence that iPS cell therapy may be able to treat human monogenetic disorders in the future.

  7. The prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors among Saudi patients with hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Owaidah, Tarek; Momen, Abdulkareem Al; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Almusa, Abdulrahman; Alkasim, Fawaz; Tarawah, Ahmed; Nouno, Randa Al; Batniji, Fatima Al; Alothman, Fahad; Alomari, Ali; Abu-Herbish, Saud; Abu-Riash, Mahmoud; Siddiqui, Khawar; Ahmed, Mansor; Mohamed, SY; Saleh, Mahasen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hemophilia A and B are X-linked diseases that predominantly affect male patients. Patients can develop coagulation factor inhibitors, which exponentially increases the treatment cost. However, the prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors in Saudi Arabia is unclear. This study aimed to determine the Saudi prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors. This 4-year, 7-center, cross-sectional study evaluated the Saudi prevalences of hemophilia A and B. We collected the patients’ clinical data, evaluated their disease, and tested for factor inhibitors. We included 202 patients with hemophilia (median age at diagnosis: 0.13 years, range: birth–34.8 years). The patients included 198 male patients (98%), 148 patients with hemophilia A (73.3%), and 54 patients with hemophilia B (26.7%). The patients exhibited severe factor VIII activity (<1%; 121 patients; 5.2%), moderate activity (1–5%; 7 patients; 4.9%), and mild activity (14 patients; 9.9%). Among the patients with care-related data, most patients were treated for episodic bleeding (76.8%) or received prophylaxis (22.6%); 1 patient received both treatments. Among the patients with source-related data, the factor replacements were derived from plasma (48.4%), recombinant concentrates (22.9%), both sources (14.6%), or fresh frozen plasma (14.1%). Factor VIII inhibitors were observed in 43 (29.3%) of the 147 patients, and only 1 of the 54 patients developed factor IX inhibitors. Most patients who developed inhibitors had severe hemophilia (40/44; 90.9%), and inhibitors were also common among patients who received recombinant products (14/43; 32.6%). The Saudi prevalence of factor inhibitors was similar to those among other ethnic populations. PMID:28079788

  8. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a novel recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Negrier, Claude; Klamroth, Robert; Tiede, Andreas; Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Voigt, Christine; Jacobs, Iris; Morfini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    A recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX (FIX) with human albumin (rIX-FP) has been developed to facilitate hemophilia B treatment by less frequent FIX dosing. This first-in-human dose-escalation trial in 25 previously treated subjects with hemophilia B (FIX ≤ 2 IU/dL) examined the safety and pharmacokinetics of 25, 50, and 75 IU/kg rIX-FP. Patients in the 50-IU/kg cohort underwent a comparative pharmacokinetics assessment with their previous FIX product (plasma-derived or recombinant). No allergic reactions or inhibitors were observed. Four mild, possibly treatment-related adverse events were reported. In the 50-IU/kg cohort (13 subjects), the mean half-life of rIX-FP was 92 hours, more than 5 times longer than the subjects' previous FIX product. After 25 or 50 IU/kg rIX-FP administration, the baseline-corrected mean FIX activity remained elevated at day 7 (7.4 IU/dL and 13.4 IU/dL, respectively) and day 14 (2.5 IU/dL and 5.5 IU/dL, respectively). The incremental recovery of rIX-FP was higher than both recombinant and plasma-derived FIX (1.4 vs 0.95 and 1.1 IU/dL per IU/kg, respectively). These results demonstrated both the safety and improved pharmacokinetics of rIX-FP, thus indicating this new product with extended half-life as possibly able to control and prevent bleeding with less frequent injection. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT01233440. PMID:22859609

  9. [Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with hemophilia].

    PubMed

    Baptista González, Héctor A

    2002-10-01

    After the introduction of second generation ELISA and confirmatory tests clinically available, it was possible to determine that prevalence of infection with HCV was 98% among hemophiliacs exposed to factor VIII concentrates that weren't submitted to viral inactivation. Liver failure is 4.2 times more probable among patients also infected with HIV. The hepatocellular carcinoma studies show similar findings. They report a rate of 1.4 for every 1,000 hemophiliacs, and almost all patients have antibodies for hepatitis C virus. The studies with hemophiliacs exposed to unsafe blood products for HCV showed a significant increase in mortality from different liver diseases, as compared to control subjects. Mortality rate shows an important increase in the hemophiliacs also infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Combination therapy (ribavirin and interferon) doesn't seem to make a difference in the response rate as compared to patients without hemophilia. In spite of the best efforts to improve the safety of factor VIII concentrates, it has been impossible to eliminate the risk of transmission of other infective agents. That's why it seems that recombinant technology will be the answer in obtaining the concentrates.

  10. Immune tolerance induction in hemophilia A: a review.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Guglielmo; Siragusa, Sergio; Kroner, Barbara L

    2003-02-01

    In this article, a comparative analysis of the data stemming from the studies conducted in the field of immune tolerance treatment (ITT) of hemophilia A was attempted. Comparisons are difficult because previous studies differ in many respects, including the dosage of factor (F) VIII, the number of FVIII administrations per day, the association with immunosuppressive drugs (prednisone, cyclophosphamide), and, most importantly, the definition of success in terms of the reacquisition of tolerance. However, a number of variables consistently influenced outcome: the inhibitor titer, either the maximum one or the one assayed before immune tolerance (IT) start and age. As to the FVIII dose, results are contrasting, even though the overall impression is that high dosages are associated with higher success rates. Treatment duration analyses appear to be fairly consistent in all the studies, with 1 year as the crucial time period useful in predicting outcome. Preliminary data suggest that concentrates containing von Willebrand factor may increase the success rate and allow patients refractory to IT procedures carried out with ultrapure or recombinant concentrates to become tolerant in the end. These data need to be formally confirmed in trials that compare the different brands. In the studies published so far, a common language and widely accepted definitions of the variables have emerged, which are important in setting up the controlled trials and improving the comparison among published data.

  11. Advances in Overcoming Immune Responses following Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Carol H.

    2012-01-01

    Both Clinical trials and pre-clinical experiments for hemophilia gene therapy showed that it is important to overcome potential immune responses against gene transfer vectors and/or transgene products to ensure the success of gene therapy. Recently various approaches have been investigated to prevent or modulate such responses. Gene transfer vectors have been specifically engineered and immunosuppressive regimens have been administered to avoid or manipulate the immune responses against the vectors. In order to prevent cytotoxic lymphocyte or antibody formation induced by transgene expression, novel approaches have been developed, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of variant genes encoding less immunogenic proteins or gene transfer protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunosuppressive strategies to target either T and/or B cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated regulatory T cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Recent development of these strategies to evade vector-specific immune responses and induce long-term immune tolerance specific to the transgene product will be discussed. PMID:22737594

  12. Hemophilia A: an ideal disease to correct in utero

    PubMed Central

    Porada, Christopher D.; Rodman, Christopher; Ignacio, Glicerio; Atala, Anthony; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is the most frequent inheritable defect of the coagulation proteins. The current standard of care for patients with HA is prophylactic factor infusion, which is comprised of regular (2–3 times per week) intravenous infusions of recombinant or plasma-derived FVIII to maintain hemostasis. While this treatment has greatly increased the quality of life and lengthened the life expectancy for many HA patients, its high cost, the need for lifelong infusions, and the fact that it is unavailable to roughly 75% of the world's HA patients make this type of treatment far from ideal. In addition, this lifesaving therapy suffers from a high risk of treatment failure due to immune response to the infused FVIII. There is thus a need for novel treatments, such as those using stem cells and/or gene therapy, which have the potential to mediate long-term correction or permanent cure following a single intervention. In the present review, we discuss the clinical feasibility and unique advantages that an in utero approach to treating HA could offer, placing special emphasis on a new sheep model of HA we have developed and on the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) as cellular vehicles for delivering the FVIII gene. PMID:25566073

  13. Immune tolerance induction in patients with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Astermark, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Replacement therapy with factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates has become the mainstay of treatment for hemophilia, but about 30% of patients with a severe disease develop neutralizing antibodies against FVIII, which can lead to treatment resistance and an increased risk of bleeding. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) overcomes the immune response to FVIII concentrates in the majority of patients. Several factors may influence the efficacy of ITI, including disease-related factors (e.g. peak inhibitor titer and pre-ITI titer), and genetic factors (e.g. type of mutation). Treatment-related factors, such as the type of FVIII concentrate used in ITI will also potentially influence the outcome. Specifically, higher success rates with von Willebrand factor (VWF)-containing factor VIII concentrates than with high-purity FVIII concentrates have been reported, but further studies are needed. Potential mechanisms involved include steric hindrance, inhibition of FVIII degradation, or immunomodulatory effects. However, the exact mechanism by which immune tolerance is induced remains unclear. High-dose FVIII ITI appears to induce immune tolerance more rapidly than low-dose protocols and with a reduced risk of bleeding episodes. The addition of immunosuppressive therapy, such as rituximab, to ITI may improve outcomes, although the optimal approach to combined ITI/immunosuppression has not been established. Ongoing studies are likely to provide further insight into the role of genetic features and the type of FVIII concentrate on the success rate of ITI.

  14. Percutaneous coronary intervention in left main coronary artery disease in a patient with hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Arzu, Er; Emre, Altekin R; Mehmet, Kabukcu; Selim, Yalcinkaya; Necmi, Deger

    2011-05-01

    A 77-year-old male patient with the diagnosis of hemophilia presented himself at the cardiology clinic with unstable angina and a coronary angiography was planned. Factor IX was prepared before the procedure due to the risk of hemorrhage. Critical lesions were detected in the left main coronary artery (LMCA) and the procedure was performed on the LMCA in the same session. No complication of hemorrhage developed. Having rarely found in literature on any procedure on the LMCA without factor IX infusion we wished to report on this rare case of concurrent hemophilia B and acute coronary syndrome.

  15. Successful medical management of a neonate with spontaneous splenic rupture and severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif M; Rossoff, Jenna; Yallapragada, Sushmita; Liem, Robert I; Sharathkumar, Anjali A

    2017-03-01

    Splenic rupture in neonates is a rare event, usually occurring in the setting of underlying predisposing conditions. Here, we present the case of a term neonate who presented with worsening anemia in the setting of known hemolytic disease during the newborn period and was later found to have a spontaneous splenic rupture. He was subsequently diagnosed with severe hemophilia A, and was managed medically with recombinant factor VIII replacement therapy without any surgical intervention. This is the first reported case of a neonate who had spontaneous splenic rupture and severe hemophilia A, and underwent successful medical treatment without any surgical intervention.

  16. Reduced bleeding events with subcutaneous administration of recombinant human factor IX in immune-tolerant hemophilia B dogs.

    PubMed

    Russell, Karen E; Olsen, Eva H N; Raymer, Robin A; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Bellinger, Dwight A; Read, Marjorie S; Rup, Bonita J; Keith, James C; McCarthy, Kyle P; Schaub, Robert G; Nichols, Timothy C

    2003-12-15

    Intravenous administration of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) acutely corrects the coagulopathy in hemophilia B dogs. To date, 20 of 20 dogs developed inhibitory antibodies to the xenoprotein, making it impossible to determine if new human FIX products, formulations, or methods of chronic administration can reduce bleeding frequency. Our goal was to determine whether hemophilia B dogs rendered tolerant to rhFIX would have reduced bleeding episodes while on sustained prophylactic rhFIX administered subcutaneously. Reproducible methods were developed for inducing tolerance to rhFIX in this strain of hemophilia B dogs, resulting in a significant reduction in the development of inhibitors relative to historical controls (5 of 12 versus 20 or 20, P <.001). The 7 of 12 tolerized hemophilia B dogs exhibited shortened whole blood clotting times (WBCTs), sustained detectable FIX antigen, undetectable Bethesda inhibitors, transient or no detectable antihuman FIX antibody titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and normal clearance of infused rhFIX. Tolerized hemophilia B dogs had 69% reduction in bleeding frequency in year 1 compared with nontolerized hemophilia B dogs (P =.0007). If proven safe in human clinical trials, subcutaneous rhFIX may provide an alternate approach to prophylactic therapy in selected patients with hemophilia B.

  17. Traumatic Hemarthrosis of the Knee Secondary to Hemophilia A in a Collegiate Soccer Player: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Kelly A; Hoffmann, Sandra J; Ritenour, Donna M

    2002-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the case of a collegiate soccer player who suffered from a traumatic knee hemarthrosis secondary to hemophilia A. This case presents an opportunity to discuss the participation status of athletes with hemophilia. BACKGROUND: Hemophilia is a hereditary blood disease characterized by impaired coagulability of the blood. Hemophilia A is the most common of the severe, inherited bleeding disorders. This type, also called classic hemophilia, is due to a deficiency of clotting factor VIII. The athlete with hemophilia A reported pain and loss of function of his knee during a soccer game despite the absence of injury. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: Anterior cruciate ligament tear, intra-articular fracture, meniscus tear, capsular tear, hemarthrosis. TREATMENT: After the injury, the athlete was admitted to the hospital, where his knee joint was aspirated and he was infused with factor VIII. Later, he participated in traditional knee rehabilitation and was returned to play at the discretion of the orthopaedist and the hematologist. UNIQUENESS: In past participation guidelines, individuals with bleeding disorders were disqualified from athletic participation; however, with advances in medical care, these individuals may be permitted to participate in accordance with the law. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with hemophilia participate in athletics; therefore, team physicians and athletic trainers must be prepared to care for these individuals.

  18. Traumatic Hemarthrosis of the Knee Secondary to Hemophilia A in a Collegiate Soccer Player: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Kelly A.; Hoffmann, Sandra J.; Ritenour, Donna M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of a collegiate soccer player who suffered from a traumatic knee hemarthrosis secondary to hemophilia A. This case presents an opportunity to discuss the participation status of athletes with hemophilia. Background: Hemophilia is a hereditary blood disease characterized by impaired coagulability of the blood. Hemophilia A is the most common of the severe, inherited bleeding disorders. This type, also called classic hemophilia, is due to a deficiency of clotting factor VIII. The athlete with hemophilia A reported pain and loss of function of his knee during a soccer game despite the absence of injury. Differential Diagnosis: Anterior cruciate ligament tear, intra-articular fracture, meniscus tear, capsular tear, hemarthrosis. Treatment: After the injury, the athlete was admitted to the hospital, where his knee joint was aspirated and he was infused with factor VIII. Later, he participated in traditional knee rehabilitation and was returned to play at the discretion of the orthopaedist and the hematologist. Uniqueness: In past participation guidelines, individuals with bleeding disorders were disqualified from athletic participation; however, with advances in medical care, these individuals may be permitted to participate in accordance with the law. Conclusions: Individuals with hemophilia participate in athletics; therefore, team physicians and athletic trainers must be prepared to care for these individuals. PMID:12937588

  19. [Introns 1 and 22 inversions and F8 gene sequencing for molecular diagnosis of hemophilia A in Chile].

    PubMed

    Poggi, Helena; Honorato, Josefina; Romeo, Eliana; Zúñiga, Pamela; Quiroga, Teresa; Lagos, Marcela

    2011-02-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited disorder caused by alterations in factor VIII gene (F8) located on the X-chromosome, the intron 22 inversion being the most common mutation. The rest are predominantly point mutations distributed along this large gene of 26 exons. To implement a molecular diagnostic test to detect mutations in the F8 gene in Chilean patients with Hemophilia A. To validate the testing methods, we analyzed samples with intron 22 and intron 1 inversion, and with point mutations previously studied, as well as one subject without Hemophilia. We also studied unrelated Chilean patients with Hemophilia A and their female relatives for carrier testing. Intron 22 and intron 1 inversions were studied by long distance polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and point mutations by sequencing the coding and promoter regions of the F8 gene. The results obtained in all samples used for validation were concordant with those obtained previously. In the Chilean patients, the intron 22 inversion and point mutations previously described were observed. In 6 out of 9 patients with mild Hemophilia A we found the same mutation (Arg2159Cys) in exon 23, which has been described as prevalent in mild Hemophilia A. The analysis of intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, as well as of point mutations in the F8 gene will help us to confirm the diagnosis in patients with severe, moderate and mild Hemophilia A, and also it will allow us to perform carrier testing and to provide better genetic counseling.

  20. Effect of BAX499 aptamer on tissue factor pathway inhibitor function and thrombin generation in models of hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Gissel, Matthew; Orfeo, Thomas; Foley, Jonathan H; Butenas, Saulius

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction In hemophilia, thrombin generation is significantly suppressed due to decreased factor (F)X activation. Clinical studies and experiments with transgenic mice have suggested that the severity of hemophilia is substantially reduced by tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) deficiency. Methods We evaluated the effect of TFPI antagonist aptamer BAX499 (formerly ARC19499) on TFPI function in purified systems and on thrombin generation and clot formation in plasma and blood. Results BAX499 effectively neutralized TFPI inhibition of FXa and FXa dependent inhibition of TF/FVIIa by TFPI. BAX499 did not inhibit FXa or TF/FVIIa when used up to 500 nM. In the synthetic coagulation proteome with TFPI at its mean physiologic concentration, BAX499 at 1 – 10 nM increased thrombin generation triggered with 5 pM relipidated TF in a concentration-dependent manner. In severe hemophilia A or B models using the synthetic coagulation proteome, the addition of BAX499 at 5 nM increased thrombin generation to the levels observed in normal control. Thrombin generation measured in induced hemophilia B plasma required ~100 nM BAX499 to restore thrombin levels to those seen in untreated plasma. In induced hemophilia B whole blood, BAX499 repaired the clotting time but failed to appreciably impact the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Conclusion These data suggest that inhibition of TFPI by BAX499 may have potential for hemophilia treatment but requires further study in blood-based hemophilia systems. PMID:22951415

  1. F8 gene mutation type and inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gouw, Samantha C; van den Berg, H Marijke; Oldenburg, Johannes; Astermark, Jan; de Groot, Philip G; Margaglione, Maurizio; Thompson, Arthur R; van Heerde, Waander; Boekhorst, Jorien; Miller, Connie H; le Cessie, Saskia; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2012-03-22

    This systematic review was designed to provide more precise effect estimates of inhibitor development for the various types of F8 gene mutations in patients with severe hemophilia A. The primary outcome was inhibitor development and the secondary outcome was high-titer-inhibitor development. A systematic literature search was performed to include cohort studies published in peer-reviewed journals with data on inhibitor incidences in the various F8 gene mutation types and a mutation detection rate of at least 80%. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) of inhibitor development for different types of F8 gene mutations were calculated with intron 22 inversion as the reference. Data were included from 30 studies on 5383 patients, including 1029 inhibitor patients. The inhibitor risk in large deletions and nonsense mutations was higher than in intron 22 inversions (pooled OR = 3.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.3-5.7 and OR = 1.4, 95% CI, 1.1-1.8, respectively), the risk in intron 1 inversions and splice-site mutations was equal (pooled OR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.5 and OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.5), and the risk in small deletions/insertions and missense mutations was lower (pooled OR = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.4-0.6 and OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.4, respectively). The relative risks for developing high titer inhibitors were similar.

  2. Transitioning issues in adolescent to young adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors: an approach for a growing population.

    PubMed

    Young, Guy

    2010-09-01

    The major adverse effect of factor replacement therapy in patients with hemophilia is the development of neutralizing antibodies termed inhibitors. This complication renders standard factor replacement therapy ineffective resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Until recently, the population of adults with inhibitors was relatively small due to the death of many of the patients from HIV that they contracted from contaminated factor in the early 1980s. With the advent of factor products with reduced risks for deadly infections in the mid-1980s to early 1990s, a cohort of inhibitor patients is now beginning to enter adulthood thus raising the issues regarding the transition of these patients into adulthood. It is, therefore, expected that adult hematologists will be seeing more inhibitor patients and that pediatric hematologists will be faced with managing this transition process, which may not necessarily include transition to an adult facility or adult hematologist. This review will discuss the various issues ranging from choice of medical provider to a discussion of psychosocial and financial issues facing this specific patient population.

  3. Pharmacological concentrations of recombinant factor VIIa restore hemostasis independent of tissue factor in antibody-induced hemophilia mice.

    PubMed

    Keshava, S; Sundaram, J; Rajulapati, A; Pendurthi, U R; Rao, L V M

    2016-03-01

    ESSENTIALS: The role of tissue factor (TF) in recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) therapy in hemophilia is unclear. An acquired mouse hemophilia model with very low or normal levels of human TF was used in the study. rFVIIa is equally effective in correcting the bleeding in mice expressing low or normal levels of TF. Pharmacological doses of rFVIIa restore hemostasis in hemophilia independent of TF. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has been used widely for treating hemophilia patients with inhibitory autoantibodies against factor VIII or IX. Its mechanism of action is not entirely known. A majority of in vitro studies suggested that pharmacological concentrations of rFVIIa restore hemostasis in hemophilia in a phospholipid-dependent manner, independent of tissue factor (TF). However, a few studies suggested that a TF-dependent mechanism has a primary role in correction of bleeding by rFVIIa in hemophilia patients. Here, we investigated the potential contribution of TF in rFVIIa-induced hemostasis in hemophilia employing a model system of FVIII antibody-induced hemophilia in TF transgenic mice. Mice expressing low levels of human TF (LTF mice), mice expressing relatively high levels of human TF (HTF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) had neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies administered in order to induce hemophilia in these mice. The mice were then treated with varying concentrations of rFVIIa. rFVIIa-induced hemostasis was evaluated with the saphenous vein bleeding model. Administration of FVIII inhibitory antibodies induced the hemophilic bleeding phenotype in all three genotypes. rFVIIa administration rescued the bleeding phenotype in all three genotypes. No significant differences were observed in rFVIIa-induced correction of bleeding between LTF and HTF mice that had FVIII antibodies administered. Our results provide strong evidence supporting the suggestion that the hemostatic effect of pharmacological doses of rFVIIa stems from a TF-independent mechanism. © 2016

  4. Desvenlafaxine as a possible cause of acquired hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Shaligram, Deepika; Alqassem, Tahani; Koby, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is characterized by the depletion of Factor VIII mediated by specific autoantibodies. While the cause is unknown in 50% of the cases, an association with malignancy, peripartum period, autoimmune disease and the use of drugs has been described. We report a case of AHA possibly induced by desvenlafaxine. Mr. P, a 70-year-old Caucasian male with alcohol and opioid dependence in remission, was started on 50 mg of desvenlafaxine for a moderate depressive episode. After 10 weeks, he developed an ecchymosis of the right upper extremity, in the absence of past or family history of bleeding disorder. He had a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (74.5 s) not corrected on performing mixing study, decreased Factor VIII activity (< 1%) and detectable Factor VIII inhibitor (30 Bethesda units) confirming a diagnosis of AHA. After all other causes were ruled out, desvenlafaxine was discontinued and the patient was infused with Factor VIIa followed by a 6-week prednisone taper with which he achieved remission. While serotonin inhibitors are known to impair platelet aggregation leading to bleeding, abnormalities in the coagulation cascade have not been described so far. Desvenlafaxine appears to be the probable cause of AHA given the temporal association, remission after withdrawal of the drug and the lack of any other probable cause. New-onset abnormalities of the coagulation cascade such as AHA should be considered in the context of bleeding events with desvenlafaxine and perhaps other serotonin inhibitors, given the significant mortality rates when untreated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Thrombin generation testing for monitoring hemophilia treatment: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Gian Luca; Berntorp, Erik

    2010-10-01

    systems suitable for detecting changes in the kinetics of thrombin generation, and the test's clinical utility for patients with hemophilia or von Willebrand disease.

  6. Immunoadsorption for pregnancy-associated severe acquired hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Heike; Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun; Marquardt, Natascha; Oldenburg, Johannes; Goldmann, Georg

    2014-02-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is a common cause of maternal mortality. Acquired hemophilia (AH) is a rare, life-threatening bleeding disorder induced by autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitors). We report about eight patients with postpartum AH (out of 82). Seven AH patients with severe bleeding complications were treated by the "Modified Bonn-Malmö Protocol (MBMP)" which consists of inhibitor elimination via immunoadsorption (IA) in combination with immunosuppression and high-dose Factor VIII substitution. One patient was treated only by immunosuppression. Seven out of eight patients with severe AH and mean inhibitor titers (IT) of 118 BU/mL were referred to our center. They were severe cases with a median delay of diagnosis of 30.5 days (range 7-278 days). After a median of 3 IA sessions (range 3-5 days), no inhibitor was detectable. The factor substitution was discontinued after a median of 13 IA sessions (range 8-24 days) and IA was terminated after a median of 15 sessions (range 9-27 days). One less severe affected patient (IT: 2.1 BU/mL) received prednisolone (1.5 mg/kg BW) for 120 days. Complete remission was achieved in all patients with a median follow-up of 100 months (range 56-126 m). The delayed diagnosis of pregnancy-associated AH leads to a high bleeding risk with bleeding associated complications. Immunoadsorption offers an important treatment option in severe AH, enabling a fast reconstitution of the blood coagulation with a reduced time for the Factor VIII substitution and for immunosuppressive treatment. In cases of postpartum bleeding the diagnosis of AH should be routinely considered.

  7. Cosegregation of a factor VIII microsatellite marker with mild hemophilia A in Golden Retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Marjory B; Barnas, Jennifer L; Fremont, Jacqueline; Ray, Jharna

    2005-01-01

    Mild hemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) was diagnosed in Golden Retrievers and pedigree studies were undertaken to test the cosegregation of an intragenic factor VIII marker with the disease phenotype. The study population consisted of 30 client-owned dogs (22 males and 8 females). Hemophilic males (n = 12) typically demonstrated prolonged bleeding after trauma or surgery rather than spontaneous hemorrhagic events. The affected males had a proportionate reduction in factor VIII coagulant activity (mean FVIII:C = 4%) and factor VIII protein concentration (mean FVIII:Ag = 3%). Twenty-five dogs (10 affected males, 8 clear males, 2 obligate carrier dams, and 5 suspect carrier daughters) were genotyped for a factor VIII microsatellite marker, with allele size assigned by an automated capillary electrophoresis system. Five distinct marker alleles were present in the study pedigree and a 300-base pair allele was found to segregate with the hemophilia A phenotype. The inheritance of the hemophilia-associated allele defined carrier status for 5 suspect daughters of obligate carrier dams. The limitations inherent to linkage analyses (i.e., lack of access to key family members and homozygosity at the marker locus) did not preclude carrier detection in this pedigree. We conclude that genotype analysis for the intragenic factor VIII marker can aid in control of canine hemophilia A through enhanced carrier detection.

  8. Translational Data from Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Margaret H.; Arruda, Valder R.; Stedman, Hansell H.; Kay, Mark A.; High, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical testing of new therapeutic strategies in relevant animal models is an essential part of drug development. The choice of animal models of disease that are used in these studies is driven by the strength of the translational data for informing about safety, efficacy, and success or failure of human clinical trials. Hemophilia B is a monogenic, X-linked, inherited bleeding disorder that results from absent or dysfunctional coagulation factor IX (FIX). Regarding preclinical studies of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia B, dogs with severe hemophilia B (<1% FIX) provide well-characterized phenotypes and genotypes in which a species-specific transgene can be expressed in a mixed genetic background. Correction of the hemophilic coagulopathy by sustained expression of FIX, reduction of bleeding events, and a comprehensive assessment of the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the expressed transgene and recombinant AAV vector are all feasible end points in these dogs. This review compares the preclinical studies of AAV vectors used to treat dogs with hemophilia B with the results obtained in subsequent human clinical trials using muscle- and liver-based approaches. PMID:25675273

  9. Factor VIII gene (F8) mutation and risk of inhibitor development in nonsevere hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Corien L; van Velzen, Alice S; Peters, Marjolein; Astermark, Jan; Brons, Paul P; Castaman, Giancarlo; Cnossen, Marjon H; Dors, Natasja; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Hamulyak, Karly; Hart, Daniel P; Hay, Charles R M; Haya, Saturnino; van Heerde, Waander L; Hermans, Cedric; Holmström, Margareta; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor; Keenan, Russell D; Klamroth, Robert; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta A P; Leebeek, Frank W G; Liesner, Ri; Mäkipernaa, Anne; Male, Christoph; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Mazzucconi, Maria G; McRae, Simon; Meijer, Karina; Mitchell, Michael; Morfini, Massimo; Nijziel, Marten; Oldenburg, Johannes; Peerlinck, Kathelijne; Petrini, Pia; Platokouki, Helena; Reitter-Pfoertner, Sylvia E; Santagostino, Elena; Schinco, Piercarla; Smiers, Frans J; Siegmund, Berthold; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Yee, Thynn T; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem; van der Bom, Johanna G; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2013-09-12

    Neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) toward factor VIII form a severe complication in nonsevere hemophilia A, profoundly aggravating the bleeding pattern. Identification of high-risk patients is hampered by lack of data that take exposure days to therapeutic factor VIII concentrates into account. In the INSIGHT study, we analyzed the association between F8 mutation and inhibitor development in patients with nonsevere hemophilia A (factor VIII 2-40 IU/dL). This analysis included 1112 nonsevere hemophilia A patients from 14 centers in Europe and Australia that had genotyped at least 70% of their patients. Inhibitor risk was calculated as Kaplan-Meier incidence with cumulative number of exposure days as the time variable. During 44 800 exposure days (median, 24 exposure days per patient; interquartile range [IQR], 7-90), 59 of the 1112 patients developed an inhibitor; cumulative incidence of 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0-6.6) after a median of 28 exposure days (IQR, 12-71). The inhibitor risk at 50 exposure days was 6.7% (95% CI, 4.5-8.9) and at 100 exposure days the risk further increased to 13.3% (95% CI, 9.6-17.0). Among a total of 214 different F8 missense mutations 19 were associated with inhibitor development. These results emphasize the importance of F8 genotyping in nonsevere hemophilia A.

  10. SVA retrotransposition in exon 6 of the coagulation factor IX gene causing severe hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki; Kozuka, Toshihiro; Nakata, Yukiko; Hasebe, Ryo; Takagi, Akira; Kitazawa, Jun-ichi; Shima, Midori; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2015-07-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities of the coagulation factor IX gene (F9). Insertion mutations in F9 ranging from a few to more than 100 base pairs account for only a few percent of all hemophilia B cases. We investigated F9 to elucidate genetic abnormalities causing severe hemophilia B in a Japanese subject. We performed PCR-mediated analysis of F9 and identified a large insertion in exon 6. Next, we carried out direct sequencing of a PCR clone of the whole insert using nested deletion by exonuclease III and S1 nuclease. We identified an approximately 2.5-kb SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-F element flanked by 15-bp duplications in the antisense orientation in exon 6. Additionally, we carried out exontrap analysis to assess the effect of this retrotransposition on mRNA splicing. We observed that regular splicing at exons 5 and 6 of F9 was disturbed by the SVA retrotransposition, suggesting that abnormal FIX mRNA may be reduced by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In conclusion, this is the first report of SVA retrotransposition causing severe hemophilia B; only five cases of LINE-1 or Alu retrotranspositions in F9 have been reported previously.

  11. Left ventricular assist device and heart transplantation in hemophilia a patient.

    PubMed

    Quader, Mohammed; Rusina, Zane; Lewis, Neil P; Martin, Lisa; Katlaps, Gundars

    2013-12-01

    We report here a hemophilia patient who was bridged with a left ventricle assist device and later received heart transplantation. Preparation for surgery with factor VIII supplementation, intraoperative conduct of surgery, and challenges of postoperative course are described with a brief literature review.

  12. Efficacy and safety of recombinant factor VIII products in patients with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Musso, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The introduction of recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) clotting factor concentrates nearly 20 years ago represented a significant advance in the treatment of hemophilia A. The major advantage of rFVIII products compared with plasma-derived FVIII products is related to product safety, with rFVIII products virtually eliminating bloodborne pathogen transmission. The most challenging aspect of hemophilia A management today is the development of FVIII inhibitors; previously untreated patients are at the highest risk for inhibitor formation. Presented in this article are results of clinical trials in previously treated and untreated patients and postmarketing surveillance studies for the four commercially available rFVIII products (Recombinate, ReFacto, Kogenate FS/Kogenate Bayer and Advate). Recombinant FVIII therapies are highly efficacious when used ondemand and prophylactically, and they have excellent safety profiles; there have been no reports of viral- or prion-based disease transmission associated with rFVIII administration. The incidence rate of inhibitors in previously untreated patients ranges from 15% to approximately 30%. Because rFVIII concentrates have proven efficacy and safety profiles, a number of hemophilia treatment groups recommend rFVIII products as first-line therapy in the management of hemophilia A.

  13. Validation of the VERITAS-Pro treatment adherence scale in a Spanish sample population with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Torres-Ortuño, Ana; Galindo-Piñana, Pilar; Nieto-Munuera, Joaquín; Duncan, Natalie; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a validation in Spanish of the Validated Hemophilia Regimen Treatment Adherence Scale - Prophylaxis (VERITAS-Pro) questionnaire for use in patients with hemophilia under prophylactic treatment. The VERITAS-Pro scale was adapted through a process of back translation from English to Spanish. A bilingual native Spanish translator translated the scale from English to Spanish. Subsequently, a bilingual native English translator translated the scale from Spanish to English. The disagreements were resolved by agreement between the research team and translators. Seventy-three patients with hemophilia, aged 13-62 years, were enrolled in the study. The scale was applied twice (2 months apart) to evaluate the test-retest reliability. Internal consistency reliability was lower on the Spanish VERITAS-Pro than on the English version. Test-retest reliability was high, ranging from 0.83 to 0.92. No significant differences (P>0.05) were found between test and retest scores in subscales of VERITAS-Pro. In general, Spanish patients showed higher rates of nonadherence than American patients in all subscales. The Spanish version of the VERITAS-Pro has high levels of consistency and empirical validity. This scale can be administered to assess the degree of adherence of prophylactic treatment in patients with hemophilia.

  14. Validation of the VERITAS-Pro treatment adherence scale in a Spanish sample population with hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Torres-Ortuño, Ana; Galindo-Piñana, Pilar; Nieto-Munuera, Joaquín; Duncan, Natalie; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to conduct a validation in Spanish of the Validated Hemophilia Regimen Treatment Adherence Scale – Prophylaxis (VERITAS-Pro) questionnaire for use in patients with hemophilia under prophylactic treatment. Patients and methods The VERITAS-Pro scale was adapted through a process of back translation from English to Spanish. A bilingual native Spanish translator translated the scale from English to Spanish. Subsequently, a bilingual native English translator translated the scale from Spanish to English. The disagreements were resolved by agreement between the research team and translators. Seventy-three patients with hemophilia, aged 13–62 years, were enrolled in the study. The scale was applied twice (2 months apart) to evaluate the test–retest reliability. Results Internal consistency reliability was lower on the Spanish VERITAS-Pro than on the English version. Test–retest reliability was high, ranging from 0.83 to 0.92. No significant differences (P>0.05) were found between test and retest scores in subscales of VERITAS-Pro. In general, Spanish patients showed higher rates of nonadherence than American patients in all subscales. Conclusion The Spanish version of the VERITAS-Pro has high levels of consistency and empirical validity. This scale can be administered to assess the degree of adherence of prophylactic treatment in patients with hemophilia. PMID:28392680

  15. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  16. US Hemophilia Treatment Center population trends 1990-2010: patient diagnoses, demographics, health services utilization.

    PubMed

    Baker, J R; Riske, B; Drake, J H; Forsberg, A D; Atwood, R; Voutsis, M; Shearer, R

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, US government agencies have partially supported regional networks of Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC). HTC multidisciplinary teams provide comprehensive and coordinated diagnosis, treatment, prevention, education, outreach and surveillance services to improve the health of people with genetic bleeding disorders. However, national data are scarce on HTC-patient population trends and services. The aim of the study was to examine national trends over the past 20 years in patient diagnoses, demographics and health services utilization among the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-supported HTC network. Diagnoses, demographics and health services utilization data from 1990 to 2010 were aggregated from all HTCs using the Hemophilia Data Set (HDS). From 1990 to 2010, the HTC population grew 90% from 17 177 to 32 612. HTC patients with von Willebrand's disease increased by 148%, females by 346%, Hispanic patients by 236% and African Americans by 104%. Four thousand and seventy-five deaths were reported. From 2002 to 2010, annual comprehensive evaluations grew 38%, and persons with severe haemophilia on a home intravenous therapy programme rose 37%. In 2010, 46% of patients were less than 18 years vs. 24% for the general US population. The Hemophilia Data Set documents the growth and diversity of the US Hemophilia Treatment Center Network's patient population and services. Despite disproportionate deaths due to HIV, the HTC patient base grew faster than the general US population. The HDS is a vital national public health registry for this rare-disorder population.

  17. Post splenectomy fatal pulmonary embolism in a patient with moderate hemophilia a.

    PubMed

    Davoodabadi, Abdolhossein; Adib, Mohammad Mahdi; Keleidari, Behrooz

    2011-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a bleeding disorder caused by defective production of factor VIII. The main concern associated with the disease is bleeding, especially after trauma and surgeries. Factor VIII replacement therapy is associated with substantial decrease of bleeding events during surgery. However, there have been a number of reports of thromboemblic events in this situation. The present report describes a case of moderate hemophilia A in which splenectomy did lead to pulmonary embolism and subsequent death.The patient was a 25-year-old man with hemophilia A admitted after a car accident and trauma to left lower chest and abdomen. He received factor VIII concentrates for replacement therapy. He was hemodynamically stable on the first day, but on the second day his hemoglobin declined and he showed signs of abdominal tenderness. He, therefore, was subjected to laparatomy and splenectomy. After the operation, he suddenly developed dyspnea and decline in blood pressure, and death afterwards. Autopsy of the patient revealed massive pulmonary thromboembolism. The symptoms and outcome of the present case indicate that although pulmonary thromboembolism in the early postoperative period in patients with hemophilia A undergoing splenectomy and receiving factor VIII concentrate for replacement is rare, it should not be assumed a far-fetched event, and prophylactic measures to prevent thromboemboly must be considered.

  18. Outcomes in Patients With Hemophilia and von Willebrand Disease Undergoing Invasive or Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Chapin, John; Bamme, Jaqueline; Hsu, Fraustina; Christos, Paul; DeSancho, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Adults with hemophilia A (HA), hemophilia B (HB), and von Willebrand disease (VWD) frequently require surgery and invasive procedures. However, there is variability in perioperative management guidelines. We describe our periprocedural outcomes in this setting. A retrospective chart review from January 2006 to December 2012 of patients with HA, HB, and VWD undergoing surgery or invasive procedures was conducted. Type of procedures, management including the use of continuous factor infusion, and administration of antifibrinolytics were reviewed. Adverse outcomes were defined as acute bleeding (<48 hours), delayed bleeding (≥48 hours), transfusion, inhibitor development, and thrombosis. We identified 59 patients with HA and HB. In all, 24 patients had severe hemophilia and 12 had mild/moderate hemophilia. Twelve patients had inhibitors. There were also 5 female carriers of HA and 6 patients with VWD. There were 34 major surgeries (26 orthopedic, 8 nonorthopedic) and 129 minor surgeries. Continuous infusion was used in 55.9% of major surgeries versus 8.5% of minor surgeries. Antifibrinolytics were administered in 14.7% of major surgeries versus 23.2% of minor surgeries. In all, 4 patients developed acute bleeding and 10 patients developed delayed bleeding. Delayed bleeding occurred in 28.6% of genitourinary procedures and in 16.1% of dental procedures. Five patients acquired an inhibitor and 2 had thrombosis. In conclusion, patients with HA, HB, or VWD had similar rates of adverse outcomes when undergoing minor surgeries or major surgeries. This finding underscores the importance of an interdisciplinary management and procedure-specific guidelines for patients with hemophilia and VWD prior to even minor invasive procedures.

  19. Interventions for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhou, Ruiqing; Duan, Xin; Long, Dan; Yang, Songtao

    2014-08-28

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). In most cases, bleeding episodes are spontaneous and severe at presentation. The optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial. To determine the efficacy of hemostatic therapies for acute bleeds in people with acquired hemophilia A; and to compare different forms of therapy for these bleeds. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 4) and MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to 30 April 2014). We searched the conference proceedings of the: American Society of Hematology; European Hematology Association; International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH); and the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) (from 2000 to 30 April 2014). In addition to this we searched clinical trials registers. All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of hemostatic therapies for people with acquired hemophilia A, with no restrictions on gender, age or ethnicity. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No randomised clinical trials of hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A were found. Thus, we are not able to draw any conclusions or make any recommendations on the optimal hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A based on the highest quality of evidence. GIven that carrying out randomized controlled trials in this field is a complex task, the authors suggest that, while planning randomised controlled trials in which patients can be enrolled, clinicians treating the disease continue to base their choices on alternative, lower quality sources of evidence, which hopefully, in the future, will also be appraised and incorporated in a Cochrane Review.

  20. Atherosclerotic Heart Disease: Prevalence and Risk Factors in Hospitalized Men with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Moore, Charity G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Atherosclerotic heart disease (ASHD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Few studies have determined prevalence and predictors of ASHD in hemophilia (HA), a population whose survival is improving with safer blood products and effective treatments for AIDS and hepatitis C. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with ASHD in hemophilia A patients in Pennsylvania. Methods The prevalence of ASHD (myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease), cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, co-morbidities, and in-hospital mortality were assessed on statewide ASHD discharge data, 2001–2006, from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4). Results The prevalence of hemophilia ASHD admissions fluctuated between 6.5% and 10.5% for 2001 to 2006, p=0.62. Compared to HA without ASHD, HA with ASHD were older and more likely to be hypertensive, hyperlipidemic, and diabetic, all p<0.0001, with greater severity of illness, p=0.013. By contrast, HA and non-HA with ASHD had similar rates of hypertension, diabetes, and ICD-9 specified ischemic heart disease, including acute myocardial infarction (MI), p=0.39, old MI, p=0.47, and angina, p=0.63. Rates of catheterization and angiography, p=0.06 and p=0.07, were marginally lower, but primary circulatory system admitting diagnoses, p=0.29, were similar between HA and non-HA ASHD groups, as was length of stay, p=0.14, severity of illness, p=0.64, and in-hospital deaths, p=0.75. Conclusions Hemophilia patients with ASHD have similar cardiovascular risk factors, admitting diagnoses, severity of illness, and in-hospital mortality as the general population. These findings suggest cardiovascular prevention measures should be promoted in hemophilia. PMID:21371197

  1. Progress and challenges in the development of a cell-based therapy for hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Fomin, Marina E.; Togarrati, Padma Priya; Muench, Marcus O.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A results from an insufficiency of factor VIII (FVIII). Although replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII is a life-saving therapy for hemophilia A patients, such therapy is a life-long treatment rather than a cure for the disease. In this review we discuss the possibilities, progress and challenges that remain in the development of a cell-based cure for hemophilia A. The success of cell therapy depends on the type and availability of donor cells, the age of the host and method of transplantation, and the levels of engraftment and production of FVIII by the graft. Early therapy, possibly even prenatal transplantation, may yield the highest levels of engraftment by avoiding immunological rejection of the graft. Potential cell sources of FVIII include a specialized subset of endothelial cells known as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) present in the adult and fetal liver, or patient-specific endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that have undergone gene editing to produce FVIII. Achieving sufficient engraftment of transplanted LSECs is one of the obstacles to successful cell therapy for hemophilia A. We discuss recent results from transplants performed in animals that show production of functional and clinically relevant levels of FVIII obtained from donor LSECs. Hence, the possibility of treating hemophilia A can be envisioned through persistent production of FVIII from transplanted donor cells derived from a number of potential cell sources or through creation of donor endothelial cells from patient-specific iPSCs. PMID:25297648

  2. The ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) developed by the WHO for measuring function in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    De la Corte-Rodriguez, H; Rodriguez-Merchan, E C

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of the disease in people with hemophilia (PWH) must include an analysis of functioning. Researchers have done a lot of work over the last two decades in developing disease specific assessment tools in hemophilia - some of them based on the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health). This article is a narrative review of the ICF developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in the context of hemophilia. Expert commentary: The WFH has developed a website with a 'compendium of assessment tools' based on the ICF. The ICF developed by the WHO makes it possible to propose an approach that prioritizes capacities over difficulties. This article is intended to motivate physicians who treat PWH to incorporate the ICF into their assessments. A generalized use of the ICF will provide a common communication context. The ICF developed by the WHO should be used in hemophilia.

  3. Acquired hemophilia: a rare but life-threatening potential cause of bleeding in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Walsh, Christopher E; Cromwell, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    There are a number of potential etiologies of severe bleeding encountered in the intensive care unit. Although rare, acquired hemophilia is one such etiology that often presents with major bleeding requiring intensive care. Despite the introduction of effective treatments, the reported mortality rate of patients with acquired hemophilia ranges from 6 to 8% and is in part attributable to sequential delays in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the intensive care specialist with this underrecognized cause of bleeding, with an emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. As the objective of this article was to provide a concise overview of the diagnosis and management of acquired hemophilia, a directed search of English-language literature was undertaken using the PubMed database, targeting such topics as the differential diagnosis of bleeding in the intensive care unit and the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of acquired hemophilia. Clinical study findings pertaining to the efficacy of specific treatments for acquired hemophilia were summarized. Recognition of acquired hemophilia presents a clinical challenge, given the rarity of this condition, a general lack of familiarity with acquired hemophilia, and the potential for confusion with other more common causes of bleeding in the intensive care unit. Nevertheless, there are sentinel clinical and laboratory findings that should raise suspicion of this diagnosis. The treatment of acquired hemophilia is a multi-step, physiologically focused process aimed at controlling both active and recurrent bleeding. Therefore, prompt diagnosis is central to prognosis. Consultation with a hematologist may facilitate efficient diagnosis and management.

  4. Acquired hemophilia presenting as profound hematuria: evaluation, diagnosis, and management of elusive cause of bleeding in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Walsh, Christopher; Bailey, Heatherlee; Cromwell, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    There are numerous causes of bleeding that may present to the Emergency Department (ED). Although rare, acquired hemophilia is a potentially life-threatening bleeding disorder, with reported mortality rates ranging from 6% to 8% among patients who received proper diagnosis and treatment. Approximately two thirds of patients with this condition will present with major bleeding, the magnitude of which may necessitate urgent evaluation and care. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the evaluation, differential diagnosis, and management of acquired hemophilia for the emergency physician. A case report of a patient who presented to the ED with gross hematuria secondary to undiagnosed acquired hemophilia is described to facilitate a review of the laboratory evaluation, differential diagnosis, and treatment of acquired hemophilia. Patients with acquired hemophilia-related bleeding may present to the ED for care, given the often serious nature of their bleeding. Delayed diagnosis may postpone the initiation of targeted, effective treatments for achieving hemostasis, with potentially catastrophic consequences, particularly in patients who require emergent invasive procedures. Recognition of the potential for an underlying bleeding disorder and subsequent consultation with a hematologist are critical first steps in effectively identifying and managing a patient with acquired hemophilia who presents with bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nanocapsule-delivered Sleeping Beauty mediates therapeutic Factor VIII expression in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells of hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Kren, Betsy T; Unger, Gretchen M; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Trossen, Alycia A; Korman, Vicci; Diethelm-Okita, Brenda M; Reding, Mark T; Steer, Clifford J

    2009-07-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are a major endogenous source of Factor VIII (FVIII), lack of which causes the human congenital bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Despite extensive efforts, gene therapy using viral vectors has shown little success in clinical hemophilia trials. Here we achieved cell type-specific gene targeting using hyaluronan- and asialoorosomucoid-coated nanocapsules, generated using dispersion atomization, to direct genes to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes, respectively. To highlight the therapeutic potential of this approach, we encapsulated Sleeping Beauty transposon expressing the B domain-deleted canine FVIII in cis with Sleeping Beauty transposase in hyaluronan nanocapsules and injected them intravenously into hemophilia A mice. The treated mice exhibited activated partial thromboplastin times that were comparable to those of wild-type mice at 5 and 50 weeks and substantially shorter than those of untreated controls at the same time points. Further, plasma FVIII activity in the treated hemophilia A mice was nearly identical to that in wild-type mice through 50 weeks, while untreated hemophilia A mice exhibited no detectable FVIII activity. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposon targeted to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells provided long-term expression of FVIII, without apparent antibody formation, and improved the phenotype of hemophilia A mice.

  6. The Utilization of Rehabilitation in Patients with Hemophilia A in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rehabilitation plays an important role in the physical health of patients with hemophilia. However, comprehensive information regarding the utilization of rehabilitation for such patients remains scarce. Aim This population-based study aimed to examine the characteristics, trends, and most important factors affecting rehabilitation usage in patients with hemophilia A using a nationwide database in Taiwan. Methods Data from 777 patients with hemophilia A who were registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed using SAS 9.0. Results Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and clotting factor VIII concentrate costs were identified as factors affecting rehabilitation usage; musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures (odds ratio = 3.788; P < 0.001) were the most important predictor of whether a patient with hemophilia A would use rehabilitation services. Joint disorders, arthropathies, bone and cartilage disorders, intracranial hemorrhage, and brain trauma were common diagnoses during rehabilitation use. The costs of physical therapy (physiotherapy) comprised the majority (71.2%) of rehabilitation therapy categories. Increasingly, rehabilitation therapy was performed at physician clinics. The total rehabilitation costs were <0.1% of the total annual medical costs. Conclusion Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and increased use of clotting factor VIII concentrate affect the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A the most. The findings in this study could help clinicians comprehensively understand the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:27690229

  7. Nested Cohort

    Cancer.gov

    NestedCohort is an R software package for fitting Kaplan-Meier and Cox Models to estimate standardized survival and attributable risks for studies where covariates of interest are observed on only a sample of the cohort.

  8. Health-related quality of life in Iranian adult men with severe hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Faranoush, Mohammad; Shahverdi, Ehsan; Qorbani, Raheb; Moghaddam, Mostafa

    2017-07-20

    : Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessment should be part of the regular clinical assessment of persons with hemophilia. This study assessed quality of life of severe hemophilia patients (Type A) in Tehran comprehensive hemophilia care center. This cross-sectional study was done in 2016 and 84 men aged over 20 years with severe hemophilia (Type A) were assessed. All patients have been treated over 10 years at the comprehensive hemophilia care center, Iran. The HRQOL assessment includes the A36 Hemophilia-QOL questionnaire, sociodemographical and clinical characteristics. The overall HRQOL mean (±SD) in the present sample was 69.1 ± 26.0 (A36Hemofilia-QoL Global Index). The mean (±SD) scores according the domains were: physical health (15.0 ± 5.7), daily activities (6.7 ± 3.8), joint damage (4.2 ± 2.9), pain (3.0 ± 1.9), social activities and relationships (10.7 ± 5.8) and emotional function (9.2 ± 5.0) classified moderate-to-poor state. In contrast with treatment satisfaction (4.8 ± 1.6), treatment difficulties (9.5 ± 3.4) and mental health (6.2 ± 3.3), those were all in moderate-to-good state. Patients with higher education levels had better quality of life in the area of anxiety (P = 0.034), mental health (P = 0.007), social activities and personal relationships (P = 0.002). In general, poor quality of life of patients was 13.1%, 42.9% weak-to-moderate, 38.1% moderate-to-good and 6% good. It was shown that over 50% of patients had low-to-moderate HRQOL in the domains, such as physical health, daily activities, joint damage, pain, social activities and personal relationships. Efforts are necessary to improve their HRQOL.

  9. Treatment of patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors to factor FVIII with cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernandez, R; Quintana Gonzalez, S; Martinez Murillo, C; Dominguez Garcia, V; Rodriguez Moyado, H; Collazo Jaloma, J

    1996-01-01

    In this study, cimetidine was used to treat patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors to factor VIII who presented with acute hemorrhages (Group A) and those without hemorrhages (Group B). The dose of cimetidine was 15 mg/kg/day. Group A consisted of five patients with inhibitors between 156 and > 10,000 Bethesda Units (BU), all with serious hemorrhagic problems. The control of hemorrhaging was effective in 100% of these patients, although inhibitor levels remained high (25-380 BU). Group B consisted of seven patients who did not have hemorrhages, whose inhibitor levels were 41-358 BU. Five of these patients no longer had anamnestic responses to Factor VIII after several months of treatment with cimetidine. No difference in the response to cimetidine was seen between HIV positive and HIV negative patients. The results suggest that cimetidine is useful to suppress inhibitors to Factor VIII in patients with hemophilia A.

  10. Reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in hemophilia treatment: ASH meeting 2015.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Clemens; Schmidt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    During the 57(th) annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology 2015 in Orlando, Florida, various aspects in the field of hemostaseology were presented. The Choosing Wisely® campaign pointed out the importance of the critical use of diagnostic tools to rule out pulmonary embolism and questioned the relevance of thrombophilia testing in women undergoing routine infertility evaluation. Furthermore, the approval of idarucizumab, a specific antidote for the reversal of the anticoagulant effects of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, was highlighted. Finally, hemophilia specialists awaited the results of the SIPPET Trial, which were presented for the first time during the plenary session. Replacement therapy of previously untreated hemophilia A patients with plasma-derived factor VIII containing von Willebrand factor resulted in a lower incidence of inhibitors compared with patients treated with recombinant factor VIII.

  11. Immunomodulation for inhibitors in hemophilia A: the important role of Treg cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Carol H

    2010-08-01

    Approximately 25-30% of the hemophilia A patients develop inhibitory antibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) following protein-replacement therapy. This problem is also thought to occur following gene-replacement therapy. Recently, many approaches have been investigated to modulate FVIII-specific immune responses in either protein-replacement or gene therapy hemophilia A mouse models. Several promising protocols have been demonstrated to successfully prevent or modulate the formation of anti-FVIII antibodies, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of less immunogenic FVIII proteins, or formulations or gene therapy protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunomodulation strategies to target either T- and/or B-cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated Treg cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses and induce long-term tolerance in primed subjects still need to be developed.

  12. Severe and moderate hemophilia A: identification of 38 new genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Casaña, Pilar; Cabrera, Noelia; Cid, Ana Rosa; Haya, Saturnino; Beneyto, Magdalena; Espinós, Carmen; Cortina, Vicente; Dasí, Maria Angeles; Aznar, Josè Antonio

    2008-07-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by a lack or decrease of factor VIII activity. Its socio-economic impact is high given its high bleeding expression and treatment cost. Our aim was to establish the mutation of each patient to improve family management. A total of 116 unrelated families with severe and moderate hemophilia A were involved. Non-carriers of intron 22 and intron 1 rearrangements were included in F8 gene screening. Intron 1 and 22 inversion frequencies were 3% and 52.5% respectively. Putative mutations were identified in all the families; 38 were new. The cumulative inhibitor incidence was 22%. Approximately half the families carry non-recurrent mutations, which were unique in around one third. Harmful effects for mutations predicting null alleles are expected. Missense mutation consequences are not easily predictable, despite the help of some bio-informatics tools.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell treatment for hemophilia: a review of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sokal, E M; Lombard, C; Mazza, G

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia remains a non-curative disease, and patients are constrained to undergo repeated injections of clotting factors. In contrast, the sustained production of endogenous factors VIII (FVIII) or IX (FIX) by the patient's own cells could represent a curative treatment. Gene therapy has thus provided new hope for these patients. However, the issues surrounding the durability of expression and immune responses against gene transfer vectors remain. Cell therapy, involving stem cells expanded in vitro, can provide de novo protein synthesis and, if implanted successfully, could induce a steady-state production of low quantities of factors, which may keep the patient above the level required to prevent spontaneous bleeding. Liver-derived stem cells are already being assessed in clinical trials for inborn errors of metabolism and, in view of their capacity to produce FVIII and FIX in cell culture, they are now also being considered for clinical application in hemophilia patients.

  14. A case of acquired hemophilia A diagnosed after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takuma; Komatsu, Michiharu; Ito, Akihiro; Ito, Tetsuya; Suga, Tomoaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Sakai, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    A 65-year-old male with no personal or familial history of bleeding disorders underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for neurogenic dysphagia due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. On postoperative day 6, continuous oozing of venous blood was observed at the stoma. Prothrombin time was within normal range, but activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged. Cross-mixing test results indicated the existence of an inhibitor, and laboratory findings revealed decreased factor VIII activity and high levels of factor VIII inhibitor. The patient was diagnosed as having acquired hemophilia A, for which steroid monotherapy was effective. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but potentially fatal disease. Clinicians should be aware of this condition in patients presenting with sudden hemorrhage after PEG or other endoscopic treatments, even in those with no apparent history of bleeding.

  15. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephen; Gull, Sadaf; Ahmad, Jawad; Carey, Declan

    2014-02-05

    A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department with his first episode of hematemesis. He was anemic and coagulopathic on admission, and became hemodynamically unstable requiring surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Prior to surgery, he required 100% plasma exchange with human plasma derived prothrombin complex concentrate (Octaplex) as the exchange fluid. At induction of anesthesia, he received tranexamic acid, prothrombin complex concentrate, and platelets. At the time of knife to skin, he was given coagulation factor VIIa intravenously as a bolus. This treatment was on the recommendation of the hematology team who suspected a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia on the basis of his history and coagulation screen. His bleeding was controlled and a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A was confirmed in the postoperative period. This was managed with immunosuppressive therapy, and at the 2 year follow-up he remains well and is off all treatment.

  16. Immunomodulation for inhibitors in hemophilia A: the important role of Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Carol H

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 25–30% of the hemophilia A patients develop inhibitory antibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) following protein-replacement therapy. This problem is also thought to occur following gene-replacement therapy. Recently, many approaches have been investigated to modulate FVIII-specific immune responses in either protein-replacement or gene therapy hemophilia A mouse models. Several promising protocols have been demonstrated to successfully prevent or modulate the formation of anti-FVIII antibodies, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of less immunogenic FVIII proteins, or formulations or gene therapy protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunomodulation strategies to target either T- and/or B-cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated Treg cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses and induce long-term tolerance in primed subjects still need to be developed. PMID:20976115

  17. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Shunsuke; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Ohashi, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-15

    Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX). An adenovirus (Ad) vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX) (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX) maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  18. Most Factor VIII B Domain Missense Mutations Are Unlikely to Be Causative Mutations for Severe Hemophilia A: Implications for Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Kyoichi; Selvaraj, Sundar R; Miao, Hongzhi Z; Pipe, Steven W

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background & Objective The factor VIII (FVIII) B domain shares very little amino acid homology to other known proteins and is not directly necessary for procoagulant activity. Despite this, missense mutations within the B domain have been reported in patients with hemophilia A. Given that the B domain is dispensable for secretion and function of FVIII, we hypothesized that these mutations should not be causative of hemophilia A in these patients. Methods Plasmid vectors containing B domain missense mutations that were reported to be associated with moderate/severe hemophilia A (T751S, D826E, V993L, H1047Y, T1353A, N1441K, L1462P, E1579D, A1591S, P1641L and S1669L) were analyzed for their effect on synthesis and secretion compared to FVIII wild-type (WT) following transient transfection into COS-1 and CHO cells in vitro. Further, H1047Y, N1441K and E1579D mutants were expressed in vivo in a hemophilia A mouse model by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection. Results FVIII activity and antigen levels for all mutants expressed into the conditioned media of COS-1 and CHO cells were similar to FVIII WT. Also, plasma expression of these mutants was similar to FVIII WT in hemophilia A mice. An in vivo tail clip bleeding assay also demonstrated that blood loss from hemophilia A mice expressing FVIII WT, H1047Y, N1441K and E1579D were similar. Conclusion We conclude that most missense mutations within the FVIII B domain would be unlikely to lead to severe hemophilia A and that the majority of such missense mutations represent polymorphisms or non-pathologic mutations. PMID:21645226

  19. Once-weekly prophylactic dosing of recombinant factor IX improves adherence in hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Djambas Khayat, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regular prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia should be considered an optimal treatment. There is no general agreement on the optimal prophylaxis regimen, and adherence to prophylaxis is a main challenge due to medical, psychosocial, and cost controversies. Improved approaches in prophylaxis regimen of hemophilia B are needed to make patients’ lives easier. There is some evidence to support the efficacy of once-weekly prophylaxis. Longer sampling schedules are required for the determination of pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of factor IX (FIX). The half-life of FIX seems to be longer than previously described and is expected to be 34 hours. The clinical significance of maintaining a 1% trough level is widely debated in hemophilia B. The overall relationship between factor concentrate levels and incidence of joint bleeding was found to be very weak. Data also indicate that the distribution of FIX into an extravascular FIX compartment may contribute to hemostasis independently of circulating plasma FIX levels. Clinical assessment of the frequency and severity of bleeds remain an important measure of the efficacy of treatment. Role of PK-guided therapy remains to be established. Two prospective randomized studies had evaluated the efficacy and safety of 100 IU/kg once-weekly prophylaxis with nonacog alfa, and this prophylaxis regimen was found to be associated with lower annual bleeding rate compared with on-demand treatment in adolescents and adults with moderately severe-to-severe hemophilia B. Secondary prophylaxis therapy with 100 IU/kg nonacog alfa once weekly reduced annual bleeding rate by 89.4% relative to on-demand treatment. Residual FIX may be supportive of effectiveness. Once-weekly prophylaxis was well tolerated in the two studies, with a safety profile similar to that reported during the on-demand treatment period. To individually tailor treatment to clinical response and to minimize costs of factor concentrate, it would be of interest to

  20. Once-weekly prophylactic dosing of recombinant factor IX improves adherence in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Djambas Khayat, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regular prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia should be considered an optimal treatment. There is no general agreement on the optimal prophylaxis regimen, and adherence to prophylaxis is a main challenge due to medical, psychosocial, and cost controversies. Improved approaches in prophylaxis regimen of hemophilia B are needed to make patients' lives easier. There is some evidence to support the efficacy of once-weekly prophylaxis. Longer sampling schedules are required for the determination of pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of factor IX (FIX). The half-life of FIX seems to be longer than previously described and is expected to be 34 hours. The clinical significance of maintaining a 1% trough level is widely debated in hemophilia B. The overall relationship between factor concentrate levels and incidence of joint bleeding was found to be very weak. Data also indicate that the distribution of FIX into an extravascular FIX compartment may contribute to hemostasis independently of circulating plasma FIX levels. Clinical assessment of the frequency and severity of bleeds remain an important measure of the efficacy of treatment. Role of PK-guided therapy remains to be established. Two prospective randomized studies had evaluated the efficacy and safety of 100 IU/kg once-weekly prophylaxis with nonacog alfa, and this prophylaxis regimen was found to be associated with lower annual bleeding rate compared with on-demand treatment in adolescents and adults with moderately severe-to-severe hemophilia B. Secondary prophylaxis therapy with 100 IU/kg nonacog alfa once weekly reduced annual bleeding rate by 89.4% relative to on-demand treatment. Residual FIX may be supportive of effectiveness. Once-weekly prophylaxis was well tolerated in the two studies, with a safety profile similar to that reported during the on-demand treatment period. To individually tailor treatment to clinical response and to minimize costs of factor concentrate, it would be of interest to

  1. Self-reported barriers to hemophilia care in people with factor VIII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Riske, Brenda; Forsberg, Ann D; Ullman, Megan; Baker, Judith R; Koerper, Marion A; Curtis, Randall G; Lou, Mimi; Joanne, Wu; Johnson, Kathleen A

    2011-12-01

    In 1975, a national network of hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs) was created to increase access to healthcare services for individuals with hemophilia. Studies demonstrate that care in HTCs improves outcomes and reduces costs. The objective of the study was to assess the association of demographic, insurance, and clinical characteristics with self-reported barriers to HTC utilization. Data were collected from six HTCs from 2005 through 2007. Adult participants and parents of children aged <18 years were interviewed. Barriers were assessed by asking whether it was difficult to obtain care in the past 12 months. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to assess factors associated with self-reported barriers to care. All analyses were performed in 2010-2011. Data for 327 participants (50% adult, 64% severe hemophilia) were analyzed in 2010-2011. Most participants/parents did not report barriers to HTC utilization. However, 46 participants/parents (14%) reported one to six barriers, and 23 reported one barrier. Most frequently reported barriers were "distance to the clinic" for children (44%) and "insurance coverage" for adults (40%). Factors significantly associated with self-reported barriers were: lower income (<$20,000; OR=3.11, 95% CI=1.14-8.45), difficulty finding insurance or obtaining full-year coverage (OR=5.71, 95% CI=2.63-12.41), and decreased state Medicaid coverage for low-income, non-elderly individuals (OR=0.93, 95% CI=0.89-0.98). This study indicates that, although few people with hemophilia have barriers to care at HTCs, those with lower income, difficulty finding or maintaining adequate insurance coverage, or living in states with lower Medicaid generosity are more likely to report barriers. Identifying and resolving such barriers may improve care access and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. LASER versus electromagnetic field in treatment of hemarthrosis in children with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Eid, Mohamed A; Aly, Sobhy M

    2015-11-01

    Children with hemophilia usually have recurrent joint bleeding that leads to joint damage, loss of range of motion, and restriction of mobility, therefore affecting the quality of life in these children. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to that of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in treatment of hemarthrosis in children with hemophilia. Thirty boys with hemophilia A with ages ranging from 9 to 13 years were selected and assigned randomly, using sealed envelopes, into two equal intervention groups. The study group I received the traditional physical therapy program in addition to LLLT, whereas the study group II received the same physical therapy program given to the study group I in addition to PEMF. Both groups received the treatment sessions three times per week for three successive months. Pain, laboratory investigations, swelling, and range of motion (ROM) of the affected knee joint, in addition to physical fitness were evaluated before, at the end of the sixth week and at 12 weeks of the treatment program. Laser group showed significant improvement in all measured variables after the sixth week of treatment when compared with PEMF. By 12 weeks of treatment, there was a significant improvement in pain, ROM, ESR and leucocytes levels in laser group compared with PEMF, while there was no significant difference in knee circumferences and the 6-min walk test (6MWT) between both groups. Both groups showed significant improvement at 12 weeks of treatment compared with that at 6 weeks. Both LLLT and PEMF are effective modalities in reducing pain, swelling, increasing ROM and improving physical fitness. Twelve weeks of treatment of both modalities demonstrated significant improvement than 6 weeks of treatment. Laser therapy induced significant improvement than electromagnetic therapy in treatment of hemarthrosis-related problems in children with hemophilia.

  3. Vitamin D levels in children with severe hemophilia A: an underappreciated deficiency.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2015-04-01

    Osteoporosis in hemophilic patients is a significant problem. The causes of osteoporosis in hemophilic patients are lack of adequate exercise, multiple hemorrhage and inflammation, and low vitamin D levels. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children with severe hemophilia A. Forty-seven children with severe hemophilia were included in the study. None of the patients had previously received vitamin D supplementation. No patient had clinical or radiologic findings of rickets or seropositivity of hepatitis C virus or HIV. The mean age of the patients was 11.64 ± 5.70 (range, 2-18) years. The mean vitamin D level was 16.35 ± 7.49 ng/ml (range, 3.25-33.80). Vitamin D levels were below 10 ng/ml (severe vitamin D deficiency) in 9 cases (19%), between 10 and 19.99 ng/ml (vitamin D deficiency) in 23 cases (49%), between 20 and 29.99 ng/ml (vitamin D insufficiency) in 13 cases (28%), and above 30 ng/ml (normal vitamin D level) in 2 cases (4%). The mean serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in the children with hemophilia during winter and autumn were significantly lower than that during summer (P = 0.0028 and P = 0.0091, respectively). A majority of our hemophilic patients (96%) had low vitamin D levels. The study showed that the risk of vitamin D deficiency is the most highest during winter and autumn. Normal lifelong vitamin D levels are especially important in hemophilia because of the possible synergistic effect of vitamin D levels on periarticular and general osteoporosis, which is intrinsic to hemophilic conditions. We advise routine checking of vitamin D levels twice a year and vitamin D supplementation to maintain its level between 30 and 100 ng/ml.

  4. Assessment of Musculoskeletal Function and its Correlation with Radiological Joint Score in Children with Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samriti; Garg, Kapil; Singh, Jagdish

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the functional independence of children with hemophilia A and its correlation to radiological joint score. The present cross sectional study was conducted at SPMCHI, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, India. Children in the age group of 4-18 y affected with severe, moderate and mild hemophilia A and with a history of hemarthrosis who attended the OPD, emergency or got admitted in wards of SPMCHI, SMS Medical College were examined. Musculoskeletal function was measured in 98 patients using Functional Independence Score in Hemophilia (FISH) and index joints (joints most commonly affected with repeated bleeding) were assessed radiologically with plain X rays using Pettersson score. The mean FISH score was 28.07 ± 3.90 (range 17-32) with squatting, running and step climbing as most affected tasks. The mean Pettersson score was 3.8 ± 3.2. A significant correlation was found between mean Pettersson score and FISH (r = -0.875, P < 0.001) with knee and elbow having r = -0.810 and -0.861 respectively, but not in case of ankle with r = -0.420 (P 0.174). The FISH and radiological joint (Pettersson's) scores may be extremely useful in the clinical practice in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is considered very sensitive to detect early joint damage, but at a cost that makes it relatively inaccessible. FISH seems to be a reliable tool for assessment of functional independence in patients with hemophilia A.

  5. Targeting of Antithrombin in Hemophilia A or B with RNAi Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pasi, K John; Rangarajan, Savita; Georgiev, Pencho; Mant, Tim; Creagh, Michael D; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Bevan, David; Austin, Steve; Hay, Charles R; Hegemann, Inga; Kazmi, Rashid; Chowdary, Pratima; Gercheva-Kyuchukova, Liana; Mamonov, Vasily; Timofeeva, Margarita; Soh, Chang-Heok; Garg, Pushkal; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Akinc, Akin; Sørensen, Benny; Ragni, Margaret V

    2017-08-31

    Current hemophilia treatment involves frequent intravenous infusions of clotting factors, which is associated with variable hemostatic protection, a high treatment burden, and a risk of the development of inhibitory alloantibodies. Fitusiran, an investigational RNA interference (RNAi) therapy that targets antithrombin (encoded by SERPINC1), is in development to address these and other limitations. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, we enrolled 4 healthy volunteers and 25 participants with moderate or severe hemophilia A or B who did not have inhibitory alloantibodies. Healthy volunteers received a single subcutaneous injection of fitusiran (at a dose of 0.03 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo. The participants with hemophilia received three injections of fitusiran administered either once weekly (at a dose of 0.015, 0.045, or 0.075 mg per kilogram) or once monthly (at a dose of 0.225, 0.45, 0.9, or 1.8 mg per kilogram or a fixed dose of 80 mg). The study objectives were to assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and safety of fitusiran. No thromboembolic events were observed during the study. The most common adverse events were mild injection-site reactions. Plasma levels of fitusiran increased in a dose-dependent manner and showed no accumulation with repeated administration. The monthly regimen induced a dose-dependent mean maximum antithrombin reduction of 70 to 89% from baseline. A reduction in the antithrombin level of more than 75% from baseline resulted in median peak thrombin values at the lower end of the range observed in healthy participants. Once-monthly subcutaneous administration of fitusiran resulted in dose-dependent lowering of the antithrombin level and increased thrombin generation in participants with hemophilia A or B who did not have inhibitory alloantibodies. (Funded by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02035605 .).

  6. Strategies to encourage physical activity in patients with hemophilia to improve quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Miwa; Takedani, Hideyuki; Yokota, Kazuhiko; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder caused by a congenital abnormality of blood coagulation. Until the mid-1970s, patients with hemophilia (PWH) were advised to refrain from physical activity (PA) because of a perceived increased risk of bleeding. Since then, PA, which is recognized as being essential for health maintenance, is now recommended by the World Federation of Hemophilia. Moreover, a number of studies reported that PA can improve treatment efficacy and prevent bleeding in PWH. Physical assessment and intervention in PA are currently used in clinical practice. However, the necessity of PA is not emphasized, and many PWH generally have low- to- no PA. Therefore, a behavior change approach to encourage patient motivation is becoming ever more important. In this article, we review articles addressing PA in PWH and discuss strategies to encourage PA through a behavior change approach by focusing on factors relevant to hemophilia, such as benefits and bleeding risk of PA, risk management of bleeding, PA characteristics, and difficulty with exercise adherence. The trust relationship between clinicians and patients, a transtheoretical model of behavior change, and motivation theory as approaches to promote PA are introduced. Finally, we review a case report of the clinical success of a behavior change approach to promote PA. Many PWH find it difficult to continue PA because of aging, fear of bleeding, insufficient recognition of PA benefits, and psychological problems. Therefore, it is essential and important to perform prophylaxis with PWH and to heighten their understanding of the benefits and risks of PA, before initiating the exercise regimen. For those patients who find it difficult to participate in PA, it is necessary to plan individual-based behavior change approach and encourage self-efficacy. PMID:27274330

  7. Iranian Low-dose Escalating Prophylaxis Regimen in Children with Severe Hemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Eshghi, Peyman; Sadeghi, Elham; Tara, S Zahra; Habibpanah, Behnaz; Hantooshzadeh, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    Establishing an appropriate prophylaxis regimen for children with hemophilia is a critical challenge in developing countries. Barriers including availability and affordability, catheter-related complications, and inhibitor development risks have led to the introduction of new tailored prophylaxis regimens in different countries. This study emphasizes on the benefits of the Iranian low-dose escalating prophylaxis regimen in a Hemophilia Comprehensive Care Center in Iran. Referred patients with hemophilia less than 15 years of age, who were subject to prophylaxis regimen, are studied retrospectively. A once-weekly prophylaxis regimen of 25 IU/kg was started for the patients primarily. Their prophylaxis regimen was changed to 25 IU/kg twice a week and then 3 times a week when they experienced 3 joint bleedings, 4 soft tissue bleedings, or a 1 life-threatening bleed without a specific trauma history. Overall, 25 patients with severe hemophilia and at least 6-month history of on-demand (OD) treatment were studied. A mean of 1754 IU/kg/yr of coagulation factors, used for OD and prophylaxis purposes, was sufficient to decrease the mean annual bleeding rate (ABR) to 1.86 after prophylaxis. It also reduced the mean hospitalization days and the mean number of target joints to 0.24 and 0.16, respectively. Overall, 19 (76%) patients were continuing their once-weekly regimen at the end of the follow-up. None of the patients needed 3-times-a-week regimen or central venous catheterization and none developed inhibitors in the follow-up. Benefits of the Iranian low-dose escalating prophylaxis regimen prove equal to some of the previous 3-times-a-week prophylaxis regimens in reducing the ABR and hospitalizations.

  8. Arteriovenous fistula for long-term venous access for boys with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Walter J; Valentino, Leonard A; Bonilla, Ana Silvia; Goncharova, Irina; Taylor, Audrey; Pooley, Thomas A; Jacobs, Chad E

    2007-05-01

    Hemophilia is a sex-linked condition affecting about 1 of every 5000 males in the United States. The management of children with hemophilia can be improved with regular intravenous infusion of factor VIII or IX, thus preventing crippling and sometimes fatal hemorrhage. Maintaining this vital intravenous access is often hampered by gradual loss of superficial veins or repeated central catheter sepsis and thrombosis. This study reviewed an experience with arteriovenous fistula in selected hemophilia patients with limited venous access. Consecutive patients operated on between October 2000 and July 2006 for venous access with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula were reviewed. They were selected because of repeated problems with other venous access. Patency, ease of use, duplex scan derived brachial artery diameter, and arm length were assessed. During a 69-month period, 10 arteriovenous fistulas (five brachial artery-basilic vein fistulas, 5 brachial artery-cephalic vein fistulas) were created for nine patients. The patients were a median age of 5.5 years (range, 1 to 27 years), and all were <13 except the 27-year-old patient. There were no postoperative hematomas requiring evacuation. One arteriovenous fistula failed to mature and was redone in the opposite arm, which subsequently occluded after 13 months. Of the mature fistulas, patency was 100% at 1 year, 80% (4/5) at 3 years, and 75% (3/4) at 4 years, with mean follow-up of 22 months. Brachial artery diameter increased in the involved arm by a ratio of 1.95 (range, 1.51 to 2.5) compared with the opposite arm. Arm length disparity was increased by 0.5 cm (range, 0.8 to 1.5 cm) in the involved arm. All fistulas allowed good access at home by a care provider. For hemophilia patients with compromised venous access, arteriovenous fistulas provide good early patency. Brachial artery diameter and arm length require continued follow-up.

  9. Expression of von Willebrand factor "Normandy": an autosomal mutation that mimics hemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Tuley, E A; Gaucher, C; Jorieux, S; Worrall, N K; Sadler, J E; Mazurier, C

    1991-01-01

    von Willebrand disease Normandy (vWD Normandy) is a recently described phenotype in which a mutant von Willebrand factor (vWF) appears structurally and functionally normal except that it does not bind to blood coagulation factor VIII. This interaction is required for normal survival of factor VIII in the circulation; consequently, vWD Normandy can present as apparent hemophilia A but with autosomal recessive rather than X chromosome-linked inheritance. A vWF missense mutation, Thr28----Met, was identified in the propositus in or near the factor VIII binding site. The corresponding mutant recombinant vWF(T28M) formed normal multimers and had normal ristocetin cofactor activity. However, vWF(T28M) exhibited the same defect in factor VIII binding as natural vWF Normandy, confirming that this mutation causes the vWD Normandy phenotype. The distinction between hemophilia A and vWD Normandy is clinically important and should be considered in families affected by apparent mild hemophilia A that fail to show strict X chromosome-linked inheritance and, particularly, in potential female carriers with low factor VIII levels attributed to extreme lyonization. Images PMID:1906179

  10. Expression of von Willebrand factor "Normandy": an autosomal mutation that mimics hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Tuley, E A; Gaucher, C; Jorieux, S; Worrall, N K; Sadler, J E; Mazurier, C

    1991-07-15

    von Willebrand disease Normandy (vWD Normandy) is a recently described phenotype in which a mutant von Willebrand factor (vWF) appears structurally and functionally normal except that it does not bind to blood coagulation factor VIII. This interaction is required for normal survival of factor VIII in the circulation; consequently, vWD Normandy can present as apparent hemophilia A but with autosomal recessive rather than X chromosome-linked inheritance. A vWF missense mutation, Thr28----Met, was identified in the propositus in or near the factor VIII binding site. The corresponding mutant recombinant vWF(T28M) formed normal multimers and had normal ristocetin cofactor activity. However, vWF(T28M) exhibited the same defect in factor VIII binding as natural vWF Normandy, confirming that this mutation causes the vWD Normandy phenotype. The distinction between hemophilia A and vWD Normandy is clinically important and should be considered in families affected by apparent mild hemophilia A that fail to show strict X chromosome-linked inheritance and, particularly, in potential female carriers with low factor VIII levels attributed to extreme lyonization.

  11. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  12. Gene therapy for hemophilia "A" and "B": efficacy, safety and immune consequences.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T

    2007-01-01

    The first successful gene therapy trials for the treatment of hereditary disorders underscore the potential of gene therapy to combat disease and alleviate human suffering. The development of gene therapy for hemophilia is not only a research priority in its own right but also serves as an ideal trailblazer for many different diseases. Significant progress has recently been made in the development of gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. Long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII and IX could be expressed following gene therapy in hemophilic mice, stably correcting the bleeding diathesis. These advances parallel the development of improved gene delivery systems. The induction of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to the clotting factors could potentially preclude stable phenotypic correction. The risk of inhibitor formation varied, depending at least in part on the type of vector used and its in vivo tropism. We also demonstrated that the risk of immune responses to the vector particles, the clotting factors and/or transduced cells can be reduced by using vectors that only minimally interact with antigen presenting cells. In hemophilic mice, robust and stable clotting factor expression levels were achieved using adeno-associated viral vectors based on the newly disovered serotypes AAV8 and AAV9 which can efficient deliver the clotting factor genes into hepatocytes without triggering any inflammatory responses or adverse events. Pre-clinical studies in large animal models will be initiated to further validate these improved AAV vectors to ultimately justify a clinical trial in patients with severe hemophilia.

  13. Successful Phenotype Improvement following Gene Therapy for Severe Hemophilia A in Privately Owned Dogs.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Haskins, Mark E; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A; Arruda, Valder R

    2016-01-01

    Severe hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by <1% of residual factor VIII (FVIII) clotting activity. The disease affects several mammals including dogs, and, like humans, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the canine model has been one of the best predictors of the therapeutic dose tested in clinical trials for hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and other genetic diseases, such as congenital blindness. Here we report our experience with liver gene therapy with AAV-FVIII in two outbred, privately owned dogs with severe HA that resulted in sustained expression of 1-2% of normal FVIII levels and prevented 90% of expected bleeding episodes. A Thr62Met mutation in the F8 gene was identified in one dog. These data recapitulate the improvement of the disease phenotype in research animals, and in humans, with AAV liver gene therapy for hemophilia B. Our experience is a novel example of the benefits of a relevant preclinical canine model to facilitate both translational studies in humans and improved welfare of privately owned dogs.

  14. Eradication of neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII in canine hemophilia A after liver gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Finn, Jonathan D; Ozelo, Margareth C; Sabatino, Denise E; Franck, Helen W G; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Crudele, Julie M; Zhou, Shangzhen; Kazazian, Haig H; Lillicrap, David; Nichols, Timothy C; Arruda, Valder R

    2010-12-23

    Inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) are a major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A, affecting approximately 20% to 30% of patients. Current treatment for inhibitors is based on long-term, daily injections of large amounts of FVIII protein. Liver-directed gene therapy has been used to induce antigen-specific tolerance, but there are no data in hemophilic animals with pre-existing inhibitors. To determine whether sustained endogenous expression of FVIII could eradicate inhibitors, we injected adeno-associated viral vectors encoding canine FVIII (cFVIII) in 2 strains of inhibitor hemophilia A dogs. In 3 dogs, a transient increase in inhibitor titers (up to 7 Bethesda Units [BU]) at 2 weeks was followed by continuous decline to complete disappearance within 4-5 weeks. Subsequently, an increase in cFVIII levels (1.5%-8%), a shortening of clotting times, and a reduction (> 90%) of bleeding episodes were observed. Immune tolerance was confirmed by lack of antibody formation after repeated challenges with cFVIII protein and normal protein half-life. A fourth dog exhibited a strong early anamnestic response (216 BU), with slow decline to 0.8 BU and cFVIII antigen detection by 18 months after vector delivery. These data suggest that liver gene therapy has the potential to eradicate inhibitors and could improve the outcomes of hemophilia A patients.

  15. Impact of inhibitors on hemophilia A mortality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Soucie, J Michael; Miller, Connie H

    2015-05-01

    The previously published mortality studies are limited in hemophilia populations but suggest that there is no increased risk of mortality in factor VIII inhibitor patients. This retrospective study analyzed surveillance data collected on 7,386 males with severe hemophilia A over a 13-year period to assess the association between a current inhibitor and death. During the study period, 432 participants died, among whom 48 were patients with an inhibitor. Clinical characteristics most strongly associated with death were increased number of reported bleeds, signs of liver disease, infection with either HIV or HCV, and the presence of inhibitor. Patients who underwent successful tolerization were not considered inhibitor patients in our analysis. In a multivariable analysis, the odds of death were 70% higher among patients with a current inhibitor compared to those without an inhibitor (P < 0.01). Deaths among patients with inhibitors were much more likely to be attributed to bleeding complications than those among patients without an inhibitor (42 vs. 12%, P < 0.0001). We conclude that males with severe hemophilia A and a current inhibitor are at increased risk of death.

  16. Successful Phenotype Improvement following Gene Therapy for Severe Hemophilia A in Privately Owned Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Mary Beth; Haskins, Mark E.; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Severe hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by <1% of residual factor VIII (FVIII) clotting activity. The disease affects several mammals including dogs, and, like humans, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the canine model has been one of the best predictors of the therapeutic dose tested in clinical trials for hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and other genetic diseases, such as congenital blindness. Here we report our experience with liver gene therapy with AAV-FVIII in two outbred, privately owned dogs with severe HA that resulted in sustained expression of 1–2% of normal FVIII levels and prevented 90% of expected bleeding episodes. A Thr62Met mutation in the F8 gene was identified in one dog. These data recapitulate the improvement of the disease phenotype in research animals, and in humans, with AAV liver gene therapy for hemophilia B. Our experience is a novel example of the benefits of a relevant preclinical canine model to facilitate both translational studies in humans and improved welfare of privately owned dogs. PMID:27011017

  17. Leopold: the "bleeder prince" and public knowledge about hemophilia in Victorian Britain.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Alan R

    2012-07-01

    Hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorder inherited by males born of unaffected female carriers of the trait. British physicians became knowledgeable about this hereditary disease early in the nineteenth century as they investigated families transmitting the character through several generations. Prince Leopold (b. 1853), the fourth son of Queen Victoria, experienced recurrent bleeding episodes and was diagnosed with hemophilia during childhood. His hemorrhagic attacks were first described in the medical journals during 1868, and subsequently in the London and provincial newspapers. The royal family carefully managed news about health matters, and many newspapers reported widespread public sympathy for the travails of the queen and her children. But the republican press argued that the disaffected working classes resented the hyperbole connecting the health of royal individuals with the political future of the entire nation. Public discussion of hemophilia transformed it from a rare medical phenomenon to a matter of national news. Practicing physicians, the royal family, and the general public all came to understand the clinical features and the hereditary nature of the problem. Members of the royal family subsequently utilized this information to guide the marriages of their own children to prevent the spread of this dreaded bleeding disorder.

  18. Oral Tolerance Induction in Hemophilia B Dogs Fed with Transplastomic Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Roland W; Nichols, Timothy C; Su, Jin; Zhang, Bei; Sherman, Alexandra; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin; Perrin, George Q; Häger, Mattias; Wiinberg, Bo; Daniell, Henry

    2017-02-01

    Anti-drug antibodies in hemophilia patients substantially complicate treatment. Their elimination through immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols poses enormous costs, and ITI is often ineffective for factor IX (FIX) inhibitors. Moreover, there is no prophylactic ITI protocol to prevent anti-drug antibody (ADA) formation. Using general immune suppression is problematic. To address this urgent unmet medical need, we delivered antigen bioencapsulated in plant cells to hemophilia B dogs. Commercial-scale production of CTB-FIX fusion expressed in lettuce chloroplasts was done in a hydroponic facility. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds, and pentamer assembly after 30-month storage at ambient temperature. Robust suppression of immunoglobulin G (IgG)/inhibitor and IgE formation against intravenous FIX was observed in three of four hemophilia B dogs fed with lyophilized lettuce cells expressing CTB-FIX. No side effects were detected after feeding CTB-FIX-lyophilized plant cells for >300 days. Coagulation times were markedly shortened by intravenous FIX in orally tolerized treated dogs, in contrast to control dogs that formed high-titer antibodies to FIX. Commercial-scale production, stability, prolonged storage of lyophilized cells, and efficacy in tolerance induction in a large, non-rodent model of human disease offer a novel concept for oral tolerance and low-cost production and delivery of biopharmaceuticals.

  19. Synthesis of FVIII in Hemophilia-A patients with the intron-22-inversion may modulate immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Yanover, Chen; Miller-Jenkins, Lisa M.; Garfield, Susan; Cole, Shelley A.; Curran, Joanne E.; Moses, Eric K.; Rydz, Natalia; Simhadri, Vijaya; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Lillicrap, David; Viel, Kevin; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Pierce, Glenn F.; Howard, Tom E.; Sauna, Zuben E.

    2013-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to replacement Factor-VIII impair the effective management of hemophilia-A1. Individuals with hemophilia-A due to major F8 gene disruptions lack antigenically cross-reactive material in their plasma (CRM-negative) and prevalence of inhibitors is >60%. Conversely, subjects with missense mutations are CRM-positive and the prevalence of inhibitors is <10%2. Individuals with the intron-22-inversion (~50% of individuals with severe hemophilia-A) should be in the former group based on the genetic defect. Although these individuals are CRM-negative, only 20% of them develop inhibitors3. Here we demonstrate the presence of comparable levels of F8 mRNA and intracellular Factor-VIII protein in B-lymphoblastoid cells and liver biopsies from healthy controls and subjects with the intron-22-inversion. These results support the hypothesis that most individuals with the intron-22-inversion are tolerized to Factor-VIII and thus do not develop inhibitors. Furthermore we developed a pharmacogenetic algorithm that permits the stratification of inhibitor risk for sub-populations by predicting immunogenicity using, as input, the number of putative T-cell epitopes in the infused FVIII and the competence of MHC-Class-II molecules to present such epitopes. The algorithm exhibited significant accuracy in predicting inhibitors in 25 unrelated individuals with the intron-22-inversion (AUC = 0.890; P = 0.001). PMID:24037092

  20. Rational design of a fully active, long-acting PEGylated factor VIII for hemophilia A treatment.

    PubMed

    Mei, Baisong; Pan, Clark; Jiang, Haiyan; Tjandra, Hendri; Strauss, Jonathan; Chen, Yaoqi; Liu, Tongyao; Zhang, Xin; Severs, Joanne; Newgren, Jim; Chen, Jianmin; Gu, Jian-Ming; Subramanyam, Babu; Fournel, Michael A; Pierce, Glenn F; Murphy, John E

    2010-07-15

    A long-acting factor VIII (FVIII) as a replacement therapy for hemophilia A would significantly improve treatment options for patients with hemophilia A. To develop a FVIII with an extended circulating half-life, but without a reduction in activity, we have engineered 23 FVIII variants with introduced surface-exposed cysteines to which a polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer was specifically conjugated. Screening of variant expression level, PEGylation yield, and functional assay identified several conjugates retaining full in vitro coagulation activity and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding.PEGylated FVIII variants exhibited improved pharmacokinetics in hemophilic mice and rabbits. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies in VWF knockout mice indicated that larger molecular weight PEG may substitute for VWF in protecting PEGylated FVIII from clearance in vivo. In bleeding models of hemophilic mice, PEGylated FVIII not only exhibited prolonged efficacy that is consistent with the improved pharmacokinetics but also showed efficacy in stopping acute bleeds comparable with that of unmodified rFVIII. In summary site-specifically PEGylated FVIII has the potential to be a long-acting prophylactic treatment while being fully efficacious for on-demand treatment for patients with hemophilia A.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of SCT800, a new recombinant FVIII, in hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ruo-lan; Liu, Liang; Xie, Liang-zhi; Gai, Wen-lin; Cao, Si-shuo; Meng, Zhi-yun; Gan, Hui; Wu, Zhuo-na; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Dou, Gui-fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: SCT800 is a new third-generation recombinant FVIII agent that is undergoing promising preclinical study. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of SCT800 in hemophilia A mice. Methods: After hemophilia A mice were intravenously injected with single dose of SCT800 (80, 180, and 280 IU/kg) or the commercially available product Xyntha (280 IU/kg), pharmacokinetics profiles were evaluated based on measuring plasma FVIII: C. For pharmacodynamics study, dose-response curves of SCT800 and Xyntha (1–200 IU/kg) were constructed using a tail bleeding model monitoring both bleeding time and blood loss. Results: Pharmacokinetics profile analysis showed a dose independency of SCT800 ranging from 80 to 280 IU/kg and comparable pharmacokinetic profiles between SCT800 and Xyntha at the doses tested. Pharmacodynamics study revealed comparable ED50 values of SCT800 and Xyntha in the tail bleeding model: 14.78 and 15.81 IU/kg for bleeding time, respectively; 13.50 and 13.58 IU/kg for blood loss, respectively. Moreover, at the doses tested, the accompanying dose-related safety evaluation in the tail bleeding model showed lower hypercoagulable tendency and wider dosage range potential for SCT800 than Xyntha. Conclusion: In hemophilia A mice, SCT800 shows comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to Xyntha at the doses tested, and possibly with better safety properties. PMID:26806305

  2. Expression of von Willebrand factor Normandy: An autosomal mutation that mimics hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    Tuley, E.A.; Worrall, N.K.; Sadler, J.E. ); Gaucher, C.; Jorieux, S.; Mazurier, C. )

    1991-07-15

    von Willebrand disease Normandy (vWD Normandy) is a recently described phenotype in which a mutant von Willebrand factor (VWF) appears structurally and functionally normal except that is does not bind to blood coagulation factor VIII. This interaction is required for normal survival of factor VIII in the circulation; consequently, vWD Normandy can present as apparent hemophilia A but with autosomal recessive rather than X chromosome-linked inheritance. AvWF missense mutation, Thr{sup 28} {r arrow} Met, was identified in the propositus in or near the factor VIII binding site. The corresponding mutant recombinant vWF(T28M) formed normal multimers and had normal ristocetin cofactor activity. However, vWF(T28M) exhibited the same defect in factor VIII binding as natural vWF Normandy, confirming that this mutation causes the vWD Normandy phenotype. The distinction between hemophilia A and vWD Normandy is clinically important and should be considered in families affected by apparent mild hemophilia A that fail to show strict X chromosome-linked inheritance and, particularly, in potential female carriers with low factor VIII levels attributed to extreme lyonization.

  3. Acute Compartment Syndrome after an Olecranon Fracture in a Patient with Mild Hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John M; Christophersen, Christy; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a serious condition characterized by compartmental pressures within 20 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure, or clinical signs of pain, paresthesia, pallor, and lack of pulses. Often a surgical intervention is necessary. Increased surveillance for compartment syndrome is important when a patient with a bleeding disorder sustains a traumatic injury. We present a case of forearm compartment syndrome in a patient with mild hemophilia B who sustained an olecranon fracture. The patient received factor replacement and he underwent emergent forearm fasciotomies to avoid muscle necrosis. Over the subsequent week, the patient returned to the operating room 3 times for repeat irrigation and debridements, partial wound closure, open reduction internal fixation of his olecranon fracture and eventual skin grafting of the volar forearm wound. Failure to recognize compartment syndrome in even mild forms of hemophilia may result in loss of function, neurologic deficits, and limb amputations. The management of acute compartment syndrome in patients with hemophilia requires timely recognition, replacement of clotting factors, and emergent fasciotomies.

  4. Rationale for a randomized controlled trial comparing two prophylaxis regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A: the Hemophilia Adult Prophylaxis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2011-01-01

    A major goal of comprehensive hemophilia care is to prevent occurrence of bleeds by prophylaxis or regular preventive factor, one or more times weekly. Although prophylaxis is effective in reducing bleeding and joint damage in children, whether it is necessary to continue into adulthood is not known. The purpose of this article is to describe a Phase III randomized controlled trial to evaluate prophylaxis comparing two dose regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A. I hypothesize that adults with mature cartilage and joints are less susceptible to joint bleeds and joint damage, and that once-weekly recombinant factor VIII prophylaxis, with up to two rescue doses per week, is as effective as thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing bleeding frequency, but less costly and more acceptable, with higher quality of life. The ultimate goal of this project is to determine whether once-weekly prophylaxis is any worse than thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing joint bleeding frequency, while potentially utilizing less factor, at lower cost, leading to a better quality of life. This is an innovative concept, as it challenges the current paradigm of thrice-weekly prophylaxis in adults, which is based on dosing in children. Furthermore, this trial will assess interdose thrombin generation, a novel tissue factor-based assay of hemostasis, to determine if individualized thrombin generation can predict more individualized prophylaxis dosing, which would be practice changing. PMID:21939418

  5. Rationale for a randomized controlled trial comparing two prophylaxis regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A: the Hemophilia Adult Prophylaxis Trial.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2011-10-01

    A major goal of comprehensive hemophilia care is to prevent occurrence of bleeds by prophylaxis or regular preventive factor, one or more times weekly. Although prophylaxis is effective in reducing bleeding and joint damage in children, whether it is necessary to continue into adulthood is not known. The purpose of this article is to describe a Phase III randomized controlled trial to evaluate prophylaxis comparing two dose regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A. I hypothesize that adults with mature cartilage and joints are less susceptible to joint bleeds and joint damage, and that once-weekly recombinant factor VIII prophylaxis, with up to two rescue doses per week, is as effective as thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing bleeding frequency, but less costly and more acceptable, with higher quality of life. The ultimate goal of this project is to determine whether once-weekly prophylaxis is any worse than thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing joint bleeding frequency, while potentially utilizing less factor, at lower cost, leading to a better quality of life. This is an innovative concept, as it challenges the current paradigm of thrice-weekly prophylaxis in adults, which is based on dosing in children. Furthermore, this trial will assess interdose thrombin generation, a novel tissue factor-based assay of hemostasis, to determine if individualized thrombin generation can predict more individualized prophylaxis dosing, which would be practice changing.

  6. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Background Individual pharmacokinetic assessment is a critical component of tailored prophylaxis for hemophilia patients. Population pharmacokinetics allows using individual sparse data, thus simplifying individual pharmacokinetic studies. Implementing population pharmacokinetics capacity for the hemophilia community is beyond individual reach and requires a system effort. Objective The Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to assemble a database of patient pharmacokinetic data for all existing factor concentrates, develop and validate population pharmacokinetics models, and integrate these models within a Web-based calculator for individualized pharmacokinetic estimation in patients at participating treatment centers. Methods Individual pharmacokinetic studies on factor VIII and IX concentrates will be sourced from pharmaceutical companies and independent investigators. All factor concentrate manufacturers, hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and independent investigators (identified via a systematic review of the literature) having on file pharmacokinetic data and willing to contribute full or sparse pharmacokinetic data will be eligible for participation. Multicompartmental modeling will be performed using a mixed-model approach for derivation and Bayesian forecasting for estimation of individual sparse data. NONMEM (ICON Development Solutions) will be used as modeling software. Results The WAPPS-Hemo research network has been launched and is currently joined by 30 HTCs from across the world. We have gathered dense individual pharmacokinetic data on 878 subjects, including several replicates, on 21 different molecules from 17 different sources. We have collected sparse individual pharmacokinetic data on 289 subjects from the participating centers through the testing phase of the WAPPS-Hemo Web interface. We have developed prototypal population pharmacokinetics models for 11 molecules. The WAPPS-Hemo website

  7. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service-Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Alfonso; Keepanasseril, Arun; Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-12-15

    Individual pharmacokinetic assessment is a critical component of tailored prophylaxis for hemophilia patients. Population pharmacokinetics allows using individual sparse data, thus simplifying individual pharmacokinetic studies. Implementing population pharmacokinetics capacity for the hemophilia community is beyond individual reach and requires a system effort. The Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service-Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to assemble a database of patient pharmacokinetic data for all existing factor concentrates, develop and validate population pharmacokinetics models, and integrate these models within a Web-based calculator for individualized pharmacokinetic estimation in patients at participating treatment centers. Individual pharmacokinetic studies on factor VIII and IX concentrates will be sourced from pharmaceutical companies and independent investigators. All factor concentrate manufacturers, hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and independent investigators (identified via a systematic review of the literature) having on file pharmacokinetic data and willing to contribute full or sparse pharmacokinetic data will be eligible for participation. Multicompartmental modeling will be performed using a mixed-model approach for derivation and Bayesian forecasting for estimation of individual sparse data. NONMEM (ICON Development Solutions) will be used as modeling software. The WAPPS-Hemo research network has been launched and is currently joined by 30 HTCs from across the world. We have gathered dense individual pharmacokinetic data on 878 subjects, including several replicates, on 21 different molecules from 17 different sources. We have collected sparse individual pharmacokinetic data on 289 subjects from the participating centers through the testing phase of the WAPPS-Hemo Web interface. We have developed prototypal population pharmacokinetics models for 11 molecules. The WAPPS-Hemo website (available at www.wapps-hemo.org, version

  8. Social Worker Perceptions and Observations Regarding Men's Management of Hemophilia and Use of Community-Based Support.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Erik Bruce

    2015-08-01

    The study reported in this article was conducted in response to Utah service provider concerns that men with hemophilia may be disengaged from their local community-based support network. This study explored the challenges, adaptations, and needs of men with hemophilia from the perspective of Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC) social workers. Utah's two active HTC social workers participated in face-to-face interviews. Fourteen HTC social workers from surrounding regions completed written interviews. The researcher used a qualitative, grounded theory approach to analyze the data. Resilience theory provided a lens for interpreting the results. Findings from these professionals indicate that men with hemophilia appear to be ambivalent toward services that are available to them for reasons that include work and insurance status, prior personal history with the bleeding disorders community, strength of relationship with local service providers, degree of customization of HTC services, and the desire to maintain personal independence. Understanding this dynamic may be helpful in developing services that are more specifically tailored to the needs of men with hemophilia, in addition to potentially providing stronger community-based support to men with other genetic disorders.

  9. Omental implantation of BOECs in hemophilia dogs results in circulating FVIII antigen and a complex immune response.

    PubMed

    Ozelo, Margareth C; Vidal, Barbara; Brown, Christine; Notley, Colleen; Hegadorn, Carol; Webster, Sandra; Harpell, Lori; Ahlin, James; Winterborn, Andrew; Handforth, Janine; Arruda, Valder R; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2014-06-26

    Ex vivo gene therapy strategies avoid systemic delivery of viruses thereby mitigating the risk of vector-associated immunogenicity. Previously, we delivered autologous factor VIII (FVIII)-expressing blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to hemophilia A mice and showed that these cells remained sequestered within the implanted matrix and provided therapeutic levels of FVIII. Prior to translating this strategy into the canine (c) model of hemophilia A, we increased cFVIII transgene expression by at least 100-fold with the use of the elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α) promoter and a strong endothelial enhancer element. BOECs isolated from hemophilia A dogs transduced with this lentiviral vector express levels of cFVIII ranging between 1.0 and 1.5 U/mL per 10(6) cells over 24 hours. Autologous BOECs have been implanted into the omentum of 2 normal and 3 hemophilia A dogs. These implanted cells formed new vessels in the omentum. All 3 hemophilia A dogs treated with FVIII-expressing autologous BOECs developed anti-FVIII immunoglobulin G2 antibodies, but in only 2 of the dogs were these antibodies inhibitory. FVIII antigen levels >40% in the absence of FVIII coagulant function were detected in the circulation for up to a year after a single gene therapy treatment, indicating prolonged cellular viability and synthesis of FVIII.

  10. Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010)

    PubMed Central

    TOBASE, P.; LANE, H.; SIDDIQI, A.-E-A.; INGRAM-RICH, R.; WARD, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent joint hemarthroses due to hemophilia (Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiency) often lead to invasive orthopedic interventions to decrease frequency of bleeding and/or to alleviate pain associated with end-stage hemophilic arthropathy. Aim Identify trends in invasive orthopedic interventions among people with hemophilia who were enrolled in the Universal Data Collection (UDC) program during the period 2000–2010. Methods Data were collected from 130 hemophilia treatment centers in the United States annually during the period 2000–2010, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of visits in which an invasive orthopedic intervention was reported was expressed as a proportion of the total visits in each year of the program. Invasive orthopedic interventions consisted of arthroplasty, arthrodesis, and synovectomy. Joints included in this study were the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Results A 5.6% decrease in all invasive orthopedic interventions in all joints of people with hemophilia enrolled in the UDC program over the 11-year study period was observed. Conclusions These data reflect a declining trend in invasive orthopedic interventions in people with hemophilia. Further research is needed to understand the characteristics that may influence invasive orthopedic interventions. PMID:27030396

  11. Treatment of Hemophilia A in Utero and Postnatally using Sheep as a Model for Cell and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Porada, Christopher D.; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A represents the most common inheritable deficiency of the coagulation proteins. Current state-of- the-art treatment consists of frequent prophylactic infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII protein to maintain hemostasis, and has greatly increased life expectancy and quality of life for many hemophilia A patients. This treatment approach is, however, far from ideal, due to the need for lifelong intravenous infusions, the high treatment cost, and the fact that it is unavailable to a large percentage of the world’s hemophiliacs. There is thus a need for novel treatments that can promise long-term or permanent correction. In contrast to existing protein based therapeutics, gene therapy offers to provide a permanent cure following few, or even a single, treatment. In the present paper, we review ongoing work towards this end, focusing on studies we have performed in a large animal model. Some of the key topics covered in this review include the unique opportunities sheep offer as a model system, the re-establishment and clinical and molecular characterization of a line of sheep with severe hemophilia A, the advantages and feasibility of treating a disease like hemophilia A in utero, and the use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) as cellular delivery vehicles for the FVIII gene. The review finishes with a brief discussion of our recent success correcting ovine hemophilia A with a postnatal transplant with gene-modified MSC, and the limitations of this approach that remain to be overcome. PMID:23264887

  12. Thromboprophylaxis and Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Hemophilia A or B Who Underwent High-Risk Orthopedic Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Raza, Shahzad; Kale, Gautam; Kim, Daniel; Akbar, Syed A; Holm, Lisa; Naidzionak, Ulad; Hossain, Akm M; Dong, Xiang; Doll, Donald C; Freter, Carl E; Hopkins, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) carry a high risk of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE); therefore, anticoagulation prophylaxis is recommended in these patients. Unfortunately, there are no guidelines about VTE prophylaxis in patients with hemophilia who underwent these high-risk surgeries. To determine whether these patients have high risk of VTE, we conducted a retrospective study on patients with hemophilia who underwent elective THR/TKA at our institute from 2004 to 2012. Postoperatively, we collected information on duration and method of factor VIII/IX infusion, VTE-prophylaxis, and complications. There were 23 patients with hemophilia, 18 (78%) with hemophilia A and 5 (22%) with hemophilia B, who underwent high-risk surgeries (39% THR and 61% TKA). The VTE prophylaxis included sequential compression device, 12 (52%), and prophylactic enoxaparin, 1 (4%). Ten (43%) patients did not receive VTE prophylaxis. At 1-year follow-up, we did not find any evidence of clinical VTE in our patients. Better risk stratification is needed to identify patients who would benefit from pharmacological prophylaxis.

  13. Allele frequencies of three factor VIII gene polymorphisms in Iranian populations and their application in hemophilia A carrier detection.

    PubMed

    Azimifar, S Babak; Seyedna, S Yoosef; Zeinali, Sirous

    2006-05-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by a quantitative or qualitative deficiency of blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). ARMS (amplification refractory mutation system) primers were designed to determine allele frequencies of three FVIII gene linked markers, IVS7 nt 27 G/A SNP, BclI/intron 18, and HindIII/intron 19 among 85 normal Iranian women from unrelated families. Then same method was applied to perform carrier detection for hemophilia A families. The allele frequencies of IVS7 nt 27 "G"/"A" allele, BclI "T"/"A" allele, and HindIII "C"/"T" allele among normal women were 0.88/0.12, 0.52/0.48, and 0.48/0.52, respectively. The three polymorphisms were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium, which decreased the overall heterozygosity to 51%. Twenty-one women from 15 unrelated hemophilia A families were referred to us for hemophilia A carrier detection. Taking advantage of these three biallelic polymorphisms in conjunction with multiallelic St14 VNTR (locus DXS52), IVS13 (CA)n STR, and IVS22 (CA)n STR, carrier status was determined in 16 women (16/21 or 76% of the at-risk women) from 11 families (11/15 or 73% of the families). The used ARMS methods are rapid and can easily be applied in conjunction with other FVIII gene linked polymorphisms for indirect mutation detection of hemophilia A where they are informative.

  14. Spontaneous omental bleeding in a 20-year old patient with hemophilia A. A rare cause for emergency laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Aumann, V; Chiapponi, C; Meyer, F; Wybranski, C; Bruns, C J; Jannasch, O

    2016-11-08

    Spontaneous intraabdominal hemorrhage is a very rare event even in patients with bleeding disorders like hemophilia. Nevertheless this rare case must be considered in patients with coagulopathies presenting with abdominal pain. Prompt radiologic imaging and surgical consultation are of highest priority. Here we report on a 20-year-old patient with moderate hemophilia A, who underwent emergency laparotomy for a spontaneous idiopathic bleeding of the omentum majus. There are few cases in the literature on this sort of event in patients with hemophilia, who mostly suffer from spontaneous joint bleedings. These patients require an intensive, interdisciplinary perioperative care, involving haematologists, surgeons, radiologists and anesthesists. Finally we discuss, whether an optimized, individually adapted treatment with coagulation factors might possibly have prevented this bleeding event in this patient.

  15. Pharmacological concentrations of rFVIIa restore hemostasis independent of tissue factor in antibody-induced hemophilia mice

    PubMed Central

    KESHAVA, S.; SUNDARAM, J.; RAJULAPATI, A.; PENDURTHI, U.R.; RAO, L.V.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has been used widely for treating hemophilia patients with inhibitory autoantibodies against factor VIII or IX. Its mechanism of action is not entirely known. A majority of in vitro studies suggested that pharmacological concentrations of rFVIIa restore hemostasis in hemophilia in a phospholipid-dependent mechanism, independent of tissue factor (TF). However, a few studies suggested that a TF-dependent mechanism plays a primary role in rFVIIa correction of bleeding in hemophilia patients. Here, we investigated the potential contribution of TF in rFVIIa-induced hemostasis in hemophilia employing a model system of FVIII antibody-induced hemophilia in TF transgenic mice. Methods Mice expressing low levels of human TF (LTF mice), relatively high levels of human TF (HTF mice) or wild-type mice (WT mice) were administered with neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies to induce hemophilia in these mice. The mice were then treated with varying concentrations of rFVIIa. rFVIIa-induced hemostasis was evaluated with the saphenous vein bleeding model. Results Administration of FVIII inhibitory antibodies induced the hemophilic bleeding phenotype in all three genotypes. rFVIIa administration rescued the bleeding phenotype in all three genotypes. No significant differences were observed in rFVIIa-induced correction in the bleeding of LTF and HTF mice administered with FVIII antibodies. Conclusions Our results provide strong evidence supporting that the hemostatic effect of pharmacological doses of rFVIIa stems from a TF-independent mechanism. PMID:26727350

  16. Effects of recombinant human prothrombin on thrombin generation in plasma from patients with hemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Hansson, K M; Gustafsson, D; Skärby, T; Frison, L; Berntorp, E

    2015-07-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the impact of FII levels, and their increase, on the hemostatic potential in plasma from hemophilia A and B patients with and without inhibitors. Recombinant human factor (F) II (rhFII) was added ex vivo to plasma from 68 patients with hemophilia A and B, with or without inhibitors. The hemostatic potential as measured by thrombin generation (calibrated automated thrombogram [CAT]) was focused on the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) as it has been shown to correlate with the clinical phenotype of bleeding in hemophilia patients and has also been used to guide bypassing therapy in hemophilia patients with inhibitors before elective surgery. The factor eight inhibitor bypassing agent (FEIBA(®) ) was used as a reference to the clinical situation. The study shows that rhFII concentration-dependently increased ETP by a similar magnitude in hemophilia A and B, both with and without inhibitors. Compared with FEIBA, rhFII showed a shallower concentration-response curve. In both types of hemophilia 100 mg L(-1) of rhFII roughly doubled the ETP. A corresponding response was obtained by 0.5 U mL(-1) of FEIBA. These data support the theory that FII is one of the major components responsible for the efficacy of FEIBA. The data also indicate that rhFII may be useful, alone or in combination with other coagulation factors, in some of the conditions for which FEIBA is used today, although more data are needed to substantiate this. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Rituximab as first-line treatment for the management of adult patients with non-severe hemophilia A and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lim, M Y; Nielsen, B; Lee, K; Kasthuri, R S; Key, N S; Ma, A D

    2014-06-01

    The role of immunosuppression in the management of patients with congenital hemophilia and inhibitors is uncertain. The use of rituximab has been limited to case reports and case series. In most reports, rituximab was used as second-line or third-line treatment following failure of conventional immune tolerance induction therapy, and more commonly in pediatric patients. The objective of this study was to describe our experience with rituximab for the eradication of factor VIII inhibitors in adult patients with non-severe hemophilia A. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of adult patients with non-severe hemophilia A and a diagnosis of FVIII inhibitor treated with rituximab (four weekly doses of 375 mg m(-2) ) as first-line treatment at our hemophilia center. We identified nine consecutive adult patients with hemophilia A (moderate, n = 5; mild, n = 4) at our institution between 2000 and 2013, with a median age of 54 years (range, 24-77 years) at the time of inhibitor diagnosis. No patient received concomitant immune tolerance induction therapy. All nine patients had successful eradication of FVIII inhibitors. The median time from the first dose of rituximab to a clinical response was 95 days (range, 12-278 days). The median follow-up was 56 months (range, 13-139 months). Following inhibitor eradication, eight patients were rechallenged with FVIII concentrates. Two patients developed inhibitor recurrence associated with surgery. This case series demonstrates that rituximab is a useful first-line treatment to achieve sustained inhibitor eradication in adult patients with non-severe hemophilia A. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Life-threatening bleeding in a patient with mild hemophilia A and heterozygosity for von Willebrand disease Type 2N.

    PubMed

    Allan, John N; Friedman, Kenneth D; DeSancho, Maria T

    2014-12-01

    Hemophilia A and von Willebrand disease (VWD) are distinct bleeding disorders with a spectrum of clinical phenotypes. They are characterized by mutations in either factor VIII (F8) or von Willebrand factor (VWF) genes, respectively. The pattern of inheritance and appropriate laboratory evaluation differentiates these diseases, and treatment strategies for both are different. Here, we report a male patient with hemophilia A and VWD Type 2 Normandy (N) mutations who presented with life-threatening bleeding. We document his medical history, clinical course, management, and diagnostic work up.

  19. Hemophilia Management via Data Collection and Reporting: Initial Findings from the Comprehensive Care Sustainability Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Michael D; Pindolia, Vanita K

    2017-01-01

    Despite being a rare disorder, hemophilia represents a significant driver of health care resource utilization and requires expert hematologic and multidisciplinary services to achieve optimal outcomes. Since their inception nearly 40 years ago, hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs) have served as centers of excellence in providing the intensive care and ancillary services necessary for this unique patient base; however, the full capabilities of these centers may be underused in the current framework of managed care, largely because of a lack of communication and information shared between payers and HTC stakeholders. In an effort to enact tangible change toward improving the quality of care for bleeding disorders, the National Hemophilia Foundation developed an ongoing initiative among 18 leading clinicians and managed care decision makers called the Comprehensive Care Sustainability Collaborative (CCSC). The primary aim of the CCSC is to develop a framework for quality improvement pilot programs that can be replicated across the United States between payers and HTCs to facilitate cost-effective hemophilia management by integrating the HTC comprehensive care model. After CCSC committee members shared perspectives on care delivery, quality, and value, actionable data points were reviewed at length in order to develop meaningful metrics to facilitate information sharing between HTC and payer stakeholders. The following pragmatic measures will be reported by HTCs and payers via a series of pilot programs (reporting group is indicated in brackets): (a) patient classification by diagnosis (type, severity, and inhibitor status) [HTC]; (b) total cost of clotting factor [payer]; (c) prescribed factor dose/dispensed dose/patient weight (± range) [payer and HTC]; (d) emergency department visits/hospitalizations [payer and HTC]; (e) home infusion of clotting factor (%) [HTC]; (f) total cost per patient [payer]; and (g) patient contacts (e.g., clinic visits, follow

  20. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel M.; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  1. Emerging Issues in Diagnosis, Biology, and Inhibitor Risk in Mild Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Eckhardt, Corien; van Velzen, Alice; Linari, Silvia; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Mild hemophilia A (MHA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder defined by factor VIII (FVIII) levels between 5 and 40 U/dL. Diagnosis occurs later in life compared with severe or moderate disease. Although bleeding episodes are especially posttraumatic, their unexpected occurrence may be potentially life threatening if diagnosis is missed or delayed. Desmopressin is the treatment of choice for MHA since it is cheap and safe, but a significant proportion of cases do not attain FVIII postinfusion greater than 50 U/dL, which is considered a safe level for major surgery. Thus, replacement therapy may be needed and is usually successful in MHA, but recent data indicate that this can be associated with the occurrence of inhibitors against FVIII, as for severe hemophilia A. However, in contrast to severe or moderate hemophilia A, patients with MHA have a lifelong risk of inhibitor formation. Inhibitors may change the clinical phenotype dramatically, as the inhibitor frequently cross-reacts with the patient's endogenous FVIII, reducing the endogenous FVIII plasma levels below 1 U/dL. Specific F8 missense mutations predispose to inhibitor development. Inhibitors are frequently provoked by intensive treatment with therapeutic FVIII concentrates (more than 5 consecutive exposure days). Bleeding in inhibitor patients may be treated with desmopressin, high doses of FVIII concentrate or FVIII bypassing agents. Many inhibitors disappear over time when no FVIII concentrate is administered. However, this does not imply that a patient is tolerant and an anamnestic reaction may occur when treatment with FVIII concentrate is again necessary. To eradicate, an inhibitor different strategies may be used: watchful waiting, immunosuppression, or immune tolerance induction regimen.

  2. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-10-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels <0.05 IUmL(-1)) undergoing elective, minor or major surgery. Retrospective data were collected on FVIII treatment, including timing and dosing, time point of FVIII sampling and all FVIII plasma concentrations achieved (trough, peak and steady state), brand of concentrate, as well as patients' and surgical characteristics. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (P<0.01) and increased in cases with blood group O (26%; P<0.01). In addition, a minor decrease in clearance was observed when a major surgical procedure was performed (7%; P<0.01). The developed population model describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Potential role of a new PEGylated recombinant factor VIII for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Tung Thanh; Gumuscu, Burak

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A, a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor (F) VIII, is an X-linked bleeding disorder with an approximate incidence of one in 5,000 male infants. Bleeding-related complications often result in greater severity of disease, poor quality of life, surgical interventions for severe joint destruction, and shortened life span. With the availability of plasma-derived and recombinant FVIII products, the benefits of primary prophylaxis were demonstrated and is now the standard of care for patients with severe factor deficiencies. Current hemophilia research is focusing on the creation of new factor replacement therapies with longer half-lives; accessing alternative mechanisms to achieve desired hemostasis and enhance bypassing activity; and limiting the immunogenicity of the protein. PEGylation involves the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a protein, peptide, or a small molecule drug. PEG effectively increases the molecular weight and size of the protein by creating a hydrophilic cloud around the molecule. This molecular change may reduce susceptibility of the molecule to proteolytic activity and degradation. It is also believed that PEGylation changes the surface charge of the protein that ultimately interferes with some receptor-mediated clearance processes. The half-life of PEGylated factor is more prolonged when compared to non-PEGylated full-length recombinant FVIII. The dawn of a new era in the care of hemophilia patients is upon us with the release of recombinant FVIII products with extended half-lives, and products with even more extended half-life will become available in a very short time. With all the promise of these new agents, many questions still remain.

  4. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching )

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. [Analysis of individualized primary prophylactic treatment of 19 cases of children with severe hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    Liu, G Q; Tang, L; Wu, X Y; Zhen, Y Z; Li, G; Chen, Z P; Wang, Y; Zhang, N N; Zhang, J S; Yu, G X; Wu, R H

    2016-12-02

    Objective: To study the current situation of primary prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A children and to explore rational regimen in order to provide evidence for the development of primary prophylaxis in China. Method: A retrospective clinical data collection and analysis was conducted for 19 severe hemophilia A children who received primary prophylaxis in Beijing Children's Hospital outpatient clinic between February 2011 and September 2015 and evaluated the regimen and efficacy. Result: (1) Primary prophylaxis regimen: the median beginning age 1.8 (range 0.5-2.9) years, the median FⅧ preparation using dosage 16.7 (8.0-23.5) U/(kg·time), the median using frequency was 1.0 (1.0-3.0) time/week. Eight cases among the patients received escalation of treatment intensity because of the poor bleeding control. (2) Efficacy: the median annual bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.9 (0-6.0) times/year, the median annual joint bleeding rate (AJBR) was 0 (0-3.3) times/year, without life threatening bleeding. All of them kept in 4th scale of Beijing Children Hospital daily activity level. The median annual factor consumption was 1 844 (840-5 040) U/kg. Conclusion: Low-dose primary prophylaxis regimen which were in low-dose /low frequencies and adjusted by bleeding frequency could decrease bleeding and joint bleeding frequency significantly, maintained the normal daily activity capacity and saved the factor consumption compared to standard regimen in severe hemophilia A children.

  6. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  7. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    PubMed Central

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels <0.05 IUmL−1) undergoing elective, minor or major surgery. Retrospective data were collected on FVIII treatment, including timing and dosing, time point of FVIII sampling and all FVIII plasma concentrations achieved (trough, peak and steady state), brand of concentrate, as well as patients’ and surgical characteristics. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (P<0.01) and increased in cases with blood group O (26%; P<0.01). In addition, a minor decrease in clearance was observed when a major surgical procedure was performed (7%; P<0.01). The developed population model describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. PMID:27390359

  8. Effect of acute bleeding on daily quality of life assessments in patients with congenital hemophilia with inhibitors and their families: observations from the dosing observational study in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Ellis J; Recht, Michael; Sabio, Hernan; Saxena, Kapil; Solem, Caitlyn T; Pickard, A Simon; Gut, Robert Z; Cooper, David L

    2012-01-01

    Quality-of-life (QOL) assessments in frequently bleeding patients with congenital hemophilia with inhibitors and their families are confounded by preexisting arthropathy and family circumstances. Periodic QOL assessments typically made on nonbleed days may not provide complete reflections of the burden on patients/families. To evaluate the impact of bleeding episodes on patients/caregivers/families and the association between monthly QOL scores and patients' average diary experiences. Frequently bleeding inhibitor patients (≥four bleeds in 3 months), or their caregivers, provided daily assessment of EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire and EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire visual analogue scale, pain (11-point Likert scale), and family anxiety/stress/activity change over 3 to 6 months. QOL scores were stratified by bleed/nonbleed days. Patient QOL assessments were recorded by 37 of the 39 enrolled patients/caregivers (3771 of 3777 eligible dairy days, 472 bleed/3299 nonbleed days). Median (range) diary duration was 91 (66-180) days, with 8.2% (0%-72.2%) bleed days. Mean health scores were significantly worse on bleed days than on nonbleed days (P < 0.0001 for all): EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire index, 0.66 versus 0.82; visual analogue scale health, 69.7 versus 77.4; and pain score, 4.1 versus 1.8. Bleed days also had higher (P < 0.001) proportions of days with abnormalities in family anxiety/stress (42% vs. 30%) and family activity changes (34% vs. 21%). Assessing the impact of hemophilia with inhibitors on patient/family QOL typically includes periodic (likely nonbleed day) evaluations reflecting baseline abnormalities. Daily assessment, however, indicated that frequent acute bleeds impair QOL beyond patient's nonbleed day baseline. New approaches are required to assess the cumulative impact of frequent acute bleeds on patients and their families. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR

  9. Influence of factor 5 rs6025 and factor 2 rs1799963 mutation on inhibitor development in patients with hemophilia A--an Israeli-German multicenter database study.

    PubMed

    Kenet, Gili; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Bogdanova, Nadja; Ettingshausen, Carmen Escuriola; Goldenberg, Neil; Gutsche, Sven; Halimeh, Susan; Holzhauer, Susanne; Kurnik, Karin; Limperger, Verena; Junker, Ralf; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2014-04-01

    The present cohort study was performed to investigate the impact of the factor 5 rs6025 [F5] and the factor 2 rs1799963 [F2] mutations on high-titer inhibitor development [HRI] in patients with severe/moderate-severe hemophilia A [HA]. 216 patients with F8<2% born between 1980 and 2011 were followed after initial HA diagnosis over the first 200 exposure days. The first HA patient per family who presented for diagnosis was included in the present study. 32 of 216 children [14.8%] tested for F5/F2 carried either the F5 or the F2 variant. HRI occurred in 14 out of 32F5/F2-carriers compared with 40 of 184 without F5/F2. Multivariate analysis adjusted for F8 genotype, treatment intensity, first-line use of plasma derived FVIII versus recombinant FVIII concentrates revealed that the presence of F5/F2 independently increases the risk of HRI development to odds [OR] of 3.4. Large deletions in the F8 gene [OR: 5.10], patients from Israel [OR: 4.0], the increase of FVIII per one IU/kgbw [OR: 1.05] and birth year [OR: 1.12] were significantly associated with the risk to develop HRI. Data presented here suggest that HRI development is of multifactorial origin and that F5 and F2 mutations may contribute to this risk. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  11. Targeting factor VIII expression to platelets for hemophilia A gene therapy does not induce an apparent thrombotic risk in mice.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, C K; Mattson, J G; Weiler, H; Shi, Q; Montgomery, R R

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Platelet-Factor (F) VIII gene therapy is a promising treatment in hemophilia A. This study aims to evaluate if platelet-FVIII expression would increase the risk for thrombosis. Targeting FVIII expression to platelets does not induce or elevate thrombosis risk. Platelets expressing FVIII are neither hyper-activated nor hyper-responsive.

  12. AAV-based neonatal gene therapy for hemophilia A: long-term correction and avoidance of immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Lipshutz, G S

    2012-12-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy has been hampered by immune responses to vector-associated antigens and by neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors against the factor VIII (FVIII) protein; these 'inhibitors' more commonly affect hemophilia A patients than those with hemophilia B. A gene replacement strategy beginning in the neonatal period may avoid the development of these immune responses and lead to prolonged expression with correction of phenotype, thereby avoiding long-term consequences. A serotype rh10 adeno-associated virus (AAV) was developed splitting the FVIII coding sequence into heavy and light chains with the chicken β-actin promoter/CMV enhancer for dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vector delivery. Virions of each FVIII chain were co-injected intravenously into mice on the second day of life. Mice express sustained levels of FVIII antigen ≥5% up to 22 months of life without development of antibodies against FVIII. Phenotypic correction was manifest in all AAV-FVIII-treated mice as demonstrated by functional assay and reduction in bleeding time. This study demonstrates the use of AAV in a gene replacement strategy in neonatal mice that establishes both long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A and lack of antibody development against FVIII in this disease model where AAV is administered shortly after birth. These studies support the consideration of gene replacement therapy for diseases that are diagnosed in utero or in the early neonatal period.

  13. Novel factor VIII variants with a modified furin cleavage site improve the efficacy of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G N; George, L A; Siner, J I; Davidson, R J; Zander, C B; Zheng, X L; Arruda, V R; Camire, R M; Sabatino, D E

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor (F) VIII is an inefficiently expressed protein. Furin deletion FVIII variants were purified and characterized using in vitro and in vivo assays. These minimally modified novel FVIII variants have enhanced function. These variants provide a strategy for increasing FVIII expression in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  14. Phenotypic correction and stable expression of factor VIII in hemophilia A mice by embryonic stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, J J; Kuang, Y; Zhang, L L; Shen, C L; Wang, L; Lu, S Y; Lu, X B; Fei, J; Gu, M M; Wang, Z G

    2013-05-13

    Hereditary deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) leads to hemophilia A, a severe X-linked bleeding disorder. Current therapies include fixed-dose FVIII prophylaxis, factor replacement therapy, and most recently, gene therapy. Prophylaxis and FVIII replacement therapies are limited by incomplete efficacy, high cost, restricted availability, and development of neutralizing antibodies in chronically treated individuals. Limited success has been obtained in preclinical trials using gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia. Therefore, new options for therapy for hemophilia A are needed. We evaluated the potential of embryonic stem cells for correcting hemophilia A in mice. FVIII-deficient mouse blastocysts were collected and injected with mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing green-fluorescent protein (GFP) and transferred to pseudopregnant recipient mice. Expression of FVIII was measured in the liver and plasma of the 5 chimeric mice that were produced. Three of these mice were GFP-positive at the age of 6 months. The plasma FVIII activity levels were equal to those of wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that embryonic stem cell transplantation at an early embryonic stage has potential as therapy for this progressively debilitating, life-threatening bleeding disorder.

  15. Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

  16. Feasibility of using thrombin generation assay (TGA) for monitoring bypassing agent therapy in patients with hemophilia having inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yilmaz; Balkan, Can; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Akin, Mehmet; Bilenoglu, Basri; Kavakli, Kaan

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring bypassing agent therapy and observing concordance with clinical hemostasis is crucial in vital hemorrhages and major surgeries in patients with hemophilia having inhibitor. We aimed to investigate the value of the thrombin generation assay (TGA) and thromboelastography (TEG) for monitoring hemostasis in patients with hemophilia having inhibitor, during supplementation therapy with bypassing agents. The study group consisted of 7 patients with hemophilia having factor VIII inhibitor. All patients were male. The median age of the participants was 10 years. Age range was 6 to 32 years. The median inhibitor level was 10 Bethesda units (BU), with a range of 5 to 32 BU. A total of 17 bleeding episodes were evaluated. Both TEG and TGA tests were assessed in addition to clinical responses. Assessments were made prior to bypass agent therapy such as recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) or activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) for bleeding episodes, during the first hour and 24 hours after either intervention in patients. No relation between clinical response and TGA or TEG parameters was found in patients. There was no difference between clinical responses after rFVIIa and aPCC treatments. However, after aPCC treatment, endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin levels and also TEG R, K, and alpha angle degrees were significantly higher. In conclusion, we found that the clinical effectiveness of bypass therapy in hemophilia cannot be assessed by TGA and TEG.

  17. [Prophylaxis in hemophilia: situation analysis and call-to-action in Latin America. A report from the GLAITH group].

    PubMed

    Mijares, Mercedes Elena; De Sánchez, Apsara Boadas

    2015-09-01

    Prophylactic treatment in the management of hemophilia has been a crucial factor in improving the prognosis and quality of life for people with hemophilia (PCH). However, it is not globally implemented. In Latin America it is difficult to assess the status of PCH and the its management does not conform to ideal standards. The GLAITH group discussed the problem in Latin America. A survey of its members and its findings were discussed at a meeting in Bogota in May 2013. Proportions of hemophilia A and B were 75-90% and 10-25% respectively. Severe hemophilia represents 26-55% of cases. A high percentage of PCH have hemophilic arthropathy. The general care and specific treatments of PCH vary by country, only 50-60% of the treatment is covered and in 85-95% of the cases are performed on an on- demand basis. Just 5-15% receives prophylaxis, most of them secondary. Few countries have a national program or homogeneous records. Finally the GLAITH group proceeded to develop a conclusion and call to action for the region where the following points are recommended: the establishment of a unified Latin American registry; prospective cost-effectiveness studies and evaluation criteria related to secondary prophylaxis; comparative studies of quality of life with and without prophylaxis in the region; promotion of individualization of treatment and, the increase of primary and secondary prophylaxis globally in Latin America.

  18. Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

  19. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene.

    PubMed

    Chao, B N; Baldwin, W H; Healey, J F; Parker, E T; Shafer-Weaver, K; Cox, C; Jiang, P; Kanellopoulou, C; Lollar, P; Meeks, S L; Lenardo, M J

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibody formation is a severe complication in hemophilia A therapy. We genetically engineered and characterized a mouse model with complete deletion of the F8 coding region. F8(TKO) mice exhibit severe hemophilia, express no detectable F8 mRNA, and produce FVIII inhibitors. The defined background and lack of FVIII in F8(TKO) mice will aid in studying FVIII inhibitor formation. The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII (i.e. cross-reacting material, CRM) have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8(TKO) strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8(TKO) mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8(TKO) mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8(TKO) and E16 mice. We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice, which is valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a

  20. Engineering liver tissues under the kidney capsule site provides therapeutic effects to hemophilia B mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Utoh, Rie; Takagi, Soichi; Shima, Midori; Okano, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in liver tissue engineering have encouraged further investigation into the evaluation of therapeutic benefits based on animal disease models. In the present study, liver tissues were engineered in coagulation factor IX knockout (FIX-KO) mice, a mouse model of hemophilia B, to determine if the tissue engineering approach would provide therapeutic benefits. Primary hepatocytes were isolated from the liver of wild-type mice and suspended in a mixture of culture medium and extracellular matrix components. The hepatocyte suspension was injected into the space under the bilateral kidney capsules of the FIX-KO mice to engineer liver tissues. The plasma FIX activities (FIX:C) of the untreated FIX-KO mice were undetectable at any time point. In contrast, the liver tissue engineered FIX-KO mice achieved 1.5-2.5% of plasma FIX activities (FIX:C) and this elevated FIX:C level persisted throughout the 90 day experimental period. Significant FIX mRNA expression levels were found in the engineered liver tissues at levels similar to the wild-type livers. The present study demonstrates that liver tissue engineering could provide therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hemophilia B.

  1. IDO1 suppresses inhibitor development in hemophilia A treated with factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Matino, Davide; Gargaro, Marco; Santagostino, Elena; Di Minno, Matteo N.D.; Castaman, Giancarlo; Morfini, Massimo; Rocino, Angiola; Mancuso, Maria E.; Di Minno, Giovanni; Coppola, Antonio; Talesa, Vincenzo N.; Volpi, Claudia; Vacca, Carmine; Orabona, Ciriana; Iannitti, Rossana; Mazzucconi, Maria G.; Santoro, Cristina; Tosti, Antonella; Chiappalupi, Sara; Sorci, Guglielmo; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Belvini, Donata; Radossi, Paolo; Landolfi, Raffaele; Fuchs, Dietmar; Boon, Louis; Pirro, Matteo; Marchesini, Emanuela; Grohmann, Ursula; Puccetti, Paolo; Iorio, Alfonso; Fallarino, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) is a major obstacle in using this clotting factor to treat individuals with hemophilia A. Patients with a congenital absence of FVIII do not develop central tolerance to FVIII, and therefore, any control of their FVIII-reactive lymphocytes relies upon peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is a key regulatory enzyme that supports Treg function and peripheral tolerance in adult life. Here, we investigated the association between IDO1 competence and inhibitor status by evaluating hemophilia A patients harboring F8-null mutations that were either inhibitor negative (n = 50) or positive (n = 50). We analyzed IDO1 induction, expression, and function for any relationship with inhibitor occurrence by multivariable logistic regression and determined that defective TLR9-mediated activation of IDO1 induction is associated with an inhibitor-positive status. Evaluation of experimental hemophilic mouse models with or without functional IDO1 revealed that tryptophan metabolites, which result from IDO1 activity, prevent generation of anti-FVIII antibodies. Moreover, treatment of hemophilic animals with a TLR9 agonist suppressed FVIII-specific B cells by a mechanism that involves IDO1-dependent induction of Tregs. Together, these findings indicate that strategies aimed at improving IDO1 function should be further explored for preventing or eradicating inhibitors to therapeutically administered FVIII protein. PMID:26426076

  2. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates inhibitor development in gene-therapy-treated hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Liu, H; Mah, C; Fletcher, B S

    2009-06-01

    A serious impediment to gene and protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors. Mechanisms responsible for inhibitor development include T-cell-dependent adaptive immune responses and the CD28-B7 signaling pathway that eventually leads to the formation of antibodies directed against factor VIII (FVIII). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a potent immunosuppressive enzyme that can inhibit T-cell responses and induce T-cell apoptosis by regulation of tryptophan metabolism. Kynurenine, one of the metabolites of tryptophan, has been implicated as an immune modulator. Here we hypothesize that co-delivery of the genes for FVIII and IDO can attenuate inhibitor formation. Using transposon-based gene delivery, we observed long-term therapeutic FVIII expression and significantly reduced inhibitor titers when the genes were co-delivered. Co-expression of FVIII and IDO in the liver was associated with increased plasma kynurenine levels, an inhibition of T-cell infiltration and increased apoptosis of T cells within the liver. These experiments suggest that modulation of tryptophan catabolism through IDO expression provides a novel strategy to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia gene/protein therapy.

  3. Tolerance induction in hemophilia A animal models: battling inhibitors with antigen-specific immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Adair, Patrick; Su, Yan; Scott, David W

    2013-05-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder due to either a lack of or greatly reduced activity in the blood coagulation protein factor VIII (FVIII), due to mutations in the F8 gene. This poses significant challenges for FVIII replacement therapy since hemophilic patients are not immunologically tolerant to the protein. Thus, a proportion of patients who receive plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII replacement therapy develop anti FVIII neutralizing antibodies, known as "inhibitors." These patients require long-term regimens of high dose FVIII administration, which has varying success rates and prohibitive costs. Therefore, therapeutics for tolerance induction in such patients with inhibitors are desired. In this review, we address the current progress of immunotherapies for inducing FVIII specific tolerance in animal models of hemophilia A. Specifically we discuss the beneficial effects of B-cell depletion on immune tolerance induction (ITI), B-cell mediated gene therapy, antigen-coupled lymphocyte therapy, and regulatory T-cell epitopes (Tregitopes).

  4. Gene transfer to hemophilia A mice via oral delivery of FVIII-chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Katherine; Sarkar, Rita; Raut, Sanj; Leong, Kam W

    2008-12-18

    Effective oral delivery of a non-viral gene carrier would represent a novel and attractive strategy for therapeutic gene transfer. To evaluate the potential of this approach, we studied the oral gene delivery efficacy of DNA polyplexes composed of chitosan and Factor VIII DNA. Transgene DNA was detected in both local and systemic tissues following oral administration of the chitosan nanoparticles to hemophilia A mice. Functional factor VIII protein was detected in plasma by chromogenic and thrombin generation assays, reaching a peak level of 2-4% FVIII at day 22 after delivery. In addition, a bleeding challenge one month after DNA administration resulted in phenotypic correction in 13/20 mice given 250-600 microg of FVIII DNA in chitosan nanoparticles, compared to 1/13 mice given naked FVIII DNA and 0/6 untreated mice. While further optimization would be required to render this type of delivery system practical for hemophilia A gene therapy, the findings suggest the feasibility of oral, non-viral delivery for gene medicine applications.

  5. The CDC Hemophilia B mutation project mutation list: a new online resource.

    PubMed

    Li, Tengguo; Miller, Connie H; Payne, Amanda B; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-11-01

    Hemophilia B (HB) is caused by mutations in the human gene F9. The mutation type plays a pivotal role in genetic counseling and prediction of inhibitor development. To help the HB community understand the molecular etiology of HB, we have developed a listing of all F9 mutations that are reported to cause HB based on the literature and existing databases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Hemophilia B Mutation Project (CHBMP) mutation list is compiled in an easily accessible format of Microsoft Excel and contains 1083 unique mutations that are reported to cause HB. Each mutation is identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards. The mutation types and the predicted changes in amino acids, if applicable, are also provided. Related information including the location of mutation, severity of HB, the presence of inhibitor, and original publication reference are listed as well. Therefore, our mutation list provides an easily accessible resource for genetic counselors and HB researchers to predict inhibitors. The CHBMP mutation list is freely accessible at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations.

  6. Hemophilia A inhibitor treatment: the promise of engineered T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Abdeladhim, Maha; Pratt, Kathleen P; Scott, David W

    2017-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), a cofactor protein that is essential for normal blood clotting. Approximately, 1 in 3 patients with severe hemophilia A produce neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) that block its biologic function in the clotting cascade. Current efforts to eliminate inhibitors consist of repeated FVIII injections under what is termed an "ITI" protocol (Immune Tolerance Induction). However, this method is extremely costly and approximately 30% of patients undergoing ITI do not achieve peripheral tolerance. Human T regulatory cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a new strategy to treat this antidrug antibody response, as well as other diseases. Polyclonal Tregs are nonspecific and could potentially cause general immunosuppression. Novel approaches to induce tolerance to FVIII include the use of engineered human and mouse antigen-specific Tregs, or alternatively antigen-specific cytotoxic cells, to delete, anergize, or kill FVIII-specific lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss the current state of engineered T-cell therapies, and we describe the recent progress in applying these therapies to induce FVIII-specific tolerance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Future of Hemophilia Treatment: Longer-Acting Factor Concentrates versus Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapy is the only novel technology that currently offers the prospect of a lasting cure for hemophilia and freedom from the burden of repeated injections. Recent data from a handful of patients who have undergone gene therapy for hemophilia B are very encouraging with a sustained factor IX (FIX) level of 0.05 IU/mL maintained for over 4 years. While this level is above the current usual target trough levels, it falls well short of the level that patients on prophylaxis with longer-acting products can expect. Prophylaxis is also associated with high peak levels, which permits patients to maintain an active lifestyle. A major barrier to widespread adoption of gene therapy is a high seroprevalence of antibodies to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in the general population. Young children would be the best candidates for gene therapy in view of much lower seroprevalence to AAV in infants. A stable level of FIX early in life would prevent the onset of joint bleeds and the development of arthropathy. The recent experience with apolipoprotein tiparvovec (Glybera; uniQure, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) indicates that gene therapy is unlikely to prove to be a cheap therapeutic option. It is also quite possible that other new technologies that do not require viral vectors (such as stem cell therapy) may overtake gene therapy during development and make it redundant. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Severe hemophilia in a girl infant with mosaic Turner syndrome and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Bazrafshan, Asghar; Moghadam, Mohamad; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-04-01

    A 6-month-old girl was referred by an ophthalmologist because of postoperative bleeding. She was scheduled for operation because of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Workups were done and prolonged partial thromboplastin time with normal platelet count, normal bleeding time, and prothrombin time were detected. There was negative family history of bleeding tendency in both maternal and paternal family, so at the first step, Factor XI assay was requested which was normal. Then, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII were assayed which was 127% and less than 1%, respectively. Severe factor VIII deficiency was not suspected in a girl unless in siblings of a hemophilic patient who gets married with her carrier cousin. Chromosomal study and genetic testing were requested and mosaic Turner syndrome (45 XO) with ring X (p22, 2q13) along with inversion 22 (hemizygote) was detected. Abdominal and pelvic sonography showed absence of both ovaries with presence of infantile uterus. Maternal genetic study was in favor of carrier of hemophilia (heterozygote inversion 22). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of association of Turner syndrome with severe hemophilia A and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  9. Wound healing in hemophilia B mice and low tissue factor mice.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Dougald M; Mackman, Nigel; Hoffman, Maureane

    2010-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of physiologic mechanisms including coagulation, inflammation, formation of granulation tissue, and tissue remodeling. Coagulation with robust thrombin generation leading to fibrin formation is necessary for wound healing. It is less clear if there is a requirement for ongoing coagulation to support tissue remodeling. We have studied wound healing in mice with defects in both the initiation (low tissue factor) and propagation (hemophilia B) phases. In hemophilia B mice, dermal wound healing is delayed; this delay is associated with bleeding into the granulation tissue. Mice can be treated with replacement therapy (factor IX) or bypassing agents (factor VIIa) to restore thrombin generation. If treated just prior to wound placement, mice will have normal hemostasis in the first day of wound healing. As the therapeutic agents clear, the mice will revert to hemophilic state. If the primary role of coagulation in wound healing is to provide a stable platelet/fibrin plug that is loaded with thrombin, then treating hemophilic animals just prior to wound placement should restore normal wound healing. The results from this study did not support that hypothesis. Instead the results show that restoring thrombin generation only at the time of wound placement did not improve the delayed wound healing. In preliminary studies on low tissue factor mice, there also appears to be a delay in wound healing with evidence of bleeding into the granulation tissue. The current data suggests that ongoing coagulation function needs to be maintained to support a normal wound healing process.

  10. Chemical Chaperones Improve Protein Secretion and Rescue Mutant Factor VIII in Mice with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Milanov, Peter; Abriss, Daniela; Ungerer, Christopher; Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Pepperkok, Rainer; Seifried, Erhard; Tonn, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Inefficient intracellular protein trafficking is a critical issue in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases and in recombinant protein production. Here we investigated the trafficking of factor VIII (FVIII), which is affected in the coagulation disorder hemophilia A. We hypothesized that chemical chaperones may be useful to enhance folding and processing of FVIII in recombinant protein production, and as a therapeutic approach in patients with impaired FVIII secretion. A tagged B-domain-deleted version of human FVIII was expressed in cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to mimic the industrial production of this important protein. Of several chemical chaperones tested, the addition of betaine resulted in increased secretion of FVIII, by increasing solubility of intracellular FVIII aggregates and improving transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Similar results were obtained in experiments monitoring recombinant full-length FVIII. Oral betaine administration also increased FVIII and factor IX (FIX) plasma levels in FVIII or FIX knockout mice following gene transfer. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo applications of betaine were also able to rescue a trafficking-defective FVIII mutant (FVIIIQ305P). We conclude that chemical chaperones such as betaine might represent a useful treatment concept for hemophilia and other diseases caused by deficient intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:22973456

  11. Gene therapy, bioengineered clotting factors and novel technologies for hemophilia treatment.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G F; Lillicrap, D; Pipe, S W; Vandendriessche, T

    2007-05-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia estimates that of the 400,000 individuals worldwide with hemophilia, 300,000 receive either no, or very sporadic, treatment. Thus, considerable innovation will be required to provide cost-effective therapies/cures for all affected individuals. The high cost of prophylactic regimens hampers their widespread use, which further justifies the search for novel cost-effective therapies and ultimately a cure. Five gene transfer phase I clinical trials have been conducted using either direct in vivo gene delivery with viral vectors or ex vivo plasmid transfections and reimplantation of gene-engineered cells. Although there was evidence of gene transfer and therapeutic effects in some of these trials, stable expression of therapeutic factor VIII or FIX levels has not yet been obtained. Further improvements of the vectors and a better understanding of the immune consequences of gene transfer is warranted, as new trials are being initiated. Bioengineered clotting factors with increased stability and/or activity are being validated further in preclinical studies. Novel clotting factor formulations based on PEGylated liposomes with prolonged activities are being tested in the clinic, and are yielding encouraging results.

  12. A close insight to factor VIII inhibitor in the congenital hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Tabriznia-Tabrizi, Shamsoreza; Gholampour, Marzie; Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) has an X-linked pattern of inheritance and is the most common of the hemorrhagic disorders. HA is caused by a decreased or deficiency of the functional clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and effects 1 in 5000-10,000 male births. The common treatment for hemophilia is replacement therapy by plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII. Approximately 20-30% of people with a severe type of HA develop an inhibitor and this phenomenon is the main challenge in the management of these patients. Genetic factors and environmental determinants contribute to inhibitor development. Here, the roles of various genetic and environmental factors such as the type of FVIII concentrate used, the number of exposure days, and peak treatment time will be discussed in detail. It seems this information is helpful for hematologists. A literature review was done in January 2016 on PubMed and Scopus using the following keywords:' h(a)emophilia A & factor VIII inhibitor', 'h(a)emophilia A & factor VIII alloantibody', 'h(a)emophilia A & inhibitor'. There was no time limitation; however, there was an English language limitation placed on the articles selected. Expert commentary: Influential genetic and environmental factors in developing inhibitors have been discussed. Most of the risk factors are related to previously untreated patients with hemophili.

  13. International recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with acquired hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Huth-Kühne, Angela; Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Kessler, Craig M.; Lévesque, Hervé; Castellano, Maria Eva Mingot; Shima, Midori; St-Louis, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by autoantibodies directed against circulating coagulation factor (F) VIII. Typically, patients with no prior history of a bleeding disorder present with spontaneous bleeding and an isolated prolonged aPTT. AHA may, however, present without any bleeding symptoms, therefore an isolated prolonged aPTT should always be investigated further irrespective of the clinical findings. Control of acute bleeding is the first priority, and we recommend first-line therapy with bypassing agents such as recombinant activated FVII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate. Once the diagnosis has been achieved, immediate autoantibody eradication to reduce subsequent bleeding risk should be performed. We recommend initial treatment with corticosteroids or combination therapy with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide and suggest second-line therapy with rituximab if first-line therapy fails or is contraindicated. In contrast to congenital hemophilia, no comparative studies exist to support treatment recommendations for patients with AHA, therefore treatment guidance must rely on the expertise and clinical experience of specialists in the field. The aim of this document is to provide a set of international practice guidelines based on our collective clinical experience in treating patients with AHA and contribute to improved care for this patient group. PMID:19336751

  14. Solulin increases clot stability in whole blood from humans and dogs with hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Rea, Catherine J.; Harpell, Lori; Powell, Sandra; Lillicrap, David; Nesheim, Michael E.; Sørensen, Benny

    2012-01-01

    Solulin is a soluble form of thrombomodulin that is resistant to proteolysis and oxidation. It has been shown to increase the clot lysis time in factor VIII (fVIII)–deficient plasma by an activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa)–dependent mechanism. In the present study, blood was drawn from humans and dogs with hemophilia, and thromboelastography was used to measure tissue factor–initiated fibrin formation and tissue-plasminogen activator–induced fibrinolysis. The kinetics of TAFI and protein C activation by the thrombin-Solulin complex were determined to describe the relative extent of anticoagulation and antifibrinolysis. In severe hemophilia A, clot stability increased by > 4-fold in the presence of Solulin while minimally affecting clot lysis time. Patients receiving fVIII/fIX prophylaxis showed a similar trend of increased clot stability in the presence of Solulin. The catalytic efficiencies of TAFI and protein C activation by the thrombin-Solulin complex were determined to be 1.53 and 0.02/μM/s, respectively, explaining its preference for antifibrinolysis over anticoagulation at low concentrations. Finally, hemophilic dogs given Solulin had improved clot strength in thromboelastography assays. In conclusion, the antifibrinolytic properties of Solulin are exhibited in hemophilic human (in vitro) and dog (in vivo/ex vivo) blood at low concentrations. Our findings suggest the therapeutic utility of Solulin at a range of very low doses. PMID:22234684

  15. Biodegradable hydrophilic carriers for the oral delivery of hematological factor IX for hemophilia B treatment.

    PubMed

    Horava, Sarena D; Moy, Katie J; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-11-30

    Current protein replacement therapies for hemophilia B, a genetic bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in coagulation factor IX, rely on IV injections and infusions. Oral delivery of factor IX is a desirable needle-free option, especially for prophylaxis. We have developed a biodegradable, pH-responsive hydrogel microcarrier system based on the poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted-poly(ethylene glycol) [P(MAA-g-EG)]. Incorporation of an enzymatically degradable peptide crosslinking agent allows for site-specific degradation by trypsin in the small intestine. P(MAA-g-EG) polymer was synthesized by UV polymerization, and then subsequently crosslinked with peptide crosslinking agent using EDC-NHS chemistry. Physical characterization included FTIR for determining the composition of the peptide crosslinked polymer and SEM for microparticle morphology. The pH-responsive swelling and enzyme-specific degradation were confirmed by bright-field microscopy and the corresponding kinetics were determined by turbidimetric measurements. Evaluating the drug delivery application of this degradable system, factor IX release studies showed site-specific release, and in vitro transport studies resulted in improved factor IX absorption. Incorporation of the degradable crosslinking agent significantly improved the delivery potential as compared to previously reported non-degradable drug delivery systems. Using this degradable P(MAA-g-EG) system as a delivery vehicle for factor IX can possibly lead to an orally administered prophylactic treatment for hemophilia B patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Joining the patient on the path to customized prophylaxis: one hemophilia team explores the tools of engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gue, Deborah; Squire, Sandra; McIntosh, Kam; Bartholomew, Claude; Summers, Nicole; Sun, Haowei; Yang, Ming; Jackson, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between hemophilia team interventions and achievement of optimal clinical outcomes remains to be elucidated. The British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team has previously reported results of a comprehensive approach to individualize prophylaxis that has resulted in substantially reduced bleeding rates. In order to facilitate knowledge exchange and potential replication, it was important to gain a thorough understanding of the team’s approach. Methods A focus group of the British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team was conducted to identify specific roles and processes that might be contributing to the prophylaxis regimen outcomes in this clinic. The focus group consisted of two workshops; one to describe the individual and collective roles of the clinic team in providing clinical care and guiding patients toward individualized prophylaxis; and the other to describe the patient journey from initial contact through reaching a successful engagement with the clinic. Results Analysis of the results revealed team roles and processes that underpinned a shared decision-making relationship with the patient with a particular focus on supporting the patient’s autonomy. Within this relationship, team focus shifts away from “adherence” toward the process whereby patients design and implement prophylaxis regimens resulting in reduction or elimination of bleeding episodes. Limitations Using the current methodology, it is not possible to demonstrate a causal link between specific team processes and improved bleeding rates in patients. Conclusion Through the active support of patient autonomy in all aspects of decisions related to hemophilia management, the British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team approach de-emphasizes “adherence” as the primary goal, and focuses on a prophylaxis plan that is customized by the patient and aligned with his priorities. Adoption of this comprehensive team approach facilitates shared goals between the patient and the team

  17. Repeated oral administration of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles delivers functional FVIII with the absence of antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Dhadwar, S S; Kiernan, J; Wen, J; Hortelano, G

    2010-12-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A is expensive and involves regular infusions of factor (F)VIII concentrates. The supply of functional FVIII is further compromised by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, the development of an alternative safe, cost effective, non-invasive treatment that circumvents immune response induction is desirable. To evaluate the feasibility of oral administration of chitosan nanoparticles containing FVIII DNA to provide sustainable FVIII activity in hemophilia A mice. Nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, DNA protection and transfection efficiency. Oral administration of nanoparticles containing canine FVIII in C57Bl/6 FVIII(-/-) hemophilia A mice was evaluated for biodistribution, plasma FVIII activity and phenotypic correction. Sustainable FVIII expression was elucidated after repeated nanoparticle administration. Immune responses to repeated oral nanoparticle administration were also investigated. Chitosan nanoparticles had a particle size range of 200-400 nm and protected DNA from endonuclease and pH degradation. In addition, nanoparticles transfected HEK 293 cells resulted in expression of eGFP, luciferase and FVIII. Hemophilia A mice that ingested chitosan nanoparticles demonstrated transient canine FVIII expression reaching > 100 mU 1 day after treatment, together with partial phenotypic correction. The delivered FVIII plasmid DNA was detected in the intestine and, to a lesser extent, in the liver. Importantly, repeated weekly administrations restored FVIII activity. Furthermore, inhibitors and non-neutralizing FVIII antibodies were not detectable. Repeat oral administration of FVIII DNA formulated in chitosan nanoparticles resulted in sustained FVIII activity in hemophilic mice, and thus may provide a non-invasive alternative treatment for hemophilia A. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Brittany N.; Baldwin, Wallace H.; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Shafer-Weaver, Kimberly; Cox, Courtney; Jiang, Ping; Kanellopoulou, Chrysi; Lollar, Pete; Meeks, Shannon L.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII, i.e. cross-reacting material (CRM), have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. Objectives We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8TKO strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Methods Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. Results All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8TKO mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8TKO mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8TKO and E16 mice. Conclusions We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice making it valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a defined genetic background. PMID:26588198

  19. The Effect of Aquatic Exercise Therapy on Muscle Strength and Joint's Range of Motion in Hemophilia Patients.

    PubMed

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Dehghadani, Mehdi; Ghias, Reza

    2013-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of a period of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joints range of motion in hemophilia patients. This was a semiexperimental, pretest, post-test study with a control group. This semi-experimental study comprised twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected by convenience sampling method from patients of a referral hospital. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups of equal number. The hemophilia patients who were referred to Sayedo-Shohada Hospital enrolled in this study. Twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected using convenience sampling method and then divided randomly into intervention and control groups (10 patients in each group). Subjects of aquatic exercise therapy group underwent activity in water in three sessions (45-60 minutes) per week for 8 weeks, while the control group was only under follow-up and during this period did not experience any effective physical activity. The patients' muscle strength and joint range of motion were evaluated through standard laboratory tools, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex, Systems III) and a standard goniometer in the beginning and at end of the study. Finally, data was analyzed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The strength of the muscles around the knee joint (to perform extension and flexion movements) increased significantly in the case group while the control group experienced a significant reduction of strength in left leg, but in right leg remarkable change was observed. Range of motion in all joints was improved in the case group, while the control group did not improve significantly. The results showed that aquatic exercise therapy can be a useful method to improve joints' strength and range of motion in hemophilia patients in order to improve their daily functioning and quality of life.

  20. A novel mutation (4040-4045 nt. delA) in exon 14 of the factor VIII gene causing severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Onsori, Habib; Feizi, Mohammad Ali Hosseinpour; Feizi, Abbas Ali Hosseinpour

    2011-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by Factor VIII deficiency. Different mutations including point mutations, deletions, insertions and inversions have been reported in the FVIII gene, which cause hemophilia A. In the current study, with the use of conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) analysis, we report a novel 1-nt deletion in the A6 sequence at codons 1328-1330 (4040-4045 nt delA) occurring in exon 14 of the FVIII gene in a seven-year-old Iranian boy with severe hemophilia A. This mutation that causes frameshift and premature stop-codon at 1331 has not previously been reported in the F8 Hemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource Site (HAMSTeRS) database.

  1. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    PubMed

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P < 0.001). Patients with hematuria or severe hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  2. Co-inheritance of mild hemophilia A and heterozygosity for type 2N von Willebrand disease: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Holly; Bergstrom, Katie; Srivaths, Lakshmi

    2014-10-01

    Hemophilia A and von Willebrand disease are the two most common inherited bleeding disorders. Despite their frequency, however, there are very few reports of co-inheritance of the two disorders. We present the first report of a patient with mild hemophilia A and heterozygosity for type 2N von Willebrand disease (VWD). We discuss the patient's phenotype and highlight the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges caused by this co-inheritance.

  3. In non-severe hemophilia A the risk of inhibitor after intensive factor treatment is greater in older patients: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    KEMPTON, C. L.; SOUCIE, J. M.; MILLER, C. H.; HOOPER, C.; ESCOBAR, M. A.; COHEN, A. J.; KEY, N. S.; THOMPSON, A. R.; ABSHIRE, T. C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Twenty-five percent of new anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) that complicate hemophilia A occur in those with mild and moderate disease. Although intensive FVIII treatment has long been considered a risk factor for inhibitor development in those with non-severe disease, its strength of association and the influence of other factors have remained undefined. Objective To evaluate risk factors for inhibitor development in patients with non-severe hemophilia A. Methods Information on clinical and demographic variables and FVIII genotype was collected on 36 subjects with mild or moderate hemophilia A and an inhibitor and 62 controls also with mild or moderate hemophilia A but without an inhibitor. Results Treatment with FVIII for six or more consecutive days during the prior year was more strongly associated with inhibitor development in those ≥ 30 years of age compared with those < 30 years of age [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 12.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.76–57.81 vs. OR 2.54; 95% CI, 0.61–10.68]. Having previously received < 50 days of FVIII was also not statistically associated with inhibitor development on univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusions These findings suggest that inhibitor development in mild and moderate hemophilia A varies with age, but does not vary significantly with lifetime FVIII exposure days: two features distinct from severe hemophilia A. PMID:20704648

  4. Hemophilia A gene therapy via intraosseous delivery of factor VIII-lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Carol H

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A (HemA) patients with repeated infusions of factor VIII (FVIII; abbreviated as F8 in constructs) is costly, inconvenient, and incompletely effective. In addition, approximately 25 % of treated patients develop anti-factor VIII immune responses. Gene therapy that can achieve long-term phenotypic correction without the complication of anti-factor VIII antibody formation is highly desired. Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in stable integration of FVIII gene into the host genome, leading to persistent therapeutic effect. However, ex vivo HSC gene therapy requires pre-conditioning which is highly undesirable for hemophilia patients. The recently developed novel methodology of direct intraosseous (IO) delivery of LVs can efficiently transduce bone marrow cells, generating high levels of transgene expression in HSCs. IO delivery of E-F8-LV utilizing a ubiquitous EF1α promoter generated initially therapeutic levels of FVIII, however, robust anti-FVIII antibody responses ensued neutralized functional FVIII activity in the circulation. In contrast, a single IO delivery of G-FVIII-LV utilizing a megakaryocytic-specific GP1bα promoter achieved platelet-specific FVIII expression, leading to persistent, partial correction of HemA in treated animals. Most interestingly, comparable therapeutic benefit with G-F8-LV was obtained in HemA mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. Platelets is an ideal IO delivery vehicle since FVIII stored in α-granules of platelets is protected from high-titer anti-FVIII antibodies; and that even relatively small numbers of activated platelets that locally excrete FVIII may be sufficient to promote efficient clot formation during bleeding. Additionally, combination of pharmacological agents improved transduction of LVs and persistence of transduced cells and transgene expression. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV can generate long-term stable

  5. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    SciTech Connect

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  6. Perioperative treatment of hemophilia A patients: blood group O patients are at risk of bleeding complications.

    PubMed

    Hazendonk, H C A M; Lock, J; Mathôt, R A A; Meijer, K; Peters, M; Laros-van Gorkom, B A P; van der Meer, F J M; Driessens, M H E; Leebeek, F W G; Fijnvandraat, K; Cnossen, M H

    2016-03-01

    ESSENTIALS: Targeting of factor VIII values is a challenge during perioperative replacement therapy in hemophilia. This study aims to identify the extent and predictors of factor VIII underdosing and overdosing. Blood group O predicts underdosing and is associated with perioperative bleeding. To increase quality of care and cost-effectiveness of treatment, refining of dosing is obligatory. Perioperative administration of factor VIII (FVIII) concentrate in hemophilia A may result in both underdosing and overdosing, leading to respectively a risk of bleeding complications and unnecessary costs. This retrospective observational study aims to identify the extent and predictors of underdosing and overdosing in perioperative hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels < 0.05 IU mL(-1)). One hundred nineteen patients undergoing 198 elective, minor, or major surgical procedures were included (median age 40 years, median body weight 75 kg). Perioperative management was evaluated by quantification of perioperative infusion of FVIII concentrate and achieved FVIII levels. Predictors of underdosing and (excessive) overdosing were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Excessive overdosing was defined as upper target level plus ≥ 0.20 IU mL(-1). Depending on postoperative day, 7-45% of achieved FVIII levels were under and 33-75% were above predefined target ranges as stated by national guidelines. A potential reduction of FVIII consumption of 44% would have been attained if FVIII levels had been maintained within target ranges. Blood group O and major surgery were predictive of underdosing (odds ratio [OR] 6.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.7-14.9; OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4-7.9). Blood group O patients had more bleeding complications in comparison to patients with blood group non-O (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.00-4.09). Patients with blood group non-O were at higher risk of overdosing (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.9). Additionally, patients treated with bolus infusions were at higher risk of excessive

  7. Coexistence of acquired hemophilia A and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: Two case reports and published work review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tian-Meng; He, Chun-Xia; Hua, Bao-Lai; Li, Li; Jin, Hong-Zhong; Liu, Yue-Hua; Zuo, Ya-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare chronic subepidermal bullous autoimmune disease. The occurrence of acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is low and so the coexistence of EBA and AHA is extremely rare. We herein described a case of EBA coexisting with AHA and a case of EBA coexisting with AHA and hepatitis B. These EBA may be related to the pathogenesis of AHA. In this study, we analyzed the clinical features in the two Chinese cases of EBA coexisting with AHA, and found esophageal hemorrhage and hematemesis were the main symptoms of both patients. Cyclosporin, prednisone and lamivudine effectively control EBA with AHA and hepatitis B. The dose of cyclosporin should be more than 4 mg/kg per day and the period of treatment should be longer than 5 months to reduce the risk of EBA co-occurring with AHA. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. The role of physical therapy and rehabilitation in the management of hemophilia in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Lily; Buzzard, Brenda B

    2005-11-01

    Without replacement therapy, patients with severe hemophilia (PWH) will have five damaged joints by the age of 20, which lead to limitation of activities and prevent normal participation in society. Of all PWH, 80% live in developing countries, where access to factor replacement is limited. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation help to prevent disabilities, stimulate activities and participation, and help to preserve autonomy. Rehabilitation should be organized by creating awareness that physiotherapy and rehabilitation (next to availability of safe clotting factor) are very important in developing countries. Locally available medical and social systems and materials should be used for both education and aids and adaptations. Trainers must be trained to develop local treatment protocols. PWH and their families need to be educated and trained to do exercises. Important treatment modalities are management of pain, active muscle strengthening exercises, combined measures and exercises to regain range of motion, training proprioception and coordination, functional training, and orthotics and shoe adaptations.

  9. Autoimmune bullous disease and Hashimoto's disease complicated by acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Nobuko; Ujimoto, Daisuke; Fujita, Jiro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Nakagawa, Yukinobu; Kashiwagi, Hirokazu; Oritani, Kenji; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with a 1-month history of spontaneous hematoma in his right back and severe anemia. He had suffered from rashes with blisters involving both legs for 10 years, which had shown worsening and extended to his entire body concurrently with the hematoma. APTT was markedly prolonged to 119 seconds, and Factor VIII:C and FVIII inhibitor levels were less than 1% and 153.1 BU/ml, respectively, confirming the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Skin biopsy revealed his rashes to be caused by autoimmune bullous disease (ABD), and laboratory and physical findings showed that he also had autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's disease). Recombinant FVIIa was effective for management of his bleeding; in addition, FVIII inhibitor reduction and FVIII:C recovery, in parallel with improvement of the skin lesions, were achieved by administering prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. To our knowledge, this is the first report of AHA associated with ABD and Hashimoto's disease.

  10. Genetic modification of stem cells for cardiac, diabetic, and hemophilia transplantation therapies.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M Ian; Tang, Yaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Gene modification of stem cells prior to their transplantation enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the famous Trojan horse, the gene-modified cell has to gain entrance into the host's walls and survive to deliver its transgene products. Using cellular, molecular, and gene manipulation techniques, the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia, and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves construction of functional gene sequences and their insertion into stem cells. The modifications can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell-specific promoters, and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and nonviral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene-modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hemophilia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of factor VIII transgenes bioengineered for improved expression in gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Dooriss, Kerry L; Denning, Gabriela; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Javazon, Elisabeth H; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2009-05-01

    Successful gene therapy of hemophilia A depends on the sustained expression of therapeutic levels of factor VIII (fVIII). Because of mRNA instability, interactions with resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, and the requirement for carbohydrate-facilitated transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, fVIII is expressed at much lower levels from mammalian cells than other proteins of similar size and complexity. A number of bioengineered forms of B domain-deleted (BDD) human fVIII have been generated and shown to have enhanced expression. Previously, we demonstrated that recombinant BDD porcine fVIII exhibits high-level expression due to specific sequence elements that increase biosynthesis via enhanced posttranslational transit through the secretory pathway. In the current study, high-expression recombinant fVIII constructs were compared directly in order to determine the relative expression of the various bioengineered fVIII transgenes. The data demonstrate that BDD porcine fVIII expression is superior to that of any of the human fVIII variant constructs tested. Mean fVIII expression of 18 units/10(6) cells/24 hr was observed from HEK-293 cells expressing a single copy of the porcine fVIII transgene, which was 36- to 225-fold greater than that of any human fVIII transgene tested. Furthermore, greater than 10-fold higher expression was observed in human cells transduced with BDD porcine fVIII versus BDD human fVIII-encoding lentiviral vectors, even at low proviral copy numbers, supporting its use over other human fVIII variants in future hemophilia A gene therapy clinical trials.

  12. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency.

  13. Enhanced factor VIII heavy chain for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxia; Lu, Hui; Wang, Jinhui; Sarkar, Rita; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Hongli; High, Katherine A; Xiao, Weidong

    2009-03-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy using recombinant adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been hampered by the size of the factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA. Previously, splitting the FVIII coding sequence into a heavy-chain (HC) fragment and a light-chain (LC) fragment for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery has been successfully explored. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is a "chain imbalance" problem in which LC secretion is approximately 1-2 logs higher than that of HC, and therefore, the majority of protein synthesized is nonfunctional. To improve HC secretion, we constructed alternate FVIII HCs based on our observation that LC facilitates HC secretion. To our surprise, most of the new HC molecules exhibited enhanced expression over the traditional HC molecule (HC(745)). The optimized HC mutein, HC(HL), including additional acidic-region-3 (ar3) sequences, exhibited three- to fivefold higher activity in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assay in in vitro testing. Further characterization suggested ar3 sequences increased HC secretion, rather than promoting HC synthesis. Intravenous delivery of AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC or AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC achieved phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Mice receiving AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC achieved three- to fourfold higher HC expression than AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC, consistent with the FVIII functional assays. HC(HL) should be substituted for HC(745) in a dual AAV vector strategy due to its enhanced expression.

  14. Modeling of hemophilia A using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells derived from urine cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bei; Chen, Shen; Zhao, Zhiju; Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Du, Juan; Wu, Changwei; Chen, Qianyu; Cai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Yanhong; Pei, Duanqing; Zhong, Mei; Pan, Guangjin

    2014-07-11

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a severe, congenital bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII). For years, traditional laboratory animals have been used to study HA and its therapies, although animal models may not entirely mirror the human pathophysiology. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can undergo unlimited self-renewal and differentiate into all cell types. This study aims to generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific iPSCs that differentiate into disease-affected hepatocyte cells. These hepatocytes are potentially useful for in vitro disease modeling and provide an applicable cell source for autologous cell therapy after genetic correction. In this study, we mainly generated iPSCs from urine collected from HA patients with integration-free episomal vectors PEP4-EO2S-ET2K containing human genes OCT4, SOX2, SV40LT and KLF4, and differentiated these iPSCs into hepatocyte-like cells. We further identified the genetic phenotype of the FVIII genes and the FVIII activity in the patient-specific iPSC derived hepatic cells. HA patient-specific iPSCs (HA-iPSCs) exhibited typical pluripotent properties evident by immunostaining, in vitro assays and in vivo assays. Importantly, we showed that HA-iPSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells and the HA-iPSC-derived hepatocytes failed to produce FVIII, but otherwise functioned normally, recapitulating the phenotype of HA disease in vitro. HA-iPSCs, particular those generated from the urine using a non-viral approach, provide an efficient way for modeling HA in vitro. Furthermore, HA-iPSCs and their derivatives serve as an invaluable cell source that can be used for gene and cell therapy in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectrum of mutations in CRM-positive and CRM-reduced hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Bi, L.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Hoyer, L.W. ); Inaba, H. )

    1993-02-01

    Hemophilia A is due to the functional deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII, gene locus F8C). Although half the patients have no detectable FVIII protein in their plasma, the more rare patients ([approximately]5%) have normal levels of a dysfunctional FVIII and are termed cross-reacting material (CRM)-positive. More commonly ([approximately]45%), patients have plasma FVIII protein reduced to an extent roughly comparable to the level of FVIII activity and are designated CRM-reduced. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations within the F8C gene of 11 patients (6CRM-positive, 5 CRM-reduced) and identified 9 different mutations in 9 patients after analyses of all 26 exons, the promoter region, and the polyadenylation site. Six mutations have not been described previously. Five weree missense (Ser289Leu, Ser558Phe, Val634Ala, Val634Met, Asn1441Lys), and the sixth was a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]Phe652). A review of the literature and the assay of FVIII antigen in 5 hemophilia A patients with previously identified missense mutations from this laboratory yielded a total of 20 other unique CRM-reduced and CRM-positive mutations. Almost all CRM-positive/reduced mutations (24/26) were missense, and many (12/26) occurred at CpG dinucleotides. We examined 19 missense mutation for evolutionary conservation using the portions of the porcine and murine F8C sequences that are known, and 18/19 amino acid residue altered by mutation in these patients wer conserved. Almost 50% of mutations (11/26) clustered in the A2 domain, suggesting that this region is critical for the function of FVIII. The results indicate a nonrandom distribution of mutations and suggest that mutations in a limited number of FVIII regions may cause CRM-positive and CRM-reduced heomphilia A. 48 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Risk Factors for Inhibitor Formation in Hemophilia: A Prevalent Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Ojeifo, Oluseyi; Feng, Jinong; Yan, Jin; Hill, Kathleen A.; Sommer, Steve S.; Trucco, Massimo N.; Brambilla, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhibitor formation is a major complication of hemophilia treatment. Aim In a prevalent case-control study, we evaluated blood product exposure, genotype, and HLA type on hemophilia A inhibitor formation. Methods Product exposure was extracted from medical records. Genotype was determined on stored DNA samples by detection of virtually all mutations-SSCP (DOVAM-S) and subcycling PCR. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification and exonuclease-released fluorescence. Results Cases experienced higher intensity factor, 455 vs. 200 U per exposure, p<0.005, more frequent central nervous system (CNS) bleeding, 7 of 20 (35.0%) vs. 1 of 57 (1.7%), p=0.001, and more commonly from inhibitor families, 7 of 20 (35.0%) vs. 0 of 57 (0%), p<0.001, and African-American, 12 of 63 (19.0%) vs. 6 of 117 (5.1%), p=0.015. Among the latter, CNS bleeding was more commonly the initial bleed, 60% vs. 0%, p<0.001, and survival was shorter, 14 vs. 38 yr, p=0.025. Inhibitor formation was uncommon in those with missense mutations, 2 of 65 (3.1%) vs. 31 of 119 (26.0%), p=0.008, and unrelated to factor VIII immunogenic epitope, p=0.388, or HLA type, p>0.100. Genotype was not associated with race. Time to immune tolerance was shorter for titers < 120 vs. ≥ 120 BU/ml, 6 vs. 16 months, p<0.01, but unaffected by tolerizing dose regimen, p>0.50. Conclusions Inhibitor formation is associated with high intensity product exposure, CNS bleeding, African-American race, and low frequency of missense mutations. The ideal time to initiate prophylaxis to reduce CNS bleeding and inhibitor formation will require prospective studies. PMID:19563499

  17. Analysis of inversions in the factor VIII gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients and families

    SciTech Connect

    Domenech, M.; Tizzano, E.; Baiget, M.; Altisent, C.

    1994-09-01

    Intron 22 is the largest intron of the factor VIII gene and contains a CpG island from which two additional transcripts originate. One of these transcripts corresponds to the F8A gene which have telomeric extragenic copies in the X chromosome. An inversion involving homologous recombination between the intragenic and the distal or proximal copies of the F8A gene has been recently described as a common cause of severe hemophilia A (HA). We analyzed intron 22 rearrangements in 195 HA patients (123 familial and 72 sporadic cases). According to factor VIII levels, our sample was classified as severe in 114 cases, moderate in 29 cases and mild in 52 cases. An intron 22 (F8A) probe was hybridized to Southern blots of BcII digested DNA obtained from peripheral blood. A clear pattern of altered bands identifies distal or proximal inversions. We detected an abnormal pattern identifying an inversion in 49 (25%) of the analyzed cases. 43% of severe HA patients (49 cases) showed an inversion. As expected, no inversion was found in the moderate and mild group of patients. We found a high proportion (78%) of the distal rearrangement. From 49 identified inversions, 33 were found in familial cases (27%), while the remaining 15 were detected in sporadic patients (22%) in support that this mutational event occurs with a similar frequency in familial or sporadic cases. In addition, we detected a significant tendency of distal inversion to occur more frequently in familial cases than in sporadic cases. Inhibitor development to factor VIII was documented in approximately 1/3 of the patients with inversion. The identification of such a frequent molecular event in severe hemophilia A patients has been applied in our families to carrier and prenatal diagnosis, to determine the origin of the mutation in the sporadic cases and to detect the presence of germinal mosaicism.

  18. Unusual Initial Manifestation of Acquired Hemophilia A: A Normal Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Intramuscular Hematoma and Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsuyama, Nobuaki; Ichiba, Toshihisa; Naito, Hiroshi

    We herein present a case of acquired hemophilia A with a normal activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT), intramuscular hematoma and cerebral hemorrhage occurring in a 73-year-old man. The patient visited our emergency department with gait disturbance, pain and swelling in his right leg. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed intramuscular hematoma and intracranial hemorrhage. The results of initial coagulation studies were normal, but repeated coagulation studies revealed an isolated prolongation of the aPTT. Additional laboratory tests confirmed the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A. If the initial aPTT is normal, we should therefore repeat the aPTT and also perform other coagulation studies including a mixing study, factor VIII level and inhibitor, to investigate the underlying diseases in elderly patients with spontaneous hemorrhaging of unknown etiology.

  19. Recombinant B domain deleted porcine factor VIII for the treatment of bleeding episodes in adults with acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) often complicated by inhibitor development (CHAWI) in which neutralizing antibodies block the therapeutic benefit of replacement therapy. Inhibitors to FVIII can also be seen in an auto-immune disease known as acquired hemophilia A (AHA). 'Bypassing' therapies have been shown to provide hemostasis but dosing must be done empirically because current assays cannot measure objective markers of treatment efficacy and safety. A recombinant porcine sequence factor VIII (r-pFVIII) has been developed for the management of AHA. Preclinical, Phase I and Phase II clinical research studies in CHAWI subjects showed therapeutic potential and safety of this agent. A Phase II/III study in AHA with serious bleeding episodes shows a positive response in all subjects after administration. Based on current preclinical and clinical trial data, r-pFVIII should become the first line of treatment in the management of hemorrhage in patients with AHA.

  20. Eighteen Years of Molecular Genotyping the Hemophilia Inversion Hotspot: From Southern Blot to Inverse Shifting-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Liliana C.; Radic, Claudia P.; Abelleyro, Miguel M.; Larripa, Irene B.; De Brasi, Carlos D.

    2011-01-01

    The factor VIII gene (F8) intron 22 inversion (Inv22) is a paradigmatic duplicon-mediated rearrangement, found in about one half of patients with severe hemophilia A worldwide. The identification of this prevalent cause of hemophilia was delayed for nine years after the F8 characterization in 1984. The aim of this review is to present the wide diversity of practical approaches that have been developed for genotyping the Inv22 (and related int22h rearrangements) since discovery in 1993. The sequence— Southern blot, long distance-PCR and inverse shifting-PCR—for Inv22 genotyping is an interesting example of scientific ingenuity and evolution in order to resolve challenging molecular diagnostic problems. PMID:22072947

  1. Prediction of Intraoperative Blood Loss during Total Knee Arthroplasty in HCV+ and HCV- Patients with Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Polyanskaya, T Yu; Zorenko, V Yu; Nesterenko, V M

    2017-03-01

    We examined HCV+ and HCV- hemophilia A patients with knee arthropathy and hematocrit above 38.5%. The mean density of erythrocytes was studied by the phthalate method, intraoperative blood loss was assessed gravimetrically. The volume of blood loss in HCV+ patients with manifest adhesive process and chronic synovitis varied from 300 to 1900 ml, in patients with moderate adhesive process from 400 to 1500 ml. The volume of blood loss in HCV- patients was 300-800 ml. A positive correlation between the blood loss volume and mean density of erythrocytes was detected. Blood loss >1000 ml during total knee arthroplasty can be expected in patients with hemophilia A with HCV and high mean density of erythrocytes. Blood loss >1000 ml is unlikely in HCV- and HCV+ patients with the mean density of erythrocytes not surpassing the normal values.

  2. The State of Skewed X Chromosome Inactivation is Retained in the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Female with Hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Cuicui; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Jianping; Xue, Feng; Liu, Xiaofan; Liu, Wei; Fu, Rongfeng; Zhang, Liyan; Li, Huiyuan; Zhang, Donglei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Cheng, Tao; Yang, Renchi; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    Skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a rare reason for hemophilia B in females. It is indefinite whether X chromosome reactivation (XCR) would occur when cells of hemophilia B patients with skewed XCI were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this study, we investigated a female hemophilia B patient with a known F9 gene mutation: c.676C>T, p.Arg226Trp. We demonstrated that skewed XCI was the pathogenesis of the patient, and we successfully generated numerous iPSC colonies of the patient from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), which was the first time for generating hemophilia-specific iPSCs from PBMNCs. Then we detected the XCI state of these iPSCs. Ninety-two iPSC lines were picked for XCI analysis. All of them retained an inactive X chromosome, which could be proved by amplification of the androgen receptor gene and XIST (X inactivation-specific transcript), expression of H3K27me3, and existence of XIST clouds in XIST RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. We attempted to obtain iPSC lines with the wild-type F9 gene on the active X chromosome for further disease treatment. But it turned out that the patient's iPSCs were still skewed such as the somatic cells with 92 iPSC lines having mutant F9 on the active X chromosome. In conclusion, skewed XCI is one reason for hemophilia in females. PBMNCs are excellent somatic cell resources for hemophilia patients to do reprogramming. More attentions should be paid to generate naive iPSCs with two active X chromosomes for further clinical disease treatment. The state of skewed XCI is retained in the iPSCs from a female with hemophilia B.

  3. Severe Hemophilia A in a Male Old English Sheep Dog with a C→T Transition that Created a Premature Stop Codon in Factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Lozier, Jay N; Kloos, Mark T; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Lemoine, Nathaly; Whitford, Margaret H; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Nichols, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Animals with hemophilia are models for gene therapy, factor replacement, and inhibitor development in humans. We have actively sought dogs with severe hemophilia A that have novel factor VIII mutations unlike the previously described factor VIII intron 22 inversion. A male Old English Sheepdog with recurrent soft-tissue hemorrhage and hemarthrosis was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A (factor VIII activity less than 1% of normal). We purified genomic DNA from this dog and ruled out the common intron 22 inversion; we then sequenced all 26 exons. Comparing the results with the normal canine factor VIII sequence revealed a C→T transition in exon 12 of the factor VIII gene that created a premature stop codon at amino acid 577 in the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, 2 previously described polymorphisms that do not cause hemophilia were present at amino acids 909 and 1184. The hemophilia mutation creates a new TaqI site that facilitates rapid genotyping of affected offspring by PCR and restriction endonuclease analyses. This mutation is analogous to the previously described human factor VIII mutation at Arg583, which likewise is a CpG dinucleotide transition causing a premature stop codon in exon 12. Thus far, despite extensive treatment with factor VIII, this dog has not developed neutralizing antibodies (‘inhibitors’) to the protein. This novel mutation in a dog gives rise to severe hemophilia A analogous to a mutation seen in humans. This model will be useful for studies of the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:27780008

  4. Budget Impact Analysis of Prolonged Half-Life Recombinant FVIII Therapy for Hemophilia in the United States.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Suzanne; Buckley, Brieana; Hall, Eric; Kendter, Jon; Johnston, Karissa

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a factor VIII deficiency, associated with spontaneous, recurrent bleeding episodes. This may lead to comorbidities such as arthropathy and joint replacement, which contribute to morbidity and increased health care expenditure. Recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc), a prolonged half-life factor therapy, requires fewer infusions, resulting in reduced treatment burden. Use a budget impact analysis to assess the potential economic impact of introducing rFVIIIFc to a formulary from the perspective of a private payer in the United States. The budget impact model was developed to estimate the potential economic impact of adding rFVIIIFc to a private payer formulary across a 2-year time period. The eligible patient population consisted of inhibitor-free adults with severe hemophilia A, receiving recombinant-based episodic or prophylaxis treatment regimens. Patients were assumed to switch from conventional recombinant factor treatment to rFVIIIFc. Only medication costs were included in the model. The introduction of rFVIIIFc is estimated to have a budget impact of 1.4% ($0.12 per member per month) across 2 years for a private payer population of 1,000,000 (estimated 19.7 individuals receiving treatment for hemophilia A). The introduction of rFVIIIFc is estimated to prevent 124 bleeds across 2 years at a cost of $1891 per bleed avoided. Hemophilia A is a rare disease with a low prevalence; therefore, the overall cost to society of introducing rFVIIIFc is small. Considerations for comprehensively assessing the budget impact of introducing rFVIIIFc should include episodic and prophylaxis regimens, bleed avoidance, and annual factor consumption required under alternative scenarios. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  6. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-FVIII immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kuether, E. L.; Schroeder, J. A.; Fahs, S. A.; Cooley, B. C.; Chen, Y.; Montgomery, R. R.; Wilcox, D. A.; Shi, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous FVIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful for treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. Objective To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression in pre-immunized FVIIInull mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined by a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated by real time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured by Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytic-induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed by LAM-PCR. Results Therapeutic levels of platelet-FVIII expression were sustained long-term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced pre-immunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet-FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in pre-immunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Conclusions Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in hemophilic A mice with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. PMID:22632092

  7. Assessment of acquired hemophilia patient demographics in the United States: the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Craig M.; Ma, Alice D.; Al-Mondhiry, Hamid A.B.; Gut, Robert Z.; Cooper, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society (HTRS) Registry was used to monitor the postapproval use of recombinant factor VIIa. The objective of this manuscript is to provide key insights on the demographics of patients with acquired hemophilia in the HTRS Registry. Acquired hemophilia patient registration in HTRS captured age; sex; comorbidities and predisposing conditions; first bleeding location; laboratory parameters; exposure to blood products, factor, and bypassing agents; and initiation of immune suppression/tolerance therapy. Overall, 166 patients with acquired hemophilia were registered in HTRS (83 women, 73 men, median age 70 years); the majority were non-Hispanic whites (61.4%). The most common comorbidities were autoimmune disease (28.4%) and malignancy (14.5%). The most common first site of bleeding was subcutaneous (27.1%); this was more common in whites (29.1%) than blacks (12.5%) and in non-Hispanics (26.4%) than Hispanics (11.8%). Blood product exposure was reported for 33.1% of patients; the most commonly reported product was packed red blood cells (28%). Of the 57 patients with outcome data available for immune tolerance therapy, 26 patients (46%) reported successful treatment, 13 reported unsuccessful treatment (23%), and 18 (32%) were receiving active treatment at the time of registration. The HTRS Registry final analysis provides the only current comprehensive look at acquired hemophilia in the US population, including details on underlying autoimmune diseases and malignancies. Pertinent to recognition and diagnosis of the disease, subcutaneous bleeding as a presenting bleeding symptom was more common in white and non-Hispanic individuals. PMID:27467981

  8. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Baldwin, W Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete; Meeks, Shannon L

    2016-10-20

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. The Fc gamma receptor IIa R131H polymorphism is associated with inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, C L; Astermark, J; Nagelkerke, S Q; Geissler, J; Tanck, M W T; Peters, M; Fijnvandraat, K; Kuijpers, T W

    2014-08-01

    The development of factor (F) VIII neutralizing alloantibodies (inhibitors) is a major complication of treatment with FVIII concentrates in hemophilia A and the etiology is still poorly understood. The low-affinity Fc gamma receptors (FcγR), which are expressed on immune cells, provide an important link between cellular and humoral immunity by interacting with IgG subtypes. Genetic variations of the genes encoding FcγRs (FCGR genes) have been associated with susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between genetic variation of FCGR and inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A. In this case-control study samples of 85 severe hemophilia A patients (siblings from 44 families) were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variation of the FCGR2 and FCGR3 gene cluster were studied in an FCGR-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay. Frequencies were compared in a generalized estimating equation regression model. Thirty-six patients (42%) had a positive history of inhibitor development. The polymorphism 131R > H in the FCGR2A gene was associated with an increased risk of inhibitor development (odds ratio [OR] per H-allele, 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.9). This association persisted in 29 patients with high titer inhibitors (OR per H-allele, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.2) and in 44 patients with the F8 intron 22 inversion (OR per H-allele, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1-6.6). Hemophilia A patients with the HH genotype of the FCGR2A polymorphism 131R > H have a more than 3-fold increased risk of inhibitor development compared with patients with the RR genotype. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. A novel cell-sheet technology that achieves durable factor VIII delivery in a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Lillicrap, David; Shima, Midori; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Matsui, Hideto

    2013-01-01

    Gene- or cell-based therapies aimed at creating delivery systems for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) protein have emerged as promising options for hemophilia A treatment. However, several issues remain to be addressed regarding the efficacies and adverse events of these new classes of therapies. To improve an existing cell-based therapy involving the subcutaneous transplantation of FVIII-transduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), we employed a novel cell-sheet technology that allows individual dispersed cells to form a thin and contiguous monolayer without traditional bioabsorbable scaffold matrices. Compared to the traditional methodology, our cell-sheet approach resulted in longer-term and 3-5-fold higher expression of FVIII (up to 11% of normal) in recipient hemophilia A mice that lacked a FVIII humoral immune response due to transient immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide. Histological studies revealed that the transplanted BOEC sheets were structured as flat clusters, supporting the long-term expression of therapeutic FVIII in plasma from an ectopic subcutaneous space. Our novel tissue-engineering approach using genetically modified BOEC sheets could aid in development of cell-based therapy that will allow safe and effective in vivo delivery of functional FVIII protein in patients with hemophilia A.

  11. Issues in assessing products for the treatment of hemophilia – the intersection between efficacy, economics, and ethics

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Albert; Noone, Declan; Schlenkrich, Uwe; Schlenkrich, Steffen; O’Mahony, Brian; Cassar, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Following the obviation of the pathogen safety threats posed by previous generations of clotting factor concentrates for the treatment of hemophilia, the principal issue facing the patient community is timely access to adequate supplies of continuously improving therapies. The application of evidence-based medicine has enhanced the basis of hemophilia therapy, while resulting in some challenges to patient care. Increasingly, the criteria used for the approval and payment of treatment products by regulatory and reimbursement agencies, respectively, are becoming inflexible and unrealistic. This is occurring particularly in the requirements for demonstrating product efficacy. Concurrently, emerging evidence of the interpatient variability in the clinical response to therapy has led to the proposed personalization of therapeutic regimens. Possible impediments to optimal care include competitive tensions among suppliers who seek to gain label claims for reimbursement purposes, which result in clinical trial designs of, arguably, unethical design, carried out in poor countries. We synthesize these converging developments to suggest some changes to the current hemophilia treatment paradigm, which should make it more patient-centric and enable speedier access to new therapies. PMID:26124687

  12. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity - case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wojtyś, Małgorzata; Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia.

  13. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity – case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia. PMID:26336444

  14. A Novel Cell-Sheet Technology That Achieves Durable Factor VIII Delivery in a Mouse Model of Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Lillicrap, David; Shima, Midori; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Matsui, Hideto

    2013-01-01

    Gene- or cell-based therapies aimed at creating delivery systems for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) protein have emerged as promising options for hemophilia A treatment. However, several issues remain to be addressed regarding the efficacies and adverse events of these new classes of therapies. To improve an existing cell-based therapy involving the subcutaneous transplantation of FVIII-transduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), we employed a novel cell-sheet technology that allows individual dispersed cells to form a thin and contiguous monolayer without traditional bioabsorbable scaffold matrices. Compared to the traditional methodology, our cell-sheet approach resulted in longer-term and 3–5-fold higher expression of FVIII (up to 11% of normal) in recipient hemophilia A mice that lacked a FVIII humoral immune response due to transient immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide. Histological studies revealed that the transplanted BOEC sheets were structured as flat clusters, supporting the long-term expression of therapeutic FVIII in plasma from an ectopic subcutaneous space. Our novel tissue-engineering approach using genetically modified BOEC sheets could aid in development of cell-based therapy that will allow safe and effective in vivo delivery of functional FVIII protein in patients with hemophilia A. PMID:24358271

  15. Factor VIII ectopically targeted to platelets is therapeutic in hemophilia A with high-titer inhibitory antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qizhen; Wilcox, David A.; Fahs, Scot A.; Weiler, Hartmut; Wells, Clive W.; Cooley, Brian C.; Desai, Drashti; Morateck, Patricia A.; Gorski, Jack; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibitory immune response to exogenously infused factor VIII (FVIII) is a major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A. Generation of such inhibitors has the potential to disrupt gene therapy for hemophilia A. We explore what we believe to be a novel approach to overcome this shortcoming. Human B-domain–deleted FVIII (hBDDFVIII) was expressed under the control of the platelet-specific αIIb promoter in platelets of hemophilic (FVIIInull) mice to create 2bF8trans mice. The FVIII transgene product was stored in platelets and released at the site of platelet activation. In spite of the lack of FVIII in the plasma of 2bF8trans mice, the bleeding phenotype of FVIIInull mice was corrected. More importantly, the bleeding phenotype was corrected in the presence of high inhibitory antibody titers introduced into the mice by infusion or by spleen cell transfer from recombinant hBDDFVIII–immunized mice. Our results demonstrate that this approach to the targeted expression of FVIII in platelets has the potential to correct hemophilia A, even in the presence of inhibitory immune responses to infused FVIII. PMID:16823491

  16. Abnormal joint and bone wound healing in hemophilia mice is improved by extending factor IX activity after hemarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junjiang; Hua, Baolai; Livingston, Eric W; Taves, Sarah; Johansen, Peter B; Hoffman, Maureane; Ezban, Mirella; Monroe, Dougald M; Bateman, Ted A; Monahan, Paul E

    2017-04-13

    Wound healing requires interactions between coagulation, inflammation, angiogenesis, cellular migration, and proliferation. Healing in dermal wounds of hemophilia B mice is delayed when compared with hemostatically normal wild-type (WT) mice, with abnormal persistence of iron deposition, inflammation, and neovascularity. We observed healing following induced joint hemorrhage in WT and factor IX (FIX) knockout (FIX(-/-)) mice, examining also parameters previously studied in an excisional skin wound model. Hemostatically normal mice tolerated this joint bleeding challenge, cleared blood from the joint, and healed with minimal pathology, even if additional autologous blood was injected intra-articularly at the time of wounding. Following hemarthrosis, joint wound healing in hemophilia B mice was impaired and demonstrated similar abnormal histologic features as previously described in hemophilic dermal wounds. Therefore, studies of pathophysiology and therapy of hemophilic joint bleeding performed in hemostatically normal animals are not likely to accurately reflect the healing defect of hemophilia. We additionally explored the hypothesis that the use of a FIX replacement protein with extended circulating FIX activity could improve synovial and osteochondral wound healing in hemophilic mice, when compared with treatment with unmodified recombinant FIX (rFIX) in the established joint bleeding model. Significantly improved synovial wound healing and preservation of normal osteochondral architecture are achieved by extending FIX activity after hemarthrosis using glycoPEGylated FIX when compared with an equivalent dose of rFIX. These results suggest that treating joint bleeding only until hemostasis is achieved may not result in optimal joint healing, which is improved by extending factor activity.

  17. Pharmacological modulation of humoral immunity in a nonhuman primate model of AAV gene transfer for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Chen, Yifeng; Murphy, Samuel L; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Tai, Alex; Price, Sandra D; Metzger, Mark E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E; High, Katherine A

    2012-07-01

    Liver gene transfer for hemophilia B has shown very promising results in recent clinical studies. A potential complication of gene-based treatments for hemophilia and other inherited disorders, however, is the development of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against the therapeutic transgene. The risk of developing NAb to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated hepatic gene transfer for hemophilia is small but not absent, as formation of inhibitory antibodies to F.IX is observed in experimental animals following liver gene transfer. Thus, strategies to modulate antitransgene NAb responses are needed. Here, we used the anti-B cell monoclonal antibody rituximab (rtx) in combination with cyclosporine A (CsA) to eradicate anti-human F.IX NAb in rhesus macaques previously injected intravenously with AAV8 vectors expressing human F.IX. A short course of immunosuppression (IS) resulted in eradication of anti-F.IX NAb with restoration of plasma F.IX transgene product detection. In one animal, following IS anti-AAV6 antibodies also dropped below detection, allowing for successful AAV vector readministration and resulting in high levels (60% or normal) of F.IX transgene product in plasma. Though the number of animals is small, this study supports for the safety and efficacy of B cell-targeting therapies to eradicate NAb developed following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

  18. Hemophilia B

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... 2/1/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. ...

  19. Hemophilia Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding within joints that can lead to chronic joint disease and pain Bleeding in the head and sometimes ... is needed. People with inhibitors often experience more joint disease and other problems from bleeding that result in ...

  20. Bioengineered coagulation factor VIII enables long-term correction of murine hemophilia A following liver-directed adeno-associated viral vector delivery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Harrison C; Wright, J Fraser; Zhou, Shangzhen; Lytle, Allison M; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data support the feasibility and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in gene therapy applications. Despite several clinical trials of AAV-based gene transfer for hemophilia B, a unique set of obstacles impede the development of a similar approach for hemophilia A. These include (i) the size of the factor VIII (fVIII) transgene, (ii) humoral immune responses to fVIII, (iii) inefficient biosynthesis of human fVIII, and (iv) AAV vector immunity. Through bioengineering approaches, a novel fVIII molecule, designated ET3, was developed and shown to improve biosynthetic efficiency 10- to 100-fold. In this study, the utility of ET3 was assessed in the context of liver-directed, AAV-mediated gene transfer into hemophilia A mice. Due to the large size of the expression cassette, AAV-ET3 genomes packaged into viral particles as partial genome fragments. Despite this potential limitation, a single peripheral vein administration of AAV-ET3 into immune-competent hemophilia A mice resulted in correction of the fVIII deficiency at lower vector doses than previously reported for similarly oversized AAV-fVIII vectors. Therefore, ET3 appears to improve vector potency and mitigate at least one of the critical barriers to AAV-based clinical gene therapy for hemophilia A. PMID:26015976

  1. Mutation spectrum of 122 hemophilia A families from Taiwanese population by LD-PCR, DHPLC, multiplex PCR and evaluating the clinical application of HRM

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Yu; Su, Yi-Ning; Hung, Chia-Cheng; Tsay, Woei; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Chang, Chieh-Ting; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Lee, Chien-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Background Hemophilia A represents the most common and severe inherited hemorrhagic disorder. It is caused by mutations in the F8 gene, which leads to a deficiency or dysfunctional factor VIII protein, an essential cofactor in the factor X activation complex. Methods We used long-distance polymerase chain reaction and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography for mutation scanning of the F8 gene. We designed the competitive multiplex PCR to identify the carrier with exonal deletions. In order to facilitate throughput and minimize the cost of mutation scanning, we also evaluated a new mutation scanning technique, high resolution melting analysis (HRM), as an alternative screening method. Results We presented the results of detailed screening of 122 Taiwanese families with hemophilia A and reported twenty-nine novel mutations. There was one family identified with whole exons deletion, and the carriers were successfully recognized by multiplex PCR. By HRM, the different melting curve patterns were easily identified in 25 out of 28 cases (89%) and 15 out of 15 (100%) carriers. The sensitivity was 93 % (40/43). The overall mutation detection rate of hemophilia A was 100% in this study. Conclusion We proposed a diagnostic strategy for hemophilia A genetic diagnosis. We consider HRM as a powerful screening tool that would provide us with a more cost-effective protocol for hemophilia A mutation identification. PMID:18565236

  2. Drug-drug interaction of the anti-TFPI aptamer BAX499 and factor VIII: studies of spatial dynamics of fibrin clot formation in hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Parunov, Leonid A; Soshitova, Natalia P; Fadeeva, Olga A; Balandina, Anna N; Kopylov, Konstantin G; Kumskova, Maria A; Gilbert, James C; Schaub, Robert G; McGinness, Kathleen E; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a number of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) antagonists have been developed to serve as bypassing agents to improve hemostasis in hemophilia A. Since TFPI antagonists and FVIII concentrates are procoagulants, their combined effect on spatial clot formation could be potentially pro-thrombotic. To investigate the cooperative effect of TFPI inhibition and supplementation of FVIII in hemophilia A in a spatial, reaction-diffusion experiment in vitro. Plasma was collected at different time points from hemophilia A patients undergoing prophylaxis and was supplemented in vitro with TFPI inhibitor BAX499 (formerly ARC19499) at concentrations from 0 up to 600nM. Clotting propagation in recalcified plasma activated by a surface with immobilized tissue factor (TF) was monitored by videomicroscopy. Increasing concentration of BAX499 improved coagulation for all hemophilia A plasma samples activated with TF at 1.6pmole/m(2) by shortening lag time and increasing initial clot growth velocity and clot size. In contrast, plasma concentration of FVIII had little effect on lag time, but increased spatial clot growth velocity. There was a decrease in the BAX499 efficiency as FVIII concentration increased (lag time shortened by 50% if FVIII:C<5%, but the effect was only 25% if FVIII:C>30%). The results indicate that BAX499 has an effect on clotting in hemophilia A plasma at low FVIII concentrations, however has little effect at high FVIII concentrations. © 2013.

  3. Molecular characterization of severe hemophilia A suggests that about half the mutations are not within the coding regions and splice junctions of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Miyoko; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Kasch, L.; Warren, T.C.; McGinniss, M.J.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R. ); Kasper, C. )

    1991-08-15

    Hemophilia A is an X chromosome-linked disorder resulting from deficiency of factor VIII, an important protein in blood coagulation. A large number of disease-producing mutations have been reported in the factor VIII gene. However, a comprehensive analysis of the mutations has been difficult because of the larger gene size, its many scattered exons, and the high frequency of de novo mutations. Recently, the authors have shown that nearly all mutations resulting in mild-to-moderate hemophilia A can be detected by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In this study, they attempted to discover the mutations causing severe hemophilia A by analyzing 47 unselected patients, 30 of whom had severe hemophilia and 17 of whom had mild-to-moderate disease. Using DGGE as a screening method, they analyzed 99% of the coding region, 94% of the splice junctions, the promoter region, and the polyadenylylation site of the gene. They found the mutation in 16 of 17 (94%) patients with mild-to-moderate disease but in only 16 of 30 (53%) patients with severe hemophilia A.

  4. Individualized prophylaxis for optimizing hemophilia care: can we apply this to both developed and developing nations?

    PubMed

    Poon, Man-Chiu; Lee, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    Prophylaxis is considered optimal care for hemophilia patients to prevent bleeding and to preserve joint function thereby improving quality of life (QoL). The evidence for prophylaxis is irrefutable and is the standard of care in developed nations. Prophylaxis can be further individualized to improve outcomes and cost effectiveness. Individualization is best accomplished taking into account the bleeding phenotype, physical activity/lifestyle, joint status, and pharmacokinetic handling of specific clotting factor concentrates, all of which vary among individuals. Patient acceptance should also be considered. Assessment tools (e.g. joint status imaging and function studies/scores, QoL) for determining and monitoring risk factors and outcome, as well as population PK profiling have been developed to assist the individualization process. The determinants of optimal prophylaxis include (1) factor dose/dosing frequency, hence, cost/affordability (2) bleeding triggers (physical activity/lifestyle, chronic arthropathy and synovitis) and (3) bleeding rates. Altering one determinant results in adjustment of the other two. Thus, the trough level to protect from spontaneous bleeding can be increased in patients who have greater bleeding risks; and prophylaxis to achieve zero joint bleeds is achievable through optimal individualization. Prophylaxis in economically constrained nations is limited by the ill-affordability of clotting factor concentrates. However, at least 5 studies on children and adults from Thailand, China and India have shown superiority of low dose (~5-10 IU kg(-1) 2-3× per week) prophylaxis over episodic treatment in terms of bleed reduction, and quality of life, with improved physical activity, independent functioning, school attendance and community participation. In these nations, the prophylaxis goals should be for improved QoL rather than "zero bleeds" and perfect joints. Prophylaxis can still be individualized to affordability. Higher protective

  5. Human von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates in the management of pediatric patients with von Willebrand disease/hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Linari, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Several plasma-derived intermediate and high-purity concentrates containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) are currently available. The main role of these products in the management of the pediatric population is represented by the replacement therapy in patients with severe or intermediate forms of von Willebrand disease, in whom other treatments are ineffective or contraindicated. Another important role of VWF/FVIII concentrates in children may be their use in immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. ITI is particularly recommended for hemophilia A children who have developed an inhibitor against FVIII, currently the most serious complication of substitutive treatment in hemophilia. Although recombinant concentrates may represent the preferred option in children with hemophilia A, VWF/FVIII concentrates may offer an advantage in rescuing patients who failed previous ITI. PMID:27445481

  6. Human von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates in the management of pediatric patients with von Willebrand disease/hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Linari, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Several plasma-derived intermediate and high-purity concentrates containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) are currently available. The main role of these products in the management of the pediatric population is represented by the replacement therapy in patients with severe or intermediate forms of von Willebrand disease, in whom other treatments are ineffective or contraindicated. Another important role of VWF/FVIII concentrates in children may be their use in immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. ITI is particularly recommended for hemophilia A children who have developed an inhibitor against FVIII, currently the most serious complication of substitutive treatment in hemophilia. Although recombinant concentrates may represent the preferred option in children with hemophilia A, VWF/FVIII concentrates may offer an advantage in rescuing patients who failed previous ITI.

  7. Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kickuth, Ralph Anderson, Suzanne; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard; Eggli, Stefan; Triller, Juergen

    2006-12-15

    Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization.

  8. Identification of a novel missense mutation in exon 4 of the human factor VIII gene associated with sever hemophilia A patient.

    PubMed

    Onsori, Habib; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Ali; Montaser-Kouhsari, Sheideh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Hosseinpour, Abbas Ali

    2007-12-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by factor VIII deficiency. The factor VIII gene is on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq28 spans 186 kb and consists of 26 exons. In this study to identify defects in the factor VIII gene, Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was used. A novel missense mutation due to T --> C transition at codon 153 (TGC) of the factor VIII gene which replace a cysteine with an arginine residue, was found in a patient of North-Western of Iran with sever hemophilia A. Direct sequencing of the amplified fragment was performed to confirm the mutation. This study shows that we can use of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and silver staining of SSCP methods for detecting most of the point mutations causative hemophilia A.

  9. Perceptions of Men With Moderate to Severe Hemophilia Regarding the Management of Their Chronic Disorder and Utilization of Community-Based Support.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Erik B

    2015-11-01

    Hemophilia is a genetic bleeding disorder that almost exclusively affects men. There is a nationwide network of nonprofit organizations providing support to men with hemophilia, which are affiliated with localized agencies that serve affected individuals within specific regions of the country. This community-based study was implemented in response to a local Utah agency's concern that men with hemophilia may be disengaged from and underserved by their local support network. The goal of the study was to gain a better understanding of the (a) unique challenges, (b) adaptations, and (c) physical, financial, psychological, and social needs of adult men with moderate to severe hemophilia from the local community. Over a period of 9 months, verbal qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 affected individuals, and written interviews were obtained from 3 additional participants. Using a grounded-theory approach, six themes were identified, based on men's commentary from interviews, across a spectrum of physical, social, communal, personal, medical, and vocational dimensions. Resilience theory, which explores internal resources that assist in coping with adverse situations, was used as a framework for interpreting research results. Findings indicate that men value the array of educational, social, and medical services that are available to them but choose to manage their hemophilia independently from the community and access support according to their individual needs. Understanding this dynamic may be helpful in developing services that are more specifically tailored to the physical and psychosocial needs of adult men with hemophilia and, potentially, men with other chronic health disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Antihemophilic factor (recombinant) plasma/albumin-free method for the management and prevention of bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Pipe, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Hemophilia is a rare genetic bleeding disorder that, if not adequately controlled, is associated with life-threatening bleeding events and serious and costly complications, primarily from joint damage. The advent of effective clotting factor replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia is considered one of the foremost medical advances of the 20th century. The last 3 decades of experience in hemophilia care have witnessed the effectiveness of the care of patients with hemophilia within specialized comprehensive care centers, advances in factor replacement therapies, the benefits of prophylaxis over on-demand replacement therapy, and the role of aggressive management of joint disease to prevent dysfunction. Ongoing challenges, including the management of inhibitors to factor therapies and the consequences of thousands of patients with hemophilia becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus in the 1980s from contaminated plasma-derived factor concentrates, have highlighted the need for vigilance with respect to clotting factor product safety, access to care, and a full complement of choice of factor replacement therapies. Advate® (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] plasma/albumin-free method [rAHF-PFM]) is the first recombinant factor VIII therapy manufactured without human or animal protein additives to eliminate the risk of pathogen transmission that could be carried by these additives. Preclinical studies established bioequivalence with recombinant antihemophilic factor (Recombinate®), a product with 16 years of clinical experience. Currently licensed in 44 countries worldwide, rAHF-PFM has over 7 years of clinical research within 5 global studies supporting its safety and efficacy in the treatment of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:19707401

  11. Preclinical safety and efficacy of a new recombinant FIX drug product for treatment of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Barbara; Schiviz, Alexandra; Hoellriegl, Werner; Horling, Frank; Benamara, Karima; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Turecek, Peter L; Schwarz, Hans Peter; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Muchitsch, Eva-Maria

    2013-11-01

    Baxter has developed a new recombinant factor IX (rFIX) drug product (BAX326) for treating patients with hemophilia B, or congenital FIX deficiency. An extensive preclinical program evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of BAX326 in different species. The efficacy of BAX326 was tested in three mouse models of primary pharmacodynamics: tail-tip bleeding, carotid occlusion, and thrombelastography. The pharmacokinetics was evaluated after a single intravenous bolus injection in mice, rats, and macaques. Toxicity was assessed in rats and macaques, safety pharmacology in rabbits and macaques, and immunogenicity in mice. BAX326 was shown to be efficacious in all three primary pharmacodynamic studies (P ≤ 0.0076). Hemostatic efficacy was dose related and similar for the three lots tested. Pharmacokinetic results showed that rFIX activity and rFIX antigen concentrations declined in a bi-phasic manner, similar to a previously licensed rFIX product. BAX326 was well tolerated in rabbits and macaques at all dose levels; no thrombogenic events and no adverse clinical, respiratory, or cardiovascular effects occurred. BAX326 was also shown to have a similar immunogenicity profile to the comparator rFIX product in mice. These results demonstrate that BAX326 has a favorable preclinical safety and efficacy profile, predictive of a comparable effect to that of the previously licensed rFIX in humans.

  12. [Report of 2 cases with acquired von Willebrand disease and one with acquired hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Murillo, C; Quintana González, S; Ambriz Fernández, R; Domínguez García, V; Rodríguez Moyado, H; Arias Aranda, A; Collazo Jaloma, J; Gutiérrez Romero, M

    1995-01-01

    We report three patients with acquired inhibitors against F VIII:C/F vW:Ag complex. Two patients had acquired hemophilia A. The three patients presented with bleeding diathesis. Case 1 was a 19 years old woman with Graves-Basedow disease; case 2 was a 40 years old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus of four years; and case 3 a 38 years old woman who had had rheumatoid arthritis for five years and was in her 3d month postpartum. The F VIII:C level was below 8 U/dL in all cases. The F vW:Ag, ristocetin cofactor and platelet aggregation with ristocetin were diminished in the two cases with von Willebrand. Inhibitor to F VIII:C was 50, 38 and 20 Bethesda units, respectively, for cases 1, 2 and 3. The three patients showed clinical response to DDAVP and cryoprecipitates with partial response in laboratory tests. All patients responded to corticosteroid treatment, but immunosuppressive treatment was necessary in case 3.

  13. Phenotypic Correction of Hemophilia A in Sheep by Postnatal Intraperitoneal Transplantation of FVIII-Expressing MSC

    PubMed Central

    Porada, Christopher D.; Sanada, Chad; Kuo, Chung-Jung; Colletti, Evan; Mandeville, Walter; Hasenau, John; Zanjani, Esmail D.; Moot, Robert; Doering, Christopher; Spencer, H. Trent; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2011-01-01

    We recently re-established a line of sheep that accurately mimics the clinical symptoms and genetics of severe hemophilia A (HA). Herein, we tested a novel, non-ablative transplant therapy in 2 pediatric HA animals. Paternal mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were transduced with a porcine FVIII-encoding lentivector, and transplanted via the intraperitoneal route, without preconditioning. At the time of transplantation, these animals had received multiple hFVIII treatments for various spontaneous bleeds, and had developed debilitating hemarthroses which produced severe defects in posture and gait. Transplantation of transduced MSC resolved all existent hemarthroses, and spontaneous bleeds ceased. Damaged joints recovered fully; the animals regained normal posture and gait and resumed normal activity. Despite achieving factor-independence, a sharp rise in pre-existent Bethesda titers occurred following transplantation, decreasing the effectiveness and duration of therapy. Post-mortem examination revealed widespread engraftment, with MSC present within the lung, liver, intestine, and thymus, but particularly within joints affected at the time of transplantation, suggesting MSC homed to sites of ongoing injury/inflammation to release FVIII, explaining the dramatic improvement in hemarthrotic joints. In summary, this novel, non-ablative MSC transplantation was straightforward, safe, and converted life-threatening, debilitating HA to a moderate phenotype in a large animal model. PMID:21906573

  14. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W; Walters, Eric M; Butler, Stephen P; Whyte, Jeff J; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D; Samuel, Melissa S; Murphy, Cliff N; Wells, Kevin D; Masiello, Nick C; Prather, Randall S; Velander, William H

    2015-09-21

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world's population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock.

  15. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  16. Overrepresentation of missense mutations in mild hemophilia A patients from Belgium: founder effect or independent occurrence?

    PubMed

    Lannoy, N; Lambert, C; Vikkula, M; Hermans, C

    2015-06-01

    Roughly 40% of observed mutations responsible for hemophilia A (HA) are novel and present in either a single family or a limited number of unrelated families. During routine diagnostic analysis of 73 unrelated Belgian patients with mild HA, 4 out of 43 different mutations (p.Ser2030Asn, p.Arg2178Cys, p.Arg2178His, and p.Pro2311His) were detected in more than one family, representing 35% of total identified mutations. To discriminate between an independent recurrence or a founder effect, an analysis of intra- and -extragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and short tandem repeats (STRs) flanking the F8 gene was conducted. SNP haplotype and microsatellite analysis revealed strong evidence that p.Ser2030Asn and p.Pro2311His mutations were probably associated with a founder effect. The two other mutations localized in an F8 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) site likely resulted from recurrent de novo events. This study suggests that missense mutations producing C-to-T or G-to-A substitutions in CpG dinucleotide can occur de novo with more repetition than other causal substitutions that do not affect the CpG site. Analysis of F8 database implied that CpG sites throughout the F8 gene are not all mutated with the same frequency. Causes are still unknown and remain to be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-01-01

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  18. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    PubMed

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  19. Neonatal circumcision in severe haemophilia: a survey of paediatric haematologists at United States Hemophilia Treatment Centers.

    PubMed

    Kearney, S; Sharathkumar, A; Rodriguez, V; Chitlur, M; Valentino, L; Boggio, L; Gill, J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision in patients with severe haemophilia has not been well studied. We performed a survey of paediatric haematologists from Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC) across the United States to better understand the attitudes toward and management of neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients. Response rate to our survey was 40% (n = 64/159). Thirty-eight percent of respondents (n = 24) said that they would allow this procedure in the newborn period but in many cases this was against medical advice. The most reported concern regarding neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients was the risk of development of an inhibitor (n = 25; 39%) followed by the concern for bleeding (n = 22; 34%) and issues related to vascular access in the neonate (n = 11; 17%). All respondents recommended at least one preprocedure dose of factor replacement. Twenty-two percent (n = 14) of respondents did not use more than one dose of factor replacement but 32% (n = 21) used 1-2 postoperative doses. The remainder of paediatric haematologists surveyed recommended between 3-5 (16%; n = 10) and 6-10 (3%, n = 2) additional days postoperatively. There was wide variation in both techniques of circumcision as well as adjuvant haemostatic agents used. Only 22% of respondents said that they had an established protocol for management of circumcision in the newborn haemophilia patient. These survey results highlight the need for evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal management of circumcision in neonates with severe haemophilia.

  20. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level.

  1. A rare case of acquired hemophilia A associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Mihir; Kallamadi, Rekha; Bande, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    84 year old male with past medical history of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented with progressive subcutaneous and muscle bleed in the right forearm and arm. Workup revealed elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) - 71.8 seconds (normal 23 - 32 seconds) which was persistently elevated after mixing study (37.1 seconds immediately and 51.1 seconds after 1 hour). Further laboratory work up revealed low factor VIII level (3%) and elevated factor VIII inhibitor by Bethesda assay (3 units/ml of blood). Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) diagnosis was established and patient was treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVlla) to control the bleeding and also prednisone for immunosuppression. Subsequent monitoring suggested reduction of factor VIII inhibitor - antibody levels to undetectable level in 3 days and increase of factor VIII level from 3% to 50% in 5 days. Despite of improvement in the laboratory values he continued to have progression of his bleeding which involved posterior chest wall and also left arm. Due to the progression of the condition and prior expressed wish family decided to stop the aggressive treatment and patient died nine days after the diagnosis. The case report describes a rare presentation of AHA in MDS (With bone marrow cytogenetics abnormality) patient with fatal outcome. PMID:22837802

  2. A Gene-Specific Method for Predicting Hemophilia-Causing Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Salari, Raheleh; Wu, Andrew; Qi, Yini; Schiller, Tal; Filiberto, Amanda C.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Komar, Anton A.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of medical genetics is the accurate prediction of genotype–phenotype correlations. As an approach to develop more accurate in silico tools for prediction of disease-causing mutations of structural proteins, we present a gene- and disease-specific prediction tool based on a large systematic analysis of missense mutations from hemophilia A (HA) patients. Our HA-specific prediction tool, HApredictor, showed disease prediction accuracy comparable to other publicly available prediction software. In contrast to those methods, its performance is not limited to non-synonymous mutations. Given the role of synonymous mutations in disease and drug codon optimization, we propose that utilizing a gene- and disease-specific method can be highly useful to make functional predictions possible even for synonymous mutations. Incorporating computational metrics at both nucleotide and amino acid levels along with multiple protein sequence/structure alignment significantly improved the predictive performance of our tool. HApredictor is freely available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Przytycka/HA_Predict/index.htm. PMID:23920358

  3. User-centered requirements engineering in health information systems: a study in the hemophilia field.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonor; Ferreira, Carlos; Santos, Beatriz Sousa

    2012-06-01

    The use of sophisticated information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the health care domain is a way to improve the quality of services. However, there are also hazards associated with the introduction of ICTs in this domain and a great number of projects have failed due to the lack of systematic consideration of human and other non-technology issues throughout the design or implementation process, particularly in the requirements engineering process. This paper presents the methodological approach followed in the design process of a web-based information system (WbIS) for managing the clinical information in hemophilia care, which integrates the values and practices of user-centered design (UCD) activities into the principles of software engineering, particularly in the phase of requirements engineering (RE). This process followed a paradigm that combines a grounded theory for data collection with an evolutionary design based on constant development and refinement of the generic domain model using three well-known methodological approaches: (a) object-oriented system analysis; (b) task analysis; and, (c) prototyping, in a triangulation work. This approach seems to be a good solution for the requirements engineering process in this particular case of the health care domain, since the inherent weaknesses of individual methods are reduced, and emergent requirements are easier to elicit. Moreover, the requirements triangulation matrix gives the opportunity to look across the results of all used methods and decide what requirements are critical for the system success.

  4. Genetic diagnosis in Hemophilia A from southern China: five novel mutations and one preimplantation genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Wang, J; Lin, X Y; Xu, Y W; He, Z H; Li, H Y; Chen, S Q; Jiang, W Y

    2017-04-01

    As there is currently no complete cure for hemophilia A (HA), the identification of pathogenic mutations in factor VIII (FVIII) gene from HA patients and carriers, which can contribute to genetic counseling prenatal diagnosis, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), is an important step to prevent HA. A total of 14 unrelated Chinese HA subjects (FVIII activity <40%), 20 carrier subjects, three fetuses, and one PGD were included in this study. We first screened for the presence of FVIII intron 22 and intron 1 inversions. Second, the coding region of the FVIII gene was sequenced. For the novel mutations, FVIII mRNA expression was detected by real-time PCR and the protein structures were analyzed by bioinformatic tools. Five novel mutations (c.1A>C, c.304_305insA, c.1594T>A, c.6045G>A, and c.2645_2646insG) were found. The real-time PCR showed that the expression of FVIII mRNAs was lower in HA patients than in normal subjects. Prenatal diagnosis and PGD were successfully performed: Two of three fetuses and four of eight blastomeres were confirmed to be normal. In conclusion, genetic diagnosis of 14 unrelated HA subjects, 20 carrier subjects, three fetuses, and one PGD was successfully performed in our study. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Many factor VIII products available in the treatment of hemophilia A: an embarrassment of riches?

    PubMed

    Lieuw, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a common bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) with an incidence of ~1 in 5000 male births. Replacement of FVIII is necessary to prevent and treat bleeding episodes. However, with multiple new drugs in addition to old standards, choosing among the different FVIII treatment options is harder than ever. There are FVIII products that are plasma derived or recombinant, FVIII products designed to extend the half-life of FVIII, and the first single-chain FVIII product, recombinant factor VIII single chain (rFVIII-SC). As development of inhibitors to FVIII continues to be a major problem in the care of HA patients, recent studies showing lower rates of inhibitor development with plasma-derived FVIIII products versus recombinant FVIII products have made choosing among the many options now available even more complex. Although still unproven, extended half-life (EHL) products may provide the hope of decreased immunogenicity but need further testing in previously untreated patients (PUPs). This review highlights some of the differences between FVIII products currently available and hopefully assists the clinician to decide which FVIII product to choose for their patients.

  6. Identification of FVIII gene mutations in patients with hemophilia A using new combinatorial sequencing by hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chetta, M.; Drmanac, A.; Santacroce, R.; Grandone, E.; Surrey, S.; Fortina, P.; Margaglione, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard methods of mutation detection are time consuming in Hemophilia A (HA) rendering their application unavailable in some analysis such as prenatal diagnosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility of combinatorial sequencing-by-hybridization (cSBH) as an alternative and reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene. PATIENTS/METHODS: We have applied a new method of cSBH that uses two different colors for detection of multiple point mutations in the FVIII gene. The 26 exons encompassing the HA gene were analyzed in 7 newly diagnosed Italian patients and in 19 previously characterized individuals with FVIII deficiency. RESULTS: Data show that, when solution-phase TAMRA and QUASAR labeled 5-mer oligonucleotide sets mixed with unlabeled target PCR templates are co-hybridized in the presence of DNA ligase to universal 6-mer oligonucleotide probe-based arrays, a number of mutations can be successfully detected. The technique was reliable also in identifying a mutant FVIII allele in an obligate heterozygote. A novel missense mutation (Leu1843Thr) in exon 16 and three novel neutral polymorphisms are presented with an updated protocol for 2-color cSBH. CONCLUSIONS: cSBH is a reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene and may represent a complementary method for the genetic screening of HA patients. PMID:20300295

  7. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    PubMed Central

    Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level. PMID:22517903

  8. Minimal modification in the factor VIII B-domain sequence ameliorates the murine hemophilia A phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Iacobelli, Nicholas P.; Sabatino, Denise E.; Ivanciu, Lacramiora; Zhou, Shangzhen; Poncz, Mortimer; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant canine B-domain deleted (BDD) factor VIII (FVIII) is predominantly expressed as a single-chain protein and exhibits greater stability after activation compared with human FVIII-BDD. We generated a novel BDD-FVIII variant (FVIII-RH) with an amino acid change at the furin cleavage site within the B domain (position R1645H) that mimics the canine sequence (HHQR vs human RHQR). Compared with human FVIII-BDD, expression of FVIII-RH protein revealed a 2.5-fold increase in the single-chain form. Notably, FVIII-RH exhibited a twofold increase in biological activity compared with FVIII-BDD, likely due to its slower dissociation of the A2-domain upon thrombin activation. Injection of FVIII-RH protein in hemophilia A (HA) mice resulted in more efficacious hemostasis following vascular injury in both the macro- and microcirculation. These findings were successfully translated to adeno-associated viral (AAV)-based liver gene transfer in HA mice. Expression of circulating FVIII-RH was approximately twofold higher compared with AAV-FVIII-BDD–injected mice. Moreover, FVIII-RH exhibits superior procoagulant effects compared with FVIII-BDD following a series of hemostatic challenges. Notably, the immunogenicity of FVIII-RH did not differ from FVIII-BDD. Thus, FVIII-RH is an attractive bioengineered molecule for improving efficacy without increased immunogenicity and may be suitable for both protein- and gene-based strategies for HA. PMID:23372167

  9. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of acquired hemophilia A: experience at a single center in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Uchiumi, Hideki; Ishizaki, Takuma; Mitsui, Takeki; Gouda, Fumito; Ieko, Masahiro; Ichinose, Akitada; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Handa, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA), which is caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is a rare, life-threatening bleeding disorder, the incidence of which appears to be increasing in Japan as the population ages. However, the clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of AHA remain difficult to establish due to the rarity of this disease. We retrospectively analyzed data from 25 patients (median age 73 years; range 24-92 years; male n = 15) diagnosed with AHA between 1999 and 2015 at Gunma University Hospital. We identified autoimmune diseases and malignancy as underlying conditions in four and three patients, respectively. Factor VIII activity was significantly decreased in all patients (median 2.0%; range <1.0-8.0) by FVIII inhibitor (median 47.0 BU/mL; range 2.0-1010). Among 71 bleeding events, subcutaneous or intramuscular hemorrhage was the most prevalent. Seventeen patients required bypassing agents. Twenty-two (91.7%) of 24 patients treated with immunosuppressive agents achieved complete response (CR) during a median of 57.5 days (range 19-714 days). Although three patients (12%) relapsed and seven (28%) died of infection, none of the deaths were related to bleeding. Although most of our patients achieved CR after immunosuppressive therapy, the rate of infection-related mortality was unsatisfactorily high.

  10. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  11. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W.; Walters, Eric M.; Butler, Stephen P.; Whyte, Jeff J.; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C.; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Cliff N.; Wells, Kevin D.; Masiello, Nick C.; Prather, Randall S.; Velander, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world’s population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  12. Associations of quality of life, pain, and self-reported arthritis with age, employment, bleed rate, and utilization of hemophilia treatment center and health care provider services: results in adults with hemophilia in the HERO study

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Angela L; Witkop, Michelle; Lambing, Angela; Garrido, Cesar; Dunn, Spencer; Cooper, David L; Nugent, Diane J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Severe hemophilia and subsequent hemophilic arthropathy result in joint pain and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Assessment of HRQoL in persons with hemophilia (PWH), including underlying factors that drive HRQoL differences, is important in determining health care resource allocation and in making individualized clinical decisions. Aim To examine potential associations between HRQoL, pain interference, and self-reported arthritis and age, employment, activity, bleed frequency, and hemophilia treatment center and health care professional utilization. Methods PWH (age ≥18 years) from ten countries completed a 5-point Likert scale on pain interference over the previous 4 weeks, the EQ-5D-3L scale (mobility, usual activities, self-care, pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression) including a health-related visual analog scale (0–100, coded as an 11-point categorical response). Results Pain interference (extreme/a lot) was higher in PWH aged >40 years (31%) compared to those aged 31–40 years (27%) or ≤30 years (21%). In an analysis of eight countries with home treatment, PWH who reported EQ-5D mobility issues were less likely to be employed (53% vs 79%, with no mobility issues). Median annual bleed frequency increased with worsening EQ-5D pain or discomfort. The percentage of PWH with inhibitors reporting visual analog scale scores of 80–90–100 was lower (20%) than those without inhibitors (34%). Median bleed frequency increased with pain. Globally, nurse and social worker involvement increased with disability and pain; physiotherapist utilization was moderate regardless of the extent of disability or pain. Conclusion Increased disability and pain were associated with increased age, lower employment, higher reported bleed frequency, and lower HRQoL. PMID:26604708

  13. The value of usability testing for Internet-based adolescent self-management interventions: “Managing Hemophilia Online”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As adolescents with hemophilia approach adulthood, they are expected to assume responsibility for their disease management. A bilingual (English and French) Internet-based self-management program, “Teens Taking Charge: Managing Hemophilia Online,” was developed to support adolescents with hemophilia in this transition. This study explored the usability of the website and resulted in refinement of the prototype. Methods A purposive sample (n=18; age 13–18; mean age 15.5 years) was recruited from two tertiary care centers to assess the usability of the program in English and French. Qualitative observations using a “think aloud” usability testing method and semi-structured interviews were conducted in four iterative cycles, with changes to the prototype made as necessary following each cycle. This study was approved by research ethics boards at each site. Results Teens responded positively to the content and appearance of the website and felt that it was easy to navigate and understand. The multimedia components (videos, animations, quizzes) were felt to enrich the experience. Changes to the presentation of content and the website user-interface were made after the first, second and third cycles of testing in English. Cycle four did not result in any further changes. Conclusions Overall, teens found the website to be easy to use. Usability testing identified end-user concerns that informed improvements to the program. Usability testing is a crucial step in the development of Internet-based self-management programs to ensure information is delivered in a manner that is accessible and understood by users. PMID:24094082

  14. Directed engineering of a high-expression chimeric transgene as a strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B; Denning, Gabriela; Dooriss, Kerry; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kerstann, Keith W; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent

    2009-07-01

    Human coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is inefficiently biosynthesized in vitro and has proven difficult to express at therapeutic levels using available clinical gene-transfer technologies. Recently, we showed that a porcine and certain hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgenes demonstrate up to 100-fold greater expression than human fVIII. In this study, we extend these results to describe the use of a humanized, high-expression, hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgene that is 89% identical to human fVIII and was delivered by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia A. Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-based vectors encoding the fVIII chimera efficiently transduced human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells. Cells transduced with hybrid human/porcine fVIII encoding vectors expressed fVIII at levels 6- to 100-fold greater than cells transduced with vectors encoding human fVIII. Transplantation of transduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into hemophilia A mice resulted in long-term fVIII expression at therapeutic levels despite <5% genetically modified blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) -derived vector effectively transduced the human hematopoietic cell lines K562, EU1, U.937, and Jurkat as well as the nonhematopoietic cell lines, HEK-293T and HeLa. All cell lines expressed hybrid human/porcine fVIII, albeit at varying levels with the K562 cells expressing the highest level of the hematopoietic cell lines. From these studies, we conclude that humanized high-expression hybrid fVIII transgenes can be utilized in gene therapy applications for hemophilia A to significantly increase fVIII expression levels compared to what has been previously achieved.

  15. Factor VIII (F8) inversions in severe hemophilia A: Male germ cell origin and diagnosis with RT-PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Antonarakis, S.E. |; Rossiter, J.P.; Young, M.

    1994-09-01

    The Factor VIII (F8) gene, which is defective in hemophilia A, is located in the most telomeric megabase of Xq. Inversions due to intrachromosomal homologous recombination between mispaired copies of gene A located within intron 22 of the gene and about 500 kb telomeric to it account for nearly half of the cases of severe hemophilia A. We hypothesized that pairing of Xq with its homolog inhibits the inversion process, and that therefore the event originates predominantly in male germ cells. In all 21 informative cases in which the inversion originated in a maternal grandparent, DNA polymorphism analysis using markers within or very closely linked to F8, determined that it occurred in the male germline. In addition, all but one of 56 mothers of sporadic cases due to inversions were carriers. The data indicate that the F8 gene inversions leading to severe hemophilia A occur almost exclusively in male germ cells. The mean age of maternal grandfathers at the birth of their carrier daughters was 29.9 years (13 cases), i.e. not different from the mean paternal age in the general population, supporting the hypothesis that the inversions occur in meiosis. The inversions can be diagnosed by Southern blot analysis. For more rapid diagnosis we have used RT-PCR of RNA ectopically expressed in blood. Oligonucleotides were used to PCR amplify, after the initial RT reaction of RNA samples using random hexamers, either the normal transcript (F8 exons 21 to 24;312 bp product) or the novel abnormal transcript that is generated after the inversion. Both type 1 and 2 inversions can be recognized in affecteds and carriers by the presence of the diagnostic PcR product of 248 bp. Correct diagnoses were made in samples from 6 patients and 2 carriers with type 1 inversions, 2 patients and 2 carriers with type 2 inversions and 5 normal controls.

  16. Characterization of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Mediated Human Factor VIII Gene Therapy in Hemophilia A Mice.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Wang, Qiang; Reicherter, Amanda L; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Tipper, Christopher H; Clark, K Reed; Wadsworth, Samuel; Wang, Lili; Wilson, James M

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are promising vehicles for hemophilia gene therapy, with favorable clinical trial data seen in the treatment of hemophilia B. In an effort to optimize the expression of human coagulation factor VIII (hFVIII) for the treatment of hemophilia A, an extensive study was performed with numerous combinations of liver-specific promoter and enhancer elements with a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene. After generating 42 variants of three reduced-size promoters and three small enhancers, transgene cassettes were packaged within a single AAV capsid, AAVrh10, to eliminate performance differences due to the capsid type. Each hFVIII vector was administered to FVIII knockout (KO) mice at a dose of 10(10) genome copies (GC) per mouse. Criteria for distinguishing the performance of the different enhancer/promoter combinations were established prior to the initiation of the studies. These criteria included prominently the level of hFVIII activity (0.12-2.12 IU/mL) and the pattern of development of anti-hFVIII antibodies. In order to evaluate the impact of capsid on hFVIII expression and antibody formation, one of the enhancer and promoter combinations that exhibited high hFVIII immunogenicity was evaluated using AAV8, AAV9, AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1 capsids. The capsids subdivided into two groups: those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in ≤20% of mice (AAV8 and AAV9), and those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in >20% of mice (AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1). The results of this study, which entailed extensive vector optimization and in vivo testing, demonstrate the significant impact that transcriptional control elements and capsid can have on vector performance.

  17. Whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic risk variants underlying inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Marcin M; Blighe, Kevin; Lotta, Luca A; Pappalardo, Emanuela; Garagiola, Isabella; Mancini, Ilaria; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Santagostino, Elena; Peyvandi, Flora

    2016-06-09

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is the most problematic and costly complication of FVIII replacement therapy that affects up to 30% of previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A. The development of inhibitors is a multifactorial complication involving environmental and genetic factors. Among the latter, F8 gene mutations, ethnicity, family history of inhibitors, and polymorphisms affecting genes involved in the immune response have been previously investigated. To identify novel genetic elements underling the risk of inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A, we applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) and data analysis in a selected group of 26 Italian patients with (n = 17) and without (n = 9) inhibitors. WES revealed several rare, damaging variants in immunoregulatory genes as novel candidate mutations. A case-control association analysis using Cochran-Armitage and Fisher's exact statistical tests identified 1364 statistically significant variants. Hierarchical clustering of these genetic variants showed 2 distinct patterns of homozygous variants with a protective or harmful role in inhibitor development. When looking solely at coding variants, a total of 28 nonsynonymous variants were identified and replicated in 53 inhibitor-positive and 174 inhibitor-negative Italian severe hemophilia A patients using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The genotyping results revealed 10 variants showing estimated odds ratios in the same direction as in the discovery phase and confirmed the association of the rs3754689 missense variant (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.36-0.94; P = .028) in a highly conserved haplotype region surrounding the LCT locus on chromosome 2q21 with inhibitor development. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Directed Engineering of a High-expression Chimeric Transgene as a Strategy for Gene Therapy of Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B; Denning, Gabriela; Dooriss, Kerry; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kerstann, Keith W; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent

    2009-01-01

    Human coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is inefficiently biosynthesized in vitro and has proven difficult to express at therapeutic levels using available clinical gene-transfer technologies. Recently, we showed that a porcine and certain hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgenes demonstrate up to 100-fold greater expression than human fVIII. In this study, we extend these results to describe the use of a humanized, high-expression, hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgene that is 89% identical to human fVIII and was delivered by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia A. Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus–based vectors encoding the fVIII chimera efficiently transduced human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells. Cells transduced with hybrid human/porcine fVIII encoding vectors expressed fVIII at levels 6- to 100-fold greater than cells transduced with vectors encoding human fVIII. Transplantation of transduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into hemophilia A mice resulted in long-term fVIII expression at therapeutic levels despite <5% genetically modified blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) -derived vector effectively transduced the human hematopoietic cell lines K562, EU1, U.937, and Jurkat as well as the nonhematopoietic cell lines, HEK-293T and HeLa. All cell lines expressed hybrid human/porcine fVIII, albeit at varying levels with the K562 cells expressing the highest level of the hematopoietic cell lines. From these studies, we conclude that humanized high-expression hybrid fVIII transgenes can be utilized in gene therapy applications for hemophilia A to significantly increase fVIII expression levels compared to what has been previously achieved. PMID:19259064

  19. Altered collagen turnover in factor VIII-deficient rats with hemophilic arthropathy identifies potential novel serological biomarkers in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Manon-Jensen, T; Karsdal, M A; Nielsen, L N; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M; Vandahl, B; Olsen, E H N; Enoksson, M; Roepstorff, K

    2016-12-01

    Essentials Joint bleeding in hemophilia may induce significant remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Biomarkers of collagen turnover were investigated in a F8(-/-) rat model of hemophilic arthropathy. Biomarkers of cartilage degradation increased significantly during development of arthropathy. Basement membrane and interstitial matrix turnover changed significantly following hemarthrosis. Background Hemophilic arthropathy is a severe complication of hemophilia. It is caused by recurrent bleeding into joint cavities, which leads to synovial inflammation, fibrosis, cartilage degradation and bone remodeling. Extracellular matrix remodeling of affected tissues is a hallmark of these pathological processes. Objectives The aim of this study was to use serological biomarkers of collagen turnover to evaluate extracellular matrix remodeling in a factor VIII-deficient rat model of hemophilic arthropathy. Methods F8(-/-) rats and wild-type littermate controls were subjected to repeated knee bleeds induced by needle puncture on days 0 and 14. Development of arthropathy was confirmed by histology after termination on day 28. Serum samples were collected at baseline and throughout the study and analyzed for biomarkers of collagen turnover, including collagens of the basement membrane (type IV collagen), the interstitial matrix (collagen types III, V and VI) and cartilage (type II collagen). Results In F8(-/-) rats, induced knee bleeding and subsequent development of arthropathy caused significant alterations in collagen turnover, measured as changes in serological biomarkers of basement membrane turnover, interstitial matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. Biomarkers of type II collagen degradation correlated significantly with cartilage degradation and degree of arthropathy. Hemophilic rats had a 50% higher turnover of the basement membrane than wild-type littermates at baseline. Conclusions Joint bleeding and hemophilic arthropathy cause changes in turnover of

  20. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated coagulation factor IX prevents inhibitor formation and fatal anaphylaxis in hemophilia B mice

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Dheeraj; Moghimi, Babak; LoDuca, Paul A.; Singh, Harminder D.; Hoffman, Brad E.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2010-01-01

    To address complications of pathogenic antibody or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions in protein replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia or other inherited protein deficiencies, we have developed a prophylactic protocol using a murine hemophilia B model. Oral delivery of coagulation factor IX fused with cholera toxin β-subunit (with or without a furin cleavage site; CTB-FFIX or CTB-FIX), expressed in chloroplasts (up to 3.8% soluble protein or 0.4 mg/g leaf tissue), bioencapsulated in plant cells, effectively blocked formation of inhibitory antibodies (undetectable or up to 100-fold less than controls). Moreover, this treatment eliminated fatal anaphylactic reactions that occurred after four to six exposures to intravenous F.IX. Whereas only 20–25% of control animals survived after six to eight F.IX doses, 90–93% of F.IX-fed mice survived 12 injections without signs of allergy or anaphylaxis. Immunostaining confirmed delivery of F.IX to Peyer's patches in the ileum. Within 2–5 h, feeding of CTB-FFIX additionally resulted in systemic delivery of F.IX antigen. This high-responder strain of hemophilia B mice represents a new animal model to study anaphylactic reactions. The protocol was effective over a range of oral antigen doses (equivalent to 5–80 μg recombinant F.IX/kg), and controlled inhibitor formation and anaphylaxis long-term, up to 7 months (∼40% life span of this mouse strain). Oral antigen administration caused a deviant immune response that suppressed formation of IgE and inhibitory antibodies. This cost-effective and efficient approach of antigen delivery to the gut should be applicable to several genetic diseases that are prone to pathogenic antibody responses during treatment. PMID:20351275

  1. A genome-wide association study of resistance to HIV infection in highly exposed uninfected individuals with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; McLaren, Paul J.; Dorrell, Lucy; Shianna, Kevin V.; Stemke, Amanda; Pelak, Kimberly; Moore, Stephen; Oldenburg, Johannes; Alvarez-Roman, Maria Teresa; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Boehlen, Francoise; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H.B.; Brand, Brigit; Brown, Deborah; Chiang, Elaine; Cid-Haro, Ana Rosa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Collins, Peter; Colombo, Sara; Dalmau, Judith; Fogarty, Patrick; Giangrande, Paul; Gringeri, Alessandro; Iyer, Rathi; Katsarou, Olga; Kempton, Christine; Kuriakose, Philip; Lin, Judith; Makris, Mike; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Tsakiris, Dimitrios A.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Neff, Anne; Oka, Shinichi; Oyesiku, Lara; Parra, Rafael; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Powell, Jerry; Recht, Michael; Shapiro, Amy; Stine, Kimo; Talks, Katherine; Telenti, Amalio; Wilde, Jonathan; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Martinson, Jeremy; Hussain, Shehnaz K.; Bream, Jay H.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Carrington, Mary; Goedert, James J.; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Goldstein, David B.; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic variation contributes to differences in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To search for novel host resistance factors, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in hemophilia patients highly exposed to potentially contaminated factor VIII infusions. Individuals with hemophilia A and a documented history of factor VIII infusions before the introduction of viral inactivation procedures (1979–1984) were recruited from 36 hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and their genome-wide genetic variants were compared with those from matched HIV-infected individuals. Homozygous carriers of known CCR5 resistance mutations were excluded. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inferred copy number variants (CNVs) were tested using logistic regression. In addition, we performed a pathway enrichment analysis, a heritability analysis, and a search for epistatic interactions with CCR5 Δ32 heterozygosity. A total of 560 HIV-uninfected cases were recruited: 36 (6.4%) were homozygous for CCR5 Δ32 or m303. After quality control and SNP imputation, we tested 1 081 435 SNPs and 3686 CNVs for association with HIV-1 serostatus in 431 cases and 765 HIV-infected controls. No SNP or CNV reached genome-wide significance. The additional analyses did not reveal any strong genetic effect. Highly exposed, yet uninfected hemophiliacs form an ideal study group to investigate host resistance factors. Using a genome-wide approach, we did not detect any significant associations between SNPs and HIV-1 susceptibility, indicating that common genetic variants of major effect are unlikely to explain the observed resistance phenotype in this population. PMID:23372042

  2. Recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein for the prevention and treatment of bleeding in children with severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Young, G; Mahlangu, J; Kulkarni, R; Nolan, B; Liesner, R; Pasi, J; Barnes, C; Neelakantan, S; Gambino, G; Cristiano, L M; Pierce, G F; Allen, G

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic factor replacement, which prevents hemarthroses and thereby reduces the musculoskeletal disease burden in children with hemophilia A, requires frequent intravenous infusions (three to four times weekly). Kids A-LONG was a phase 3 open-label study evaluating the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of a longer-acting factor, recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc), in previously treated children with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII level of < 1 IU dL(-1) [< 1%]). The study enrolled 71 subjects. The starting rFVIIIFc regimen was twice-weekly prophylaxis (Day 1, 25 IU kg(-1) ; Day 4, 50 IU kg(-1) ); dose (≤ 80 IU kg(-1) ) and dosing interval (≥ 2 days) were adjusted as needed. A subset of subjects had sequential pharmacokinetic evaluations of FVIII and rFVIIIFc. The primary endpoint was development of inhibitors (neutralizing antibodies). Secondary endpoints included pharmacokinetics, annualized bleeding rate (ABR), and number of infusions required to control a bleed. No subject developed an inhibitor to rFVIIIFc. Adverse events were typical of a pediatric hemophilic population. The rFVIIIFc half-life was prolonged relative to that of FVIII, consistent with observations in adults and adolescents. The median ABR was 1.96 overall, and 0.00 for spontaneous bleeds; 46.4% of subjects reported no bleeding episodes on study. Ninety-three per cent of bleeding episodes were controlled with one to two infusions. The median average weekly rFVIIIFc prophylactic dose was 88.11 IU kg(-1) . At study end, 62 of 69 subjects (90%) were infusing twice weekly. Among subjects who had been previously receiving FVIII prophylaxis, 74% reduced their dosing frequency with rFVIIIFc. Twice-weekly infusions with rFVIIIFc were well tolerated and yielded low bleeding rates in children with severe hemophilia A. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society on Thrombosis and

  3. Improved coagulation and hemostasis in hemophilia with inhibitors by combinations of superFactor Va and Factor VIIa

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vikas; von Drygalski, Annette; Gale, Andrew J.; Griffin, John H.; Mosnier, Laurent O.

    2015-01-01

    Bypassing inhibitors in hemophilia patients is limited to activated (a) Factor(F)VII products. We introduced “FVa activity augmentation” as another bypassing strategy and studied effects of an engineered FVa variant designated superFVa. Procoagulant and clot stabilizing properties of superFVa and recombinant human (rh)FVIa, either alone or in combination, were studied in thrombin generation and clot lysis assays in normal human plasma (NHP) with or without anti-FVIII inhibitors, in hemophilia plasma, and in FVIII-deficient mice or in wild-type mice with anti-FVIII inhibitors. superFVa was as effective as rhFVIIa to improve thrombin generation or clot lysis. Furthermore, procoagulant effects were significantly enhanced when these compounds were combined. RhFVIIa at 40 nM (a therapeutic concentration) improved thrombin generation mildly, but markedly improved thrombin generation when combined with a low concentration (e.g., 3 nM) of superFVa. In clot lysis studies, the concentration of rhFVIIa to normalize clot lysis times could be reduced by 100-fold (e.g., from 40 nM to 0.4 nM) when combined with a low concentration (0.37 nM) of superFVa. In hemostasis studies of FVIII-deficient mice, blood loss was dose-dependently reduced by either superFVa or rhFVIIa. SuperFVa (200 U/kg) corrected mean blood loss indistinguishably from rhFVIII. Blood loss correction by rhFVIIa was greatly improved when combined with superFVa. Similar blood loss correction results were observed for therapies in wild-type mice after infusion with anti-FVIII inhibitors. Thus, superFVa may be an effective procoagulant agent in the setting of hemophilia with inhibitors and it merits further evaluation for new bypassing strategies. PMID:26466980

  4. Assessment of in vitro cytokine response in hemophilia A patients with or without factor VIII inhibitory antibody.

    PubMed

    Towfighi, Farzaneh; Gharagozlou, Soheila; Kardar, Gholam-Ali; Sharifian, Ramazan-Ali; Karimi, Katayoon; Lak, Manijheh; Pourfathollah, Ali-Akbar; Soleimani, Sedigheh; Shokri, Fazel

    2007-08-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor antibodies are produced in a proportion of hemophilia A patients. Development of anti-FVIII inhibitor antibodies is a T cell-dependent response, mediated by FVIII specific CD4(+) T cells. This study was performed to investigate the contribution of T helper (Th) cell-mediated cytokine response in inhibitor production. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from hemophilia A patients with (n = 14) or without inhibitor (n = 14) and from normal individuals (n = 14). Following stimulation of PBMCs with rFVIII and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) mitogen, the secreted cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), in culture supernatant and the proliferative response were assessed using sandwich ELISA and (3)H-thymidine incorporation, respectively. No significant proliferative response to FVIII was observed, whereas PHA induced a strong response in all groups. No cytokine secretion was observed in response to FVIII stimulation. Although PHA induced IL-10, TGF-beta1 and IFN-gamma secretion in all groups, the level of IFN-gamma was significantly lower in hemophilia A patients than in normal individuals (p < 0.0001). The levels of TGF-beta1 and IL-10 were similarly higher in patients compared with normal subjects, but the difference was not statistically significant. Lack of FVIII-induced proliferative response and cytokine production together with reduced secretion of PHA-induced IFN-gamma in both groups of patients suggest involvement of nonspecific immunosuppression possibly due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection observed in the majority of patients.

  5. Long-term course of anti-factor VIII antibody in patients with hemophilia A at a single center

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Chun; Choi, Yong Mook

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune tolerance induction (ITI) can reduce inhibitors against factor VIII concentrates by 70-80%. In this study, we elucidated the characteristics of inhibitors and attempted to determine the proper indications and timing for ITI. Methods Subjects included hemophilia A patients registered at the Korea Hemophilia Foundation from 1991 through 2014. Inhibitors were classified as persistent and transient. Patients were classified into groups according to peak inhibitor titer: low (<2 BU/mL), moderate (2 to <5 BU/mL), high (5 to <10 BU/mL), and very high titer (≥10 BU/mL). Results Overall, 350 (21.4%) of 1,634 hemophilia A patients developed inhibitors at least once. Of these, 100 (6.1%) and 250 (15.3%) patients developed persistent and transient inhibitors, respectively. For transient inhibitors, the median peak titer was 1.0 BU/mL, persistent for median of 11.0 months (10.0, 8.0, 13.0, and 19.0 months in the low, moderate, high, and very high titer transient inhibitor groups, respectively). Overall, 95.8% (215), 72.2% (17), 52.4% (21), and 21.7% (97) of patients in the low, moderate, high, and very high titer groups became inhibitor-negative spontaneously, without ITI. Conclusion Given the spontaneous disappearance of inhibitors and high cost of ITI, it is worthwhile to postpone ITI for 11 months unless the peak inhibitor titer is greater than 10 BU/mL. PMID:27104190

  6. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Factor VIII gene variants and inhibitor risk in African American hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Devi; Ettinger, Ruth A; Nakaya Fletcher, Shelley; James, Eddie A; Liu, Maochang; Barrett, John C; Withycombe, Janice; Matthews, Dana C; Epstein, Melinda S; Hughes, Richard J; Pratt, Kathleen P

    2015-08-13

    African American hemophilia A (HA) patients experience a higher incidence of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies ("inhibitors") vis-à-vis white patients. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene encoding FVIII-H484, FVIII-E1241, and FVIII-V2238 are more prevalent in African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that immune responses to these sites provoke inhibitors. Blood samples were obtained from 174 African American and 198 white HA subjects and their F8 gene sequences determined. Major histocompatibility complex class II binding and T-cell recognition of polymorphic sequences were evaluated using quantitative binding assays and HLA-DRB1 tetramers. Peptides corresponding to 4 common ns-SNPs showed limited binding to 11 HLA-DRB1 proteins. CD4 T cells from 22 subjects treated with FVIII products having sequences at residues FVIII-484, 1241, and 2238 differing from those of putative proteins encoded by their F8 genes did not show high-avidity tetramer binding, whereas positive-control staining of tetanus-specific CD4 T cells was routinely successful. African Americans with an intron-22 inversion mutation showed a 2-3 times-higher inhibitor incidence than whites with the same mutation (odds ratio = 2.3 [1.1-5.0, P = .04]), but this did not correlate with any of the ns-SNPs. We conclude that immune responses to "sequence-mismatched" FVIII products are unlikely to contribute appreciably to the inhibitor incidence in African Americans.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy in a hemophilia B model using a biosynthetic mRNA liver depot system

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, F; Guild, B; Karve, S; Smith, L; Love, K; Dorkin, J R; Kauffman, K J; Zhang, J; Yahalom, B; Anderson, D G; Heartlein, M W

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based gene therapy has considerable therapeutic potential, but the challenges associated with delivery continue to limit progress. Messenger RNA (mRNA) has the potential to provide for transient production of therapeutic proteins, without the need for nuclear delivery and without the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Here we describe the sustained delivery of therapeutic proteins in vivo in both rodents and non-human primates via nanoparticle-formulated mRNA. Nanoparticles formulated with lipids and lipid-like materials were developed for delivery of two separate mRNA transcripts encoding either human erythropoietin (hEPO) or factor IX (hFIX) protein. Dose-dependent protein production was observed for each mRNA construct. Upon delivery of hEPO mRNA in mice, serum EPO protein levels reached several orders of magnitude (>125 000-fold) over normal physiological values. Further, an increase in hematocrit (Hct) was established, demonstrating that the exogenous mRNA-derived protein maintained normal activity. The capacity of producing EPO in non-human primates via delivery of formulated mRNA was also demonstrated as elevated EPO protein levels were observed over a 72-h time course. Exemplifying the possible broad utility of mRNA drugs, therapeutically relevant amounts of human FIX (hFIX) protein were achieved upon a single intravenous dose of hFIX mRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles in mice. In addition, therapeutic value was established within a hemophilia B (FIX knockout (KO)) mouse model by demonstrating a marked reduction in Hct loss following injury (incision) to FIX KO mice. PMID:27356951

  9. Next generation FIX muteins with FVIII-independent activity for alternative treatment of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Quade-Lyssy, P; Abriss, D; Milanov, P; Ungerer, C; Königs, C; Seifried, E; Schüttrumpf, J

    2014-11-01

    FVIII neutralizing antibodies are the main complication of substitution therapy in hemophilia A (HA); auto-antibodies against FVIII causing acquired HA can also occur. Treatment of inhibitor patients remains challenging because prophylactic treatment with existing FVIII bypassing agents, all based on constitutively active coagulation factors, is difficult due to their short half-life. To generate zymogenic FIX variants with FVIII-independent activity for gene- and protein-based therapy for HA. Modifications were introduced into FIX based on current knowledge of FIX structure and FVIII-independent function followed by random screening. Activity, thrombin generation and FX activation by FIX mutants were characterized in the presence and absence of FVIII. Phenotype correction of promising candidates was assessed by the tail-clip assay in FVIII-knockout mice. About 1600 clones were screened and three mutations (L6F, S102N and E185D) identified, which improved FVIII-independent activity in combination with our previously described variant FIX-ITV. By systematic combination of all mutations, six FIX mutants with the desired bypassing activity were designed. Candidate mutants FIX-IDAV and FIX-FIAV demonstrated the most efficient thrombin generation in FVIII-deficient plasma and had considerably increased activities towards FX in the absence of FVIII, in that they showed an up to 5-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Expression of FIX-IDAV in FVIII knockout mice reduced blood loss after the tail-clip assay, even in the presence of neutralizing FVIII antibodies. Activatable bioengineered FIX molecules (as opposed to pre-activated coagulation factors) with FVIII-independent activity might be a promising tool for improving HA treatment, especially for patients with inhibitors. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. IMPACT OF HIV ON LIVER FIBROSIS IN MEN WITH HEPATITIS C INFECTION AND HEMOPHILIA

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Moore, Charity G.; Soadwa, Kakra; Nalesnik, Michael A.; Zajko, Albert B.; Cortese-Hassett, Andrea; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Hart, Suzanne; Zeevi, Adriana; Li, Jie; Shaikh, Obaid S.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major cause of liver disease in hemophilia. Few data exist on the proportion with liver fibrosis in this group after long-term HCV and HIV co-infection. Aim We conducted a cross-sectional multi-center study to determine impact of HIV on the prevalence and risk factors for fibrosis in hemophilic men with chronic hepatitis C. Methods Biopsies were independently scored by Ishak, Metavir, and Knodell systems. Variables were tested for associations with fibrosis by logistic regression and receiver operating curves (ROC). Results Of 220 biopsied HCV(+) men, 23.6% had Metavir ≥F3 fibrosis, with higher mean Metavir fibrosis scores among HIV/HCV co-infected than HCV mono-infected, 1.6 vs. 1.3 (p=0.044). Variables significantly associated with fibrosis included AST, ALT, APRI score (AST/ULN×100/platelet ×109/L), alpha-fetoprotein (all p<0.0001), platelets (p=0.0003), and ferritin (p=0.0008). In multiple logistic regression of serum markers, alpha-fetoprotein, APRI, and ALT were significantly associated with ≥ F3 fibrosis, AUROC=0.77 (95%CI 0.69, 0.86). Alpha-fetoprotein, APRI, and ferritin were significant in HIV(−), (AUROC 0.82 (95%CI 0.72, 0.92), and alpha-fetoprotein and platelets in HIV(+) (AUROC=0.77 (95%CI 0.65, 0.88). In a multivariable model of demographic and clinical variables, transformed (natural logarithm) of alpha-fetoprotein (p=0.0003), age (p=0.006), and HCV treatment (p=0.027) were significantly associated with fibrosis. Conclusion Nearly one-fourth of hemophilic men have Metavir ≥ 3 fibrosis. The odds for developing fibrosis are increased in those with elevated alpha-fetoprotein, increasing age, and past HCV treatment. PMID:20722744

  11. Phase 3 study of recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein in severe hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Powell, Jerry S.; Ragni, Margaret V.; Chowdary, Pratima; Josephson, Neil C.; Pabinger, Ingrid; Hanabusa, Hideji; Gupta, Naresh; Kulkarni, Roshni; Fogarty, Patrick; Perry, David; Shapiro, Amy; Pasi, K. John; Apte, Shashikant; Nestorov, Ivan; Jiang, Haiyan; Li, Shuanglian; Neelakantan, Srividya; Cristiano, Lynda M.; Goyal, Jaya; Sommer, Jurg M.; Dumont, Jennifer A.; Dodd, Nigel; Nugent, Karen; Vigliani, Gloria; Luk, Alvin; Brennan, Aoife

    2014-01-01

    This phase 3 pivotal study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of a recombinant FVIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) for prophylaxis, treatment of acute bleeding, and perioperative hemostatic control in 165 previously treated males aged ≥12 years with severe hemophilia A. The study had 3 treatment arms: arm 1, individualized prophylaxis (25-65 IU/kg every 3-5 days, n = 118); arm 2, weekly prophylaxis (65 IU/kg, n = 24); and arm 3, episodic treatment (10-50 IU/kg, n = 23). A subgroup compared recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) and rFVIIIFc pharmacokinetics. End points included annualized bleeding rate (ABR), inhibitor development, and adverse events. The terminal half-life of rFVIIIFc (19.0 hours) was extended 1.5-fold vs rFVIII (12.4 hours; P < .001). Median ABRs observed in arms 1, 2, and 3 were 1.6, 3.6, and 33.6, respectively. In arm 1, the median weekly dose was 77.9 IU/kg; approximately 30% of subjects achieved a 5-day dosing interval (last 3 months on study). Across arms, 87.3% of bleeding episodes resolved with 1 injection. Adverse events were consistent with those expected in this population; no subjects developed inhibitors. rFVIIIFc was well-tolerated, had a prolonged half-life compared with rFVIII, and resulted in low ABRs when dosed prophylactically 1 to 2 times per week. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01181128. PMID:24227821

  12. Transient blockade of the inducible costimulator pathway generates long-term tolerance to factor VIII after nonviral gene transfer into hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baowei; Ye, Peiqing; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rawlings, David J; Ochs, Hans D; Miao, Carol H

    2008-09-01

    Formation of inhibitory antibodies is a common problem encountered in clinical treatment for hemophilia. Human factor VIII (hFVIII) plasmid gene therapy in hemophilia A mice also leads to strong humoral responses. We demonstrate that short-term therapy with an anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody to transiently block the inducible costimulator/inducible costimulator ligand (ICOS/ICOSL) signaling pathway led to sustained tolerance to hFVIII in hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and allowed persistent, high-level FVIII functional activity (100%-300% of normal). Anti-ICOS treatment resulted in depletion of ICOS(+)CD4(+) T cells and activation of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes. CD4(+) T cells from anti-ICOS-treated mice did not proliferate in response to hFVIII stimulation and produced high levels of regulatory cytokines, including interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Moreover, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs from tolerized mice adoptively transferred dominant tolerance in syngeneic hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and reduced the production of antibodies against FVIII. Anti-ICOS-treated mice tolerized to hFVIII generated normal primary and secondary antibody responses after immunization with the T-dependent antigen, bacteriophage Phix 174, indicating maintenance of immune competency. Our data indicate that transient anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody treatment represents a novel single-agent immunomodulatory strategy to overcome the immune responses against transgene product after gene therapy.

  13. Early eradication of factor VIII inhibitor in patients with congenital hemophilia A by immune tolerance induction with a high dose of immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Yoko; Furue, Aya; Kagawa, Reiko; Chijimatsu, Ikue; Tomioka, Keita; Shimomura, Maiko; Imanaka, Yusuke; Nishimura, Shiho; Saito, Satoshi; Miki, Mizuka; Ono, Atsushi; Konishi, Nakao; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao

    2016-04-01

    The production of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibodies is a serious problem in patients with hemophilia A. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only strategy proven to eradicate persistent inhibitors and has been shown to be successful in 70 % of patients with hemophilia A. However, a minority of hemophilia patients present life-long inhibitors. To eliminate such inhibitors, we designed an intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) strategy in combination with high dose recombinant FVIII for ITI in hemophilia A children with inhibitors. Four previously untreated patients produced inhibitors within 16 exposures to FVIII. The peak inhibitor titers in these patients ranged from 3 to 14 BU/mL. The patients received ITI combined with IVIG within 1.5 months after the inhibitors were detected. All patients showed a negative titer for inhibitors by 28 days, with no anamnestic responses. The recovery of FVIII in the plasma concentration was normalized within three months after initiation of ITI. An additional course of IVIG administration led to induction of complete tolerance by 20 months after initiation of ITI therapy in all patients. ITI treatment with high-dose FVIII combined with IVIG may be effective for the early elimination of inhibitors.

  14. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Gene Delivery by AAV Virus Vectors Expressing Large Genomes in Hemophilia Mouse and Dog Models: A Strategy for Broad Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Paul E; Lothrop, Clinton D; Sun, Junjiang; Hirsch, Matthew L; Kafri, Tal; Kantor, Boris; Sarkar, Rita; Tillson, D Michael; Elia, Joseph R; Samulski, R Jude

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of genes that are larger than the wild-type adeno-associated virus (AAV) 4,681 nucleotide genome is inefficient using AAV vectors. We previously demonstrated in vitro that concurrent proteasome inhibitor (PI) treatment improves transduction by AAV vectors encoding oversized transgenes. In this study, an AAV vector with a 5.6 kilobase (kb) factor VIII expression cassette was used to test the effect of an US Food and Drug Administration–approved PI (bortezomib) treatment concurrent with vector delivery in vivo. Intrahepatic vector delivery resulted in factor VIII expression that persisted for >1 year in hemophilia mice. Single-dose bortezomib given with AAV2 or AAV8 factor VIII vector enhanced expression on average ~600 and ~300%, respectively. Moreover, coadministration of AAV8.canineFVIII (1 × 1013 vg/kg) and bortezomib in hemophilia A dogs (n = 4) resulted in normalization of the whole blood clotting time (WBCT) and 90% reduction in hemorrhages for >32 months compared to untreated hemophilia A dogs (n = 3) or dogs administered vector alone (n = 3). Demonstration of long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A dogs with combination adjuvant bortezomib and AAV vector expressing the oversized transgene establishes preclinical studies that support testing in humans and provides a working paradigm to facilitate a significant expansion of therapeutic targets for human gene therapy. PMID:20700109

  15. Safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of rVIII-SingleChain in children with severe hemophilia A: results of a multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stasyshyn, O; Djambas Khayat, C; Iosava, G; Ong, J; Abdul Karim, F; Fischer, K; Veldman, A; Blackman, N; St Ledger, K; Pabinger, I

    2017-04-01

    Essentials rVIII-SingleChain is a novel recombinant factor VIII with covalently bonded heavy and light chains. Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics were studied in pediatric patients with severe hemophilia A. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00. rVIII-SingleChain showed excellent hemostatic efficacy and a favorable safety profile.

  16. Prevalence of IVS10nt-18G/A in Calabrian patients with moderate/mild hemophilia A and relation with Factor VIII inhibitor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Prejanò, Simona; Santoro, Rita C; Iannaccaro, Piergiorgio

    2015-10-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by widespread mutations in the factor VIII gene. In the course of a screening to research some hemophilia A mutations, our team has identified and posted a previously unreported nucleotide change in intron 10 in 20 patients with hemophilia A. We tried to identify a possible blood relationship between the people with this mutation, performing a backwards study of every family tree. First, we interviewed the patients and, if possible, parents and grandparents. When direct memory was no longer available, we consulted Registries of Births, Marriages and Deaths, and if these data were not sufficient, going backwards in time, we consulted registries of parish churches where newborns were baptized. The studied mutation was present in 33 hemophilic patients living in Calabria, 28 of them related. Three patients, carriers of this mutation, developed an FVIII inhibitor. In all the cases, the inhibitor development followed intensive treatments, after many days of exposure. Our study displayed the presence of a responsible moderate hemophilia A mutation, limited apparently to our country, probably because of a single ancestral event, and connected with FVIII inhibitor development.

  17. Anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody ACE910 prevents joint bleeds in a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihashi, Kazutaka; Takeda, Minako; Kitazawa, Takehisa; Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Igawa, Tomoyuki; Sampei, Zenjiro; Kuramochi, Taichi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Haraya, Kenta; Adachi, Kenji; Kawabe, Yoshiki; Nogami, Keiji; Shima, Midori; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    ACE910 is a humanized anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody mimicking the function of factor VIII (FVIII). We previously demonstrated in nonhuman primates that a single IV dose of ACE910 exerted hemostatic activity against hemophilic bleeds artificially induced in muscles and subcutis, and that a subcutaneous (SC) dose of ACE910 showed a 3-week half-life and nearly 100% bioavailability, offering support for effective prophylaxis for hemophilia A by user-friendly SC dosing. However, there was no direct evidence that such SC dosing of ACE910 would prevent spontaneous bleeds occurring in daily life. In this study, we newly established a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A by multiple IV injections of an anti-primate FVIII neutralizing antibody engineered in mouse-monkey chimeric form to reduce its antigenicity. The monkeys in the control group exhibited various spontaneous bleeding symptoms as well as continuous prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time; notably, all exhibited joint bleeds, which are a hallmark of hemophilia. Weekly SC doses of ACE910 (initial 3.97 mg/kg followed by 1 mg/kg) significantly prevented these bleeding symptoms; notably, no joint bleeding symptoms were observed. ACE910 is expected to prevent spontaneous bleeds and joint damage in hemophilia A patients even with weekly SC dosing, although appropriate clinical investigation is required. PMID:25274508

  18. Anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody ACE910 prevents joint bleeds in a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Muto, Atsushi; Yoshihashi, Kazutaka; Takeda, Minako; Kitazawa, Takehisa; Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Igawa, Tomoyuki; Sampei, Zenjiro; Kuramochi, Taichi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Haraya, Kenta; Adachi, Kenji; Kawabe, Yoshiki; Nogami, Keiji; Shima, Midori; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2014-11-13

    ACE910 is a humanized anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody mimicking the function of factor VIII (FVIII). We previously demonstrated in nonhuman primates that a single IV dose of ACE910 exerted hemostatic activity against hemophilic bleeds artificially induced in muscles and subcutis, and that a subcutaneous (SC) dose of ACE910 showed a 3-week half-life and nearly 100% bioavailability, offering support for effective prophylaxis for hemophilia A by user-friendly SC dosing. However, there was no direct evidence that such SC dosing of ACE910 would prevent spontaneous bleeds occurring in daily life. In this study, we newly established a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A by multiple IV injections of an anti-primate FVIII neutralizing antibody engineered in mouse-monkey chimeric form to reduce its antigenicity. The monkeys in the control group exhibited various spontaneous bleeding symptoms as well as continuous prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time; notably, all exhibited joint bleeds, which are a hallmark of hemophilia. Weekly SC doses of ACE910 (initial 3.97 mg/kg followed by 1 mg/kg) significantly prevented these bleeding symptoms; notably, no joint bleeding symptoms were observed. ACE910 is expected to prevent spontaneous bleeds and joint damage in hemophilia A patients even with weekly SC dosing, although appropriate clinical investigation is required.

  19. Acquired hemophilia in the patient suffering from rheumatoid arthritis: case report.

    PubMed

    Drobiecki, Arkadiusz; Pasiarski, Marcin; Hus, Iwona; Sokołowska, Bożena; Wątek, Marzena

    2013-12-01

    Acquired hemophilia is a severe bleeding diathesis caused by autoantibodies against a coagulation factor VIII (FVIII inhibitor). Massive bleeding diathesis, often life threatening are observed in almost 90% of patients. In 50-60% of cases, inhibitor emerges spontaneously. However, there are some conditions like pregnancy, puerperium, autoimmune disorders or cancers that seem to induce acquired hemophilia. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for several years, who was diagnosed with acquired hemophilia in September 2011. The patient had been treated by steroids and leflunomide during the last few months. At the time of diagnosis, diffuse bruising of the forearms and the trunk was observed. The patient was treated with recombinant activated factor VII, and the first-line immunosuppressive therapy was introduced (cyclophosphamide and prednisone). We observed the elimination of symptoms and the disappearance of diathesis. Significant reduction of the titer of inhibitor was achieved, but only partial remission was obtained. It lasted until the beginning of December 2011, when the titer of the inhibitor increased again and massive bleeding to the left lower limb occurred. It was necessary to administer recombinant factor VIIa together with the second-line immunosuppressive therapy based on the Budapest protocol. The rapid reduction of the diathesis and improvement of the patient's general condition was achieved as previously. However, still there was no complete remission. After 2 weeks of treatment, the titer of inhibitor diminished, and factor VIII activity increased slightly. Because of RA, the patient was treated with methylprednisolone in maintenance doses during the next few weeks. Unfortunately, after over a month, the increase of inhibitor titer and the decrease of FVIII level were observed again. Some bruises appeared. It was necessary to increase doses of corticosteroids to therapeutic levels and add cyclophosphamide

  20. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.A.M.; Deugau, K.V.; Lillicrap, D.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which {gt}95% are single nulceotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. The authors used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. The study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male.

  1. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  2. Identification of deletion carriers in hemophilia B: quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction or multiple ligation probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Casaña, Pilar; Haya, Saturnino; Cid, Ana R; Oltra, Silvestre; Martínez, Francisco; Cabrera, Noelia; Aznar, José A

    2009-03-01

    Gross deletions in the F9 gene are easily detected by routinely sequencing hemophilia B-affected men. Nevertheless, a carrier diagnosis proves difficult as the presence of a normal allele does not recognize the partial or complete loss of the F9 gene and may be challenging if no DNA sample from affected men is available. This work aimed to identify hemophilia carriers in 2 families in which gross deletions of the F9 gene could be expected. The indirect genetic study was not conclusive, and sequencing did not show genetic defects in family 1. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay using SYBR Green revealed the deletion of a copy of exon 8 in 3 women, whereas the multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay showed the deletion of a copy of exons 7 and 8 in these 3 women. These studies enabled us not only to rule out a pregnant woman as a carrier but also to confirm a complete deletion of the gene in the patient from family 2 and the heterozygous state of his mother. The advantages that the MLPA method offers are the identification of a multiple exon deletion in the same assay and commonly used technology. The RT-PCR technology used involves standardizing and analyzing each exon independently.

  3. Thrombin generation and whole blood viscoelastic assays in the management of hemophilia: current state of art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Young, Guy; Sørensen, Benny; Dargaud, Yesim; Negrier, Claude; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Key, Nigel S

    2013-03-14

    Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that afflicts about 1 in 5000 males. Treatment relies upon replacement of the deficient factor, and response to treatment both in clinical research and practice is based upon subjective parameters such as pain and joint mobility. Existing laboratory assays quantify the amount of factor in plasma, which is useful diagnostically and prognostically. However, these assays are limited in their ability to fully evaluate the patient's clot-forming capability. Newer assays, known as global assays, provide a far more detailed view of thrombin generation and clot formation and have been studied in hemophilia for about 10 years. They have the potential to offer a more objective measure of both the hemophilic phenotype as well as the response to treatment. In particular, in patients who develop inhibitors to deficient clotting factors and in whom bypassing agents are required for hemostasis, these assays offer the opportunity to determine the laboratory response to these interventions where traditional coagulation assays cannot. In this article we review the existing literature and discuss several controversial issues surrounding the assays. Last, a vision of future clinical uses of these assays is briefly described.

  4. Access to dental care for people with bleeding disorders: survey results of hemophilia treatment centers in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Rebecca; Duong, Mai-Ly; Wachter, Benjamin; Arana, Erika; Frances, Denise

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this project was to gather data and identify factors affecting access to dental care for people with bleeding disorders in the U.S. The Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health and the National Hemophilia Foundation conducted a joint survey. The survey was completed by 102 of the 147 hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs) in the U.S. This represents 69% of the HTCs in the country. Each HTC provided specific information concerning the dental services and education provided for patients. Survey results revealed inconsistent levels of oral health services available to patients. Major factors limiting access to care include finances, patient anxiety with respect to dental treatment and a lack of providers with the skills to treat this population. Improvement in oral health for persons with bleeding disorders requires appropriate education for providers, patients and families. Additionally, both public and private health funding must be re-evaluated as it relates to people with bleeding disorders. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Long-term correction of hemophilia A mice following lentiviral mediated delivery of an optimized canine factor VIII gene.

    PubMed

    Staber, J M; Pollpeter, M J; Anderson, C-G; Burrascano, M; Cooney, A L; Sinn, P L; Rutkowski, D T; Raschke, W C; McCray, P B

    2017-09-14

    Current therapies for hemophilia A include frequent prophylactic or on-demand intravenous factor treatments which are costly, inconvenient and may lead to inhibitor formation. Viral vector delivery of factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has the potential to alleviate the debilitating clotting defects. Lentiviral-based vectors delivered to murine models of hemophilia A mediate phenotypic correction. However, a limitation of lentiviral-mediated FVIII delivery is inefficient transduction of target cells. Here, we engineer a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) -based lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoprotein to mediate efficient gene transfer to mouse hepatocytes. In anticipation of future studies in FVIII-deficient dogs, we investigated the efficacy of FIV-delivered canine FVIII (cFVIII). Codon-optimization of the cFVIII sequence increased activity and decreased blood loss as compared to the native sequence. Further, we compared a standard B-domain deleted FVIII cDNA to a cDNA including 256 amino acids of the B-domain with 11 potential asparagine-linked oligosaccharide linkages. Restoring a partial B-domain resulted in modest reduction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers. Importantly, our optimized vectors achieved wild-type levels of phenotypic correction with minimal inhibitor formation. These studies provide insights into optimal design of a therapeutically relevant gene therapy vector for a devastating bleeding disorder.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 14 September 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.67.

  6. [Chemistry approach for therapeutic education of children with hemophilia and their parents: Representation of complex phenomena related to treatment].

    PubMed

    Novais, T; Meunier, S; Trossaërt, M; Salmon, D; Chamouard, V

    2016-08-01

    The therapeutic management of hemophilia is based on replacement therapy by clotting factor concentrates and may require several injections per week. In teenagers, non-compliance with treatment may be responsible for major orthopedic complications. The aim of this study was to develop and assess an educational intervention for children with hemophilia and their parents, thus illustrating the complex phenomena related to treatment and its adhesion. The construction of the educational workshop and tools was based on the concrete, visual, and playful representation of the following concepts: pathophysiology, the replacement therapy's mechanism of action, drug elimination requiring repeated administrations, and inhibitor development. The procedure was then assessed by a sample of children and parents using a questionnaire. A 60- to 90-min workshop was developed. The different tools used to illustrate the severity of the disease, the effect of the injected drug, drug elimination, and the inhibitor effect were: a blue-to-transparent colorimetric scale in bottles, a weekly timeline, Muppets, and a slow redox reaction. Five children and eight parents assessed this educational intervention with a rating of 3.75/4 (±0.10) and 3.60/4 (±0.45), respectively. The intervention developed could be transposed to other chronic diseases with similar therapeutic characteristics (including replacement mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics). Understanding the transmitted pharmacological concepts in a playful way is a major challenge to encourage treatment adhesion during adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku )

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  8. Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) fusion protein reduces immunogenicity and induces tolerance in hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Liu, Tongyao; Drager, Douglas; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Chhabra, Ekta Seth; Peters, Robert; Josephson, Neil; Lillicrap, David; Blumberg, Richard S.; Pierce, Glenn F.; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies is a major complication of FVIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A. We investigated the immune response to recombinant human factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) in comparison to BDD-rFVIII and full-length rFVIII (FL-rFVIII) in hemophilia A mice. Repeated administration of therapeutically relevant doses of rFVIIIFc in these mice resulted in significantly lower antibody responses to rFVIII compared to BDD-rFVIII and FL-rFVIII and reduced antibody production upon subsequent challenge with high doses of rFVIIIFc. The induction of a tolerogenic response by rFVIIIFc was associated with higher percentage of regulatory T-cells, a lower percentage of pro-inflammatory splenic T-cells, and up-regulation of tolerogenic cytokines and markers. Disruption of Fc interactions with either FcRn or Fcγ receptors diminished tolerance induction, suggesting the involvement of these pathways. These results indicate that rFVIIIFc reduces immunogenicity and imparts tolerance to rFVIII demonstrating that recombinant therapeutic proteins may be modified to influence immunogenicity and facilitate tolerance. PMID:26775174

  9. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs.

  10. Partial correction of a severe molecular defect in hemophilia A, because of errors during expression of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Inaba, Hiroshi

    1997-03-01

    Although the molecular defect in patients in a Japanese family with mild to moderately severe hemophilia A was a deletion of a single nucleotide T within an A{sub 8}TA{sub 2} sequence of exon 14 of the factor VIII gene, the severity of the clinical phenotype did not correspond to that expected of a frameshift mutation. A small amount of functional factor VIII protein was detected in the patient`s plasma. Analysis of DNA and RNA molecules from normal and affected individuals and in vitro transcription/translation suggested a partial correction of the molecular defect, because of the following: (i) DNA replication/RNA transcription errors resulting in restoration of the reading frame and/or (ii) {open_quotes}ribosomal frameshifting{close_quotes} resulting in the production of normal factor VIII polypeptide and, thus, in a milder than expected hemophilia A. All of these mechanisms probably were promoted by the longer run of adenines, A{sub 10} instead of A{sub 8}TA{sub 2}, after the delT. Errors in the complex steps of gene expression therefore may partially correct a severe frameshift defect and ameliorate an expected severe phenotype. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Prolonged activity of a recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein in hemophilia A mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Jennifer A.; Liu, Tongyao; Low, Susan C.; Zhang, Xin; Kamphaus, George; Sakorafas, Paul; Fraley, Cara; Drager, Douglas; Reidy, Thomas; McCue, Justin; Franck, Helen W. G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite proven benefits, prophylactic treatment for hemophilia A is hampered by the short half-life of factor VIII. A recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) was constructed to determine the potential for reduced frequency of dosing. rFVIIIFc has an ∼ 2-fold longer half-life than rFVIII in hemophilia A (HemA) mice and dogs. The extension of rFVIIIFc half-life requires interaction of Fc with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). In FcRn knockout mice, the extension of rFVIIIFc half-life is abrogated, and is restored in human FcRn transgenic mice. The Fc fusion has no impact on FVIII-specific activity. rFVIIIFc has comparable acute efficacy as rFVIII in treating tail clip injury in HemA mice, and fully corrects whole blood clotting time (WBCT) in HemA dogs immediately after dosing. Furthermore, consistent with prolonged half-life, rFVIIIFc shows 2-fold longer prophylactic efficacy in protecting HemA mice from tail vein transection bleeding induced 24-48 hours after dosing. In HemA dogs, rFVIIIFc also sustains partial correction of WBCT 1.5- to 2-fold longer than rFVIII. rFVIIIFc was well tolerated in both species. Thus, the rescue of FVIII by Fc fusion to provide prolonged protection presents a novel pathway for FVIII catabolism, and warrants further investigation. PMID:22246033

  12. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H.; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (~1mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ~2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP+ regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ~870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft2 per annum yielding 24,000–36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. PMID:26302233

  13. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-factor VIII immunity.

    PubMed

    Kuether, E L; Schroeder, J A; Fahs, S A; Cooley, B C; Chen, Y; Montgomery, R R; Wilcox, D A; Shi, Q

    2012-08-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous factor VIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful in treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Platelet FVIII expression in preimmunized FVIII(null) mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined with a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated with real-time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured with the Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytically induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed with linear amplification-mediated PCR. Therapeutic levels of platelet FVIII expression were sustained in the long term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced preimmunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in preimmunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in mice with hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.