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Sample records for hemophilia

  1. Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Hemophilia A; Classic hemophilia; Factor VIII deficiency; Hemophilia B; Christmas disease; Factor IX deficiency ... missing or aren't functioning like they should. Hemophilia is caused by the lack of clotting factor ...

  2. Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Hemophilia is a rare disorder in which the blood does not clot normally. It is usually inherited. Hemophilia usually occurs in males. If you have hemophilia, you have little or no clotting factor. Clotting ...

  3. [Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián; Vargas-Ruiz, Angel Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is a genetic disease in which the clinical manifestation is mainly the presence of hemorrhage. There are two known types of hemophilia: hemophilia A and B, which have a deficiency of factor VIII or IX clotting, respectively. The intensity of bleeding in hemophilia depends on the plasma levels of factor VIII or IX and has traditionally been classified as mild (> 5 % activity), moderate (1-5 % activity) and severe (< 1 % activity). In laboratory tests, isolated prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) can be found, but it is necessary to determine the plasma levels of factor VIII or IX to establish the diagnosis of hemophilia A or B. The treating of this disease involves replacing exogenous factor VIII or IX concentrates. Gene therapy could be an option in the future to achieve the cure of the disease. Complications of hemophilia are the risk of transfusion-associated infections, pseudotumor hemophilic, hemophilic arthropathy and the presence of serum inhibitors.

  4. Hemophilia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hemophilia ... The following organizations provide further information on hemophilia : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemophilia/index.html National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ ...

  5. Hemophilia A

    MedlinePlus

    Factor VIII deficiency; Classic hemophilia; Bleeding disorder - hemophilia A ... When you bleed, a series of reactions take place in the body that helps blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation ...

  6. Hemophilia B

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemophilia B, and you plan to have children; genetic counseling is available ... Genetic counseling may be recommended. Testing can identify women and girls who carry the hemophilia gene. Testing can ...

  7. Hemophilia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  8. Hemophilia Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  9. [Hemophilia camps.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits.

  10. [Hemophilia camps.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits. PMID:24290020

  11. Frequently Asked Questions: Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting factor deficiencies , and inherited platelet disorders . How serious is hemophilia? The severity of hemophilia depends on ... Pictures Young Voices Compendium of Assessment Tools Educational Games Video Library Find a Treatment Centre Haemophilia Journal ...

  12. Hemophilia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... very common, mostly affects guys. In rare cases, girls can have the disease and get bleeding problems ... have a 50% chance of having hemophilia. Although girls rarely develop the symptoms of hemophilia itself, they ...

  13. Comprehensive care in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Hemophilia is a chronic and inherited X-linked bleeding disorder that requires life-long medical care. Hemophilia treatment is costly and complex partly because of the cost of the factor concentrates used in replacement therapy. However, the management of hemophilia is not based solely on achieving access to better treatment with safe factor concentrates; it also includes accurately diagnosing the disorder and providing specialized comprehensive care by a multidisciplinary team of specialists trained in hemophilia management. Comprehensive care for the person with hemophilia is defined as the continuous supervision of all medical and psychological aspects affecting the patient and his family and it demands the establishment of specialized centers, called Hemophilia Treatment Centers. The services that should be offered by a comprehensive hemophilia healthcare center are diverse and the multidisciplinary team should be coordinated preferably by a hematologist with the participation of other health professionals. It has been demonstrated that the benefits of establishing hemophilia centers are observed even in developing countries and that changes can be achieved when resources are re-organized, especially when education and training are provided at all levels. To reach these objectives, it is essential to have the participation of the patient and family members, and to strive to obtain the financial and legislative support from the State or Government in order to achieve a national comprehensive care program contemplating all the aspects needed for improving the quality of life for the community of patients with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders.

  14. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  15. Bleeding diathesis and hemophilias.

    PubMed

    Amin, Chirag; Sharathkumar, Anjali; Griest, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hemophilia and other congenital bleeding disorders are at risk for development of central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage and can present with acute or chronic neurologic symptoms. These disorders are generally caused by qualitative or quantitative deficiency of components of hemostasis such as coagulation proteins, von Willebrand factor, or platelets. Rapid diagnosis and specific medical management such as coagulation factor replacement therapy are mandatory to minimize the morbidity and mortality of CNS bleeding. Therefore, the objective of this chapter is to introduce neurologists to the physiology of hemostasis and to provide an overview of the clinical presentation, and management of inherited bleeding disorders that can potentially present with CNS bleeding. Since hemophilia is the most common bleeding disorder encountered in clinical practice, more emphasis is placed on management of hemophilia. Additionally, neurologic manifestations related to the bleeding diathesis in patients with hemophilia are elaborated. PMID:24365370

  16. How Is Hemophilia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... Treating donated blood products with a detergent and heat to destroy viruses Vaccinating people who have hemophilia ...

  17. Hemophilia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat. There is also a medicine called recombinant factor VII that can help prevent the body ... treating children with hemophilia. For example, when giving immunization shots that are normally given in the muscle, ...

  18. Hemophilia Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  19. Understanding Hemophilia. Implications for the Physical Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes hemophilia and ways to provide appropriate physical education experiences to children with hemophilia. The article focuses on what hemophilia is, how to treat hemophilia, benefits of physical activity, how to teach children with hemophilia, choosing and modifying sports and activities, and safety and emergency situations. (SM)

  20. Eloctate for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    2015-10-12

    Eloctate, a recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein with an extended half-life, was effective in preventing and controlling bleeding in patients with severe hemophilia A. Compared to other currently available factor VIII products, Eloctate's extended half-life reduces the number of doses required for routine prophylaxis, which could improve adherence. Eloctate has not been associated with formation of neutralizing antibodies, but it was not studied in previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A, who have a higher risk of this complication. Like other recombinant factor VIII products, Eloctate is very expensive.

  1. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  2. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  3. Discrepant ratios of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A as compared with hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Bertozzi, Irene; de Marinis, Giulia Berti; Tasinato, Valentina; Sambado, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of thrombosis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders represents an exceptional event. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B patients have been showed to present both arterial and venous thrombosis (85 cases of arterial thrombosis and 34 cases of venous thrombosis). The great majority of arterial thrombosis are myocardial infarction or other acute coronary syndromes, whereas the majority of venous thrombosis are deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolisms. However there are discrepancies in the proportion of arterial and venous thrombosis seen in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B. The ratio of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A is 3.72 whereas that for hemophilia B is 1.12. This indicates that arterial thrombosis is more frequent in hemophilia A as compared to hemophilia B and the opposite is true for venous thrombosis. The potential significance of this discrepancy is discussed.

  4. Epidemiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shrimati; Sharma, Nitika; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of increasing mortality in elderly hemophilia population. Majority of the patients treated with virus non-inactivated factor concentrates prepared from large plasma pools prior to 1985 have been found to be infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), a major risk factor for HCC. A PubMed search of articles published until February 2015 was performed utilizing the keywords hemophilia, malignancy, neoplasm, cancer, mortality, ageing hemophilia, epidemiology, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cancer and the relevant articles were included. Contradictory reports are available in literature on the incidence of cancers in general in hemophilia population. Almost all the studies where the incidence of HCC or mortality due to HCC have been analyzed in hemophilia population show that a vast majority of these patients are HCV infected. The incidence of HCC though higher in hemophilic population is related to the higher incidence of HCV infection and not due to the hemophilia phenotype.

  5. Hemophilia A in the third millennium.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-07-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked hereditary bleeding disorder due to the deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). According to the degree of FVIII deficiency, mild, moderate or severe forms are recognized. Although patients with mild hemophilia A usually bleed excessively only after trauma or surgery, those with severe hemophilia experience frequent episodes of spontaneous or excessive bleeding after minor trauma, particularly into joints and muscles. The modern management of hemophilia began in the 1970s and is actually based upon several plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII products. In addition, the synthetic drug desmopressin can be used to prevent or treat bleeding episodes in patients with mild hemophilia A. Long-term and continuous substitution therapy (prophylaxis), the recommended treatment in severe hemophilia, prevents bleeding and the resultant joint damage. In the last twenty years the high standard of hemophilia care has greatly improved the quality of life of patients and their life expectancy has reached that of the non-hemophilic male population, at least in high-income countries. The most serious and challenging complication of treatment of hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors, which renders FVIII concentrate infusion ineffective and exposes patients to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the actual knowledge on the clinical features and management of patients with hemophilia A is summarized.

  6. Clinical, instrumental, serological and histological findings suggest that hemophilia B may be less severe than hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Linari, Silvia; Manetti, Mirko; Romano, Eloisa; Sofi, Francesco; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patients with severe hemophilia B may have a less severe disease compared to severe hemophilia A. To investigate clinical, radiological, laboratory and histological differences in the arthropathy of severe hemophilia A and hemophilia B, 70 patients with hemophilia A and 35 with hemophilia B with at least one joint bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Joint bleedings (<10, 10–50, >50), regimen of treatment (prophylaxis/on demand), World Federation of Hemophilia, Pettersson and ultrasound scores, serum soluble RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin were assessed in all patients. RANK, RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin expression was evaluated in synovial tissue from 18 hemophilia A and 4 hemophilia B patients. The percentage of patients with either 10–50 or more than 50 hemarthrosis was greater in hemophilia A than in hemophilia B (P<0.001 and P=0.03, respectively), while that with less than 10 hemarthrosis was higher in hemophilia B (P<0.0001). World Federation of Hemophilia (36.6 vs. 20.2; P<0.0001) and ultrasound (10.9 vs. 4.3; P<0.0001) score mean values were significantly higher in hemophilia A patients. Serum osteoprotegerin and soluble RANK ligand were decreased in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B (P<0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively). Osteoprotegerin expression was markedly reduced in synovial tissue from hemophilia A patients. In conclusion, the reduced number of hemarthrosis, the lower World Federation of Hemophilia and ultrasound scores, and higher osteoprotegerin expression in serum and synovial tissue in hemophilia B suggest that hemophilia B is a less severe disease than hemophilia A. Osteoprotegerin reduction seems to play a pivotal role in the progression of arthropathy in hemophilia A. PMID:26494839

  7. Clinical, instrumental, serological and histological findings suggest that hemophilia B may be less severe than hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Linari, Silvia; Manetti, Mirko; Romano, Eloisa; Sofi, Francesco; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patients with severe hemophilia B may have a less severe disease compared to severe hemophilia A. To investigate clinical, radiological, laboratory and histological differences in the arthropathy of severe hemophilia A and hemophilia B, 70 patients with hemophilia A and 35 with hemophilia B with at least one joint bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Joint bleedings (<10, 10-50, >50), regimen of treatment (prophylaxis/on demand), World Federation of Hemophilia, Pettersson and ultrasound scores, serum soluble RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin were assessed in all patients. RANK, RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin expression was evaluated in synovial tissue from 18 hemophilia A and 4 hemophilia B patients. The percentage of patients with either 10-50 or more than 50 hemarthrosis was greater in hemophilia A than in hemophilia B (P<0.001 and P=0.03, respectively), while that with less than 10 hemarthrosis was higher in hemophilia B (P<0.0001). World Federation of Hemophilia (36.6 vs. 20.2; P<0.0001) and ultrasound (10.9 vs. 4.3; P<0.0001) score mean values were significantly higher in hemophilia A patients. Serum osteoprotegerin and soluble RANK ligand were decreased in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B (P<0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively). Osteoprotegerin expression was markedly reduced in synovial tissue from hemophilia A patients. In conclusion, the reduced number of hemarthrosis, the lower World Federation of Hemophilia and ultrasound scores, and higher osteoprotegerin expression in serum and synovial tissue in hemophilia B suggest that hemophilia B is a less severe disease than hemophilia A. Osteoprotegerin reduction seems to play a pivotal role in the progression of arthropathy in hemophilia A.

  8. Hemophilia in the managed care setting.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Dan R

    2015-03-01

    Hemophilia A and B are chronic inherited bleeding disorders that together rank as one of the most expensive chronic diseases in the United States. Factor replacement products, which are the mainstay of treatment, are among the most expensive therapies, with a total annual cost of more than $250,000 per adult patient in the United States. Indirect costs also contribute to the economic burden and include lost productivity, caregivers' unpaid costs, and hemophiliarelated disability. Advances in hemophilia care have resulted in longer survival and a growing patient population, greater complexity in management of the disorder, and rising treatment costs. The establishment of federally recognized Hemophilia Treatment Centers has decreased costs and improved patient outcomes and quality of life by promoting outpatient, preventive, and homebased care. Successful collaboration among providers and managed care programs can improve outcomes and decrease costs for the delivery of hemophilia services.

  9. The management of musculoskeletal problems in hemophilia. Part I. Principles of medical management of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    McMillan, C W; Greene, W B; Blatt, P M; White, G C; Roberts, H R

    1983-01-01

    Musculoskeletal bleeding in general and arthropathy in particular are the central problems among many in the two major forms of hemophilia: classic hemophilia, caused by factor VIII deficiency, and Christmas disease, caused by factor IX deficiency. Currently available replacement therapy, if properly used in a multidisciplinary setting, should provide significant benefit to hemophilic patients despite its cost and occasional complications.

  10. The Experience of Children with Hemophilia and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Children with hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are not a transmission risk to other children, and they can help enact best practices for school attendance by other such children. The article examines the National Hemophilia Foundation's work to promote appropriate inclusion of students with hemophilia and HIV in all…

  11. The Hemophilia Games: An Experiment in Health Education Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The Hemophilia Health Education Planning Project was designed to (1) create a set of tools useful in hemophilia planning and education, and (2) create a planning model for other diseases with similar factors. The project used the game-simulations technique which was felt to be particularly applicable to hemophilia health problems, since as a…

  12. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemophilia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemophilia? The major signs and symptoms of hemophilia are excessive bleeding and ... Children who have mild hemophilia may not have signs unless they have excessive bleeding from a dental ...

  13. Hemophilia A: Dental considerations and management

    PubMed Central

    Shastry, Shilpa Padar; Kaul, Rachna; Baroudi, Kusai; Umar, Dilshad

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To review hemophilia A with emphasis on its oral manifestations, investigations, and dental management. Materials and Methods: Search was conducted using internet-based search engines, scholarly bibliographic databases, PubMed, and Medline with key words such as “Hemophilia A,” “factor VIII,” “bleeding and clotting disorders,” and “dental management.” Results: Hemophilia comprises a group of hereditary disorders caused due to the deficiency of one or more clotting factors leading to prolonged clotting time and excessive bleeding tendencies. It is broadly divided into hemophilia A, B, and C, which occur due to deficiency of factor VIII, IX, and XI, respectively. Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive hereditary disorder and is the most common of the three, accounting for 80–85% of the cases. Conclusion: Understanding this complex entity is very important for a dentist to provide appropriate dental treatment and avoid undesirable consequences. PMID:25625071

  14. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in a hemophilia B patient

    PubMed Central

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.; Sosnowski, Roman; Szczepanik, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery in patients with hemophilia is a serious challenge. It requires a comprehensive approach, as well as careful postoperative monitoring. We present here the first case of a transperitoneal laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (TLRN) for renal cell carcinoma, of the clear-cell type, performed in a hemophilia B patient. The level of factor IX clotting activity before surgery and on postoperative days 1–6 was maintained at 65–130% and at 30–40% on subsequent days until healing of the post-operative wound was achieved. The intraoperative and postoperative courses were uneventful. TLRN can therefore be considered safe and effective for renal cell carcinoma. In hemophilia patients, the TLRN procedure requires proper preparation, as well as adequate substitution therapy for the deficient coagulation factor provided by a multidisciplinary team in a comprehensive center. PMID:27729993

  15. [Molecular genetics of hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    De Brasi, C D; Slavutsky, I R; Larripa, I B

    1996-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HemA), an X linked genetic disease, is the most common coagulation disorder with an incidence of about 1-2 in 10,000 males and is caused by mutations in the factor VIII (FVIII) coagulation gene. Firstly, some clinical aspects of the HemA are presented: the current methods to assess both the amount and activity of FVIII, the severity range observed and the presence of inhibitor antibodies against the therapeutic FVIII. Follows a discussion of the relationship of the structural domains of the FVIII protein (Figure 1), the aminoacid sequence and their functions. An activation-inactivation model of the successive peptide bonds cleavages of the FVIII is also presented (Figure 2). After the cloning of the FVIII gene in 1984, almost all types of HemA causing mutations have been characterized. However, the size and complexity of this gene prevented a screening of the full range of mutations for an accurate molecular diagnosis. Moreover, most of the patients with moderate and mild disease have missense mutations whereas approximately half of severe patients have nonsense, frameshift, and some missense mutations. There are also less frequently mutations such as deletions and insertions leading to severe phenotype and mutations affecting mRNA splicing and duplications causing both severe and mild HemA. In order to give genetic counselling in HemA families, studies at the DNA level using intragenic and/ or extragenic polymorphism analysis have been used. But this approach is not entirely satisfactory because it fails in several situations. Most of the causing mutations described above are private, and they have been found in only a few unrelated families. Recently, a common molecular inversion of the FVIII gene was identified in 50% of unrelated patients with severe HemA. The copies of a particular DNA sequence (termed F8A gene). One copy is located within intron 22 of the FVIII gene and the other two, 500 kb upstream. An homologous recombination mechanism was

  16. AIDS and hemophilia: experience in the La Paz Hemophilia Center.

    PubMed

    Magallón Martínez, M; Ortega, F; Pinilla, J

    1992-01-01

    435 hemophiliacs are usually being attended in the La Paz hemophilia Center (Madrid, Spain). 257 (59%) of these patients have been infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) because of human plasma derivate substitution therapy. The infection has been more frequent among the severely affected patients and among the most treated patients. 82% of the infected patients are between 14 and 40 years old. By December 1991, 95 (37%) of 257 seropositive patients have developed full-blown AIDS. The most frequent opportunistic infection they had suffered was esophageal candidiasis. Looking for an evolution marker, we can point that the patients older than 35 years with CD4 levels below 200/mm3 had the worst prognosis. There was no difference in the evolution among the patients aged below 17 and those aged between 17 and 35 years. The amount of concentrate used between 1980 and 1984 did not hold any relation to the evolution. 49 patients (51%) of the 95 suffering from AIDS had died by December 1991. The evolution to the death was unrelated to the patient age, CD4 lymphocyte levels, and amount of substitution therapy. In our opinion, the most valuable marker could be the kind of opportunistic infection or tumor the patient suffers from. Finally, Retrovir has demonstrated to be useful in increasing the survival rate of the patients, but after 36 months of treatment, only 33% of those AIDS patients who began taking it remained alive. Retrovir was also used in asymptomatic patients, and during an average period of time of 15 months, a lesser bone marrow toxicity and a stabilization in CD4 lymphocyte levels could be observed, but this was unable to modify the disease progression in those patients who presented circulating p24 antigen.

  17. Bruising and Hemophilia: Accident or Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles F.; Coury, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Two case histories illustrate the difficulty in evaluating abuse/neglect in children with bleeding problems such as hemophilia. Discussed are guidelines for diagnosis and prevention of abuse, including: screening techniques, the need for protection from environmental trauma, parental stress, evaluation of parents' disciplinary methods, and the…

  18. Hemophilia: The Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damiano, Mary Lou; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Care of the school student with hemophilia requires a cooperative effort by the health care team. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for the team, whose members include a hematologist, orthopedist, oral surgeon, geneticist, physical therapist, social worker, and school nurse. (JD)

  19. Replacing bad (F)actors: hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B; Spencer, H Trent

    2014-12-01

    Hemophilia A and B are bleeding disorders that result from functional deficiencies in specific circulating blood clotting factors termed factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively, and collectively display an incidence of 1 in 4000 male births. Stem cell transplantation therapies hold the promise of providing a cure for hemophilia, but currently available transplantable stem cell products do not confer endogenous FIX or FVIII biosynthesis. For this reason, stem cell-based approaches for hemophilia have focused primarily on genetic engineering of pluripotent or multipotent stem cells. While pluripotent stem cells have been branded with high expectation and promise, they remain poorly characterized in terms of clinical utility and safety. In contrast, adult-lineage-restricted stem cells are established agents in the clinical armamentarium. Of the clinically established stem cell types, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most utilized and represent the standard of care for several genetic and acquired diseases. Furthermore, HSCs are ideal cellular vehicles for gene therapy applications because they self-renew, repopulate the entire blood lineage while concurrently amplifying the transgene copy number >10(6) fold, and also have direct access to the bloodstream. Current research on HSC transplantation gene therapy approaches for hemophilia A and B is focused on the following: (1) identification of safe and efficient methods of nucleic acid transfer, (2) optimization of transgene product expression, (3) minimization of conditioning-regimen-related toxicity while maintaining HSC engraftment, and (4) overcoming preexisting immunity. Based on the existing data and current rate of progress, clinical trials of HSC transplantation gene therapy for hemophilia are predicted to begin in the coming years.

  20. Emerging and future therapies for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Marcus E; Tortella, Bartholomew J

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of care in hemophilia is a remarkable story. Over the last 60 years, advances in protein purification, protein chemistry, donor screening, viral inactivation, gene sequencing, gene cloning, and recombinant protein production have dramatically enhanced the treatment and lives of patients with hemophilia. Recent efforts have produced enhanced half-life (EHL) clotting factors to better support prophylaxis and decrease the frequency of infusions. Medical needs remain in the areas of alternate modes of administration to decrease the need for venous access, better treatment, and prophylaxis for patients who form antibodies to clotting factors, and ultimately a cure of the underlying genetic defect. In this brief review, the authors summarize data on EHL clotting factors, introduce agents whose mode of action is not clotting factor replacement, and list current gene therapy efforts. PMID:26366108

  1. Individualizing prophylaxis in hemophilia: a review.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Pia; Valentino, Leonard A; Gringeri, Alessandro; Re, Wendy M; Ewenstein, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Prophylaxis is considered optimal care for patients with severe hemophilia to prevent bleeding, including hemarthroses, which may cause arthropathy with chronic pain, occupational impairment and progressive loss of mobility. Questions remain regarding the optimal delivery of prophylaxis including how to individualize prophylaxis and optimize outcomes for each patient. Designing a prophylactic regimen for severe hemophilia must account for each patient's unique disease course, bleeding pattern, presence/absence of joint damage, pharmacokinetic profile, level of physical activity and adherence to treatment. Standard weight-based prophylaxis regimens and regimens optimized by bleeding phenotype (i.e., patients are 'allowed' to bleed to dose optimization) fail to prevent complications in many patients. Pharmacokinetic-guided dosing enables precise adjustment of dosing level and frequency to maintain adequate hemostatic levels and prevent bleeding. Optimal outcomes, such as reducing or eliminating hemorrhages, preventing or minimizing joint damage, and improving quality of life, can be achieved through an individualized care approach.

  2. CO 2 laser surgery in hemophilia treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos-Dias, A

    1992-08-01

    The use of CO 2 laser surgery between 1985 and 1991 in South Africa and Portugal for treatment of disorders in patients with mild to moderate cases of hemophilia A is discussed. Six cases of oral procedures and excision of skin tumors performed during this period are reported. In most of the cases of mild hemophilia no pre- or postoperative infusion of Factor VIII or desmopressin (DDAVP) was required. In some cases of moderate hemophilia, patients were infused with desmopressin (0.3 mug/kg body weight) and were treated postoperatively with the use of nasal desmopressin spray (150 mug to each nostril for four weeks following surgery). Factor VIII levels were measured before surgery. Follow up of four weeks was uneventful. The mean average power of the CO 2 laser was 20 W continuous and the pulse duration was 0.1 s for ablational procedures. For dermatologic procedures, a flexible plastic CO 2 laser hollow fiber was used (Flexilase, Sharplan, Allandale, NJ). We concluded that CO 2 laser surgery for hemophiliacs has a confirmed place in modern laser technology provided the standard precautions are taken and facilities are available.

  3. The Impact of HIV Infection on the Hemophilia Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    The hemophilia community has been deeply affected by the catastrophe of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The use of blood products that had first restored the potential for normal survival now bring the threat of AIDS infection and fear and discrimination from others. Strong leadership has come from the National Hemophilia Foundation.…

  4. Hemophilia and Sports: Guidelines for Participation. Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLain, Larry G.; Heldrich, Fred T.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a case report of a 15-year-old boy with severe hemophilia who played soccer 1 school year but was denied continued participation following another screening examination. Before deciding about participation, physicians must assess the type and severity of hemophilia and risk factors for injury. Appropriate sports for hemophiliacs are…

  5. Molecular approaches for improved clotting factors for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jerry S.

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is caused by a functional deficiency of one of the coagulation proteins. Therapy for no other group of genetic diseases has seen the progress that has been made for hemophilia over the past 40 years, from a life expectancy in 1970 of ∼20 years for a boy born with severe hemophilia to essentially a normal life expectancy in 2013 with current prophylaxis therapy. However, these therapies are expensive and require IV infusions 3 to 4 times each week. These are exciting times for hemophilia because several new technologies that promise extended half-lives for factor products, with potential for improvements in quality of life for persons with hemophilia, are in late-phase clinical development. PMID:24065241

  6. New challenges in hemophilia: long-term outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Young, Guy

    2012-01-01

    For the past 5 decades, the care for hemophilia patients has improved significantly to the point that a newborn with hemophilia living in a developed nation can expect to have a normal lifespan and a high quality of life. Despite this, there are several new challenges that the hemophilia community will face in the coming years. First, the hemophilia community will soon be challenged with adopting a variety of new agents into clinical practice. Second, the normalization of patients' lives as a result of improved treatment has led to new problem areas, including obese/overweight hemophiliacs and osteoporosis. In addition, although mortality rates are similar to those of the healthy population, morbidities such as hemophilic arthropathy still occur. Third, the cost of care continues to rise, both due to the development of expensive new therapies and to the costs of managing problems such as obesity and osteoporosis. Finally, most patients in the world with hemophilia receive little to no care and although this is an enormous challenge, it must be confronted. This review discusses some new challenges facing developing nations and their care for hemophilia patients. In summary, in hemophilia in the coming few years, several new challenges will need to be confronted.

  7. Gene therapy for hemophilia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Fogarty, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    After numerous preclinical studies demonstrated consistent success in large and small animal models, gene therapy has finally seen initial signs of clinically meaningful success. In a landmark study, Nathwani and colleagues reported sustained factor (F)IX expression in individuals with severe hemophilia B following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated in vivo FIX gene transfer. As the next possible treatment-changing paradigm in hemophilia care, gene therapy may provide patients with sufficient hemostatic improvement to achieve the World Federation of Hemophilia's aspirational goal of "integration of opportunities in all aspects of life… equivalent to someone without a bleeding disorder." Although promising momentum supports the potential of gene therapy to replace protein-based therapeutics for hemophilia, several obstacles remain. The largest challenges appear to be overcoming the cellular immune responses to the AAV capsid; preexisting AAV neutralizing antibodies, which immediately exclude approximately 50% of the target population; and the ability to scale-up vector manufacturing for widespread applicability. Additional obstacles specific to hemophilia A (HA) include designing a vector cassette to accommodate a larger cDNA; avoiding development of inhibitory antibodies; and, perhaps the greatest difficulty to overcome, ensuring adequate expression efficiency. This review discusses the relevance of gene therapy to the hemophilia disease state, previous research progress, the current landscape of clinical trials, and considerations for promoting the future availability of gene therapy for hemophilia.

  8. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals.

  9. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals. PMID:26770035

  10. Gene therapy for hemophilia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Fogarty, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    After numerous preclinical studies demonstrated consistent success in large and small animal models, gene therapy has finally seen initial signs of clinically meaningful success. In a landmark study, Nathwani and colleagues reported sustained factor (F)IX expression in individuals with severe hemophilia B following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated in vivo FIX gene transfer. As the next possible treatment-changing paradigm in hemophilia care, gene therapy may provide patients with sufficient hemostatic improvement to achieve the World Federation of Hemophilia's aspirational goal of "integration of opportunities in all aspects of life… equivalent to someone without a bleeding disorder." Although promising momentum supports the potential of gene therapy to replace protein-based therapeutics for hemophilia, several obstacles remain. The largest challenges appear to be overcoming the cellular immune responses to the AAV capsid; preexisting AAV neutralizing antibodies, which immediately exclude approximately 50% of the target population; and the ability to scale-up vector manufacturing for widespread applicability. Additional obstacles specific to hemophilia A (HA) include designing a vector cassette to accommodate a larger cDNA; avoiding development of inhibitory antibodies; and, perhaps the greatest difficulty to overcome, ensuring adequate expression efficiency. This review discusses the relevance of gene therapy to the hemophilia disease state, previous research progress, the current landscape of clinical trials, and considerations for promoting the future availability of gene therapy for hemophilia. PMID:26805907

  11. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A) and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population. PMID:26149016

  12. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Monahan, P E

    2015-06-01

    Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A), and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently, the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV, are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population.

  13. Factor VIII therapy for hemophilia A: current and future issues.

    PubMed

    Aledort, Louis; Ljung, Rolf; Mann, Kenneth; Pipe, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a congenital, recessive, X-linked bleeding disorder that is managed with infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant factor (F) VIII. The primary considerations in FVIII replacement therapy today are the: 1) immunogenicity of FVIII concentrates, 2) role of longer-acting FVIII products, 3) prophylactic use of FVIII in children and adults with severe hemophilia A, and 4) affordability and availability of FVIII products. Improving patient outcomes by increasing the use of FVIII prophylaxis, preventing or eliminating FVIII inhibitors, and expanding access to FVIII concentrates in developing countries are the major challenges confronting clinicians who care for patients with hemophilia A.

  14. Individualizing factor replacement therapy in severe hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Carcao, Manuel D; Iorio, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    Prophylactic replacement of factor concentrate is the established optimal treatment to avoid or minimize joint disease in severe hemophilia patients, thus ultimately improving their life expectancy and quality of life toward values matching those in the normal population. Where uncertainty still exists is around the optimal regimen to be prescribed for prophylaxis, and more and more treaters and patients are showing interest in patient tailored approaches to prophylaxis, aiming at matching the prophylaxis regimen to the specific needs of the patient. The rationale behind tailoring the prophylaxis regimen to the individual patient is based on the significant variability that exists between patients (all with the same label of severe hemophilia) with respect to their bleeding phenotype, their pharmacokinetic handling of factor, their levels of physical activity, and a variety of other characteristics that contribute to differential prophylaxis needs of patients. Of course, any form of tailoring of prophylaxis needs to take into consideration the economic resources of the country; for many countries very intense prophylaxis regimens are just not possible. This article will review different concerns and strategies when tailoring prophylaxis, and will address how these issues will apply to the new longer acting factor concentrates in development.

  15. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and hemophilia: apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Brunet, P; Rigot, J M; Coupez, B; Mazeman, E

    1995-02-01

    We report pelvis calculi fragmentation through the use of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in a patient with mild hemophilia B. The EDAP LT 01 lithotriptor was used without incident. We review other reported cases in the literature.

  16. Pregnancy and delivery in a woman with hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Rust, L A; Goodnight, S H; Freeman, R K; Johnson, C S

    1975-10-01

    Hemophilia B (Factor IX deficiency, Christmas disease) may cause excessive bleeding in women. The obstetric and hematologic management of the pregnancy and delivery of a woman with a Factor IX level of 4% is presented and discussed.

  17. Hemophilia B and free tissue transfer: medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Knott, P Daniel; Khariwala, Samir S; Minarchek, Joseph

    2005-03-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a rare, X-linked bleeding diathesis, which may present with life-threatening hemorrhage. Management of the coagulopathy in the setting of free tissue transfer may be particularly challenging. The authors present the first case in the English literature of a male with hemophilia B undergoing microvascular free flap reconstruction, as well as a review of the current surgical and medical management of hemophilia B. Based upon this experience, perioperative specific factor replacement is recommended. Given physiologic trough levels of the replaced factor, routine antiplatelet therapy appears appropriate. Management of free tissue transfer in the setting of severe hemophilia is significantly more challenging and should benefit from multidisciplinary coordination.

  18. Exertional compartment syndrome in covert mild hemophilia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tountas, C P; Ferris, F O; Cobb, S W

    1992-07-01

    A 37-year-old white male experienced unexpected postoperative bleeding after fasciotomy and decompression for left pronator and compartment syndromes of the forearm. He was subsequently diagnosed with a mild form of hemophilia A. One year later, surgery was required for right pronator and compartment syndromes. Pre- and postoperative cryoprecipitate infusions controlled bleeding following the second operation until the patient discontinued his infusions, resulting in a wound hematoma. Covert mild hemophilia is implicated in the pathogenesis of his compartment syndromes.

  19. Gastrectomy in siblings with Christmas disease (hemophilia B).

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, R; Kawarada, Y; Ogura, Y

    1980-12-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is regarded as one of the commonest clinical manifestations of classic hemophilia and Christmas disease. Although major surgery is usually avoided in such cases, recently we had 2 cases of Christmas disease in siblings who had undergone a successful gastrectomy and concomitant administration of a concentrated preparation of factor IX. In addition, findings in 7 other Japanese patients with hemophilia who underwent gastrectomy are discussed.

  20. Treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impact of hemophilia on young adults (aged 18-30 years) with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Witkop, Michelle; Guelcher, Christine; Forsyth, Angela; Hawk, Sarah; Curtis, Randall; Kelley, Laureen; Frick, Neil; Rice, Michelle; Rosu, Gabriela; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    The Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) initiative assessed psychosocial issues reported by people with moderate to severe hemophilia and was led by a multidisciplinary international advisory board. This analysis reports data from young adult respondents (aged 18-30 years), including both US and overall global (including US respondents) results, and investigates treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impacts of hemophilia on relationships. More young adults in HERO received prophylaxis than on-demand treatment, although a majority reported not using factor products exactly as prescribed, and 50% of global respondents and 26% of US respondents reported issues with access to factor replacement therapy in the previous 5 years. Many young adults with hemophilia reported comorbidities, including bone/skeletal arthritis, chronic pain, and viral infections, and nearly half of young adults reported anxiety/depression. Most reported pain interference with daily activities in the past 4 weeks, although a majority reported participating in lower-risk activities and approximately half in intermediate-risk activities. Most young adults were very or quite satisfied with the support of partners/spouses, family, and friends, although roughly one-third reported that hemophilia affected their ability to develop close relationships with a partner. A majority of young adults reported that hemophilia has had a negative impact on employment, and 62% of global respondents and 78% of US respondents were employed at least part-time. Together these data highlight the psychosocial issues experienced by young adults with hemophilia and suggest that increased focus on these issues may improve comprehensive care during the transition to adulthood.

  1. Treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impact of hemophilia on young adults (aged 18-30 years) with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Witkop, Michelle; Guelcher, Christine; Forsyth, Angela; Hawk, Sarah; Curtis, Randall; Kelley, Laureen; Frick, Neil; Rice, Michelle; Rosu, Gabriela; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    The Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) initiative assessed psychosocial issues reported by people with moderate to severe hemophilia and was led by a multidisciplinary international advisory board. This analysis reports data from young adult respondents (aged 18-30 years), including both US and overall global (including US respondents) results, and investigates treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impacts of hemophilia on relationships. More young adults in HERO received prophylaxis than on-demand treatment, although a majority reported not using factor products exactly as prescribed, and 50% of global respondents and 26% of US respondents reported issues with access to factor replacement therapy in the previous 5 years. Many young adults with hemophilia reported comorbidities, including bone/skeletal arthritis, chronic pain, and viral infections, and nearly half of young adults reported anxiety/depression. Most reported pain interference with daily activities in the past 4 weeks, although a majority reported participating in lower-risk activities and approximately half in intermediate-risk activities. Most young adults were very or quite satisfied with the support of partners/spouses, family, and friends, although roughly one-third reported that hemophilia affected their ability to develop close relationships with a partner. A majority of young adults reported that hemophilia has had a negative impact on employment, and 62% of global respondents and 78% of US respondents were employed at least part-time. Together these data highlight the psychosocial issues experienced by young adults with hemophilia and suggest that increased focus on these issues may improve comprehensive care during the transition to adulthood. PMID:26619194

  2. Visuoperceptual sequelae in children with hemophilia and intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Esmeralda; O’Callaghan, Erin T.; Murray, Joan; Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine the impact of focal brain injuries on the outcomes of visual perception and visuospatial abilities in Mexican children with hemophilia who have experienced intracranial hemorrhages. Methods We assessed ten boys who had hemophilia with intracranial hemorrhage (HIC), six boys who had hemophilia without intracranial hemorrhage (HH), and ten boys without hemophilia (CTL). The Verbal (VIQ), Performance IQs (PIQ), and Full Scale IQs (FSIQ) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children—Mexican Revision, Visual Perception, and Visuospatial Abilities domains, which are from a neuropsychological assessment battery for Spanish-speaking children (ENI), were employed for our analysis. Results The results showed that the HIC group performed in the low-average range on the PIQ and FSIQ, which was lower than the HH group. The HIC group showed low performance on visual perception tests, such as line orientation, fragmented objects, and overlapping figures, compared with their matched controls. Conclusions The results suggest that it is not the ability to recognize objects that is impaired in the HIC group, but the ability to identify objects under less favorable conditions. Our findings may have therapeutic and rehabilitative implications for the management of children with hemophilia and early focal brain lesions. PMID:26835360

  3. Patient and parent preferences for characteristics of prophylactic treatment in hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Roberto; Krishnan, Sangeeta; Vietri, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction New longer-acting factor products will potentially allow for less frequent infusion in prophylactic treatment of hemophilia. However, the role of administration frequency relative to other treatment attributes in determining preferences for prophylactic hemophilia treatment regimens is not well understood. Aim To identify the relative importance of frequency of administration, efficacy, and other treatment characteristics among candidates for prophylactic treatment for hemophilia A and B. Method An Internet survey was conducted among hemophilia patients and the parents of pediatric hemophilia patients in Australia, Canada, and the US. A monadic conjoint task was included in the survey, which varied frequency of administration (three, two, or one time per week for hemophilia A; twice weekly, weekly, or biweekly for hemophilia B), efficacy (no bleeding or breakthrough bleeding once every 4 months, 6 months, or 12 months), diluent volume (3 mL vs 2.5 mL for hemophilia A; 5 mL vs 3 mL for hemophilia B), vials per infusion (2 vs 1), reconstitution device (assembly required vs not), and manufacturer (established in hemophilia vs not). Respondents were asked their likelihood to switch from their current regimen to the presented treatment. Respondents were told to assume that other aspects of treatment, such as risk of inhibitor development, cost, and method of distribution, would remain the same. Results A total of 89 patients and/or parents of children with hemophilia A participated; another 32 were included in the exercise for hemophilia B. Relative importance was 47%, 24%, and 18% for frequency of administration, efficacy, and manufacturer, respectively, in hemophilia A; analogous values were 48%, 26%, and 21% in hemophilia B. The remaining attributes had little impact on preferences. Conclusion Patients who are candidates for prophylaxis and their caregivers indicate a preference for reduced frequency of administration and high efficacy, but preferences

  4. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future. PMID:27131224

  5. Pain Experience in Hemophilia Patients: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rambod, Masoume; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Khair, Kate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pain, as a crucial subsequence of joint hemorrhages in hemophilia patients, is chronic, debilitating, and distracting. This study aimed to describe and interpret pain experiences of hemophilia patients in their lives. Methods: This qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach was conducted on fourteen hemophilia patients who had been referred to a hemophilia center affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The study question was “what is the meaning of pain in hemophilia patients’ lives? The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and field notes through purposeful sampling. Then, thematic analysis with van Manen’s six-step methodological framework was used. MAX.QDA qualitative software package, 2010, was used to analyze the data. Results: The three main themes that emerged in this study were “alteration in physical health”, “engagement in psychological problems”, and “impairment in social relationships”. Alteration in physical health consisted of three subthemes, namely “impairment of physical function”, “change in body physics”, and “disturbance in sleep quality”. In addition, two subthemes including “nostalgia of pain in adults with hemophilia” and “psychological distress” emerged from engagement in psychological problems. Finally, “loss of social activity” and “change in relationships” were related to impairment in social relationships. Conclusion: The present study highlighted alteration in physical health, engagement in psychological problems, and impairment in social relationship as a result of pain in hemophilia patients. Thus, healthcare providers and family members have to pay special attention to these problems. Besides, providing complementary therapy interventions is suggested for reducing these issues. PMID:27713894

  6. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future.

  7. Acquired Hemophilia A Successfully Treated with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder due to the development of specific autoantibodies against factor VIII. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been proven to be effective in obtaining a long-term suppression of inhibitors of AHA, besides other immunosuppressive standard treatments. Here we describe a case of idiopathic AHA in a 60-year old man successfully treated with rituximab. He showed a complete clinical response with a normalization of clotting parameters after 5 weekly courses of rituximab given at a dose of 375 mg/sqm., but after stopping rituximab, an initial worsening of coagulation parameters induced the addition of 3 further courses. At present, the patient is in complete clinical and hematological remission after 200 days. This case confirms that Rituximab may be a safe and useful tool to treat AHA and, a prolonged administration can overcome the initial resistance. However, the precise position of this drug in the therapeutic strategy (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be established and warrants further investigation. PMID:25745551

  8. Acquired hemophilia a successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder due to the development of specific autoantibodies against factor VIII. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been proven to be effective in obtaining a long-term suppression of inhibitors of AHA, besides other immunosuppressive standard treatments. Here we describe a case of idiopathic AHA in a 60-year old man successfully treated with rituximab. He showed a complete clinical response with a normalization of clotting parameters after 5 weekly courses of rituximab given at a dose of 375 mg/sqm., but after stopping rituximab, an initial worsening of coagulation parameters induced the addition of 3 further courses. At present, the patient is in complete clinical and hematological remission after 200 days. This case confirms that Rituximab may be a safe and useful tool to treat AHA and, a prolonged administration can overcome the initial resistance. However, the precise position of this drug in the therapeutic strategy (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be established and warrants further investigation. PMID:25745551

  9. Hemophilia A in a Belgian Shepherd Malinois dog: case report.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, A; Lubas, G; Trotta, M; Caldin, M

    2014-08-01

    This case report presents a Belgian Shepherd Malinois dog affected by hemophilia A recognized at the age of seven months. The clinical follow-up including all the diagnostic procedures leading to the final diagnosis and the course of this disorder are presented. This is a typical proband case demonstrating the appearance of this genetic disease in a breed never involved by this coagulation disorder so far documented that started an intensive and laborious plan to reduce the incidence of hemophilia A and the further appearance of new cases.

  10. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  11. Acquired hemophilia A in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Tsukamoto, N; Suto, M; Uchiumi, H; Mitsuhashi, H; Yokohama, A; Maesawa, A; Nojima, Y; Naruse, T

    2001-06-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed acquired hemophilia A. The patient, a 24-year-old Japanese woman, was referred to our hospital because of uncontrollable bleeding following a tooth extraction. Laboratory examination revealed prolonged APTT (116 seconds), reduced factor VIII activity (2.8 %) and the presence of factor VIII inhibitor at a titer of 46.5 Bethesda units/ml. Transfusion of prothrombin complex concentrate and activated prothrombin complex concentrate followed by administration of prednisolone and cyclophosphamide successfully arrested bleeding and reduced the factor VIII inhibitor level. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis and introduction of adequate therapies are critical. PMID:11446683

  12. An unusual presentation of hemophilia B: pseudotumor of proximal tibia.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Saurav; Arora, Sumit; Khanna, Shilpa; Maini, Lalit; Gautam, V K

    2011-07-01

    Hemophilia is one of the most common genetically inherited causes of bleeding disorders. The usual presentation is continuous bleeding from a wound. Very seldom, it presents as a pseudotumor of bone. When left untreated, it may induce compression and pressure necrosis of adjacent structures. Careful evaluation and a high index of suspicion are usually required to arrive at the correct diagnosis. In this article, we report the case of a 10-year-old boy with hemophilia B (Christmas disease) that presented as a pseudotumor producing a large defect in the proximal tibia.

  13. Problems of Hemophilia and the Role of the Rehabilitation Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrai, Edward B.; Handford, H. Allen

    1983-01-01

    Because of the multiple problems associated with hemophilia, optimal treatment is usually provided in a comprehensive care setting by a team of medical and nonmedical professionals. The rehabilitation counselor contributes expertise to that of other team members in development and implementation of an individual rehabilitation plan for…

  14. Men with severe hemophilia in the United States: birth cohort analysis of a large national database

    PubMed Central

    Mazepa, Marshall A.; Baker, Judith R.; Riske, Brenda K.; Soucie, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The availability of longitudinal data collected prospectively from 1998 to 2011 at federally funded US hemophilia treatment centers provided an opportunity to construct a descriptive analysis of how outcomes of men with severe hemophilia have been altered by the incremental advances and setbacks in hemophilia care in the last 50 years in the United States. This surveillance collaboration with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assembled the largest uniformly examined population with severe hemophilia (n = 4899 men with severe factor VIII and IX deficiency). To address the heterogeneity of this population, 4 successive birth cohorts, differentially affected by eras of hemophilia care, were examined separately in regard to demographics, complications of hemophilia and its treatment, and mortality. Severely affected men in each birth cohort were compared also with the corresponding mild hemophilia birth cohorts (n = 2587 men total) to control for outcomes that might be attributable to aging and environment independent of severely defective hemostasis. The analysis demonstrates improving access to standard of care therapy, correlating the proportion of men on prophylactic factor replacement and reduced bleeding frequency for the youngest men. Frequent bleeding persisted in one third to one half of men across all ages, however, and the disability gap between severe and mild hemophilia did not narrow. The greatest cause of death was liver failure, but attempted anti–hepatitis C virus therapy and cure were low. The study suggests a continued need for national surveillance to monitor and inform hemophilia interventions and outcomes. PMID:26983851

  15. [Prophylactic replacement therapy in hemophilia. A case report (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mitterstieler, G

    1976-01-01

    In a six year old boy with severe hemophilia prophylactic substitution of factor VIII was started in 1973 in order to prevent early invalidity due to series of bleeding in the right anklejoint. A substitution of factor VIII over 8 months with 21 resp. 30 U/kg body-weight did not lead to a significant improvement. But since the factor VIII in a dosage of 18 U/kg body-weight is given three times a week no bleeding occurred during the treatment time of 14 months and also the ability to walk improved to an excellent degree.--So far no signs of hepatitis or an factor-VIII-antibody could be detected.--Some results from the prophylactic treatment of severe hemophilia and Christmas disease are cited from the literature.

  16. Clinical profile of hemophilia patients in Jodhpur Region

    PubMed Central

    Payal, Vikas; Sharma, Pramod; Goyal, Vishnu; Jora, Rakesh; Parakh, Manish; Payal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemophilia is widely distributed all over the world, but little is known about its clinical profile in resource-limited regions. An insight into its clinical spectrum will help in the formulation of policies to improve the situation in these areas. Aims: To study the clinical profile of hemophiliacs (age <18 years) in Jodhpur region and screen them for transfusion-transmitted infections. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Umaid Hospital, Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur, over a period of 12 months. Result: Out of a total of 56 cases enrolled, 51 (91%) cases were diagnosed as hemophilia A while 5 (9%) were diagnosed as hemophilia B. Positive family history was found in 26 (46%) cases. According to their factor levels, 25 (44%) cases had severe disease, 20 (36%) had moderate disease, and 11 (20%) had mild disease. The mean age of onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 1.73 ± 1.43 and 3.87 ± 3.84 years, respectively. First clinical presentation was posttraumatic bleed in 20 (36%), gum bleeds in 17 (30%), epistaxis in 4 (7%), joint bleeds in 4 (7%), skin bleeds in 4 (7%), and circumcision bleed in 3 (5%) cases. Knee joint was the predominant joint affected by hemarthrosis in 38 (68%), followed by ankle in 29 (52%), elbow in 20 (36%), and hip joint in 7 (13%) cases. All patients had a negative screening test for transfusion-transmitted infections. Conclusion: Occurrence of posttraumatic bleeds and gum bleeds in an otherwise normal child should warn the clinician for evaluation of hemophilia. PMID:27011682

  17. Acquired hemophilia A: A rare cause of gross hematuria.

    PubMed

    Hosier, Gregory W; Mason, Ross J; Sue Robinson, K; Bailly, Gregory G

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare condition caused by spontaneous development of factor VIII inhibitor. This condition most commonly presents with multiple hemorrhagic symptoms and isolated hematuria is exceedingly rare. Early diagnosis is important, as this condition carries a high mortality rate (13-22%). We present a case of an 82-year-old man with isolated hematuria caused by a factor VIII inhibitor who was successfully treated with recombinant activated factor VII concentrate, as well as prednisone and cyclophosphamide. PMID:26834904

  18. Acquired hemophilia A: A rare cause of gross hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Hosier, Gregory W.; Mason, Ross J.; Sue Robinson, K.; Bailly, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare condition caused by spontaneous development of factor VIII inhibitor. This condition most commonly presents with multiple hemorrhagic symptoms and isolated hematuria is exceedingly rare. Early diagnosis is important, as this condition carries a high mortality rate (13–22%). We present a case of an 82-year-old man with isolated hematuria caused by a factor VIII inhibitor who was successfully treated with recombinant activated factor VII concentrate, as well as prednisone and cyclophosphamide. PMID:26834904

  19. Hemophilia A in Brazil – epidemiology and treatment developments

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adriana Aparecida; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa; Guerra, Maximiliano Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited disorder characterized by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII, which predisposes patients to bleeding events. Treatment is based on replacement of the deficient factor, in a therapeutic or prophylactic manner. Brazil is the country with the third largest population of people with hemophilia, for which the public health system provides free comprehensive care. Maintaining an updated registry of patients, documenting the prevalence of complications, and assessing the effectiveness of resource use are indispensable elements in the design of a well-coordinated national program. According to sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data collected by the computerized Brazilian system on coagulopathies, in June 2013, there were 9,122 registered patients with hemophilia A in Brazil, of which 36.1% had a severe form of the disease. Clotting factor inhibitors were present in 7.5%, but 25.7% of records did not provide this type of data. Around 70% of the patients belonged to the economically active population, being between 15 and 59 years old. Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus was present in 23.4% of the patients tested and infection by hepatitis C virus antibodies in 59.3%. Infection by the hepatitis B virus and human T-lymphotropic virus was also reported. The high percentage of incomplete records regarding serological data shows the fragility of the information system to date. There was also no information available on the prevalence of permanent or disabling joint damage. Although few hemophiliacs receive adequate care in developing countries, and despite Brazil exhibiting great social inequalities, the Ministry of Health has made significant advances in the treatment of hemophilia A. The gradual increase in importation of factor VIII concentrate enabled the implementation of primary and secondary modalities of prophylaxis, in addition to the induction of immune tolerance. There are also plans to set up a factory in the

  20. Acquired hemophilia a: retrospective analysis of 49 cases from a single Chinese hemophilia center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanhui; Xue, Feng; Shi, Hao; Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Linxiang; Yang, Renchi

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by the autoantibody directed against factor VIII in patients without previous history of a bleeding disorder. We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics and outcomes of 49 patients with AHA diagnosed in our center from February 1994 to October 2012. Twenty-four patients with acute bleeding episodes were treated with prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) at a relative low dose of 30 to -50 U/kg/d and achieved good outcomes without any adverse reaction. Corticosteroids alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide were used as the first-line therapy to eradicate the inhibitors. In 39 evaluable patients, 35 (89.7%) achieved complete remission (CR). This study demonstrates that when bypassing agents such as recombinant activated factor VII and activated PCCs are not affordable or available, low dose PCC is effective and safe to control acute bleeding in patients with AHA. First-line therapy achieved good outcomes with a CR rate of 89.7%.

  1. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B in a family of French bulldogs.

    PubMed

    Slappendel, R J

    1975-10-15

    A congenital coagulation defect was suspected in 10 male French bulldogs, independently referred to the Small Animal Clinic of the Utrecht State University by private pet owners from all over the country. The cases are described in this report. Coagulation studies, performed in 8 of these dogs, revealed a factor VIII (anti-hemophilic globulin) deficiency in 5, and a factor IX (Christmas factor) deficiency in 3 propositi. A pedigree analysis revealed that all of the 10 propositi were lineal descendants, in the female line, of one and the same female ancestor. An inquiry by letter among the owners of 210 male descendants, in the female line, of this common ancestor revealed hemorrhagic episodes in at least another 10 male offspirng. The presence of a large number of carriers can be expected among the French bulldog population in the Netherlands, since the officially registered female offspring in the female line of the ancestor bitch, comprised over 170 dogs as of January, 1971. The possible mechanisms responsible for the simultaneous occurrence of hemophilia A and B in one canine family are discussed.

  2. Genome-editing technologies for gene correction of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Yong; Lee, Dongjin R; Sung, Jin Jea; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hemophilia is caused by various mutations in blood coagulation factor genes, including factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), that encode key proteins in the blood clotting pathway. Although the addition of therapeutic genes or infusion of clotting factors may be used to remedy hemophilia's symptoms, no permanent cure for the disease exists. Moreover, patients often develop neutralizing antibodies or experience adverse effects that limit the therapy's benefits. However, targeted gene therapy involving the precise correction of these mutated genes at the genome level using programmable nucleases is a promising strategy. These nucleases can induce double-strand breaks (DSBs) on genomes, and repairs of such induced DSBs by the two cellular repair systems enable a targeted gene correction. Going beyond cultured cell systems, we are now entering the age of direct gene correction in vivo using various delivery tools. Here, we describe the current status of in vivo and ex vivo genome-editing technology related to potential hemophilia gene correction and the prominent issues surrounding its application in patients with monogenic diseases.

  3. Importance of immune response genes in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Josiane Bazzo; Macedo, Luciana Conci; de Barros, Morgana Ferreira; Rodrigues, Camila; Cadide, Renata Campos; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a disease caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII resulting from genetic inheritance linked to chromosome X. One treatment option is the administration of plasma or recombinant FVIII. However, some patients develop inhibitors or antibodies against this factor. Inhibitors are alloantibodies that bind to the epitope of factor VIII causing it to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign peptide. This is the most serious complication in hemophilia patients in respect to replacement therapy. Some studies have suggested that genetic factors influence the development of factor VIII inhibitors such as ethnicity, family history, mutations in the factor VIII gene and in genes of the immune system. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to assess the influence of genetic factors of immune response genes, especially genes of the major histocompatibility complex and cytokines, which may be related to the development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A patients. Understanding these risk factors will help to determine future differential treatment in the control and prevention of the development of inhibitors. PMID:24106448

  4. Female twins with severe Christmas disease (hemophilia B).

    PubMed

    Wollina, K; Bowen, D J; Syrbe, G; Zintl, F

    1993-11-15

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked bleeding disorder. We report on female twins, who were conspicious in prolonged bleeding after venipuncture as well as hematomas after intramuscular injections even in the first months of their life. Their father suffering from a severe hemophilia B deceased in 1992. Their mother, half-brother and grandmother from their father's side had no signs of bleeding disorders. Clotting analysis performed in both twins revealed a markedly prolonged partial thromboplastin time (> 100 s). The factor IX levels were below 2%. In order to detect mutations, a general screen using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR products have been performed. PCR products have been cut into smaller fragments using restriction endonucleases (RE) for an in-depth SSCP screen. A general screen for gross abnormalities in the factor IX gene including deletions, insertions and rearrangements was performed by Southern blot analysis of RE-digests of genomic DNA using the factor IX cDNA as a hybridization probe. Furthermore, we screened for mutations in the CG dinucleotides comprising part of RE-recognition sequences (exon 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8). By all methods applied herein, no mutations have been detected in these twins. On the basis of our results the hemophilia B of these twins might be explained by extreme non-random lyonization.

  5. Understanding patient preferences and willingness to pay for hemophilia therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W; Young, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite clearly improved clinical outcomes for prophylaxis compared to on-demand therapy, on average only 56% of patients diagnosed with severe hemophilia receive prophylactic factor replacement therapy in the US. Prophylaxis rates generally drop as patients transition from childhood to adulthood, partly due to patients becoming less adherent when they reach adulthood. Assessment of patient preferences is important because these are likely to translate into increased treatment satisfaction and adherence. In this study, we assessed preferences and willingness to pay (WTP) for on-demand, prophylaxis, and longer acting prophylaxis therapies in a sample of US hemophilia patients. Methods Adult US hemophilia patients and caregivers (N=79) completed a discrete-choice survey that presented a series of trade-off questions, each including a pair of hypothetical treatment profiles. Using a mixed logit model for analysis, we compared the relative importance of five treatment characteristics: 1) out-of-pocket treatment costs (paid by patients), 2) factor dose adjustment, 3) treatment side effects, 4) availability of premixed factor, and 5) treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency. Based on these attribute estimates, we calculated patients’ WTP. Results Out-of-pocket treatment costs (P<0.001), side effects (P<0.001), and treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency (P<0.001) were found to be statistically significant in the model. Patients were willing to pay US $410 (95% confidence interval: $164–$656) out of pocket per month for thrice-weekly prophylaxis therapy compared to on-demand therapy and $360 (95% confidence interval: $145–$575) for a switch from thrice-weekly to once-weekly prophylaxis therapy. Conclusion Improvements in treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency, treatment side effects, and out-of-pocket costs per month were the greatest determinants of hemophilia treatment choice and WTP. The positive preferences and WTP for longer acting

  6. Interpatient phenotypic inconsistency in severe congenital hemophilia: a systematic review of the role of inherited thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Montagnana, Martina; Targher, Giovanni; Veneri, Dino; Zaffanello, Marco; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Manzato, Franco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the clinical phenotype of hemophilia may vary greatly among patients with the same apparent level of coagulation factor and the same genetic mutation. Thus, patients with severe hemophilia may experience a severe phenotype or only a milder bleeding tendency, suggesting some other moderating influence. To elucidate the mechanism of this heterogeneity, some investigators have recently suggested that inherited thrombophilic factors may play a role in the milder clinical presentation of severe hemophilia. In this review, we summarize current knowledge with respect to the modulation of the clinical phenotype of severe hemophilia by prothrombotic genetic risk factors. Although the published literature seems to indicate a protective effect for the coinheritance of factor V Leiden, the limited data available do not permit any firm conclusions. Further trials on a large population of patients are needed to establish the role of genetic thrombophilia in the phenotypic expression of severe hemophilia.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of congenital hemophilia with inhibitors a Latin American perspective.

    PubMed

    Pérez Bianco, Raúl; Ozelo, Margareth Castro; Villaça, Paula Ribeiro; Solano, Maria Helena; Jimenez Cruze, Guillermo; Martinez Murillo, Carlos; Garcia Chavez, Jaime; Mendoza, Saul; Rodriguez Grecco, Ismael; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2008-01-01

    The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups (CLOTTING) is composed of a number of hemophilia specialists from Latin America. The group aims to encourage the adoption of a good standard of care for Latin American patients with hemophilia. The occurrence of inhibitors in patients with hemophilia poses clinical challenges, and it is estimated that between 1000 and 3000 patients in Latin America are affected by hemophilia with inhibitors. There is an urgent need to establish a regional consensus and clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. We present an extensive review based on best current clinical practice and published literature, as seen from a Latin American perspective, taking into account the variable nature of hemophilia care available in the various countries in this Region.

  8. Health-related quality of life in hemophilia: results of the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life Index (Haem-a-Qol) at a Brazilian blood center

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adriana Aparecida; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa; Corrêa, Camila Soares Lima; da Cruz, Danielle Teles; Rodrigues, Daniela de Oliveira Werneck; Ferreira, Monica Calil Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on health-related quality of life are based on the increasingly evident need for medical care not to be limited to preventing death, but to focus instead on the value of health. Objective This study aimed to measure the health-related quality of life in hemophilia, using the Hemophilia- Specific Quality of Life (Haem-A-QoL) questionnaire and describe the socioeconomic characteristics and health conditions of these patients. Methods The Brazilian version of the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire was administered to hemophiliac adults, treated in an on-demand regime at the Juiz de Fora Regional Blood Center - HEMOMINAS Foundation. The patients were interviewed about demographic and socioeconomic data and their understanding of the questionnaire. Clinical data were collected from medical records. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set for p-values < 0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, version 15.0). Results Thirty-nine patients were evaluated. The mean age was 36.8 years. 84.6% had hemophilia A; 20.5% of the patients had hemophilia classified as mild, 41% as moderate and 38.5% as severe. The records of 10.5% of the patients registered seropositivity for anti-HIV and 57.9% for anti-HCV. Target joints were detected in 69.2%. The mean total Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life score was 35.55. 'Sports and leisure'and 'Physical health'were the most impaired dimensions and the dimension 'Relationship and partners'was the least impaired. The Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life scores showed good discriminant validity for hemophilia severity (p-value = 0.001), HIV-infection (p-value = 0.02), HCV-infection (p-value = 0.01) and the presence of target joints (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Health-related quality of life in hemophilia, measured by the Hemophilia-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire, was influenced by the

  9. Acquired hemophilia a: diagnosis, aetiology, clinical spectrum and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shrimati; Bhave, Manali; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-04-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per million/year with a high mortality rate of more than 20%. The disease occurs due to autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) which neutralize its procoagulant function and result in severe, often life-threatening bleeding. The antibodies arise in individuals with no prior history of hemophilia A. AHA may be associated with pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, malignancy, infections or medication and occurs most commonly in the elderly. Approximately 50% of the patients remain idiopathic with no known underlying pathological condition. Clinical manifestations include spontaneous hemorrhages into the skin, muscles or soft tissues or excessive bleeding during surgery. Hemarthrosis which is the hallmark of congenital severe hemophilia A seldom occurs in AHA. The diagnosis of AHA is based on the isolated prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) which does not normalize after the addition of normal plasma along with reduced FVIII levels. The treatment involves two aspects-eradication of antibodies and maintaining effective hemostasis during a bleeding episode. The protocols for eradication of antibodies include immunoadsorption, immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction (ITI). The treatment of acute bleeding episodes involves use of different bypassing agents like recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa, NovoSeven®) and activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC, (FEIBA®) in case of patients with high titer inhibitors or with antifibrinolytics,1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) or FVIII concentrates in low titer inhibitor patients. The anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, has shown very good results either singly or in combination with immunosuppressive regimens in patients who do not respond to standard immunosuppressors. The present review summarizes the diagnostic, aetiological, clinical and treatment aspects of AHA focusing

  10. Factor IX molecular defects in diagnosing hemophilia B: a review.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, M

    1989-07-01

    The past several years have seen an explosive growth in the application of recombinant DNA methods to study the molecular pathology of various inherited disorders. As a consequence, molecular defects responsible for the disease have been identified at the sequence level. In this review, I briefly describe the recent progress in the uses of factor IX gene probes in clinical diagnosis of hemophilia B (Christmas disease) carriers, as well as their use for analyzing the structural gene abnormalities that are responsible for the disease.

  11. In vitro and In vivo Model Systems for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong; Kapranov, Philipp; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary disorder caused by various mutations in factor VIII gene resulting in either a severe deficit or total lack of the corresponding activity. Recent success in gene therapy of a related disease, hemophilia B, gives new hope that similar success can be achieved for hemophilia A as well. To develop a gene therapy strategy for the latter, a variety of model systems are needed to evaluate molecular engineering of the factor VIII gene, vector delivery efficacy and safety-related issues. Typically, a tissue culture cell line is the most convenient way to get a preliminary glimpse of the potential of a vector delivery strategy. It is then followed by extensive testing in hemophilia A mouse and dog models. Newly developed hemophilia A sheep may provide yet another tool for evaluation of factor VIII gene delivery vectors. Hemophilia models based on other species may also be developed since hemophiliac animals have been identified or generated in rat, pig, cattle and horse. Although a genetic nonhuman primate hemophilia A model has yet to be developed, the non-genetic hemophilia A model can also be used for special purposes when specific questions need to be addressed that cannot not be answered in other model systems. Hemophilia A is caused by a functional deficiency in the factor VIII gene. This X-linked, recessive bleeding disorder affects approximately 1 in 5000 males [1–3]. Clinically, it is characterized by frequent and spontaneous joint hemorrhages, easy bruising and prolonged bleeding time. The coagulation activity of FVIII dictates severity of the clinical symptoms. Approximately 50% of all cases are classified as severe with less than 1% of normal levels of factor VIII detected [4]. This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding. In contrast, patients with 5–30% of normal factor VIII activity exhibit mild clinical manifestations. PMID:25401041

  12. Inhibitors in childhood hemophilia A: genetic and treatment-related risk factors for development and eradication.

    PubMed

    DiMichele, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies remains a serious complication of hemophilia replacement therapy. Factor VIII inhibiting antibodies (inhibitors) occur commonly following replacement therapy in hemophilia A, creating a significant burden of clinical disease. This article will review our current understanding of risk factors and their known impact on inhibitor development in previously untreated or minimally treated children with severe and mild hemophilia A. It will also explore how the most recently elucidated immunology of inhibitor development might hold important clues to more effective inhibitor eradication and prevention in this heavily impacted patient population. PMID:23109404

  13. Safety and efficacy of TIPS in patients with hemophilia and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Joshua P; Bloom, Allan I; Bass, Nathan M; Kerlan, Robert K; Wilson, Mark W; Gordon, Roy L; Laberge, Jeanne M

    2007-02-01

    The prevalence of portal hypertension and its complications is increasing among patients with hemophilia and cirrhosis. The authors evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic postosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement in this population. A retrospective analysis was performed of adult patients who underwent TIPS placement at a single center. Four patients with hemophilia and cirrhosis were identified. Outcome measures included technical success and complications, recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage, shunt patency, hepatic encephalopathy, ascites control, and mortality. With periprocedural factor VIII supplementation, TIPS were placed in all patients without complications and with improvement in portal hypertension. Outcomes after TIPS placement appear to be comparable to those in patients without hemophilia. PMID:17327567

  14. Management of Pregnancy in a Patient with Severe Hemophilia Type A

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vipra; Khalid, Aysha; Cohen, Alice J.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia type A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder with a diversity of clinical manifestations ranging from persistent bleeding after minor trauma, spontaneous deep muscle or joint hemorrhage, to intracranial hemorrhage. As an X-linked disorder, hemophilia is rare in females and therefore there is little experience with pregnancy and no standardized guidelines to prevent bleeding antepartum, at delivery, and postpartum. We report the clinical course and management of a woman with severe hemophilia A who on two occasions had uncomplicated pregnancies and vaginal deliveries at term utilizing bolus recombinant factor VIII concentrate. PMID:23943706

  15. Dallas, police surveillance and the NHF. National Hemophilia Foundation.

    PubMed

    Dubin, C S

    1995-04-01

    In 1995, the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) held its annual meeting in Dallas amid ongoing controversies over AIDS and viral contamination of the U.S. blood supply. Principal topics were the class action lawsuit, delivering justice to those infected with HIV, and the legislative campaign for government compensation. The Dallas meeting was marked by controversy: the NHF failed to endorse the class action suit against blood supply producers; the NHF Board elections produced a leadership dominated by people without hemophilia and ignored persons who represented change; and a large number of police were present, authorized by the NHF, and seen by many to be a result of the NHF members' concern about potentially unruly demonstrations or possibly as a way of squashing dissent and diversity. The NHF has also discouraged those infected with HIV from taking legal action, and they have openly obstructed the pursuit of legal justice by disseminating misinformation regarding individuals' legal rights. It is felt that the NHF cannot be characterized as a consumer advocacy group and that the Dallas meeting served only to reinforce the view of NHF's role in obstructing the real empowerment of the hemophiliac community.

  16. Recurrent bleeding following traumatic hyphema due to mild hemophilia B (Christmas disease).

    PubMed

    Wilker, Shawn C; Singh, Annapurna; Ellis, Forrest J

    2007-12-01

    Traumatic hyphemas generally resolve spontaneously. When recurrent bleeding occurs, a coagulopathy should be suspected. We present a unique case of a traumatic hyphema with recurrent bleeding in association with mild hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency).

  17. The polygenic nature of inhibitors in hemophilia A: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Schwarz, John; Menius, Erika D.; Pavlova, Anna; Oldenburg, Johannes; Kessing, Bailey; DiMichele, Donna M.; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Studies of determinants of development of inhibitory Abs to factor VIII in people with hemophilia A indicate a complex process involving multiple factors. The Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort was formed to extend our understanding of the genetic background of risk. The study group contains 833 subjects from 3 independent cohorts: brother pairs and singletons with and without a history of inhibitors, as well as 104 brother pairs discordant for inhibitor status. Using an Illumina iSelect platform, 13 331 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from 1081 genes, primarily immune response and immune modifier genes, were typed. Each cohort was analyzed separately with results combined using a meta-analytic technique. After adjustment for potential confounders, 53 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be significant predictors of inhibitor status using the criteria of odds ratios in the same direction in all cohorts or allowing for a 20% interval around an odds ratio = 1 in 1 of the 3 and significant in at least 2. Of the 53 markers, 13 had meta P < .001. Eight of the 53 were significant predictors among the discordant pairs. Results support the complexity of the immune response and encourage further research with the goal of understanding the pathways involved. PMID:23223434

  18. Young adults with hemophilia in the U.S.: demographics, comorbidities, and health status.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Randall; Baker, Judith; Riske, Brenda; Ullman, Megan; Niu, Xiaoli; Norton, Kristi; Lou, Mimi; Nichol, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in hemophilia care over the last several decades might lead to expectations of a near-normal quality of life for young adults with hemophilia. However, few published reports specifically examine health status indicators in this population. To remedy this knowledge gap, we examined the impact of hemophilia on physical and social functioning and quality of life among a national US cohort of 141 young men with hemophilia aged 18-34 years of age who received care at 10 geographically diverse, federally funded hemophilia treatment centers in 11 states between 2005 and 2013 and enrolled in the Hemophilia Utilization Group Studies. Indicators studied included educational achievement, employment status, insurance, health-related quality of life, and prevalence of the following comorbidities: pain, range of motion limitation, overweight/obesity, and viral status. The cohort was analyzed to compare those aged 18-24 to those aged 25-34 years. When compared to the general US adult population, this nationally representative cohort of young US adults with hemophilia experienced significant health and social burdens: more liver disease, joint damage, joint pain, and unemployment as well as lower high-school graduation rates. Nearly half were overweight or obese. Conversely, this cohort had higher levels of health insurance and equivalent mental health scores. While attention has typically focused on newborns, children, adolescents, and increasingly, on older persons with hemophilia, our findings suggest that a specific focus on young adults is warranted to determine the most effective interventions to improve health and functioning for this apparently vulnerable age group. PMID:26619192

  19. Unmet needs in the transition to adulthood: 18- to 30-year-old people with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Quon, Doris; Reding, Mark; Guelcher, Chris; Peltier, Skye; Witkop, Michelle; Cutter, Susan; Buranahirun, Cathy; Molter, Don; Frey, Mary Jane; Forsyth, Angela; Tran, Duc Bobby; Curtis, Randall; Hiura, Grant; Levesque, Justin; de la Riva, Debbie; Compton, Matthew; Iyer, Neeraj N; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    Young adults with hemophilia face unique challenges during the transition to adulthood, including issues associated with switching from pediatric to adult hematology care, building mature interpersonal relationships, and establishing an independent career with an assurance of medical insurance coverage. A greater understanding of these challenges is essential for developing effective strategies to address the specific needs of this population. These challenges may be differentiated from those of older adults with hemophilia in large part because of more extensive childhood prophylaxis and safer factor products, resulting in fewer joint problems and lower rates of HIV and HCV infections. This analysis of the changing nature and unmet needs of today's young adults entering into adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as potential strategies for optimally addressing these needs, was developed following roundtable discussions between patients, caregivers, hematologists, and other health care professionals participating in comprehensive care. Challenges identified among young adults with hemophilia include psychosocial issues related to maturity, personal responsibility, and increased independence, as well as concerns regarding when and with whom to share information about one's hemophilia, limited awareness of educational and financial resources, and a low perceived value of regular hematology care. The initiatives proposed herein highlight important opportunities for health care professionals at pediatric and adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as national organizations, community groups, and career counselors, to address key unmet needs of this patient population. PMID:26619193

  20. Unmet needs in the transition to adulthood: 18- to 30-year-old people with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Quon, Doris; Reding, Mark; Guelcher, Chris; Peltier, Skye; Witkop, Michelle; Cutter, Susan; Buranahirun, Cathy; Molter, Don; Frey, Mary Jane; Forsyth, Angela; Tran, Duc Bobby; Curtis, Randall; Hiura, Grant; Levesque, Justin; de la Riva, Debbie; Compton, Matthew; Iyer, Neeraj N; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    Young adults with hemophilia face unique challenges during the transition to adulthood, including issues associated with switching from pediatric to adult hematology care, building mature interpersonal relationships, and establishing an independent career with an assurance of medical insurance coverage. A greater understanding of these challenges is essential for developing effective strategies to address the specific needs of this population. These challenges may be differentiated from those of older adults with hemophilia in large part because of more extensive childhood prophylaxis and safer factor products, resulting in fewer joint problems and lower rates of HIV and HCV infections. This analysis of the changing nature and unmet needs of today's young adults entering into adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as potential strategies for optimally addressing these needs, was developed following roundtable discussions between patients, caregivers, hematologists, and other health care professionals participating in comprehensive care. Challenges identified among young adults with hemophilia include psychosocial issues related to maturity, personal responsibility, and increased independence, as well as concerns regarding when and with whom to share information about one's hemophilia, limited awareness of educational and financial resources, and a low perceived value of regular hematology care. The initiatives proposed herein highlight important opportunities for health care professionals at pediatric and adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as national organizations, community groups, and career counselors, to address key unmet needs of this patient population.

  1. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-09-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume.

  2. Current and future prospects for hemophilia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Peter; Walsh, Christopher E

    2016-07-01

    Here we review the recent literature on Hemophilia gene transfer/therapy. Gene therapy is one of several new technologies being developed as a treatment for bleeding disorders. We will discuss current and pending clinical efforts and attempt to relate how the field is trending. In doing so, we will focus on the use of recombinant Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer since all currently active trials are using this vector. Recent exciting results embody nearly 20 years of preclinical and translational research. After several early clinical attempts, therapeutic factor levels that can now be achieved reflect several modifications of the original vectors. Patterns of results are slowly starting to emerge as different AAV vectors are being tested. As with any new technology, there are drawbacks, and the potential for immune/inflammatory and oncogenic risks have emerged and will be discussed.

  3. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    PubMed

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  4. Progress and challenges in the development of a cell-based therapy for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fomin, M E; Togarrati, P P; Muench, M O

    2014-12-01

    Hemophilia A results from an insufficiency of factor VIII (FVIII). Although replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII is a life-saving therapy for hemophilia A patients, such therapy is a life-long treatment rather than a cure for the disease. In this review, we discuss the possibilities, progress, and challenges that remain in the development of a cell-based cure for hemophilia A. The success of cell therapy depends on the type and availability of donor cells, the age of the host and method of transplantation, and the levels of engraftment and production of FVIII by the graft. Early therapy, possibly even prenatal transplantation, may yield the highest levels of engraftment by avoiding immunological rejection of the graft. Potential cell sources of FVIII include a specialized subset of endothelial cells known as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) present in the adult and fetal liver, or patient-specific endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells that have undergone gene editing to produce FVIII. Achieving sufficient engraftment of transplanted LSECs is one of the obstacles to successful cell therapy for hemophilia A. We discuss recent results from transplants performed in animals that show production of functional and clinically relevant levels of FVIII obtained from donor LSECs. Hence, the possibility of treating hemophilia A can be envisioned through persistent production of FVIII from transplanted donor cells derived from a number of potential cell sources or through creation of donor endothelial cells from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Shortened Lifespan and Lethal Hemorrhage in a Hemophilia A Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pollpeter, Molly J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilia A animal models have helped advance our understanding of factor VIII deficiency. Previously, factor VIII deficient mouse models were reported to have a normal life span without spontaneous bleeds. However, the bleeding frequency and survival in these animals has not been thoroughly evaluated. Objective To investigate the survival and lethal bleeding frequency in two strains of E-16 hemophilia A mice. Methods We prospectively studied factor VIII deficient hemizygous affected males (n = 83) and homozygous affected females (n = 55) for survival and bleeding frequency. Animals were evaluated for presence and location of bleeds as potential cause of death. Results and Conclusions Hemophilia A mice had a median survival of 254 days, which is significantly shortened compared to wild type controls (p < 0.0001). In addition, the hemophilia A mice experienced hemorrhage in several tissues. This previously-underappreciated shortened survival in the hemophilia A murine model provides new outcomes for investigation of therapeutics and also reflects the shortened lifespan of patients if left untreated. PMID:27144769

  6. Protein Replacement Therapy and Gene Transfer in Canine Models of Hemophilia A, Hemophilia B, von Willebrand Disease, and Factor VII Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Timothy C.; Dillow, Aaron M.; Franck, Helen W.G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Raymer, Robin A.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Arruda, Valder R.; High, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Dogs with hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von Willebrand disease (VWD), and factor VII deficiency faithfully recapitulate the severe bleeding phenotype that occurs in humans with these disorders. The first rational approach to diagnosing these bleeding disorders became possible with the development of reliable assays in the 1940s through research that used these dogs. For the next 60 years, treatment consisted of replacement of the associated missing or dysfunctional protein, first with plasma-derived products and subsequently with recombinant products. Research has consistently shown that replacement products that are safe and efficacious in these dogs prove to be safe and efficacious in humans. But these highly effective products require repeated administration and are limited in supply and expensive; in addition, plasma-derived products have transmitted bloodborne pathogens. Recombinant proteins have all but eliminated inadvertent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, but the other limitations persist. Thus, gene therapy is an attractive alternative strategy in these monogenic disorders and has been actively pursued since the early 1990s. To date, several modalities of gene transfer in canine hemophilia have proven to be safe, produced easily detectable levels of transgene products in plasma that have persisted for years in association with reduced bleeding, and correctly predicted the vector dose required in a human hemophilia B liver-based trial. Very recently, however, researchers have identified an immune response to adeno-associated viral gene transfer vector capsid proteins in a human liver-based trial that was not present in preclinical testing in rodents, dogs, or nonhuman primates. This article provides a review of the strengths and limitations of canine hemophilia, VWD, and factor VII deficiency models and of their historical and current role in the development of improved therapy for humans with these inherited bleeding disorders. PMID:19293459

  7. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  8. Cognitive and psychological profiles in treatment compliance: a study in an elderly population with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Riva, Silvia; Nobili, Alessandro; Djade, Codjo D; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santagostino, Elena; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with hemophilia have to face new challenges linked to concomitant pathologies and concurrent use of different treatments. In order to promote optimal care in the elderly hemophilia population, this study is aimed to analyze treatment compliance in relation to the presence of comorbidities and the role of potential determinants that can affect compliance (positively or negatively), including health-related quality of life, cognitive decline, and sociodemographic parameters (eg, living situation, partnership, presence of caregivers). This will be an observational study of elderly patients with hemophilia (aged >60 years). Patients will be interviewed during their routine medical visits. The data interview will pertaining to several dimension of treatment management. This study will detect more vulnerable patients with special care needs and will highlight psychological factors that should be considered for future psychosocial interventions.

  9. Cognitive and psychological profiles in treatment compliance: a study in an elderly population with hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Silvia; Nobili, Alessandro; Djade, Codjo D; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santagostino, Elena; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with hemophilia have to face new challenges linked to concomitant pathologies and concurrent use of different treatments. In order to promote optimal care in the elderly hemophilia population, this study is aimed to analyze treatment compliance in relation to the presence of comorbidities and the role of potential determinants that can affect compliance (positively or negatively), including health-related quality of life, cognitive decline, and sociodemographic parameters (eg, living situation, partnership, presence of caregivers). This will be an observational study of elderly patients with hemophilia (aged >60 years). Patients will be interviewed during their routine medical visits. The data interview will pertaining to several dimension of treatment management. This study will detect more vulnerable patients with special care needs and will highlight psychological factors that should be considered for future psychosocial interventions. PMID:26185433

  10. Portal Vein Delivery of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Alexandra; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cooper, Mario; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Raymer, Robin A.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Herzog, Roland W.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a very complex organ with a large variety of functions, making it an attractive organ for gene replacement therapy. Many genetic disorders can be corrected by delivering gene products directly into the liver using viral vectors. In this chapter, we will describe gene delivery via portal vein administration in mice and dogs to correct the blood coagulation disorder hemophilia B. Although there are multiple delivery routes for both viral and non-viral vectors in animals, portal vein administration delivers vectors directly and efficiently into the liver. Complete correction of murine hemophilia B and multi-year near-correction of canine hemophilia B have been achieved following portal vein delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing factor IX from hepatocyte-specific promoters. Peripheral vein injection can lead to increased vector dissemination to off-target organ such as the lung and spleen. Below, we will describe portal vein injection delivery route via laparotomy. PMID:24557919

  11. New developments in the management of moderate-to-severe hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Nazeef, Moniba; Sheehan, John P

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic deficiency of coagulation factor IX (FIX) activity associated with recurrent deep tissue and joint bleeding that may lead to long-term disability. FIX replacement therapy using plasma-derived protein or recombinant protein has significantly reduced bleeding and disability from hemophilia B, particularly when used in a prophylactic fashion. Although modern factor replacement has excellent efficacy and safety, barriers to the broader use of prophylaxis remain, including the need for intravenous (IV) access, frequent dosing, variability in individual pharmacokinetics, and cost. To overcome the requirement for frequent factor dosing, novel forms of recombinant FIX have been developed that possess extended terminal half-lives. Two of these products (FIXFc and rIX-FP) represent fusion proteins with the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) Fc domain and albumin, respectively, resulting in proteins that are recycled in vivo by the neonatal Fc receptor. The third product has undergone site-specific PEGylation on the activation peptide of FIX, similarly resulting in a long-lived FIX form. Clinical trials in previously treated hemophilia B patients have demonstrated excellent efficacy and confirmed less-frequent dosing requirements for the extended half-life forms. However, gaps in knowledge remain with regard to the risk of inhibitor formation and allergic reactions in previously untreated patient populations, safety in elderly patients with hemophilia, effects on in vivo FIX distribution, and cost-effectiveness. Additional strategies designed to rebalance hemostasis in hemophilia patients include monoclonal-antibody-mediated inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity and siRNA-mediated reduction in antithrombin expression by the liver. Both of these approaches are long acting and potentially involve subcutaneous administration of the drug. In this review, we will discuss the biology of FIX, the evolution of FIX replacement therapy, the

  12. Specific and global coagulation assays in the diagnosis of discrepant mild hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Annette E; Van Veen, Joost J; Goodeve, Anne C; Kitchen, Steve; Makris, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The activity of the factor VIII coagulation protein can be measured by three methods: a one or two-stage clotting assay and a chromogenic assay. The factor VIII activity of most individuals with mild hemophilia A is the same regardless of which method is employed. However, approximately 30% of patients show marked discrepancies in factor VIII activity measured with the different methods. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of assay discrepancy in our center, assess the impact of alternative reagents on factor VIII activity assays and determine the usefulness of global assays of hemostasis in mild hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was measured in 84 individuals with mild hemophilia A using different reagents. Assay discrepancy was defined as a two-fold or greater difference between the results of the one-stage and two-stage clotting assays. Rotational thromboelastometry and calibrated automated thrombography were performed. Assay discrepancy was observed in 31% of individuals; 12% with lower activity in the two-stage assay and 19% with lower activity in the one-stage assay. The phenotype could not always be predicted from the individual's genotype. Chromogenic assays were shown to be a suitable alternative to the two-stage clotting assay. Thromboelastometry was found to have poor sensitivity in hemophilia. Calibrated automated thrombography supported the results obtained by the two-stage and chromogenic assays. The current international guidelines do not define the type of assay to be used in the diagnosis of mild hemophilia A and some patients could be misclassified as normal. In our study, 4% of patients would not have been diagnosed on the basis of the one-stage factor VIII assay. Laboratories should use both one stage and chromogenic (or two-stage) assays in the diagnosis of patients with possible hemophilia A.

  13. New developments in the management of moderate-to-severe hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Nazeef, Moniba; Sheehan, John P

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic deficiency of coagulation factor IX (FIX) activity associated with recurrent deep tissue and joint bleeding that may lead to long-term disability. FIX replacement therapy using plasma-derived protein or recombinant protein has significantly reduced bleeding and disability from hemophilia B, particularly when used in a prophylactic fashion. Although modern factor replacement has excellent efficacy and safety, barriers to the broader use of prophylaxis remain, including the need for intravenous (IV) access, frequent dosing, variability in individual pharmacokinetics, and cost. To overcome the requirement for frequent factor dosing, novel forms of recombinant FIX have been developed that possess extended terminal half-lives. Two of these products (FIXFc and rIX-FP) represent fusion proteins with the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) Fc domain and albumin, respectively, resulting in proteins that are recycled in vivo by the neonatal Fc receptor. The third product has undergone site-specific PEGylation on the activation peptide of FIX, similarly resulting in a long-lived FIX form. Clinical trials in previously treated hemophilia B patients have demonstrated excellent efficacy and confirmed less-frequent dosing requirements for the extended half-life forms. However, gaps in knowledge remain with regard to the risk of inhibitor formation and allergic reactions in previously untreated patient populations, safety in elderly patients with hemophilia, effects on in vivo FIX distribution, and cost-effectiveness. Additional strategies designed to rebalance hemostasis in hemophilia patients include monoclonal-antibody-mediated inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity and siRNA-mediated reduction in antithrombin expression by the liver. Both of these approaches are long acting and potentially involve subcutaneous administration of the drug. In this review, we will discuss the biology of FIX, the evolution of FIX replacement therapy, the

  14. New developments in the management of moderate-to-severe hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Nazeef, Moniba; Sheehan, John P

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic deficiency of coagulation factor IX (FIX) activity associated with recurrent deep tissue and joint bleeding that may lead to long-term disability. FIX replacement therapy using plasma-derived protein or recombinant protein has significantly reduced bleeding and disability from hemophilia B, particularly when used in a prophylactic fashion. Although modern factor replacement has excellent efficacy and safety, barriers to the broader use of prophylaxis remain, including the need for intravenous (IV) access, frequent dosing, variability in individual pharmacokinetics, and cost. To overcome the requirement for frequent factor dosing, novel forms of recombinant FIX have been developed that possess extended terminal half-lives. Two of these products (FIXFc and rIX-FP) represent fusion proteins with the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) Fc domain and albumin, respectively, resulting in proteins that are recycled in vivo by the neonatal Fc receptor. The third product has undergone site-specific PEGylation on the activation peptide of FIX, similarly resulting in a long-lived FIX form. Clinical trials in previously treated hemophilia B patients have demonstrated excellent efficacy and confirmed less-frequent dosing requirements for the extended half-life forms. However, gaps in knowledge remain with regard to the risk of inhibitor formation and allergic reactions in previously untreated patient populations, safety in elderly patients with hemophilia, effects on in vivo FIX distribution, and cost-effectiveness. Additional strategies designed to rebalance hemostasis in hemophilia patients include monoclonal-antibody-mediated inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity and siRNA-mediated reduction in antithrombin expression by the liver. Both of these approaches are long acting and potentially involve subcutaneous administration of the drug. In this review, we will discuss the biology of FIX, the evolution of FIX replacement therapy, the

  15. Acquired hemophilia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mulliez, S M N; Vantilborgh, A; Devreese, K M J

    2014-06-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against clotting factor VIII (FVIII). FVIII autoantibody is characterized as polyclonal immunoglobulin G directed against the FVIII procoagulant activity. This disease occurs most commonly in the elderly population and with preponderance of men in nonpregnancy-related AHA. There are well-established clinical associations with AHA such as malignancy, other autoimmune diseases and pregnancy. However, up to 50% of reported cases remain idiopathic. The clinical manifestation of AHA includes mostly spontaneous hemorrhages into skin, muscles and soft tissues, or mucous membranes. AHA should be suspected when a patient with no previous history of bleeding presents with bleeding and an unexplained prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. The diagnosis is confirmed in the laboratory by the subsequent identification of reduced FVIII levels and FVIII inhibitor titration. There is a high mortality, making prompt diagnosis and treatment vitally important. The principles of treatment consist in controlling the bleeding and eradicating the inhibitor. Because of the overall high relapse rate (15-33%), it is also recommended to follow up these patients. The review summarizes what is currently known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of AHA and starts with a case report.

  16. A genetic analysis of 23 Chinese patients with hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-Yun; Hu, Bei; Liu, Hui; Tang, Liang; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Ying-Ying; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia B (HB) is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the coagulation factor IX (FIX) gene. Genotyping patients with HB is essential for genetic counseling and provides useful information for patient management. In this study, the F9 gene from 23 patients with HB was analyzed by direct sequencing. Nineteen point mutations were identified, including a novel missense variant (c.520G > C, p.Val174Leu) in a patient with severe HB and a previously unreported homozygous missense mutation (c.571C > T, p.Arg191Cys) in a female patient with mild HB. Two large F9 gene deletions with defined breakpoints (g.10413_11363del, g.12163_23369del) were identified in two patients with severe HB using a primer walking strategy followed by sequencing. The flanking regions of the two breakpoints revealed recombination-associated elements (repetitive elements, non-B conformation forming motifs) with a 5-bp microhomology in the breakpoint junction of g.12163_23369del. These findings imply that non-homologous end joining and microhomology-mediated break-induced replication are the putative mechanisms for the deletions of the F9 gene. Because the g.12163_23369del deletion caused exons to be absent without a frameshift mutation occurring, a smaller FIX protein was observed in western blot analyses. PMID:27109384

  17. Tailored versus standard dose prophylaxis in children with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Cristina; Baldacci, Erminia; Mercanti, Caterina; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella

    2013-10-01

    Prophylaxis is universally recognized as the treatment of choice in people with hemophilia, and tailored prophylaxis is the consistent modification of the standard weight-based dosing regimen. A large number of factors guide the choice of a specific tailored regimen, and different regimens are under evaluation. Tailored low-dose frequent regimens are likely to be cost-effective, but they are less accepted by patients. Escalating dose regimens seem to be quite effective in preventing bleedings and, consequently, arthropathy, although data on long-term outcomes are still not available. Pharmacokinetic-driven approaches have been also proposed. Sensitive and validated tools able to reliably measure the different outcomes are necessary in this setting. With regard to the evaluation of arthropathy, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are promising imaging techniques in detecting early joint damage. Factor VIII trough levels can be considered a measure of the efficacy of FVIII infused, although other factors influence the bleeding pattern. Global assays of coagulation could provide more complete information on the hemostatic potential of a sample and predict bleeding phenotype. These techniques are also promising for the individualization of prophylaxis regimens, potentially resulting in less frequent dosing, more comfortable and less expensive approaches.

  18. Acquired hemophilia A in the HIV-infected patient: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rattanathammethee, Thanawat; Norasetthada, Lalita; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Rattarittamrong, Ekarat; Hantrakool, Sasinee; Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree

    2015-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII). Spontaneous bleeding in the various sites and severity is the most common clinical presentation. Here, we report a 74-year-old Thai woman with HIV infection who presented with spontaneous ecchymoses. The laboratory revealed isolated activated partial thromboplastin time prolongation with low FVIII activity and a presence of FVIII inhibitor. She was diagnosed with acquired hemophilia A. Corticosteroid monotherapy was the treatment regimen for inhibitor eradication. We demonstrate the clinical course of the rare condition and review the relevant literature.

  19. Large hemorrhage due to venipuncture in the elbow of a patient with severe hemophilia: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LYU, JINGTONG; WU, WENJIE; XIANG, ZHOU; HUANG, FUGUO

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A, which is the most common form of hemophilia, is caused by a deficiency of clotting factor VIII. The incidence of hemophilia A is 1:10,000 people worldwide. The most common complication associated with hemophilia A is bleeding into joints, predominantly the knees, ankles, and elbows, which may lead to destruction or osteoarthritis of the specific joint. Various degrees of disability may follow these initial or recurrent hemorrhages. Subsequent to improvements in medical management, patients with hemophilia A currently have a life expectancy similar to that of the normal population. However, the management of patients with hemophilia A remains a clinical challenge for various reasons, including the lack of reliable and cost-effective treatment, and the high risk of intra- or post-operative hemorrhages. Large hemorrhages due to the phlebotomizing of young patients are very rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report regarding the occurrence of a large hemorrhage due to venipuncture in the elbow of a patient with hemophilia A, and discusses the pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and the medico-chirurgical treatment of this patient. PMID:26998031

  20. Uncomplicated abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol in a hemophilia A carrier.

    PubMed

    Hou, Melody Y

    2016-08-01

    Little evidence exists regarding medical abortion for women with inherited bleeding disorders. A 21-year-old primigravid hemophilia A carrier desired a medical abortion. After counseling, she chose medical abortion, which occurred without excess bleeding or surgical intervention. PMID:27085601

  1. Efficacy and safety of recombinant factor VIII products in patients with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Musso, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The introduction of recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) clotting factor concentrates nearly 20 years ago represented a significant advance in the treatment of hemophilia A. The major advantage of rFVIII products compared with plasma-derived FVIII products is related to product safety, with rFVIII products virtually eliminating bloodborne pathogen transmission. The most challenging aspect of hemophilia A management today is the development of FVIII inhibitors; previously untreated patients are at the highest risk for inhibitor formation. Presented in this article are results of clinical trials in previously treated and untreated patients and postmarketing surveillance studies for the four commercially available rFVIII products (Recombinate, ReFacto, Kogenate FS/Kogenate Bayer and Advate). Recombinant FVIII therapies are highly efficacious when used ondemand and prophylactically, and they have excellent safety profiles; there have been no reports of viral- or prion-based disease transmission associated with rFVIII administration. The incidence rate of inhibitors in previously untreated patients ranges from 15% to approximately 30%. Because rFVIII concentrates have proven efficacy and safety profiles, a number of hemophilia treatment groups recommend rFVIII products as first-line therapy in the management of hemophilia A.

  2. Hemophilia relief bill passes, but money won't arrive soon.

    PubMed

    1998-11-27

    The Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief Act, signed by President Clinton, authorized up to $750 million in compensation to hemophiliacs infected with HIV through 1987 from contaminated blood products. That amount represents an estimated $100,000 per hemophiliac or survivor. The money will hopefully be available in fiscal 2000, subject to Congress passing a specific appropriations bill.

  3. Translational Data from Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Margaret H.; Arruda, Valder R.; Stedman, Hansell H.; Kay, Mark A.; High, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical testing of new therapeutic strategies in relevant animal models is an essential part of drug development. The choice of animal models of disease that are used in these studies is driven by the strength of the translational data for informing about safety, efficacy, and success or failure of human clinical trials. Hemophilia B is a monogenic, X-linked, inherited bleeding disorder that results from absent or dysfunctional coagulation factor IX (FIX). Regarding preclinical studies of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia B, dogs with severe hemophilia B (<1% FIX) provide well-characterized phenotypes and genotypes in which a species-specific transgene can be expressed in a mixed genetic background. Correction of the hemophilic coagulopathy by sustained expression of FIX, reduction of bleeding events, and a comprehensive assessment of the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the expressed transgene and recombinant AAV vector are all feasible end points in these dogs. This review compares the preclinical studies of AAV vectors used to treat dogs with hemophilia B with the results obtained in subsequent human clinical trials using muscle- and liver-based approaches. PMID:25675273

  4. Impact of an individualized prophylaxis approach on young adults with severe hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Susana; Carvalho, Manuela; Lopes, Manuela; Araújo, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    It is now well established that the treatment of choice for children with severe hemophilia is prophylaxis started early in life. Although, there is no consensus among the hemophilia management community to either stop or maintain prophylactic treatment in adulthood, experts, and centers advise individualized prophylaxis according to clinical bleeding pattern, condition of joints, pharmacokinetic profile, physical activity, type of employment, and patients' personal preferences. The aim of this article is to describe the impact of an individualized prophylaxis approach on young adults with severe hemophilia, in the setting of a Portuguese Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centre. We proposed a tailored prophylaxis approach on a young adult cohort with 10 patients with severe hemophilia (7× type A and 3× type B) on standard prophylactic regimens in childhood, based on clinical outcome. Patients were evaluated and prophylaxis was adjusted (dose and/or frequency) to daily life activity and bleeding pattern. After 12 months of follow-up, one patient returned to the previous regimen due to breakthrough bleeds and the remaining nine patients maintained their new prophylaxis approach, without increasing bleeding episodes. With an individualized approach, in this cohort of nine patients, we observed no negative impact on clinical outcome, with a proposed improvement in quality of life and a reduction of costs.

  5. Advances in hemophilia and the role of current and emerging prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of hemophilia treatment and management is the prevention of painful, disabling, and costly joint arthropathy that results from its characteristic bleeding into joints and muscles. Prophylactic treatment with clotting-factor concentrates has been shown to prevent hemophilic arthropathy and is, therefore, the standard of care for hemophilia A and B. Data has demonstrated the clinical efficacy and overall benefits of prophylaxis in young children, adolescents, and adults. Early initiation with prima-ry prophylaxis is ideal, but secondary prophylaxis in adolescents and adults has also demonstrated significant success. Because the standard of care includes prophylaxis with factor-concentrate replacement in order to prevent joint damage in patients with hemophilia, prophylaxis is now more common and needs to be addressed in all clinical settings, including managed care. However, further research is needed to help clinicians develop individualized factor-replacement protocols and under-stand the impact of long-term use into adulthood. World Federation of Hemophilia guidelines do not have definitive recommendations on continuation of prophylaxis into adulthood. The optimal regimen for initiating prophylaxis, duration of treatment, and dosing regimens continue to be studied.

  6. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  7. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  8. Developments in the treatment of hemophilia B: focus on emerging gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cancio, Maria I; Reiss, Ulrike M; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Gray, John T

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia B is a genetic disorder that is characterized by a deficiency of clotting factor IX (FIX) and excessive bleeding. Advanced understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease has led to the development of improved treatment strategies that aim to minimize the acute and long-term complications of the disease. Patients with hemophilia B are ideal candidates for gene therapy, mostly because a small increase in protein production can lead to significantly decreased bleeding diathesis. Although human clotting FIX was cloned and sequenced over 30 years ago, progress toward achieving real success in human clinical trials has been slow, with long-term, therapeutically relevant gene expression only achieved in one trial published in 2011. The history of this extensive research effort has revealed the importance of the interactions between gene therapy vectors and multiple arms of the host immune system at multiple stages of the transduction process. Different viral vector systems each have unique properties that influence their ability to deliver genes to different tissues, and the data generated in several clinical trials testing different vectors for hemophilia have guided our understanding toward development of optimal configurations for treating hemophilia B. The recent clinical success implementing a novel adeno-associated virus vector demonstrated sufficient FIX expression in patients to convert a severe hemophilia phenotype to mild, an achievement which has the potential to profoundly alter the impact of this disease on human society. Continued research should lead to vector designs that result in higher FIX activity at lower vector doses and with reduced host immune responses to the vector and the transgene product. PMID:24159262

  9. The investigation of relationship between joint findings and serum angiogenic and inflammatory factor levels in severe hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Karapnar, Tuba H; Karadaş, Nihal; Özek, Gülcihan; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Atabay, Berna; Türker, Meral; Yüksel, Faize; Karapınar, Deniz Y; Vergin, Canan; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2014-10-01

    Despite the use of primary prophylactic Factor VIII replacement in severe hemophilia A patients, bleeding into joints cannot be prevented completely and early diagnosis and treatment of the joint bleedings are important for prevention of permanent joint damage. Recent studies have shown that neoangiogenesis plays important role in development of synovitis after recurrent joint bleedings. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between joint findings and levels of serum angiogenic and inflammatory factors in severe hemophilia A patients.The patient groups consisted of 10 severe hemophilia A patients with acute joint bleeding and 25 severe hemophilia A patients without acute joint bleeding. They were all inhibitor negative. The control group consisted of 22 healthy male children. Complete blood cell count analysis, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin, lactic acid, and ELISA-based detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, thrombomodulin, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and endostatin were performed from peripheral blood of patient and the control groups. CRP and MIF levels were detected significantly higher in hemophilia patients with acute joint bleeding than patients without acute joint bleeding. There was a positive correlation between serum thrombomodulin, VEGF, and MIF levels. In this study, we demonstrated that serum CRP and MIF levels increases in acute bleeding period regardless of the presence of previous joint damage in children with severe hemophilia. CRP elevation may be a useful and rapid marker for acute bleeding in these patients.

  10. The Utilization of Rehabilitation in Patients with Hemophilia A in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rehabilitation plays an important role in the physical health of patients with hemophilia. However, comprehensive information regarding the utilization of rehabilitation for such patients remains scarce. Aim This population-based study aimed to examine the characteristics, trends, and most important factors affecting rehabilitation usage in patients with hemophilia A using a nationwide database in Taiwan. Methods Data from 777 patients with hemophilia A who were registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed using SAS 9.0. Results Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and clotting factor VIII concentrate costs were identified as factors affecting rehabilitation usage; musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures (odds ratio = 3.788; P < 0.001) were the most important predictor of whether a patient with hemophilia A would use rehabilitation services. Joint disorders, arthropathies, bone and cartilage disorders, intracranial hemorrhage, and brain trauma were common diagnoses during rehabilitation use. The costs of physical therapy (physiotherapy) comprised the majority (71.2%) of rehabilitation therapy categories. Increasingly, rehabilitation therapy was performed at physician clinics. The total rehabilitation costs were <0.1% of the total annual medical costs. Conclusion Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and increased use of clotting factor VIII concentrate affect the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A the most. The findings in this study could help clinicians comprehensively understand the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:27690229

  11. Nanocapsule-delivered Sleeping Beauty mediates therapeutic Factor VIII expression in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells of hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Kren, Betsy T.; Unger, Gretchen M.; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Trossen, Alycia A.; Korman, Vicci; Diethelm-Okita, Brenda M.; Reding, Mark T.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are a major endogenous source of Factor VIII (FVIII), lack of which causes the human congenital bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Despite extensive efforts, gene therapy using viral vectors has shown little success in clinical hemophilia trials. Here we achieved cell type–specific gene targeting using hyaluronan- and asialoorosomucoid-coated nanocapsules, generated using dispersion atomization, to direct genes to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes, respectively. To highlight the therapeutic potential of this approach, we encapsulated Sleeping Beauty transposon expressing the B domain–deleted canine FVIII in cis with Sleeping Beauty transposase in hyaluronan nanocapsules and injected them intravenously into hemophilia A mice. The treated mice exhibited activated partial thromboplastin times that were comparable to those of wild-type mice at 5 and 50 weeks and substantially shorter than those of untreated controls at the same time points. Further, plasma FVIII activity in the treated hemophilia A mice was nearly identical to that in wild-type mice through 50 weeks, while untreated hemophilia A mice exhibited no detectable FVIII activity. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposon targeted to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells provided long-term expression of FVIII, without apparent antibody formation, and improved the phenotype of hemophilia A mice. PMID:19509468

  12. A case of acquired hemophilia A diagnosed after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takuma; Komatsu, Michiharu; Ito, Akihiro; Ito, Tetsuya; Suga, Tomoaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Sakai, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    A 65-year-old male with no personal or familial history of bleeding disorders underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for neurogenic dysphagia due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. On postoperative day 6, continuous oozing of venous blood was observed at the stoma. Prothrombin time was within normal range, but activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged. Cross-mixing test results indicated the existence of an inhibitor, and laboratory findings revealed decreased factor VIII activity and high levels of factor VIII inhibitor. The patient was diagnosed as having acquired hemophilia A, for which steroid monotherapy was effective. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but potentially fatal disease. Clinicians should be aware of this condition in patients presenting with sudden hemorrhage after PEG or other endoscopic treatments, even in those with no apparent history of bleeding.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell treatment for hemophilia: a review of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sokal, E M; Lombard, C; Mazza, G

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia remains a non-curative disease, and patients are constrained to undergo repeated injections of clotting factors. In contrast, the sustained production of endogenous factors VIII (FVIII) or IX (FIX) by the patient's own cells could represent a curative treatment. Gene therapy has thus provided new hope for these patients. However, the issues surrounding the durability of expression and immune responses against gene transfer vectors remain. Cell therapy, involving stem cells expanded in vitro, can provide de novo protein synthesis and, if implanted successfully, could induce a steady-state production of low quantities of factors, which may keep the patient above the level required to prevent spontaneous bleeding. Liver-derived stem cells are already being assessed in clinical trials for inborn errors of metabolism and, in view of their capacity to produce FVIII and FIX in cell culture, they are now also being considered for clinical application in hemophilia patients.

  14. An innovative outcome-based care and procurement model of hemophilia management.

    PubMed

    Gringeri, Alessandro; Doralt, Jennifer; Valentino, Leonard A; Crea, Roberto; Reininger, Armin J

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorder associated with spontaneous and post-traumatic bleeding. Each hemophilia patient requires a personalized approach to episodic or prophylactic treatment, but self-management can be challenging for patients, and avoidable bleeding may occur. Patient-tailored care may provide more effective prevention of bleeding, which in turn, may decrease the likelihood of arthropathy and associated chronic pain, missed time from school or work, and progressive loss of mobility. A strategy is presented here aiming to reduce or eliminate bleeding altogether through a holistic approach based on individual patient characteristics. In an environment of budget constraints, this approach would link procurement to patient outcome, adding incentives for all stakeholders to strive for optimal care and, ultimately, a bleed-free world.

  15. Attitudes and practices of hemophilia care providers involved in HIV risk-reduction counseling.

    PubMed

    Meredith, K L; Hannan, J A; Green, T A; Wiley, S D

    1994-10-01

    Hemophilia physicians, nurses, and social workers attending a national conference were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing their attitudes and practices regarding HIV risk-reduction counseling. All of the 150 respondents reported recommending the use of condoms to their clients, but only two-thirds felt comfortable demonstrating a condom, while fewer could explain condom choices or how to make safe sex more pleasurable. Less than half questioned their clients about history of STDs, sexual practices, or level of sexual satisfaction. Those who devoted 50 percent or more time to HIV risk-reduction efforts reported being more complete in their assessment and more comfortable in their counseling role. Providers claimed it would help if they had more time (84%) and better skills (64%, especially nurses) for this practice. Because HIV prevention services in hemophilia are delivered by a team, further studies are required to determine the aggregate impact of their intervention on the client.

  16. Hemophilia And Von Willebrand Disease In Children: Emergency Department Evaluation And Management.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Kevin R; Rubinstein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Hemophilia and von Willebrand disease are the most common inherited bleeding disorders encountered in the emergency department. Evidence suggests that the management of bleeding disorders in the emergency department is currently suboptimal, and literature to guide evaluation and management in this setting is limited, though some guidelines do exist. The emergency clinician must have a high index of suspicion for new diagnoses, particularly in young patients with unprovoked bleeding and children with multiple or severe bleeds. The foundation of hemophilia treatment is urgent clotting factor replacement, with replacement goals guided by the presenting complaint. Bleeding in von Willebrand disease may be treated with products containing von Willebrand factor or with desmopressin. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, common presentations, evaluation strategies, and emergency management of these bleeding disorders.

  17. Advances in the clinical management of inhibitors in hemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, Cindy A

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors to factor (F)VIII or FIX are the most serious and challenging complication of hemophilia treatment, increasing morbidity and mortality because bleeds no longer respond to standard clotting factor replacement therapy. For patients with high-titer inhibitors, immune tolerance induction achieved through regular factor exposure is the only proven therapy capable of Inhibitor eradication and is almost always indicated for inhibitors of recent onset. Bypassing therapy is used to treat and prevent bleeding, but neither of the two currently available bypassing agents has the predictable hemostatic efficacy of factor replacement in hemophilia patients without inhibitors. Major research efforts are focused on the development of new, more potent therapies for the management of patients with inhibitors.

  18. [Mutational Analysis of Hemophilia B in Russia: Molecular-Genetic Study].

    PubMed

    Surin, V L; Demidova, E Yu; Selivanova, D S; Luchinina, Yu A; Salomashkina, V V; Pshenichnikova, O S; Likhacheva, E A

    2016-04-01

    Hemophilia B is a hereditary X-linked coagulation disorder. This pathology is caused by various defects in the factor IX gene, which is, being about 34 kb long and consisting of eight exons, localized in the Xq27 locus of the. X-chromosome long arm. Mutations were revealed in 56 unrelated patients with hemophilia B in this study by using direct sequencing of factor IX gene functionally important fragments. Forty-six mutations were found with prevailing missense mutations (n = 30). The rest of the mutations were nonsense (n = 4) and splicing (n = 4) mutations, large deletions (n = 3), microdeletions (n = 2), microinsertions (n = 2), and promoter mutations (n = 1). Eleven of 46 mutations were previously unknown for human populations.

  19. Permanent phenotypic correction of hemophilia B in immunocompetent mice by prenatal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Simon N; Nivsarkar, Megha S; Mistry, Ajay R; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Kemball-Cook, Geoffrey; Mosley, Karen L; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos; Radcliffe, Pippa; Holder, Maxine V; Brittan, Mairi; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Bigger, Brian W; Gregory, Lisa G; Cook, H Terence; Ali, Robin R; Thrasher, Adrian; Tuddenham, Edward G D; Themis, Mike; Coutelle, Charles

    2004-11-01

    Hemophilia B, also known as Christmas disease, arises from mutations in the factor IX (F9) gene. Its treatment in humans, by recombinant protein substitution, is expensive, thus limiting its application to intermittent treatment in bleeding episodes and prophylaxis during surgery; development of inhibitory antibodies is an associated hazard. This study demonstrates permanent therapeutic correction of his disease without development of immune reactions by introduction of an HIV-based lentiviral vector encoding the human factor IX protein into the fetal circulation of immunocompetent hemophiliac and normal outbred mice. Plasma factor IX antigen remained at around 9%, 13%, and 16% of normal in the 3 hemophilia B mice, respectively, until the last measurement at 14 months. Substantial improvement in blood coagulability as measured by coagulation assay was seen in all 3 mice and they rapidly stopped bleeding after venipuncture. No humoral or cellular immunity against the protein, elevation of serum liver enzymes, or vector spread to the germline or maternal circulation were detected.

  20. Strategies to encourage physical activity in patients with hemophilia to improve quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Miwa; Takedani, Hideyuki; Yokota, Kazuhiko; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder caused by a congenital abnormality of blood coagulation. Until the mid-1970s, patients with hemophilia (PWH) were advised to refrain from physical activity (PA) because of a perceived increased risk of bleeding. Since then, PA, which is recognized as being essential for health maintenance, is now recommended by the World Federation of Hemophilia. Moreover, a number of studies reported that PA can improve treatment efficacy and prevent bleeding in PWH. Physical assessment and intervention in PA are currently used in clinical practice. However, the necessity of PA is not emphasized, and many PWH generally have low- to- no PA. Therefore, a behavior change approach to encourage patient motivation is becoming ever more important. In this article, we review articles addressing PA in PWH and discuss strategies to encourage PA through a behavior change approach by focusing on factors relevant to hemophilia, such as benefits and bleeding risk of PA, risk management of bleeding, PA characteristics, and difficulty with exercise adherence. The trust relationship between clinicians and patients, a transtheoretical model of behavior change, and motivation theory as approaches to promote PA are introduced. Finally, we review a case report of the clinical success of a behavior change approach to promote PA. Many PWH find it difficult to continue PA because of aging, fear of bleeding, insufficient recognition of PA benefits, and psychological problems. Therefore, it is essential and important to perform prophylaxis with PWH and to heighten their understanding of the benefits and risks of PA, before initiating the exercise regimen. For those patients who find it difficult to participate in PA, it is necessary to plan individual-based behavior change approach and encourage self-efficacy. PMID:27274330

  1. Strategies to encourage physical activity in patients with hemophilia to improve quality of life.

    PubMed

    Goto, Miwa; Takedani, Hideyuki; Yokota, Kazuhiko; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder caused by a congenital abnormality of blood coagulation. Until the mid-1970s, patients with hemophilia (PWH) were advised to refrain from physical activity (PA) because of a perceived increased risk of bleeding. Since then, PA, which is recognized as being essential for health maintenance, is now recommended by the World Federation of Hemophilia. Moreover, a number of studies reported that PA can improve treatment efficacy and prevent bleeding in PWH. Physical assessment and intervention in PA are currently used in clinical practice. However, the necessity of PA is not emphasized, and many PWH generally have low- to- no PA. Therefore, a behavior change approach to encourage patient motivation is becoming ever more important. In this article, we review articles addressing PA in PWH and discuss strategies to encourage PA through a behavior change approach by focusing on factors relevant to hemophilia, such as benefits and bleeding risk of PA, risk management of bleeding, PA characteristics, and difficulty with exercise adherence. The trust relationship between clinicians and patients, a transtheoretical model of behavior change, and motivation theory as approaches to promote PA are introduced. Finally, we review a case report of the clinical success of a behavior change approach to promote PA. Many PWH find it difficult to continue PA because of aging, fear of bleeding, insufficient recognition of PA benefits, and psychological problems. Therefore, it is essential and important to perform prophylaxis with PWH and to heighten their understanding of the benefits and risks of PA, before initiating the exercise regimen. For those patients who find it difficult to participate in PA, it is necessary to plan individual-based behavior change approach and encourage self-efficacy. PMID:27274330

  2. Life-threatening hemorrhage from acquired hemophilia A as a presenting manifestation of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Chirag; Gill, Amandeep; Sekhon, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Acquired factor VIII deficiency (acquired hemophilia A) is a rare condition characterized by the acquisition of autoantibodies that affect the clotting activity of factor VIII (fVIII). The most common manifestation in affected patients is a hemorrhagic diathesis. This disorder is associated with autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, postpartum period, drugs, and malignancy. Management of this condition begins with attempts to arrest an acute bleed based on the site and severity of bleeding and inhibitor titer. The next priority is eradication of the fVIII antibodies using immunosuppressive therapies. We report the case of a 66-year-old male who presented with spontaneous right thigh hematoma with prolonged activated partial prothrombin time and normal prothrombin time. Mixing studies confirmed the presence of an inhibitor. Further investigation for the underlying etiology of acquired hemophilia A leads to diagnosis of prostate cancer. Treatment consisted of bypassing agents including activated factor VII and activated prothrombin plasma concentrate to arrest the bleeding. Steroids and cyclophosphamide were added to suppress the fVIII inhibitors. Concomitant treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with chemotherapy confirmed the eradication of the inhibitors. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of prostate cancer diagnosed and treated simultaneously with acquired hemophilia A resulting in favorable patient outcome. PMID:27609734

  3. Impact of inhibitors on hemophilia A mortality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Soucie, J Michael; Miller, Connie H

    2015-05-01

    The previously published mortality studies are limited in hemophilia populations but suggest that there is no increased risk of mortality in factor VIII inhibitor patients. This retrospective study analyzed surveillance data collected on 7,386 males with severe hemophilia A over a 13-year period to assess the association between a current inhibitor and death. During the study period, 432 participants died, among whom 48 were patients with an inhibitor. Clinical characteristics most strongly associated with death were increased number of reported bleeds, signs of liver disease, infection with either HIV or HCV, and the presence of inhibitor. Patients who underwent successful tolerization were not considered inhibitor patients in our analysis. In a multivariable analysis, the odds of death were 70% higher among patients with a current inhibitor compared to those without an inhibitor (P < 0.01). Deaths among patients with inhibitors were much more likely to be attributed to bleeding complications than those among patients without an inhibitor (42 vs. 12%, P < 0.0001). We conclude that males with severe hemophilia A and a current inhibitor are at increased risk of death.

  4. Leopold: the "bleeder prince" and public knowledge about hemophilia in Victorian Britain.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Alan R

    2012-07-01

    Hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorder inherited by males born of unaffected female carriers of the trait. British physicians became knowledgeable about this hereditary disease early in the nineteenth century as they investigated families transmitting the character through several generations. Prince Leopold (b. 1853), the fourth son of Queen Victoria, experienced recurrent bleeding episodes and was diagnosed with hemophilia during childhood. His hemorrhagic attacks were first described in the medical journals during 1868, and subsequently in the London and provincial newspapers. The royal family carefully managed news about health matters, and many newspapers reported widespread public sympathy for the travails of the queen and her children. But the republican press argued that the disaffected working classes resented the hyperbole connecting the health of royal individuals with the political future of the entire nation. Public discussion of hemophilia transformed it from a rare medical phenomenon to a matter of national news. Practicing physicians, the royal family, and the general public all came to understand the clinical features and the hereditary nature of the problem. Members of the royal family subsequently utilized this information to guide the marriages of their own children to prevent the spread of this dreaded bleeding disorder.

  5. Successful Phenotype Improvement following Gene Therapy for Severe Hemophilia A in Privately Owned Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Mary Beth; Haskins, Mark E.; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Severe hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by <1% of residual factor VIII (FVIII) clotting activity. The disease affects several mammals including dogs, and, like humans, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the canine model has been one of the best predictors of the therapeutic dose tested in clinical trials for hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and other genetic diseases, such as congenital blindness. Here we report our experience with liver gene therapy with AAV-FVIII in two outbred, privately owned dogs with severe HA that resulted in sustained expression of 1–2% of normal FVIII levels and prevented 90% of expected bleeding episodes. A Thr62Met mutation in the F8 gene was identified in one dog. These data recapitulate the improvement of the disease phenotype in research animals, and in humans, with AAV liver gene therapy for hemophilia B. Our experience is a novel example of the benefits of a relevant preclinical canine model to facilitate both translational studies in humans and improved welfare of privately owned dogs. PMID:27011017

  6. Development of acquired hemophilia A during treatment of multiple myeloma with lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Saburi, Masuho; Ohtsuka, Eiichi; Itani, Kazuhito; Nagamatsu, Kentarou; Ikebe, Taichi; Miyazaki, Yasuhiko; Ogata, Masao; Saburi, Yoshio

    2015-05-01

    We describe a 67-year-old female demonstrating symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) with anemia and bone lesions initially diagnosed in 2009. Although a partial response was achieved after bortezomib and dexamethasone treatment, MM recurred in 2012. Therefore, treatment with lenalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone was commenced. Coagulation tests conducted prior to the chemotherapy were normal. Lenalidomide was discontinued after 10 days due to exacerbation of renal dysfunction. Simultaneously, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was prolonged to 89.5 seconds. The mixing test showed an inhibitor pattern, with factor VIII at 2% and factor VIII inhibitor at 4.85 BU/ml. A diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A was made, and treatment with prednisolone was started, after which APTT improved to 36.4 seconds and factor VIII inhibitor decreased to 1.09 BU/ml. The factor VIII inhibitor level again increased concomitantly with restarting lenalidomide, which was, therefore, discontinued, while immunosuppressive therapy was administered with the addition of cyclophosphamide. Factor VIII inhibitor gradually disappeared from the patient's blood over the next four months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of lenalidomide as a possible cause of acquired hemophilia A. Our experience indicates that we need to pay attention to acquired hemophilia A after initiating lenalidomide therapy in patients with hematologic malignancies.

  7. Targeting factor replacement therapy in severe hemophilia: which level is important?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathelijn; Berntorp, Erik

    2015-11-01

    The original aim of prophylactic replacement therapy was to convert the bleeding pattern of severe hemophilia to that of moderate hemophilia through regular infusions of clotting factor concentrates. However, targeting prophylaxis on minimum trough levels does not prevent all bleeding. At the group level, there is a clear association of factor levels with bleeding and outcome. But bleeding phenotype in individual patients shows large variation, independent of trough levels maintained. The association of peak levels with bleeding on prophylaxis is not established. Experience with surgery suggests that certain peak levels need to be achieved during other hemostatic challenges, such as playing sports. Individualization of prophylaxis should include timing of infusion according to special activities. The clinical relevance of factor levels is even more urgent since the recent introduction of long-acting clotting factor concentrates with their different pharmacokinetic profiles and the prospect of gene therapy resulting in constant factor levels. It should be considered that the success of any prophylactic regimen is also dependent on other factors, such as the age at initiation of prophylaxis, adherence, lifestyle, cartilage susceptibility, and the other components of the clotting system. Factor levels are thus an important but quite small piece in the total picture of treating hemophilia and we currently cannot identify a specific trough or peak level to use for monitoring. At the same time, knowledge of a patients' level during the infusion intervals may help to individualize and adjust treatment according to the clinical symptoms.

  8. Successful Phenotype Improvement following Gene Therapy for Severe Hemophilia A in Privately Owned Dogs.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Haskins, Mark E; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A; Arruda, Valder R

    2016-01-01

    Severe hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by <1% of residual factor VIII (FVIII) clotting activity. The disease affects several mammals including dogs, and, like humans, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the canine model has been one of the best predictors of the therapeutic dose tested in clinical trials for hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and other genetic diseases, such as congenital blindness. Here we report our experience with liver gene therapy with AAV-FVIII in two outbred, privately owned dogs with severe HA that resulted in sustained expression of 1-2% of normal FVIII levels and prevented 90% of expected bleeding episodes. A Thr62Met mutation in the F8 gene was identified in one dog. These data recapitulate the improvement of the disease phenotype in research animals, and in humans, with AAV liver gene therapy for hemophilia B. Our experience is a novel example of the benefits of a relevant preclinical canine model to facilitate both translational studies in humans and improved welfare of privately owned dogs.

  9. Life-threatening hemorrhage from acquired hemophilia A as a presenting manifestation of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Chirag; Gill, Amandeep; Sekhon, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Acquired factor VIII deficiency (acquired hemophilia A) is a rare condition characterized by the acquisition of autoantibodies that affect the clotting activity of factor VIII (fVIII). The most common manifestation in affected patients is a hemorrhagic diathesis. This disorder is associated with autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, postpartum period, drugs, and malignancy. Management of this condition begins with attempts to arrest an acute bleed based on the site and severity of bleeding and inhibitor titer. The next priority is eradication of the fVIII antibodies using immunosuppressive therapies. We report the case of a 66-year-old male who presented with spontaneous right thigh hematoma with prolonged activated partial prothrombin time and normal prothrombin time. Mixing studies confirmed the presence of an inhibitor. Further investigation for the underlying etiology of acquired hemophilia A leads to diagnosis of prostate cancer. Treatment consisted of bypassing agents including activated factor VII and activated prothrombin plasma concentrate to arrest the bleeding. Steroids and cyclophosphamide were added to suppress the fVIII inhibitors. Concomitant treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with chemotherapy confirmed the eradication of the inhibitors. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of prostate cancer diagnosed and treated simultaneously with acquired hemophilia A resulting in favorable patient outcome. PMID:27609734

  10. Danazol increases factor VIII and factor IX in classic hemophilia and Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Gralnick, H R; Rick, M E

    1983-06-01

    We gave danazol (600 mg per day orally for 14 days), an attenuated androgen, to four adults with classic hemophilia and one adult with Christmas disease. The levels of factor VIII in the patients with classic hemophilia ranged from 1 to 3 per cent before treatment and rose to 3 to 8 per cent during the treatment period. The level of factor IX in the patient with Christmas disease rose from 5 to 14 per cent. The rise in clotting-factor activity was usually observed within five to six days after the initiation of therapy and peaked between 7 and 13 days. The drug had no untoward effects. During the 70 patient-days of therapy, only two patients required plasma products, each on one occasion. These data suggest that danazol therapy may decrease the hemorrhagic tendency and reduce the need for transfusions of plasma products in classic hemophilia and Christmas disease. Controlled clinical trials will be required to establish its value in these applications.

  11. Social Worker Perceptions and Observations Regarding Men's Management of Hemophilia and Use of Community-Based Support.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Erik Bruce

    2015-08-01

    The study reported in this article was conducted in response to Utah service provider concerns that men with hemophilia may be disengaged from their local community-based support network. This study explored the challenges, adaptations, and needs of men with hemophilia from the perspective of Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC) social workers. Utah's two active HTC social workers participated in face-to-face interviews. Fourteen HTC social workers from surrounding regions completed written interviews. The researcher used a qualitative, grounded theory approach to analyze the data. Resilience theory provided a lens for interpreting the results. Findings from these professionals indicate that men with hemophilia appear to be ambivalent toward services that are available to them for reasons that include work and insurance status, prior personal history with the bleeding disorders community, strength of relationship with local service providers, degree of customization of HTC services, and the desire to maintain personal independence. Understanding this dynamic may be helpful in developing services that are more specifically tailored to the needs of men with hemophilia, in addition to potentially providing stronger community-based support to men with other genetic disorders. PMID:26285364

  12. Treatment of Hemophilia A in Utero and Postnatally using Sheep as a Model for Cell and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Porada, Christopher D.; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A represents the most common inheritable deficiency of the coagulation proteins. Current state-of- the-art treatment consists of frequent prophylactic infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII protein to maintain hemostasis, and has greatly increased life expectancy and quality of life for many hemophilia A patients. This treatment approach is, however, far from ideal, due to the need for lifelong intravenous infusions, the high treatment cost, and the fact that it is unavailable to a large percentage of the world’s hemophiliacs. There is thus a need for novel treatments that can promise long-term or permanent correction. In contrast to existing protein based therapeutics, gene therapy offers to provide a permanent cure following few, or even a single, treatment. In the present paper, we review ongoing work towards this end, focusing on studies we have performed in a large animal model. Some of the key topics covered in this review include the unique opportunities sheep offer as a model system, the re-establishment and clinical and molecular characterization of a line of sheep with severe hemophilia A, the advantages and feasibility of treating a disease like hemophilia A in utero, and the use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) as cellular delivery vehicles for the FVIII gene. The review finishes with a brief discussion of our recent success correcting ovine hemophilia A with a postnatal transplant with gene-modified MSC, and the limitations of this approach that remain to be overcome. PMID:23264887

  13. Social Worker Perceptions and Observations Regarding Men's Management of Hemophilia and Use of Community-Based Support.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Erik Bruce

    2015-08-01

    The study reported in this article was conducted in response to Utah service provider concerns that men with hemophilia may be disengaged from their local community-based support network. This study explored the challenges, adaptations, and needs of men with hemophilia from the perspective of Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC) social workers. Utah's two active HTC social workers participated in face-to-face interviews. Fourteen HTC social workers from surrounding regions completed written interviews. The researcher used a qualitative, grounded theory approach to analyze the data. Resilience theory provided a lens for interpreting the results. Findings from these professionals indicate that men with hemophilia appear to be ambivalent toward services that are available to them for reasons that include work and insurance status, prior personal history with the bleeding disorders community, strength of relationship with local service providers, degree of customization of HTC services, and the desire to maintain personal independence. Understanding this dynamic may be helpful in developing services that are more specifically tailored to the needs of men with hemophilia, in addition to potentially providing stronger community-based support to men with other genetic disorders.

  14. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel M; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders.

  15. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel M.; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  16. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel M; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  17. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    PubMed Central

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels <0.05 IUmL−1) undergoing elective, minor or major surgery. Retrospective data were collected on FVIII treatment, including timing and dosing, time point of FVIII sampling and all FVIII plasma concentrations achieved (trough, peak and steady state), brand of concentrate, as well as patients’ and surgical characteristics. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (P<0.01) and increased in cases with blood group O (26%; P<0.01). In addition, a minor decrease in clearance was observed when a major surgical procedure was performed (7%; P<0.01). The developed population model describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. PMID:27390359

  18. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching )

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Emerging Issues in Diagnosis, Biology, and Inhibitor Risk in Mild Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Eckhardt, Corien; van Velzen, Alice; Linari, Silvia; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Mild hemophilia A (MHA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder defined by factor VIII (FVIII) levels between 5 and 40 U/dL. Diagnosis occurs later in life compared with severe or moderate disease. Although bleeding episodes are especially posttraumatic, their unexpected occurrence may be potentially life threatening if diagnosis is missed or delayed. Desmopressin is the treatment of choice for MHA since it is cheap and safe, but a significant proportion of cases do not attain FVIII postinfusion greater than 50 U/dL, which is considered a safe level for major surgery. Thus, replacement therapy may be needed and is usually successful in MHA, but recent data indicate that this can be associated with the occurrence of inhibitors against FVIII, as for severe hemophilia A. However, in contrast to severe or moderate hemophilia A, patients with MHA have a lifelong risk of inhibitor formation. Inhibitors may change the clinical phenotype dramatically, as the inhibitor frequently cross-reacts with the patient's endogenous FVIII, reducing the endogenous FVIII plasma levels below 1 U/dL. Specific F8 missense mutations predispose to inhibitor development. Inhibitors are frequently provoked by intensive treatment with therapeutic FVIII concentrates (more than 5 consecutive exposure days). Bleeding in inhibitor patients may be treated with desmopressin, high doses of FVIII concentrate or FVIII bypassing agents. Many inhibitors disappear over time when no FVIII concentrate is administered. However, this does not imply that a patient is tolerant and an anamnestic reaction may occur when treatment with FVIII concentrate is again necessary. To eradicate, an inhibitor different strategies may be used: watchful waiting, immunosuppression, or immune tolerance induction regimen.

  20. Potential role of a new PEGylated recombinant factor VIII for hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Tung Thanh; Gumuscu, Burak

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A, a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor (F) VIII, is an X-linked bleeding disorder with an approximate incidence of one in 5,000 male infants. Bleeding-related complications often result in greater severity of disease, poor quality of life, surgical interventions for severe joint destruction, and shortened life span. With the availability of plasma-derived and recombinant FVIII products, the benefits of primary prophylaxis were demonstrated and is now the standard of care for patients with severe factor deficiencies. Current hemophilia research is focusing on the creation of new factor replacement therapies with longer half-lives; accessing alternative mechanisms to achieve desired hemostasis and enhance bypassing activity; and limiting the immunogenicity of the protein. PEGylation involves the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a protein, peptide, or a small molecule drug. PEG effectively increases the molecular weight and size of the protein by creating a hydrophilic cloud around the molecule. This molecular change may reduce susceptibility of the molecule to proteolytic activity and degradation. It is also believed that PEGylation changes the surface charge of the protein that ultimately interferes with some receptor-mediated clearance processes. The half-life of PEGylated factor is more prolonged when compared to non-PEGylated full-length recombinant FVIII. The dawn of a new era in the care of hemophilia patients is upon us with the release of recombinant FVIII products with extended half-lives, and products with even more extended half-life will become available in a very short time. With all the promise of these new agents, many questions still remain. PMID:27382347

  1. Use of recombinant activated factor VII for acute bleeding episodes in acquired hemophilia: final analysis from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry acquired hemophilia study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alice D.; Kessler, Craig M.; Al-Mondhiry, Hamid A.B.; Gut, Robert Z.; Cooper, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry was used to monitor the postapproval use and safety of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa). The objective of this article is to evaluate the data from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry related to rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes in patients with acquired hemophilia. For each rFVIIa-treated bleeding episode, the initial dose, total dose, average infused dose, number of doses, and treatment duration were calculated. Efficacy was assessed on a three-point scale. Out of the 166 registered patients with acquired hemophilia, 110 patients were treated for 237 bleeding episodes (139 rFVIIa treated); the majority (70%) were in patients older than 60 years. The most frequently reported bleeding locations were subcutaneous (40%) and mucosal (32%). Subcutaneous bleeding episodes were more commonly reported in women (55% vs. 40% men) and white patients (44 vs. 27% black). Of the 139 rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes, rFVIIa was used as first-line treatment in 127 bleeding episodes. The median initial dose was 90 μg/kg; the median total dose per episode was 333.5 μg/kg. Physician-rated efficacy of rFVIIa for each bleeding episode was reported as ‘bleeding stopped’ in 85% of bleeding episodes, ‘bleeding slowed’ in 11% of bleeding episodes, ‘no improvement’ in 4% of bleeding episodes, and was not documented in 1 bleeding episode. One thromboembolic event was reported; transient neurologic symptoms were reported in a 31-year-old postpartum patient after 110 doses of rFVIIa. Adequate hemostasis was provided for most rFVIIa-treated bleeding episodes at doses largely conforming to the package insert. No major safety concerns were reported. PMID:26761583

  2. Vitamin D levels in children with severe hemophilia A: an underappreciated deficiency.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2015-04-01

    Osteoporosis in hemophilic patients is a significant problem. The causes of osteoporosis in hemophilic patients are lack of adequate exercise, multiple hemorrhage and inflammation, and low vitamin D levels. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children with severe hemophilia A. Forty-seven children with severe hemophilia were included in the study. None of the patients had previously received vitamin D supplementation. No patient had clinical or radiologic findings of rickets or seropositivity of hepatitis C virus or HIV. The mean age of the patients was 11.64 ± 5.70 (range, 2-18) years. The mean vitamin D level was 16.35 ± 7.49 ng/ml (range, 3.25-33.80). Vitamin D levels were below 10 ng/ml (severe vitamin D deficiency) in 9 cases (19%), between 10 and 19.99 ng/ml (vitamin D deficiency) in 23 cases (49%), between 20 and 29.99 ng/ml (vitamin D insufficiency) in 13 cases (28%), and above 30 ng/ml (normal vitamin D level) in 2 cases (4%). The mean serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in the children with hemophilia during winter and autumn were significantly lower than that during summer (P = 0.0028 and P = 0.0091, respectively). A majority of our hemophilic patients (96%) had low vitamin D levels. The study showed that the risk of vitamin D deficiency is the most highest during winter and autumn. Normal lifelong vitamin D levels are especially important in hemophilia because of the possible synergistic effect of vitamin D levels on periarticular and general osteoporosis, which is intrinsic to hemophilic conditions. We advise routine checking of vitamin D levels twice a year and vitamin D supplementation to maintain its level between 30 and 100 ng/ml. PMID:25485786

  3. Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

  4. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  5. [Prophylaxis in hemophilia: situation analysis and call-to-action in Latin America. A report from the GLAITH group].

    PubMed

    Mijares, Mercedes Elena; De Sánchez, Apsara Boadas

    2015-09-01

    Prophylactic treatment in the management of hemophilia has been a crucial factor in improving the prognosis and quality of life for people with hemophilia (PCH). However, it is not globally implemented. In Latin America it is difficult to assess the status of PCH and the its management does not conform to ideal standards. The GLAITH group discussed the problem in Latin America. A survey of its members and its findings were discussed at a meeting in Bogota in May 2013. Proportions of hemophilia A and B were 75-90% and 10-25% respectively. Severe hemophilia represents 26-55% of cases. A high percentage of PCH have hemophilic arthropathy. The general care and specific treatments of PCH vary by country, only 50-60% of the treatment is covered and in 85-95% of the cases are performed on an on- demand basis. Just 5-15% receives prophylaxis, most of them secondary. Few countries have a national program or homogeneous records. Finally the GLAITH group proceeded to develop a conclusion and call to action for the region where the following points are recommended: the establishment of a unified Latin American registry; prospective cost-effectiveness studies and evaluation criteria related to secondary prophylaxis; comparative studies of quality of life with and without prophylaxis in the region; promotion of individualization of treatment and, the increase of primary and secondary prophylaxis globally in Latin America.

  6. AAV-based Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A: Long-Term Correction and Avoidance of Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuhong; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy has been hampered by immune responses to vector-associated antigens and by neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors to the factor VIII (FVIII) protein; these ‘inhibitors’ more commonly effect hemophilia A patients than those with hemophilia B. A gene replacement strategy beginning in the neonatal period may avoid the development of these immune responses and lead to prolonged expression with correction of phenotype thereby avoiding long-term consequences. Serotype rh10 AAV was developed splitting the FVIII coding sequence into heavy and light chains with the chicken β-actin promoter/CMV enhancer for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery. Coinjection of virions of each FVIII chain intravenously to mice on the second day of life was performed. Mice express sustained FVIII antigen levels of ≥5% to 22 months of life without the development of antibodies to FVIII. Phenotypic correction was manifest in all AAV-FVIII-treated mice as demonstrated by functional assay and reduction in bleeding time. This study demonstrates the use of AAV in a gene replacement strategy in neonatal mice that establishes both long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A and lack of antibody development to FVIII in this disease model where AAV is administered shortly after birth. These studies support consideration of gene replacement therapy for diseases that are diagnosed in utero or in the early neonatal period. PMID:22241178

  7. Hierarchical scaffold design for mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Daniel L; Cuerquis, Jessica; El Ayoubi, Rouwayda; Forner, Kathy-Ann; Roy, Ranjan; François, Moïra; Griffith, May; Lillicrap, David; Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra; Blostein, Mark D; Galipeau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia B and other hereditary plasma protein deficiencies showed great promise in pre-clinical and early clinical trials. However, safety concerns about in vivo delivery of viral vectors and poor post-transplant survival of ex vivo modified cells remain key hurdles for clinical translation of gene therapy. We here describe a 3D scaffold system based on porous hydroxyapatite-PLGA composites coated with biomineralized collagen 1. When combined with autologous gene-engineered factor IX (hFIX) positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implanted in hemophilic mice, these scaffolds supported long-term engraftment and systemic protein delivery by MSCs in vivo. Optimization of the scaffolds at the macro-, micro- and nanoscales provided efficient cell delivery capacity, MSC self-renewal and osteogenesis respectively, concurrent with sustained delivery of hFIX. In conclusion, the use of gene-enhanced MSC-seeded scaffolds may be of practical use for treatment of hemophilia B and other plasma protein deficiencies. PMID:20864158

  8. The story of a unique molecule in hemophilia A: recombinant single-chain factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid

    2016-05-01

    For patients with hemophilia A, replacement of deficient factor VIII (FVIII) using plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) products to restore hemostatic control can reduce bleeding complications and preserve musculoskeletal function. Despite the clinical availability of several of these products, challenges remain in the treatment of hemophilia A, the most notable of which are the risk of inhibitor development and the limited half-life of existing FVIII concentrates, which can make prophylaxis burdensome for patients. The use of recombinant protein technology may lead to novel FVIII products with improved properties. This article describes the story of a unique recombinant FVIII protein, rVIII-SingleChain, which is currently in development. In contrast to native FVIII and other commercially available rFVIII preparations, rVIII-SingleChain uses a strong, covalent bond to connect the light and heavy chains, thereby creating a stable, single-chain rFVIII. It has enhanced intrinsic stability, better integrity after reconstitution, and a higher binding affinity to von Willebrand factor. The physicochemical profile of rVIII-SingleChain and preclinical data on its activity and phamacokinetics strengthened the rationale for its clinical investigation. Available data from the AFFINITY clinical trial program are promising; indicating that it has good hemostatic efficacy when used on demand, for prophylaxis, and in the surgical setting, and is also very well tolerated. A pediatric study and an extension study are ongoing as part of the AFFINITY program.

  9. Severe hemophilia in a girl infant with mosaic Turner syndrome and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Bazrafshan, Asghar; Moghadam, Mohamad; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-04-01

    A 6-month-old girl was referred by an ophthalmologist because of postoperative bleeding. She was scheduled for operation because of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Workups were done and prolonged partial thromboplastin time with normal platelet count, normal bleeding time, and prothrombin time were detected. There was negative family history of bleeding tendency in both maternal and paternal family, so at the first step, Factor XI assay was requested which was normal. Then, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII were assayed which was 127% and less than 1%, respectively. Severe factor VIII deficiency was not suspected in a girl unless in siblings of a hemophilic patient who gets married with her carrier cousin. Chromosomal study and genetic testing were requested and mosaic Turner syndrome (45 XO) with ring X (p22, 2q13) along with inversion 22 (hemizygote) was detected. Abdominal and pelvic sonography showed absence of both ovaries with presence of infantile uterus. Maternal genetic study was in favor of carrier of hemophilia (heterozygote inversion 22). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of association of Turner syndrome with severe hemophilia A and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  10. The story of a unique molecule in hemophilia A: recombinant single-chain factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid

    2016-05-01

    For patients with hemophilia A, replacement of deficient factor VIII (FVIII) using plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) products to restore hemostatic control can reduce bleeding complications and preserve musculoskeletal function. Despite the clinical availability of several of these products, challenges remain in the treatment of hemophilia A, the most notable of which are the risk of inhibitor development and the limited half-life of existing FVIII concentrates, which can make prophylaxis burdensome for patients. The use of recombinant protein technology may lead to novel FVIII products with improved properties. This article describes the story of a unique recombinant FVIII protein, rVIII-SingleChain, which is currently in development. In contrast to native FVIII and other commercially available rFVIII preparations, rVIII-SingleChain uses a strong, covalent bond to connect the light and heavy chains, thereby creating a stable, single-chain rFVIII. It has enhanced intrinsic stability, better integrity after reconstitution, and a higher binding affinity to von Willebrand factor. The physicochemical profile of rVIII-SingleChain and preclinical data on its activity and phamacokinetics strengthened the rationale for its clinical investigation. Available data from the AFFINITY clinical trial program are promising; indicating that it has good hemostatic efficacy when used on demand, for prophylaxis, and in the surgical setting, and is also very well tolerated. A pediatric study and an extension study are ongoing as part of the AFFINITY program. PMID:27288063

  11. IDO1 suppresses inhibitor development in hemophilia A treated with factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Matino, Davide; Gargaro, Marco; Santagostino, Elena; Di Minno, Matteo N.D.; Castaman, Giancarlo; Morfini, Massimo; Rocino, Angiola; Mancuso, Maria E.; Di Minno, Giovanni; Coppola, Antonio; Talesa, Vincenzo N.; Volpi, Claudia; Vacca, Carmine; Orabona, Ciriana; Iannitti, Rossana; Mazzucconi, Maria G.; Santoro, Cristina; Tosti, Antonella; Chiappalupi, Sara; Sorci, Guglielmo; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Belvini, Donata; Radossi, Paolo; Landolfi, Raffaele; Fuchs, Dietmar; Boon, Louis; Pirro, Matteo; Marchesini, Emanuela; Grohmann, Ursula; Puccetti, Paolo; Iorio, Alfonso; Fallarino, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) is a major obstacle in using this clotting factor to treat individuals with hemophilia A. Patients with a congenital absence of FVIII do not develop central tolerance to FVIII, and therefore, any control of their FVIII-reactive lymphocytes relies upon peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is a key regulatory enzyme that supports Treg function and peripheral tolerance in adult life. Here, we investigated the association between IDO1 competence and inhibitor status by evaluating hemophilia A patients harboring F8-null mutations that were either inhibitor negative (n = 50) or positive (n = 50). We analyzed IDO1 induction, expression, and function for any relationship with inhibitor occurrence by multivariable logistic regression and determined that defective TLR9-mediated activation of IDO1 induction is associated with an inhibitor-positive status. Evaluation of experimental hemophilic mouse models with or without functional IDO1 revealed that tryptophan metabolites, which result from IDO1 activity, prevent generation of anti-FVIII antibodies. Moreover, treatment of hemophilic animals with a TLR9 agonist suppressed FVIII-specific B cells by a mechanism that involves IDO1-dependent induction of Tregs. Together, these findings indicate that strategies aimed at improving IDO1 function should be further explored for preventing or eradicating inhibitors to therapeutically administered FVIII protein. PMID:26426076

  12. Challenges and open issues in the management of acquired hemophilia A (AHA).

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shrimati D; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare autoimmune bleeding disorder caused by antibodies which neutralize the function of factor VIII (FVIII). The disease presents a complex clinical challenge to the treating Physicians and Hematologists. As the disease is associated with high mortality, prompt management is necessary. Early recognition, quick diagnosis and timely referral to a specialized center are important for better management of these patients. The different clinical manifestations, underlying pathology, inhibitor kinetics and the associated age related comorbidities do not allow extrapolation of the treatment protocols of congenital hemophilia to AHA. The basic strategies of the management of AHA patients involve maintaining hemostasis, suppression or eradication of antibodies, diagnosis and treatment of underlying pathology and avoid treatment related complications like thrombosis. The efficiency of hemostatic agents which are generally used to treat AHA is unpredictable. Due to the rarity of the disease, there are no randomized clinical trials on the management of this disorder and thus the expertise and experience of the treating Physicians' guide treatment strategies.

  13. Mixing and administration times of bypassing agents: observations from the Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia (DOSE)

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, Jennifer; Donkin, Jennifer; Recht, Michael; Cooper, David L

    2014-01-01

    DOSE (Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia) was a prospective, observational diary study designed to evaluate the use of bypassing agents in patients prescribed recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) as first-line treatment in the home setting. Patients with congenital hemophilia with inhibitors and caregivers participated, and as part of the study, the time spent preparing and administering product was recorded for bypassing agent (BPA) infusions. The aim of this manuscript is to present the results of the analysis of the time spent preparing and administering a single dose of either rFVIIa or plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC). Diaries were completed for 18 adult patients and 19 caregivers of 21 children with 176 BPA-treated bleeding episodes and 1,350 BPA infusions (1,270 rFVIIa, 80 pd-aPCC). The median preparation and administration times were 5.0 minutes and 5.0 minutes for rFVIIa and 29.0 minutes and 24.5 minutes for pd-aPCC, respectively. Preparation and administration times were significantly shorter with rFVIIa than pd-aPCC (P<0.0001). The significantly shorter combined preparation and administration time of rFVIIa, taking into consideration the faster-than-recommended aPCC infusion rates, suggests that rFVIIa permits a rapid and safe initiation of treatment once a bleeding episode is identified and a decision is made to treat at home. PMID:25187744

  14. The Future of Hemophilia Treatment: Longer-Acting Factor Concentrates versus Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapy is the only novel technology that currently offers the prospect of a lasting cure for hemophilia and freedom from the burden of repeated injections. Recent data from a handful of patients who have undergone gene therapy for hemophilia B are very encouraging with a sustained factor IX (FIX) level of 0.05 IU/mL maintained for over 4 years. While this level is above the current usual target trough levels, it falls well short of the level that patients on prophylaxis with longer-acting products can expect. Prophylaxis is also associated with high peak levels, which permits patients to maintain an active lifestyle. A major barrier to widespread adoption of gene therapy is a high seroprevalence of antibodies to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in the general population. Young children would be the best candidates for gene therapy in view of much lower seroprevalence to AAV in infants. A stable level of FIX early in life would prevent the onset of joint bleeds and the development of arthropathy. The recent experience with apolipoprotein tiparvovec (Glybera; uniQure, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) indicates that gene therapy is unlikely to prove to be a cheap therapeutic option. It is also quite possible that other new technologies that do not require viral vectors (such as stem cell therapy) may overtake gene therapy during development and make it redundant.

  15. IDO1 suppresses inhibitor development in hemophilia A treated with factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Matino, Davide; Gargaro, Marco; Santagostino, Elena; Di Minno, Matteo N D; Castaman, Giancarlo; Morfini, Massimo; Rocino, Angiola; Mancuso, Maria E; Di Minno, Giovanni; Coppola, Antonio; Talesa, Vincenzo N; Volpi, Claudia; Vacca, Carmine; Orabona, Ciriana; Iannitti, Rossana; Mazzucconi, Maria G; Santoro, Cristina; Tosti, Antonella; Chiappalupi, Sara; Sorci, Guglielmo; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Belvini, Donata; Radossi, Paolo; Landolfi, Raffaele; Fuchs, Dietmar; Boon, Louis; Pirro, Matteo; Marchesini, Emanuela; Grohmann, Ursula; Puccetti, Paolo; Iorio, Alfonso; Fallarino, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) is a major obstacle in using this clotting factor to treat individuals with hemophilia A. Patients with a congenital absence of FVIII do not develop central tolerance to FVIII, and therefore, any control of their FVIII-reactive lymphocytes relies upon peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is a key regulatory enzyme that supports Treg function and peripheral tolerance in adult life. Here, we investigated the association between IDO1 competence and inhibitor status by evaluating hemophilia A patients harboring F8-null mutations that were either inhibitor negative (n = 50) or positive (n = 50). We analyzed IDO1 induction, expression, and function for any relationship with inhibitor occurrence by multivariable logistic regression and determined that defective TLR9-mediated activation of IDO1 induction is associated with an inhibitor-positive status. Evaluation of experimental hemophilic mouse models with or without functional IDO1 revealed that tryptophan metabolites, which result from IDO1 activity, prevent generation of anti-FVIII antibodies. Moreover, treatment of hemophilic animals with a TLR9 agonist suppressed FVIII-specific B cells by a mechanism that involves IDO1-dependent induction of Tregs. Together, these findings indicate that strategies aimed at improving IDO1 function should be further explored for preventing or eradicating inhibitors to therapeutically administered FVIII protein. PMID:26426076

  16. MANN: empowered and oppressed? Men's Advocacy Network of the National Hemophilia Foundation.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, D

    1995-04-01

    The author describes the purpose and the development of MANN (Men's Advocacy Network of the NHF), a complementary response for men to the women's advocacy group WONN (Women's Outreach Network of NHF), and discusses its potency as an advocacy group. MANN's initial platform demanded changes in the NHF that required more consumer input and leadership to the NHF Board. MANN had also demanded that forty percent of the NHF Board and Executive Board be comprised of persons with hemophilia and/or HIV, and that the NHF pursue conflict-of-interest guidelines, and a Congressional Investigation. The author states that these demands had never materialized because the leadership of the NHF refused to allow them to be implemented, and that MANN is being manipulated by the NHF old guard. Further, the author claims that COTT (The Committee of Ten Thousand) is not influenced by NHF, and has made significant impacts in educating the government, media, and public, regarding the history leading to the HIV infection of persons with hemophilia. COTT also has profound influence on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and on the safety of the nation's blood supply, including the progress of investigations and litigations.

  17. Joining the patient on the path to customized prophylaxis: one hemophilia team explores the tools of engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gue, Deborah; Squire, Sandra; McIntosh, Kam; Bartholomew, Claude; Summers, Nicole; Sun, Haowei; Yang, Ming; Jackson, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between hemophilia team interventions and achievement of optimal clinical outcomes remains to be elucidated. The British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team has previously reported results of a comprehensive approach to individualize prophylaxis that has resulted in substantially reduced bleeding rates. In order to facilitate knowledge exchange and potential replication, it was important to gain a thorough understanding of the team’s approach. Methods A focus group of the British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team was conducted to identify specific roles and processes that might be contributing to the prophylaxis regimen outcomes in this clinic. The focus group consisted of two workshops; one to describe the individual and collective roles of the clinic team in providing clinical care and guiding patients toward individualized prophylaxis; and the other to describe the patient journey from initial contact through reaching a successful engagement with the clinic. Results Analysis of the results revealed team roles and processes that underpinned a shared decision-making relationship with the patient with a particular focus on supporting the patient’s autonomy. Within this relationship, team focus shifts away from “adherence” toward the process whereby patients design and implement prophylaxis regimens resulting in reduction or elimination of bleeding episodes. Limitations Using the current methodology, it is not possible to demonstrate a causal link between specific team processes and improved bleeding rates in patients. Conclusion Through the active support of patient autonomy in all aspects of decisions related to hemophilia management, the British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team approach de-emphasizes “adherence” as the primary goal, and focuses on a prophylaxis plan that is customized by the patient and aligned with his priorities. Adoption of this comprehensive team approach facilitates shared goals between the patient and the team

  18. Duodenal Tumor Presenting as Acquired Hemophilia in an 88-Year-Old Woman: A Clinical Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Moncada, Juan Carlos; Moran, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia is a rare disease, presenting with severe hemorrhage, we present a case caused by a duodenal tumor, the clinical management, ethical implications, treatment recommendations, and a review of the literature. PMID:22966469

  19. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    PubMed

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P < 0.001). Patients with hematuria or severe hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  20. Anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine microenvironment mediated by IL-4 and IL-10 coordinates the immune response in hemophilia A patients infected chronically with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, João Paulo; Chaves, Daniel Gonçalves; Araújo, Ana Ruth Silva; de Araújo, Erbênia Maria Martins; da Silva Fraporti, Liziara; Neves, Walter Luiz Lima; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; Torres, Katia Luz; Gentz, Solange Henschke Lima; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Malheiro, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    In the past decades patients with hemophilia were infected commonly by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and a significant number of patients are infected chronically. Focusing on the role of the immune system for controlling and or maintaining HCV infection, the leukocyte and cytokine profiles of peripheral blood from hemophilia A patients and other patients with and without HCV infection were studied. The results demonstrated that hemophilia A is characterized by a general state of circulating leukocytes activation along with an overall increase in the frequency of IL-6 and IL-10 with decrease of IL-8 and IL-12. HCV infection of patients with hemophilia A does not influence further the activation state of circulating leukocytes but is accompanied by lower levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and a prominent anti-inflammatory/regulatory serum cytokine pattern, mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Additionally, the results demonstrated that hemophilia A patients infected with HCV displaying No/Low antibody response to C33c and C22 have significant lower viral load and higher serum levels of IL-12 and IL-4. This finding suggests that the differential RIBA reactivity to C33c/C22 HCV core proteins may have a putative value as a prognostic biomarker for the infection in hemophilia A patients.

  1. Half-life extended factor VIII for the treatment of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Tiede, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) prevents joint bleeding and other hemorrhages in patients with hemophilia A. Conventional FVIII concentrates have a short half-life, with an average of about 12 h in adults, ranging in individual patients between 6 and 24 h, and even shorter in younger children. Therefore, effective prophylaxis requires frequent intravenous injection, usually three times per week or every other day. Several technologies are currently under investigation to extend the half-life of FVIII, including Fc fusion (Eloctate, Elocta, efmoroctocog alfa), addition of polyethylene glycol (turoctocog alfa pegol [N8-GP], BAY 94-9027, BAX 855), and a single-chain construct (CSL627). This review summarizes characteristics of products in clinical development and discusses their potential benefits.

  2. Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) variants and carrier detection analyzed by DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Poon, M C; Chui, D H; Patterson, M; Starozik, D M; Dimnik, L S; Hoar, D I

    1987-04-01

    We have used two strategies to study 14 hemophilia B families from 11 kindreds for possible carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. First, we sequentially used the Factor IX probes (sequentially with restriction enzymes Taq I, Xmn I, and Dde I), and the linked probes p45h (Taq I), p45d (Pst I), and 52a (Taq I) for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Second, we searched for useful variant Taq I digestion fragments using the Factor IX complementary DNA. Two separate new Taq I variants in exon VIII were identified. Using both strategies, 11 of 14 families (from 9 of 11 kindreds) were informative for further studies. In five kindreds studied in detail, the carrier status of all 11 at risk females was determined and prenatal diagnosis could be offered to the offsprings of each of the six carriers identified. Thus, in this study, we have identified a higher proportion of informative families than has previously been reported.

  3. Sclerotherapy Of Esophageal Varices In Severe Hemophilia A Patient And High Titer Inhibitor--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Andrzej B; Dąbrowski, Wojciech P; Szczepanik, Anna M; Pielaciński, Konrad; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    In cirrhotic hemophilia patients bleeding from esophageal varices is a serious clinical condition due to congenital deficiency of clotting factors VIII or IX, decreased prothrombin synthesis and hypersplenic thrombocytopenia. In hemophiliac with high-titer inhibitor bypassing therapy is required with activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC) or recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa). Doses and duration treatment with these agents following endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices have not been yet established. Authors report the first case of a severe hemophilia A patient with high titer inhibitor (40 BU) treated with repeated injection sclerotherapy. The patient was admitted with symptoms of massive esophageal variceal hemorrhage ceased with emergency sclerotherapy. Bypassing therapy was administered with aPCC at initial dose of 72.5 U/kg and then with average daily dose of 162 U/kg through 5 days. To achieved a total eradication of esophageal varices the patient was then subjected to four elective sclerotherapy procedures. Two were covered by aPCC with daily dose of 120 U/kg and 145 U/kg for 4 and 3 days respectively and the following two procedures were covered by rFVIIa with the initial dose of 116 µg/kg and the next doses of 87 µg/kg administered every 3 hours in procedure day and every 4 hours on the next two days. During all procedures excellent hemostasis was achieved and no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed. Bypassing regimen therapy with aPCC and rFVIIa we applied have been shown to be safe and effective in this patient subjected to sclerotherapy procedures.

  4. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency. PMID:25655313

  5. Intraosseous Delivery of Lentiviral Vectors Targeting Factor VIII Expression in Platelets Corrects Murine Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage-Sca1+c-Kit+ hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency. PMID:25655313

  6. Recombinant B domain deleted porcine factor VIII for the treatment of bleeding episodes in adults with acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) often complicated by inhibitor development (CHAWI) in which neutralizing antibodies block the therapeutic benefit of replacement therapy. Inhibitors to FVIII can also be seen in an auto-immune disease known as acquired hemophilia A (AHA). 'Bypassing' therapies have been shown to provide hemostasis but dosing must be done empirically because current assays cannot measure objective markers of treatment efficacy and safety. A recombinant porcine sequence factor VIII (r-pFVIII) has been developed for the management of AHA. Preclinical, Phase I and Phase II clinical research studies in CHAWI subjects showed therapeutic potential and safety of this agent. A Phase II/III study in AHA with serious bleeding episodes shows a positive response in all subjects after administration. Based on current preclinical and clinical trial data, r-pFVIII should become the first line of treatment in the management of hemorrhage in patients with AHA.

  7. Recombinant B domain deleted porcine factor VIII for the treatment of bleeding episodes in adults with acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) often complicated by inhibitor development (CHAWI) in which neutralizing antibodies block the therapeutic benefit of replacement therapy. Inhibitors to FVIII can also be seen in an auto-immune disease known as acquired hemophilia A (AHA). 'Bypassing' therapies have been shown to provide hemostasis but dosing must be done empirically because current assays cannot measure objective markers of treatment efficacy and safety. A recombinant porcine sequence factor VIII (r-pFVIII) has been developed for the management of AHA. Preclinical, Phase I and Phase II clinical research studies in CHAWI subjects showed therapeutic potential and safety of this agent. A Phase II/III study in AHA with serious bleeding episodes shows a positive response in all subjects after administration. Based on current preclinical and clinical trial data, r-pFVIII should become the first line of treatment in the management of hemorrhage in patients with AHA. PMID:25927594

  8. Alprolix (recombinant Factor IX Fc fusion protein): extended half-life product for the prophylaxis and treatment of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Ducore, Jonathan M; Miguelino, Maricel G; Powell, Jerry S

    2014-10-01

    Hemophilia B is a genetic disease caused by mutation of the gene for coagulation protein Factor IX. When severe, the disease leads to spontaneous life-threatening bleeding episodes. Current therapy requires frequent intravenous infusions of therapeutic recombinant or plasma-derived protein concentrates containing Factor IX. Alprolix™ (recombinant Factor IX Fc fusion protein), is a therapeutic Factor IX preparation that has been engineered for a prolonged half-life in circulation, has completed pivotal clinical trials and has been approved recently in the USA, Canada, Australia and Japan for use in the clinic for patients with hemophilia B. This promising therapy should allow patients to use fewer infusions to maintain appropriate Factor IX activity levels in all clinical settings, and its use may be indicated in both on demand and prophylactic treatments.

  9. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  10. Recombinant Factor IX Fc Fusion Protein Maintains Full Procoagulant Properties and Exhibits Prolonged Efficacy in Hemophilia B Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toby, Garabet G.; Liu, Tongyao; Buyue, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.; Sommer, Jurg M.; Jiang, Haiyan; Peters, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia B is an inherited X chromosome–linked disorder characterized by impaired blood clotting owing to the absence of functional coagulation factor IX. Due to the relatively short half-life of factor IX, patients with hemophilia B require frequent factor IX infusions to maintain prophylaxis. We have developed a recombinant factor IX (rFIX) fused to the Fc region of IgG (rFIXFc) with an extended half-life in animals and humans. Materials and Methods Procoagulant properties of rFIXFc and rFIX (BENEFIX®) were compared to determine the effect of the Fc region on rFIXFc hemostatic function. Specifically, we assessed rFIXFc activation, intermolecular interactions within the Xase complex, inactivation by antithrombin III (AT) and thrombin generation potential compared with rFIX. We also assessed the acute and prophylactic efficacy profiles of rFIXFc and rFIX in vivo in hemophilia B mouse bleeding models. Results and Conclusions The activation by factor XIa or factor VIIa/tissue factor, inhibition by AT, interaction profiles with phospholipids, affinities for factor VIIIa within the context of the Xase complex, and thrombin generation profiles were similar for rFIXFc and rFIX. Xase complexes formed with either molecule exhibited similar kinetic profiles for factor Xa generation. In acute efficacy models, mice infused with rFIXFc or rFIX were equally protected from bleeding. However, in prophylactic efficacy models, protection from bleeding was maintained approximately three times longer in rFIXFc-dosed mice than in those given rFIX; this prolonged efficacy correlates with the previously observed half-life extension. We conclude that rFIXFc retains critical FIX procoagulant attributes and that the extension in rFIXFc half-life translates into prolonged efficacy in hemophilia B mice. PMID:26840952

  11. Assessment of acquired hemophilia patient demographics in the United States: the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Craig M.; Ma, Alice D.; Al-Mondhiry, Hamid A.B.; Gut, Robert Z.; Cooper, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society (HTRS) Registry was used to monitor the postapproval use of recombinant factor VIIa. The objective of this manuscript is to provide key insights on the demographics of patients with acquired hemophilia in the HTRS Registry. Acquired hemophilia patient registration in HTRS captured age; sex; comorbidities and predisposing conditions; first bleeding location; laboratory parameters; exposure to blood products, factor, and bypassing agents; and initiation of immune suppression/tolerance therapy. Overall, 166 patients with acquired hemophilia were registered in HTRS (83 women, 73 men, median age 70 years); the majority were non-Hispanic whites (61.4%). The most common comorbidities were autoimmune disease (28.4%) and malignancy (14.5%). The most common first site of bleeding was subcutaneous (27.1%); this was more common in whites (29.1%) than blacks (12.5%) and in non-Hispanics (26.4%) than Hispanics (11.8%). Blood product exposure was reported for 33.1% of patients; the most commonly reported product was packed red blood cells (28%). Of the 57 patients with outcome data available for immune tolerance therapy, 26 patients (46%) reported successful treatment, 13 reported unsuccessful treatment (23%), and 18 (32%) were receiving active treatment at the time of registration. The HTRS Registry final analysis provides the only current comprehensive look at acquired hemophilia in the US population, including details on underlying autoimmune diseases and malignancies. Pertinent to recognition and diagnosis of the disease, subcutaneous bleeding as a presenting bleeding symptom was more common in white and non-Hispanic individuals. PMID:27467981

  12. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity - case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wojtyś, Małgorzata; Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia.

  13. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of recurrent bleeding into the pleural cavity – case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Żuk, Ewa; Alchimowicz, Jacek; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a coagulation disorder caused by autoantibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII. The first sign of this disease is often massive bleeding, which can affect patients after routine procedures. The parameter which indicates the presence of this condition is isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The present article describes a case of a 32-year-old man with acute interstitial pneumonia and pleural effusion, in whom a massive hemothorax appeared after thoracocentesis; active bleeding was observed after the introduction of a chest tube. The patient was operated on, and no pinpoint bleeding was discovered during the procedure. Active bleeding was still taking place postoperatively. The patient underwent another operation after 6 days. Once more, no pinpoint bleeding was found. Prolonged APTT was observed. The activity of blood coagulation factor VIII was 3.04%. The presence of antibodies against factor VIII was confirmed, and acquired hemophilia was diagnosed. The article also includes an analysis of the literature on acquired hemophilia. PMID:26336444

  14. Issues in assessing products for the treatment of hemophilia – the intersection between efficacy, economics, and ethics

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Albert; Noone, Declan; Schlenkrich, Uwe; Schlenkrich, Steffen; O’Mahony, Brian; Cassar, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Following the obviation of the pathogen safety threats posed by previous generations of clotting factor concentrates for the treatment of hemophilia, the principal issue facing the patient community is timely access to adequate supplies of continuously improving therapies. The application of evidence-based medicine has enhanced the basis of hemophilia therapy, while resulting in some challenges to patient care. Increasingly, the criteria used for the approval and payment of treatment products by regulatory and reimbursement agencies, respectively, are becoming inflexible and unrealistic. This is occurring particularly in the requirements for demonstrating product efficacy. Concurrently, emerging evidence of the interpatient variability in the clinical response to therapy has led to the proposed personalization of therapeutic regimens. Possible impediments to optimal care include competitive tensions among suppliers who seek to gain label claims for reimbursement purposes, which result in clinical trial designs of, arguably, unethical design, carried out in poor countries. We synthesize these converging developments to suggest some changes to the current hemophilia treatment paradigm, which should make it more patient-centric and enable speedier access to new therapies. PMID:26124687

  15. [A quick and efficient method to generate hemophilia B mouse models by the CRISPR/Cas system].

    PubMed

    Qihan, Wang; Cong, Huai; Ruilin, Sun; Hua, Zhuang; Hongyan, Chen; Jian, Fei; Daru, Lu

    2015-11-01

    Hemophilia B, or the Christmas disease, is a common human disease caused by coagulation factor Ⅸ (FⅨ) deficiency. It is an X-linked recessive hereditary disease. Here we obtained FⅨ-knockout mouse strains with phenotype of hemophilia B with the CRISPR/Cas system efficiently. We chose the 8th exon as the target locus, and co-injected codon-optimized Cas9 mRNA with sgRNA of FⅨ into C57BL/6 mice zygotes. We obtained 60 mice in total and genotyped them by high resolution melting (HRM) and sequencing. The results showed the mutation rate was 85.0% in total, and 79.5% and 95.2% in males and females, respectively. No off-targets were detected in the similar locus by HRM. We future measured the FⅨ activity of each mice. The FⅨ: C of mutant mice were significantly below the normal level and reduced to 6.82% of wild-type mice. The activity assay demonstrated that all the mutant mice were lack of FⅨ. In summary, we have generated hemophilia B model mice with extreme efficiency, using the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene editing system.

  16. Uptake of Genetic Counseling, Knowledge of Bleeding risks and Psychosocial Impact in a South African Cohort of Female Relatives of People with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Gillham, Anne; Greyling, Brenda; Wessels, Tina-Marie; Mbele, Bongi; Schwyzer, Rosemarie; Krause, Amanda; Mahlangu, Johnny

    2015-12-01

    In excess of 200 people with hemophilia (PWH) and their families have received genetic counseling (GC) at the Hemophilia Comprehensive Care Centre at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital. However, very few of their at-risk female relatives have attended GC to discuss their reproductive risks and options, or their potential bleeding risks. Limited research has been conducted internationally on factors influencing uptake of GC and testing amongst female relatives of PWH. This prospective study aimed to explore the factors that influence the uptake of GC and testing by female relatives of PWH. An open-ended semi-structured interview schedule was developed. Participants included female relatives of PWH who at least had a family member who had received GC. Seventeen participants were interviewed; 7 who had GC previously and 10 who had not. All participants who had previously received GC found the service helpful and were mothers referred because their sons had hemophilia. Of those who had not had GC, possible deterrents included: being unaware of GC service, focus in clinic on PWH and not potential carriers, misunderstood risks related to hemophilia and carrier status, fear of finding out carrier status, and non-disclosure in families. Most participants were unaware of potential bleeding risks for carriers. The information will be used to provide a better service to female relatives of PWH with a goal being to set up a dedicated hemophilia carrier clinic. PMID:25828422

  17. Adenovirus-Associated Virus Vector–Mediated Gene Transfer in Hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Nathwani, Amit C.; Tuddenham, Edward G.D.; Rangarajan, Savita; Rosales, Cecilia; McIntosh, Jenny; Linch, David C.; Chowdary, Pratima; Riddell, Anne; Pie, Arnulfo Jaquilmac; Harrington, Chris; O’Beirne, James; Smith, Keith; Pasi, John; Glader, Bertil; Rustagi, Pradip; Ng, Catherine Y.C.; Kay, Mark A.; Zhou, Junfang; Spence, Yunyu; Morton, Christopher L.; Allay, James; Coleman, John; Sleep, Susan; Cunningham, John M.; Srivastava, Deokumar; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A.; Gray, John T.; Reiss, Ulrike M.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.; Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hemophilia B, an X-linked disorder, is ideally suited for gene therapy. We investigated the use of a new gene therapy in patients with the disorder. METHODS We infused a single dose of a serotype-8–pseudotyped, self-complementary adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a codon-optimized human factor IX (FIX) transgene (scAAV2/8-LP1-hFIXco) in a peripheral vein in six patients with severe hemophilia B (FIX activity, <1% of normal values). Study participants were enrolled sequentially in one of three cohorts (given a high, intermediate, or low dose of vector), with two participants in each group. Vector was administered without immunosuppressive therapy, and participants were followed for 6 to 16 months. RESULTS AAV-mediated expression of FIX at 2 to 11% of normal levels was observed in all participants. Four of the six discontinued FIX prophylaxis and remained free of spontaneous hemorrhage; in the other two, the interval between prophylactic injections was increased. Of the two participants who received the high dose of vector, one had a transient, asymptomatic elevation of serum aminotransferase levels, which was associated with the detection of AAV8-capsid–specific T cells in the peripheral blood; the other had a slight increase in liver-enzyme levels, the cause of which was less clear. Each of these two participants received a short course of glucocorticoid therapy, which rapidly normalized aminotransferase levels and maintained FIX levels in the range of 3 to 11% of normal values. CONCLUSIONS Peripheral-vein infusion of scAAV2/8-LP1-hFIXco resulted in FIX transgene expression at levels sufficient to improve the bleeding phenotype, with few side effects. Although immune-mediated clearance of AAV-transduced hepatocytes remains a concern, this process may be controlled with a short course of glucocorticoids without loss of transgene expression. (Funded by the Medical Research Council and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00979238

  18. Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kickuth, Ralph Anderson, Suzanne; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard; Eggli, Stefan; Triller, Juergen

    2006-12-15

    Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization.

  19. Human von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates in the management of pediatric patients with von Willebrand disease/hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Linari, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Several plasma-derived intermediate and high-purity concentrates containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) are currently available. The main role of these products in the management of the pediatric population is represented by the replacement therapy in patients with severe or intermediate forms of von Willebrand disease, in whom other treatments are ineffective or contraindicated. Another important role of VWF/FVIII concentrates in children may be their use in immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. ITI is particularly recommended for hemophilia A children who have developed an inhibitor against FVIII, currently the most serious complication of substitutive treatment in hemophilia. Although recombinant concentrates may represent the preferred option in children with hemophilia A, VWF/FVIII concentrates may offer an advantage in rescuing patients who failed previous ITI. PMID:27445481

  20. Human von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates in the management of pediatric patients with von Willebrand disease/hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Linari, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Several plasma-derived intermediate and high-purity concentrates containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) are currently available. The main role of these products in the management of the pediatric population is represented by the replacement therapy in patients with severe or intermediate forms of von Willebrand disease, in whom other treatments are ineffective or contraindicated. Another important role of VWF/FVIII concentrates in children may be their use in immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. ITI is particularly recommended for hemophilia A children who have developed an inhibitor against FVIII, currently the most serious complication of substitutive treatment in hemophilia. Although recombinant concentrates may represent the preferred option in children with hemophilia A, VWF/FVIII concentrates may offer an advantage in rescuing patients who failed previous ITI. PMID:27445481

  1. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-07-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level.

  2. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    PubMed

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  3. Neonatal circumcision in severe haemophilia: a survey of paediatric haematologists at United States Hemophilia Treatment Centers.

    PubMed

    Kearney, S; Sharathkumar, A; Rodriguez, V; Chitlur, M; Valentino, L; Boggio, L; Gill, J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision in patients with severe haemophilia has not been well studied. We performed a survey of paediatric haematologists from Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC) across the United States to better understand the attitudes toward and management of neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients. Response rate to our survey was 40% (n = 64/159). Thirty-eight percent of respondents (n = 24) said that they would allow this procedure in the newborn period but in many cases this was against medical advice. The most reported concern regarding neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients was the risk of development of an inhibitor (n = 25; 39%) followed by the concern for bleeding (n = 22; 34%) and issues related to vascular access in the neonate (n = 11; 17%). All respondents recommended at least one preprocedure dose of factor replacement. Twenty-two percent (n = 14) of respondents did not use more than one dose of factor replacement but 32% (n = 21) used 1-2 postoperative doses. The remainder of paediatric haematologists surveyed recommended between 3-5 (16%; n = 10) and 6-10 (3%, n = 2) additional days postoperatively. There was wide variation in both techniques of circumcision as well as adjuvant haemostatic agents used. Only 22% of respondents said that they had an established protocol for management of circumcision in the newborn haemophilia patient. These survey results highlight the need for evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal management of circumcision in neonates with severe haemophilia.

  4. Minimal modification in the factor VIII B-domain sequence ameliorates the murine hemophilia A phenotype.

    PubMed

    Siner, Joshua I; Iacobelli, Nicholas P; Sabatino, Denise E; Ivanciu, Lacramiora; Zhou, Shangzhen; Poncz, Mortimer; Camire, Rodney M; Arruda, Valder R

    2013-05-23

    Recombinant canine B-domain deleted (BDD) factor VIII (FVIII) is predominantly expressed as a single-chain protein and exhibits greater stability after activation compared with human FVIII-BDD. We generated a novel BDD-FVIII variant (FVIII-RH) with an amino acid change at the furin cleavage site within the B domain (position R1645H) that mimics the canine sequence (HHQR vs human RHQR). Compared with human FVIII-BDD, expression of FVIII-RH protein revealed a 2.5-fold increase in the single-chain form. Notably, FVIII-RH exhibited a twofold increase in biological activity compared with FVIII-BDD, likely due to its slower dissociation of the A2-domain upon thrombin activation. Injection of FVIII-RH protein in hemophilia A (HA) mice resulted in more efficacious hemostasis following vascular injury in both the macro- and microcirculation. These findings were successfully translated to adeno-associated viral (AAV)-based liver gene transfer in HA mice. Expression of circulating FVIII-RH was approximately twofold higher compared with AAV-FVIII-BDD-injected mice. Moreover, FVIII-RH exhibits superior procoagulant effects compared with FVIII-BDD following a series of hemostatic challenges. Notably, the immunogenicity of FVIII-RH did not differ from FVIII-BDD. Thus, FVIII-RH is an attractive bioengineered molecule for improving efficacy without increased immunogenicity and may be suitable for both protein- and gene-based strategies for HA.

  5. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  6. Phase 3 study of recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein in severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Powell, Jerry S; Ragni, Margaret V; Chowdary, Pratima; Josephson, Neil C; Pabinger, Ingrid; Hanabusa, Hideji; Gupta, Naresh; Kulkarni, Roshni; Fogarty, Patrick; Perry, David; Shapiro, Amy; Pasi, K John; Apte, Shashikant; Nestorov, Ivan; Jiang, Haiyan; Li, Shuanglian; Neelakantan, Srividya; Cristiano, Lynda M; Goyal, Jaya; Sommer, Jurg M; Dumont, Jennifer A; Dodd, Nigel; Nugent, Karen; Vigliani, Gloria; Luk, Alvin; Brennan, Aoife; Pierce, Glenn F

    2014-01-16

    This phase 3 pivotal study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of a recombinant FVIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) for prophylaxis, treatment of acute bleeding, and perioperative hemostatic control in 165 previously treated males aged ≥12 years with severe hemophilia A. The study had 3 treatment arms: arm 1, individualized prophylaxis (25-65 IU/kg every 3-5 days, n = 118); arm 2, weekly prophylaxis (65 IU/kg, n = 24); and arm 3, episodic treatment (10-50 IU/kg, n = 23). A subgroup compared recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) and rFVIIIFc pharmacokinetics. End points included annualized bleeding rate (ABR), inhibitor development, and adverse events. The terminal half-life of rFVIIIFc (19.0 hours) was extended 1.5-fold vs rFVIII (12.4 hours; P < .001). Median ABRs observed in arms 1, 2, and 3 were 1.6, 3.6, and 33.6, respectively. In arm 1, the median weekly dose was 77.9 IU/kg; approximately 30% of subjects achieved a 5-day dosing interval (last 3 months on study). Across arms, 87.3% of bleeding episodes resolved with 1 injection. Adverse events were consistent with those expected in this population; no subjects developed inhibitors. rFVIIIFc was well-tolerated, had a prolonged half-life compared with rFVIII, and resulted in low ABRs when dosed prophylactically 1 to 2 times per week.

  7. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-06-18

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  8. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    PubMed Central

    Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level. PMID:22517903

  9. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W.; Walters, Eric M.; Butler, Stephen P.; Whyte, Jeff J.; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C.; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Cliff N.; Wells, Kevin D.; Masiello, Nick C.; Prather, Randall S.; Velander, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world’s population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  10. Surgery in hemophilia and related disorders. A prospective study of 100 consecutive procedures.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, C S

    1986-01-01

    Surgery is safe in hemophiliacs. The current problem of blood product-transmitted AIDS has recently dampened an unqualified stance, but the dangers of not performing indicated nonelective surgery outweigh the possibility of inflicting AIDS. Successful surgery in hemophiliacs first requires determination of the type of hemophilia involved. If an inhibitor is present, the procedure needs careful re-evaluation, but in general, surgical indications should be those of the general population and routine procedures should be followed. We find it helpful to have nursing personnel aware from the onset that these patients and their medications require certain precautions, especially with respect to pain medication. Unfortunately, too few medical personnel realize how many pain compounds contain aspirin. In addition, we usually prescribe intramuscular injection of medication. Factor levels must be monitored. A less-than-expected yield of factor following infusion is an excellent screen for clinically significant inhibitors. Patients also vary with respect to factor replacement and the half-life of infused factors. Kasper et al found no difference in half-life of infused factor with respect to whether the patient was in a nonoperative or postoperative status; they did not find evidence that factor was consumed during the hemostatic stress of the surgery and that a given patient's response in a nonoperative setting was predictive of his response in the postoperative period. The internist should be available so that any hemostatic problems experienced by the surgeon can be promptly addressed.

  11. Strategies to target long-lived plasma cells for treating hemophilia A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-03-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) can persistently produce anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies which disrupt therapeutic effect of FVIII in hemophilia A patients with inhibitors. The migration of plasma cells to BM where they become LLPCs is largely controlled by an interaction between the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4. AMD3100 combined with G-CSF inhibit their interactions, thus facilitating the mobilization of CD34(+) cells and blocking the homing of LLPCs. These reagents were combined with anti-CD20 to reduce B-cells and the specific IL-2/IL-2mAb (JES6-1) complexes to induce Treg expansion for targeting anti-FVIII immune responses. Groups of mice primed with FVIII plasmid and protein respectively were treated with the combined regimen for six weeks, and a significant reduction of anti-FVIII inhibitor titers was observed, associated with the dramatic decrease of circulating and bone marrow CXCR4(+) plasma cells. The combination regimens are highly promising in modulating pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies in FVIII primed subjects.

  12. Innovative Pharmacological Therapies for the Hemophilias Not Based on Deficient Factor Replacement.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santagostino, Elena; Franchini, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the pharmacological treatment of hemophilias A and B have mainly focused on the development of long-acting factor (F)VIII and FIX products. Alternative approaches not based on the replacement of the missing factor have also been explored, with the aim of producing therapeutic agents with reduced immunogenicity and yet equally effective in patients with or without inhibitors. These new classes of hemostatic agents act mainly by bypassing the need of FVIII and FIX in tenase formation, quenching anticoagulant pathways, enhancing the activity of some coagulation factors or stabilizing the fibrin clot. Current knowledge on the status of development of these novel molecules is summarized in this narrative review. We also surmise that the main interests for these products not based on the replacement of FVIII or FIX in deficient patients pertain to the potential for bleeding prevention in inhibitor patients, an earlier and easier prophylaxis implementation thanks to subcutaneous administration and prolonged half-life, and a low immunogenicity with the potential for prevention of inhibitor development in high-risk patients. PMID:27148843

  13. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-01-01

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  14. Associations of quality of life, pain, and self-reported arthritis with age, employment, bleed rate, and utilization of hemophilia treatment center and health care provider services: results in adults with hemophilia in the HERO study

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Angela L; Witkop, Michelle; Lambing, Angela; Garrido, Cesar; Dunn, Spencer; Cooper, David L; Nugent, Diane J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Severe hemophilia and subsequent hemophilic arthropathy result in joint pain and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Assessment of HRQoL in persons with hemophilia (PWH), including underlying factors that drive HRQoL differences, is important in determining health care resource allocation and in making individualized clinical decisions. Aim To examine potential associations between HRQoL, pain interference, and self-reported arthritis and age, employment, activity, bleed frequency, and hemophilia treatment center and health care professional utilization. Methods PWH (age ≥18 years) from ten countries completed a 5-point Likert scale on pain interference over the previous 4 weeks, the EQ-5D-3L scale (mobility, usual activities, self-care, pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression) including a health-related visual analog scale (0–100, coded as an 11-point categorical response). Results Pain interference (extreme/a lot) was higher in PWH aged >40 years (31%) compared to those aged 31–40 years (27%) or ≤30 years (21%). In an analysis of eight countries with home treatment, PWH who reported EQ-5D mobility issues were less likely to be employed (53% vs 79%, with no mobility issues). Median annual bleed frequency increased with worsening EQ-5D pain or discomfort. The percentage of PWH with inhibitors reporting visual analog scale scores of 80–90–100 was lower (20%) than those without inhibitors (34%). Median bleed frequency increased with pain. Globally, nurse and social worker involvement increased with disability and pain; physiotherapist utilization was moderate regardless of the extent of disability or pain. Conclusion Increased disability and pain were associated with increased age, lower employment, higher reported bleed frequency, and lower HRQoL. PMID:26604708

  15. Factor VIIa analog has marked effects on platelet function and clot kinetics in blood from patients with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Donald F; Martin, Erika J; Nolte, Melinda E; Kuhn, Janice G; Barrett, J Christian; Ezban, Mirella

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the hemostatic effects of NN1731 and rFVIIa, an ex-vivo study in hemophilia patients used the Hemodyne Hemostasis Analysis System (HAS) to measure platelet contractile force (PCF), clot elastic modulus (CEM), and force onset time (FOT), and the Haemoscope Thrombelastograph (TEG) to measure reaction time (R), kinetics time (K), and maximum amplitude (MA). Blood samples from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 Factor VIII-deficient patients of varying severity (mild, moderate, severe), were spiked with rFVIIa and NN1731 (both 0.64 and 1.28 microg/ml, respectively) and analyzed to characterize platelet function and clot kinetics. There was wide variability in the rFVIIa response. NN1731 had greater and more consistent effects on PCF, CEM, FOT, R, and K relative to rFVIIa, in all hemophilia groups. The lowest NN1731 concentration (0.64 microg/ml) shortened R and FOT, and increased CEM and PCF more than rFVIIa 1.28 microg/ml. NN1731 normalized clotting parameters equivalent to values obtained in healthy volunteers. FOT and R were highly correlated (r = 0.96). No correlation was observed between CEM and MA. NN1731 produced less variable, more pronounced and predictable ex-vivo hemostatic effects on PCF, CEM, FOT, R and K than rFVIIa in all hemophilia groups. HAS and TEG assays provided similar estimates of FOT and R, however CEM appeared to be more sensitive than MA to changes in clot firmness.

  16. Factor VIII (F8) inversions in severe hemophilia A: Male germ cell origin and diagnosis with RT-PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Antonarakis, S.E. |; Rossiter, J.P.; Young, M.

    1994-09-01

    The Factor VIII (F8) gene, which is defective in hemophilia A, is located in the most telomeric megabase of Xq. Inversions due to intrachromosomal homologous recombination between mispaired copies of gene A located within intron 22 of the gene and about 500 kb telomeric to it account for nearly half of the cases of severe hemophilia A. We hypothesized that pairing of Xq with its homolog inhibits the inversion process, and that therefore the event originates predominantly in male germ cells. In all 21 informative cases in which the inversion originated in a maternal grandparent, DNA polymorphism analysis using markers within or very closely linked to F8, determined that it occurred in the male germline. In addition, all but one of 56 mothers of sporadic cases due to inversions were carriers. The data indicate that the F8 gene inversions leading to severe hemophilia A occur almost exclusively in male germ cells. The mean age of maternal grandfathers at the birth of their carrier daughters was 29.9 years (13 cases), i.e. not different from the mean paternal age in the general population, supporting the hypothesis that the inversions occur in meiosis. The inversions can be diagnosed by Southern blot analysis. For more rapid diagnosis we have used RT-PCR of RNA ectopically expressed in blood. Oligonucleotides were used to PCR amplify, after the initial RT reaction of RNA samples using random hexamers, either the normal transcript (F8 exons 21 to 24;312 bp product) or the novel abnormal transcript that is generated after the inversion. Both type 1 and 2 inversions can be recognized in affecteds and carriers by the presence of the diagnostic PcR product of 248 bp. Correct diagnoses were made in samples from 6 patients and 2 carriers with type 1 inversions, 2 patients and 2 carriers with type 2 inversions and 5 normal controls.

  17. [Detection of alloantibodies against Factor VIII in plasma of patients with hemophilia A and its relationship with Factor VIIIC domain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yu, Zi-Qiang; Wan, Chu-Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Hua; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to detect the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) by ELISA for estimating the incidence of the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with hemophilia A, and to investigate the relationship between factor VIIIC domain and alloantibodies. Total of 140 patients with hemophilia A and 80 normal controls were enrolled in this study, among them plasma FVIII level of 84 patients was less than 1%, plasma FVIII level of 34 patients was between 1% and 5%, and plasma FVIII level of 22 patients was more than 5%. All patients were treated with plasma-derived FVIII concentrate or plasma before. The ELISA plate was coated with McAb (SZ-132) against FVIII prepared in our laboratory, then human recombinant FVIII concentrates were applied. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 was recorded. The threshold of alloantibody of patient plasma was set as mean value>3 SD more than control. The plate was coated with antibody against His, then human recombinant FVIII-C1C2 prepared in our laboratory was added. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 were recorded. The threshold was set as the mean value>3 SD more than control. The results showed that the alloantibodies against FVIII were found in 56 patients (40%) by ELISA, and 82.1% (46/56) of this kind of alloantibody could interact with the C domain of FVIII. It is concluded that C domain of FVIII is one of the primary binding sites for the alloantibodies against FVIII in Chinese patients with hemophilia A.

  18. Consanguineous Marital Union Resulting in a Progeny of Whistling-face Syndrome and Hemophilia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Vivek; Gurjar, Minal

    2015-04-01

    Many different types of genetic disorders are noted to be prevalent among consanguineous progeny. Although the most common type of consanguineous union in all major societies is between first cousins, the importance of customary influences is apparent from variations in the specific types of first-cousin marriages contracted. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of whistling-face syndrome (WFS) are not available, but less than a hundred cases reported in the literature are noted. We are presenting a case where a consanguineous marriage resulted in two of their children presenting with WFS and one with hemophilia.

  19. Consanguineous Marital Union Resulting in a Progeny of Whistling-face Syndrome and Hemophilia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Vivek; Gurjar, Minal

    2015-04-01

    Many different types of genetic disorders are noted to be prevalent among consanguineous progeny. Although the most common type of consanguineous union in all major societies is between first cousins, the importance of customary influences is apparent from variations in the specific types of first-cousin marriages contracted. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of whistling-face syndrome (WFS) are not available, but less than a hundred cases reported in the literature are noted. We are presenting a case where a consanguineous marriage resulted in two of their children presenting with WFS and one with hemophilia. PMID:25954077

  20. Management of third molar removal with doses of native plasma-derived factor IX (Octanine) and local measures in a female patient with severe hemophilia B: a case report.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Andre; Kentouche, Karim; Raschke, Gregor Franziskus; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Patients with hemophilia are at high risk of bleeding following oral surgery. As an X-linked recessive chromosomal bleeding disorder it is very rare in female patients. This is the first described case of management of third molar removal in a female patient suffering from severe hemophilia B. Excellent hemostasis was achieved by following a protocol using defined pre- and postoperative doses of factor IX and local hemostatic measures of collagen fleece, fibrin glue, primary suture, and tranexamic acid solution. Following defined protocols is essential in the management of oral surgery in patients with hemophilia and helps to prevent postoperative hemorrhages.

  1. IMPACT OF HIV ON LIVER FIBROSIS IN MEN WITH HEPATITIS C INFECTION AND HEMOPHILIA

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Moore, Charity G.; Soadwa, Kakra; Nalesnik, Michael A.; Zajko, Albert B.; Cortese-Hassett, Andrea; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Hart, Suzanne; Zeevi, Adriana; Li, Jie; Shaikh, Obaid S.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major cause of liver disease in hemophilia. Few data exist on the proportion with liver fibrosis in this group after long-term HCV and HIV co-infection. Aim We conducted a cross-sectional multi-center study to determine impact of HIV on the prevalence and risk factors for fibrosis in hemophilic men with chronic hepatitis C. Methods Biopsies were independently scored by Ishak, Metavir, and Knodell systems. Variables were tested for associations with fibrosis by logistic regression and receiver operating curves (ROC). Results Of 220 biopsied HCV(+) men, 23.6% had Metavir ≥F3 fibrosis, with higher mean Metavir fibrosis scores among HIV/HCV co-infected than HCV mono-infected, 1.6 vs. 1.3 (p=0.044). Variables significantly associated with fibrosis included AST, ALT, APRI score (AST/ULN×100/platelet ×109/L), alpha-fetoprotein (all p<0.0001), platelets (p=0.0003), and ferritin (p=0.0008). In multiple logistic regression of serum markers, alpha-fetoprotein, APRI, and ALT were significantly associated with ≥ F3 fibrosis, AUROC=0.77 (95%CI 0.69, 0.86). Alpha-fetoprotein, APRI, and ferritin were significant in HIV(−), (AUROC 0.82 (95%CI 0.72, 0.92), and alpha-fetoprotein and platelets in HIV(+) (AUROC=0.77 (95%CI 0.65, 0.88). In a multivariable model of demographic and clinical variables, transformed (natural logarithm) of alpha-fetoprotein (p=0.0003), age (p=0.006), and HCV treatment (p=0.027) were significantly associated with fibrosis. Conclusion Nearly one-fourth of hemophilic men have Metavir ≥ 3 fibrosis. The odds for developing fibrosis are increased in those with elevated alpha-fetoprotein, increasing age, and past HCV treatment. PMID:20722744

  2. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. PMID:27034428

  3. Factor VIII gene variants and inhibitor risk in African American hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Devi; Ettinger, Ruth A; Nakaya Fletcher, Shelley; James, Eddie A; Liu, Maochang; Barrett, John C; Withycombe, Janice; Matthews, Dana C; Epstein, Melinda S; Hughes, Richard J; Pratt, Kathleen P

    2015-08-13

    African American hemophilia A (HA) patients experience a higher incidence of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies ("inhibitors") vis-à-vis white patients. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene encoding FVIII-H484, FVIII-E1241, and FVIII-V2238 are more prevalent in African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that immune responses to these sites provoke inhibitors. Blood samples were obtained from 174 African American and 198 white HA subjects and their F8 gene sequences determined. Major histocompatibility complex class II binding and T-cell recognition of polymorphic sequences were evaluated using quantitative binding assays and HLA-DRB1 tetramers. Peptides corresponding to 4 common ns-SNPs showed limited binding to 11 HLA-DRB1 proteins. CD4 T cells from 22 subjects treated with FVIII products having sequences at residues FVIII-484, 1241, and 2238 differing from those of putative proteins encoded by their F8 genes did not show high-avidity tetramer binding, whereas positive-control staining of tetanus-specific CD4 T cells was routinely successful. African Americans with an intron-22 inversion mutation showed a 2-3 times-higher inhibitor incidence than whites with the same mutation (odds ratio = 2.3 [1.1-5.0, P = .04]), but this did not correlate with any of the ns-SNPs. We conclude that immune responses to "sequence-mismatched" FVIII products are unlikely to contribute appreciably to the inhibitor incidence in African Americans.

  4. F8 haplotype and inhibitor risk: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, John; Astermark, Jan; Menius, Erika D.; Carrington, Mary; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Nelson, George W.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral background, specifically African descent, confers higher risk for development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A. It has been suggested that differences in the distribution of factor VIII gene (F8) haplotypes, and mismatch between endogenous F8 haplotypes and those comprising products used for treatment could contribute to risk. Design and Methods Data from the HIGS Combined Cohort were used to determine the association between F8 haplotype 3 (H3) vs. haplotypes 1 and 2 (H1+H2) and inhibitor risk among individuals of genetically-determined African descent. Other variables known to affect inhibitor risk including type of F8 mutation and HLA were included in the analysis. A second research question regarding risk related to mismatch in endogenous F8 haplotype and recombinant FVIII products used for treatment was addressed. Results H3 was associated with higher inhibitor risk among those genetically-identified (N=49) as of African ancestry, but the association did not remain significant after adjustment for F8 mutation type and the HLA variables. Among subjects of all racial ancestries enrolled in HIGS who reported early use of recombinant products (N=223), mismatch in endogenous haplotype and the FVIII proteins constituting the products used did not confer greater risk for inhibitor development. Conclusion H3 was not an independent predictor of inhibitor risk. Further, our findings did not support a higher risk of inhibitors in the presence of a haplotype mismatch between the FVIII molecule infused and that of the individual. PMID:22958194

  5. Therapeutic efficacy in a hemophilia B model using a biosynthetic mRNA liver depot system

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, F; Guild, B; Karve, S; Smith, L; Love, K; Dorkin, J R; Kauffman, K J; Zhang, J; Yahalom, B; Anderson, D G; Heartlein, M W

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based gene therapy has considerable therapeutic potential, but the challenges associated with delivery continue to limit progress. Messenger RNA (mRNA) has the potential to provide for transient production of therapeutic proteins, without the need for nuclear delivery and without the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Here we describe the sustained delivery of therapeutic proteins in vivo in both rodents and non-human primates via nanoparticle-formulated mRNA. Nanoparticles formulated with lipids and lipid-like materials were developed for delivery of two separate mRNA transcripts encoding either human erythropoietin (hEPO) or factor IX (hFIX) protein. Dose-dependent protein production was observed for each mRNA construct. Upon delivery of hEPO mRNA in mice, serum EPO protein levels reached several orders of magnitude (>125 000-fold) over normal physiological values. Further, an increase in hematocrit (Hct) was established, demonstrating that the exogenous mRNA-derived protein maintained normal activity. The capacity of producing EPO in non-human primates via delivery of formulated mRNA was also demonstrated as elevated EPO protein levels were observed over a 72-h time course. Exemplifying the possible broad utility of mRNA drugs, therapeutically relevant amounts of human FIX (hFIX) protein were achieved upon a single intravenous dose of hFIX mRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles in mice. In addition, therapeutic value was established within a hemophilia B (FIX knockout (KO)) mouse model by demonstrating a marked reduction in Hct loss following injury (incision) to FIX KO mice. PMID:27356951

  6. Prevalence of IVS10nt-18G/A in Calabrian patients with moderate/mild hemophilia A and relation with Factor VIII inhibitor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Prejanò, Simona; Santoro, Rita C; Iannaccaro, Piergiorgio

    2015-10-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by widespread mutations in the factor VIII gene. In the course of a screening to research some hemophilia A mutations, our team has identified and posted a previously unreported nucleotide change in intron 10 in 20 patients with hemophilia A. We tried to identify a possible blood relationship between the people with this mutation, performing a backwards study of every family tree. First, we interviewed the patients and, if possible, parents and grandparents. When direct memory was no longer available, we consulted Registries of Births, Marriages and Deaths, and if these data were not sufficient, going backwards in time, we consulted registries of parish churches where newborns were baptized. The studied mutation was present in 33 hemophilic patients living in Calabria, 28 of them related. Three patients, carriers of this mutation, developed an FVIII inhibitor. In all the cases, the inhibitor development followed intensive treatments, after many days of exposure. Our study displayed the presence of a responsible moderate hemophilia A mutation, limited apparently to our country, probably because of a single ancestral event, and connected with FVIII inhibitor development.

  7. Early eradication of factor VIII inhibitor in patients with congenital hemophilia A by immune tolerance induction with a high dose of immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Yoko; Furue, Aya; Kagawa, Reiko; Chijimatsu, Ikue; Tomioka, Keita; Shimomura, Maiko; Imanaka, Yusuke; Nishimura, Shiho; Saito, Satoshi; Miki, Mizuka; Ono, Atsushi; Konishi, Nakao; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao

    2016-04-01

    The production of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibodies is a serious problem in patients with hemophilia A. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only strategy proven to eradicate persistent inhibitors and has been shown to be successful in 70 % of patients with hemophilia A. However, a minority of hemophilia patients present life-long inhibitors. To eliminate such inhibitors, we designed an intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) strategy in combination with high dose recombinant FVIII for ITI in hemophilia A children with inhibitors. Four previously untreated patients produced inhibitors within 16 exposures to FVIII. The peak inhibitor titers in these patients ranged from 3 to 14 BU/mL. The patients received ITI combined with IVIG within 1.5 months after the inhibitors were detected. All patients showed a negative titer for inhibitors by 28 days, with no anamnestic responses. The recovery of FVIII in the plasma concentration was normalized within three months after initiation of ITI. An additional course of IVIG administration led to induction of complete tolerance by 20 months after initiation of ITI therapy in all patients. ITI treatment with high-dose FVIII combined with IVIG may be effective for the early elimination of inhibitors. PMID:26830966

  8. Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) fusion protein reduces immunogenicity and induces tolerance in hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Liu, Tongyao; Drager, Douglas; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Chhabra, Ekta Seth; Peters, Robert; Josephson, Neil; Lillicrap, David; Blumberg, Richard S.; Pierce, Glenn F.; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies is a major complication of FVIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A. We investigated the immune response to recombinant human factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) in comparison to BDD-rFVIII and full-length rFVIII (FL-rFVIII) in hemophilia A mice. Repeated administration of therapeutically relevant doses of rFVIIIFc in these mice resulted in significantly lower antibody responses to rFVIII compared to BDD-rFVIII and FL-rFVIII and reduced antibody production upon subsequent challenge with high doses of rFVIIIFc. The induction of a tolerogenic response by rFVIIIFc was associated with higher percentage of regulatory T-cells, a lower percentage of pro-inflammatory splenic T-cells, and up-regulation of tolerogenic cytokines and markers. Disruption of Fc interactions with either FcRn or Fcγ receptors diminished tolerance induction, suggesting the involvement of these pathways. These results indicate that rFVIIIFc reduces immunogenicity and imparts tolerance to rFVIII demonstrating that recombinant therapeutic proteins may be modified to influence immunogenicity and facilitate tolerance. PMID:26775174

  9. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku )

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  10. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs.

  11. Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) fusion protein reduces immunogenicity and induces tolerance in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Liu, Tongyao; Drager, Douglas; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Chhabra, Ekta Seth; Peters, Robert; Josephson, Neil; Lillicrap, David; Blumberg, Richard S; Pierce, Glenn F; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies is a major complication of FVIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A. We investigated the immune response to recombinant human factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) in comparison to BDD-rFVIII and full-length rFVIII (FL-rFVIII) in hemophilia A mice. Repeated administration of therapeutically relevant doses of rFVIIIFc in these mice resulted in significantly lower antibody responses to rFVIII compared to BDD-rFVIII and FL-rFVIII and reduced antibody production upon subsequent challenge with high doses of rFVIIIFc. The induction of a tolerogenic response by rFVIIIFc was associated with higher percentage of regulatory T-cells, a lower percentage of pro-inflammatory splenic T-cells, and up-regulation of tolerogenic cytokines and markers. Disruption of Fc interactions with either FcRn or Fcγ receptors diminished tolerance induction, suggesting the involvement of these pathways. These results indicate that rFVIIIFc reduces immunogenicity and imparts tolerance to rFVIII demonstrating that recombinant therapeutic proteins may be modified to influence immunogenicity and facilitate tolerance. PMID:26775174

  12. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. PMID:26302233

  13. Carrier detection in classic hemophilia by combined measurement of immunologic (VIII AGN) and procoagulant (VIII AHF) activities.

    PubMed

    Eyster, M E; Jones, M B; Moore, T; Delli-Bovi, L

    1976-06-01

    Accurate carrier detection in classic hemophilia has been difficult because of (1) technical problems related to the performance of both immunologic (VIII AGN) and procoagulant (VIII AHF) determinations, and (2) statistical problems related to the analysis of these data. VIII AHF was determined by a one-stage assay based on the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). VIII AGN was measured by the method of quantitative immunoelectrophoresis. The discriminant function U. = 0.67 1n (AHF) -- 3.17 AGN X 10(-3) was calculated for a validation group of 20 normal persons and for seven obligate carriers, and tested for accuracy of prediction on a cross-validation group of seven additional normal women and ten additional obligate carriers. A U. score of greater than or equal to 2.54 correctly identified 25 of 27 normal persons. Sixteen of 17 obligate carriers had U. scores below 2.54. In addition, of seven possilbe carriers, four were identified as normal and three as carriers. Five normal women taking oral contraceptives had disproportionately high U. scores. It is concluded that detection of carriers of classic hemophilia should be possible in the clinical laboratory by calculation of a discriminant function from combined measurements of VIII AGN and VIII AHF.

  14. Prolonged activity of a recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein in hemophilia A mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Jennifer A.; Liu, Tongyao; Low, Susan C.; Zhang, Xin; Kamphaus, George; Sakorafas, Paul; Fraley, Cara; Drager, Douglas; Reidy, Thomas; McCue, Justin; Franck, Helen W. G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite proven benefits, prophylactic treatment for hemophilia A is hampered by the short half-life of factor VIII. A recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) was constructed to determine the potential for reduced frequency of dosing. rFVIIIFc has an ∼ 2-fold longer half-life than rFVIII in hemophilia A (HemA) mice and dogs. The extension of rFVIIIFc half-life requires interaction of Fc with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). In FcRn knockout mice, the extension of rFVIIIFc half-life is abrogated, and is restored in human FcRn transgenic mice. The Fc fusion has no impact on FVIII-specific activity. rFVIIIFc has comparable acute efficacy as rFVIII in treating tail clip injury in HemA mice, and fully corrects whole blood clotting time (WBCT) in HemA dogs immediately after dosing. Furthermore, consistent with prolonged half-life, rFVIIIFc shows 2-fold longer prophylactic efficacy in protecting HemA mice from tail vein transection bleeding induced 24-48 hours after dosing. In HemA dogs, rFVIIIFc also sustains partial correction of WBCT 1.5- to 2-fold longer than rFVIII. rFVIIIFc was well tolerated in both species. Thus, the rescue of FVIII by Fc fusion to provide prolonged protection presents a novel pathway for FVIII catabolism, and warrants further investigation. PMID:22246033

  15. Factor VIII delivered by hematopoietic stem cell-derived B cells corrects the phenotype of hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali; Zweier-Renn, Lynnsey A.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The main impediments to clinical application of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for treatment of hemophilia A are the bone marrow transplant-related risks and the potential for insertional mutagenesis caused by retroviral vectors. To circumvent these limitations, we have adapted a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen and directed factor VIII (FVIII) protein synthesis to B lineage cells using an insulated lentiviral vector containing an immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer-promoter. Transplantation of lentiviral vector-modified HSCs resulted in therapeutic levels of FVIII in the circulation of all transplanted mice for the duration of the study (6 months). Immunostaining of spleen cells showed that the majority of FVIII was synthesized by B220+ B cells and CD138+ plasma cells. Subsequent challenge with recombinant FVIII elicited at most a minor anti-FVIII antibody response, demonstrating induction of immune hyporesponsiveness. All transplant recipients exhibited clot formation and survived tail clipping, indicating correction of their hemophilic phenotype. Therapeutic levels of FVIII could be transferred to secondary recipients by bone marrow transplantation, confirming gene transfer into long-term repopulating HSCs. Moreover, short-term therapeutic FVIII levels could also be achieved in secondary recipients by adoptive transfer of HSC-derived splenic B cells. Our findings support pursuit of B cell-directed protein delivery as a potential clinical approach to treat hemophilia A and other disorders correctable by systemically distributed proteins. PMID:21264447

  16. Overexpression of factor VIII after AAV delivery is transiently associated with cellular stress in hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Nguyen, Giang N; Sabatino, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a large glycoprotein that is challenging to express both in vitro and in vivo. Several studies suggest that high levels of FVIII expression can lead to cellular stress. After gene transfer, transgene expression is restricted to a subset of cells and the increased FVIII load per cell may impact activation of the unfolded protein response. We sought to determine whether increased FVIII expression in mice after adeno-associated viral liver gene transfer would affect the unfolded protein response and/or immune response to the transgene. The FVIII gene was delivered as B-domain deleted single chain or two chain (light and heavy chains) at a range of doses in hemophilia A mice. A correlation between FVIII expression and anti-FVIII antibody titers was observed. Analysis of key components of the unfolded protein response, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), showed transient unfolded protein response activation in the single chain treated group expressing >200% of FVIII but not after two chain delivery. These studies suggest that supraphysiological single chain FVIII expression may increase the likelihood of a cellular stress response but does not alter liver function. These data are in agreement with the observed long-term expression of FVIII at therapeutic levels after adeno-associated viral delivery in hemophilia A dogs without evidence of cellular toxicity. PMID:27738645

  17. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.A.M.; Deugau, K.V.; Lillicrap, D.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which {gt}95% are single nulceotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. The authors used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. The study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male.

  18. Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) fusion protein reduces immunogenicity and induces tolerance in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Liu, Tongyao; Drager, Douglas; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Chhabra, Ekta Seth; Peters, Robert; Josephson, Neil; Lillicrap, David; Blumberg, Richard S; Pierce, Glenn F; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies is a major complication of FVIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A. We investigated the immune response to recombinant human factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) in comparison to BDD-rFVIII and full-length rFVIII (FL-rFVIII) in hemophilia A mice. Repeated administration of therapeutically relevant doses of rFVIIIFc in these mice resulted in significantly lower antibody responses to rFVIII compared to BDD-rFVIII and FL-rFVIII and reduced antibody production upon subsequent challenge with high doses of rFVIIIFc. The induction of a tolerogenic response by rFVIIIFc was associated with higher percentage of regulatory T-cells, a lower percentage of pro-inflammatory splenic T-cells, and up-regulation of tolerogenic cytokines and markers. Disruption of Fc interactions with either FcRn or Fcγ receptors diminished tolerance induction, suggesting the involvement of these pathways. These results indicate that rFVIIIFc reduces immunogenicity and imparts tolerance to rFVIII demonstrating that recombinant therapeutic proteins may be modified to influence immunogenicity and facilitate tolerance.

  19. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Racel G.; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential “cure.” Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained. PMID:21245323

  20. Modification of an exposed loop in the C1 domain reduces immune responses to factor VIII in hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Aleksandra; van Haren, Simon D.; Herczenik, Eszter; Kaijen, Paul; Ruminska, Aleksandra; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Zheng, X. Long; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; ten Brinke, Anja; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    Development of neutralizing Abs to blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) provides a major complication in hemophilia care. In this study we explored whether modulation of the uptake of FVIII by APCs can reduce its intrinsic immunogenicity. Endocytosis of FVIII by professional APCs is significantly blocked by mAb KM33, directed toward the C1 domain of FVIII. We created a C1 domain variant (FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A), which showed only minimal binding to KM33 and retained its activity as measured by chromogenic assay. FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A displayed a strongly reduced internalization by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as murine BM-derived dendritic cells. We subsequently investigated the ability of this variant to induce an immune response in FVIII-deficient mice. We show that mice treated with FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A have significantly lower anti-FVIII Ab titers and FVIII-specific CD4+ T-cell responses compared with mice treated with wild-type FVIII. These data show that alanine substitutions at positions 2090, 2092, and 2093 reduce the immunogenicity of FVIII. According to our findings we hypothesize that FVIII variants displaying a reduced uptake by APCs provide a novel therapeutic approach to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia A. PMID:22498747

  1. Modification of an exposed loop in the C1 domain reduces immune responses to factor VIII in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Aleksandra; van Haren, Simon D; Herczenik, Eszter; Kaijen, Paul; Ruminska, Aleksandra; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Zheng, X Long; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; ten Brinke, Anja; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-05-31

    Development of neutralizing Abs to blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) provides a major complication in hemophilia care. In this study we explored whether modulation of the uptake of FVIII by APCs can reduce its intrinsic immunogenicity. Endocytosis of FVIII by professional APCs is significantly blocked by mAb KM33, directed toward the C1 domain of FVIII. We created a C1 domain variant (FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A), which showed only minimal binding to KM33 and retained its activity as measured by chromogenic assay. FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A displayed a strongly reduced internalization by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as murine BM-derived dendritic cells. We subsequently investigated the ability of this variant to induce an immune response in FVIII-deficient mice. We show that mice treated with FVIII-R2090A/K2092A/F2093A have significantly lower anti-FVIII Ab titers and FVIII-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses compared with mice treated with wild-type FVIII. These data show that alanine substitutions at positions 2090, 2092, and 2093 reduce the immunogenicity of FVIII. According to our findings we hypothesize that FVIII variants displaying a reduced uptake by APCs provide a novel therapeutic approach to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia A. PMID:22498747

  2. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency).

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Deugau, K V; Lillicrap, D P

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which greater than 95% are single nucleotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. We used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. Our study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male.

  3. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, J; Houghton, K; Luke, A

    2010-01-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for ‘safe’ physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifing any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:21455465

  4. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, J; Houghton, K; Luke, A

    2010-04-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for 'safe' physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifing any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:21455465

  5. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma, and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, John F; Houghton, Kristin; Luke, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological, and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for 'safe' physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifying any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma, and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:20445355

  6. The old and new: PCCs, VIIa, and long-lasting clotting factors for hemophilia and other bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2013-01-01

    What is the correct use of established clotting factors, prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs), and activated factor VII in bleeding complications of trauma, surgery, and old and new oral anticoagulants? How will new clotting factors, specifically the long-acting factors, change the hemostatic management of coagulation deficiency disorders? From bench to bedside, comparative coagulation studies and clinical trials of modified clotting factors are providing insights to help guide hemostatic management of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. Comparative thrombin-generation studies and preclinical and clinical trials suggest that PCCs and fresh-frozen plasma are effective in reversing the anticoagulant effects of warfarin, yet there are few data to guide reversal of the new oral anticoagulants dabigatran and rivaroxaban. Although coagulation studies support the use of PCCs to reverse new oral anticoagulants, correlation with clinical response is variable and clinical trials in bleeding patients are needed. For congenital bleeding disorders, exciting new technologies are emerging from the bench. Data from clinical trials of molecularly modified coagulation factors with extended half-lives suggest the possibility of fewer infusions, reduced bleeds, and better quality of life in persons with hemophilia. Preclinical studies of other novel prohemostatic approaches for hemophilia and other congenital coagulation disorders include RNA interference silencing of antithrombin, monoclonal anti-tissue factor pathway inhibitor (anti-antibody, anti-tissue factor pathway inhibitor) aptamer, bispecific anti-IXa/X antibody, and fucoidans. Understanding the comparative coagulation studies of established prohemostatic agents, the pharmacokinetics of new long-acting clotting factors, and their correlation with bleeding outcomes will provide opportunities to optimize the hemostatic management of both congenital and acquired hemostatic disorders.

  7. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment.

  8. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment. PMID:25911555

  9. Severe hemophilia A in a female by cryptic translocation: Order and orientation of factor VIII within Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Migeon, B.R.; McGinniss, M.J.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Axelman, J.; Stasiowski, B.A.; Youssoufian, H.; Kearns, W.G.; Chung, A.; Pearson, P.L.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); Muneer, R.S. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors report studies of a female with severe hemophilia A resulting from a complex de novo translocation of chromosomes X and 17 (46,X,t(X; 17)). Somatic cell hybrids containing the normal X, the der(X), or the der(17) were analyzed for coagulation factor VIII (F8C) sequences using Southern blots and polymerase chain reaction. The normal X, always late replicating, contains a normal F8C gene, whereas the der(X) has no F8C sequences. The der(17) chromosome containing Xq24-Xq28 carries a functional G6PD locus and a deleted F8C allele that lacks exons 1--15. Also, it lacks the DXYS64-X locus, situated between the F8C locus and the Xq telomere. These results indicate that a cryptic breakpoint within Xq28 deleted the 5[prime] end of F8C, but left the more proximal G6PD locus intact on the der(17)chromosome. As the deleted segment includes the 5[prime] half of F8C as well as the subtelomeric DXYS64 locus, F8C must be oriented on the chromosome with its 5[prime] region closest to the telomere. Therefore, the order of these loci is Xcen-G6PD-3[prime]F8C-5[prime]F8C-DXYS64-Xqtel. The analysis of somatic cell hybrids has elucidated the true nature of the F8C mutation in the pro-band, revealing a more complex rearrangement (three chromosomes involved) than that expected from cytogenetic analysis, chromosome painting, and Southern blots. A 900-kb segment within Xq28 has been translocated to another autosome. Hemophilia A in this heterozygous female is due to the decapitation of the F8C gene on the der(17) and inactivation of the intact allele on the normal X. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Expression and Characterization of Gly-317 Variants of Factor IX Causing Variable Bleeding in Hemophilia B Patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuya; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-06-23

    We recently identified two hemophilia B patients who carried Gly-317 to Arg (FIX-G317R) or Gly-317 to Glu (FIX-G317E) substitutions in their FIX gene. The former mutation caused severe and the latter moderate bleeding in afflicted patients. To understand the molecular basis for the variable clinical manifestation of Gly-317 mutations, we prepared recombinant G317R and G317E derivatives of FIX and compared their kinetic properties to those of recombinant wild-type FIX in appropriate assay systems. Both physiological activators, factor XIa and extrinsic Tenase (factor VIIa-tissue factor), activated both zymogen variants with an ∼1.5-fold elevated K(m); however, extrinsic Tenase activated FIX-G317E with an ∼2-fold improved k(cat). By contrast to zymogen activation, the catalytic activities of both FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E enzymes toward the natural substrate, factor X, were dramatically (>4 orders of magnitude) impaired, but their apparent affinity for interaction with factor VIIIa was only slightly (<2-fold) decreased. Further studies revealed that the reactivity of FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E with antithrombin has been impaired 10- and 13-fold, respectively, in the absence and 166- and 500-fold, respectively, in the presence of pentasaccharide. As expected, the clotting activities of FIX variants could not be measured by the aPTT assay. These results implicate a critical role for Gly-317 in maintaining normal catalytic function for FIX/FIXa in the clotting cascade. The results further suggest that improved k(cat) of FIX-G317E activation in the extrinsic pathway together with dramatically impaired reactivity of FIXa-G317E with antithrombin may account for the less severe bleeding phenotype of a hemophilia B patient carrying the FIX-G317E mutation.

  11. Expression and Characterization of Gly-317 Variants of Factor IX Causing Variable Bleeding in Hemophilia B Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuya; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified two hemophilia B patients who carried Gly-317 to Arg (FIX-G317R) or Gly-317 to Glu (FIX-G317E) substitutions in their FIX gene. The former mutation caused severe and the latter one moderate bleeding in afflicted patients. To understand the molecular basis for the variable clinical manifestation of Gly-317 mutations, we prepared recombinant G317R and G317E derivatives of FIX and compared their kinetic properties to recombinant wild-type FIX in appropriate assay systems. Both physiological activators, factor XIa and extrinsic Tenase (factor VIIa-tissue factor) activated both zymogen variants with ~1.5-fold elevated Km, however, extrinsic Tenase activated FIX-G317E with ~2-fold improved kcat. By contrast to zymogen activation, the catalytic activities of both FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E enzymes toward the natural substrate, factor X, were dramatically (more than four orders of magnitude) impaired, but their apparent affinity for interaction with factor VIIIa was only slightly (<2-fold) decreased. Further studies revealed that the reactivity of FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E with antithrombin has been impaired 10- and 13-fold, respectively, in the absence and 166- and 500-fold, respectively, in the presence of pentasaccharide. As expected, the clotting activities of FIX variants were not measurable by the aPTT assay. These results implicate a critical role for Gly-317 in maintaining normal catalytic function for FIX/FIXa in the clotting cascade. The results further suggest that improved kcat of FIX-G317E activation in the extrinsic pathway together with dramatically impaired reactivity of FIXa-G317E with antithrombin may account for the less severe bleeding phenotype of hemophilia B patient carrying the FIX-G317E mutation. PMID:26023895

  12. Intermediate-dose versus high-dose prophylaxis for severe hemophilia: comparing outcome and costs since the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Petrini, Pia; Holmström, Margareta; Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, H. Marijke; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia is very effective but is limited by cost issues. The implementation of 2 different prophylactic regimens in The Netherlands and Sweden since the 1970s may be considered a natural experiment. We compared the costs and outcomes of Dutch intermediate- and Swedish high-dose prophylactic regimens for patients with severe hemophilia (factor VIII/IX < 1 IU/dL) born between 1970 and 1994, using prospective standardized outcome assessment and retrospective collection of cost data. Seventy-eight Dutch and 50 Swedish patients, median age 24 years (range, 14-37 years), were included. Intermediate-dose prophylaxis used less factor concentrate (median: Netherlands, 2100 IU/kg per year [interquartile range (IQR), 1400-2900 IU/kg per year] vs Sweden, 4000 IU/kg per year [IQR, 3000-4900 IU/kg per year]); (P < .01). Clinical outcome was slightly inferior for the intermediate-dose regimen (P < .01) for 5-year bleeding (median, 1.3 [IQR, 0.8-2.7] vs 0 [IQR, 0.0-2.0] joint bleeds/y) and joint health (Haemophilia Joint Health Score >10 of 144 points in 46% vs 11% of participants), although social participation and quality of life were similar. Annual total costs were 66% higher for high-dose prophylaxis (mean, 180 [95% confidence interval, 163 - 196] × US$1000 for Dutch vs 298 [95% confidence interval, 271-325]) × US$1000 for Swedish patients; (P < .01). At group level, the incremental benefits of high-dose prophylaxis appear limited. At the patient level, prophylaxis should be tailored individually, and many patients may do well receiving lower doses of concentrate without compromising safety. PMID:23777770

  13. An Inventory of Healthy Weight Practices in Federally-Funded Hemophilia Treatment Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Elizabeth; Deutsche, Joann; Okoroh, Ekwutosi; Owens-McAlister, Sally; Majumdar, Suvankar; Ullman, Megan; Damiano, Mary Lou; Recht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the hemophilia population, obesity has an adverse effect on health care cost, chronic complications, and joint disease. Although staffs of federally-funded Hemophilia Treatment Centers in the United States (HTCs) anecdotally recognize these outcomes, practices to promote healthy weights have not been reported. This evaluation identifies routine practices among HTCs in body mass index (BMI) assessment, perceptions about need to address obesity, and roles in offering evidence-based strategies to promote healthy weights. A telephone survey was developed to assess HTCs practices including patient BMI assessment and counseling, perceptions about the importance healthy patient weights, and HTCs roles in weight management. Ninety of the 130 federally-funded HTCs contacted elected to participate and completed the telephone survey. Of these, 67% routinely calculated BMI and 48% provided results to patients. Approximately one third classified obesity correctly for children (30%) and adults (32%), using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s BMI cutoffs. Most HTCs (87%) reported obesity as an issue of “big” or “moderate” concern and 98% indicated HTC responsibility to address this issue. Most centers (64%) address patient weight during comprehensive visits. One third (33%) of centers include a nutritionist; of those without, 61% offer nutrition referrals when needed. Most (89%) HTCs do not have a protocol in place to address healthy weights; 53% indicated guidelines are needed. HTCs offer services to help improve weight outcomes. Training programs for calculating and interpreting BMI as well as identification of appropriate guidelines to apply to the HTC patient population are needed. PMID:24629074

  14. Intermediate-dose versus high-dose prophylaxis for severe hemophilia: comparing outcome and costs since the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathelijn; Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Petrini, Pia; Holmström, Margareta; Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, H Marijke; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-08-15

    Prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia is very effective but is limited by cost issues. The implementation of 2 different prophylactic regimens in The Netherlands and Sweden since the 1970s may be considered a natural experiment. We compared the costs and outcomes of Dutch intermediate- and Swedish high-dose prophylactic regimens for patients with severe hemophilia (factor VIII/IX < 1 IU/dL) born between 1970 and 1994, using prospective standardized outcome assessment and retrospective collection of cost data. Seventy-eight Dutch and 50 Swedish patients, median age 24 years (range, 14-37 years), were included. Intermediate-dose prophylaxis used less factor concentrate (median: Netherlands, 2100 IU/kg per year [interquartile range (IQR), 1400-2900 IU/kg per year] vs Sweden, 4000 IU/kg per year [IQR, 3000-4900 IU/kg per year]); (P < .01). Clinical outcome was slightly inferior for the intermediate-dose regimen (P < .01) for 5-year bleeding (median, 1.3 [IQR, 0.8-2.7] vs 0 [IQR, 0.0-2.0] joint bleeds/y) and joint health (Haemophilia Joint Health Score >10 of 144 points in 46% vs 11% of participants), although social participation and quality of life were similar. Annual total costs were 66% higher for high-dose prophylaxis (mean, 180 [95% confidence interval, 163 - 196] × US$1000 for Dutch vs 298 [95% confidence interval, 271-325]) × US$1000 for Swedish patients; (P < .01). At group level, the incremental benefits of high-dose prophylaxis appear limited. At the patient level, prophylaxis should be tailored individually, and many patients may do well receiving lower doses of concentrate without compromising safety.

  15. Minimizing the Risk of Perioperative Bleeding in a Child with Hemophilia A during Dental Rehabilitation under General Anesthesia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yehia El Batawi, Hisham

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hemophilia, among other bleeding disorders, raises concerns for dental service providers who routinely use sharp hand and rotary instruments, address highly vascular soft tissue and provide dental extractions. In pediatric dentistry, dealing with fearful or irritable children increases the possibility of trauma and subsequent bleeding risks in hemophilic pediatric dental patients. In the current report, we discuss how anesthetic, pediatric and dental management may contribute to the delivery of safe and complete dental treatment for such children. This report describes the safe performance of dental treatments, including multiple extractions under general anesthesia, in a hemophilic child. How to cite this article: El Batawi HY. Minimizing the Risk of Perioperative Bleeding in a Child with Hemophilia A during Dental Rehabilitation under General Anesthesia: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):217-222. PMID:25206227

  16. HLA Class I and KIR Genes Do Not Protect Against HIV Type 1 Infection in Highly Exposed Uninfected Individuals With Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Vince, Nicolas; Bashirova, Arman A.; Lied, Alexandra; Gao, Xiaojiang; Dorrell, Lucy; McLaren, Paul J.; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving patients with hemophilia A who were exposed to but uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) did not reveal genetic variants associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection, beyond homozygosity for CCR5-Δ32. Since variation in HLA class I and KIR genes is not well interrogated by standard GWAS techniques, we tested whether these 2 loci were involved in protection from HIV-1 infection in the same hemophilia cohort, using controls from the general population. Our data indicate that HLA class I alleles, presence or absence of KIR genes, and functionally relevant combinations of the HLA/KIR genotypes are not involved in resistance to parenterally transmitted HIV-1 infection. PMID:24719475

  17. Anti-CD20 as the B-Cell Targeting Agent in a Combined Therapy to Modulate Anti-Factor VIII Immune Responses in Hemophilia a Inhibitor Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Lin, Jacqueline; Butts, Chérie L; Miao, Carol H

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing antibody formation against transgene products can represent a major complication following gene therapy with treatment of genetic diseases, such as hemophilia A. Although successful approaches have been developed to prevent the formation of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies, innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses in FVIII-primed subjects are still lacking. Anti-FVIII neutralizing antibodies circulate for long periods in part due to persistence of memory B-cells. Anti-CD20 targets a variety of B-cells (pre-B-cells to mature/memory cells); therefore, we investigated the impact of B-cell depletion on anti-FVIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice using anti-CD20 combined with regulatory T (Treg) cell expansion using IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin. We found that anti-CD20 alone can partially modulate anti-FVIII immune responses in both unprimed and FVIII-primed hemophilia A mice. Moreover, in mice treated with anti-CD20+IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes+rapamycin+FVIII, anti-FVIII antibody titers were significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with regimens targeting only B or T cells. In addition, titers remained low after a second challenge with FVIII plasmid. Treg cells and activation markers were transiently and significantly increased in the groups treated with IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes; however, significant B-cell depletion was obtained in anti-CD20-treated groups. Importantly, both FVIII-specific antibody-secreting cells and memory B-cells were significantly reduced in mice treated with combination therapy. This study demonstrates that a combination regimen is highly promising as a treatment option for modulating anti-FVIII antibodies and facilitating induction of long-term tolerance to FVIII in hemophilia A mice.

  18. Acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom: a 2-year national surveillance study by the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter W; Hirsch, Sybil; Baglin, Trevor P; Dolan, Gerard; Hanley, John; Makris, Michael; Keeling, David M; Liesner, Ri; Brown, Simon A; Hay, Charles R M

    2007-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a severe bleeding disorder caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Previous reports have focused on referral center patients and it is unclear whether these findings are generally applicable. To improve understanding of the disease, a 2-year observational study was established to identify and characterize the presenting features and outcome of all patients with acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom. This allowed a consecutive cohort of patients, unbiased by referral or reporting practice, to be studied. A total of 172 patients with a median age of 78 years were identified, an incidence of 1.48/million/y. The cohort was significantly older than previously reported series, but bleeding manifestations and underlying diseases were similar. Bleeding was the cause of death in 9% of the cohort and remained a risk until the inhibitor had been eradicated. There was no difference in inhibitor eradication or mortality between patients treated with steroids alone and a combination of steroids and cytotoxic agents. Relapse of the inhibitor was observed in 20% of the patients who had attained first complete remission. The data provide the most complete description of acquired hemophilia A available and are applicable to patients presenting to all centers.

  19. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Bhavya S; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Doering, Christopher B; Meeks, Shannon L

    2012-01-01

    Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa). However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I") kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II") inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined fVIII/rfVIIa therapy

  20. Transitioning issues in adolescent to young adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors: an approach for a growing population.

    PubMed

    Young, Guy

    2010-09-01

    The major adverse effect of factor replacement therapy in patients with hemophilia is the development of neutralizing antibodies termed inhibitors. This complication renders standard factor replacement therapy ineffective resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Until recently, the population of adults with inhibitors was relatively small due to the death of many of the patients from HIV that they contracted from contaminated factor in the early 1980s. With the advent of factor products with reduced risks for deadly infections in the mid-1980s to early 1990s, a cohort of inhibitor patients is now beginning to enter adulthood thus raising the issues regarding the transition of these patients into adulthood. It is, therefore, expected that adult hematologists will be seeing more inhibitor patients and that pediatric hematologists will be faced with managing this transition process, which may not necessarily include transition to an adult facility or adult hematologist. This review will discuss the various issues ranging from choice of medical provider to a discussion of psychosocial and financial issues facing this specific patient population.

  1. Single nucleotide primer extension to detect genetic diseases: Experimental application to hemophilia B (factor IX) and cystic fibrosis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppuswamy, M.N.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Spitzer, S.G.; Groce, S.L.; Bajaj, S.P. ); Kasper, C.K. )

    1991-02-15

    In this report, the authors describe an approach to detect the presence of abnormal alleles in those genetic diseases in which frequency of occurrence of the same mutation is high (e.g., hemophilia B). Initially, from each subject, the DNA fragment containing the putative mutation site is amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. For each fragment two reaction mixtures are then prepared. Each contains the amplified fragment, a primer (18-mer or longer) whose sequence is identical to the coding sequence of the normal gene immediately flanking the 5{prime} end of the mutation site, and either an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled nucleotide corresponding to the normal coding sequence at the mutation site or an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled nucleotide corresponding to the mutant sequence. An essential feature of the present methodology is that the base immediately 3{prime} to the template-bound primer is one of those altered in the mutant, since in this way an extension of the primer by a single base will give an extended molecule characteristic of either the mutant or the wild type. The method is rapid and should be useful in carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of every genetic disease with a known sequence variation.

  2. New and Emerging Agents for the Treatment of Hemophilia: Focus on Extended Half-Life Recombinant Clotting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2015-09-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked disorders caused by deficient or defective clotting factor VIII (FVIII) or IX factor (FIX) proteins, and characterized by spontaneous or traumatic bleeding into joints and muscles. Previous use of plasma and plasma-derived clotting factors that lacked appropriate viral inactivation steps in manufacturing led to significant morbidity associated with transfusion-transmitted HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). The development of recombinant proteins revolutionized their treatment, and, with no new HIV or HCV infection via clotting proteins for nearly 30 years, greatly improved their lifespan, which now approaches that of the general population, and with the same risks for aging complications. Novel long-acting factor proteins are being licensed to extend FVIII and FIX half-life, thereby reducing infusion frequency and potentially bleed frequency and associated morbidity. Further, novel therapeutics which take advantage of new technologies, including siRNA, monoclonal antibody, and small peptide inhibition technologies, have the potential to simplify treatment and improve outcomes for those with inhibitors.

  3. Trends in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) load among HIV-1-infected children with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Engels, E A; Rosenberg, P S; Katki, H; Goedert, J J; Biggar, R J

    2001-08-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons, virus load (serum/plasma level of HIV) predicts outcome. Virus load trends have been characterized in adults and infants but not in children. Virus load trends in 22 male children with hemophilia who acquired HIV-1 postnatally (age 0.7-5.2 years at seroconversion) were studied. The mean HIV-1 load 2 years after seroconversion was 4.40 log10 copies/mL, and the mean change over time (slope) was 0.03 log10 copies/(mL x year). Significant among-children variation was apparent: a random effects model predicted that 95% of children had early virus loads 3.75-5.04 log10 copies/mL and slopes -0.07 to 0.12 log10 copies/(mL x year). Higher early virus loads and higher slopes were each associated with increased mortality (P=.006 and P=.03, respectively). In conclusion, those subjects had virus load trends similar to those in adults. Early virus loads were lower than those in vertically infected infants, which suggests that factors changing soon after birth affect viral replication.

  4. In situ genetic correction of F8 intron 22 inversion in hemophilia A patient-specific iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Hu, Zhiqing; Li, Zhuo; Pang, Jialun; Feng, Mai; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin-Peng, Siyuan; Liu, Bo; Chen, Fangping; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of severe Hemophilia A (HA) cases are caused by F8 intron 22 inversion (Inv22). This 0.6-Mb inversion splits the 186-kb F8 into two parts with opposite transcription directions. The inverted 5′ part (141 kb) preserves the first 22 exons that are driven by the intrinsic F8 promoter, leading to a truncated F8 transcript due to the lack of the last 627 bp coding sequence of exons 23–26. Here we describe an in situ genetic correction of Inv22 in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). By using TALENs, the 627 bp sequence plus a polyA signal was precisely targeted at the junction of exon 22 and intron 22 via homologous recombination (HR) with high targeting efficiencies of 62.5% and 52.9%. The gene-corrected iPSCs retained a normal karyotype following removal of drug selection cassette using a Cre-LoxP system. Importantly, both F8 transcription and FVIII secretion were rescued in the candidate cell types for HA gene therapy including endothelial cells (ECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the gene-corrected iPSCs. This is the first report of an efficient in situ genetic correction of the large inversion mutation using a strategy of targeted gene addition. PMID:26743572

  5. Acquired hemophilia A associated with IgG4-related lung disease in a patient with autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Keishi; Gocho, Kyoko; Ishida, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Hirota, Nao; Sato, Keita; Sano, Go; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Sakamoto, Susumu; Takai, Yujiro; Hata, Yoshinobu; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Homma, Sakae

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related lung diseases can occur in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). However, the causal relationship between AIP and acquired hemophilia A (AH) is unknown. We herein report the first case of AH associated with IgG4-related lung disease that developed in a patient with AIP. A 65-year-old asymptomatic man with a history of AIP and sclerosing cholangitis diagnosed at the age of 57 was admitted to our hospital due to an abnormal reticulonodular shadow on chest X-ray. An examination of lung biopsy specimens revealed IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in the interstitium. The serum IgG4 level was elevated. One year later, the patient developed a progressive severe hematoma in the left femoral muscle. On admission, laboratory examinations revealed severe anemia with a markedly prolonged activated partial prothrombin time, a decreased level of factor VIII (FVIII) activity, and the existence of anti-FVIII antibodies. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of AH. No relapse has been observed over the past 25 months, during which time, corticosteroid therapy has been continuously administered.

  6. Recombinant factor IX-Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) demonstrates safety and prolonged activity in a phase 1/2a study in hemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Valentino, Leonard A.; Key, Nigel S.; Josephson, Neil C.; Powell, Jerry S.; Cheng, Gregory; Thompson, Arthur R.; Goyal, Jaya; Tubridy, Karen L.; Peters, Robert T.; Dumont, Jennifer A.; Euwart, Donald; Li, Lian; Hallén, Bengt; Gozzi, Peter; Bitonti, Alan J.; Jiang, Haiyan; Luk, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Current factor IX (FIX) products display a half-life (t1/2) of ∼ 18 hours, requiring frequent intravenous infusions for prophylaxis and treatment in patients with hemophilia B. This open-label, dose-escalation trial in previously treated adult subjects with hemophilia B examined the safety and pharmacokinetics of rFIXFc. rFIXFc is a recombinant fusion protein composed of FIX and the Fc domain of human IgG1, to extend circulating time. Fourteen subjects received a single dose of rFIXFc; 1 subject each received 1, 5, 12.5, or 25 IU/kg, and 5 subjects each received 50 or 100 IU/kg. rFIXFc was well tolerated, and most adverse events were mild or moderate in intensity. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. Dose-proportional increases in rFIXFc activity and Ag exposure were observed. With baseline subtraction, mean activity terminal t1/2 and mean residence time for rFIXFc were 56.7 and 71.8 hours, respectively. This is ∼ 3-fold longer than that reported for current rFIX products. The incremental recovery of rFIXFc was 0.93 IU/dL per IU/kg, similar to plasma-derived FIX. These results show that rFIXFc may offer a viable therapeutic approach to achieve prolonged hemostatic protection and less frequent dosing in patients with hemophilia B. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00716716. PMID:22110246

  7. Effects of Therapeutic Exercise and Hydrotherapy on Pain Severity and Knee Range of Motion in Patients with Hemophilia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mazloum, Vahid; Rahnama, Nader; Khayambashi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and limited range of motion (ROM) are the crucial subsequent results of joint hemorrhages in individuals with bleeding disorders and hemophilia. Exercise interventions are particularly recommended in treatment of such patients. The purpose of this study was to detect the influences of conventional exercise therapy and hydrotherapy on the knee joint complications in patients with hemophilia. Methods: A total of 40 patients engaging hemophilia A were randomized into one of three groups: Therapeutic exercise (N = 13), hydrotherapy (N = 14) or control (N = 13). While the first two groups followed their specific programs for 4 weeks, routine life-style was maintained by subjects in the control group in this period. To evaluate the pain level and knee ROM the visual analog scale and standard goniometer were utilized, respectively. The outcome was measured at baseline and after completing the prescribed protocols. Data analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe statistical tests (P < 0.05). Results: Both experimental groups experienced more significant decreasing in pain level (P < 0.001) and knee flexion and extension ROM (P < 0.001) in comparison to the control group. Although the pain was significantly (P < 0.01) more alleviated in participants treated through hydrotherapy in comparison to exercise therapy, the difference in ROM improvement was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using hydrotherapy in addition to usual rehabilitation training can result in beneficial effect in terms of pain and knee joint ROM. However, it appears that hydrotherapy is more effective in reducing pain. PMID:24554996

  8. Frequency of intron 1 and 22 inversions of Factor VIII gene in Mexican patients with severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Mantilla-Capacho, Johanna Milena; Beltrán-Miranda, Claudia Patricia; Luna-Záizar, Hilda; Aguilar-López, Lilia; Esparza-Flores, María Amparo; López-Guido, Beatriz; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Jaloma-Cruz, Ana Rebeca

    2007-04-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is one of the most common inherited bleeding disorders caused by FVIII gene mutations. Inversion of intron 22 (inv22) originates 50% of cases of severe HA and is a major risk factor for inhibitor development. Inversion of intron 1 (inv1) has been reported to occur in 2-3% of severe HA patients. We studied both inversions to determine their frequencies in Mexican patients with severe HA and to compare these data with other HA populations. The inv22 was evaluated as a risk factor for FVIII inhibitor development in severe HA patients. We studied 44 patients from 31 severe HA families for the detection of inv22 and 94 patients from 65 families to detect inv1. We used the subcycling long-distance PCR to detect inv22 and rapid PCR in duplex reactions to detect inv1. We found a frequency of 45% for the inv22 and no inv1-positive patients (0%). These frequencies were not statistically different from other populations, although haplotype analyses of FVIII gene and telomeric regions should be incorporated to explore population-specific variation of inv1 frequencies. Inv22-positive patients showed 1.88X higher risk for developing inhibitors with respect to patients carrying other severe mutations; however, this OR value was not significant. Our findings confirm inv22 as a hot-spot for severe HA and evidence the low frequency of inv1 in a Mexican population. The non-significant risk for developing inhibitors among inv22-positive patients agrees with the variety of genetic and non-genetic factors involved in such a complication.

  9. Advances in bypassing agent therapy for hemophilia patients with inhibitors to close care gaps and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Amy D; Hedner, Ulla

    2011-10-01

    In the past, patients with hemophilia and inhibitors have had less-than-optimal treatment and have experienced more orthopedic complications than patients without inhibitors. Bypassing agents offer the potential to close treatment gaps between inhibitor and noninhibitor patients by helping the former better attain key treatment goals, including: facilitating early initiation of treatment and hemostatic control in hemarthroses; providing effective treatment in serious hemorrhagic episodes; and performance of major surgery. Effective treatment with a bypassing agent minimizes joint and/or muscle damage and potentially can serve as an effective prophylactic agent to minimize the number of hemarthroses experienced per year, thereby mitigating the development of arthropathy. The reported efficacy of the currently available bypassing agents ranges from approximately 50-80% (50-64% in controlled studies) for plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC) and 81-91% (in controlled studies) for recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), including use in major orthopedic surgery. Both bypassing agents have undergone key improvements in their formulation and/or properties in recent years. The nanofiltered, vapor-heated formulation of pd-aPCC has diminished the risk of acquiring blood-borne viral infections and the room temperature stable formulation of rFVIIa allows more convenient storage, increased ease to dissolve and inject, and smaller volumes, thereby increasing overall ease of administration. Use of recommended dosing has been demonstrated to provide effective hemostasis with a minimal number of injections for both agents. In this paper, we review the individual characteristics of pd-aPCC and rFVIIa and discuss clinical data from studies conducted in inhibitor patients that demonstrate the potential benefits of these bypassing agents in this difficult-to-treat population, and underscore the potential opportunities to close the gap in care between

  10. Therapeutic and routine prophylactic properties of rFactor VIII Fc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Pratima; Fosbury, Emma; Riddell, Anne; Mathias, Mary

    2016-01-01

    rFVIIIFc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) is an extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII licensed for use in patients with hemophilia A for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding and surgical episodes. Pharmacokinetic studies in adults have shown a mean 1.5-fold increase in half-life compared to full-length factor VIII. When compared to adults, the half-life is decreased by 8% in adolescents between 12 and 17 years, by 18% in children 6 to <12 years, and by 33% in children between the ages of 2 and <6 years. There is a considerable interindividual variation in the prolongation of the half-life particularly in children and across the age groups, the range extending from no increase to a 2.5-fold increase. In addition to age, von willebrand factor (VWF) antigen level has demonstrated a significant impact on rFVIIIFc half-life, with higher VWF levels associated with greater prolongation of half-life. The pivotal and pediatric clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of rFVIIIFc for use in regular prophylaxis and in management of bleeds and surgery. In these studies, just under half the participants showed a zero annualized bleed rate (ABR), and the median ABR (1.6 in the pivotal study for the individualized prophylaxis arm) showed a further decrease in the extension study. On average, the patients required fewer infusions (reduced by at least a third), and the mean weekly consumption seems to be in keeping with standard recombinant factor VIII. EHL rFVIIIFc has made decreased infusion frequency a possibility. However, the interindividual variability in dose and infusion frequency highlights the need for a personalized approach based on individual patient’s half-life and/or response to treatment.

  11. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Ketterling, R P; Vielhaber, E; Bottema, C D; Schaid, D J; Cohen, M P; Sexauer, C L; Sommer, S S

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, we report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by us, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, transitions at the dinucleotide CpG show the largest male predominance (11-fold). In contrast to single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. PMID:8434583

  12. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: implications in human hemophilia treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Dong, B; Firrman, J; Wu, W; Roberts, S; Moore, A R; Liu, L S; Chin, M P S; Diao, Y; Kost, J; Xiao, W

    2016-07-01

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A (HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVIII (hFVIII) indicated that the development of novel HA treatment may require careful characterization of non-human FVIII. To investigate whether the data obtained using cFVIII can translate to HA treatment in human, we analyzed the differential biological properties of canine heavy chain (cHC) and light chain (cLC) by comparing with human heavy chain (hHC) and light chain (hLC). The secretion of cHC was 5-30-fold higher than hHC, with or without light chains (LCs). cHC+hLC group exhibited ~18-fold increase in coagulation activity compared with hHC+hLC delivery by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. Unlike hHC, the secretion of cHC was independent of LCs. cLC improves the specific activity of FVIII by two- to threefold compared with hLC. Moreover, the cLC, but not cHC, contributes to the higher stability of cFVIII. Our results suggested that the cFVIII expression results in the canine model should be interpreted with caution as the cHC secreted more efficiently than hHC and cLC exhibited a more active and stable phenotype than hLC. PMID:27064790

  13. Evaluation of factor VIII polymorphic short tandem repeat markers in linkage analysis for carrier diagnosis of hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sabina; Dong, Sufang; Li, Zuhua; Huang, Zhuliang; Zheng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is the most common inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by heterogeneous mutations in the factor VIII gene (FVIII). Diagnosis of the carrier is critical for preventing the birth of children affected by this coagulation disorder, which ultimately facilitates its management. Due to the heterogeneous nature of mutations, the large inversions and the complexity of the FVIII gene, direct recognition of the disease-associated mutation in HA is complex. Indirect linkage analysis using highly informative heterozygous polymorphic markers is an alternative method for determining the co-segregation of the mutant gene within a family for carrier detection of HA. The aim of the present study was to perform carrier diagnosis in a family with HA. Rapid multifluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed with six extragenic short tandem repeats (STRs), DXS1073, DXS15, DXS8091, DXS1227, DXS991, DXS993 and one intragenic marker, STR22 for linkage analysis in the HA family. All the STR markers employed in the present study were informative for linkages of pathogenic and healthy haplotypes among family members, particularly STR22, DXS1073 and DXS15. The STR marker, STR22, is within the FVIII gene while the DXS1073 and DXS15 markers are very close to the FVIII gene, where the chances of recombination are comparatively low, and provided the most accurate interpretation analysis, indicating that the proband's sister may have been the HA carrier. Rapid multifluorescent PCR using STR markers and linkage analysis was identified to be a simple method for performing HA carrier diagnosis. PMID:27446547

  14. Long term survival in persons with hemophilia and chronic hepatitis C: 40 year outcomes of a large single center cohort.

    PubMed

    Eyster, M Elaine; Kong, Lan; Li, Menghan; Schreibman, Ian R

    2016-09-01

    We studied the course of chronic HCV infections in a cohort of 222 persons with hemophilia (PWH) and von Willebrand disease followed at our center since 1973. Twenty two (10%) developed end stage liver disease (ESLD). Forty years after HCV infection, cumulative incidence of ESLD was 12.3% and overall survival was 45.5%. Those who were infected with HCV only (n = 100) had a survival of 75.2%, while those infected with HIV (n = 122) had a survival of 24% (P < 0.001). Survivals were significantly longer for those infected with HCV at younger age (< 15 years) compared to those infected over age 30 years (P = 0.014). Cause specific deaths for ESLD and bleeding were 8.8% and 8.3% respectively. For HIV negative subjects, the annual hazard of death from ESLD and bleeding was near zero for the first 10 years, and then rose slowly over the next 20 years to 0.4/100py for ESLD and 0.2/100py for bleeding. Sixty subjects completed 79 treatment episodes. Sustained viral response rates increased from 7/21 (33%) between 1990 and 2001, to 17/29 (58%) between 2002 and 2011, and to 27/29 (93%), since 2012 with the advent of the directly acting antiviral agents. These results confirm the very slow ESLD progression rate in HIV negative PWH. However, the risk of death from both ESLD and bleeding increases steadily with longer duration of HCV infection. More aggressive surveillance to detect those with early fibrosis is needed now that curative treatment is possible in >95% of individuals. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E335-E340, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27214557

  15. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: implications in human hemophilia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Wu, Wenman; Roberts, Sean; Moore, Andrea Rossi; Liu, LinShu; Chin, Mario P.S.; Diao, Yong; Kost, Joseph; Xiao, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVIII(hFVIII) indicated that the development of novel HA treatment may require careful characterization of non-human FVIII. To investigate whether the data obtained using cFVIII can translate to HA treatment in human, we analyzed the differential biological properties of canine heavy chain (cHC) and light chain (cLC) by comparing with human HC (hHC) and LC (hLC). The secretion of cHC was 5~30 fold higher than hHC, with or without LCs. cHC+hLC group exhibited ~18-fold increase in coagulation activity compared with hHC+hLC delivery by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. Unlike hHC, the secretion of cHC was independent of LCs. cLC improves the specific activity of FVIII by 2~3-fold compared with hLC. Moreover, the cLC but not cHC, contributes the high stability of cFVIII. Our results suggested that the cFVIII expression results in the canine model should be interpreted with caution as the cHC secreted more efficiently than hHC and cLC exhibited a more active and stable phenotype than hLC. PMID:27064790

  16. Therapeutic and routine prophylactic properties of rFactor VIII Fc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Pratima; Fosbury, Emma; Riddell, Anne; Mathias, Mary

    2016-01-01

    rFVIIIFc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) is an extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII licensed for use in patients with hemophilia A for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding and surgical episodes. Pharmacokinetic studies in adults have shown a mean 1.5-fold increase in half-life compared to full-length factor VIII. When compared to adults, the half-life is decreased by 8% in adolescents between 12 and 17 years, by 18% in children 6 to <12 years, and by 33% in children between the ages of 2 and <6 years. There is a considerable interindividual variation in the prolongation of the half-life particularly in children and across the age groups, the range extending from no increase to a 2.5-fold increase. In addition to age, von willebrand factor (VWF) antigen level has demonstrated a significant impact on rFVIIIFc half-life, with higher VWF levels associated with greater prolongation of half-life. The pivotal and pediatric clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of rFVIIIFc for use in regular prophylaxis and in management of bleeds and surgery. In these studies, just under half the participants showed a zero annualized bleed rate (ABR), and the median ABR (1.6 in the pivotal study for the individualized prophylaxis arm) showed a further decrease in the extension study. On average, the patients required fewer infusions (reduced by at least a third), and the mean weekly consumption seems to be in keeping with standard recombinant factor VIII. EHL rFVIIIFc has made decreased infusion frequency a possibility. However, the interindividual variability in dose and infusion frequency highlights the need for a personalized approach based on individual patient’s half-life and/or response to treatment. PMID:27695377

  17. Recombinant long-acting glycoPEGylated factor IX in hemophilia B: a multinational randomized phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Guy; Knobe, Karin; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Banner, Claus; Gürsel, Türkiz; Mahlangu, Johnny; Matsushita, Tadashi; Mauser-Bunschoten, Eveline P.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Walsh, Christopher E.; Negrier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    This multinational, randomized, single-blind trial investigated the safety and efficacy of nonacog beta pegol, a recombinant glycoPEGylated factor IX (FIX) with extended half-life, in 74 previously treated patients with hemophilia B (FIX activity ≤2 IU/dL). Patients received prophylaxis for 52 weeks, randomized to either 10 IU/kg or 40 IU/kg once weekly or to on-demand treatment of 28 weeks. No patients developed inhibitors, and no safety concerns were identified. Three hundred forty-five bleeding episodes were treated, with an estimated success rate of 92.2%. The median annualized bleeding rates (ABRs) were 1.04 in the 40 IU/kg prophylaxis group, 2.93 in the 10 IU/kg prophylaxis group, and 15.58 in the on-demand treatment group. In the 40 IU/kg group, 10 (66.7%) of 15 patients experienced no bleeding episodes into target joints compared with 1 (7.7%) of 13 patients in the 10 IU/kg group. Health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) assessed with the EuroQoL-5 Dimensions visual analog scale score improved from a median of 75 to 90 in the 40 IU/kg prophylaxis group. Nonacog beta pegol was well tolerated and efficacious for the treatment of bleeding episodes and was associated with low ABRs in patients receiving prophylaxis. Once-weekly prophylaxis with 40 IU/kg resolved target joint bleeds in 66.7% of the affected patients and improved HR-QoL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01333111. PMID:25261199

  18. First analysis of 10-year trends in national factor concentrates usage in haemophilia: data from CHARMS, the Canadian Hemophilia Assessment and Resource Management System.

    PubMed

    Traore, A N; Chan, A K C; Webert, K E; Heddle, N; Ritchie, B; St-Louis, J; Teitel, J; Lillicrap, D; Iorio, A; Walker, I

    2014-07-01

    The Canadian Hemophilia Assessment and Resource Management System (CHARMS) tracks factor concentrates (FC) from the sole suppliers, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) and Hema-Quebec (HQ), to hospitals and to patients' homes. Patients FC infusion data are entered into CHARMS at Canadian Hemophilia Treatment Centres (HTCs) then exported to the national database (CentrePoint). From 2000 to 2009, 2260 registered haemophilia A or B patients received FVIII (1,009,097,765 IU) and FIX (272,406,859 IU). Over 91% of FVIII and over 84% of FIX was infused at home. Utilization of FVIII progressively increased; this was accounted for by an increase in the number of patients treated (r = 0.97; P < 0.001), there being a linear relationship between the increase in utilization and the increase in number of patients treated (P < 0.001). There was also a correlation with the annual amount used per patient (r = 0.95; P < 0.001). Utilization of FIX did not increase over time. The highest proportional utilization of both FVIII and FIX was for prophylaxis, and this proportion progressively increased being, in year 10 (2009), 77% and 66% for FVIII and FIX respectively. The proportion used for bleeding remained steady; in year 10 that proportion was 14% for FVIII and 26% for FIX, the use per patient for bleeding decreasing. The HTC-based CHARMS tracking system is essential, in Canada, for analysing indications for infusion, for predicting utilization and planning for future needs.

  19. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  20. Illustrated operative management of spontaneous bleeding and compartment syndrome of the lower extremity in a patient with acquired hemophilia A: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous bleeding resulting in compartment syndrome at the lower adult leg due to acquired hemophilia A is rare. There are no reports on operative management of this entity. Case presentation We present a case of atraumatic compartment syndrome of the lower leg due to acquired factor VIII deficiency, in an 83-year-old Caucasian man of European descent. He was treated surgically with a long and complicated postoperative course after presenting to a community hospital with a 2-day history of increasing pain and swelling in his left lower leg without a previous history of trauma. Conclusions Awareness, prompt diagnosis and effective treatment of compartment syndrome caused by a rare bleeding disorder, which is usually acquired by the elderly, is essential and may spare a patient from surgery or even limb loss, if early administration of recombinant factor VIIa is effective. The course of disease in a patient with operative management of spontaneous bleeding, compartment syndrome and acquired hemophilia A may be prolonged. However, an interdisciplinary approach with meticulous surgical treatment and bleeding management with recombinant factor VIIa as well as inhibitor eradication by immunosuppressive treatment can be successful and expensive. PMID:24886030

  1. Surgical Treatment of an Infected Nonunion of the Middle Third of the Femur Associated with Femoral Shortening in a Hemophilia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Salduz, Ahmet; Kaya, Özcan; Balci, Halil İbrahim; Akgul, Turgut; Dikici, Fatih; Zülfikar, Bülent; Kocaoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The management of nonunion and limb length discrepancy has remained a constant challenge in hemophilic patients. In this study, we aimed to present the treatment of femur infected nonunion and limb length discrepancy in a twenty-seven-year-old patient with hemophilia type A. A 27-year-old male patient with hemophilia type A referred to our institution for the treatment of right femur infected nonunion and 10 cm shortness of the femur. Resection of the nonunion site and bone-to-bone fixation with autologous bone grafting were performed. Compression to the pseudoarthrosis site and distraction from new osteotomy site were applied with the unilateral external fixator. Union was achieved, and 6 cm lengthening was obtained according to the initial length. Patient was followed up for 7 years. After this treatment, the patient is able to walk with full weight bearing on the affected extremity with 4 cm shortening which is compensated by the heel lift. The results of this case indicate that limb lengthening and treatment of nonunion with the external fixation could be reliable and effective method for hemophilic patients. PMID:27073706

  2. Successful immune tolerance induction with low-dose coagulation factor VIII in a patient with hemophilia A from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yilmaz; Ersin, Toret; Yesim, Oymak; Hilkay, Karapinar Tuba; Dilek, Ince; Gulcihan, Ozek; Ahmet, Koc

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor development is the most frequent and serious complication of the treatment in patients with hemophilia. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only option of treatment for the eradication of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor. We would like to present our case with hemophilia whose FVIII inhibitor eradication was done by a low-dose ITI regimen. Our patient has been applied on-demand therapy until 8 years of age. Secondary prophylaxis was began because of having hemophilic arthropathy. A low titer of FVIII inhibitor (4.2 BU/ml) was detected in the fifth month of the prophylaxis. The peak inhibitor titer of patient was 4.6 BU/ml, and there was no decrease in inhibitor titer in the follow-up duration. The low-dose ITI (50 IU/kg, 3 days a week) was started. His inhibitor level was detected negative and the recovery test was ameliorated in the 15th of the ITI therapy. High-dose regimen ITI could not be given particularly in developing countries such as Turkey in view of the high cost of treatment. Patients who had good risk factors might be successfully treated by using low-dose ITI regimen as effective as high-dose ITI regimen.

  3. F8 gene mutation profile in Indian hemophilia A patients: Identification of 23 novel mutations and factor VIII inhibitor risk association.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2016-04-01

    'FVIII inhibitors', especially in severe hemophilia A (HA) patients, is a serious adverse effect that complicates their clinical management. Many genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been proposed for FVIII inhibitor development, diverse in different population groups. This is the first study in Indian hemophiliacs that analyzes inhibitor risk in relation to the complete F8 mutation profile, in a case-control study that included 145 Indian severe HA patients, i.e. 69 inhibitor positive (with 18 inhibitor concordant/discordant family members), and 58 inhibitor negative patients, after informed consent. While 53.54% (68/127) index cases were positive for intron 22 or intron 1 inversions, 55 causative F8 mutations were detected in the 59 inversion negative patients, of which 23 were novel mutations (in 24 patients) and 32 were reported earlier (in 35 patients). A higher incidence of mutations, in the C1 and C2 domains in inhibitor positive patients, and in the A1 domain in inhibitor negative patients was observed, though not significantly different. The study suggests that large F8 rearrangements (significantly higher in the inhibitor positive patients) pose the highest risk, while missense mutations (significantly higher in the inhibitor negative patients) pose the lowest risk of inhibitor development in Indian hemophilia A patients.

  4. Successful immune tolerance induction with low-dose coagulation factor VIII in a patient with hemophilia A from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yilmaz; Ersin, Toret; Yesim, Oymak; Hilkay, Karapinar Tuba; Dilek, Ince; Gulcihan, Ozek; Ahmet, Koc

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor development is the most frequent and serious complication of the treatment in patients with hemophilia. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only option of treatment for the eradication of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor. We would like to present our case with hemophilia whose FVIII inhibitor eradication was done by a low-dose ITI regimen. Our patient has been applied on-demand therapy until 8 years of age. Secondary prophylaxis was began because of having hemophilic arthropathy. A low titer of FVIII inhibitor (4.2 BU/ml) was detected in the fifth month of the prophylaxis. The peak inhibitor titer of patient was 4.6 BU/ml, and there was no decrease in inhibitor titer in the follow-up duration. The low-dose ITI (50 IU/kg, 3 days a week) was started. His inhibitor level was detected negative and the recovery test was ameliorated in the 15th of the ITI therapy. High-dose regimen ITI could not be given particularly in developing countries such as Turkey in view of the high cost of treatment. Patients who had good risk factors might be successfully treated by using low-dose ITI regimen as effective as high-dose ITI regimen. PMID:26484639

  5. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Armentano, D; Thompson, A R; Darlington, G; Woo, S L

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. We report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently gamma-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  6. Remarkable variation in the informativeness of RFLP markers linked to hemophilia B locus in Indian population groups: implication in the strategy for carrier detection.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Saha, A; Kumar P, Senthil; Chandak, G R; Majumder, P P; Ray, K

    2006-01-01

    Hemophilia B, an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder, is caused by heterogeneous mutations in the factor IX (F9) gene. Hence, carriers of the disease are usually detected by F9 gene linked RFLP analysis. We aimed to test a set of RFLP markers (DdeI, XmnI, MnlI, TaqI & HhaI), used worldwide for carrier detection, to estimate its heterozygosity in different population groups of India, and identify additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) if necessary. A total of 8 population groups encompassing different regions of India, consisting of 107 unrelated normal females without any history of hemophilia B in the family and 13 unrelated obligate carriers were recruited in the study. Regions of F9 gene were amplified by PCR from genomic DNA of the donors followed by restriction enzyme digestion and/or sequencing as appropriate. Combined informativeness for the markers varied between 52-86% among normal females belonging to different geographical locations of India. Haplotype analysis revealed that the most prevalent haplotype lacked the restriction sites for all five RFLP markers. Screening regions of F9 gene that harbor 10 SNPs reported in dbSNP yielded only two SNPs, which increased the overall informativeness in each population group and heterozygosity in the obligate carriers for the disease from 38% to 69%. Our data show that heterozygosity of commonly used RFLP markers is remarkably variable across different regions of India. Thus prudent selection of the markers based on specific population groups including usage of additional markers is recommended for efficient carrier detection.

  7. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  8. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274.

  9. Heat treatment of samples improve the performance of the Nijmegen-Bethesda assay in hemophilia A patients undergoing immune tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    de Lima Montalvão, Silmara Aparecida; Tucunduva, Alini Camargo; de Almeida Sambo, Andrea Luísa; De Paula, Erich Vinicius; de Souza Medina, Samuel; Ozelo, Margareth Castro

    2015-12-01

    Nijmegen-Bethesda assay is the gold standard to assess inhibitory antibodies against factor (F) VIII. This method has some limitations, including high coefficient of variation and possible interference of residual endogenous or exogenous factor VIII. Heat-treatment of samples at 56 °C for 30 min could be a strategy to improve the sensitivity of this test. The aim of this study was to compare inhibitor quantification in hemophilia patients with and without inhibitor performed in previously heated and non-heated samples. A total of 109 analyses from 46 patients with severe hemophilia A were performed. Patients were divided into three groups: 20 patients with no history of inhibitor, recently and not recently exposed to FVIII (group I), 21 patients with history of inhibitor not exposed to FVIII (group II), and 5 patients (68 samples) undergoing an immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocol (group III). For patients with no history of inhibitor, heat-treatment did not modify the results (p=0.24). However, differences in inhibitor levels between heated and non-heated samples were observed in patients with history of inhibitor (group II, p<0.05) and in patients in ITI (group III, p<0.001). In 11 samples, inhibitor quantification shifted from negative to positive. Additionally, a longitudinal evaluation of each ITI patient showed similar trend line for the results of heated and non-heated samples. In this study, we demonstrated that heating samples increase sensitivity of Nijmegen-Bethesda assay, with no shift from negative to positive results in patients with no history of inhibitor. Furthermore, this procedure has an important role to patients undergoing an ITI protocol. PMID:26344704

  10. Living with Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... are swimming, biking (wearing a helmet), walking, and golf. To prevent bleeding, you also may be able ... periods apply As children grow, it's important to learn about available options for insurance. Look into what ...

  11. Learning about Hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers ... Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources Smithsonian NHGRI Genome Exhibition Talking Glossary: English Talking Glossary: Español Issues ...

  12. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, J.; Schwaab, R.; Möller-Taube, A.; Schwaab, U.; Schmidt, W.; Brackmann, H. H.; Grimm, T.; Olek, K.; Oldenburg, J.

    1996-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients--all exclusively from sporadic families--were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7 percent). Fifty-five patients (37.4 percent) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0 percent) a point mutation, 14 (9.5 percent) a small deletion, 8 (5.4 percent) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4 percent) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7 percent) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6 percent). Sixteen (10.9 percent) of the identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9 percent) of 76 patients, mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patients mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold-higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its

  13. Comparison of Clot-based, Chromogenic, and Fluorescence Assays for Measurement of Factor VIII Inhibitors in the U.S. Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Boylan, Brian; Shapiro, Amy D.; Lentz, Steven R.; Wicklund, Brian M.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Soucie, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Detection and validation of inhibitors (antibodies) to hemophilia treatment products are important for clinical care, evaluation of product safety, and assessment of population trends. Methods Centralized monitoring for factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors was conducted for patients in the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study using a previously reported modified Nijmegen-Bethesda clotting assay (NBA), a chromogenic Bethesda assay (CBA), and a novel fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results NBA and CBA were performed on 1005 specimens and FLI on 272 specimens. CBA was negative on 880/883 specimens (99.7%) with Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU)<0.5 and positive on 42/42 specimens (100%) with NBU≥2.0 and 43/80 specimens (53.8%) with NBU 0.5–1.9. Among specimens with positive NBA and negative CBA, 58.1% were FLI-negative, 12.9% had evidence of lupus anticoagulant, and 35.5% had non-time-dependent inhibition. CBA and FLI were positive on 72.4% and 100% of 1.0–1.9 NBU specimens and 43.1% and 50.0% of 0.5–0.9 NBU specimens. FLI detected antibodies in 98.0% of CBA-positive and 81.6% of NBA-positive specimens (P=0.004). Among 21 new inhibitors detected by NBA, 5 (23.8%) with 0.7–1.3 NBU did not react in CBA or FLI. Among previously positive patients with 0.5–1.9 NBU, 7/25 (28%) were not CBA or FLI positive. FLI was positive on 36/169 NBU-negative specimens (21.3%). Conclusions FVIII specificity could not be demonstrated by CBA or FLI for 26% of inhibitors of 0.5–1.9 NBU; such results must be interpreted with caution. Low titer inhibitors detected in clot-based assays should always be repeated, with consideration given to evaluating their reactivity with FVIII using more specific assays. PMID:23601690

  14. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Targeting of the human F8 at the multicopy rDNA locus in Hemophilia A patient-derived iPSCs using TALENickases.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jialun; Wu, Yong; Li, Zhuo; Hu, Zhiqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xionghao; Zhou, Miaojin; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yanchi; Feng, Mai; Liang, Desheng

    2016-03-25

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a monogenic disease due to lack of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII). This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding but there is no cure for HA until very recently. In this study, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with severe HA and used transcription activator-like effector nickases (TALENickases) to target the factor VIII gene (F8) at the multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus in HA-iPSCs, aiming to rescue the shortage of FVIII protein. The results revealed that more than one copy of the exogenous F8 could be integrated into the rDNA locus. Importantly, we detected exogenous F8 mRNA and FVIII protein in targeted HA-iPSCs. After they were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), the exogenous FVIII protein was still detectable. Thus, it is showed that the multicopy rDNA locus could be utilized as an effective target site in patient-derived iPSCs for gene therapy. This strategy provides a novel iPSCs-based therapeutic option for HA and other monogenic diseases.

  16. Recommendations for authors of manuscripts reporting inhibitor cases developed in previously treated patients with hemophilia: communication from the SSC of the ISTH.

    PubMed

    Iorio, A; Barbara, A M; Bernardi, F; Lillicrap, D; Makris, M; Peyvandi, F; Rosendaal, F

    2016-08-01

    Aim The scope of this recommendation is to provide guidance for reporting of inhibitor cases in previously treated patients (PTPs) with hemophilia A. This guidance is intended to improve transparency and completeness of reporting of observed events; it does not cover planning, executing or analyzing original studies aimed at the assessment of inhibitor rates. Recommendation We recommend that for each case of inhibitor development reported in a published paper, a paragraph or a table is included in the main publication reporting as a minimum the underlined data fields in Table . We recommend transparent reporting when any of the suggested information is not available. We recommend that particular care is used in reporting the timeline of events by clearly identifying a reference time-point. We suggest that journals in the field adopt this guidance as instructions for the authors and as a guide for reviewers. Conclusion Development of inhibitors in PTPs is a very rare event. Standardized reporting of inhibitor characteristics will contribute to generating a body of evidence otherwise not available. Case by case reporting of the recommended data elements may shed light on the natural history and risk factors of inhibitor development in PTPs and be useful for tailoring care in similar future cases. PMID:27496160

  17. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    SciTech Connect

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  18. Exposure of FVIII in the Presence of Phosphatidyl Serine Reduces Generation of Memory B-Cells and Induces Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Hyporesponsiveness in Hemophilia A Mice.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Radha; Davidowitz, Andrew; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-08-01

    A major complication of replacement therapy with Factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A (HA) is the development of unwanted immune responses. Previous studies showed that administration of FVIII in the presence of phosphatidyl serine (PS) reduced the development of anti-FVIII antibodies in HA mice. However, the impact of PS-mediated effects on immunological memory, such as generation of memory B-cells, is not clear. The effect of PS on memory B-cells was therefore investigated using adoptive transfer approach in FVIII(-/-) HA mice. Adoptive transfer of memory B-cells from a PS-FVIII-treated group to naïve mice followed by challenge of the recipient mice with FVIII showed a significantly reduced anti-FVIII antibody response in the recipient mice, compared with animals that received memory B-cells from free FVIII and FVIII-charge matched phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) group. The decrease in memory B-cell response is accompanied by an increase in FoxP3 expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Flow cytometry studies showed that the generation of Tregs is higher in PS-treated animals as compared with FVIII and FVIII-PG treated animals. The PS-mediated hyporesponsiveness was found to be antigen-specific. The PS-FVIII immunization showed hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII rechallenge but not against ovalbumin (OVA) rechallenge, an unrelated antigen. This demonstrates that PS reduces immunologic memory of FVIII and induces antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in HA mice.

  19. Acquired Hemophilia A May Be Associated with Ticagrelor Therapy in a 52-Year-Old Man After a Recent Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Paola; Canaparo, Roberto; Capello, Tiziana; Deorsola, Barbara; Perazzolo, Laura; Marengo, Claudio; Serpe, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a 52-year-old man who was hospitalized for right leg pain due to a relevant hemorrhagic effusion. He was on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT): acetylsalicylic acid and ticagrelor, a reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Signs, symptoms, and laboratory blood tests led to the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Ticagrelor therapy-associated AHA was hypothesized due to the fact that, before adding this drug, all laboratory and clinical examinations were repeatedly normal. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment was started without DAPT interruption due to the high risk of stent thrombosis. After 10 days, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time dropped from 107 to 49 seconds, the patient’s factor VIII (FVIII) levels gradually normalized over the following few weeks, and FVIII inhibitor titer was negative. Recently, some reports have established a link between the development of AHA and treatment with clopidogrel, an irreversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a link between AHA and ticagrelor has been reported.

  20. The dataset from administration of single or combined immunomodulation agents to modulate anti-FVIII antibody responses in FVIII plasmid or protein primed hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A mice with pre-existing inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) were treated with single agents, AMD3100 and GCS-F, respectively. Inhibitor titers in treated mice and control HemA inhibitors mice were followed over time. Total B cells and plasma cells (PCs) were characterized by flow cytometry. HemA inhibitor mice were then treated with a combination regimen of IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin and AMD3100. Finally, HemA inhibitor mice were treated with a new combination therapy using include IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + Anti-CD20+AMD3100+G-CSF. The timeline of combination therapy was illustrated. Inhibitor titers following treatment in FVIII plasmid or protein induced inhibitor mice were evaluated overtime. A representative figure and gating strategies to characterize the subsets of Treg cells and B cells are presented. Please see http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellimm.2016.01.005 [1] for interpretation and discussion of these data and results. PMID:27081675

  1. Acquired Hemophilia A May Be Associated with Ticagrelor Therapy in a 52-Year-Old Man After a Recent Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Paola; Canaparo, Roberto; Capello, Tiziana; Deorsola, Barbara; Perazzolo, Laura; Marengo, Claudio; Serpe, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a 52-year-old man who was hospitalized for right leg pain due to a relevant hemorrhagic effusion. He was on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT): acetylsalicylic acid and ticagrelor, a reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Signs, symptoms, and laboratory blood tests led to the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Ticagrelor therapy-associated AHA was hypothesized due to the fact that, before adding this drug, all laboratory and clinical examinations were repeatedly normal. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment was started without DAPT interruption due to the high risk of stent thrombosis. After 10 days, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time dropped from 107 to 49 seconds, the patient’s factor VIII (FVIII) levels gradually normalized over the following few weeks, and FVIII inhibitor titer was negative. Recently, some reports have established a link between the development of AHA and treatment with clopidogrel, an irreversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a link between AHA and ticagrelor has been reported. PMID:27660505

  2. Soy Phosphatidylinositol-Containing Lipid Nanoparticle Prolongs the Plasma Survival and Hemostatic Efficacy of B-domain-Deleted Recombinant Canine Factor VIII in Hemophilia A Dogs.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Krithika A; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin; Rigsbee, Natalie; Nichols, Timothy C; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2016-08-01

    Soy phosphatidylinositol (PI)-containing lipid nanoparticles prolong plasma survival, improve hemostatic efficacy, and decrease immunogenicity of human B-domain-deleted factor VIII (BDD FVIII) in hemophilia A (HA) mice. We hypothesize that PI-associated BDD FVIII is more potent than the free protein and, using mathematical modeling, have projected that PI-associated BDD FVIII could be used for once-weekly prophylactic dosing in patients. To facilitate translation to the clinic, comparative plasma survival and ex vivo efficacy of PI-associated recombinant canine FVIII (PI-rcFVIII) were evaluated in HA dogs. Two HA dogs were administered a 50-U/kg intravenous dose of free or PI-rcFVIII. rcFVIII activity measurements and ex vivo efficacy analyses such as whole blood clotting time and thromboelastography were conducted on recovered plasma and whole blood samples. PI association decreased clearance (∼25%) and increased plasma exposure (∼1.4-fold) of rcFVIII. PI-rcFVIII-treated animals had prolonged improvements in whole blood clotting time and thromboelastography parameters compared to free rcFVIII-treated animals. Because rcFVIII is a BDD form of FVIII, these studies provide proof of principle that observations with human BDD FVIII in mice translate to higher animal species. In addition, PI-rcFVIII has potential applications in canine HA management and as a bypass therapy in inhibitor-positive HA patients. PMID:27372547

  3. Acquired Hemophilia A May Be Associated with Ticagrelor Therapy in a 52-Year-Old Man After a Recent Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Pasquino, Paola; Canaparo, Roberto; Capello, Tiziana; Deorsola, Barbara; Perazzolo, Laura; Marengo, Claudio; Serpe, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a 52-year-old man who was hospitalized for right leg pain due to a relevant hemorrhagic effusion. He was on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT): acetylsalicylic acid and ticagrelor, a reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Signs, symptoms, and laboratory blood tests led to the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Ticagrelor therapy-associated AHA was hypothesized due to the fact that, before adding this drug, all laboratory and clinical examinations were repeatedly normal. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment was started without DAPT interruption due to the high risk of stent thrombosis. After 10 days, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time dropped from 107 to 49 seconds, the patient's factor VIII (FVIII) levels gradually normalized over the following few weeks, and FVIII inhibitor titer was negative. Recently, some reports have established a link between the development of AHA and treatment with clopidogrel, an irreversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a link between AHA and ticagrelor has been reported. PMID:27660505

  4. Reduced production of IFN-γ and LT-α is associated with successful prednisone therapy in patients with acquired hemophilia A: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Fang, Jian; Leissinger, Cindy A; Ganapamo, Frédéric

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a standard treatment for acquired hemophilia A (AH). Although the optimal treatment regimen and duration of GC's is unknown, measurement of sub-clinical immune responses may help direct therapeutic decision making. To study the helpfulness of this approach, three male patients diagnosed with AH were treated with prednisone. The therapy resulted in inhibitor elimination in two out of the three individuals. During the treatment, peripheral mononuclear cells were isolated at different time points and stimulated in vitro. The expression of IFN-γ and LT-α were monitored at both the protein and the mRNA levels. The amount of IFN-γ and LT-α were markedly reduced by the time of inhibitor disappearance in the patients responding to GC therapy but remained high in the non-responder until cyclophosphamide was added. This study suggests that the secretion level of IFN-γ and/or LT-α could be a predictive marker of prednisone responsiveness.

  5. The dataset from administration of single or combined immunomodulation agents to modulate anti-FVIII antibody responses in FVIII plasmid or protein primed hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A mice with pre-existing inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) were treated with single agents, AMD3100 and GCS-F, respectively. Inhibitor titers in treated mice and control HemA inhibitors mice were followed over time. Total B cells and plasma cells (PCs) were characterized by flow cytometry. HemA inhibitor mice were then treated with a combination regimen of IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin and AMD3100. Finally, HemA inhibitor mice were treated with a new combination therapy using include IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + Anti-CD20+AMD3100+G-CSF. The timeline of combination therapy was illustrated. Inhibitor titers following treatment in FVIII plasmid or protein induced inhibitor mice were evaluated overtime. A representative figure and gating strategies to characterize the subsets of Treg cells and B cells are presented. Please see http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellimm.2016.01.005 [1] for interpretation and discussion of these data and results.

  6. Detection of hemophilia a carriers in Azeri Turkish population of Iran: usefulness of HindIII and BclI markers.

    PubMed

    Moharrami, Tamouchin; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori; Pourfeizi, Abbas Ali H; Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari

    2015-11-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked coagulation disorder caused by the deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII). Linkage analysis is a common indirect method for the detection of female carriers in families with HA. In the current study, 173 patients from 30 unrelated families with HA were recruited from the Azeri Turkish population of northwest Iran and analyzed for BclI and HindIII markers by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. We investigated the potential of using these markers for the detection of mutation in carriers through linkage analysis, which would be of tremendous use in prenatal diagnosis. Among the tested women, 47% and 35% were found to be heterozygous for BclI and HindIII polymorphic markers, respectively. The BclI and HindIII markers were informative for the detection of 63% and 17% potential carriers, respectively, demonstrating the effectiveness of the BclI marker for the detection of HA carriers among the Azeri Turkish population.

  7. Factor IX levels in patients with hemophilia B (Christmas disease) following transfusion with concentrates of factor IX or fresh frozen plasma (FFP).

    PubMed

    Zauber, N P; Levin, J

    1977-05-01

    There has been no systematic re-examination of variables that may affect the level and duration of response of patients with hemophilia B (Christmas disease) to transfusion. Therefore, 49 of our transfusion episodes and 171 previously reported transfusions were evaluated. Mean calculated initial increase of Factor IX levels (delta %/unit (U) of procoagulant activity infused/kg) was 0.82 +/- 0.09% (mean +/-S.E.) in previously reported cases and 1.01 +/- 0.13% in our patients, after transfusion of concentrate; but only 0.05 +/- 0.11% after fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Response was not altered by acute hemorrhage, baseline Factor IX levels, or body weight. Proplex (Hyland) and Konyne (Cutter) produced similar responses. Following transfusion, the disappearance curve was biphasic. The mean T1/2 for the second component was 27.5 hrs, but the direct T1/2 was only 6.4 +/- 1.0 hr. Regardless of common clinical variables, increase of Factor IX following transfusion of American concentrates is 1.0% (or 0.01 U)/1 administered/kg. Appropriate frequency of transfusion depends upon an understanding of the biphasic disappearance of Factor IX. Importantly, the initial frequency of transfusion therapy should be based on a direct T1/2 of only 6 to 8 hrs.

  8. Factor VIII brand and the incidence of factor VIII inhibitors in previously untreated UK children with severe hemophilia A, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter W; Palmer, Benedict P; Chalmers, Elizabeth A; Hart, Daniel P; Liesner, Ri; Rangarajan, Savita; Talks, Katherine; Williams, Michael; Hay, Charles R M

    2014-11-27

    The effect of recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) brand on inhibitor development was investigated in all 407 severe hemophilia A previously untreated patients born in the United Kingdom (UK) between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2011. Eighty-eight (22%) had been in the RODIN study. Information was extracted from the National Haemophilia Database. Because exposure days (EDs) were not known for some patients, time from first treatment was used as a surrogate for rFVIII exposure. An inhibitor developed in 118 (29%) patients, 60 high and 58 low titer, after a median (interquartile range) of 7.8 (3.3-13.5) months from first exposure and 16 (9-30) EDs. Of 128 patients treated with Kogenate Bayer/Helixate NexGen, 45 (35.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 27.4-43.8) developed an inhibitor compared with 42/172 (24.4%, 95% CI 18.6% to 31.4%) with Advate (P = .04). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI) for Kogenate Bayer/Helixate NexGen compared with Advate was 2.14 (1.12-4.10) (P = .02) for high titer and 1.75 (1.11-2.76) (P = .02) for all inhibitors. When excluding UK-RODIN patients, the adjusted HR (95% CI) for high-titer inhibitors was 2.00 (0.93-4.34) (P = .08). ReFacto AF was associated with a higher incidence of all, but not high-titer, inhibitors than Advate. These results will help inform debate around the relative immunogenicity and use of rFVIII brands.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Biogeneric Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™) and Activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrates (FEIBA™) to Treat Hemophilia A Patients with Inhibitors in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Mina; Eshghi, Peyman; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Cheraghali, Abdoll Majid; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Naderi, Majid; Managhchi, Mohammad Reza; Hoorfar, Hamid; Toogeh, Gholam Reza; Imani, Ali; Khodayari, Mohammad Taghi; Habibpanah, Behnaz; Hantooshzadeh, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, bypassing agents such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) and activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC) are used to treat bleeding episodes in the Hemophilia patients with inhibitors. AryoSeven® is an Iranian biogeneric rFVIIa with homogeneity of efficacy and the nature to NovoSeven in a comparative trial. The current clinical trial aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of FEIBA and AryoSeven® by Decision Analytic Model according to the Iranian healthcare system. An open label, multi-center, cross-over clinical trial was designed. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their prior tendency to one or none of the products. To determine the premium therapeutic strategy, the Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated. Protocol F led to more treatment success in group F than the other groups (P= 0.03). Also, there was a significant statistical difference between the mean of effectiveness scores in the groups using protocol F (P = 0.01). The effectiveness of protocol F and A were 89% and 72%, respectively. ICER cost US$ to manage an episode of bleeding to get one more unit of effectiveness using FEIBA VS. AryoSeven. Although the results showed that AryoSeven was more cost-effective compared to FEIBA, the two strategies were undominated. In other words, both medicines can be applied in the first line of the treatment if the cost of FEIBA was reduced. The present clinical trial was registered at IRCT website, under ID No.2013020612380N1. PMID:27642341

  10. Small ncRNA Expression-Profiling of Blood from Hemophilia A Patients Identifies miR-1246 as a Potential Regulator of Factor 8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sarachana, Tewarit; Dahiya, Neetu; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Saini, Surbhi; Guelcher, Christine; Guerrera, Michael F.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Sauna, Zuben E.; Atreya, Chintamani D.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of functional plasma clotting factor VIII (FVIII). Genetic mutations in the gene encoding FVIII (F8) have been extensively studied. Over a thousand different mutations have been reported in the F8 gene. These span a diverse range of mutation types, namely, missense, splice-site, deletions of single and multiple exons, inversions, etc. There is nonetheless evidence that other molecular mechanisms, in addition to mutations in the gene encoding the FVIII protein, may be involved in the pathobiology of HA. In this study, global small ncRNA expression profiling analysis of whole blood from HA patients, and controls, was performed using high-throughput ncRNA microarrays. Patients were further sub-divided into those that developed neutralizing-anti-FVIII antibodies (inhibitors) and those that did not. Selected differentially expressed ncRNAs were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. We identified several ncRNAs, and among them hsa-miR-1246 was significantly up-regulated in HA patients. In addition, miR-1246 showed a six-fold higher expression in HA patients without inhibitors. We have identified an miR-1246 target site in the noncoding region of F8 mRNA and were able to confirm the suppressory role of hsa-miR-1246 on F8 expression in a stable lymphoblastoid cell line expressing FVIII. These findings suggest several testable hypotheses vis-à-vis the role of nc-RNAs in the regulation of F8 expression. These hypotheses have not been exhaustively tested in this study as they require carefully curated clinical samples. PMID:26176629

  11. Good manufacturing practice production of self-complementary serotype 8 adeno-associated viral vector for a hemophilia B clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Allay, James A; Sleep, Susan; Long, Scott; Tillman, David M; Clark, Rob; Carney, Gael; Fagone, Paolo; McIntosh, Jenny H; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nathwani, Amit C; Gray, John T

    2011-05-01

    To generate sufficient clinical-grade vector to support a phase I/II clinical trial of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-mediated factor IX (FIX) gene transfer for hemophilia B, we have developed a large-scale, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible method for vector production and purification. We used a 293T-based two-plasmid transient transfection system coupled with a three-column chromatography purification process to produce high-quality self-complementary AAV2/8 FIX clinical-grade vector. Two consecutive production campaigns using a total of 432 independent 10-stack culture chambers produced a total of ∼2 × 10(15) vector genomes (VG) by dot-blot hybridization. Benzonase-treated microfluidized lysates generated from pellets of transfected cells were purified by group separation on Sepharose beads followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The virus-containing fractions were further processed by gel filtration and ultrafiltration, using a 100-kDa membrane. The vector was formulated in phosphate-buffered saline plus 0.25% human serum albumin. Spectrophotometric analysis suggested ∼20% full particles, with only low quantities of nonviral proteins were visible on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A sensitive assay for the detection of replication-competent AAV was developed, which did reveal trace quantities of such contaminants in the final product. Additional studies have confirmed the long-term stability of the vector at -80°C for at least 24 months and for at least 24 hr formulated in the clinical diluent and stored at room temperature within intravenous bags. This material has been approved for use in clinical trials in the United States and the United Kingdom.

  12. Genotyping of intron 22 inversion of factor VIII gene for diagnosis of hemophilia A by inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tzu-Yu; Wang, Chun-Chi; Shih, Chi-Jen; Wu, Hui-Fen; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2014-09-01

    This is the first capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis for diagnosis of hemophilia A (HA). The intron 22 inversion of factor VIII gene (F8) causes 40-50 % of severe bleeding disorder of HA in all human populations. Consequently, identification of the disease-causing mutations is becoming increasingly important for accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. In this study, the key steps of inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) and of short-end injection capillary electrophoresis were used for more specific and rapid genotyping of intron 22 inversion of F8. In IS-PCR, three specific primers were used to amplify 512-bp amplicon for wild type and 584-bp amplicon for patients with intron 22 inversion. The capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) system was performed using 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 0.3 % (w/v) polyethylene oxide (PEO). The PCR amplicons were electrokinetically injected at 10 kV for 10 s at a temperature of 25 °C. The optimal short-end injection CGE was applied to detect the F8 gene of HA patients and carriers within 5 min. Intron 22 inversion was indeed found on some HA patients (13/35, 37.1 %). All genotyping results showed good agreement with DNA sequencing method and long-distance polymerase chain reaction (LD-PCR). The IS-PCR combined with short-end injection CGE method was feasible and efficient for intron 22 inversion screening of F8 in the HA populations.

  13. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V.; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N.; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C.; P’Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A.; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St. Ledger, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain–truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927. PMID:27330001

  14. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C; P'Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St Ledger, Katie; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2016-08-01

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain-truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Biogeneric Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™) and Activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrates (FEIBA™) to Treat Hemophilia A Patients with Inhibitors in Iran.

    PubMed

    Golestani, Mina; Eshghi, Peyman; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Cheraghali, Abdoll Majid; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Naderi, Majid; Managhchi, Mohammad Reza; Hoorfar, Hamid; Toogeh, Gholam Reza; Imani, Ali; Khodayari, Mohammad Taghi; Habibpanah, Behnaz; Hantooshzadeh, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, bypassing agents such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) and activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC) are used to treat bleeding episodes in the Hemophilia patients with inhibitors. AryoSeven® is an Iranian biogeneric rFVIIa with homogeneity of efficacy and the nature to NovoSeven in a comparative trial. The current clinical trial aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of FEIBA and AryoSeven® by Decision Analytic Model according to the Iranian healthcare system. An open label, multi-center, cross-over clinical trial was designed. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their prior tendency to one or none of the products. To determine the premium therapeutic strategy, the Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated. Protocol F led to more treatment success in group F than the other groups (P= 0.03). Also, there was a significant statistical difference between the mean of effectiveness scores in the groups using protocol F (P = 0.01). The effectiveness of protocol F and A were 89% and 72%, respectively. ICER cost US$ to manage an episode of bleeding to get one more unit of effectiveness using FEIBA VS. AryoSeven. Although the results showed that AryoSeven was more cost-effective compared to FEIBA, the two strategies were undominated. In other words, both medicines can be applied in the first line of the treatment if the cost of FEIBA was reduced. The present clinical trial was registered at IRCT website, under ID No.2013020612380N1. PMID:27642341

  16. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C; P'Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St Ledger, Katie; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2016-08-01

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain-truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927. PMID:27330001

  17. Separation of intron 22 inversion type 1 and 2 of hemophilia A by modified inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tzu-Yu; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Wang, Chun-Chi; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2014-12-01

    An inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) combined with short-end capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) was developed for genotyping of intron 22 inversion Type 1 (Inv22-1) and Type 2 (Inv22-2) of hemophilia A (HA). Severe HA cases are affected by intron 22 inversion around 45-50%. Inv22-1 has higher frequency than Inv22-2. The aim of this study is to distinguish them by genotyping. In order to improve Inv22 genotyping efficiency, five primers were designed and applied to differentiate the wild type, Inv22-1, Inv22-2 and carrier. Three amplicons of 405, 457 and 512 bp were recognized for wild type; 333, 457 and 584 bp for Inv22-1; 385, 405 and 584 bp for Inv22-2. The Inv22-1 carrier has 5 amplicons including 333, 405, 457, 512, 584 bp and Inv22-2 carrier is differentiated by 385, 405, 457, 512 and 584 bp. The amplicons between Inv22-1 and Inv22-2 carriers are only different in 333 bp for Inv22-1 carrier and 385 bp for Inv22-2 carrier. Capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) was used for separation within 5 min. The separation voltage was set at 8 kV (cathode at detector), and the temperature was kept at 25°C. The sieving matrix was 89 mM Tris, 89 mM boric acid, 2mM EDTA containing 0.4% (w/v) HPMC and 1 μM of YO-PRO(®)-1 Iodide. Total of 50 HA patients (including 35 non-Inv22, 14 Inv22-1, and one Inv22-2 patients) and 7 HA carriers were diagnosed in the application. Seven random samples (5 patients and 2 carriers) were subjected to comparison and gave identical results of DNA sequencing and this modified IS-PCR.

  18. Matching-adjusted indirect comparisons of efficacy of BAY 81-8973 vs two recombinant factor VIII for the prophylactic treatment of severe hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Pocoski, Jennifer; Li, Nanxin; Ayyagari, Rajeev; Church, Nikki; Maas Enriquez, Monika; Xiang, Quer; Kelkar, Sneha; Du, Ella X; Wu, Eric Q; Xie, Jipan

    2016-01-01

    Background No head-to-head trials comparing recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) products currently exist. This was a matching-adjusted indirect comparison (MAIC) study of efficacy of BAY 81-8973 with antihemophilic factor (recombinant) plasma/albumin-free method (rAHF-PFM) and turoctocog alfa for the prophylaxis of severe hemophilia A. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify trials of rAHF-PFM and turoctocog alfa. Comparisons were conducted using BAY 81-8973 individual patient data (IPD) from LEOPOLD trials and published data from rAHF-PFM and turoctocog alfa trials. Differences in outcome reporting were reconciled using transformation of BAY 81-8973 IPD. Patients in pooled LEOPOLD trials were weighted to match baseline characteristics for rAHF-PFM or turoctocog alfa trials using MAICs. After matching, annualized bleed rates (ABRs) were compared using weighted t-tests. Results Two rAHF-PFM trials and one turoctocog alfa trial were identified. In these trials, rFVIIIs were dosed thrice weekly or every other day; in LEOPOLD trials, BAY 81-8973 was dosed twice- or thrice weekly. Three MAICs were conducted because the two rAHF-PFM trials calculated ABRs differently, matching for age, race, and weight (turoctocog alfa only). BAY 81-8973 had similar ABR of all bleeds vs rAHF-PFM (two trials: 4.8 vs 6.3, 1.9 vs 1.8 [square root transform]) and lower ABR of spontaneous bleeds and trauma bleeds (2.6 vs 4.1, 2.1 vs 4.7; both P<0.05). BAY 81-8973 showed lower ABR of all bleeds and spontaneous bleeds vs turoctocog alfa (4.3 vs 6.5, 2.8 vs 4.3; both P<0.05) and similar ABR of trauma bleeds (1.5 vs 1.6). In subgroup analysis, twice-weekly BAY 81-8973 had similar ABRs of all bleeds, spontaneous bleeds, and trauma bleeds compared to rAHF-PFM and turoctocog alfa. Conclusion This indirect comparison found that prophylaxis with BAY 81-8973, even including the lower frequency of two times a week and lower factor VIII consumption, has efficacy comparable to r

  19. A case of successful hepatitis C virus eradication by 24 weeks of telaprevir-based triple therapy for a hemophilia patient with hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus co-infection who previously failed pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Murata, Masayuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ogawa, Eiichi; Mitsumoto, Fujiko; Hiramine, Satoshi; Ikezaki, Hiroaki; Takayama, Koji; Shimizu, Motohiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Hayashi, Jun

    2014-05-01

    In Japan, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection of some patients with hemophilia was caused by the transfusion of imported blood products, such as unheated coagulation factor. With the development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV, chronic HCV infection has become a major cause of liver disease and mortality for hemophiliac patients coinfected with HCV/HIV. Data is limited regarding the efficacy and safety of antiviral therapy with the HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir (TVR) in combination with pegylated interferon-α (PegIFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) for hemophilia patients coinfected with HCV/HIV. We report a case of a Japanese patient with hemophilia and HCV/HIV coinfection who had partial response to prior to PegIFN-α and RBV therapy. This is the first published report of 24-week TVR-based triple therapy for a hemophilia patient coinfected with HCV/HIV. The patient had HCV genotype 1a infection with a high viral load. His single-nucleotide polymorphism of the interleukin 28B (rs8099917) gene was the TT major allele. He presented with undetectable HIV RNA and a high CD4(+) T cell counts by taking ART including tenofovir, emtricitabine and raltegravir. He was again treated for HCV with TVR plus PegIFN-α2b and RBV for the first 12 weeks, followed by the continuation of PegIFN-α2b and RBV for 12 additional weeks while continuing ART. He had rapid virological response and achieved sustained virological response with the 24-week treatment. No serious adverse events such as skin rash, severe anemia or exacerbated bleeding tendency were observed, only a mild headache. No dose adjustment was necessary when tenofovir and raltegravir were used in combined with TVR, and no HIV breakthrough was observed. TVR-based triple therapy with ART could can an effective treatment for hemophilia patients coinfected with HCV (genotype 1)/HIV regardless of prior response. TVR can be used in combination with tenofovir, emtricitabine and

  20. Employing a gain-of-function factor IX variant R338L to advance the efficacy and safety of hemophilia B human gene therapy: preclinical evaluation supporting an ongoing adeno-associated virus clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Paul E; Sun, Junjiang; Gui, Tong; Hu, Genlin; Hannah, William B; Wichlan, David G; Wu, Zhijian; Grieger, Joshua C; Li, Chengwen; Suwanmanee, Thipparat; Stafford, Darrel W; Booth, Carmen J; Samulski, Jade J; Kafri, Tal; McPhee, Scott W J; Samulski, R Jude

    2015-02-01

    Vector capsid dose-dependent inflammation of transduced liver has limited the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) factor IX (FIX) gene therapy vectors to reliably convert severe to mild hemophilia B in human clinical trials. These trials also identified the need to understand AAV neutralizing antibodies and empty AAV capsids regarding their impact on clinical success. To address these safety concerns, we have used a scalable manufacturing process to produce GMP-grade AAV8 expressing the FIXR338L gain-of-function variant with minimal (<10%) empty capsid and have performed comprehensive dose-response, biodistribution, and safety evaluations in clinically relevant hemophilia models. The scAAV8.FIXR338L vector produced greater than 6-fold increased FIX specific activity compared with wild-type FIX and demonstrated linear dose responses from doses that produced 2-500% FIX activity, associated with dose-dependent hemostasis in a tail transection bleeding challenge. More importantly, using a bleeding model that closely mimics the clinical morbidity of hemophilic arthropathy, mice that received the scAAV8.FIXR338L vector developed minimal histopathological findings of synovitis after hemarthrosis, when compared with mice that received identical doses of wild-type FIX vector. Hemostatically normal mice (n=20) and hemophilic mice (n=88) developed no FIX antibodies after peripheral intravenous vector delivery. No CD8(+) T cell liver infiltrates were observed, despite the marked tropism of scAAV8.FIXR338L for the liver in a comprehensive biodistribution evaluation (n=60 animals). With respect to the role of empty capsids, we demonstrated that in vivo FIXR338L expression was not influenced by the presence of empty AAV particles, either in the presence or absence of various titers of AAV8-neutralizing antibodies. Necropsy of FIX(-/-) mice 8-10 months after vector delivery revealed no microvascular or macrovascular thrombosis in mice expressing FIXR338L (plasma FIX activity

  1. In Vivo Expansion of Regulatory T cells With IL-2/IL-2 mAb Complexes Prevents Anti-factor VIII Immune Responses in Hemophilia A Mice Treated With Factor VIII Plasmid-mediated Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-01-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7–14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII. PMID:21468007

  2. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI.

  3. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI. PMID:26517064

  4. Assessment of individual dose utilization vs. physician prescribing recommendations for recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in paediatric and adult patients with congenital haemophilia and alloantibody inhibitors (CHwI): the Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia (DOSE).

    PubMed

    Gruppo, R A; Kessler, C M; Neufeld, E J; Cooper, D L

    2013-07-01

    Recent data from the Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia diary study has described home treatment with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in congenital haemophilia with inhibitors (CHwI). The current analysis compares prescribed and patient/caregiver-reported rFVIIa administration in paediatric and adult CHwI patients in this study. Patients with ≥ 4 bleeding episodes within a 3-month period prescribed rFVIIa as first-line therapy for bleeding episodes were eligible. Patients/caregivers completed a diary for ≥ 90 days or until the patient experienced four bleeds. Initial, total and mean rFVIIa doses reported for each bleeding episode were calculated and compared with the physician-prescribed doses. Of 52 enrolled patients (25 children; 27 adults), 39 (75%) completed the study. Children and adults had similar mean durations of bleeding episodes. Both patient groups were administered higher initial rFVIIa doses for joint bleeds than prescribed: median (range) 215.2 (74.1-400.0) mcg kg(-1) vs. 200.0 (61.0-270.0) mcg kg(-1) for children, and 231.3 (59.3-379.7) mcg kg(-1) vs. 123.0 (81.0-289.0) mcg kg(-1) for adults. The median infused dose for joint bleeds was higher in adults than children (175.2 vs. 148.0 mcg kg(-1) ), but children received significantly more doses per joint bleed than adults (median 6.5 vs. 3.0). The median total dose per joint bleed was higher in children than adults (1248.7 vs. 441.6). For children and adults, both initial and additional doses administered for bleeds were higher than prescribed. Children received higher total doses per bleed due to an increased number of infusions per bleed.

  5. “Antihemophilic factor is not the only answer for all factor VIII deficiencies.” Case report of odontogenic infection in a patient with hemophilia A, complicated by factor VIII inhibitors, and managed by transfusion of antihemophilic factor and factor VIII inhibitor bypass activity

    PubMed Central

    Sudheesh, K. M.; Bharani, K. S. N. Siva; Kiran, H. Y.; Hanagavadi, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Dental extraction in hemophiliacs with acquired inhibitors is always a risky procedure, which often presents a lot of problems associated with bleeding. A known case of hemophilia A complicated with factor VIII inhibitors and having odontogenic infection was successfully managed by transfusion of factor VIII inhibitor bypass activity (FEIBA) and antihemophilic factor. Past medical history was significant for multiple factor VIII transfusions. Bethesda assay done to identify inhibitors revealed low titer factor VIII inhibitors. Extraction of the involved tooth was done after transfusion of FEIBA with low-dose protocols. Minimal bleeding was noted after extraction which was controlled by local measures. FEIBA was proven to be highly effective, and no side effects of the product were observed.

  6. Hemophilia Treatments Have Come a Long Way

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. Today, an increasing number are made using recombinant DNA technology (a form of artificial DNA), with ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas ...

  7. The Use of Tools by Children with Hemophilia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markova, I.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Eight mothers with their 3.1- to 5.7-year-old hemophiliac children and eight control mothers with their nonhemophiliac children were videotaped while playing two games without tools and three additional games involving use of a knife, a pair of scissors, and a wooden hammer. Mothers of hemophiliac children did not correct their children when they…

  8. [Simultaneous occurrence of hemophilia A and acute lymphatic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Schmid, L; Schafroth, U; Osterwalder, B; Senn, H J

    1987-11-14

    In this paper the case of a man with haemophilia A is presented. At the age of 18 years an acute lymphatic leukaemia was observed. The case report demonstrates that even in the presence of a severe plasmatic coagulopathy an acute lymphatic leukaemia can be successfully treated with intensive chemotherapy, if the monitoring of the coagulation values and the substitution of antihaemophilic globulin and thrombocytes are guaranteed. Only 4 cases of haemophilia and acute leukaemia in the same patient are described in the literature. So we believe that the association of these two rare disorders is merely accidental.

  9. Effect of danazol on coagulation parameters and bleeding in hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Garewal, H S; Corrigan, J J; Durie, B G; Jeter, M A; Damiano, M L

    1985-02-22

    Danazol was given orally at a dose of 600 mg/day to six hemophiliacs for eight to 14 weeks. All patients showed a significant decrease in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) beginning with the first measurement (two weeks) and persisting until use of the drug was discontinued. However, a corresponding increase in the deficient factor activity could not be consistently demonstrated. Despite the shortened APTT, bleeding episodes continued in the severe hemophiliacs and the patient with Christmas disease. In four patients, bleeding appeared to increase in severity or change in pattern, and in two cases the bleeding manifestations did not respond to usual factor infusions but responded to discontinuation of the drug therapy and further factor replacement. Euglobulin lysis times were measured in five patients (one hemophiliac and four with nonhemophilic conditions) who were receiving danazol. The lysis times were markedly shortened. Increased fibrinolytic activity may be responsible for the increased bleeding manifestations in danazol-treated hemophiliacs.

  10. The human genes for hemophilia A and hemophilia B flank the X chromosome fragile site at Xq27.3.

    PubMed Central

    Purrello, M; Alhadeff, B; Esposito, D; Szabo, P; Rocchi, M; Truett, M; Masiarz, F; Siniscalco, M

    1985-01-01

    Two DNA recombinant clones, shown by separate studies to contain DNA sequences homologous to the genes coding for the human blood coagulation Factors VIII and IX, were hybridized in situ to metaphases or prometaphases derived from patients with the fragile-X syndrome and from a normal control. The results of these experiments indicate that (i) both genes are located in the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the human X chromosome flanking the fragile site at Xq27.3, (ii) the resolution of this localization is approximately 0.5% the length of the human haploid genome, i.e., 1.8 X 10(7) bp, (iii) the linear order of loci within the above region is Factor IX-fragile site-Factor VIII-Xqter. Both the localization and the linear order of these loci have been confirmed by Southern blotting studies using the same molecular probes and a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids known to have retained different segments of the human X chromosome. The findings described herein and the knowledge that Factor IX deficiency recombines freely with at least two loci of the G6PD cluster support our hypothesis that the chromosomal region which includes the fragile-X site is normally a region of high meiotic recombination. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3924593

  11. Quality of life in haemophilia A: Hemophilia Utilization Group Study Va (HUGS-Va).

    PubMed

    Poon, J-L; Zhou, Z-Y; Doctor, J N; Wu, J; Ullman, M M; Ross, C; Riske, B; Parish, K L; Lou, M; Koerper, M A; Gwadry-Sridhar, F; Forsberg, A D; Curtis, R G; Johnson, K A

    2012-09-01

    This study describes health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of persons with haemophilia A in the United States (US) and determines associations between self-reported joint pain, motion limitation and clinically evaluated joint range of motion (ROM), and between HRQoL and ROM. As part of a 2-year cohort study, we collected baseline HRQoL using the SF-12 (adults) and PedsQL (children), along with self-ratings of joint pain and motion limitation, in persons with factor VIII deficiency recruited from six Haemophilia Treatment Centres (HTCs) in geographically diverse regions of the US. Clinically measured joint ROM measurements were collected from medical charts of a subset of participants. Adults (N = 156, mean age: 33.5 ± 12.6 years) had mean physical and mental component scores of 43.4 ± 10.7 and 50.9 ± 10.1, respectively. Children (N = 164, mean age: 9.7 ± 4.5 years) had mean total PedsQL, physical functioning, and psychosocial health scores of 85.9 ± 13.8, 89.5 ± 15.2, and 84.1 ± 15.3, respectively. Persons with more severe haemophilia and higher self-reported joint pain and motion limitation had poorer scores, particularly in the physical aspects of HRQoL. In adults, significant correlations (P < 0.01) were found between ROM measures and both self-reported measures. Except among those with severe disease, children and adults with haemophilia have HRQoL scores comparable with those of the healthy US population. The physical aspects of HRQoL in both adults and children with haemophilia A in the US decrease with increasing severity of illness. However, scores for mental aspects of HRQoL do not differ between severity groups. These findings are comparable with those from studies in European and Canadian haemophilia populations.

  12. 78 FR 57868 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive Patent License: Oral Treatment of Hemophilia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive Patent License: Oral...), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is contemplating the grant of an Exclusive Patent License to... inventions embodied in U.S. Patent No. 7,220,718, issued 27 February 2007 (HHS Ref. No. E-281-2001/...

  13. Rituximab for the treatment of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Zaffanello, Marco; Veneri, Dino; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2007-07-01

    Rituximab, a monoclonal chimeric antibody to the CD20 antigen, is an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Moreover, rituximab has also shown efficacy in various autoimmune disorders. In this review, we will focus on the use of rituximab in childhood disorders of hemostasis associated with inhibitor formation. Although the results presented suggest that rituximab can be useful in the treatment of this subset of pediatric patients, most of the data come from isolated case reports or descriptions of small, uncontrolled series. Therefore, large, prospective, and randomized trials are needed to confirm the positive, preliminary results.

  14. [Efavirenz and nevirapine plasma levels in HIV-infected patients with hemophilia].

    PubMed

    Martorell, Marta; López, Rosa M; Ribera, Esteban; Ruiz, Isabel; Tural, Cristina; Puig, Lluís; Monterde, Josep

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate efavirenz and nevirapine plasma levels in HIV-infected hemophilic patients seen in two hospitals in Barcelona. Plasma levels of these drugs were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at four-month intervals, together with viral load and CD4 cell count. Nineteen patients treated with efavirenz and 8 with nevirapine were included, and 68 efavirenz and 31 nevirapine determinations were performed. Mean study time was 12 months. Median efavirenz plasma concentration was 2.95 .g/ml (interval: 1.54-5.26 .g/ml) in patients with favorable virological response and 1.86 .g/ml (0.82-4.88 .g/ml) in patients with detectable viral load (p = 0.32). Nevirapine plasma concentrations were 4.41 .g/ml (3.50-6.72 .g/ml) and 3.12 .g/ml (2.44-3.80 .g/ml) respectively (p = 0.18).

  15. Physiotherapy Treatment in Patients with Hemophilia and Chronic Ankle Arthropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle causes pain and deterioration in gait, causing disability. Although some physiotherapy modalities are effective in the management of acute bleeding, the results are unknown in chronic arthropathy. Our objective was to determine the most effective physiotherapy procedures for treating the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle and to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A systematic review was carried out in the Cochrane Database, PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PEDro, TESEO, and specialized journals (Haemophilia and Haematologica). It included articles with at least one group undergoing any kind of physiotherapy treatment and with pretest and posttest evaluation, published before April 2013. An analysis of variables was performed and assessed the methodological quality of studies. Five studies met the criteria for inclusion. Hydrotherapy treatments, strength training and balance strength, balance training, and sports therapy, have improved range of movement, pain, balance, and subjective physical performance. The proposed methodological analysis was not possible due to the low quality of the studies. Although the results are positive, they lack rigorous evidence on the effects of treatments. Studies are needed to establish the efficacy of the various forms of physiotherapy in the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle. PMID:23997955

  16. Tricuspid atresia with christmas disease (hemophilia B). Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lawson, R; Rullman, D; Brodeur, M; Starr, A

    1975-04-01

    A case combining Christmas disease and tricuspid atresia is presented. A severe coagulation defect in a hypoxic, polycythemic patient poses an added grave risk to major surgery. In the presence of marked and worsening symptoms, however, major surgery can be performed in these difficult cases. Close liason with a skilled hematology department is essential. Minimal tissue dissection is advised, and the usefulness of a reversed saphenous vein conduit is described.

  17. Coronary bypass in a patient with hemophilia B, or Christmas disease. Case report.

    PubMed

    Tourbaf, K D; Bettigole, R E; Zizzi, J A; Subramanian, S; Andersen, M N

    1979-04-01

    A 40-year-old patient with moderate factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease) underwent quadruple saphenous vein coronary bypass grafts for angina and severe coronary atherosclerosis involving the left and right main, left anterior descending, and circumflex coronary arteries. Excessive bleeding was prevented by infusion of factor IX concentrates during and after the operation. The surgical procedure and total body perfusion were carried out in the same manner as in patients without a hemorrhagic disorder. The patient was discharged after 13 days of hospitalization. He is doing well at the time of this publication and has returned to work.

  18. [Coronary artery bypass with extracorporeal circulation in a patient with hemophilia B].

    PubMed

    Bukowski, J G; De Brux, J L; Ganascia, B; Cottineau, C; Jacob, J P

    1996-01-01

    A 64-year-old patient with factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease) underwent quadruple coronary bypass grafting for angina pectoris. Excessive bleeding was prevented by infusion of factor IX concentrates from one day before surgery until the 19th postoperative day. The surgical procedure and the cardiopulmonary bypass were carried out in the same manner as in patients without any haemorrhagic disorder. No haemorrhagic complication occurred, neither during nor after the operation.

  19. [Detection of carriers of hemophilia A by testing for HindIII polymorphism in the factor VIII gene by PCR].

    PubMed

    Surin, V L; Aseev, M V; Zhukova, E L; Baranov, V S; Solov'ev, G Ia; Grineva, N I; Andreeva, T A; Izhevskaia, V L; Likhacheva, E A; Pliushch, O P

    1990-10-01

    Representatives of 62 families from Moscow and Leningrad with haemophilia A observed in the pedigree were tested for HindIII polymorphism in the factor VIII gene. The proposed scheme of investigation was based on intron 19 of the FVIII gene amplification by the PCR technique followed by restriction analysis with the inner control of hydrolysis. 207 unrelated X-chromosomes were analysed, the frequency of the incidence of the polymorphic HindIII site in the given population found to be 0.29. The frequency of incidence of the HindIII heterozygotes calculated according to Hardy-Weinberg equation was 0.41. This value evidences for relatively high informativity of this polymorphism for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of haemophilia A. 23 families (37%) out of 62 examined in the study were informative for this criteria. The new scheme proved to be effective in testing HindIII polymorphism for haemophilia A carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. The whole procedure takes one day, the radiolabelled probes are not used. The scheme described was inculcated in the All-Union Research Center for Haematology, Ministry of Health, USSR, Moscow, Research Institute for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Leningrad, Institute of Medical Genetics, Greifswald, DDR. PMID:2149345

  20. Patterns and predictors of high-risk sexual behavior in female partners of HIV-infected men with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Dublin, S; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    1992-05-01

    This study sought to characterize and quantify the high-risk heterosexual activity in HIV-discordant couples. An analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal questionnaire data from 217 HIV-negative female sexual partners of HIV-infected hemophiliac men were included in this study. There was a comparison of prevalence rates of anal sex, oral sex, vaginal intercourse with or without condoms, and use of other contraceptives between 1985-91. Logistic regression analysis of demographic, sexual, and clinical variables was used to predict unprotected vaginal sex. Actuarial estimates of semiannual relapse rates to unsafe sex were used. The proportion of women at low risk increases from 7 to 69% between 1985-91, mainly because more women were using condoms during all acts of vaginal intercourse. Other contraceptive practices did not change during this time. The proportion who engaged in oral or anal sex decreased from 26 to 13% and from 13% to 4%, respectively. Unprotected vaginal sex was more common among women who enrolled earlier, had less education, engaged in oral or anal sex, and among those whose partners had not had AIDS. Unprotected vaginal sex before enrollment was the strongest predictor of this high-risk activity during followup. 2-year rates of relapse to high-risk behavior were significantly higher among women who enrolled at high risk compared with those who enrolled at low risk (39 vs 8%, p=0.005). Although high risk sexual behavior become much less prevalent in this population between 1985-91, many continued to have unprotected vaginal sex occasionally. Counseling efforts should target couples who have been the most sexually active or have less education, and should emphasize not only initial risk reduction but also maintenance of low-risk behavior. PMID:1616653

  1. [AIDS in a woman having had sexual relations with a patient with hemophilia A. Characteristic findings in DNA image cytometry].

    PubMed

    Schaar, H; Auffermann, W; Böcking, A; Franke, P; Pusztai-Markos, Z; Reininghaus, A; Schmitt, H

    1986-12-19

    A 37-year-old female patient reported marked weight loss, prolonged alopecia, recurrent infections and watery diarrhoea. Examination revealed Salmonella infection, candidiasis and immunological signs of previous toxoplasmosis. Between 1978 and 1981, the patient had had close sexual relations to a patient with haemophilia A. Due to this fact, AIDS was suspected. Serological tests for HIV were not available at the time. The findings in DNA image cytometry (nuclear DNA inclusion bodies, polyploid lymphocyte nuclei and binuclear lymphocytes) suggested a viral infection of the lymphoid cells. Electron microscopy revealed in hepatocytes and cerebral cells intranuclear inclusion bodies whose size and contents were not compatible with an infection caused by cytomegalovirus, herpes virus or Epstein-Barr virus. In autopsy, infections of various organ systems such as pneumonia, tracheobronchitis, urocystitis, pyelonephritis, Candida oesophagitis and enteritis were found.

  2. Haemophilia registry of the Medical Committee of the Swiss Hemophilia Society. Update and annual survey 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    von der Weid, N

    2012-01-01

    The Haemophilia Registry of the Swiss Haemophilia Society was created in the year 2000. The latest records from October 31st 2011 are presented here. Included are all patients with haemophilia A or B and other inherited coagulation disorders (including VWD patients with R-Co activity below 10%) known and followed by the 11 paediatric and 12 adult haemophilia treatment or reference centers. Currently there are 950 patients registered, the majority of which (585) having haemophilia A. Disease severity is graded according to ISTH criteria and its distribution between mild, moderate and severe haemophilia is similar to data from other European and American registries. The majority (about two thirds) of Swiss patients with haemophilia A or B are treated on-demand, with only about 20% of patients being on prophylaxis. The figure is different in paediatrics and young adults (1st and 2nd decades), where 80 to 90% of patients with haemophilia A are under regular prophylaxis. Interestingly enough, use of factor concentrates, although readily available, is rather low in Switzerland, especially when taking the country's GDP into account: The total amount of factor VIII and IX was 4.94 U pro capita, comparable to other European countries with distinctly lower incomes (Poland, Slovakia, Hungary). This finding is mainly due to the afore mentioned low rate of prophylactic treatment of haemophilia in our country. Our registry remains an important instrument of quality control of haemophilia therapy in Switzerland.

  3. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause bleeding, such as endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss) Large bruises from a minor bump ... 8573 National Hemophilia Foundation Phone: 800-424-2634 World Federation of Hemophilia Phone: 514-875-7944 Return ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients and Caregivers: How Blood Clots Orphanet: Congenital factor II deficiency University of Iowa Health Care: Prothrombin Gene Mutation Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Canadian Hemophilia Society National Hemophilia Foundation: Factor II ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Prothrombin ...

  5. The Hemophiliac and His World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourdeau, R., Ed.

    The document contains the papers presented at the 5th Congress of the World Federation of Hemophilia in Montreal in 1968. Seven papers concern specific therapy of hemophilia, five papers treat nonspecific forms of therapy, seven papers deal with prophylaxis and complications in hemophilia, seven others deal with orthopedic and other surgical…

  6. [Hemophilic patients. Treatment protocol in the dental office].

    PubMed

    Kouvelas, N; Vierrou, A M

    1988-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited hemorrhagic disease which is due to the insufficiency of Factor VIII, or Factor IX, or Factor XI. Hemophilia patients are regarded as special patients with increased dental problems. The present paper consists of two parts. In the first part the types of hemophilia, ways of transmission, severity forms, and clinical characteristics are described. In the second part a protocol concerning the dental treatment of hemophilia patients is presented. There are four basic types of hemophilia: hemophilia A or classical hemophilia or Factor VIII deficiency, hemophilia B or Christmas disease, hemophilia C and von Willebrand's disease. Hemophilia is transmitted either as a sex-linked recessive or as an autosomal dominant trait, depending on the type of the disease. The severity of hemophilia depends on the amount of the coagulation factor present. According to this amount, there are four scales of severity. The clinical characteristics of the disease also depend on the amount of the factor present and vary, from occasional bleedings to serious and even life-threatening bleeding episodes. In the second part of the paper the special psychological and physiological problems of the hemophiliacs are discussed. In addition, there is reference to the hematologic coverage these patients need, as well as to the protection measures for the dental personnel against hepatitis and AIDS. The dental treatment plan at the office is presented in detail, including a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment of hemophilia patients in the operating room under general anesthesia.

  7. A comparison of traditional vs. Canadian tailored prophylaxis dosing of prophylactic factor infusions in children with haemophilia A and B in a single hemophilia treatment center.

    PubMed

    Dodd, C; Watts, R G

    2012-07-01

    Prophylactic infusion of clotting factor concentrates is a developing standard of care for individuals with haemophilia. The ideal schedule and techniques of prophylactic infusions remain incompletely defined. Our aim was to determine the optimal techniques and schedules for factor prophylaxis in paediatric patients. A retrospective electronic medical record review of all children treated with prophylactic factor infusions in a single Haemophilia Treatment Center was conducted. Comparison of traditional vs. Canadian dosing regimens and primary vs. secondary prophylaxis was made. Failure of prophylaxis was defined as the first serious bleed. A total of 58 children were identified for review. Five cases were excluded (four due to high titre inhibitors and one due to repeated non-compliance), thus there were 53 total cases: 46 with severe haemophilia, 2 with moderate haemophilia, 5 with mild haemophilia, 44 with haemophilia A and 9 with haemophilia B; 32 Traditional dosing and 21 Canadian dosing regimens. Patients on primary prophylaxis had a decreased failure rate (25%) compared to children treated with secondary prophylaxis (67%) regardless of technique of prophylaxis. When compared to a 'Traditional' factor prophylaxis schedule, the 'Canadian' tailored prophylaxis protocol was comparable with the exception of a decreased use of implanted venous devices in the 'Canadian' group. Ongoing bleeding (primarily joint bleeds) occurs with all prophylactic regimens. The lowest incidence of treatment failure was noted in children who began primary prophylaxis at a young age and before initial joint bleeds. Primary prophylaxis is superior to secondary prophylaxis regardless of dosing regimen. Traditional and Canadian dosing regimens were equivalent in outcome when measured over several years of follow-up.

  8. The mild phenotype in severe hemophilia A with Arg1781His mutation is associated with enhanced binding affinity of factor VIII for factor X.

    PubMed

    Yada, Koji; Nogami, Keiji; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Fay, Philip J; Shima, Midori

    2013-06-01

    The clinical severity in some patients with haemophilia A appears to be unrelated to the levels of factor (F)VIII activity (FVIII:C), but mechanisms are poorly understood. We have investigated a patient with a FVIII gene mutation at Arg1781 to His (R1781H) presenting with a mild phenotype despite FVIII:C of 0.9 IU/dl. Rotational thromboelastometry using the patient's whole blood demonstrated that the clot time and clot firmness were comparable to those usually observed at FVIII:C 5-10 IU/dl. Thrombin and FXa assays using plasma samples also showed that the peak levels of thrombin formation and the initial rate of FXa generation were comparable to those observed at FVIII:C 5-10 IU/dl. The results suggested a significantly greater haemostatic potential in this individual than in those with severe phenotype. The addition of incremental amounts of FX to control plasma with FVIII:C 0.9 IU/dl in clot waveform analyses suggested that the enhanced functional tenase assembly might have been related to changes in association between FVIII and FX. To further investigate this mechanism, we prepared a stably expressed, recombinant, B-domainless FVIII R1781H mutant. Thrombin generation assays using mixtures of control plasma and FVIII revealed that the coagulation function observed with the R1781H mutant (0.9 IU/dl) was comparable to that seen with wild-type FVIII:C at ~5 IU/dl. In addition, the R1781H mutant demonstrated an ~1.9-fold decrease in Km for FX compared to wild type. These results indicated that relatively enhanced binding affinity of FVIII R1781H for FX appeared to moderate the severity of the haemophilia A phenotype. PMID:23467620

  9. 42 CFR 412.521 - Basis of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... have hemophilia. (iv) Anesthesia services furnished by hospital employed nonphysician anesthetists or... direct costs of approved medical education programs, bad debts, anesthesia services furnished by...

  10. Blood safety and the choice of anti-hemophilic factor concentrate.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Leonard A; Oza, Veeral M

    2006-09-01

    Hemophilia is a congenital disorder due to the deficiency of the activity of factor VIII (classical hemophilia A) or IX (Christmas disease or hemophilia B). Bleeding is common and may result in long-term complications or even death. Bleeding may be treated or prevented by infusion of factor concentrates however these drugs are not without risk. Clinicians often feel ill prepared to provide accurate and impartial information regarding these drugs. This review will provide the reader with an historical yet up to date perspective on blood safety as it relates to the choice of concentrates to treat hemophilia.

  11. Spotlight on the human factor: building a foundation for the future of haemophilia A management: report from a symposium on human recombinant FVIII at the World Federation of Hemophilia World Congress, Melbourne, Australia on 12 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Kessler, C; Oldenburg, J; Ettingshausen, C Escuriola; Tiede, A; Khair, K; Négrier, C; Klamroth, R

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor development is the most serious and challenging complication in the treatment of severe haemophilia A. Up to 38% of such patients develop inhibitors with current recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) products produced in hamster cell lines. Human-cl rhFVIII is a new generation fully sulfated B-domain-deleted FVIII coagulant glycoprotein, which is generated from a human cell line. Thus, there are no non-human epitopes which would be potentially immunogenic. This molecule has significantly higher VWF-binding affinity compared with existing full-length rFVIII produced in hamster cell lines. The development aim of Human-cl rhFVIII is to address the challenges of FVIII inhibitors and frequent infusions during prophylaxis. Human-cl rhFVIII's mean half-life is very comparable to some of the newer products which involve modification of the FVIII molecule to extend the circulating half-life. There are promising data concerning the use of a personalized prophylaxis regimen with Human-cl rhFVIII. Preliminary data indicate a median dosing interval of 3.5 days with 66.7% of the patients on a twice per week or fewer infusions schedule combined with a low bleeding rate and no increased FVIII consumption when compared to standard prophylaxis. No product-specific laboratory assay is required to monitor the coagulation activity for Human-cl rhFVIII. The results of registration clinical trials with Human-cl rhFVIII as well as the ongoing studies in previously untreated patients (NuProtect) and personalized prophylaxis study in previously treated patients (NuPreviq), will be discussed. The manufacturer has received marketing authorization for Human-cl rhFVIII in Europe and Canada under the name Nuwiq(®) and plans to launch it in the USA and globally in 2015.

  12. Current practices regarding newborn intracranial haemorrhage and obstetrical care and mode of delivery of pregnant haemophilia carriers: a survey of obstetricians, neonatologists and haematologists in the United States, on behalf of the National Hemophilia Foundation's Medical and Scientific Advisory Council.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R; Lusher, J M; Henry, R C; Kallen, D J

    1999-11-01

    We undertook this survey to determine institutional practices of obstetricians, neonatologists and haematologists regarding care of pregnant haemophilia carriers and newborns with haemophilia and intracranial haemorrhage (ICH). Our purpose was also to determine whether institutions had written guidelines to manage such patients. Questionnaires were sent to 1000 obstetricians and through the Haemophilia Treatment Centres (HTC) to 180 paediatric haematologists and 180 neonatologists, each representing an institution. Twenty-three per cent of obstetricians, 22% of neonatologists and 16% of paediatric haematologists returned completed surveys. Over 94% of the respondents had no written guidelines for management of pregnant haemophilia carriers or their newborns or for neurologic assessment of newborns. For known haemophilia carriers, 57% of the obstetricians routinely preferred vaginal delivery and 11% preferred caesarean section. Availability of perinatal services influenced prenatal management (P < 0.05). In term newborns with documented ICH, only 23% of neonatologists would evaluate for haemophilia, whereas in pre-term newborns with ICH, this number dropped even further to 3%. For all newborns with haemophilia, 40% preferred routine administration of clotting factor concentrates (CFC) immediately following birth to offset the trauma of delivery and 89% of paediatric haematologists favoured early prophylaxis with CFC. Guidelines are needed for management of pregnant haemophilia carriers as well as newborns with haemophilia. Physicians need to be made aware that ICH may be a presenting sign of haemophilia in both term as well as pre-term newborns, so that appropriate therapy can be instituted early in the event of a bleed.

  13. Spotlight on the human factor: building a foundation for the future of haemophilia A management: report from a symposium on human recombinant FVIII at the World Federation of Hemophilia World Congress, Melbourne, Australia on 12 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Kessler, C; Oldenburg, J; Ettingshausen, C Escuriola; Tiede, A; Khair, K; Négrier, C; Klamroth, R

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor development is the most serious and challenging complication in the treatment of severe haemophilia A. Up to 38% of such patients develop inhibitors with current recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) products produced in hamster cell lines. Human-cl rhFVIII is a new generation fully sulfated B-domain-deleted FVIII coagulant glycoprotein, which is generated from a human cell line. Thus, there are no non-human epitopes which would be potentially immunogenic. This molecule has significantly higher VWF-binding affinity compared with existing full-length rFVIII produced in hamster cell lines. The development aim of Human-cl rhFVIII is to address the challenges of FVIII inhibitors and frequent infusions during prophylaxis. Human-cl rhFVIII's mean half-life is very comparable to some of the newer products which involve modification of the FVIII molecule to extend the circulating half-life. There are promising data concerning the use of a personalized prophylaxis regimen with Human-cl rhFVIII. Preliminary data indicate a median dosing interval of 3.5 days with 66.7% of the patients on a twice per week or fewer infusions schedule combined with a low bleeding rate and no increased FVIII consumption when compared to standard prophylaxis. No product-specific laboratory assay is required to monitor the coagulation activity for Human-cl rhFVIII. The results of registration clinical trials with Human-cl rhFVIII as well as the ongoing studies in previously untreated patients (NuProtect) and personalized prophylaxis study in previously treated patients (NuPreviq), will be discussed. The manufacturer has received marketing authorization for Human-cl rhFVIII in Europe and Canada under the name Nuwiq(®) and plans to launch it in the USA and globally in 2015. PMID:25472812

  14. 42 CFR 51a.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inherited disorders caused by the transmission of certain aberrant genes from one generation to another. Hemophilia means a genetically transmitted bleeding disorder resulting from a deficiency of a plasma...

  15. 42 CFR 412.521 - Basis of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subchapter. (iii) A payment amount per unit for blood clotting factor provided to Medicare inpatients who... hemophilia clotting factor costs as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section, are made to the...

  16. 42 CFR 412.521 - Basis of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subchapter. (iii) A payment amount per unit for blood clotting factor provided to Medicare inpatients who... hemophilia clotting factor costs as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section, are made to the...

  17. 42 CFR 412.521 - Basis of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subchapter. (iii) A payment amount per unit for blood clotting factor provided to Medicare inpatients who... hemophilia clotting factor costs as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section, are made to the...

  18. 42 CFR 130.40 - Reconsideration of denial of petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Reconsideration Procedures § 130.40 Reconsideration of... individuals, who are independent of the Ricky Ray Program Office, to review the initial determination and...

  19. 42 CFR 130.40 - Reconsideration of denial of petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Reconsideration Procedures § 130.40 Reconsideration of... individuals, who are independent of the Ricky Ray Program Office, to review the initial determination and...

  20. 42 CFR 130.40 - Reconsideration of denial of petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Reconsideration Procedures § 130.40 Reconsideration of... individuals, who are independent of the Ricky Ray Program Office, to review the initial determination and...

  1. Study of an Intervention to Improve Problem List Accuracy and Use

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-30

    Attention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity; Asthma; COPD; Breast Cancer; Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Diabetes; Glaucoma; Hemophilia; Hypertension; Hyperthyroidism; Hypothyroidism; Myasthenia Gravis; Osteoporosis; Osteopenia; Renal Failure; Renal Insufficiency; Sickle Cell Disease; Stroke

  2. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  3. Total ankle replacement or ankle fusion in painful advanced hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In advanced painful hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle, the last resort is surgical treatment (ankle arthrodesis [AA] or total ankle replacement [TAR]). There is a controversy in the literature on which of the two procedures is more appropriate. A review of the literature was performed to clarify such a controversy. The first search engine was MedLine (keywords: total ankle replacement, ankle arthrodesis). Seventy articles were found in MedLine. Of these, only 16 were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. The second search engine was the Cochrane Library, where only nine systematic reviews were found on the role of TAR and AA in non-hemophilia patients. TAR and AA provide pain relief and patient satisfaction in hemophilia patients in the short term. The available non-hemophilia literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. My current view is that AA may be preferable in most hemophilia patients.

  4. No more Doritos and lobster tails: a case report of life-threatening sublingual hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Huma; Gilani, Javed M; Khan, Omar A

    2009-07-01

    This case report highlights a life-threatening complication of mild hemophilia A. We report the onset of airway compromise through a massive sublingual hematoma in a 67-year-old male suffering from the mild form of hemophilia A. This case emphasizes the need for prompt medical attention and recognition of potentially serious complications of the disease in patients suffering with even mild form of this bleeding diathesis. PMID:19902776

  5. Spontaneous hyphema in an infant with Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Ghose, S; Kishore, K; Patil, N D; Saxena, R

    1993-02-01

    A 4-month-old boy presented with an apparently spontaneous uniocular hyphema as the initial manifestation of Christmas disease (hemophilia B). Although it is uncommon for patients with hemophilia to experience major bleeds in infancy, and the ocular involvement is usually limited to periocular hemorrhages, we recommend that a coagulation profile be obtained in all patients with intraocular hemorrhage to rule out this disease.

  6. Comparison of the rates of joint arthroplasty in patients with severe factor VIII and IX deficiency: an index of different clinical severity of the 2 coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Iorio, Alfonso; Santagostino, Elena; Morfini, Massimo; Bisson, Ruggero; Innocenti, Massimo; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Pasta, Gian Luigi; Radossi, Paolo; Rodorigo, Giuseppina; Santoro, Cristina; Sartori, Roberto; Scaraggi, Antonio; Solimeno, Luigi Pier; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2009-07-23

    Data from the Italian Hemophilia Centres were collected to perform a retrospective survey of joint arthroplasty in patients with severe hemophilia. Twenty-nine of 49 hemophilia centers reported that 328 of the 347 operations were carried out in 253 patients with severe hemophilia A (HA) and 19 in 15 patients with severe hemophilia B (HB). When results were normalized to the whole Italian hemophilia population (1770 severe HA and 319 severe HB), patients with HA had a 3-fold higher risk of undergoing joint arthroplasty (odds ratio [OR], 3.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-5.77; P < .001). These results were confirmed after adjustment for age, HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and inhibitor in a Cox regression model (HR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.62-4.33; P < .001). The survival analysis of time to joint arthroplasty in the subset of patients with severe HA was not affected by the severity of factor VIII (FVIII) gene mutations. A systematic review of literature articles reporting joint arthroplasties in HA and HB showed that the proportion of HA patients who had undergone arthroplasties was higher than that of HB patients, in agreement with the findings in our Italian cohort. These data suggest that the 2 inherited coagulation disorders have a different severity of clinical phenotype.

  7. Seroprevalence of hepatitis C, hepatitis B and HIV viruses in hemophiliacs born 1985-2010 in west Azarbaijan of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Nasim; Nateghi, Shahin; Noroozi, Mehran; Hejazi, Sasan; Aghanezhad, Fateme; Ali, Afsaneh Akbarpoor Morad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although, in the past the risk of transfusion transmitted viral infections were high in hemophilia patients, but introduction of viral inactivation methods in1985,decreased the risk of human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C and B viruses transmission significantly. The aim of study was seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag), hepatitis C virus antibody (HCV Ab) and human immunodeficiency virus antibody (HIVAb) in hemophiliacs in west Azarbaijan of Iran, born in 1985-2010. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, fifty patients with hereditary bleeding disorders born in 1985-2010, from total 250 patients who had been registered in Urmia Hemophilia Society were enrolled through the year 2010 to assess their seroprevalence for HCV Ab, HIV Ab and HBs Ag. Thirty five of 50 patients had hemophilia. Also; we performed a subset analysis for hemophilia patients. Results: All 50 patients with hereditary bleeding disorders including 35 patients with hemophilia were seronegative for HIV Ab and HBs Ag. HCV-Ab was detected in serum of 3 of 50 (6%) patients with bleeding disorders. After subset analysis for hemophilia (A and B) patients, we found HCV infection in 8.57% (3 of 35) of hemophiliacs. Conclusion: In this study prevalence of HCV infection was very smaller than similar studies in Iran and other countries. This study shows the safety of using viral inactivated factor concentrates and recombinant factors after year 1985. None of Hemophiliacs were seropositive for HIV Ab and HBs Ag. PMID:23559767

  8. Update of 156 episodes of central nervous system bleeding in hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    de Tezanos Pinto, M; Fernandez, J; Perez Bianco, P R

    1992-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1991, 156 episodes of central nervous system (CNS) bleeding were documented in 106 patients from a total population of 1,410 hemophiliacs (7.5%). Ninety-one hemophilia A patients presented 131 bleeding episodes; 15 hemophilia B patients had 25 episodes. 32% of these episodes took place in patients less than 5 years of age. 46% were age 10 or less, and 72% were age 20 or less. The mean age was 14.8 years in hemophilia A and 9 years in hemophilia B patients. A significant increase in the mean age of hemophilia A patients has been observed over the last 10 years; this may be related to HIV infection. A history of recent trauma was documented in 39.7% of the episodes. Spontaneous CNS bleeding was predominant in severe hemophilia (85.2%). One hundred and fifty-four CNS bleeding episodes were intracranial and 2 intraspinal. Of the intracranial episodes, 37.7% were subarachnoid, 29.8 subdural, and 22.7% intracerebral. Factor VIII or IX inhibitors were present in 11.3% of the patients; this figure is slightly lower than that observed in our total hemophilic population. Over 50% of the patients had psychoneurological sequelae; the most frequent were seizure disorders and motor impairment. The overall mortality rate was 29.2%. The mortality was more closely related to the CNS bleeding site than to the severity of hemophilia. Treatment should be based on prompt and prolonged replacement therapy to ensure hemostatic levels of antihemophilia factors.

  9. Optimal management of hemophilic arthropathy and hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Lobet, Sébastien; Hermans, Cedric; Lambert, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia is a hematological disorder characterized by a partial or complete deficiency of clotting factor VIII or IX. Its bleeding complications primarily affect the musculoskeletal system. Hemarthrosis is a major hemophilia-related complication, responsible for a particularly debilitating chronic arthropathy, in the long term. In addition to clotting factor concentrates, usually prescribed by the hematologist, managing acute hemarthrosis and chronic arthropathy requires a close collaboration between the orthopedic surgeon and physiotherapist. This collaboration, comprising a coagulation and musculoskeletal specialist, is key to effectively preventing hemarthrosis, managing acute joint bleeding episodes, assessing joint function, and actively treating chronic arthropathy. This paper reviews, from a practical point of view, the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilia-induced arthropathy for hematologists, orthopedic surgeons, and physiotherapists. PMID:25378964

  10. Genotype analysis identifies the cause of the "royal disease".

    PubMed

    Rogaev, Evgeny I; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Faskhutdinova, Gulnaz; Kittler, Ellen L W; Moliaka, Yuri K

    2009-11-01

    The "royal disease," a blood disorder transmitted from Queen Victoria to European royal families, is a striking example of X-linked recessive inheritance. Although the disease is widely recognized to be a form of the blood clotting disorder hemophilia, its molecular basis has never been identified, and the royal disease is now likely extinct. We identified the likely disease-causing mutation by applying genomic methodologies (multiplex target amplification and massively parallel sequencing) to historical specimens from the Romanov branch of the royal family. The mutation occurs in F9, a gene on the X chromosome that encodes blood coagulation factor IX, and is predicted to alter RNA splicing and to lead to production of a truncated form of factor IX. Thus, the royal disease is the severe form of hemophilia, also known as hemophilia B or Christmas disease.

  11. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols. PMID:26739399

  12. Spontaneous disappearance of an IgA anti-factor IX inhibitor in a child with Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R R; Panush, R S; Kitchens, C S

    1984-10-01

    The few inhibitors to blood coagulation factor IX in patients with Christmas disease (hemophilia B) that have been studied have been shown to belong to the IgG class of immunoglobulins. We report the first case in which a factor IX inhibitor was of the IgA class. Additionally, he appears to be the youngest patient with hemophilia B to have developed an inhibitor. His inhibitor complicated treatment of the patient for several years because of its anamnestic rise following factor IX concentrate administration. It then spontaneously vanished and has not returned in spite of repeated factor IX complex administration.

  13. Drug therapy reviews: clinical use of hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Lowe, G D; Lawson, D H

    1978-04-01

    Systemic hemostatic agents are reviewed. Among the agents discussed are vitamin K preparations (phytonadione, menadione, menadione sodium bisulfite, menadiol sodium diphosphate); and blood products (whole blood, plasma, cryoprecipitate, factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates and fibrinogen concentrates). Normal and abnormal hemostasis and fibrinolysis are discussed, as is the general management of systemic hemostatic defects. Specific disorders covered are clotting factor deficiencies, hemophilia A, factor VIII inhibitors, von Willebrand disease, hemophilia B (Christmas disease), other congenital coagulation disorders, acquired deficiency of factors II, VII, IX and X, and defibrination syndrome.

  14. Inhibitor-neutralisation assay and electro-immuno assay of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Bertina, R M; van der Linden, I K

    1977-06-15

    A rabbit antibody specifically precipitating human factor IX has been used in the assay of factor IX antigen. The results obtained with two different methods (inhibitor-neutralisation assay and electro-immunoassay) have been compared in a group of healthy individuals and in a group of hemophilia B patients and carriers. In general, identical results are obtained with both methods, except in some hemophilia B+ carriers and patients, where the electroimmuno assay gives 1.5-2.0 times higher levels. Results obtained by electroimmuno assay are more accurate and reproducible than those obtained by inhibitor-neutralisation assay, which is of importance for its potential use in carrier detection.

  15. 42 CFR 414.900 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...— (i) Influenza. (ii) Pneumococcal and Hepatitis B vaccines. (iii) Antigens. (iv) Hemophilia blood...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Drugs and Biologicals Under Part B § 414.900 Basis and scope. (a) This subpart implements sections 1842(o), 1847A,...

  16. 42 CFR 414.900 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...— (i) Influenza. (ii) Pneumococcal and Hepatitis B vaccines. (iii) Antigens. (iv) Hemophilia blood...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Drugs and Biologicals Under Part B § 414.900 Basis and scope. (a) This subpart implements sections 1842(o), 1847A,...

  17. 42 CFR 414.900 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...— (i) Influenza. (ii) Pneumococcal and Hepatitis B vaccines. (iii) Antigens. (iv) Hemophilia blood...) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Drugs and Biologicals Under Part B § 414.900 Basis and scope. (a) This subpart implements sections 1842(o), 1847A,...

  18. 42 CFR 414.900 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Influenza. (ii) Pneumococcal and Hepatitis B vaccines. (iii) Antigens. (iv) Hemophilia blood clotting factor...) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Drugs and Biologicals Under Part B § 414.900 Basis and scope. (a) This subpart implements sections 1842(o), 1847A, and...

  19. 42 CFR 414.701 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Drugs and Biologicals § 414.701... for determining the payment allowance limit for drugs and biologicals covered under Part B of Title... covered drugs, for example, influenza, pneumococcal and hepatitis vaccines, antigens, hemophilia...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. B Appendix B to...

  1. 42 CFR 130.33 - How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete? 130.33 Section 130.33 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing...

  2. 42 CFR 130.24 - What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues? 130.24 Section 130.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF...

  3. 42 CFR 130.50 - Limitation on agent and attorney fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on agent and attorney fees. 130.50 Section 130.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Attorney Fees § 130.50 Limitation on agent and...

  4. Reactions to Prenatal Testing: Reflection of Religiosity and Attitudes toward Abortion and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Martie; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2000-01-01

    A study asked 166 undergraduates what they would do if through prenatal testing they discovered that they (or their partner) were carrying a fetus with disabilities. Respondents were more uncertain about whether to continue the pregnancy when the fetus was diagnosed with Down syndrome than with spina bifida or hemophilia. (Contains references.)…

  5. 42 CFR 130.32 - How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions? 130.32 Section 130.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures...

  6. School Behavior and Attendance during the First Year of Treatment for Childhood Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehbens, James A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated school behavior and attendance of children with cancer (N=36) and hemophilia (N=26). Teacher ratings of students' behavior showed no differences before and after treatment. Children with cancer were absent four times more than healthy children; absenteeism of hemophiliacs was twice the normal rate. Academic performance was negatively…

  7. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  8. The Role of Parental and Extrafamilial Social Support in the Psychosocial Adjustment of Children with a Chronically Ill Father.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotchick, Beth A.; Summers, Peter; Forehand, Rex; Steele, Ric G.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the relation between social support and psychosocial adjustment in children of men with hemophilia. Results, based on 53 families, indicate that the impact of illness, not the severity of illness itself, related to children's psychosocial adjustment. Main effects were observed for parental support on child- and parent-reported…

  9. 42 CFR 130.40 - Reconsideration of denial of petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reconsideration of denial of petitions. 130.40 Section 130.40 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Reconsideration Procedures § 130.40 Reconsideration...

  10. 42 CFR 130.3 - Amount of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of payments. 130.3 Section 130.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM General Provisions § 130.3 Amount of payments. If there are sufficient...

  11. Strategies for Working with Culturally Diverse Communities and Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall-David, Elizabeth

    This guide, originally written to aid in the identification and education of ethnic minority patients with hemophilia, has been published to assist community groups in a range of educational, medical, and social service outreach efforts. It begins with two introductory chapters on ethnic identity and intergroup relations. Chapter 3 offers…

  12. 42 CFR 130.34 - How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition? 130.34 Section 130.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and...

  13. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130.20 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation Required for Complete Petitions §...

  14. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. C...

  15. 42 CFR 130.35 - How and when will the Secretary pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary pay a petition? 130.35 Section 130.35 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and Paying...

  16. Challenges in the Evaluation for Possible Abuse: Presentations of Congenital Bleeding Disorders in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jami; Carpenter, Shannon; Anderst, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe children with congenital bleeding disorders that present in a manner that may be concerning for non-accidental trauma (NAT), and to evaluate associations with disease and demographic characteristics. Methods: Ten year retrospective charts of subjects were reviewed at a Hemophilia Treatment Center. Demographic, historical,…

  17. Handi Helps, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handi Helps, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The eight issues of Handi Helps presented in this document focus on specific issues of concern to the disabled, parents, and those working with the disabled. The two-page handi help fact sheets focus on the following topics: child abuse, leukemia, arthritis, Tourette Syndrome, hemophilia, the puppet program "Meet the New Kids on the Block" and dog…

  18. 42 CFR 414.900 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Influenza. (ii) Pneumococcal and Hepatitis B vaccines. (iii) Antigens. (iv) Hemophilia blood clotting factor...) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Drugs and Biologicals Under Part B § 414.900 Basis and scope. (a) This subpart implements sections 1842(o), 1847A, and...

  19. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  1. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  2. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  3. 32 CFR 634.37 - Voluntary breath and bodily fluid testing based on implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., administrative actions, and civilian courts. (d) Special rules exist for persons who have hemophilia, other blood-clotting disorders, or any medical or surgical disorder being treated with an anticoagulant. These persons— (1) May refuse a blood extraction test without penalty. (2) Will not be administered a...

  4. 32 CFR 634.37 - Voluntary breath and bodily fluid testing based on implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., administrative actions, and civilian courts. (d) Special rules exist for persons who have hemophilia, other blood-clotting disorders, or any medical or surgical disorder being treated with an anticoagulant. These persons— (1) May refuse a blood extraction test without penalty. (2) Will not be administered a...

  5. 32 CFR 634.37 - Voluntary breath and bodily fluid testing based on implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., administrative actions, and civilian courts. (d) Special rules exist for persons who have hemophilia, other blood-clotting disorders, or any medical or surgical disorder being treated with an anticoagulant. These persons— (1) May refuse a blood extraction test without penalty. (2) Will not be administered a...

  6. 32 CFR 634.37 - Voluntary breath and bodily fluid testing based on implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., administrative actions, and civilian courts. (d) Special rules exist for persons who have hemophilia, other blood-clotting disorders, or any medical or surgical disorder being treated with an anticoagulant. These persons— (1) May refuse a blood extraction test without penalty. (2) Will not be administered a...

  7. 32 CFR 634.37 - Voluntary breath and bodily fluid testing based on implied consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., administrative actions, and civilian courts. (d) Special rules exist for persons who have hemophilia, other blood-clotting disorders, or any medical or surgical disorder being treated with an anticoagulant. These persons— (1) May refuse a blood extraction test without penalty. (2) Will not be administered a...

  8. School Absences and School Achievements in Children with Congenital Coagulation Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvist, S. Beatrice M.

    1988-01-01

    Ten Finnish children (aged 7-15 years) suffering from hemophilia or von Willebrand's disease were compared with 20 healthy schoolmates with reference to scholastic achievement and school absences. It appears that despite a greater number of absences, the children affected by the disease were doing relatively well in school. (TJH)

  9. Fractional populations in sex-linked inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo Lee, Seung; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Koo Kim, Chul; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-03-01

    We study the fractional populations in chromosome inherited diseases. The governing equations for the fractional populations are found and solved in the presence of mutation and selection. The physical fixed points obtained are used to discuss the cases of color blindness and hemophilia.

  10. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. C...

  11. 42 CFR 130.35 - How and when will the Secretary pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary pay a petition? 130.35 Section 130.35 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and Paying...

  12. 42 CFR 130.20 - Form of medical documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Form of medical documentation. 130.20 Section 130.20 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation Required for Complete Petitions §...

  13. 42 CFR 130.50 - Limitation on agent and attorney fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limitation on agent and attorney fees. 130.50 Section 130.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Attorney Fees § 130.50 Limitation on agent and...

  14. 42 CFR 130.32 - How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions? 130.32 Section 130.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures...

  15. 42 CFR 130.40 - Reconsideration of denial of petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reconsideration of denial of petitions. 130.40 Section 130.40 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Reconsideration Procedures § 130.40 Reconsideration...

  16. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. B Appendix B to...

  17. 42 CFR 130.24 - What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues? 130.24 Section 130.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF...

  18. 42 CFR 130.3 - Amount of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Amount of payments. 130.3 Section 130.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM General Provisions § 130.3 Amount of payments. If there are sufficient...

  19. 42 CFR 130.33 - How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete? 130.33 Section 130.33 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing...

  20. 42 CFR 130.34 - How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition? 130.34 Section 130.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and...

  1. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Palaschak, Brett; Hoffman, Brad E; Srikanthan, Meera A; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII) and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity. PMID:27738644

  2. 42 CFR 130.24 - What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues? 130.24 Section 130.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF...

  3. 42 CFR 130.34 - How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition? 130.34 Section 130.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and...

  4. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. C...

  5. 42 CFR 130.50 - Limitation on agent and attorney fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitation on agent and attorney fees. 130.50 Section 130.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Attorney Fees § 130.50 Limitation on agent and...

  6. 42 CFR 130.34 - How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition? 130.34 Section 130.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and...

  7. 42 CFR 130.32 - How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions? 130.32 Section 130.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures...

  8. 42 CFR 130.34 - How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether to pay a petition? 130.34 Section 130.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and...

  9. 42 CFR 130.35 - How and when will the Secretary pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary pay a petition? 130.35 Section 130.35 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and Paying...

  10. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. C...

  11. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. C...

  12. 42 CFR 130.3 - Amount of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Amount of payments. 130.3 Section 130.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM General Provisions § 130.3 Amount of payments. If there are sufficient...

  13. 42 CFR 130.32 - How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions? 130.32 Section 130.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures...

  14. 42 CFR 130.32 - How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary determine the order of receipt of petitions? 130.32 Section 130.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures...

  15. 42 CFR 130.24 - What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues? 130.24 Section 130.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF...

  16. 42 CFR 130.3 - Amount of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Amount of payments. 130.3 Section 130.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM General Provisions § 130.3 Amount of payments. If there are sufficient...

  17. 42 CFR 130.3 - Amount of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Amount of payments. 130.3 Section 130.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM General Provisions § 130.3 Amount of payments. If there are sufficient...

  18. 42 CFR 130.33 - How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete? 130.33 Section 130.33 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing...

  19. 42 CFR 130.50 - Limitation on agent and attorney fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limitation on agent and attorney fees. 130.50 Section 130.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Attorney Fees § 130.50 Limitation on agent and...

  20. 42 CFR 130.35 - How and when will the Secretary pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary pay a petition? 130.35 Section 130.35 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and Paying...

  1. 42 CFR 130.35 - How and when will the Secretary pay a petition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How and when will the Secretary pay a petition? 130.35 Section 130.35 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing and Paying...

  2. 42 CFR 130.33 - How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete? 130.33 Section 130.33 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing...

  3. 42 CFR 130.24 - What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What additional documentation may the Secretary require to resolve eligibility or payment issues? 130.24 Section 130.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF...

  4. 42 CFR 130.33 - How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will the Secretary determine whether a petition is complete? 130.33 Section 130.33 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Procedures for Filing...

  5. 42 CFR 130.50 - Limitation on agent and attorney fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limitation on agent and attorney fees. 130.50 Section 130.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Attorney Fees § 130.50 Limitation on agent and...

  6. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  7. Inherited factor XI deficiency: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    Inherited factor XI (FXI) deficiency, also called Hemophilia C, is an uncommon autosomal recessive disorder, which is associated with a variable bleeding tendency that usually manifests after trauma or surgery. This concise report reviews current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, genetics, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and management of this inherited bleeding disorder.

  8. Hidden Disabilities: A Look at Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VSA Educational Services, Washington, DC. Resource Center on Substance Abuse Prevention and Disability.

    This leaflet discusses alcohol and other drug abuse prevention for individuals with hidden disabilities such as cancer, epilepsy, diabetes, kidney failure, hemophilia, hypertension, early stages of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), or heart disease. Their increased risk for alcohol and other drug abuse and reasons for increased risk are…

  9. Global Post-Authorization Safety Surveillance Study: real-world data on prophylaxis and on-demand treatment using FEIBA (an activated prothrombin complex concentrate)

    PubMed Central

    Negrier, Claude; Voisin, Sophie; Baghaei, Fariba; Numerof, Robert; Novack, Aaron; Doralt, Jennifer E.; Romanov, Vadim; Gringeri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, Post-Authorization Safety Surveillance (PASS) study was carried out in patients with hemophilia A or B and inhibitors treated with FEIBA for 1 year to collect real-world data on safety and effectiveness of FEIBA. The study followed a cohort design and did not make stipulations on treatment or observation schedule, as it was designed to observe routine medical practices based on physicians’ treatment decisions, including whether patients received on-demand or prophylaxis with FEIBA. The attending physician maintained documentation, including medical records, laboratory reports, adverse event reports, and so on and a subject diary was used. Eighty-one patients were treated with FEIBA at 40 sites in 10 countries over a 4-year period. Sixty-nine patients (85.2%) had hemophilia A, two had (2.5%) hemophilia B, and ten (12.3%) had acquired hemophilia A. At baseline 45 patients (55.6%) were prescribed prophylaxis and 36 (44.6%) on-demand treatment. This study was novel in following safety and effectiveness in ‘real world’ on-demand and prophylactic use of FEIBA, and was able to collect data in these rare patients under routine clinical practice. PMID:26829366

  10. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  11. Home Care for Children with Chronic Illnesses and Severe Disabilities: A Bibliography and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alice; And Others

    The bibliography and resource guide summarizes relevant research and information on home care for children with disabilities and chronic illnesses, including those with such diagnoses as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hemophilia, sickle cell anemia, autism, or failure-to-thrive…

  12. 75 FR 52533 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... hemophilia without regard to age, and for the screening of newborns for sickle cell anemia and other genetic...: Sickle Cell Disease and Other Hemoglobinopathies Program Evaluation-- Background: In response to the growing need for resources devoted to sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies, Congress,...

  13. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Karlyn

    2016-01-01

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  14. Design of the INHIBIT trial: preventing inhibitors by avoiding 'danger', prolonging half-life and promoting tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Margaret V; Malec, Lynn M

    2014-12-01

    Inhibitor formation is among the most serious complications of hemophilia treatment. With the US FDA licensure of the novel long-lasting recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) Fc fusion protein, Eloctate, which prolongs FVIII half-life, we propose an innovative approach to prevent inhibitor formation. In this paper, we describe a multicenter, Phase II, single-arm, 48-week trial, the INHIBIT trial, to determine if Eloctate, begun before a bleed and continued as once weekly prophylaxis, will reduce inhibitor formation in children with hemophilia A. We hypothesize that avoiding 'danger,' that is, immune activation by a bleed at first factor exposure and prolonging FVIII half-life will prevent inhibitors and promote FVIII-specific T-cell tolerance. If successful, this approach will suggest a new paradigm in clinical practice.

  15. A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Santagostino, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Advances in recombinant technology and knowledge about coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) are building a platform for new therapeutic options in patients with hemophilia A. The development of turoctocog alfa, a novel, high-purity, third-generation, B-domain truncated recombinant FVIII, has been produced and formulated without the use of animal-derived or human serum-derived components, in the wake of understanding of the new biochemical characteristics of FVIII, namely its protein structure, and glycosylation and sulfating patterns. Culture conditions and a five-step purification process have been developed to optimize the safety of turoctocog alfa. The results of two pilot clinical trials using turoctocog alfa confirmed high safety levels, with no patient developing inhibitors during the period of observation. The purpose of this review is to describe briefly the molecular and biological properties of turoctocog alfa, together with details of its clinical development, with emphasis on the needs of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:25548513

  16. Management of the hemophilic pseudotumor of the abdomen: A rare pathological entity

    PubMed Central

    López-Gómez, Javier; Contreras, Juan S.; Figueroa-Ruiz, Marco; Servín-Torres, Erick; Velázquez-García, José; Bevia-Pérez, Francisco; Delgadillo-Teyer, Germán

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication that occurs in patients with severe hemophilia. Results from multiple episodes of bleeding into the bones and soft tissues. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 31 years old male patient, with severe hemophilia A. Diagnosed with an abdominal tumor 10 years ago during routine screening, that progressively grew to encompass the entire abdominal area, with symptoms of intestinal obstruction. DISCUSSION Hemophilic pseudotumor appears as a painless tumor of slow growth that can compress vital organs producing bone destruction, muscle and skin necrosis. The tumor may have fistulas or break spontaneously. CONCLUSION The abdominal hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare pathological entity, with few reports worldwide, but must be considered in hemophilic patients with a well documented abdominal tumor. PMID:25290383

  17. Tolerogenic nanoparticles to induce immunologic tolerance: Prevention and reversal of FVIII inhibitor formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hong; Rossi, Robert J; Yoon, Jeongheon; Wang, Hong; Scott, David W

    2016-03-01

    The immune response of hemophilia A patients to administered FVIII is a major complication that obviates this very therapy. We have recently described the use of synthetic, biodegradable nanoparticles carrying rapamycin and FVIII peptide antigens, to induce antigen-specific tolerance. Herein we test the tolerogenicity of nanoparticles that contains full length FVIII protein in hemophilia A mice, focusing on anti-FVIII humoral immune response. As expected, recipients of tolerogenic nanoparticles remained unresponsive to FVIII despite multiple challenges for up to 6 months. Furthermore, therapeutic treatments in FVIII-immunized mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies resulted in diminished antibody titers, albeit efficacy required longer therapy with the tolerogenic nanoparticles. Interestingly, durable FVIII-specific tolerance was also achieved in animals co-administered with FVIII admixed with nanoparticles encapsulating rapamycin alone. These results suggest that nanoparticles carrying rapamycin and FVIII can be employed to induce specific tolerance to prevent and even reverse inhibitor formation.

  18. Evaluation of Aryoseven Safety (Recombinant Activated Factor VII) in Patients with Bleeding Disorders (An Observational Post-Marketing Surveillance Study)

    PubMed Central

    Toogeh, Gholamreza; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Eshghi, Peyman; Managhchi, Mohammadreza; Shaverdi-niasari, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Katayoon; Roostaei, Samin; Emran, Neda; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII induces hemostasis in patients with coagulopathy disorders. AryoSeven™ as a safe Iranian Recombinant activated factor VII has been available on our market. This study was performed to establish the safety of AryoSeven on patients with coagulopathy disorder. Methods: This single-center, descriptive, cross sectional study was carried out in Thrombus and Homeostasis Research Center ValiAsr Hospital during 2013-2014. Fifty one patients with bleeding disorders who received at least one dose of Aryoseven were enrolled. Patients’ demographic data and adverse effect of drug and reaction related to Aryoseven or previous usage of Recombinant activated FVII were recorded in questionnaires. Finally data were analyzed to compare side effects of Aryoseven and other Recombinant activated FVII brands. Results: Aryoseven was prescribed for 51 Patients. Of all participants with mean age 57.18+21.38 yr, 31 cases were male and 26 subjects had past history of recombinant activated FVII usage. Glanzman was the most frequent disorder followed by congenital FVII deficiency, hemophilia with inhibitors, factor 5 deficiency, acquired hemophilia, hemophilia A with inhibitor, and hemophilia A or B with inhibitor. The majority of bleeding episodes had occurred in joints. Three patients (5.9%) complained about adverse effects of Aryoseven vs. 11.5 % about adverse effects of other brands. However this difference was not significant, statistically. Conclusion: Based on monitor patients closely for any adverse events, we concluded that Aryoseven administration under careful weighing of benefit versus potential harm may comparable with other counterpart drugs. PMID:27799968

  19. Hematology Expert System (HES) For Tonsillectomy/Adenoidectomy Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzi, Nicolino J.; Kapoor, Sandhya; Gerrard, Jon M.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this expert system is to assess a predisposition to bleeding in a patient undergoing a tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy as may occur with patients who have certain blood conditions such as hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease. This goal is achieved by establishing a correlation between the patients' responses to a medical questionnaire and the relative quantities of blood lost during the operation.

  20. 75 FR 22137 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... 12) and parents of teens/young and Recruitment adults (aged 16-19) living with Script. hemophilia... (12 groups x 9 1 1.5 12) and parents of teens/young participants per adults (aged 16-19) living with...- Informed Consent.... 108 1 6/60 12) and parents of teens/young (12 groups x 9 adults (aged 16-19)...

  1. Cementable implant-supported prosthesis, serial extraction, and serial implant installation: case report.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Harry; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2004-12-01

    Cement-retained implant-supported prostheses are particularly indicated where access for screw placement is limited or impossible like in posterior locations or where there is limited jaw opening. The patient in this case report suffered from limited jaw opening as a result of a long history of temporomandibular joint ankylosis related to hemophilia. Cement-retained implant-supported prostheses coupled with serial extraction, serial implant installations, and chairside provisional restorations made uneventful treatment possible.

  2. Expression of factor VIII in recombinant and transgenic systems.

    PubMed

    Soukharev, Serguei; Hammond, David; Ananyeva, Natalya M; Anderson, Julia A M; Hauser, Charlotte A E; Pipe, Steven; Saenko, Evgueni L

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency in a coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) causes a genetic disorder hemophilia A, which is treated by repeated infusions of expensive FVIII products. Recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), the culmination of years of extensive international research, is an important alternative to plasma-derived FVIII (pdFVIII) and is considered to have a higher margin of safety. Advances in biotechnology allowed production of rFVIII at industrial scale, which significantly improved treatment of hemophilia A patients. We review the contemporary methods used for FVIII expression in mammalian cell culture systems and discuss the factors responsible for insufficient recoveries of rFVIII, such as inefficient accumulation of FVIII mRNA in the cell, complexity of the mechanisms of FVIII secretion, and instability of secreted FVIII. The approaches to improve the yield of rFVIII in cell culture systems include genetic engineering of B-domain-deleted FVIII, introduction of introns into FVIII cDNA constructs for more efficient processing and accumulation of FVIII mRNA, and introduction of mutations into chaperone-binding sites of FVIII to improve its secretion. Design of FVIII with prolonged half-life in vivo is considered as another promising direction in improving rFVIII protein and efficiency of hemophilia A therapy. As an alternative to expression of rFVIII in cell culture systems, we discuss production of rFVIII in transgenic animals, where high levels of rFVIII have been successfully secreted into milk. We also pay attention to the major limitations of this approach, such as safety issues associated with potential transmission of animal pathogens. Finally, we present a brief characterization of commercial recombinant FVIII products currently available on the market for hemophilia A treatment.

  3. Rare and unusual bleeding manifestations in congenital bleeding disorders: an annotated review.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Vettore, Silvia; Ruzzon, Elisabetta; Marinis, Giulia Berti de; Fabris, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Epistaxis, superficial and deep hematomas, hemarthrosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria represent the most frequent hemorrhagic events in congenital coagulation disorders. Occasionally, bleeding manifestations occur in unusual sites or are peculiar. A clotting defect may alter the clinical aspect of skin conditions or infections (hemorrhagic scabies or varicella). Hemobilia may occur as a complication of transjugular liver biopsy in hemophilia or Bernard-Soulier syndrome. Hemarthrosis of small joints of feet and hands occur in patients with hemophilia treated with protease inhibitors. Intramedullary hematomas of long bones have been described in α2-plasmin inhibitor or fibrinogen deficiencies. Spleen fracture with consequent hemoperitoneum has been reported in patients with fibrinogen deficiency. Rectus muscle sheath hematoma may occur in patients with factor VII (FVII)or FX deficiency. Acute or subacute intestinal obstruction may be caused by intramural wall hematomas in hemophilia and von Willebrand (vW)-disease. Physicians should always keep in mind that a congenital hemorrhagic disorder may cause bleeding in any tissue of the body and therefore alter the normal clinical features of a given disease.

  4. Engineered antigen-specific human regulatory T cells: immunosuppression of FVIII-specific T- and B-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Chan; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Su, Yan; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Rossi, Robert J.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Pratt, Kathleen P.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of human regulatory T cells (Tregs) for clinical applications offers great promise for the treatment of undesirable immune responses in autoimmunity, transplantation, allergy, and antidrug antibody responses, including inhibitor responses in hemophilia A patients. However, polyclonal Tregs are nonspecific and therefore could potentially cause global immunosuppression. To avoid this undesirable outcome, the generation of antigen-specific Tregs would be advantageous. Herein, we report the production and properties of engineered antigen-specific Tregs, created by transduction of a recombinant T-cell receptor obtained from a hemophilia A subject’s T-cell clone, into expanded human FoxP3+ Tregs. Such engineered factor VIII (FVIII)-specific Tregs efficiently suppressed the proliferation and cytokine production of FVIII-specific T-effector cells. Moreover, studies with an HLA-transgenic, FVIII-deficient mouse model demonstrated that antibody production from FVIII-primed spleen cells in vitro were profoundly inhibited in the presence of these FVIII-specific Tregs, suggesting potential utility to treat anti-FVIII inhibitory antibody formation in hemophilia A patients. PMID:25498909

  5. Drug-induced anti-factor VIII antibodies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Capra, Franco; Nicolini, Nicoletta; Veneri, Dino; Manzato, Franco; Baudo, Francesco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2007-04-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening hemorrhagic disorder caused by the onset of autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII. Acquired hemophilia A is most frequently associated with autoimmune diseases, solid tumors, lymphoproliferative diseases, pregnancy, and drug reactions. However, in approximately 50 percent of the patients no underlying disorder can be identified. Prompt diagnosis of this acquired bleeding disorder is essential for appropriate management aimed to control hemorrhage and suppress the inhibitor. Based on electronic and manual searches of the published literature, this review examines the current knowledge on drug-induced factor VIII autoantibodies. A total of 34 cases were identified, mostly related to a variety of agents, including antibiotics and psychiatric and immunomodulatory drugs. In particular there is increased evidence for an association between acquired hemophilia A and interferon given as treatment for hepatitis C virus infection. Although most inhibitors reported in the literature were at high titers (mean: 67.7 Bethesda Units/ml), their prognosis was good, as they disappeared in most cases after suspension of the involved drug or after immunosuppressive therapy (complete remission rate: 83.3%). However, further studies are needed to better elucidate the epidemiology, natural history, clinical relevance, and optimal treatment of drug-associated factor VIII autoantibodies.

  6. Baker’s cyst in pediatric patients: Ultrasonographic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, S.; Depaoli, R.; Canepari, M.; Bartolucci, F.; Zacchino, M.; Draghi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Evaluate incidence, etiology, and sonographic features of Baker’s cyst in children. Materials and methods We examined 16 pediatric patients, with the clinical diagnosis of Baker’s cyst. The possibility to confirm or to exclude the presence of the lesion, assess the structure, presence of bilateralism and joint effusion were considered. Three subjects had known juvenile arthritis, 2 hemophilia, 11 a popliteal swelling in the absence of concomitant diseases. Results In all patients it was possible to confirm (11) or to exclude (5) the presence of Baker’s cyst. The idiopathic forms (6) exhibited anechoic structure; in patients with arthritis (3) there was hypertrophic synovium; in hemophilic patients at the presentation (2) anechoic structure with layering (serum and red blood cells); in chronic hemophilia synovial hypertrophy was seen. Joint effusion was constantly present in children with hemophilia and arthritis and in 1 case of idiopathic cyst. Conclusion Baker’s cysts in children are rare. Ultrasound is able to confirm or to exclude the presence of the lesion and it is able to evaluate characteristics, bilateralism and association with joint effusion. PMID:23396996

  7. Defendants challenge class action certification.

    PubMed

    Dubin, C S; Wadleigh, J

    1995-04-01

    The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) and the manufacturers of Anti-Hemophilia Factor Concentrates (AHF) are being sued in a class action case for ignoring and downplaying risks of HIV infection from AHF in order to enhance their financial gain. The defendants in the case, however, have challenged the class action certification. Their Petition for a Writ of Mandamus argues that a class action lawsuit is not an appropriate legal vehicle for this type of case because, among other reasons, it will place an entire industry's survival in the hands of a single jury decision. The two primary challenges to certification by the petition are that 1) it would complicate hemophilia/AIDS litigation and not simplify it, and 2) there is no common definition of negligence throughout state law. With certification in question, it is conceivable, according to attorney David Shrager, "that hundreds or even thousands of additional claims will now be filed in state and Federal courts throughout the country." Essentially, the defense against the Writ argues that the defendants knew in the 1960s of the high risk from known and new viruses in the plasma pools, that they had a duty to reduce such risk, and that they not only failed to withdraw their products from the market, they downplayed the harm done to persons who used contaminated AHF by making misleading statements. The class action trial is scheduled to begin October 2, 1995. PMID:11362336

  8. Isokinetic torque levels in hemophiliac knee musculature.

    PubMed

    Strickler, E M; Greene, W B

    1984-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) measure peak torques generated by knee extensors and flexors in hemophilia patients; 2) describe flexor to extensor; 3) record the point in the arc of motion where peak torque was achieved; 4) correlate results with age, degree of hemophilic arthropathy, and presence of flexion contracture; and 5) compare results with reports on healthy subjects. Forty-seven patients (94 knees) with severe hemophilia were tested with a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at a speed of 30 degrees per second. Height, weight, thigh girths, and passive knee range of motion were recorded. Standing roentgenograms of the knee were evaluated to assess degree of arthropathy. Subjects were divided into groups by age and degree of arthropathy. Descriptive statistics were generated for all groups. Average peak extensor and flexor torque was similar for adolescents and adults. Increasing degree of arthropathy was associated with significant decreases in both extensor and flexor torque, an increase in flexor to extensor ratios and increasing knee flexion contractures. Across all groups, flexor to extensor ratios were abnormally high, particularly in patients with type IV arthropathy. The point in arc of motion where peak torques occurred did not differ significantly across groups and compared favorably with measures reported in the literature. For all ages, mean peak extensor and flexor torques were less than values reported in the literature for healthy subjects. Results of this study demonstrate the profound decrease in torque produced by knee musculature in hemophilia patients, particularly those with more severe arthropathy and knee flexion deformity.

  9. [Attitude of hemophilic adult individuals towards their disease].

    PubMed

    Carruyo-Vizcaíno, Cecilia; Vizcaíno, Gilberto; Carrizo, Edgardo; Arteaga-Vizcaíno, Melvis; Sarmiento, Sandra; Vizcaíno-Carruyo, Jennifer

    2004-09-01

    The mental health of hemophilic individuals and their families play an important role on the integral treatment of the disease. The knowledge of the beliefs and attitudes perceived by the patients toward their disease will make possible a positive influence in their clinical improvement, their response to the treatment, as well as their quality of life. On the basis of the Azjen and Fishbein's Theory of Reasoned Action, a questionnaire was applied to 43 adult hemophilics to determine the salient beliefs about their disease. These beliefs permitted to elaborate a main structured questionnaire named Attitude Model in Patients with Hemophilia (Modelo de Actitud en Pacientes con Hemofilia, MAPACHE, in spanish), which was administered to the individuals and thus, the attitude toward their disease was obtained. Seventy two percent (72%) gave a major importance to the clinical aspects of the disease (hemorrhage, joint discomfort and trauma), 40% knew the general concepts of hemophilia (heredity, care and seriousness of the disease), 20% mentioned the implications of the psychosocial factors and only 18% had knowledge concerning the coagulation factors deficiency and the appropriate treatment. The MAPACHE showed a slightly positive score attitude (4.44 +/- 1.12 SEM) towards the disease in the majority of the groups (74.5%); with 26% of the hemophilics with a negative attitude. There were no significant differences between attitude and clinical parameters. It is recommended that a multidisciplinary team of caregivers should focus their efforts toward education and preventive measures in order to avoid the complications and consequences of the disease, to make possible a better quality of life in individuals with hemophilia.

  10. Tooth loss and associated factors in patients with coagulopathies in the State of Paraíba, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Larycia Vicente; Moreira, Mayara dos Santos Camêlo; de Oliveira, Carla Ramos; de Medeiros, Julia Julliêta; Lima, Eufrásio de Andrade; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim

    2013-01-01

    Background The most common and best known hereditary coagulopathies are hemophilia A and B followed by von Willebrand Disease. Objective This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of tooth loss and investigate its association with demographic and socioeconomic data, as well as to discuss self-reported oral morbidity and use of health services by patients with coagulopathies treated in blood centers in Paraíba, Brazil. Methods This was a quantitative cross-sectional epidemiological survey. Data was collected in the period from October 2011 to July 2012 by clinical examination and by assessing interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire. The findings were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics with the level of significance (α) being set at 10%. Results One hundred and six, predominantly male (88.8%), patients with coagulopathies were evaluated. The ages ranged from one to 59 years. Most patients were of mixed race (61.3%), most reported family incomes between R$ 501.00 and R$ 1500.00 (49.1%), and most had not completed elementary school (37.1%). Hemophilia A was found in 76.4% of the cases. The prevalence of dental caries among individuals was 50.0% predominantly in the 13- to 19-year-old age range (66.7%). As regards to tooth loss, teeth were missing in 35.1% of the study participants. Conclusion Tooth loss is high in this population. Males with severe hemophilia A, those who use fluoride and have a good or very good perception about their last dental appointment have a reduced chance of losing their teeth. PMID:24255614

  11. Delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics by genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B.; Archer, David; Spencer, H. Trent

    2010-01-01

    Several populations of adult human stem cells have been identified, but only a few of these are in routine clinical use. The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is arguably the most well characterized and the most routinely transplanted adult stem cell. Although details regarding several aspects of this cell’s phenotype are not well understood, transplant of HSCs has advanced to become the standard of care for the treatment of a range of monogenic diseases and several types of cancer. It has also proven to be an excellent target for genetic manipulation, and clinical trials have already demonstrated the usefulness of targeting this cell as a means of delivering nucleic acid therapeutics for the treatment of several previously incurable diseases. It is anticipated that additional clinical trials will soon follow, such as genetically engineering HSCs with vectors to treat monogenic diseases such as hemophilia A. In addition to the direct targeting of HSCs, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to replace virtually any engineered stem cell therapeutic, including HSCs. We now know that for the broad use of genetically-modified HSCs for the treatment of non-lethal diseases, e.g. hemophilia A, we must be able to regulate the introduction of nucleic acid sequences into these target cells. We can begin to refine transduction protocols to provide safer approaches to genetically manipulate HSCs and strategies are being developed to improve the overall safety of gene transfer. This review focuses on recent advances in the systemic delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics using genetically-modified stem cells, specifically focusing on i) the use of retroviral vectors to genetically modify HSCs, ii) the expression of fVIII from hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of hemophilia A, and iii) the use of genetically engineered hematopoietic cells generated from iPS cells as treatment for disorders of hematopoiesis. PMID:20869414

  12. Small peptides blocking inhibition of factor Xa and tissue factor-factor VIIa by tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI).

    PubMed

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M Christella L G D; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-17

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nM). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nM) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nM). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  13. Small Peptides Blocking Inhibition of Factor Xa and Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa by Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI)*

    PubMed Central

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M. Christella L. G. D.; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nm). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nm) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nm). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  14. Storage of Factor VIII Variants with Impaired von Willebrand Factor Binding in Weibel-Palade Bodies in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Bouwens, Eveline A. M.; Voorberg, Jan; Mertens, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Background Point mutations resulting in reduced factor VIII (FVIII) binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF) are an important cause of mild/moderate hemophilia A. Treatment includes desmopressin infusion, which concomitantly increases VWF and FVIII plasma levels, apparently from storage pools containing both proteins. The source of these VWF/FVIII co-storage pools and the mechanism of granule biogenesis are not fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied intracellular trafficking of FVIII variants implicated in mild/moderate hemophilia A together with VWF in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells. The role of VWF binding was addressed using FVIII variants displaying reduced VWF interaction. Binding studies using purified FVIII proteins revealed moderate (Arg2150His, Del2201, Pro2300Ser) to severe (Tyr1680Phe, Ser2119Tyr) VWF binding defects. Expression studies in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells revealed that all FVIII variants were present within VWF-containing organelles. Quantitative studies showed that the relative amount of FVIII storage was independent of various mutations. Substantial amounts of FVIII variants are co-stored in VWF-containing storage organelles, presumably by virtue of their ability to interact with VWF at low pH. Conclusions Our data suggest that the potential of FVIII co-storage with VWF is not affected in mild/moderate hemophilia A caused by reduced FVIII/VWF interaction in the circulation. These data support the hypothesis that Weibel-Palade bodies comprise the desmopressin-releasable FVIII storage pool in vivo. PMID:21909383

  15. Radiosynoviorthesis in hemophilic joints with yttrium-90 citrate and rhenium-186 sulfide and long term results.

    PubMed

    Teyssler, Petr; Taborska, Katerina; Kolostova, Katarina; Bobek, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Repeated bleeding in the joint cavities is the most annoying symptom and often has disabling effects in patients with hemophilia (PWH). Our aim was to study the effect of radiosynovectomy (RSO) with beta particle-emitting radiocolloids in the treatment of hemorhagic arthropathy. We have treated 22 joints from 18 patients with hemophilia A, from April 2008 to February 2012, 5 knees, 11 elbows and 6 ankles. Joints were divided into two Groups, those treated with yttrium-90-citrate ((90)Y-C) (5 knees, 2 of them twice)-Group I and those with rhenium-186-sulfide ((186)Re-S) (11 elbows, 1 of them treated twice and 6 ankles)-Group II. A total of 25 treatments. Follow-up period was 3 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results showed a favourable subjective and a better objective result in all 5 joints of Group I and in 15/17 joints of Group II, respectively. Follow-up after 3 months showed significant improvement in Hemophilia Join Health Score (HJHS) after 20 treatments and steady score after 5 treatments. After 1 year, 19 treated joints had improved for the first time, 3 remained steady and 3 were not examined. After 3 years, 9 treated joints were HJHS steady, while 16 were not examined. One year after treatment, 13/14 joints of patients, aged 6-23 years showed better HJHS score, while 9/11 joints of patients aged 26-51 years, showed better HJHS. Synovial membrane thickness as measured by MRI in 8 joints, before and 3 months after treatment was not related to prognosis. In conclusion, in a small group of hemophilic patients with hemorrhagic arthropathy treated with (90)Y-C and with (186)Re-S, our study showed good results irrespective of age in 22/25 treatments after 3 months or 1 year. The thickness of synovial membrane in the 8 joints studied was not related to prognosis.

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma and the risk of occupational exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Malaguarnera, Michele; Ardiri, Annalisa; Proiti, Maria; Rigano, Giuseppe; Frazzetto, Evelise; Ruggeri, Maria Irene; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Nicoletta; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Catania, Vito Emanuele; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Toro, Adriana; Bertino, Emanuele; Mangano, Dario; Bertino, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer. The main risk factors for HCC are alcoholism, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cirrhosis, aflatoxin, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease and hemophilia. Occupational exposure to chemicals is another risk factor for HCC. Often the relationship between occupational risk and HCC is unclear and the reports are fragmented and inconsistent. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the association of infective and non-infective occupational risk exposure and HCC in order to encourage further research and draw attention to this global occupational public health problem. PMID:27168870

  17. [Progress of laboratory diagnosis of hemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases--specialized to cross-mixing test--introduction].

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yutaka

    2009-10-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of hemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases, especially cross-mixing tests, was developed because the recent progress in studies to solve the practical problem of cross-mixing tests has been remarkable in Japan; however, this information was not well presented to clinical laboratory technologists and hospital doctors. Therefore, three specialists have contributed articles on problems of solving clinical and laboratory diagnoses of anti-phospholipid syndrome and acquired hemophilia, both from the clinical setting. These articles show new concrete approaches to carry out blood coagulation tests and their laboratory information.

  18. Portal vein thrombosis treated using danaparoid sodium and antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, T; Hirokazu, Takahashi; Hosono, K; Endo, H; Akiyama, T; Yoneda, K; Inamori, M; Abe, Y; Kubota, K; Saito, S; Nakajima, A

    2010-01-01

    A 45-year-old man under treatment for liver cirrhosis (LC) due to chronic hepatitis C and hemophilia A was seen in our emergency room because of a 10-kg weight gain in the previous week due to ascites. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was detected with computer tomography (CT) and ultrasonographic (US). Danaparoid sodium (DS) and antithrombin III (AT III) were administrated and doppler US images showed improvement of portal venous blood flow. DS or AT III may be safe and alternative therapies for PVT. PMID:20422871

  19. Sports for the physically challenged child.

    PubMed

    Wind, William M; Schwend, Richard M; Larson, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Participation in sports is important for the physical and emotional health of the physically challenged child. Sports can improve strength, endurance, and cardiopulmonary fitness while providing companionship, a sense of achievement, and heightened self-esteem. With interest in such participation increasing, it is necessary for the physicians, therapists, and families of children with special needs to understand the preparticipation evaluation, athletic options, specialized equipment, and sport-specific risks. Recommendations that provide guidelines for safe, effective participation in sports are currently available for common congenital and developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, myelodysplasia, hemophilia, congenital amputations, and arthritic disorders. PMID:15089086

  20. Self healing hemophilic pseudotumor of the mandible in a 5-year-old boy, an interesting and rare finding: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ruchika Keshaw; Siva, B; Rajpal, Jaisika; Singh, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor (PT) is a very rare complication of hemophilia consisting of a chronic, encapsulated, hemorrhagic fluid collection occurring both in the soft tissues and/or bone. Radiological features of osseous hemophilic PT are nonspecific and mimic several other benign or malignant bone tumors or infectious processes. Although the diagnosis is usually made on the location of the lesion and by the knowledge of the underlying disease, the radiologist should be aware of the imaging characteristics, in order to avoid misinterpretation as a malignant tumor, as biopsy of these lesions is contraindicated. PMID:26838154

  1. Derivation of HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 human embryonic stem cell lines from IVF embryos after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Aguilera, Yolanda; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Mellado, Nuria; Sánchez, Javier; Moya, Cristina; Sánchez-Palazón, Luis; Palacios, Jose; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Soria, Bernat

    2016-05-01

    From 106 human blastocyts donate for research after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenetic disorder, 3 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 were successfully derived. HVR1 was assumed to be genetically normal, HVR2 carrying Becker muscular dystrophy and HVR3 Hemophilia B. Despite the translocation t(9;15)(q34.3;q14) detected in HVR2, all the 3 cell lines were characterised in vitro and in vivo as normal hESCs lines and were registered in the Spanish Stem Cell Bank. PMID:27346196

  2. Monoclonals and DNA probes in diagnostic and preventative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Della Povta, G.; Albertini, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Use of DNA Probes for Prenatal and Carrier Diagnosis of Hemophilia and Fragile X Mental Retardation; The Application of DNA Probes to Diagnosis and Research of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Clinical Trial, New Probes and Deletion Mapping; Molecular Genetics of the Human Collagens; Molecular Genetics of Human Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Genes; Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA and Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA: Implications in Diagnosis and Pathogenesis; and DNA Probes to Evaluate the Possible Association of Papovaviruses with Human Tumors.

  3. Human gene therapy: methods and materials. (latest citations from the biobusiness data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the evolution of technologies for genetic identification and treatment of diseases such as cancer, immune deficiencies, anemias, hemophilias, muscular dystrophy, and diabetes. Emphasis is placed upon development and application of genetic engineering techniques for the production of medicinal biological preparations. Other topics include the use of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) probes for gene isolation and disease marker identification, methods for replacing missing or defective genetic material, and mapping of the human genome. Governmental regulation, and moral and ethical implications are briefly reviewed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. An unusual complication in a gravida with factor IX deficiency: case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guy, G P; Baxi, L V; Hurlet-Jensen, A; Chao, C R

    1992-09-01

    Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B, Christmas disease) is an X-linked recessive coagulation disorder. It occurs in one out of every 25,000-30,000 male births and requires even rarer genetic circumstances for phenotypic expression in females. We report the occurrence of a large, late-trimester subchorionic hematoma in a gravida with factor IX deficiency and with laboratory evidence of consumptive coagulopathy during treatment. The patient was managed conservatively and had a successful outcome at term. The only four reported cases of antepartum management of factor IX deficiency in the English literature are reviewed.

  5. The activated coagulation time of whole blood as a routine pre-operative sceening test.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, P G

    1971-05-01

    Patients with disorders of hemostasis who undergo surgical procedures are in danger of hemorrhage. While the careful medical history remains the most sensitive test of a bleeding tendency, some such patients can give no suggestive history. In three patients with coagulopathy-one with mild classical hemophilia, one with Christmas disease, and one with warfarin toxicity-the abnormality was missed by routine preoperative history but promptly detected by the routine preoperative use of the activated coagulation time (act). Either this test or the activated partial thromboplastin time should be included in the routine preoperative work-up, along with appropriate additional tests of the hemostatic mechanism.

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma and the risk of occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Malaguarnera, Michele; Ardiri, Annalisa; Proiti, Maria; Rigano, Giuseppe; Frazzetto, Evelise; Ruggeri, Maria Irene; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Nicoletta; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Catania, Vito Emanuele; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Toro, Adriana; Bertino, Emanuele; Mangano, Dario; Bertino, Gaetano

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer. The main risk factors for HCC are alcoholism, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cirrhosis, aflatoxin, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease and hemophilia. Occupational exposure to chemicals is another risk factor for HCC. Often the relationship between occupational risk and HCC is unclear and the reports are fragmented and inconsistent. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the association of infective and non-infective occupational risk exposure and HCC in order to encourage further research and draw attention to this global occupational public health problem. PMID:27168870

  7. Structure of the human factor VIII C2 domain in complex with the 3E6 inhibitory antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Wuerth, Michelle E.; Cragerud, Rebecca K.; Spiegel, P. Clint

    2015-11-24

    Blood coagulation factor VIII is a glycoprotein cofactor that is essential for the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Inhibitory antibodies arise either spontaneously or in response to therapeutic infusion of functional factor VIII into hemophilia A patients, many of which are specific to the factor VIII C2 domain. The immune response is largely parsed into “classical” and “non-classical” inhibitory antibodies, which bind to opposing faces cooperatively. In this study, the 2.61 Å resolution structure of the C2 domain in complex with the antigen-binding fragment of the 3E6 classical inhibitory antibody is reported. The binding interface is largely conservedmore » when aligned with the previously determined structure of the C2 domain in complex with two antibodies simultaneously. Further inspection of the B factors for the C2 domain in various X-ray crystal structures indicates that 3E6 antibody binding decreases the thermal motion behavior of surface loops in the C2 domain on the opposing face, thereby suggesting that cooperative antibody binding is a dynamic effect. Furthermore, understanding the structural nature of the immune response to factor VIII following hemophilia A treatment will help lead to the development of better therapeutic reagents.« less

  8. Structure of the human factor VIII C2 domain in complex with the 3E6 inhibitory antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wuerth, Michelle E.; Cragerud, Rebecca K.; Spiegel, P. Clint

    2015-11-24

    Blood coagulation factor VIII is a glycoprotein cofactor that is essential for the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Inhibitory antibodies arise either spontaneously or in response to therapeutic infusion of functional factor VIII into hemophilia A patients, many of which are specific to the factor VIII C2 domain. The immune response is largely parsed into “classical” and “non-classical” inhibitory antibodies, which bind to opposing faces cooperatively. In this study, the 2.61 Å resolution structure of the C2 domain in complex with the antigen-binding fragment of the 3E6 classical inhibitory antibody is reported. The binding interface is largely conserved when aligned with the previously determined structure of the C2 domain in complex with two antibodies simultaneously. Further inspection of the B factors for the C2 domain in various X-ray crystal structures indicates that 3E6 antibody binding decreases the thermal motion behavior of surface loops in the C2 domain on the opposing face, thereby suggesting that cooperative antibody binding is a dynamic effect. Furthermore, understanding the structural nature of the immune response to factor VIII following hemophilia A treatment will help lead to the development of better therapeutic reagents.

  9. High-resolution mapping of epitopes on the C2 domain of factor VIII by analysis of point mutants using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Lewis, Kenneth B.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Schuman, Jason T.; Lin, Jasper C.; Healey, John F.; Meeks, Shannon L.; Lollar, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies that develop in patients with hemophilia A and in murine hemophilia A models, clinically termed “inhibitors,” bind to several distinct surfaces on the FVIII-C2 domain. To map these epitopes at high resolution, 60 recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins were generated, each having a single surface-exposed residue mutated to alanine or a conservative substitution. The binding kinetics of these muteins to 11 monoclonal, inhibitory anti-FVIII-C2 antibodies were evaluated by surface plasmon resonance and the results compared with those obtained for wild-type FVIII-C2. Clusters of residues with significantly altered binding kinetics identified “functional” B-cell epitopes, defined as those residues contributing appreciable antigen–antibody avidity. These antibodies were previously shown to neutralize FVIII activity by interfering with proteolytic activation of FVIII by thrombin or factor Xa, or with its binding to phospholipid surfaces, von Willebrand factor, or other components of the intrinsic tenase complex. Fine mapping of epitopes by surface plasmon resonance also indicated surfaces through which FVIII interacts with proteins and phospholipids as it participates in coagulation. Mutations that significantly altered the dissociation times/half-lives identified functionally important interactions within antigen–antibody interfaces and suggested specific sequence modifications to generate novel, less antigenic FVIII proteins with possible therapeutic potential for treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24591205

  10. Physical activity in individuals with haemophilia and experience with recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein and recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein for the treatment of active patients: a literature review and case reports

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Álvarez-Román, María Teresa; Chowdary, Pratima; Quon, Doris V.; Schafer, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia and the National Hemophilia Foundation encourage people with haemophilia (PWH) to participate in routine physical activity. The benefits of physical activity for PWH include improvements in joint, bone, and muscle health. Accordingly, a number of studies suggest that levels of physical activity among PWH are similar to those of their healthy peers, especially among individuals who began prophylaxis at an early age (≤3 years). Importantly, several studies found either no increased risk or only a transient increase in risk of bleeding with more intensive physical activity compared with less intensive physical activity. Data on optimal prophylaxis regimens for PWH who participate in physical/sporting activities; however, remain sparse. Long-acting recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) and recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) demonstrated efficacy for the prevention and treatment of bleeding episodes in Phase 3 clinical trials of participants with haemophilia A and B, respectively, with most individuals able to maintain or increase their physical activities. This manuscript reviews the current literature that describes physical activity in PWH. Additionally, case studies are presented to provide supplemental information to clinicians illustrating the use of rFVIIIFc and rFIXFc in physically active patients with haemophilia A and B, respectively. These case reports demonstrate that it is possible for patients to be physically active and maintain good control of their haemophilia with extended interval prophylactic dosing using rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc. PMID:27116081

  11. Immunoaffinity purification of factor IX (Christmas factor) by using conformation-specific antibodies directed against the factor IX-metal complex.

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, H A; Limentani, S A; Furie, B C; Furie, B

    1985-01-01

    Factor IX is a vitamin K-dependent blood clotting zymogen that is functionally defective or absent in patients with hemophilia B. A method of immunoaffinity chromatography has been developed for a one-step high yield purification of factor IX directly from plasma. The technique utilizes conformation-specific antibodies that bind solely to the metal-stabilized factor IX conformer, but not to the conformer of factor IX found in the absence of metal ions. Anti-factor IX-Ca(II) antibodies were immobilized on an agarose matrix. Human plasma in the presence of 7.5 mM MgCl2 was applied to the antibody-agarose column. The factor IX that binds to these antibodies was specifically eluted by metal chelation with EDTA. This immunopurification resulted in a 10,000-fold one-step purification of the fully functional zymogen. Purified factor IX yielded a single band upon gel electrophoresis in Na-DodSO4 and had a specific activity of 120-150 units/mg. The purified factor IX was separated from other vitamin K-dependent blood clotting proteins and hepatitis virus; no activated factor IX was detected. This method has application for the large scale purification of factor IX for the treatment of hemophilia B. Images PMID:2408269

  12. The efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of inhibitor-associated hemostatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino; Lippi, Giuseppe; Stenner, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody active against normal and malignant B cells which has proven to be effective in the therapy of CD-20 positive lymphomas. Its B-cell cytotoxic action has also been exploited in many non-malignant autoimmune disorders in which it has been used with the aim of interfering with the production of pathologic antibodies. The present knowledge regarding the use of rituximab in antibody-associated disorders of hemostasis (i.e. idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, acquired hemophilia A, congenital hemophilia with inhibitors, acquired inhibitors against coagulation factors) is presented briefly in this review. The results suggest that rituximab can be useful in the treatment of disorders of hemostasis associated with inhibitor formation. Although collectively the number of patients treated is now quite substantial, most of the data are drawn from isolated case reports or descriptions of small, uncontrolled series. Large, prospective, randomized trials are, therefore, needed to confirm the positive, preliminary results.

  13. Analysis of the spatial and temporal characteristics of platelet-delivered factor VIII–based clots

    PubMed Central

    Neyman, Michael; Gewirtz, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    Normally factor (F) VIII is not expressed in megakaryocytes, but when human FVIII was transgenically expressed in murine megakaryocytes, it was stored in platelet α-granules and released at sites of injury. This platelet FVIII (pFVIII) is effective in correcting hemostasis, even in the presence of circulating inhibitors, so it offers a potential gene therapy strategy for hemophilia A. To understand clot development by pFVIII, we have examined clot response to laser injury in both cremaster arterioles and venules in FVIIInull mice either infused with FVIII or transgenic for pFVIII. In both sets of vessels, pFVIII is at least as effective as infused FVIII. However, there are temporal and spatial differences in fibrin and platelet accumulation within clots depending on how FVIII is delivered. These differences may be related to the temporal and spatial distribution of the α-granular–released FVIII within the developing clot, and may explain the increased frequency and size of embolic events seen with pFVIII. These observations may not only have implications for the use of pFVIII in gene therapy for hemophilia A, but may also have physiologic consequences, explaining why many procoagulant factors are delivered both in the plasma and in platelet α-granules. PMID:18559671

  14. Hemostatic disorders in women.

    PubMed

    Kadir, R A; Davies, J

    2013-06-01

    The past few decades have seen major advances in multidisciplinary obstetric care and management of gynecological conditions in women with bleeding disorders. Awareness of the impact of bleeding disorders has improved among the obstetric and gynecological community. Undiagnosed bleeding disorders can be the underlying cause for a significant proportion of women with heavy menstrual bleeding. They may also be the cause or a contributory factor for other gynecological problems, such as dysmenorrhea, intermenstrual bleeding, and endometriosis. Hemostatic assessment should be considered in women referred for menstrual abnormalities if they have a positive bleeding history as quantified by bleeding assessment tools. The reproductive choices and options for prenatal diagnosis are also expanding for families with hemophilia with a drive toward achieving a non-invasive approach. Current non-invasive prenatal diagnostic techniques are limited to identification of fetal gender. Research is ongoing to overcome the specific diagnostic challenges of identifying hemophilia mutations, utilizing free fetal DNA circulating in maternal plasma. The management of obstetric hemorrhage has recently evolved to include a greater focus on the identification of and early treatment for coagulation disorders. Deficiencies in certain hemostatic variables are associated with progression to more severe bleeding; therefore, specific interventions have been proposed to target this. Evidence is still lacking to support such strategy, and future research is required to assess the efficacy and the safety of these hemostatic interventions in women with persistent PPH. PMID:23809121

  15. Russia's imperial blood: was Rasputin not the healer of legend?

    PubMed

    Kendrick, John M L

    2004-09-01

    The only son of Russia's last Tsar, a great-grandson of Queen Victoria, continues to be used as the favorite example of the X-linked inheritance of hemophilia, in spite of the fact that this popular historical diathesis has never been confirmed by any form of modern medical laboratory testing. Certain to be controversial, a new study of the symptoms that were witnessed by those who were closest to the teenaged Russian heir now raises the possibility that his blood disorder might well have been something other than hemophilia. The key to discovering Tsarevich Alexei's true diagnosis is found in those now legendary allegations that the infamous "Mad Monk", Grigory Rasputin, had possessed a power of healing that was somehow responsible for the young boy's mysterious history of spontaneous recoveries. If we are to accept the popular diagnosis of history and call it a clotting factor deficiency, then the boy's now famous sudden recoveries will remain a complete mystery. The so-called "Mad Monk" Rasputin, as a direct result of the revolutionary propaganda of the time, is then overblown into a larger-than-life legend. If, however, we are to change the diagnosis and call it a platelet disorder, then the air is let out of the legend, and Rasputin is revealed to have been nothing more than a very ordinary middle-aged Siberian hippie who did not possess any healing powers at all.

  16. Bioengineering factor Xa to treat bleeding.

    PubMed

    Camire, Rodney M

    2016-05-01

    There is a clinical need to develop safe and rapid therapeutic strategies to control bleeding arising from a host of emergent situations. Over the past several years our laboratory has developed novel zymogen-like FXa variants and tested their safety and efficacy using hemophilia as a model system. The variants have a spectrum of properties resulting from an amino acid change at the N-terminus of the heavy chain that alters a critical conformational change. These properties, which include resistance to plasma protease inhibitors, low activity in the absence of FVa, and rescue of low activity upon incorporation in prothrombinase, yield remarkably effective pro-hemostatic agents. The FVa-dependent restoration of activity is a key aspect to their efficacy and also contributes to localizing the variants to the site of vascular injury. While pre-clinical data support their use in the setting of hemophilia, they have the potential to act as rapid pro-hemostatic agents for the treatment of a range of bleeding conditions. This review will discuss the biochemical properties of these FXa zymogen-like variants and their in vivo characterization. PMID:27207419

  17. Emerging genetic and pharmacologic therapies for controlling hemostasis: beyond recombinant clotting factors.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    For more than 3 decades, the scientific community has pursued gene correction of hemophilia, with the goal that an individual with congenitally deficient factor VIII or factor IX might synthesize adequate endogenous clotting factor to be relieved of burdensome repeated clotting factor infusions, as well as the emotional weight of continuous hemorrhage risk. Recent reports of successful factor IX gene therapy and partial correction of the bleeding phenotype have raised the bar for success for a robust crop of new clinical gene therapy efforts for both hemophilia A and B. At the same time that gene therapy is gaining momentum, suggesting the possibility of relief from regular intravenous coagulation protein replacement, a number of innovative technologies that enhance hemostatic potential independently of replacement factor administration are demonstrating success in human clinical application. Human clinical trial progress is reviewed regarding a recombinant bispecific IgG antibody to factors IXa and X that mimics factor VIII cofactor activity, as well as monoclonal antibody and short interfering RNA strategies that demonstrate hemostatic efficacy via opposing inhibitors of coagulation. These strategies, associated with prolonged hemostatic potential following subcutaneous (ACE910, ALN-AT3, Concizumab) or single administration (eg, gene therapy) make it possible to imagine a day when recombinant clotting factor administration, rather than being a daily preoccupation, is relegated to an adjunctive role in supporting more novel standard of care therapies.

  18. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  19. Secondary autoimmune diseases occurring after HSCT for an autoimmune disease: a retrospective study of the EBMT Autoimmune Disease Working Party.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, Thomas; Labopin, Myriam; Di Gioia, Massimo; Abinun, Mario; Alexander, Tobias; Miniati, Irene; Gualandi, Francesca; Fassas, Athanasios; Martin, Thierry; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Wulffraat, Nico; Buch, Maya; Sampol, Antonia; Carreras, Enric; Dubois, Benedicte; Gruhn, Bernd; Güngör, Tayfun; Pohlreich, David; Schuerwegh, Annemie; Snarski, Emilian; Snowden, John; Veys, Paul; Fasth, Anders; Lenhoff, Stig; Messina, Chiara; Voswinkel, Jan; Badoglio, Manuela; Henes, Jörg; Launay, David; Tyndall, Alan; Gluckman, Eliane; Farge, Dominique

    2011-08-11

    To specify the incidence and risk factors for secondary autoimmune diseases (ADs) after HSCT for a primary AD, we retrospectively analyzed AD patients treated by HSCT reported to EBMT from 1995 to 2009 with at least 1 secondary AD (cases) and those without (controls). After autologous HSCT, 29 of 347 patients developed at least 1 secondary AD within 21.9 (0.6-49) months and after allogeneic HSCT, 3 of 16 patients. The observed secondary ADs included: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n = 3), acquired hemophilia (n = 3), autoimmune thrombocytopenia (n = 3), antiphospholipid syndrome (n = 2), thyroiditis (n = 12), blocking thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (n = 1), Graves disease (n = 2), myasthenia gravis (n = 1), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), sarcoidosis (n = 2), vasculitis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 1). After autologous HSCT for primary AD, the cumulative incidence of secondary AD was 9.8% ± 2% at 5 years. Lupus erythematosus as primary AD, and antithymocyte globulin use plus CD34(+) graft selection were important risk factors for secondary AD by multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 6.2 (0.54-11) years after autologous HSCT, 26 of 29 patients with secondary AD were alive, 2 died during their secondary AD (antiphospholipid syndrome, hemophilia), and 1 death was HSCT-related. This European multicenter study underlines the need for careful management and follow-up for secondary AD after HSCT.

  20. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, M; Ng, E-P; Bakhtiari, K; Vinciguerra, M; Ali Ahmad, H; Awala, H; Mintova, S; Daghighi, M; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F; de Vries, M; Motazacker, M M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, F

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161